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Sample records for nanoscale duplex oxide

  1. A nanoscale duplex precipitation approach for improving the properties of Fe-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongwu; Liu, C T; Wang, Xun-Li; Wen, Y. R.; Fujita, T.; Hirata, A.; Chen, M.W.; Miller, Michael K; Chen, Guang; Chin, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The precipitate size and number density are important factors for tailoring the mechanical behaviors of nanoscale precipitate-hardened alloys. However during thermal aging, the precipitate size and number density change leading to either poor strength or high strength but significantly reduced ductility. Here we demonstrate, by producing nanoprecipitates with unusual duplex structures in a composition-optimized multicomponent precipitation-hardened alloy, a unique approach to improve the stability of the alloy against the effects of thermal aging and consequently change in the mechanical properties. Our study provides compelling experimental evidence that these nanoscale precipitates consist of a duplex structures with a Cu-enriched bcc core that is partially encased by a B2-ordered Ni(Mn,Al) phase. This duplex structure enables the precipitate size and number density to be independently optimized, provides a more complex obstacle for dislocation movement due to the ordering and an additional interphase interface, and yields a high yield strength alloy without sacrificing the ductility.

  2. A nanoscale shape memory oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinxing; Ke, Xiaoxing; Gou, Gaoyang; Seidel, Jan; Xiang, Bin; Yu, Pu; Liang, Wen-I; Minor, Andrew M; Chu, Ying-Hao; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ren, Xiaobing; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2013-01-01

    Stimulus-responsive shape-memory materials have attracted tremendous research interests recently, with much effort focused on improving their mechanical actuation. Driven by the needs of nanoelectromechanical devices, materials with large mechanical strain, particularly at nanoscale level, are therefore desired. Here we report on the discovery of a large shape-memory effect in bismuth ferrite at the nanoscale. A maximum strain of up to ~14% and a large volumetric work density of ~600±90 J cm(-3) can be achieved in association with a martensitic-like phase transformation. With a single step, control of the phase transformation by thermal activation or electric field has been reversibly achieved without the assistance of external recovery stress. Although aspects such as hysteresis, microcracking and so on have to be taken into consideration for real devices, the large shape-memory effect in this oxide surpasses most alloys and, therefore, demonstrates itself as an extraordinary material for potential use in state-of-art nanosystems. PMID:24253399

  3. A nanoscale shape memory oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinxing; Ke, Xiaoxing; Gou, Gaoyang; Seidel, Jan; Xiang, Bin; Yu, Pu; Liang, Wen-I.; Minor, Andrew M.; Chu, Ying-Hao; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ren, Xiaobing; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2013-11-01

    Stimulus-responsive shape-memory materials have attracted tremendous research interests recently, with much effort focused on improving their mechanical actuation. Driven by the needs of nanoelectromechanical devices, materials with large mechanical strain, particularly at nanoscale level, are therefore desired. Here we report on the discovery of a large shape-memory effect in bismuth ferrite at the nanoscale. A maximum strain of up to ~14% and a large volumetric work density of ~600±90 J cm-3 can be achieved in association with a martensitic-like phase transformation. With a single step, control of the phase transformation by thermal activation or electric field has been reversibly achieved without the assistance of external recovery stress. Although aspects such as hysteresis, microcracking and so on have to be taken into consideration for real devices, the large shape-memory effect in this oxide surpasses most alloys and, therefore, demonstrates itself as an extraordinary material for potential use in state-of-art nanosystems.

  4. Direct observation and quantification of nanoscale spinodal decomposition in super duplex stainless steel weld metals.

    PubMed

    Shariq, Ahmed; Hättestrand, Mats; Nilsson, Jan-Olof; Gregori, Andrea

    2009-06-01

    Three variants of super duplex stainless steel weld metals with the basic composition 29Cr-8Ni-2Mo (wt%) were investigated. The nitrogen content of the three materials was 0.22%, 0.33% and 0.37%, respectively. Isothermal heat treatments were performed at 450 degrees C for times up to 243 h. The hardness evolution of the three materials was found to vary with the overall concentration of the nitrogen. Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) was used to directly detect and quantify the degree of spinodal decomposition in different material conditions. 3-DAP atomic reconstruction clearly illustrate nanoscale variation of iron rich (alpha) and chromium rich (alpha') phases. A longer ageing time produces a coarser microstructure with larger alpha and alpha' domains. Statistical evaluation of APFIM data showed that phase separation was significant already after 1 h of ageing that gradually became more pronounced. Although nanoscale concentration variation was evident, no significant influence of overall nitrogen content on the degree of spinodal decomposition was found. PMID:19504899

  5. Emergent nanoscale superparamagnetism at oxide interfaces.

    PubMed

    Anahory, Y; Embon, L; Li, C J; Banerjee, S; Meltzer, A; Naren, H R; Yakovenko, A; Cuppens, J; Myasoedov, Y; Rappaport, M L; Huber, M E; Michaeli, K; Venkatesan, T; Ariando; Zeldov, E

    2016-01-01

    Atomically sharp oxide heterostructures exhibit a range of novel physical phenomena that are absent in the parent compounds. A prominent example is the appearance of highly conducting and superconducting states at the interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. Here we report an emergent phenomenon at the LaMnO3/SrTiO3 interface where an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator abruptly transforms into a nanoscale inhomogeneous magnetic state. Upon increasing the thickness of LaMnO3, our scanning nanoSQUID-on-tip microscopy shows spontaneous formation of isolated magnetic nanoislands, which display thermally activated moment reversals in response to an in-plane magnetic field. The observed superparamagnetic state manifests the emergence of thermodynamic electronic phase separation in which metallic ferromagnetic islands nucleate in an insulating antiferromagnetic matrix. We derive a model that captures the sharp onset and the thickness dependence of the magnetization. Our model suggests that a nearby superparamagnetic-ferromagnetic transition can be gate tuned, holding potential for applications in magnetic storage and spintronics. PMID:27558907

  6. Emergent nanoscale superparamagnetism at oxide interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Anahory, Y.; Embon, L.; Li, C. J.; Banerjee, S.; Meltzer, A.; Naren, H. R.; Yakovenko, A.; Cuppens, J.; Myasoedov, Y.; Rappaport, M. L.; Huber, M. E.; Michaeli, K.; Venkatesan, T.; Ariando; Zeldov, E.

    2016-01-01

    Atomically sharp oxide heterostructures exhibit a range of novel physical phenomena that are absent in the parent compounds. A prominent example is the appearance of highly conducting and superconducting states at the interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. Here we report an emergent phenomenon at the LaMnO3/SrTiO3 interface where an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator abruptly transforms into a nanoscale inhomogeneous magnetic state. Upon increasing the thickness of LaMnO3, our scanning nanoSQUID-on-tip microscopy shows spontaneous formation of isolated magnetic nanoislands, which display thermally activated moment reversals in response to an in-plane magnetic field. The observed superparamagnetic state manifests the emergence of thermodynamic electronic phase separation in which metallic ferromagnetic islands nucleate in an insulating antiferromagnetic matrix. We derive a model that captures the sharp onset and the thickness dependence of the magnetization. Our model suggests that a nearby superparamagnetic–ferromagnetic transition can be gate tuned, holding potential for applications in magnetic storage and spintronics. PMID:27558907

  7. Emergent nanoscale superparamagnetism at oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeldov, Eli

    Atomically sharp oxide heterostructures exhibit a range of novel physical phenomena that do not occur in the parent bulk compounds. The most prominent example is the appearance of highly conducting and superconducting states at the interface between the band insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. We present a new emergent phenomenon at the LaMnO3/SrTiO3 interface in which an antiferromagnetic insulator abruptly transforms into a superparamagnetic state. Above a critical thickness of LaMnO3 of five unit cells, our scanning nanoSQUID-on-tip microscopy shows spontaneous formation of isolated magnetic islands with in-plane moment of 104 to 105μB with characteristic diameter of 10 to 50 nm. The nanoscale islands display superparamagnetic dynamics of random moment reversals by thermal activation or in response to an in-plane magnetic field. We propose a charge reconstruction model of the polar LaMnO3/SrTiO3 heterostructure which describes a sharp emergence of thermodynamic phase separation leading to nucleation of metallic ferromagnetic islands in an insulating antiferromagnetic matrix. The model suggests that a gate tunable superparamagnetic-ferromagnetic transition can be induced, holding potential for applications in magnetic storage and spintronics.

  8. Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura; Xu, Jennifer C.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    A report describes the fabrication and testing of nanoscale metal oxide semiconductors (MOSs) for gas and chemical sensing. This document examines the relationship between processing approaches and resulting sensor behavior. This is a core question related to a range of applications of nanotechnology and a number of different synthesis methods are discussed: thermal evaporation- condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed, providing a processing overview to developers of nanotechnology- based systems. The results of a significant amount of testing and comparison are also described. A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. The TECsynthesized single-crystal nanowires offer uniform crystal surfaces, resistance to sintering, and their synthesis may be done apart from the substrate. The TECproduced nanowire response is very low, even at the operating temperature of 200 C. In contrast, the electrospun polycrystalline nanofiber response is high, suggesting that junction potentials are superior to a continuous surface depletion layer as a transduction mechanism for chemisorption. Using a catalyst deposited upon the surface in the form of nanoparticles yields dramatic gains in sensitivity for both nanostructured, one-dimensional forms. For the nanowire materials, the response magnitude and response rate uniformly increase with increasing operating temperature. Such changes are interpreted in terms of accelerated surface diffusional processes, yielding greater access to chemisorbed oxygen species and faster dissociative chemisorption, respectively. Regardless of operating temperature, sensitivity of the nanofibers is a factor of 10 to 100 greater than that of nanowires with the same catalyst for the same test condition. In summary, nanostructure appears critical to governing the reactivity, as measured by electrical

  9. Characterization of nanoscale oxide and oxyhydroxide powders using EXAFS spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Darab, J.G.; Linehan, J.C.; Matson, D.W.; Ma, Y.

    1993-06-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been used to determine the structural environment local to iron(HI) and zircorium(IV) cations in respectively, nanoscale iron oxyhydroxide and nanoscale zirconium oxide powders. The iron oxyhydroxide powder, produced by the modified reverse micelle (MRM) technology, was found to have a short-range structure most similar to that of goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH). The short-range structure of the zirconium oxide powder, produced using the rapid thermal decomposition of solutes (RTDS) technology, was found to be a mixture of monoclinic zirconia and cubic zirconia environments.

  10. Characterization of nanoscale oxide and oxyhydroxide powders using EXAFS spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Darab, J.G.; Linehan, J.C.; Matson, D.W. ); Ma, Y. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-06-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been used to determine the structural environment local to iron(HI) and zircorium(IV) cations in respectively, nanoscale iron oxyhydroxide and nanoscale zirconium oxide powders. The iron oxyhydroxide powder, produced by the modified reverse micelle (MRM) technology, was found to have a short-range structure most similar to that of goethite ([alpha]-FeOOH). The short-range structure of the zirconium oxide powder, produced using the rapid thermal decomposition of solutes (RTDS) technology, was found to be a mixture of monoclinic zirconia and cubic zirconia environments.

  11. Controllable Tuning Plasmonic Coupling with Nanoscale Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The nanoparticle on mirror (NPoM) construct is ideal for the strong coupling of localized plasmons because of its simple fabrication and the nanometer-scale gaps it offers. Both of these are much harder to control in nanoparticle dimers. Even so, realizing controllable gap sizes in a NPoM remains difficult and continuous tunability is limited. Here, we use reactive metals as the mirror so that the spacing layer of resulting metal oxide can be easily and controllably created with specific thicknesses resulting in continuous tuning of the plasmonic coupling. Using Al as a case study, we contrast different approaches for oxidation including electrochemical oxidation, thermal annealing, oxygen plasma treatments, and photo-oxidation by laser irradiation. The thickness of the oxidation layer is calibrated with depth-mode X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). These all consistently show that increasing the thickness of the oxidation layer blue-shifts the plasmonic resonance peak while the transverse mode remains constant, which is well matched by simulations. Our approach provides a facile and reproducible method for scalable, local and controllable fabrication of NPoMs with tailored plasmonic coupling, suited for many applications of sensing, photochemistry, photoemission, and photovoltaics. PMID:25978297

  12. Optical spectroscopy of nanoscale and heterostructured oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senty, Tess R.

    Through careful analysis of a material's properties, devices are continually getting smaller, faster and more efficient each day. Without a complete scientific understanding of material properties, devices cannot continue to improve. This dissertation uses optical spectroscopy techniques to understand light-matter interactions in several oxide materials with promising uses mainly in light harvesting applications. Linear absorption, photoluminescence and transient absorption spectroscopy are primarily used on europium doped yttrium vanadate nanoparticles, copper gallium oxide delafossites doped with iron, and cadmium selenide quantum dots attached to titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Europium doped yttrium vanadate nanoparticles have promising applications for linking to biomolecules. Using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, it was shown that organic ligands (benzoic acid, 3-nitro 4-chloro-benzoic acid and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) can be attached to the surface of these molecules using metal-carboxylate coordination. Photoluminescence spectroscopy display little difference in the position of the dominant photoluminescence peaks between samples with different organic ligands although there is a strong decrease in their intensity when 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid is attached. It is shown that this strong quenching is due to the presence of high-frequency hydroxide vibrational modes within the organic linker. Ultraviolet/visible linear absorption measurements on delafossites display that by doping copper gallium oxide with iron allows for the previously forbidden fundamental gap transition to be accessed. Using tauc plots, it is shown that doping with iron lowers the bandgap from 2.8 eV for pure copper gallium oxide, to 1.7 eV for samples with 1 -- 5% iron doping. Using terahertz transient absorption spectroscopy measurements, it was also determined that doping with iron reduces the charge mobility of the pure delafossite samples. A comparison of cadmium selenide

  13. EXAFS and XANES analysis of oxides at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Alexei; Chaboy, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide research activity at the nanoscale is triggering the appearance of new, and frequently surprising, materials properties in which the increasing importance of surface and interface effects plays a fundamental role. This opens further possibilities in the development of new multifunctional materials with tuned physical properties that do not arise together at the bulk scale. Unfortunately, the standard methods currently available for solving the atomic structure of bulk crystals fail for nanomaterials due to nanoscale effects (very small crystallite sizes, large surface-to-volume ratio, near-surface relaxation, local lattice distortions etc.). As a consequence, a critical reexamination of the available local-structure characterization methods is needed. This work discusses the real possibilities and limits of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis at the nanoscale. To this end, the present state of the art for the interpretation of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is described, including an advanced approach based on the use of classical molecular dynamics and its application to nickel oxide nanoparticles. The limits and possibilities of X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to determine several effects associated with the nanocrystalline nature of materials are discussed in connection with the development of ZnO-based dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) and iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:25485137

  14. Transfer molding of nanoscale oxides using water-soluble templates.

    PubMed

    Bass, John D; Schaper, Charles D; Rettner, Charles T; Arellano, Noel; Alharbi, Fahhad H; Miller, Robert D; Kim, Ho-Cheol

    2011-05-24

    We report a facile method for creating nanoscopic oxide structures over large areas that is capable of producing high aspect ratio nanoscale structures with feature sizes below 50 nm. A variety of nanostructured oxides including TiO(2), SnO(2) and organosilicates are formed using sol-gel and nanoparticle precursors by way of molding with water-soluble polymeric templates generated from silicon masters. Sequential stacking techniques are developed that generate unique 3-dimensional nanostructures with combinatorially mixed geometries, scales, and materials. Applicable to a variety of substrates, this scalable method allows access to a broad range of new thin film morphologies for applications in devices, catalysts, and functional surface coatings. PMID:21469708

  15. Characterizing nano-scale electrocatalysis during partial oxidation of methane

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daehee; Kim, Dongha; Kim, Joosun; Moon, Jooho

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical analysis allows in situ characterization of solid oxide electrochemical cells (SOCs) under operating conditions. However, the SOCs that have been analyzed in this way have ill-defined or uncommon microstructures in terms of porosity and tortuosity. Therefore, the nano-scale characterization of SOCs with respect to three-phase boundaries has been hindered. We introduce novel in situ electrochemical analysis for SOCs that uses combined solid electrolyte potentiometry (SEP) and impedance measurements. This method is employed to investigate the oscillatory behavior of a porous Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode during the partial oxidation of methane under ambient pressure at 800°C. The cyclic oxidation and reduction of nickel induces the oscillatory behavior in the impedance and electrode potential. The in situ characterization of the nickel surface suggests that the oxidation of the nickel occurs predominantly at the two-phase boundaries, whereas the nickel at the three-phase boundaries remains in the metallic state during the cyclic redox reaction. PMID:24487242

  16. Nano-scale polar-nonpolar oxide heterostructures for photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongli; Saidi, Wissam A.; Yang, Jinlong; Zhao, Jin

    2016-03-01

    We proposed based on first principles density functional theory calculations that a nano-scale thin film based on a polar-nonpolar transition-metal oxide heterostructure can be used as a highly-efficient photocatalyst. This is demonstrated using a SrTiO3/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 sandwich-like heterostructure with photocatalytic activity in the near-infrared region. The effect of the polar nature of LaAlO3 is two-fold. First, the induced electrostatic field accelerates the photo-generated electrons and holes into opposite directions and minimizes their recombination rates. Hence, the reduction and oxidation reactions can be instigated at the SrTiO3 surfaces located on the opposite sides of the heterostructure. Second, the electric field reduces the band gap of the system making it photoactive in the infrared region. We also show that charge separation can be enhanced by using compressive strain engineering that creates ferroelectric instability in STO. The proposed setup is ideal for tandem oxide photocatalysts especially when combined with photoactive polar materials.We proposed based on first principles density functional theory calculations that a nano-scale thin film based on a polar-nonpolar transition-metal oxide heterostructure can be used as a highly-efficient photocatalyst. This is demonstrated using a SrTiO3/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 sandwich-like heterostructure with photocatalytic activity in the near-infrared region. The effect of the polar nature of LaAlO3 is two-fold. First, the induced electrostatic field accelerates the photo-generated electrons and holes into opposite directions and minimizes their recombination rates. Hence, the reduction and oxidation reactions can be instigated at the SrTiO3 surfaces located on the opposite sides of the heterostructure. Second, the electric field reduces the band gap of the system making it photoactive in the infrared region. We also show that charge separation can be enhanced by using compressive strain engineering that creates

  17. Evaluation of Oxidation and Hydrogen Permeation of Al Containing Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Thad M.; Korinko, Paul; Duncan, Andrew

    2005-06-17

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings are typically applied to these steel to retard hydrogen ingress. The focal point of the reported work was to evaluate the potential for intentional alloying of commercial 300-series stainless steels to promote hydrogen permeation resistant oxide scales. Previous research on the Cr- and Fe-oxide scales inherent to 300-series stainless steels has proven to be inconsistent in effecting permeation resistance. The approach undertaken in this research was to add aluminum to the 300-series stainless steels in an attempt to promote a pure Al-oxide or and Al-rich oxide scale. Aloxide had been previously demonstrated to be an effective hydrogen permeation barrier. Results for 304L and 347H alloys doped with Al in concentration from 0.5-3.0 wt% with respect to oxidation kinetic studies, cyclic oxidation and characterization of the oxide scale chemistry are reported herein. Gaseous hydrogen permeation testing of the Al-doped alloys in both the unoxidized and oxidized (600 C, 30 mins) conditions are reported. A critical finding from this work is that at concentration as low as 0.5 wt% Al, the Al stabilizes the ferrite phase in these steels thus producing duplex austenitic-ferritic microstructures. As the Al-content increases the amount of measured ferrite increases thus resulting in hydrogen permeabilities more closely resembling ferritic steels.

  18. Passivation and anodic oxidation of duplex TiN coating on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenja, S.; Pan, J.; Wallinder, I.O.; Leygraf, C.; Kulu, P.

    1999-11-01

    The passivation and anodic oxidation of duplex TiN coatings deposited by arc ion plating onto prenitrided AISI 304 stainless steel have been studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Mott-Schottky measurements in 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.05 M HCl. The chemical composition of the oxidized surface film atop TiN was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Up to 1.2 V/SHE the TiN coating exhibits passive behavior, which is attributed to the formation of a TiO{sub 2}-like film of nanometer thickness which grows linearly with anodic potential at a rate of 2.4 nm/V. Above 1.2 V/SHE enhanced anodic oxidation of TiN is observed at a rate of 17.7 nm/V, and the overall corrosion performance is governed both by the oxidized TiN coating and by a metallic Ti interlayer atop the nitrided stainless steel substrate. At all potentials the TiO{sub 2} film is characterized by relatively high donor densities and is, furthermore, terminated by a hydroxylated surface.

  19. Photoluminescence mechanism model for oxidized porous silicon and nanoscale-silicon-particle-embedded silicon oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, G. G.; Li, Y. J.

    2003-08-01

    There is much debate about the photoluminescence (PL) mechanisms of the nanoscale Si/Si oxide systems containing oxidized porous silicon and a nanoscale-Si-particle (NSP)—embedded Si oxide deposited by chemical vapor deposition, sputtering, or Si-ion implanting into Si oxide. In this paper, we suggest that two competitive processes, namely, the quantum confinement (QC) process and the quantum confinement-luminescence center (QCLC) process, take place in the PL. The photoexcitation occurs in the NSPs for both of the processes, while the photoemission occurs either in the NSPs for the QC process or in the luminescence centers (LCs) in Si oxide adjacent to the NSPs for the QCLC process. The rates of the two processes are compared quantitatively. Which process plays the major role in PL is determined by the capture cross section, the luminescence efficiency, and the density of the LCs, and the sizes of the NSPs. For a nanoscale Si/Si oxide system with the LCs having certain capture cross-section and luminescence efficiency, the higher the LC density and the larger the sizes of NSPs, the more beneficial for the QCLC process to surpass the QC process, and vice versa. For certain LC parameters, there is a critical most probable size for the NSPs. When the most probable size of the NSPs is larger than the critical one, the QCLC process dominates the PL, and when the most probable size of the NSPs is smaller than the critical one, the QC process dominates the PL. When the most probable size of the NSPs is close to the critical one, both the QC and QCLC processes should be taken into account. We have used this model to discuss PL experimental results reported for some nanoscale Si/Si oxide systems.

  20. Structure-property relationships of nanoscale engineered perovskite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei

    Recent advances in the synthesis of nanoscale customized structure have demonstrated that reactive molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) can be used to construct nanostructure of oxides with atomic control. The ability to engineer the structure and chemistry of oxides at the nanometer scale makes possible for the creation of new functional materials that can be designed to have exceptional properties. This thesis focused on understanding structure-property relationships of such nanoscale customized oxides utilizing state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Epitaxial thin films of n = 1--5 members of Ruddlesden-Popper homologous series Srn+1Ti nO3n+1 were synthesized by reactive MBE. We investigated the structure and microstructure of these thin films by x-ray diffraction along with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) in combination with computer image simulations. We found that the thin films of n = 1--3 members are nearly free of intergrowths, e.g. phase-pure, while n = 4 and 5 thin films contain noticeably more intergrowth defects and anti-phase boundaries in their perovskite sheets. We show that these results are consistent with what is known about the thermodynamics of Sr n+1TinO3 n+1 phases. We also investigated the atomic structure and interfacial structure of artificial PbTiO3/SrTiO3 and BaTiO3/SrTiO 3 superlattices grown by MBE both with and without digital compositional grading. Both of these systems form a solid solution over their entire composition range. Thus, these layered heterostructures are metastable. We demonstrated, however, that the thermodynamically metastable superlattices can be kinetically stabilized via layer-by-layer growth. In addition, we found that the interfaces between two constituents in the heterostructures are atomically-abrupt. The superlattice thin films were made fully coherent with the substrates, resulting in a homogeneous large strain in the BaTiO3 layers due to the lattice mismatch between BaTiO3

  1. Simple Methods for Production of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Films from Household Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Baliss, Michelle S.; Hinman, Jordan J.; Ziegenhorn, John W.; Andrews, Mark J.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2013-01-01

    Production of thin metal oxide films was recently explored as part of an outreach program with a goal of producing nanoscale structures with household items. Household items coated with various metals or titanium compounds can be heated to produce colorful films with nanoscale thicknesses. As part of a materials chemistry laboratory experiment…

  2. Nanoscale inhomogeneities in yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBCO) superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Zahirul; Sinha, S. K.; Lang, J. C.; Liu, X.; Haskel, D.; Moss, S. C.; Srajer, G.; Veal, B. W.; Wermeille, D.; Lee, D. R.; Haeffner, D. R.; Welp, U.; Wochner, P.

    2004-03-01

    X-ray diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source reveal that nanoscale inhomogeneities, electronic or structural in origin, form in yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBa_2Cu_3O_6+x) superconductors and coexist with the superconducting (SC) state. Diffuse scattering from these inhomogeneous superstructures is due to atomic displacements with respect to equilibrium lattice sites (Z. Islam et al. Phys. Rev. B 66, 92501 (2002)), that are characterized by a wavevector of the form q=(q_x,0,0), where qx varies with hole doping from 2 unit cells (along shorter Cu-O-Cu direction) for very low doping to 4 unit cells at optimal doping. Interestingly, while these superstructures are 3-dimensionally ordered when the SC state is weakened (e.g., at x=0.4), as the doping increases, they become quasi 1D with correlation lengths comparable to SC coherence lengths in these cuprates. Recent first-principles calculations (D. de Fontaine et al., to be published) for the x=0.63 compound show that atomic displacements consistent with experimental data can be the result of ordering of O vacancies in YBCO. Models for various superstructures and their role in the phase diagram will be discussed.

  3. Prototropic Equilibria in DNA Containing One-electron Oxidized GC: Intra-duplex vs. Duplex to Solvent Deprotonation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Munafo, Shawn A.; Khanduri, Deepti; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    By use of ESR and UV-vis spectral studies, this work identifies the protonation states of one-electron oxidized G:C (viz. G•+:C, G(N1-H)•:C(+H+), G(N1-H)•:C, and G(N2-H)•:C) in a DNA oligomer d[TGCGCGCA]2. Benchmark ESR and UV-vis spectra from one electron oxidized 1-Me-dGuo are employed to analyze the spectral data obtained in one-electron oxidized d[TGCGCGCA]2 at various pHs. At pH ≥7, the initial site of deprotonation of one-electron oxidized d[TGCGCGCA]2 to the surrounding solvent is found to be at N1 forming G(N1-H)•:C at 155 K. However, upon annealing to 175 K, the site of deprotonation to the solvent shifts to an equilibrium mixture of G(N1-H)•:C and G(N2-H)•:C. For the first time, the presence of G(N2-H)•:C in a ds DNA-oligomer is shown to be easily distinguished from the other prototropic forms, owing to its readily observable nitrogen hyperfine coupling (Azz(N2)= 16 G). In addition, for the oligomer in H2O, an additional 8 G N2-H proton HFCC is found. This ESR identification is supported by a UV-vis absorption at 630 nm which is characteristic for G(N2-H)• in model compounds and oligomers. We find that the extent of photo-conversion to the C1′ sugar radical (C1′•) in the one-electron oxidized d[TGCGCGCA]2 allows for a clear distinction among the various G:C protonation states which can not be easily distinguished by ESR or UV-vis spectroscopies with this order for the extent of photo-conversion: G•+:C > G(N1-H)•:C(+H+) >> G(N1-H)•:C. We propose that it is the G•+:C form that undergoes deprotonation at the sugar and this requires reprotonation of G within the lifetime of exited state. PMID:21491657

  4. First evidence on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide in groundnut using solution culture technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, Manchala; Sudhakar, Palagiri; Nagamadhuri, Kandula Venkata; Balakrishna Reddy, Kota; Giridhara Krishna, Thimmavajjula; Prasad, Tollamadugu Naga Venkata Krishna Vara

    2015-06-01

    Nanoscale materials, whose size typically falls below 100 nm, exhibit novel chemical, physical and biological properties which are different from their bulk counterparts. In the present investigation, we demonstrated that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (n-CaO) could transport through phloem tissue of groundnut unlike the corresponding bulk materials. n-CaO particles are prepared using sol-gel method. The size of the as prepared n-CaO measured (69.9 nm) using transmission electron microscopic technique (TEM). Results of the hydroponics experiment using solution culture technique revealed that foliar application of n-CaO at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, 500, 1,000 ppm) on groundnut plants confirmed the entry of calcium into leaves and stems through phloem compared to bulk source of calcium sprayed (CaO and CaNO3). After spraying of n-CaO, calcium content in roots, shoots and leaves significantly increased. Based on visual scoring of calcium deficiency correction and calcium content in plant parts, we may establish the fact that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (size 69.9 nm) could move through phloem tissue in groundnut. This is the first report on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide particles in plants and this result points to the use of nanoscale calcium oxide particles as calcium source to the plants through foliar application, agricultural crops in particular, as bulk calcium application through foliar nutrition is restricted due to its non-mobility in phloem.

  5. Surface evolution at nanoscale during oxidation: A competing mechanism between local curvature effect and stress effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xufei; Li, Yan; Wang, Dan; Lu, Siyuan; Feng, Xue

    2016-04-01

    The process of surface evolution of a chemically etched stepped structure at nanoscale during oxidation at 600 °C is in situ and real time observed using scanning probe microscope, which is integrated in a nanoindentation equipment for high temperature test. Experimental results reveal that this curved stepped structure becomes flat after being oxidized for a short period of time. However, after a longer time of oxidation, it is observed that the originally flat surface near the stepped structure becomes rough. Analysis shows that such a surface evolution is attributed to the competition between the nanoscale curvature effect (related to surface energy) and the stress developed in the oxide film during oxidation (related to strain energy). It is demonstrated that both the surface energy and strain energy can modify the surface chemical potential, which acts as the driving force of the surface diffusion of oxygen and further affects the oxide formation on the surface.

  6. Transition of oxide film configuration and the critical stress inferred by scanning probe microscopy at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xufei; Li, Yan; Zhang, Changxing; Dong, Xuelin; Feng, Xue

    2016-09-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) equipped in high temperature nanoindentation instrument is adopted to in situ characterize the oxide film growth on Ni-base single crystal at nanoscale. SPM images reveal a transition of oxide film configuration that the originally flat surface roughens during oxidation. Based on the stress-diffusion coupling effect during oxidation, the stress evolution in the oxide film and the evolution of surface configuration are analyzed. A new method to infer the critical stress in the oxide film at the transition point is proposed by measuring the undulated surface wavelength based on the surface morphology obtained by SPM.

  7. Multimode resistive switching in nanoscale hafnium oxide stack as studied by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Celano, U.; Goux, L.; Liu, L.; Degraeve, R.; Cheng, Y.; Kang, J.; Jurczak, M.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-07-01

    The nanoscale resistive switching in hafnium oxide stack is investigated by the conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). The initial oxide stack is insulating and electrical stress from the C-AFM tip induces nanometric conductive filaments. Multimode resistive switching can be observed in consecutive operation cycles at one spot. The different modes are interpreted in the framework of a low defect quantum point contact theory. The model implies that the optimization of the conductive filament active region is crucial for the future application of nanoscale resistive switching devices.

  8. Fabrication of self-aligned, nanoscale, complex oxide varactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Richard X.; Toonen, Ryan C.; Hirsch, Samuel G.; Ivill, Mathew P.; Cole, Melanie W.; Strawhecker, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Applications in ferroelectric random access memory and superparaelectric devices require the fabrication of ferroelectric capacitors at the nanoscale that exhibit extremely small leakage currents. To systematically study the material-size dependence of ferroelectric varactor performance, arrays of parallel-plate structures have been fabricated with nanoscale dielectric diameters. Electron beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma dry etching have been used to fabricate arrays of ferroelectric varactors using top electrodes as a self-aligned etch mask. Parallel-plate test structures using RF-sputtered Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 thin-films were used to optimize the fabrication process. Varactors with diameters down to 20 nm were successfully fabricated. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics were measured to evaluate the significance of etch-damage and fabrication quality by ensuring low leakage currents through the structures.

  9. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines traditional ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound . Traditional ultrasound uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create ...

  10. Influence Of pH On The Transport Of Nanoscale Zinc Oxide In Saturated Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread use of nanoscale zinc oxide (nZnO) in various fields causes subsurface environment contamination. Even though the transport of dissolved zinc ions in subsurface environments such as soils and sediments has been widely studied, the transport mechanism of nZnO in such e...

  11. A transition in mechanisms of size dependent electrical transport at nanoscale metal-oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Jiechang; Nonnenmann, Stephen S.; Qin, Wei; Bonnell, Dawn A.

    2013-12-16

    As device miniaturization approaches nanoscale dimensions, interfaces begin to dominate electrical properties. Here the system archetype Au/SrTiO{sub 3} is used to examine the origin of size dependent transport properties along metal-oxide interfaces. We demonstrate that a transition between two classes of size dependent electronic transport mechanisms exists, defined by a critical size ε. At sizes larger than ε an edge-related tunneling effect proportional to 1/D (the height of the supported Au nanoparticle) is observed; interfaces with sizes smaller than ε exhibit random fluctuations in current. The ability to distinguish between these mechanisms is important to future developments in nanoscale device design.

  12. G-Quadruplex Folds of the Human Telomere Sequence Alter the Site Reactivity and Reaction Pathway of Guanine Oxidation Compared to Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Aaron M.; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2013-01-01

    Telomere shortening occurs during oxidative and inflammatory stress with guanine (G) as the major site of damage. In this work, a comprehensive profile of the sites of oxidation and structures of products observed from G-quadruplex and duplex structures of the human telomere sequence was studied in the G-quadruplex folds (hybrid (K+), basket (Na+), and propeller (K+ + 50% CH3CN)) resulting from the sequence 5’-(TAGGGT)4T-3’ and in an appropriate duplex containing one telomere repeat. Oxidations with four oxidant systems consisting of riboflavin photosensitization, carbonate radical generation, singlet oxygen, and the copper Fenton-like reaction were analyzed under conditions of low product conversion to determine relative reactivity. The one-electron oxidants damaged the 5’-G in G-quadruplexes leading to spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and 2,2,4-triamino-2H-oxazol-5-one (Z) as major products as well as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG) and 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh) in low relative yields, while oxidation in the duplex context produced damage at the 5’- and middle-Gs of GGG sequences and resulted in Gh being the major product. Addition of the reductant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to the reaction did not alter the riboflavin-mediated damage sites, but decreased Z by 2-fold and increased OG by 5-fold, while not altering the hydantoin ratio. However, NAC completely quenched the CO3•− reactions. Singlet oxygen oxidations of the G-quadruplex showed reactivity at all Gs on the exterior faces of G-quartets and furnished the product Sp, while no oxidation was observed in the duplex context under these conditions, and addition of NAC had no effect. Because a long telomere sequence would have higher-order structures of G-quadruplexes, studies were also conducted with 5’-(TAGGGT)8-T-3’, and it provided similar oxidation profiles to the single G-quadruplex. Lastly, CuII/H2O2-mediated oxidations were found to be indiscriminate in the damage patterns, and 5-carboxamido-5

  13. Field emitters with nanoscale tips based on Mo oxide fabricated by electrochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Takeo; Sato, Takahiro; Kitamura, Shin; Kitao, Akiko; Kubota, Oichi; Ozaki, Eiji; Motoi, Taiko

    2016-04-01

    Field emitters with nanoscale tips and a fabrication technique using a nanoscale gap are described. Each fabrication technique makes it possible to form emitters on a meter-scale glass substrate. The emitter has a configuration with one side gate to reduce the electron scattering losses at the counter electrode to improve the emission efficiency. All thin film layers constituting the emitter are fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and sputtering deposition. Nanoscale tips are formed between a shallow gap less than 7 nm deep by the joule heating of a Mo complex oxide, which is produced by the electro chemical etching of a deposited Mo layer. To our knowledge, this is the first work that shows a uniform efficiency of 5% or more achieved at an anode voltage of 10 kV and an operation voltage of 23 V.

  14. Nanoscale assembly of high-temperature oxidation-resistant nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao

    2010-02-01

    Structural considerations for designing a high-temperature oxidation-resistant metallic material are proposed, based on the dependence of the material structure on a promotion of the development of a protective scale of chromia or alumina. The material should have numerous sites on its surface for nucleating the protective oxides at the onset of oxidation and abundant grain boundaries in deeper areas for simultaneously supplying sufficient flux of the protective-oxide-forming elements toward the surface for a rapid linkage of the oxide nuclei through their lateral growth. Based on these considerations, we fabricated, using an electrochemical deposition method, novel nanocomposites which have a nanocrystalline metal matrix containing Cr and/or Al nanoparticles dispersed at the nano length scale. The validity of the design considerations is verified by comparing the high-temperature oxidation of a typical Ni-Cr nanocomposite system with two types of conventional Ni-Cr materials having similar or higher Cr content but different structure: one is a composite having a nanocrystalline Ni matrix containing Cr microparticles dispersed at the microscale and the other are micron-grained Ni-Cr alloys with the Cr distribution at the atomic length scale. PMID:20644803

  15. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H(2)PtCl(6), Pd(NO(3))(3) and Rh(NO(3))(3). Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes. PMID:18657902

  16. Nanoscale Tunable Reduction of Graphene Oxide for Graphene Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhongqing; Wang, Debin; Kim, Suenne; Kim, Soo-Young; Hu, Yike; Yakes, Michael K.; Laracuente, Arnaldo R.; Dai, Zhenting; Marder, Seth R.; Berger, Claire; King, William P.; de Heer, Walter A.; Sheehan, Paul E.; Riedo, Elisa

    2010-06-01

    The reduced form of graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive alternative to graphene for producing large-scale flexible conductors and for creating devices that require an electronic gap. We report on a means to tune the topographical and electrical properties of reduced GO (rGO) with nanoscopic resolution by local thermal reduction of GO with a heated atomic force microscope tip. The rGO regions are up to four orders of magnitude more conductive than pristine GO. No sign of tip wear or sample tearing was observed. Variably conductive nanoribbons with dimensions down to 12 nanometers could be produced in oxidized epitaxial graphene films in a single step that is clean, rapid, and reliable.

  17. Stochastic stick-slip nanoscale friction on oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Craciun, A D; Gallani, J L; Rastei, M V

    2016-02-01

    The force needed to move a nanometer-scale contact on various oxide surfaces has been studied using an atomic force microscope and theoretical modeling. Force-distance traces unveil a stick-slip movement with erratic slip events separated by several nanometers. A linear scaling of friction force with normal load along with low pull-off forces reveals dispersive adhesive interactions at the interface. We model our findings by considering a variable Lennard-Jones-like interaction potential, which accounts for slip-induced variation of the effective contact area. The model explains the formation and fluctuation of stick-slip phases and provides guidelines for predicting transitions from stick-slip to continuous sliding on oxide surfaces. PMID:26751769

  18. Nanoscale reduction of graphene oxide thin films and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzoni, M.; Giugni, A.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Mescola, A.; Torre, B.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we report on a method to reduce thin films of graphene oxide (GO) to a spatial resolution better than 100 nm over several tens of micrometers by means of an electrochemical scanning probe based lithography. In situ tip-current measurements show that an edged drop in electrical resistance characterizes the reduced areas, and that the reduction process is, to a good approximation, proportional to the applied bias between the onset voltage and the saturation thresholds. An atomic force microscope (AFM) quantifies the drop of the surface height for the reduced profile due to the loss of oxygen. Complementarily, lateral force microscopy reveals a homogeneous friction coefficient of the reduced regions that is remarkably lower than that of native graphene oxide, confirming a chemical change in the patterned region. Micro Raman spectroscopy, which provides access to insights into the chemical process, allows one to quantify the restoration and de-oxidation of the graphitic network driven by the electrochemical reduction and to determine characteristic length scales. It also confirms the homogeneity of the process over wide areas. The results shown were obtained from accurate analysis of the shift, intensity and width of Raman peaks for the main vibrational bands of GO and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) mapped over large areas. Concerning multilayered GO thin films obtained by drop-casting we have demonstrated an unprecedented lateral resolution in ambient conditions as well as an improved control, characterization and understanding of the reduction process occurring in GO randomly folded multilayers, useful for large-scale processing of graphene-based material.

  19. Reverse micelle synthesis of nanoscale metal containing catalysts. [Nickel metal (with a nickel oxide surface layer) and iron oxyhydroxide nanoscale powders

    SciTech Connect

    Darab, J.G.; Fulton, J.L.; Linehan, J.C.

    1993-03-01

    The need for morphological control during the synthesis of catalyst precursor powders is generally accepted to be important. In the liquefaction of coal, for example, iron-bearing catalyst precursor particles containing individual crystallites with diameters in the 1-100 nanometer range are believed to achieve good dispersion through out the coal-solvent slurry during liquefaction 2 runs and to undergo chemical transformations to catalytically active iron sulfide phases. The production of the nanoscale powders described here employs the confining spherical microdomains comprising the aqueous phase of a modified reverse micelle (MRM) microemulsion system as nanoscale reaction vessels in which polymerization, electrochemical reduction and precipitation of solvated salts can occur. The goal is to take advantage of the confining nature of micelles to kinetically hinder transformation processes which readily occur in bulk aqueous solution in order to control the morphology and phase of the resulting powder. We have prepared a variety of metal, alloy, and metal- and mixed metal-oxide nanoscale powders from appropriate MRM systems. Examples of nanoscale powders produced include Co, Mo-Co, Ni[sub 3]Fe, Ni, and various oxides and oxyhydroxides of iron. Here, we discuss the preparation and characterization of nickel metal (with a nickel oxide surface layer) and iron oxyhydroxide MRM nanoscale powders. We have used extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to study the chemical polymerization process in situ, x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microcroscopies (SEM and TEM), elemental analysis and structural modelling to characterize the nanoscale powders produced. The catalytic activity of these powders is currently being studied.

  20. Nanoscale characterization of oxidized ultrathin Co-films by ballistic electron emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng Johnson Goh, Kuan; Wang, Simin; Tan, Siew Ting Melissa; Zhang, Zheng; Kawai, Hiroyo; Troadec, Cedric; Ng, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of devices scaling down further to the few nanometer regime, the ability to characterize material localized within the few nm of a critical device region poses a current challenge, particularly when the material is already buried under other material layers such as under a metal contact. Conventional techniques typically provide indirect information of the nanoscale material quality through a surface or volume averaging perspective. Here we present a study of local (nm range) oxidation in few nanometer thick Co-films using Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy/Spectroscopy (BEEM/BEES). Co films were grown on n-Si(111) substrates, oxidized in ambient atmosphere before capping with a thin Au film to prevent further oxidation and enable BEEM measurements. In addition to BEES, the temporal progression of Co oxidation was also tracked by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. At room temperature, we report that the electron injection thresholds are sufficiently different for local regions with Co and oxidized-Co enabling their distinction in BEEM measurements. Our results demonstrate the possibility of using BEEM for nanoscale spatial mapping of the oxidized regions in Co-films, and this can provide critical information toward the successful fabrication of next generation Co-based nano-devices.

  1. Thermodynamics of Manganese Oxides at Bulk and Nanoscale: Phase Formation, Transformation, Oxidation-Reduction, and Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkner, Nancy R.

    Natural manganese oxides are generally formed in surficial environments that are near ambient temperature and water-rich, and may be exposed to wet-dry cycles and a variety of adsorbate species that influence dramatically their level of hydration. Manganese oxide minerals are often poorly crystalline, nanophase, and hydrous. In the near-surface environment they are involved in processes that are important to life, such as water column oxygen cycling, biomineralization, and transport of minerals/nutrients through soils and water. These processes, often involving transformations among manganese oxide polymorphs, are governed by a complex interplay between thermodynamics and kinetics. Manganese oxides are also used in technology as catalysts, and for other applications. The major goal of this dissertation is to examine the energetics of bulk and nanophase manganese oxide phases as a function of particle size, composition, and surface hydration. Careful synthesis and characterization of manganese oxide phases with different surface areas provided samples for the study of enthalpies of formation by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry and of the energetics of water adsorption on their surfaces. These data provide a quantitative picture of phase stability and how it changes at the nanoscale. The surface energy of the hydrous surface of Mn3O4 is 0.96 +/- 0.08 J/m2, of Mn2O3 is 1.29 +/- 0.10 J/m2, and of MnO2 is 1.64 +/- 0.10 J/m2. The surface energy of the anhydrous surface of Mn3O4 is 1.62 +/- 0.08 J/m 2, of Mn2O3 is 1.77 +/- 0.10 J/m 2, and of MnO2 is 2.05 +/- 0.10 J/m2. Supporting preliminary findings (Navrotsky et al., 2010), the spinel phase (Mn3O4) has a lower surface energy (more stabilizing) than bixbyite, while the latter has a smaller surface energy than pyrolusite. These differences significantly change the positions in oxygen fugacity---temperature space of the redox couples Mn3O4-Mn2O 3 and Mn2O3-MnO2 favoring the lower surface enthalpy phase (the

  2. Characterization of Nano-scale Aluminum Oxide Transport through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, S.; Reynolds, M.; Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Johnson, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    Colloidal material (including that in the nanoparticle size range) is naturally present in most subsurface environments. Mobilization of these colloidal materials via particle disaggregation may occur through abrupt changes in flow rate and/or via chemical perturbations, such as rapid changes in ionic strength or solution pH. While concentrations of natural colloidal materials in the subsurface are typically small, those concentrations may be greatly increased at contaminated sites such as following the application of metal oxides for groundwater remediation efforts. Additionally, while land application of biosolids has become common practice in the United States as an alternative to industrial fertilizers, biosolids have been shown to contain a significant fraction of organic and inorganic nano-scale colloidal materials such as oxides of iron, titanium, and aluminum. Given their reactivity and small size, there are many questions concerning the potential migration of nano-scale colloidal materials through the soil column and their potential participation in the facilitated transport of contaminants, such as heavy metals and emerging pollutants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the transport behavior of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanoparticles through porous media. The impacts of pH, ionic strength, pore-water velocity (i.e., residence time), and aqueous-phase concentration on transport was investigated. All experiments were conducted with large injection pulses to fully characterize the impact of long-term retention and transport behavior relevant for natural systems wherein multiple retention processes may be operative. The results indicate that the observed nonideal transport behavior of the nano-scale colloids is influenced by multiple retention mechanisms/processes. Given the ubiquitous nature of these nano-scale colloids in the environment, a clear understanding of their transport and fate is necessary in further resolving the potential for

  3. Drift-diffusion equation for ballistic transport in nanoscale metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, Jung-Hoon; Lundstrom, Mark S.

    2002-11-01

    We develop a drift-diffusion equation that describes ballistic transport in a nanoscale metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). We treat injection from different contacts separately, and describe each injection with a set of extended McKelvey one-flux equations [Phys. Rev. 123, 51 (1961); 125, 1570 (1962)] that include hierarchy closure approximations appropriate for high-field ballistic transport and degenerate carrier statistics. We then reexpress the extended one-flux equations in a drift-diffusion form with a properly defined Einstein relationship. The results obtained for a nanoscale MOSFET show excellent agreement with the solution of the ballistic Boltzmann transport equation with no fitting parameters. These results show that a macroscopic transport model based on the moments of the Boltzmann transport equation can describe ballistic transport.

  4. Deposition of duplex Al 2O 3/aluminum coatings on steel using a combined technique of arc spraying and plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Weichao; Shen, Dejiu; Wang, Yulin; Chen, Guangliang; Feng, Wenran; Zhang, Guling; Fan, Songhua; Liu, Chizi; Yang, Size

    2006-02-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a cost-effective technique that can be used to prepare ceramic coatings on metals such as Ti, Al, Mg, Nb, etc., and their alloys, but this promising technique cannot be used to modify the surface properties of steels, which are the most widely used materials in engineering. In order to prepare metallurgically bonded ceramic coatings on steels, a combined technique of arc spraying and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was adopted. In this work, metallurgically bonded ceramic coatings on steels were obtained using this method. We firstly prepared aluminum coatings on steels by arc spraying, and then obtained the metallurgically bonded ceramic coatings on aluminum coatings by PEO. The characteristics of duplex coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The corrosion and wear resistance of the ceramic coatings were also studied. The results show that, duplex Al 2O 3/aluminum coatings have been deposited on steel substrate after the combined treatment. The ceramic coatings are mainly composed of α-Al 2O 3, γ-Al 2O 3, θ-Al 2O 3 and some amorphous phase. The duplex coatings show favorable corrosion and wear resistance properties. The investigations indicate that the combination of arc spraying and plasma electrolytic oxidation proves a promising technique for surface modification of steels for protective purposes.

  5. Self-Assembled Epitaxial Au-Oxide Vertically Aligned Nanocomposites for Nanoscale Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Leigang; Sun, Liuyang; Gomez-Diaz, Juan Sebastian; Hogan, Nicki L; Lu, Ping; Khatkhatay, Fauzia; Zhang, Wenrui; Jian, Jie; Huang, Jijie; Su, Qing; Fan, Meng; Jacob, Clement; Li, Jin; Zhang, Xinghang; Jia, Quanxi; Sheldon, Matthew; Alù, Andrea; Li, Xiaoqin; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-06-01

    Metamaterials made of nanoscale inclusions or artificial unit cells exhibit exotic optical properties that do not exist in natural materials. Promising applications, such as super-resolution imaging, cloaking, hyperbolic propagation, and ultrafast phase velocities have been demonstrated based on mostly micrometer-scale metamaterials and few nanoscale metamaterials. To date, most metamaterials are created using costly and tedious fabrication techniques with limited paths toward reliable large-scale fabrication. In this work, we demonstrate the one-step direct growth of self-assembled epitaxial metal-oxide nanocomposites as a drastically different approach to fabricating large-area nanostructured metamaterials. Using pulsed laser deposition, we fabricated nanocomposite films with vertically aligned gold (Au) nanopillars (∼20 nm in diameter) embedded in various oxide matrices with high epitaxial quality. Strong, broad absorption features in the measured absorbance spectrum are clear signatures of plasmon resonances of Au nanopillars. By tuning their densities on selected substrates, anisotropic optical properties are demonstrated via angular dependent and polarization resolved reflectivity measurements and reproduced by full-wave simulations and effective medium theory. Our model predicts exotic properties, such as zero permittivity responses and topological transitions. Our studies suggest that these self-assembled metal-oxide nanostructures provide an exciting new material platform to control and enhance optical response at nanometer scales. PMID:27186652

  6. Label-free, atomic force microscopy-based mapping of DNA intrinsic curvature for the nanoscale comparative analysis of bent duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Buzio, Renato; Repetto, Luca; Giacopelli, Francesca; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Valbusa, Ugo

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method for the characterization of the local intrinsic curvature of adsorbed DNA molecules. It relies on a novel statistical chain descriptor, namely the ensemble averaged product of curvatures for two nanosized segments, symmetrically placed on the contour of atomic force microscopy imaged chains. We demonstrate by theoretical arguments and experimental investigation of representative samples that the fine mapping of the average product along the molecular backbone generates a characteristic pattern of variation that effectively highlights all pairs of DNA tracts with large intrinsic curvature. The centrosymmetric character of the chain descriptor enables targetting strands with unknown orientation. This overcomes a remarkable limitation of the current experimental strategies that estimate curvature maps solely from the trajectories of end-labeled molecules or palindromes. As a consequence our approach paves the way for a reliable, unbiased, label-free comparative analysis of bent duplexes, aimed to detect local conformational changes of physical or biological relevance in large sample numbers. Notably, such an assay is virtually inaccessible to the automated intrinsic curvature computation algorithms proposed so far. We foresee several challenging applications, including the validation of DNA adsorption and bending models by experiments and the discrimination of specimens for genetic screening purposes. PMID:22402493

  7. Label-free, atomic force microscopy-based mapping of DNA intrinsic curvature for the nanoscale comparative analysis of bent duplexes.

    PubMed

    Buzio, Renato; Repetto, Luca; Giacopelli, Francesca; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Valbusa, Ugo

    2012-06-01

    We propose a method for the characterization of the local intrinsic curvature of adsorbed DNA molecules. It relies on a novel statistical chain descriptor, namely the ensemble averaged product of curvatures for two nanosized segments, symmetrically placed on the contour of atomic force microscopy imaged chains. We demonstrate by theoretical arguments and experimental investigation of representative samples that the fine mapping of the average product along the molecular backbone generates a characteristic pattern of variation that effectively highlights all pairs of DNA tracts with large intrinsic curvature. The centrosymmetric character of the chain descriptor enables targetting strands with unknown orientation. This overcomes a remarkable limitation of the current experimental strategies that estimate curvature maps solely from the trajectories of end-labeled molecules or palindromes. As a consequence our approach paves the way for a reliable, unbiased, label-free comparative analysis of bent duplexes, aimed to detect local conformational changes of physical or biological relevance in large sample numbers. Notably, such an assay is virtually inaccessible to the automated intrinsic curvature computation algorithms proposed so far. We foresee several challenging applications, including the validation of DNA adsorption and bending models by experiments and the discrimination of specimens for genetic screening purposes. PMID:22402493

  8. Nanoscale Surface Modification of Lithium-Rich Layered-Oxide Composite Cathodes for Suppressing Voltage Fade.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fenghua; Yang, Chenghao; Xiong, Xunhui; Xiong, Jiawen; Hu, Renzong; Chen, Yu; Liu, Meilin

    2015-10-26

    Lithium-rich layered oxides are promising cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries and exhibit a high reversible capacity exceeding 250 mAh g(-1) . However, voltage fade is the major problem that needs to be overcome before they can find practical applications. Here, Li1.2 Mn0.54 Ni0.13 Co0.13 O2 (LLMO) oxides are subjected to nanoscale LiFePO4 (LFP) surface modification. The resulting materials combine the advantages of both bulk doping and surface coating as the LLMO crystal structure is stabilized through cationic doping, and the LLMO cathode materials are protected from corrosion induced by organic electrolytes. An LLMO cathode modified with 5 wt % LFP (LLMO-LFP5) demonstrated suppressed voltage fade and a discharge capacity of 282.8 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 C with a capacity retention of 98.1 % after 120 cycles. Moreover, the nanoscale LFP layers incorporated into the LLMO surfaces can effectively maintain the lithium-ion and charge transport channels, and the LLMO-LFP5 cathode demonstrated an excellent rate capacity. PMID:26335589

  9. Nanoscale mapping of carbon oxidation in pyrogenic black carbon from ancient Amazonian anthrosols.

    PubMed

    Archanjo, B S; Baptista, D L; Sena, L A; Cançado, L G; Falcão, N P S; Jorio, A; Achete, C A

    2015-04-01

    Understanding soil organic matter is necessary for the development of soil amendments, which are important for sustaining agriculture in humid tropical climates. Ancient Amazonian anthrosols are uniquely high in black recalcitrant carbon, making them extremely fertile. In this study, we use high-resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy to resolve the oxidation process of carbon in the nanoscale crystallites within the black carbon grains of this special soil. Most alkali and acid chemical extraction methods are known to cause chemical modifications in soil organic matter and to give poor or no information about the real spatial structure of soil aggregates. However, here we show that carbon-oxygen functional groups such as phenol, carbonyl, and carboxyl dominate over different spatial regions, with areas varying from over tens to hundreds of nm(2). The chemical maps show that in the nanoscale grain, the surface has a tendency to be less aromatic than the grain core, where higher oxidative-degradation levels are indicated by the presence of carbonyl and carboxyl groups. A deep understanding of these structures could allow artificial reproduction of these natural events. PMID:25699655

  10. Nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures for active hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ming; Zhou, Wu; Tsai, Mon-Che; Zhou, Jigang; Guan, Mingyun; Lin, Meng-Chang; Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Yang, Jiang; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2014-08-01

    Active, stable and cost-effective electrocatalysts are a key to water splitting for hydrogen production through electrolysis or photoelectrochemistry. Here we report nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures formed on carbon nanotube sidewalls as highly effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction with activity similar to platinum. Partially reduced nickel interfaced with nickel oxide results from thermal decomposition of nickel hydroxide precursors bonded to carbon nanotube sidewalls. The metal ion-carbon nanotube interactions impede complete reduction and Ostwald ripening of nickel species into the less hydrogen evolution reaction active pure nickel phase. A water electrolyzer that achieves ~20 mA cm-2 at a voltage of 1.5 V, and which may be operated by a single-cell alkaline battery, is fabricated using cheap, non-precious metal-based electrocatalysts.

  11. Nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures for active hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ming; Zhou, Wu; Tsai, Mon-Che; Zhou, Jigang; Guan, Mingyun; Lin, Meng-Chang; Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Yang, Jiang; Pennycook, Stephen J; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    Active, stable and cost-effective electrocatalysts are a key to water splitting for hydrogen production through electrolysis or photoelectrochemistry. Here we report nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures formed on carbon nanotube sidewalls as highly effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction with activity similar to platinum. Partially reduced nickel interfaced with nickel oxide results from thermal decomposition of nickel hydroxide precursors bonded to carbon nanotube sidewalls. The metal ion-carbon nanotube interactions impede complete reduction and Ostwald ripening of nickel species into the less hydrogen evolution reaction active pure nickel phase. A water electrolyzer that achieves ~20 mA cm(-2) at a voltage of 1.5 V, and which may be operated by a single-cell alkaline battery, is fabricated using cheap, non-precious metal-based electrocatalysts. PMID:25146255

  12. Coupling carbon dioxide reduction with water oxidation in nanoscale photocatalytic assemblies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooyul; McClure, Beth Anne; Edri, Eran; Frei, Heinz

    2016-06-01

    The reduction of carbon dioxide by water with sunlight in an artificial system offers an opportunity for utilizing non-arable land for generating renewable transportation fuels to replace fossil resources. Because of the very large scale required for the impact on fuel consumption, the scalability of artificial photosystems is of key importance. Closing the photosynthetic cycle of carbon dioxide reduction and water oxidation on the nanoscale addresses major barriers for scalability as well as high efficiency, such as resistance losses inherent to ion transport over macroscale distances, loss of charge and other efficiency degrading processes, or excessive need for the balance of system components, to mention a few. For the conversion of carbon dioxide to six-electron or even more highly reduced liquid fuel products, introduction of a proton conducting, gas impermeable separation membrane is critical. This article reviews recent progress in the development of light absorber-catalyst assemblies for the reduction and oxidation half reactions with focus on well defined polynuclear structures, and on novel approaches for optimizing electron transfer among the molecular or nanoparticulate components. Studies by time-resolved optical and infrared spectroscopy for the understanding of charge transfer processes between the chromophore and the catalyst, and of the mechanism of water oxidation at metal oxide nanocatalysts through direct observation of surface reaction intermediates are discussed. All-inorganic polynuclear units for reducing carbon dioxide by water at the nanoscale are introduced, and progress towards core-shell nanotube assemblies for completing the photosynthetic cycle under membrane separation is described. PMID:27121982

  13. Duplex Al2O3/DLC Coating on 15SiCp/2024 Aluminum Matrix Composite Using Combined Microarc Oxidation and Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Wenbin; Tian, Hua; Du, Jiancheng; Hua, Ming; Zhang, Xu; Li, Yongliang

    2012-08-01

    Microarc oxidation (MAO) treatment produces a thick Al2O3 coating on the 15SiCp/2024 aluminum matrix composite. After pretreatment of Ti ion implantation, a thin diamond-like carbon film (DLC) was deposited on the top of polished Al2O3 coating by a pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition system with a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source. The morphology and tribological properties of the duplex Al2O3/DLC multiplayer coating were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SRV ball-on-disk friction tester. It is found that the duplex Al2O3/DLC coating had good adhesion and a low friction coefficient of less than 0.07. As compared to a single Al2O3 or DLC coating, the duplex Al2O3/DLC coating on aluminum matrix composite exhibited a better wear resistance against ZrO2 ball under dry sliding, because the Al2O3 coating as an intermediate layer improved load support for the top DLC coating on 15SiCp/2024 composite substrate, meanwhile the top DLC coating displayed low friction coefficient.

  14. Compact chromium oxide thin film resistors for use in nanoscale quantum circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C. R.; Fenton, J. C.; Constantino, N. G. N.; Warburton, P. A.

    2014-12-14

    We report on the electrical characterisation of a series of thin amorphous chromium oxide (CrO{sub x}) films, grown by dc sputtering, to evaluate their suitability for use as on-chip resistors in nanoelectronics. By increasing the level of oxygen doping, the room-temperature sheet resistance of the CrO{sub x} films was varied from 28 Ω/◻ to 32.6 kΩ/◻. The variation in resistance with cooling to 4.2 K in liquid helium was investigated; the sheet resistance at 4.2 K varied with composition from 65 Ω/◻ to above 20 GΩ/◻. All of the films measured displayed linear current–voltage characteristics at all measured temperatures. For on-chip devices for quantum phase-slip measurements using niobium–silicon nanowires, interfaces between niobium–silicon and chromium oxide are required. We also characterised the contact resistance for one CrO{sub x} composition at an interface with niobium–silicon. We found that a gold intermediate layer is favourable: the specific contact resistivity of chromium-oxide-to-gold interfaces was 0.14 mΩcm{sup 2}, much lower than the value for direct CrO{sub x} to niobium–silicon contact. We conclude that these chromium oxide films are suitable for use in nanoscale circuits as high-value resistors, with resistivity tunable by oxygen content.

  15. Synthesis of nanoscale silicon oxide oxidation state distributions: The transformation from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laminack, William; Gole, James L.; White, Mark G.; Ozdemir, Serdar; Ogden, Andrew G.; Martin, Holly J.; Fang, Zongtang; Wang, Tsang-Hsiu; Dixon, David A.

    2016-06-01

    Silicon oxide nanostructures which span the range from hydrophilic to hydrophobic have been synthesized. The surface chemistry of these silicon-based nanostructures was analyzed using a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflectance infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The dominant oxidation state for the nanostructured oxides shifts from an average oxidation state of +III to a combination of +II and +III oxidation states. A correlation of the ability to adsorb water with variations in the surface Si:O ratios was observed showing a transition from hydrophilic to hydrophobic character.

  16. Efficient electrochemical water oxidation in neutral and near-neutral systems with a nanoscale silver-oxide catalyst.

    PubMed

    Joya, Khurram S; Ahmad, Zahoor; Joya, Yasir F; Garcia-Esparza, Angel T; de Groot, Huub J M

    2016-08-11

    In electrocatalytic water splitting systems pursuing for renewable energy using sunlight, developing robust, stable and easily accessible materials operating under mild chemical conditions is pivotal. We present here a unique nanoparticulate type silver-oxide (AgOx-NP) based robust and highly stable electrocatalyst for efficient water oxidation. The AgOx-NP is generated in situ in a HCO3(-)/CO2 system under benign conditions. Micrographs show that they exhibit a nanoscale box type squared nano-bipyramidal configuration. The oxygen generation is initiated at low overpotential, and a sustained O2 evolution current density of >1.1 mA cm(-2) is achieved during prolonged-period water electrolysis. The AgOx-NP electrocatalyst performs exceptionally well in metal-ion free neutral or near-neutral carbonate, phosphate and borate buffers relative to recently reported Co-oxide and Ni-oxide based heterogeneous electrocatalysts, which are unstable in metal-ion free electrolytes and tend to deactivate with time and lose catalytic performance during long-term experimental tests. PMID:27472834

  17. Nanoscale conductive niobium oxides made through low temperature phase transformation for electrocatalyst support

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K; Li, YF; Yan, LT; Xing, YC

    2014-01-01

    We report an effective approach to synthesize nanoscale Nb2O5 coated on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and transform it at low temperatures to the conductive form of NbO2. The latter, when used as a Pt electrocatalyst support, shows significant enhancement in catalyst activity and durability in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Direct phase transformation of Nb2O5 to NbO2 often requires temperatures above 1000 degrees C. Here we show that this can be achieved at a much lower temperature (e.g. 700 degrees C) if the niobium oxide is first activated with carbon. Low temperature processing allows retaining nanostructures of the oxide without sintering, keeping its high surface areas needed for being a catalyst support. We further show that Pt supported on the conductive oxides on CNTs has two times higher mass activity for the ORR than on bare CNTs. The electrochemical stability of Pt was also outstanding, with only ca. 5% loss in electrochemical surface areas and insignificant reduction in half-wave potential in ORR after 5000 potential cycles.

  18. Oxide films at the nanoscale: new structures, new functions, and new materials.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2011-11-15

    We all make use of oxide ultrathin films, even if we are unaware of doing so. They are essential components of many common devices, such as mobile phones and laptops. The films in these ubiquitous electronics are composed of silicon dioxide, an unsurpassed material in the design of transistors. But oxide films at the nanoscale (typically just 10 nm or less in thickness) are integral to many other applications. In some cases, they form under normal reactive conditions and confer new properties to a material: one example is the corrosion protection of stainless steel, which is the result of a passive film. A new generation of devices for energy production and communications technology, such as ferroelectric ultrathin film capacitors, tunneling magnetoresistance sensors, solar energy materials, solid oxide fuel cells, and many others, are being specifically designed to exploit the unusual properties afforded by reduced oxide thickness. Oxide ultrathin films also have tremendous potential in chemistry, representing a rich new source of catalytic materials. About 20 years ago, researchers began to prepare model systems of truly heterogeneous catalysts based on thin oxide layers grown on single crystals of metal. Only recently, however, was it realized that these systems may behave quite differently from their corresponding bulk oxides. One of the phenomena uncovered is the occurrence of a spontaneous charge transfer from the metal support to an adsorbed species through the thin insulating layer (or vice versa). The importance of this property is clear: conceptually, the activation and bond breaking of adsorbed molecules begin with precisely the same process, electron transfer into an antibonding orbital. But electron transfer can also be harnessed to make a supported metal particle more chemically active, increase its adhesion energy, or change its shape. Most importantly, the basic principles underlying electron transfer and other phenomena (such as structural

  19. Electrical Transport in Nanoscale Complex Oxide Thin Films: Strontium titanate and RNiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Junwoo

    Complex oxide thin films have attracted significant attention due to a wealth of physical phenomena, such as ferroelectricity and Mott transitions arising from strong interactions in d-bands. Moreover, the physical phenomena observed in these materials exhibit sensitivities, which are not found in conventional semiconductors and give rise to abrupt changes in their physical properties. The richness of electronic phases and unique functionalities of complex oxides are attractive for applications in next-generation electronic devices. To realize new electronic devices with complex oxides, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of the electrical transport and to control the transport properties of complex oxide thin films. In this dissertation, electrical transport phenomena and their electrical control are experimentally studied in two different complex oxide thin film systems, exhibiting resistive switching and Mott metal-insulator transitions. The first part will briefly discuss resistive switching in ultrathin SrTiO3 tunnel junctions in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) geometry. The current-voltage characteristics provide hints of the origin of the resistive switching phenomena in SrTiO3 tunnel barriers, which are also relevant for resistive switching in thicker films. The second part focuses on the control of metal-insulator transitions in RNiO3, where R = trivalent rare earth ion, using different strategies: band-width control and band-filling control. The electrical transport in low-dimensional, strongly correlated LaNiO3 is explored in terms of band-width control by strain and dimensionality. A new concept of band-filling control in nanoscale NdNiO3 thin films by modulation doping is discussed, and the experimental charge injection from high-quality La-doped SrTiO3 into NdNiO3 thin films is experimentally studied. The potential and limitations of a Modulation-doped Mott Field Effect Transistor (MM-FET) for future "Mott" electronic devices is discussed.

  20. Size-dependent nanoscale kirkendall effect during the oxidation of nickel nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Railsback, Justin G; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C; Wang, Junwei; Tracy, Joseph B

    2010-04-27

    The transformation of Ni nanoparticles (NPs) of different sizes (average diameters of 9, 26, and 96 nm) during oxidation to hollow (single void) or porous (multiple voids) NiO through the nanoscale Kirkendall effect was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Samples treated for 1-4 h at 200-500 degrees C show that the structures of the completely oxidized NPs do not depend on the temperature, but oxidation proceeds more quickly at elevated temperatures. For the Ni/NiO system, after formation of an initial NiO shell (of thickness approximately 3 nm), single or multiple voids nucleate on the inner surface of the NiO shell, and the voids grow until conversion to NiO is complete. Differences in the void formation and growth processes cause size-dependent nanostructural evolution: For 9 and 26 nm NPs, a single void forms beneath the NiO shell, and the void grows by moving across the NP while conversion to NiO occurs opposite the site where the void initially formed. Because of the differences in the Ni/NiO volume ratios for the 9 and 26 nm NPs when the void first forms, they have distinct nanostructures: The 9 nm NPs form NiO shells that are nearly radially symmetric, while there is a pronounced asymmetry in the NiO shells for 26 nm NPs. By choosing an intermediate oxidation temperature and varying the reaction time, partially oxidized Ni(core)/NiO(shell) NPs can be synthesized with good control. For 96 nm NPs, multiple voids form and grow, which results in porous NiO NPs. PMID:20361781

  1. Duplex Oxide Formation during Transient Oxidation of Cu-5%Ni(001) Investigated by In situ UHV-TEM and XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.C.; Starr, D.; Kang, Y.; Luo, L.; Tong, X.; Zhou, G.

    2012-05-20

    The transient oxidation stage of a model metal alloy thin film was characterized with in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytic high-resolution TEM. We observed the formations of nanosized NiO and Cu{sub 2}O islands when Cu-5a5%Ni(100) was exposed to oxygen partial pressure, pO{sub 2} = 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr and various temperatures in situ. At 350 C epitaxial Cu{sub 2}O islands formed initially and then NiO islands appeared on the surface of the Cu{sub 2}O island, whereas at 750 C NiO appeared first. XPS and TEM was used to reveal a sequential formation of NiO and then Cu{sub 2}O islands at 550 C. The temperature-dependant oxide selection may be due to an increase of the diffusivity of Ni in Cu with increasing temperature.

  2. Exposure, Health and Ecological Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Oxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels which are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (CeO(2)) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coa...

  3. Effects of nanoscale morphology and defects in oxide: optoelectronic functions of zinc oxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Tadaaki; Duy Dao, Thang; Sugavaneshwar, R. P.; Chen, Kai; Nanda, K. K.

    2016-02-01

    Oxide nanomaterials have been attracting growing interest for both fundamental research and industrial applications ranging from gas sensors, light-emitting devices, to photocatalysts, and solar cells. The optical and electronic properties of oxide nanomaterials are strongly dependent on their surface morphologies as well as defects, such as surface areas, aspect ratios, foreign atom impurities, and oxygen vacancies. In this review, we describe some examples of our recent contributions to the nanomaterials and devices that exhibit remarkable functionalities based on one-dimensional nanostructures of ZnO and their hetero junctions as well as their variants with appropriately incorporated dopants.

  4. Combined flame and solution synthesis of nanoscale tungsten-oxide and zinc/tin-oxide heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhizhong; Huo, Di; Kear, Bernard H; Tse, Stephen D

    2015-12-28

    Heterostructures of tungsten-oxide nanowires decorated with zinc/tin-oxide nanostructures are synthesized via a combined flame and solution synthesis approach. Vertically well-aligned tungsten-oxide nanowires are grown on a tungsten substrate by a flame synthesis method. Here, tetragonal WO(2.9) nanowires (diameters of 20-50 nm, lengths >10 μm, and coverage density of 10(9)-10(10) cm(-2)) are produced by the vapor-solid mechanism at 1720 K. Various kinds of Zn/Sn-oxide nanostructures are grown or deposited on the WO(2.9) nanowires by adjusting the Sn(2+) : Zn(2+) molar ratio in an aqueous ethylenediamine solution at 65 °C. With WO(2.9) nanowires serving as the base structures, sequential growth or deposition on them of hexagonal ZnO nanoplates, Zn(2)SnO(4) nanocubes, and SnO(2) nanoparticles are attained for Sn(2+) : Zn(2+) ratios of 0 : 1, 1 : 10, and 10 : 1, respectively, along with different saturation conditions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the interfaces at the nanoheterojunctions shows abrupt interfaces for ZnO/WO(2.9) and Zn(2)SnO(4)/WO(2.9), despite lattice mismatches of >20%. PMID:26585764

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Thermoelectric Oxides at Macro- and Nano-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Feiyue

    Thermoelectric materials can directly convert a temperature difference into electrical voltage and vice versa. Due to this unique property, thermoelectric materials are widely used in industry and scientific laboratories for temperature sensing and thermal management applications. Waste heat harvesting, another potential application of thermoelectric materials, has long been limited by the low conversion efficiency of the materials. Potential high temperature applications, such as power plant waste heat harvesting and combustion engine exhaust heat recovery, make thermoelectric oxides a very promising class of thermoelectric materials. In this thesis, the synthesis and characterization of thermoelectric oxide materials are explored. In the first part of this thesis, the measurement methodologies and instrumentation processes employed to investigate different thermoelectric properties, such as the Seebeck coefficient and carrier concentration at the bulk scale and the thermal conductivity at the nanoscale, are detailed. Existing scientific and engineering challenges associated with these measurements are also reviewed. To overcome such problems, original parts and methodologies have been designed. Three fully functional systems were ultimately developed for the characterization of macroscale thermoelectric properties as well as localized thermal conductivity. In the second part of the thesis, the synthesis of NaxCo 2O4, a thermoelectric oxide material, is discussed. Modification of both composition and structure were carried out so as to optimize the thermoelectric performance of NaxCo2O4. Nanostructuring methods, such as ball milling, electrospinning, auto-combustion synthesis, and core-shell structure fabrication, have been developed to refine the grain size of NaxCo2O4 in order to reduce its thermal conductivity. However, the structure of the nanostructured materials is very unstable at high temperature and limited improvement on thermoelectric performance is

  6. Fabrication of Nanoscale Oxide Aperture under the Influence of Electron Beam Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M. Y.; Kim, D. W.; Choi, Seong S.

    2004-03-01

    Recently there have been tremendous interests about near field optical lithographic techniques for the next generation gigabyte information storage devices. The near field optical lithographic technique will circumvent the classical diffraction limit and can provide the sub-wavelength size patterns less than 100 nm and the parallel data processing has been examined. Therefore, several parallel processing techniques such as multi-cantilever array and the nano-size aperture array have been previously reported. In this work, the nano-fabrication technique for the sub-wavelength size aperture array is presented. Initially, the (50× 50) dot array was patterned on the SiO2 thermally grown on Si (100) substrate. Each dot has (5× 5) μ m^2 pattern size. The anisotropic TMAH etching of the Si substrate was performed and followed by anisotropic stress-dependent thermal oxidation at 1000 r C and backside Si etching using TMAH solution. The opening of the nano-size aperture on the oxide pyramid array was carried out using water-diluted (50:1) HF solution. The uniformity of the (50× 50) nano-size aperture array was examined carefully on the four corners of the array patterns. The average diameter of the aperture was ˜ 260 nm and its deviation was found to be ˜ 10%. The opening rate of the nano-oxide aperture presented the slightly higher that the expected data. The increased opening rate was attributed to the large amount of electron accumulation during FE-SEM measurements. The increased opening rate can be attributed to the Fermi level shift from electron accumulation on the nanoscale aperture area..

  7. Detection of Strand Cleavage And Oxidation Damage Using Model DNA Molecules Captured in a Nanoscale Pore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercoutere, W.; Solbrig, A.; DeGuzman, V.; Deamer, D.; Akeson, M.

    2003-01-01

    We use a biological nano-scale pore to distinguish among individual DNA hairpins that differ by a single site of oxidation or a nick in the sugar-phosphate backbone. In earlier work we showed that the protein ion channel alpha-hemolysin can be used as a detector to distinguish single-stranded from double-stranded DNA, single base pair and single nucleotide differences. This resolution is in part a result of sensitivity to structural changes that influence the molecular dynamics of nucleotides within DNA. The strand cleavage products we examined here included a 5-base-pair (5-bp) hairpin with a 5-prime five-nucleotide overhang, and a complementary five-nucleotide oligomer. These produced predictable shoulder-spike and rapid near-full blockade signatures, respectively. When combined, strand annealing was monitored in real time. The residual current level dropped to a lower discrete level in the shoulder-spike blockade signatures, and the duration lengthened. However, these blockade signatures had a shorter duration than the unmodified l0bp hairpin. To test the pore sensitivity to nucleotide oxidation, we examined a 9-bp hairpin with a terminal 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG), or a penultimate 8-oxo-dG. Each produced blockade signatures that differed from the otherwise identical control 9bp hairpins. This study showed that DNA structure is modified sufficiently by strand cleavage or oxidation damage at a single site to alter in a predictable manner the ionic current blockade signatures produced. This technique improves the ability to assess damage to DNA, and can provide a simple means to help characterize the risks of radiation exposure. It may also provide a method to test radiation protection.

  8. Layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale interlayer gaps as a stable host for lithium metal anodes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dingchang; Liu, Yayuan; Liang, Zheng; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Sun, Jie; Wang, Haotian; Yan, Kai; Xie, Jin; Cui, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Metallic lithium is a promising anode candidate for future high-energy-density lithium batteries. It is a light-weight material, and has the highest theoretical capacity (3,860 mAh g(-1)) and the lowest electrochemical potential of all candidates. There are, however, at least three major hurdles before lithium metal anodes can become a viable technology: uneven and dendritic lithium deposition, unstable solid electrolyte interphase and almost infinite relative dimension change during cycling. Previous research has tackled the first two issues, but the last is still mostly unsolved. Here we report a composite lithium metal anode that exhibits low dimension variation (∼20%) during cycling and good mechanical flexibility. The anode is composed of 7 wt% 'lithiophilic' layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale gaps that can host metallic lithium. The anode retains up to ∼3,390 mAh g(-1) of capacity, exhibits low overpotential (∼80 mV at 3 mA cm(-2)) and a flat voltage profile in a carbonate electrolyte. A full-cell battery with a LiCoO2 cathode shows good rate capability and flat voltage profiles. PMID:26999479

  9. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (∼1012 inch−2). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on–off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics. PMID:27491392

  10. Nanoscale-alumina induces oxidative stress and accelerates amyloid beta (Aβ) production in ICR female mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Shahid Ali; Yoon, Gwang Ho; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ullah, Faheem; Amin, Faiz Ul; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-09-01

    The adverse effects of nanoscale-alumina (Al2O3-NPs) have been previously demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies, whereas little is known about their mechanism of neurotoxicity. It is the goal of this research to determine the toxic effects of nano-alumina on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and mouse hippocampal HT22 cells in vitro and on ICR female mice in vivo. Nano-alumina displayed toxic effects on SH-SY5Y cell lines in three different concentrations also increased aluminium abundance and induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells. Nano-alumina peripherally administered to ICR female mice for three weeks increased brain aluminium and ROS production, disturbing brain energy homeostasis, and led to the impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory. Most importantly, these nano-particles induced Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology by enhancing the amyloidogenic pathway of Amyloid Beta (Aβ) production, aggregation and implied the progression of neurodegeneration in the cortex and hippocampus of these mice. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that nano-alumina is toxic to both cells and female mice and that prolonged exposure may heighten the chances of developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as AD.

  11. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2016-08-01

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (~1012 inch-2). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on-off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics.

  12. Layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale interlayer gaps as a stable host for lithium metal anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dingchang; Liu, Yayuan; Liang, Zheng; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Sun, Jie; Wang, Haotian; Yan, Kai; Xie, Jin; Cui, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Metallic lithium is a promising anode candidate for future high-energy-density lithium batteries. It is a light-weight material, and has the highest theoretical capacity (3,860 mAh g–1) and the lowest electrochemical potential of all candidates. There are, however, at least three major hurdles before lithium metal anodes can become a viable technology: uneven and dendritic lithium deposition, unstable solid electrolyte interphase and almost infinite relative dimension change during cycling. Previous research has tackled the first two issues, but the last is still mostly unsolved. Here we report a composite lithium metal anode that exhibits low dimension variation (∼20%) during cycling and good mechanical flexibility. The anode is composed of 7 wt% ‘lithiophilic’ layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale gaps that can host metallic lithium. The anode retains up to ∼3,390 mAh g–1 of capacity, exhibits low overpotential (∼80 mV at 3 mA cm–2) and a flat voltage profile in a carbonate electrolyte. A full-cell battery with a LiCoO2 cathode shows good rate capability and flat voltage profiles.

  13. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L

    2016-01-01

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (∼10(12) inch(-2)). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on-off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics. PMID:27491392

  14. Electroless deposition of conformal nanoscale iron oxide on carbon nanoarchitectures for electrochemical charge storage.

    PubMed

    Sassin, Megan B; Mansour, Azzam N; Pettigrew, Katherine A; Rolison, Debra R; Long, Jeffrey W

    2010-08-24

    We describe a simple self-limiting electroless deposition process whereby conformal, nanoscale iron oxide (FeO(x)) coatings are generated at the interior and exterior surfaces of macroscopically thick ( approximately 90 microm) carbon nanofoam paper substrates via redox reaction with aqueous K(2)FeO(4). The resulting FeO(x)-carbon nanofoams are characterized as device-ready electrode structures for aqueous electrochemical capacitors and they demonstrate a 3-to-7 fold increase in charge-storage capacity relative to the native carbon nanofoam when cycled in a mild aqueous electrolyte (2.5 M Li(2)SO(4)), yielding mass-, volume-, and footprint-normalized capacitances of 84 F g(-1), 121 F cm(-3), and 0.85 F cm(-2), respectively, even at modest FeO(x) loadings (27 wt %). The additional charge-storage capacity arises from faradaic pseudocapacitance of the FeO(x) coating, delivering specific capacitance >300 F g(-1) normalized to the content of FeO(x) as FeOOH, as verified by electrochemical measurements and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The additional capacitance is electrochemically addressable within tens of seconds, a time scale of relevance for high-rate electrochemical charge storage. We also demonstrate that the addition of borate to buffer the Li(2)SO(4) electrolyte effectively suppresses the electrochemical dissolution of the FeO(x) coating, resulting in <20% capacitance fade over 1000 consecutive cycles. PMID:20731433

  15. Nanoscale metal oxide and supported metal catalysts for Li-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kan

    The dissertation work focuses on research and development of durable nanoscale catalysts and supports for rechargeable Li-air batteries that use aqueous catholytes. Transition metal oxides, TiO2 and Nb2 O5 in particular, were prepared from a sol-gel process in the form of nanocoatings (5˜50 nm) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and studied as catalyst supports. Carbon doping in the oxides and post annealing significantly increased their electronic conductivity. Pt catalyst on the support with TiO 2 (Pt/c-TiO2/CNTs) showed a much better oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity than a commercial Pt on carbon black (Pt/C). Negligible loss (< 3%) in ORR activity was found in Pt/c-TiO2/CNTs as compared to more than 50% loss in Pt/C, demonstrating a significantly improved durability in the developed catalysts. However, Pt/c-Nb2O5/CNTs was found to be worse in ORR activity and durability, suggesting that c-Nb 2O5/CNTs may not be a good support. CNTs have fibrous shape and would provide a unique porous structure as electrode. Their buckypapers were made and used to support catalysts of Pt and IrO2 in the cathodes of Li-air batteries with sulfuric acid catholyte. At low Pt loading (5 wt.%) without IrO2 on the buckypaper cathode, the Li-air cell achieved a discharging capacity of 306 mAh/g and a specific energy of 1067 Wh/kg at 0.2 mA/cm2. A significant charge overpotential reduction (˜ 0.3 V) was achieved when IrO2 was also used to form a bifunctional catalyst with Pt on the buckypapers. The round trip efficiency was increased from 72% to 81% with the bifunctional cathode, demonstrating a higher energy conversion efficiency.

  16. Probing and tuning the size, morphology, chemistry and structure of nanoscale cerium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana Vnt

    Cerium oxide (ceria)-based materials in the nanoscale regime are of significant fundamental and technological interest. Nanoceria in pure and doped forms has current and potential use in solid oxide fuel cells, catalysis, UV-screening, chemical mechanical planarization, oxygen sensors, and bio-medical applications. The characteristic feature of Ce to switch between the +3 and +4 oxidation states renders oxygen buffering capability to ceria. The ease of this transformation was expected to be enhanced in the nanoceria. In most the practical scenarios, it is necessary to have a stable suspension of ceria nanoparticles (CNPs) over longer periods of time. However, the existing literature is confined to short term studies pertaining to synthesis and property evaluation. Having understood the need for a comprehensive understanding of the CNP suspensions, this dissertation is primarily aimed at understanding the behavior of CNPs in various chemical and physical environments. We have synthesized CNPs in the absence of any surfactants at room temperature and studied the aging characteristics. After gaining some understanding about the behavior of this functional oxide, the synthesis environment and aging temperature were varied, and their affects were carefully analyzed using various materials analysis techniques such as high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). When the CNPs were aged at room temperature in as-synthesized condition, they were observed to spontaneously assemble and evolve as fractal superoctahedral structures. The reasons for this unique polycrystalline morphology were attributed to the symmetry driven assembly of the individual truncated octahedral and octahedral seed of the ceria. HRTEM and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analyses were used to explain the agglomeration behavior and evolution of the octahedral morphology. Some of the observations were supported by

  17. Interpreting nanoscale size-effects in aggregated Fe-oxide suspensions: Reaction of Fe(II) with Goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cwiertny, David M.; Handler, Robert M.; Schaefer, Michael V.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Scherer, Michelle M.

    2008-03-01

    The Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox couple plays an important role in both the subsurface fate and transport of groundwater pollutants and the global cycling of carbon and nitrogen in iron-limited marine environments. Iron oxide particles involved in these redox processes exhibit broad size distributions, and the recent demonstrations of dramatic nanoscale size-effects with various metal oxides has compelled us, as well as many others, to consider whether the rate and extent of Fe(II)/Fe(III) cycling depends upon oxide particle size in natural systems. Here, we investigated the reaction of Fe(II) with three different goethite particle sizes in pH 7.5 suspensions. Acicular goethite rods with primary particle dimensions ranging from 7 by 80 nm to 25 by 670 nm were studied. Similar behavior with respect to Fe(II) sorption, electron transfer and nitrobenzene reduction was observed on a mass-normalized basis despite almost a threefold difference in goethite specific surface areas. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and sedimentation measurements all indicated that, at pH 7.5, significant aggregation occurred with all three sizes of goethite particles. SEM images further revealed that nanoscale particles formed dense aggregates on the order of several microns in diameter. The clear formation of particle aggregates in solution raises questions regarding the use of primary particle surface area as a basis for assessing nanoscale size-effects in iron oxide suspensions at circum-neutral pH values. In our case, normalizing the Fe(II) sorption densities and rate constants for nitrobenzene reduction by BET surface area implies that goethite nanoparticles are less reactive than larger particles. We suspect, however, that aggregation is responsible for this observed size-dependence, and argue that BET values should not be used to assess differences in surface site density or intrinsic surface reactivity in aggregated particle suspensions. In order to

  18. Engineered interfaces and nano-scale thin films for solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.

    Solid state electrolytes with high oxygen ionic conductivity at low temperatures are required to develop cost effective and efficient solid oxide fuel cells. This study investigates the influence of engineered interfaces on the oxygen ionic conductivity of nano-scale multilayer thin film electrolytes. The epitaxial Sm2O3 doped CeO2 (SDC) and Sc2O3 stabilized ZrO2 (ScSZ) are selected as the alternative layers for the proposed multilayer thin film electrolyte based on the optimum structural, chemical, and electrical properties reported in the previous studies. The epitaxial SDC(111)/ScSZ(111) multilayer thin films are grown on high purity Al2O3(0001) substrates by oxygen-plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Prior to the deposition of multilayers, the growth parameters are optimized for epitaxial CeO 2, ZrO2, SDC, and ScSZ thin films. The epitaxial orientation and surface morphology of CeO2 thin films shows dependency on the growth rate. Epitaxial CeO2(111) is obtained at relatively high growth rates (>9 A/min) at a substrate temperature of 650°C and an oxygen partial pressure of 2 x 10 -5 Torr. The same growth parameters are used for the deposition of ZrO2 thin films. ZrO2 exhibits both monoclinic and cubic phases, which is stabilized in the cubic structure by doping with Sc 2O3. The Sm and Sc evaporation rates are varied during the growth to obtain thin films of 15 mol % SmO1.5 doped CeO2 and 20 mol % ScO1.5 stabilized ZrO2, respectively. The SDC/ScSZ multilayer thin films are grown using the same growth parameters by varying the number of layers. The SDC/ScSZ multilayer thin films show significant enhancement in the oxygen ionic conductivity in comparison to single layer SDC and ScSZ thin films. The increase in the oxygen ionic conductivity with the increase in number of layers can be attributed to lattice mismatch induced ionic conductivity along the interfaces. The 8-layer film exhibits the maximum oxygen ionic conductivity with one order of magnitude

  19. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic application of nanoscale metal and metal oxide heterogeneous catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue

    Nanoscale metals or metal oxides with high surface area to volume ratios have been widely used as catalysts for various chemical reactions. A major challenge to utilize metal nanocatalysts commercially is their tendency to sinter under working reaction conditions. To overcome this, much research is being done to anchor metal nanocatalysts on various supports to prevent their agglomeration. Mesoporous silica, SBA-15 is an attractive support material candidate because of its high surface area, stable structure and chemical inertness. Scientists have anchored metal nanocatalysts onto the pore of SBA-15 and observed some improvement in the stability. However, the interactions between the nanocatalysts and SBA-15 are relatively weak and sintering still occurs resulting in a loss of activity. In order to impart enhanced robustness, a new type of stable metal/SBA-15 nanocomposite has been prepared by intercalating metal nanoparticles into the walls of mesoporous silica SBA-15 by a unique synthetic strategy using metal coordinating agents such as bis[3-(triethoxysilyl) propyl]-tetrasulfide (TESPTS). In this dissertation, systemic research on the preparation parameters and extension to other metals will be presented. The structure changes caused by addition of TESPTS to the preparation of mesoporous silica were investigated. The relationship between increasing amounts of TESPTS and the structural change was obtained. Afterwards, a new type of PdMS catalyst with Pd intercalated in the walls of SBA-15 was synthesized for the first time using a modified preparation pathway. These materials were characterized by N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma. The PdMS system was utilized as an active and robust catalyst for Heck reactions. Notably, after the catalytic reaction, the PdMS catalysts maintained its reactivity and size without undergoing any agglomeration due to the stable nanocomposite structure. Carbon

  20. Characterization of Nano-scale Aluminum Oxide Transport Through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, Sasha Norien

    Land application of biosolids has become common practice in the United States as an alternative to industrial fertilizers. Although nutrient rich, biosolids have been found to contain high concentrations of unregulated and/or unrecognized emerging contaminants (e.g., pharmaceuticals, personal care products) while containing a significant fraction of inorganic nano-scale colloidal materials such as oxides of iron, titanium, and aluminum. Given their reactivity and small size, there are many questions concerning the potential migration of these nano-sized colloidal materials through the soil column and into our surface and groundwater bodies. Transport of emerging pollutants of concern through the soil column, at minimum, is impacted by colloidal properties (e.g., chemical composition, shape, aggregation kinetics), solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter), and water flow velocity. The purpose of this current research was to characterize the long-term transport behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al 2O3) through a natural porous media with changes in pH, aqueous-phase concentration, pore-water velocity and electrolyte valence. Additionally, deposition rates during the initial stages of deposition were compared to several models developed based on colloid filtration theory and DLVO stability theory. Benchtop column laboratory experiments showed that, under environmentally relevant groundwater conditions, Al2O3 nanoparticles are mobile through saturated porous media. Mobility increased under conditions in which the nanoparticles and porous media were of like charge (pH 9). Changes in linear pore water velocity, under these same high pH conditions, showed similar transport behavior with little mass retained in the system. Deposition is believed to be kinetically controlled at pH 9, as evidenced by the slightly earlier breakthrough as flow rate increased and was further supported by observed concentration effects on the arrival wave

  1. Bottom-up synthesis of ordered metal/oxide/metal nanodots on substrates for nanoscale resistive switching memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Un-Bin; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-05-01

    The bottom-up approach using self-assembled materials/processes is thought to be a promising solution for next-generation device fabrication, but it is often found to be not feasible for use in real device fabrication. Here, we report a feasible and versatile way to fabricate high-density, nanoscale memory devices by direct bottom-up filling of memory elements. An ordered array of metal/oxide/metal (copper/copper oxide/copper) nanodots was synthesized with a uniform size and thickness defined by self-organized nanotemplate mask by sequential electrochemical deposition (ECD) of each layer. The fabricated memory devices showed bipolar resistive switching behaviors confirmed by conductive atomic force microscopy. This study demonstrates that ECD with bottom-up growth has great potential to fabricate high-density nanoelectronic devices beyond the scaling limit of top-down device fabrication processes.

  2. Bottom-up synthesis of ordered metal/oxide/metal nanodots on substrates for nanoscale resistive switching memory.

    PubMed

    Han, Un-Bin; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The bottom-up approach using self-assembled materials/processes is thought to be a promising solution for next-generation device fabrication, but it is often found to be not feasible for use in real device fabrication. Here, we report a feasible and versatile way to fabricate high-density, nanoscale memory devices by direct bottom-up filling of memory elements. An ordered array of metal/oxide/metal (copper/copper oxide/copper) nanodots was synthesized with a uniform size and thickness defined by self-organized nanotemplate mask by sequential electrochemical deposition (ECD) of each layer. The fabricated memory devices showed bipolar resistive switching behaviors confirmed by conductive atomic force microscopy. This study demonstrates that ECD with bottom-up growth has great potential to fabricate high-density nanoelectronic devices beyond the scaling limit of top-down device fabrication processes. PMID:27157385

  3. A complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible monocantilever 12-point probe for conductivity measurements on the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammelgaard, L.; Bøggild, P.; Wells, J. W.; Handrup, K.; Hofmann, Ph.; Balslev, M. B.; Hansen, J. E.; Petersen, P. R. E.

    2008-09-01

    We present a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, nanoscale 12-point-probe based on TiW electrodes placed on a SiO2 monocantilever. Probes are mass fabricated on Si wafers by a combination of electron beam and UV lithography, realizing TiW electrode tips with a width down to 250nm and a probe pitch of 500nm. In-air four-point measurements have been performed on indium tin oxide, ruthenium, and titanium-tungsten, showing good agreement with values obtained by other four-point probes. In-vacuum four-point resistance measurements have been performed on clean Bi(111) using different probe spacings. The results show the expected behavior for bulk Bi, indicating that the contribution of electronic surface states to the transport properties is very small.

  4. Removal of water contaminants by nanoscale zero-valent iron immobilized in PAN-based oxidized membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyi; Li, Xiang; Ma, Bomou; Qin, Aiwen; He, Chunju

    2014-12-01

    The functionalizing nanoporous polyacrylonitrile-based oxidized membrane (PAN-OM) firmly immobilized with highly reactive nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) are successfully prepared via an innovative in situ synthesis method. Due to the formation of ladder structure, the PAN-OM present excellent thermal and chemical stabilities as a new carrier for the in-situ growth of NZVI via firm chelation and reduction action, respectively, which prevent the aggregation and release of NZVI. The developed NZVI-immobilized membrane present effective decolorizing efficiency to both anionic methyl blue and cationic methylene blue with a pseudo-first-order decay and degrading efficiency to trichloroethylene (TCE). The regeneration and stability results show that NZVI-immobilized membrane system can be regenerated without obvious performance reduction, which remain the reactivity after half a year storage period. These results suggest that PAN-based oxidized membrane immobilized with NZVI exhibit significant potential for environmental applications.

  5. Bottom-up synthesis of ordered metal/oxide/metal nanodots on substrates for nanoscale resistive switching memory

    PubMed Central

    Han, Un-Bin; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The bottom-up approach using self-assembled materials/processes is thought to be a promising solution for next-generation device fabrication, but it is often found to be not feasible for use in real device fabrication. Here, we report a feasible and versatile way to fabricate high-density, nanoscale memory devices by direct bottom-up filling of memory elements. An ordered array of metal/oxide/metal (copper/copper oxide/copper) nanodots was synthesized with a uniform size and thickness defined by self-organized nanotemplate mask by sequential electrochemical deposition (ECD) of each layer. The fabricated memory devices showed bipolar resistive switching behaviors confirmed by conductive atomic force microscopy. This study demonstrates that ECD with bottom-up growth has great potential to fabricate high-density nanoelectronic devices beyond the scaling limit of top-down device fabrication processes. PMID:27157385

  6. Analog memory and spike-timing-dependent plasticity characteristics of a nanoscale titanium oxide bilayer resistive switching device.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyungah; Kim, Insung; Jung, Seungjae; Jo, Minseok; Park, Sangsu; Park, Jubong; Shin, Jungho; Biju, Kuyyadi P; Kong, Jaemin; Lee, Kwanghee; Lee, Byounghun; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2011-06-24

    We demonstrated analog memory, synaptic plasticity, and a spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) function with a nanoscale titanium oxide bilayer resistive switching device with a simple fabrication process and good yield uniformity. We confirmed the multilevel conductance and analog memory characteristics as well as the uniformity and separated states for the accuracy of conductance change. Finally, STDP and a biological triple model were analyzed to demonstrate the potential of titanium oxide bilayer resistive switching device as synapses in neuromorphic devices. By developing a simple resistive switching device that can emulate a synaptic function, the unique characteristics of synapses in the brain, e.g. combined memory and computing in one synapse and adaptation to the outside environment, were successfully demonstrated in a solid state device. PMID:21572200

  7. Structure and properties of a duplex coating combining micro-arc oxidation and baking layer on AZ91D Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xue-Jun; Li, Ming-Tian; Yang, Rui-Song; Yu, Zu-Xiao

    2016-02-01

    A duplex coating (called MAOB coating) was fabricated on AZ91D Mg alloy by combining the process of micro-arc oxidation (MAO) with baking coating (B-coating). The structure, composition, corrosion resistance, and tribological behaviour of the coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), electrochemical and long-term immersion test, and ball-on-disc friction test. The results show that a dense 92 μm thick B-coating was tightly deposited onto the MAO-coated Mg alloy and exhibited a good mechanical interlock along the rough interface. Compared with the MAO-coated sample, the corrosion current density of the MAOB-coated Mg alloy decreased by two or three orders of magnitude and no corrosion phenomenon was observed during a long-term immersion test of about 500 h (severe corrosion pits were found for MAO-treated samples after about 168 h of immersion). The frictional coefficient values of the MAOB coating were similar to those of the MAO coating using dry sliding tests, while the B-coating on the MAO-coated surface significantly improved the wear resistance of the AZ91D Mg alloy. All of these results indicate that a B-coating can be used to further protect Mg alloys from corrosion and wear by providing a thick, dense barrier.

  8. Cobalt oxide hollow microspheres with micro- and nano-scale composite structure: Fabrication and electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Feifei; Gao, Cuiling; Wen, Zhenhai; Wang, Qiang; Li, Jinghong; Xu, Zheng

    2009-05-01

    Co 3O 4 hollow microspheres with micro- and nano-scale composite structure self-assembled by nanosheets were successfully fabricated by the template-free wet-chemical approach. This method is simple, facile and effective. The Co 3O 4 hollow microspheres with good purity and homogeneous size were well characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform IR (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP). The formation mechanism was deeply studied. The micro- and nano-scale composite structure constructed by the porous nanosheets promotes to improve the electrochemical properties of Co 3O 4 hollow microspheres. The high discharge capacity of 1048 mAh g -1 indicates it to be the potential application in electrode materials of Li-ion battery.

  9. Nanoscale current spreading analysis in solution-processed graphene oxide/silver nanowire transparent electrodes via conductive atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph E.; Perumal, Ajay; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Stavrinou, Paul N.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2016-05-01

    We use conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) to study the origin of long-range conductivity in model transparent conductive electrodes composed of networks of reduced graphene oxide (rGOX) and silver nanowires (AgNWs), with nanoscale spatial resolution. Pristine networks of rGOX (1-3 monolayers-thick) and AgNWs exhibit sheet resistances of ˜100-1000 kΩ/□ and 100-900 Ω/□, respectively. When the materials are deposited sequentially to form bilayer rGOX/AgNW electrodes and thermally annealed at 200 °C, the sheet resistance reduces by up to 36% as compared to pristine AgNW networks. CAFM was used to analyze the current spreading in both systems in order to identify the nanoscale phenomena responsible for this effect. For rGOX networks, the low intra-flake conductivity and the inter-flake contact resistance is found to dominate the macroscopic sheet resistance, while for AgNW networks the latter is determined by the density of the inter-AgNW junctions and their associated resistance. In the case of the bilayer rGOX/AgNWs' networks, rGOX flakes are found to form conductive "bridges" between AgNWs. We show that these additional nanoscopic electrical connections are responsible for the enhanced macroscopic conductivity of the bilayer rGOX/AgNW electrodes. Finally, the critical role of thermal annealing on the formation of these nanoscopic connections is discussed.

  10. The Fundamental Role of Nano-Scale Oxide Films in the Oxidation of Hydrogen and the Reduction of Oxygen on Noble Metal Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Digby Macdonald

    2005-04-15

    The derivation of successful fuel cell technologies requires the development of more effective, cheaper, and poison-resistant electrocatalysts for both the anode (H{sub 2} oxidation in the presence of small amounts of CO from the reforming of carbonaceous fuels) and the cathode (reduction of oxygen in the presence of carried-over fuel). The proposed work is tightly focused on one specific aspect of electrocatalysis; the fundamental role(s) played by nanoscale (1-2 nm thick) oxide (''passive'') films that form on the electrocatalyst surfaces above substrate-dependent, critical potentials, on charge transfer reactions, particularly at elevated temperatures (25 C < T < 200 C). Once the role(s) of these films is (are) adequately understood, we will then use this information to specify, at the molecular level, optimal properties of the passive layer for the efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction.

  11. Oxidation of nanoscale zero-valent iron under sufficient and limited dissolved oxygen: Influences on aggregation behaviors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danlie; Hu, Xialin; Wang, Rui; Yin, Daqiang

    2015-03-01

    Oxidations of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) under aerobic (dissolved oxygen≈8mgL(-1)) and anaerobic (dissolved oxygen <3mgL(-1)) conditions were simulated, and their influences on aggregation behaviors of nZVI were investigated. The two oxidation products were noted as HO-nZVI (nZVI oxidized in highly oxygenated water) and LO-nZVI (nZVI oxidized in lowly oxygenated water) respectively. The metallic iron of the oxidized nZVI was almost exhausted (Fe(0)≈8±5%), thus magnetization mainly depended on magnetite content. Since sufficient dissolved oxygen led to the much less magnetite (∼15%) in HO-nZVI than that in LO-nZVI (>90%), HO-nZVI was far less magnetic (Ms=88kAm(-1)) than LO-nZVI (Ms=365kAm(-1)). Consequently, HO-nZVI formed small agglomerates (228±10nm), while LO-nZVI tended to form chain-like aggregations (>1μm) which precipitated rapidly. Based on the EDLVO theory, we suggested that dissolved oxygen level determined aggregation morphologies by controlling the degree of oxidation and the magnitude of magnetization. Then the chain-like alignment of LO-nZVI would promote further aggregation, but the agglomerate morphology of HO-nZVI would eliminate magnetic forces and inhibit the aggregation while HO-nZVI remained magnetic. Our results indicated the fine colloidal stability of HO-nZVI, which might lead to the great mobility in the environment. PMID:25441925

  12. Bioavailability of nanoscale metal oxides TiO(2), CeO(2), and ZnO to fish.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Blair D; Scown, Tessa M; Moger, Julian; Cumberland, Susan A; Baalousha, Mohamed; Linge, Kathryn; van Aerle, Ronny; Jarvis, Kym; Lead, Jamie R; Tyler, Charles R

    2010-02-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are reported to be a potential environmental health hazard. For organisms living in the aquatic environment, there is uncertainty on exposure because of a lack of understanding and data regarding the fate, behavior, and bioavailability of the nanomaterials in the water column. This paper reports on a series of integrative biological and physicochemical studies on the uptake of unmodified commercial nanoscale metal oxides, zinc oxide (ZnO), cerium dioxide (CeO(2)), and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), from the water and diet to determine their potential ecotoxicological impacts on fish as a function of concentration. Particle characterizations were performed and tissue concentrations were measured by a wide range of analytical methods. Definitive uptake from the water column and localization of TiO(2) NPs in gills was demonstrated for the first time by use of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Significant uptake of nanomaterials was found only for cerium in the liver of zebrafish exposed via the water and ionic titanium in the gut of trout exposed via the diet. For the aqueous exposures undertaken, formation of large NP aggregates (up to 3 mum) occurred and it is likely that this resulted in limited bioavailability of the unmodified metal oxide NPs in fish. PMID:20050652

  13. Nanoscale characterization of the electrical properties of oxide electrodes at the organic semiconductor-oxide electrode interface in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Gordon Alex

    This dissertation focuses on characterizing the nanoscale and surface averaged electrical properties of transparent conducting oxide electrodes such as indium tin oxide (ITO) and transparent metal-oxide (MO) electron selective interlayers (ESLs), such as zinc oxide (ZnO), the ability of these materials to rapidly extract photogenerated charges from organic semiconductors (OSCs) used in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, and evaluating their impact on the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of OPV devices. In Chapter 1, we will introduce the fundamental principles, benefits, and the key innovations that have advanced this technology. In Chapter 2 of this dissertation, we demonstrate an innovative application of conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CAFM) to map the nanoscale electrical heterogeneity at the interface between ITO, and a well-studied OSC, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc).(MacDonald et al. (2012) ACS Nano, 6, p. 9623) In this work we collected arrays of current-voltage (J-V) curves, using a CAFM probe as the top contact of CuPc/ITO systems, to map the local J-V responses. By comparing J-V responses to known models for charge transport, we were able to determine if the local rate-limiting-step for charge transport is through the OSC (ohmic) or the CuPc/ITO interface (non-ohmic). Chapter 3 focus on the electrical property characterization of RF-magnetron sputtered ZnO (sp-ZnO) ESL films on ITO substrates. We have shown that the energetic alignment of ESLs and the OSC active materials plays a critical role in determining the PCE of OPV devices and UV light soaking sensitivity. We have used a combination of device testing, modeling, and impedance spectroscopy to characterize the effects that energetic alignment has on the charge carrier transport and distribution within the OPV device. In Chapter 4 we demonstrate that the local properties of sp-ZnO films varies as a function of the underlying ITO crystal face. We show that the local ITO crystal face determines

  14. Characterization of AZ31 magnesium alloy by duplex process combining laser surface melting and plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cancan; Liang, Jun; Zhou, Jiansong; Li, Qingbiao; Wang, Lingqian

    2016-09-01

    Top ceramic coatings were fabricated on the laser surface melting (LSM) modified AZ31 alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in a phosphate electrolyte. The effect of LSM treatment on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of the bare and PEO treated AZ31 alloy was evaluated. Results showed that LSM treatment produced a homogeneous modified layer with redistributed intermetallic compounds, resulting in enhanced corrosion resistance of AZ31 alloy. The LSM treatment had no obvious influence on the surface and cross-sectional microstructures of the PEO coatings on AZ31 alloy. Besides, MgO was the main constituent for PEO coatings, regardless of LSM pretreatment. However, the long-term corrosion properties of the PEO coated AZ31 alloy with LSM pretreatment revealed large enhancement. Based on the analysis of microstructure and corrosion property, the corrosion mechanisms of the PEO and LSM-PEO coated AZ31 alloy were proposed.

  15. Kinetic description of metal nanocrystal oxidation: a combined theoretical and experimental approach for determining morphology and diffusion parameters in hollow nanoparticles by the nanoscale Kirkendall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshiki; Mowbray, Ryan W.; Rice, Katherine P.; Stoykovich, Mark P.

    2014-10-01

    The oxidation of colloidal metal nanocrystals to form hollow shells via the nanoscale Kirkendall effect has been investigated using a combined theoretical and experimental approach. A generalized kinetic model for the formation of hollow nanoparticles describes the phenomenon and, unlike prior models, is applicable to any material system and accounts for the effect of surface energies. Phase diagrams of the ultimate oxidized nanoparticle morphology and the time to achieve complete oxidation are calculated, and are found to depend significantly upon consideration of surface energy effects that destabilize the initial formation of small voids. For the oxidation of Cu nanocrystals to Cu2O nanoparticles, we find that the diffusion coefficients dictate the morphological outcomes: the ratio of ? to ? controls the void size, ? determines the time of oxidation and ? is largely irrelevant in the kinetics of oxidation. The kinetic model was used to fit experimental measurements of 11 nm diameter Cu nanocrystals oxidized in air from which temperature-dependent diffusivities of ? and ? for 100 ≤ T ≤ 200 °C were determined. In contrast to previous interpretations of the nanoscale Kirkendall effect in the Cu/Cu2O system, these results are obtained without any a priori assumptions about the relative magnitudes of ? and ?. The theoretical and experimental approaches presented here are broadly applicable to any nanoparticle system undergoing oxidation, and can be used to precisely control the final nanoparticle morphology for applications in catalysis or optical materials.

  16. Synthesis of hollow cobalt oxide nanopowders by a salt-assisted spray pyrolysis process applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion and their electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyeon Seok; Cho, Jung Sang; Kim, Jong Hwa; Choi, Yun Ju; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-12-21

    A new concept for preparing hollow metal oxide nanopowders by salt-assisted spray pyrolysis applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion is introduced. The composite powders of metal oxide and indecomposable metal salt are prepared by spray pyrolysis. Post-treatment under a reducing atmosphere and subsequent washing using distilled water produce aggregation-free metal nanopowders. The metal nanopowders are then transformed into metal oxide hollow nanopowders by nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion. Co3O4 hollow nanopowders are prepared as first target materials. A cobalt oxide-NaCl composite powder prepared by spray pyrolysis transforms into several Co3O4 hollow nanopowders by several treatment processes. The discharge capacities of the Co3O4 nanopowders with filled and hollow structures at a current density of 1 A g(-1) for the 150th cycle are 605 and 775 mA h g(-1), respectively. The hollow structure formed by nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion improves the lithium-ion storage properties of Co3O4 nanopowders. PMID:26571144

  17. Nanoscale analysis of surface oxides on ZnMgAl hot-dip-coated steel sheets.

    PubMed

    Arndt, M; Duchoslav, J; Itani, H; Hesser, G; Riener, C K; Angeli, G; Preis, K; Stifter, D; Hingerl, K

    2012-05-01

    In this work, the first few nanometres of the surface of ZnMgAl hot-dip-galvanised steel sheets were analysed by scanning Auger electron spectroscopy, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Although the ZnMgAl coating itself is exhibiting a complex micro-structure composed of several different phases, it is shown that the topmost surface is covered by a smooth, homogeneous oxide layer consisting of a mixture of magnesium oxide and aluminium oxide, exhibiting a higher amount of magnesium than aluminium and a total film thickness of 4.5 to 5 nm. Especially by the combined analytical approach of surface-sensitive methods, it is directly demonstrated for the first time that within surface imprints--created by industrial skin rolling of the steel sheet which ensures a smooth surface appearance as well as reduced yield-point phenomenon--the original, smooth oxide layer is partly removed and that a layer of native oxides, exactly corresponding to the chemical structure of the underlying metal phases, is formed. PMID:22086398

  18. Molecular- and Nano-Scale Structure and Reactivity of Biogenic Uranium(IV) Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, E. J.; Bargar, J. R.; Veeramani, H.; Sharp, J. O.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Survova, E.; Giammar, D. E.; Ulrich, K.; Mehta, A.; Webb, S. M.; Conradson, S. D.; Clark, D. L.; Ilton, E. S.

    2008-12-01

    Bioremediation has been proposed and extensively researched as an in-situ immobilization strategy for uranium contamination in the subsurface with nanoparticulate uraninite (UO2) being the commonly reported product. Little detail is known about the structure and reactivity of this material, but based on comparison to its closest abiotic analog, UO2+x (0 < x < 0.25), we expect that it is complex and disordered and capable of structurally incorporating common groundwater cations. In addition, it has been predicted that the nanoparticulate form would induce strain and increase the solubility, and therefore reduce the effectiveness of this method as a remediation technology. In this study, the local-, intermediate- and long-range atomic and nano-scale structure of biogenic UO2 (formed at varying pH and divalent cation concentration, using Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1) was characterized using EXAFS, SR-based powder diffraction and TEM. The lattice parameter of the nanoparticulate phase is seen to be consistent with bulk UO2. There is no evidence for hyperstoichiometry or strain of the UO2 particles, the latter indicating that surface energy is relatively modest. Similar results were obtained for biogenic UO2 particles produced by other metal reducing bacteria indicating that biological variability may play a minimal role in structure. In agreement with the structural analysis, the surface area-normalized dissolution rate of the biogenic UO2 was found to be comparable to that of coarser, synthetic UO2.00. Mn2+ was found to attenuate the particle size of biogenic UO2+xand to be structurally incorporated. This finding suggests that groundwater composition can have a pronounced impact on the structure and properties of biogenic uraninite.

  19. The boron oxide{endash}boric acid system: Nanoscale mechanical and wear properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Unertl, W.N.; Erdemir, A.

    1999-08-01

    The film that forms spontaneously when boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is exposed to humid air is a solid lubricant. This film is usually assumed to be boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), the stable bulk phase. We describe the nanometer-scale surface morphology, mechanical properties, and tribological properties of these films and compare them with crystals precipitated from saturated solutions of boric acid. Scanning force microscopy (SFM) and low-load indentation were the primary experimental tools. Mechanical properties and their variation with depth are reported. In all cases, the surfaces were covered with a layer that has different mechanical properties than the underlying bulk. The films formed on boron oxide showed no evidence of crystalline structure. A thin surface layer was rapidly removed, followed by slower wear of the underlying film. The thickness of this initial layer was sensitive to sample preparation conditions, including humidity. Friction on the worn surface was lower than on the as-formed surface in all cases. In contrast, the SFM tip was unable to cause any wear to the surface film on the precipitated crystals. Indentation pop-in features were common for precipitated crystals but did not occur on the films formed on boron oxide. The surface structures were more complex than assumed in models put forth previously to explain the mechanism of lubricity in the boron oxide{endash}boric acid{endash}water system. {copyright} {ital 1999 Materials Research Society.}

  20. Investigation of the Transition from Local Anodic Oxidation to Electrical Breakdown During Nanoscale Atomic Force Microscopy Electric Lithography of Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Lin, Jun

    2016-04-01

    As one of the tip-based top-down nanoscale machining methods, atomic force microscopy (AFM) electric lithography is capable of directly generating flexible nanostructures on conductive or semi-conductive sample surfaces. In this work, distinct fabrication mechanisms and mechanism transition from local anodic oxidation (LAO) to electrical breakdown (BD) in the AFM nanoscale electric lithography of the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite sample surface was studied. We provide direct evidence of the transition process mechanism through the detected current-voltage (I-V) curve. Characteristics of the fabrication results under the LAO, transition, and BD regions involving the oxide growth rate or material removal rate and AFM probe wear are analyzed in detail. These factors are of great significance for improving the machining controllability and expanding its potential applications. PMID:26847869

  1. Degradation of nano-scale cathodes: a new paradigm for selecting low-temperature solid oxide cell materials.

    PubMed

    Call, Ann V; Railsback, Justin G; Wang, Hongqian; Barnett, Scott A

    2016-05-11

    Oxygen electrodes have been able to meet area specific resistance targets for solid oxide cell operating temperatures as low as ∼500 °C, but their stability over expected device operation times of up to 50 000 h is unknown. Achieving good performance at such temperatures requires mixed ionically and electronically-conducting electrodes with nano-scale structure that makes the electrode susceptible to particle coarsening and, as a result, electrode resistance degradation. Here we describe accelerated life testing of nanostructured Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-Ce0.9Gd0.1O2 electrodes combining impedance spectroscopy and microstructural evaluation. Measured electrochemical performance degradation is accurately fitted using a coarsening model that is then used to predict cell operating conditions where required performance and long-term stability are both achieved. A new electrode material figure of merit based on both performance and stability metrics is proposed. An implication is that cation diffusion, which determines the coarsening rate, must be considered along with oxygen transport kinetics in the selection of optimal electrode materials. PMID:27117343

  2. Synthesis Methods, Microscopy Characterization and Device Integration of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura

    2009-01-01

    A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H2, are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine activation energies for the catalyst-assisted systems. PMID:22408484

  3. Spatially coupled catalytic ignition of CO oxidation on Pt: mesoscopic versus nano-scale

    PubMed Central

    Spiel, C.; Vogel, D.; Schlögl, R.; Rupprechter, G.; Suchorski, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial coupling during catalytic ignition of CO oxidation on μm-sized Pt(hkl) domains of a polycrystalline Pt foil has been studied in situ by PEEM (photoemission electron microscopy) in the 10−5 mbar pressure range. The same reaction has been examined under similar conditions by FIM (field ion microscopy) on nm-sized Pt(hkl) facets of a Pt nanotip. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of the digitized FIM images has been employed to analyze spatiotemporal dynamics of catalytic ignition. The results show the essential role of the sample size and of the morphology of the domain (facet) boundary in the spatial coupling in CO oxidation. PMID:26021411

  4. Experimental study of thermal oxidation of nanoscale alloys of aluminium and zinc (nAlZn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Fahad; Wen, Dongsheng

    2015-10-01

    Aluminium-based alloys have wide applications but little is known about the thermal-chemical kinetics of nanoalloys. This work investigated the thermal oxidation of Zn and Al nanoalloys (nAlZn) with a BET equivalent diameter of 141 nm through the simultaneous TGA/DSC method. The thermal analysis was combined with elemental, morphology and crystalline structure analysis to elucidate the reaction mechanisms. It was found that the complete oxidation of nAlZn in air can be characterised by a three-stage process, including two endothermic and three exothermic reactions. With the help of ex-situ XRD, different reaction pathways were proposed for different stages, forming the end products of ZnO and ZnAl2O4. The reactivity comparison between Al and nAlZn suggested that different criteria should be used for different applications.

  5. Tailoring nanoscale properties of tungsten oxide for inkjet printed electrochromic devices.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Pawel Jerzy; Santos, Lidia; Pereira, Luis; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2015-02-01

    This paper focuses on the engineering procedures governing the synthesis of tungsten oxide nanocrystals and the formulation of printable dispersions for electrochromic applications. By that means, we aim to stress the relevancy of a proper design strategy that results in improved physicochemical properties of nanoparticle loaded inks. In the present study inkjet printable nanostructured tungsten oxide particles were successfully synthesized via hydrothermal processes using pure or acidified aqueous sol-gel precursors. Based on the proposed scheme, the structure and morphology of the nanoparticles were tailored to ensure the desired printability and electrochromic performance. The developed nanomaterials with specified structures effectively improved the electrochemical response of printed films, resulting in 2.5 times higher optical modulation and 2 times faster coloration time when compared with pure amorphous films. PMID:25384683

  6. Tailoring nanoscale properties of tungsten oxide for inkjet printed electrochromic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Pawel Jerzy; Santos, Lidia; Pereira, Luis; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the engineering procedures governing the synthesis of tungsten oxide nanocrystals and the formulation of printable dispersions for electrochromic applications. By that means, we aim to stress the relevancy of a proper design strategy that results in improved physicochemical properties of nanoparticle loaded inks. In the present study inkjet printable nanostructured tungsten oxide particles were successfully synthesized via hydrothermal processes using pure or acidified aqueous sol-gel precursors. Based on the proposed scheme, the structure and morphology of the nanoparticles were tailored to ensure the desired printability and electrochromic performance. The developed nanomaterials with specified structures effectively improved the electrochemical response of printed films, resulting in 2.5 times higher optical modulation and 2 times faster coloration time when compared with pure amorphous films.This paper focuses on the engineering procedures governing the synthesis of tungsten oxide nanocrystals and the formulation of printable dispersions for electrochromic applications. By that means, we aim to stress the relevancy of a proper design strategy that results in improved physicochemical properties of nanoparticle loaded inks. In the present study inkjet printable nanostructured tungsten oxide particles were successfully synthesized via hydrothermal processes using pure or acidified aqueous sol-gel precursors. Based on the proposed scheme, the structure and morphology of the nanoparticles were tailored to ensure the desired printability and electrochromic performance. The developed nanomaterials with specified structures effectively improved the electrochemical response of printed films, resulting in 2.5 times higher optical modulation and 2 times faster coloration time when compared with pure amorphous films. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05765a

  7. A Simple Nanoscale Interface Directs Alignment of a Confluent Cell Layer on Oxide and Polymer Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Patrick E.; Jones, Casey M.; Bandini, Stephen B.; Singh, Shivani; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2013-01-01

    Templating of cell spreading and proliferation is described that yields confluent layers of cells aligned across an entire two-dimensional surface. The template is a reactive, two-component interface that is synthesized in three steps in nanometer thick, micron-scaled patterns on silicon and on several biomaterial polymers. In this method, a volatile zirconium alkoxide complex is first deposited at reduced pressure onto a surface pattern that is prepared by photolithography; the substrate is then heated to thermolyze the organic ligands to form surface-bound zirconium oxide patterns. The thickness of this oxide layer ranges from 10 to 70 nanometers, which is controlled by alkoxide complex deposition time. The oxide layer is treated with 1,4-butanediphosphonic acid to give a monolayer pattern whose composition and spatial conformity to the photolithographic mask are determined spectroscopically. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells attach and spread in alignment with the pattern without constraint by physical means or by arrays of cytophilic and cytophobic molecules. Cell alignment with the pattern is maintained as cells grow to form a confluent monolayer across the entire substrate surface. PMID:23936630

  8. Considerations in Duplex Investment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Arthur; Goen, Tom

    Problems of duplex investment are noted in the introduction to this booklet designed to provide a technique by which the investment decision can be approached, develop estimates of typical costs and returns under differing conditions, and encourage investors to analyze objectives and conditions before the decision to buy or build is made. A…

  9. Duplex tab exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim Jeff (Inventor); Martens, Steven (nmn) (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An exhaust nozzle includes a conical duct terminating in an annular outlet. A row of vortex generating duplex tabs are mounted in the outlet. The tabs have compound radial and circumferential aft inclination inside the outlet for generating streamwise vortices for attenuating exhaust noise while reducing performance loss.

  10. The Duplex Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorr, Alvin L.

    1984-01-01

    The duplex society, in which the poor live in close proximity to others but in a separate compartment, is already with us. Unless something deeply changes about family income, more than one-third of future generations will come to adulthood having spent a portion of their childhood in official poverty. (RM)

  11. Fluctuations and critical phenomena in catalytic CO oxidation on nanoscale Pt facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchorski, Yu.; Beben, J.; Imbihl, R.; James, E. W.; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, J. W.

    2001-04-01

    Local fluctuations and fluctuation-induced transitions in catalytic CO oxidation are studied with field electron microscopy on the (112) facets of a [100]-oriented Pt field emitter tip. The reaction is investigated in the bistable range close to the cusp point (critical point) that terminates the bistability range in pCO, T-parameter space. The amplitude and the spatial coherence of the fluctuations increase on approaching the critical point. The fluctuations are spatially well correlated on each flat (112) facet, but their correlation decays rapidly across stepped regions that terminate the flat facets. On smaller (112) facets, an onset of fluctuation-induced transitions is observed earlier (i.e., further away from the critical point) than for larger (112) facets. The behavior of the reaction system near the cusp point appears to be similar to that of an equilibrium system near the critical point. The observed fluctuations are mimicked in a simple reaction model for CO oxidation on surfaces that incorporates both rapid diffusion of adsorbed CO, and superlattice ordering of adsorbed immobile oxygen. The steady states of the model exhibit a cusp bifurcation, from a regime of bistability to one of monostability. The fluctuations increase near this cusp point, as in experiment. This behavior is analyzed via kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and analytic procedures, focusing on the consequences for fluctuation-induced transitions.

  12. Low-Temperature Selective Growth of Tungsten Oxide Nanowires by Controlled Nanoscale Stress Induction.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyungjoo; Eun, Youngkee; Kim, Min-Ook; Choi, Jungwook; Kim, Jongbaeg

    2015-01-01

    We report a unique approach for the patterned growth of single-crystalline tungsten oxide (WOx) nanowires based on localized stress-induction. Ions implanted into the desired growth area of WOx thin films lead to a local increase in the compressive stress, leading to the growth of nanowire at lower temperatures (600 °C vs. 750-900 °C) than for equivalent non-implanted samples. Nanowires were successfully grown on the microscale patterns using wafer-level ion implantation and on the nanometer scale patterns using a focused ion beam (FIB). Experimental results show that nanowire growth is influenced by a number of factors including the dose of the implanted ions and their atomic radius. The implanted-ion-assisted, stress-induced method proposed here for the patterned growth of WOx nanowires is simpler than alternative approaches and enhances the compatibility of the process by reducing the growth temperature. PMID:26666843

  13. Low-Temperature Selective Growth of Tungsten Oxide Nanowires by Controlled Nanoscale Stress Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyungjoo; Eun, Youngkee; Kim, Min-Ook; Choi, Jungwook; Kim, Jongbaeg

    2015-12-01

    We report a unique approach for the patterned growth of single-crystalline tungsten oxide (WOx) nanowires based on localized stress-induction. Ions implanted into the desired growth area of WOx thin films lead to a local increase in the compressive stress, leading to the growth of nanowire at lower temperatures (600 °C vs. 750-900 °C) than for equivalent non-implanted samples. Nanowires were successfully grown on the microscale patterns using wafer-level ion implantation and on the nanometer scale patterns using a focused ion beam (FIB). Experimental results show that nanowire growth is influenced by a number of factors including the dose of the implanted ions and their atomic radius. The implanted-ion-assisted, stress-induced method proposed here for the patterned growth of WOx nanowires is simpler than alternative approaches and enhances the compatibility of the process by reducing the growth temperature.

  14. Enhancing oxide ion incorporation kinetics by nanoscale Yttria-doped ceria interlayers.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zeng; Prinz, Fritz B

    2011-06-01

    Interlayering 17.5 nm of Yttria-doped ceria (YDC) thin films between bulk yttria-stabilized-zirconia electrolyte and a porous Pt cathode enhanced the performance of low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The added YDC interlayer (14.11% doped Y(2)O(3)) was fabricated by atomic layer deposition and reduced the cathode/electrolyte interfacial resistances while increasing the exchange current density j(0) by a factor of 4 at operating temperatures between 300-500 °C. Tafel plots and the fitted impedance data suggest that the charge transfer coefficient α of interlayered SOFCs was 1.25 times higher, and the electrode/interfacial activation energy was reduced from 0.85 to 0.76 eV. PMID:21563786

  15. Low-Temperature Selective Growth of Tungsten Oxide Nanowires by Controlled Nanoscale Stress Induction

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyungjoo; Eun, Youngkee; Kim, Min-Ook; Choi, Jungwook; Kim, Jongbaeg

    2015-01-01

    We report a unique approach for the patterned growth of single-crystalline tungsten oxide (WOx) nanowires based on localized stress-induction. Ions implanted into the desired growth area of WOx thin films lead to a local increase in the compressive stress, leading to the growth of nanowire at lower temperatures (600 °C vs. 750–900 °C) than for equivalent non-implanted samples. Nanowires were successfully grown on the microscale patterns using wafer-level ion implantation and on the nanometer scale patterns using a focused ion beam (FIB). Experimental results show that nanowire growth is influenced by a number of factors including the dose of the implanted ions and their atomic radius. The implanted-ion-assisted, stress-induced method proposed here for the patterned growth of WOx nanowires is simpler than alternative approaches and enhances the compatibility of the process by reducing the growth temperature. PMID:26666843

  16. Reduction-Triggered Self-Assembly of Nanoscale Molybdenum Oxide Molecular Clusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yin, Panchao; Wu, Bin; Li, Tao; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Hong, Kunlun; Seifert, Soenke; Porcar, Lionel; Do, Changwoo; Keum, Jong Kahk

    2016-07-26

    A 2.9 nm molybdenum oxide cluster {Mo132} (Formula: [MoVI72MoV60O372(CH3COO)30(H2O)72]42-) can be obtained by reducing ammonium molybdate with hydrazine sulfate in weakly acidic CH3COOH/CH3COO- buffers. This reaction has been monitored by time-resolved UV-Vis, 1H-NMR, small angle X-ray/neutron scattering, and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The growth of {Mo132} cluster shows a typical sigmoid curve, suggesting a multi-step assembly mechanism for this reaction. The reaction starts with a lag phase period when partial MoVI centers of molybdate precursors are reduced to form {MoV2(acetate)} structures under the coordination effect of the acetate groups. Once the concentration of {MoV2(acetate)} reaches a critical value,more » it triggers the assembly of MoV and MoVI species into {Mo132} clusters. Parameters such as the type and amount of reducing agent, the pH, the type of cation, and the type of organic ligand in the reaction buffer, have been studied for the roles they play in the formation of the target clusters.Understanding the formation mechanism of giant molecular clusters is essential for rational design and synthesis of cluster-based nanomaterials with required morphologies and functionalities. Here, typical synthetic reactions of a 2.9 nm spherical molybdenum oxide cluster, {Mo132} (formula: [MoVI72MoV60O372(CH3COO)30(H2O)72]42), with systematically varied reaction parameters have been fully explored to determine the morphologies and concentration of products, reduction of metal centers, and chemical environments of the organic ligands. The growth of these clusters shows a typical sigmoid curve, suggesting a general multistep self-assembly mechanism for the formation of giant molecular clusters. The reaction starts with a lag phase period when partial MoVI centers of molybdate precursors are reduced to form {MoV2(acetate)} structures under the coordination effect of the acetate groups. Once the concentration of {MoV2(acetate)} reaches a

  17. Direct Imaging of Nanoscale Conductance Evolution in Ion-Gel-Gated Oxide Transistors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuan; Yuan, Hongtao; Wu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Zhuoyu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Cui, Yi; Hwang, Harold Y; Lai, Keji

    2015-07-01

    Electrostatic modification of functional materials by electrolytic gating has demonstrated a remarkably wide range of density modulation, a condition crucial for developing novel electronic phases in systems ranging from complex oxides to layered chalcogenides. Yet little is known microscopically when carriers are modulated in electrolyte-gated electric double-layer transistors (EDLTs) due to the technical challenge of imaging the buried electrolyte-semiconductor interface. Here, we demonstrate the real-space mapping of the channel conductance in ZnO EDLTs using a cryogenic microwave impedance microscope. A spin-coated ionic gel layer with typical thicknesses below 50 nm allows us to perform high resolution (on the order of 100 nm) subsurface imaging, while maintaining the capability of inducing the metal-insulator transition under a gate bias. The microwave images vividly show the spatial evolution of channel conductance and its local fluctuations through the transition as well as the uneven conductance distribution established by a large source-drain bias. The unique combination of ultrathin ion-gel gating and microwave imaging offers a new opportunity to study the local transport and mesoscopic electronic properties in EDLTs. PMID:26061780

  18. Experimental study of combustion characteristics of nanoscale metal and metal oxide additives in biofuel (ethanol)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the combustion behavior of nano-aluminum (n-Al) and nano-aluminum oxide (n-Al2O3) particles stably suspended in biofuel (ethanol) as a secondary energy carrier was conducted. The heat of combustion (HoC) was studied using a modified static bomb calorimeter system. Combustion element composition and surface morphology were evaluated using a SEM/EDS system. N-Al and n-Al2O3 particles of 50- and 36-nm diameters, respectively, were utilized in this investigation. Combustion experiments were performed with volume fractions of 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10% for n-Al, and 0.5, 1, 3, and 5% for n-Al2O3. The results indicate that the amount of heat released from ethanol combustion increases almost linearly with n-Al concentration. N-Al volume fractions of 1 and 3% did not show enhancement in the average volumetric HoC, but higher volume fractions of 5, 7, and 10% increased the volumetric HoC by 5.82, 8.65, and 15.31%, respectively. N-Al2O3 and heavily passivated n-Al additives did not participate in combustion reactively, and there was no contribution from Al2O3 to the HoC in the tests. A combustion model that utilized Chemical Equilibrium with Applications was conducted as well and was shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:21711760

  19. Nanoscale Mechanics of Graphene and Graphene Oxide in Composites: A Scientific and Technological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Vincenzo; Kinloch, Ian A; Ligi, Simone; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-08-01

    Graphene shows considerable promise in structural composite applications thanks to its unique combination of high tensile strength, Young's modulus and structural flexibility which arise due to its maximal chemical bond strength and minimal atomic thickness. However, the ultimate performance of graphene composites will depend, in addition to the properties of the matrix and interface, on the morphology of the graphene used, including the size and shape of the sheets and the number of chemical defects present. For example, whilst oxidized sp(3) carbon atoms and vacancies in a graphene sheet can degrade its mechanical strength, they can also increase its interaction with other materials such as the polymer matrix of a composite, thus maximizing stress transfer and leading to more efficient mechanical reinforcement. Herein, we present an overview of some recently published work on graphene mechanical properties and discuss a list of challenges that need to be overcome (notwithstanding the strong hype existing on this material) for the development of graphene-based materials into a successful technology. PMID:26960186

  20. Nanoparticle heating: nanoscale to bulk effects of electromagnetically heated iron oxide and gold for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Etheridge, Michael; Bischof, John C.

    2011-03-01

    Biomedical applications of nanoparticle heating range in scale from molecular activation (i.e. molecular beacons, protein denaturation, lipid melting and drug release), cellular heating (i.e. nanophotolysis and membrane permeability control and rupture) to whole tumor heating (deep and superficial). This work will present a review on the heating of two classes of biologically compatible metallic nanoparticles: iron oxide and gold with particular focus on spatial and temporal scales of the heating event. The size range of nanoparticles under discussion will focus predominantly in the 10 - 200 nm diameter size range. Mechanisms of heating range from Néelian and Brownian relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility at 100s of kHz, optical absorption due to VIS and NIR lasers and "Joule" heating at higher frequency RF (13.56 MHz). The heat generation of individual nanoparticles and the thermal responses at nano-, micro-, and macroscales are presented. This review will also discuss how to estimate a specific absorption rate (SAR, W/g) based on individual nanoparticles heating in bulk samples. Experimental setups are designed to measure the SAR and the results are compared with theoretical predictions.

  1. Reduction-Triggered Self-Assembly of Nanoscale Molybdenum Oxide Molecular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Yin, Panchao; Wu, Bin; Li, Tao; Bonnesen, Peter V; Hong, Kunlun; Seifert, Soenke; Porcar, Lionel; Do, Changwoo; Keum, Jong Kahk

    2016-08-24

    Understanding the formation mechanism of giant molecular clusters is essential for rational design and synthesis of cluster-based nanomaterials with required morphologies and functionalities. Here, typical synthetic reactions of a 2.9 nm spherical molybdenum oxide cluster, {Mo132} (formula: [Mo(VI)72Mo(V)60O372(CH3COO)30(H2O)72](42-)), with systematically varied reaction parameters have been fully explored to determine the morphologies and concentration of products, reduction of metal centers, and chemical environments of the organic ligands. The growth of these clusters shows a typical sigmoid curve, suggesting a general multistep self-assembly mechanism for the formation of giant molecular clusters. The reaction starts with a lag phase period when partial Mo(VI) centers of molybdate precursors are reduced to form {Mo(V)2(acetate)} structures under the coordination effect of the acetate groups. Once the concentration of {Mo(V)2(acetate)} reaches a critical value, it triggers the co-assembly of Mo(V) and Mo(VI) species into the giant clusters. PMID:27459601

  2. Measuring Nanoscale Heat Transfer for Gold-(Gallium Oxide)-Gallium Nitride Interfaces as a Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwejkowski, Chester; Sun, Kai; Constantin, Costel; Giri, Ashutosh; Saltonstall, Christopher; Hopkins, Patrick; NanoSynCh Team; Exsite Team

    2014-03-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is considered the most important semiconductor after the discovery of Silicon. Understanding the properties of GaN is imperative in determining the utility and applicability of this class of materials to devices. We present results of time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) measurements as a function of surface root mean square (RMS) roughness. We used commercially available 5mm x 5mm, single-side polished GaN (3-7 μm)/Sapphire (430 μm) substrates that have a Wurtzite crystal structure and are slightly n-type doped. The GaN substrates were annealed in the open atmosphere for 10 minutes (900-1000 °C). This high-temperature treatment produced RMS values from 1-60 nm and growth of gallium oxide (GaO) as measured with an atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy respectively. A gold film (80nm) was deposited on the GaN surface using electron beam physical vapor deposition which was verified using ellipsometry and profilometry. The TDTR measurements suggest that the thermal conductivity decays exponentially with RMS roughness and that there is a minimum value for thermal boundary conductance at a roughness of 15nm.

  3. Simultaneous adsorption and reduction of U(VI) on reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yubing; Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Wang, Xiangke

    2014-09-15

    The reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/rGO) composites were synthesized by chemical deposition method and were characterized by SEM, high resolution TEM, Raman and potentiometric acid-base titrations. The characteristic results showed that the nZVI nanoparticles can be uniformly dispersed on the surface of rGO. The removal of U(VI) on nZVI/rGO composites as a function of contact time, pH and U(VI) initial concentration was investigated by batch technique. The removal kinetics of U(VI) on nZVI and nZVI/rGO were well simulated by a pseudo-first-order kinetic model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, respectively. The presence of rGO on nZVI nanoparticles increased the reaction rate and removal capacity of U(VI) significantly, which was attributed to the chemisorbed OH(-) groups of rGO and the massive enrichment of Fe(2+) on rGO surface by XPS analysis. The XRD analysis revealed that the presence of rGO retarded the transformation of iron corrosion products from magnetite/maghemite to lepidocrocite. According to the fitting of EXAFS spectra, the UC (at ∼2.9Å) and UFe (at ∼3.2Å) shells were observed, indicating the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes on nZVI/rGO composites. Therefore, the nZVI/rGO composites can be suitable as efficient materials for the in-situ remediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater in the environmental pollution management. PMID:25194557

  4. Visualizing Nanoscale Distribution of Corrosion Cells by Open-Loop Electric Potential Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Honbo, Kyoko; Ogata, Shoichiro; Kitagawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Sugimoto, Itto; Shima, Shohei; Fukunaga, Akira; Takatoh, Chikako; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-02-23

    Corrosion is a traditional problem but still one of the most serious problems in industry. To reduce the huge economic loss caused by corrosion, tremendous effort has been made to understand, predict and prevent it. Corrosion phenomena are generally explained by the formation of corrosion cells at a metal-electrolyte interface. However, experimental verification of their nanoscale distribution has been a major challenge owing to the lack of a method able to visualize the local potential distribution in an electrolytic solution. In this study, we have investigated the nanoscale corrosion behavior of Cu fine wires and a duplex stainless steel by in situ imaging of local corrosion cells by open-loop electric potential microscopy (OL-EPM). For both materials, potential images obtained by OL-EPM show nanoscale contrasts, where areas of higher and lower potential correspond to anodic areas (i.e., corrosion sites) and cathodic areas, respectively. This imaging capability allows us to investigate the real-time transition of local corrosion sites even when surface structures show little change. This is particularly useful for investigating reactions under surface oxide layers or highly corrosion-resistant materials as demonstrated here. The proposed technique should be applicable to the study of other redox reactions on a battery electrode or a catalytic material. The results presented here open up such future applications of OL-EPM in nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:26811989

  5. Trap state passivation improved hot-carrier instability by zirconium-doping in hafnium oxide in a nanoscale n-metal-oxide semiconductor-field effect transistors with high-k/metal gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hsi-Wen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Chen, Ching-En; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Lin, Chien-Yu; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Ye, Yi-Han

    2016-04-01

    This work investigates the effect on hot carrier degradation (HCD) of doping zirconium into the hafnium oxide high-k layer in the nanoscale high-k/metal gate n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors. Previous n-metal-oxide semiconductor-field effect transistor studies demonstrated that zirconium-doped hafnium oxide reduces charge trapping and improves positive bias temperature instability. In this work, a clear reduction in HCD is observed with zirconium-doped hafnium oxide because channel hot electron (CHE) trapping in pre-existing high-k bulk defects is the main degradation mechanism. However, this reduced HCD became ineffective at ultra-low temperature, since CHE traps in the deeper bulk defects at ultra-low temperature, while zirconium-doping only passivates shallow bulk defects.

  6. Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of nanoscale yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells with porous substrate.

    PubMed

    Ji, Sanghoon; Cho, Gu Young; Yu, Wonjong; Su, Pei-Chen; Lee, Min Hwan; Cha, Suk Won

    2015-02-11

    Nanoscale yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte film was deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) on a porous anodic aluminum oxide supporting substrate for solid oxide fuel cells. The minimum thickness of PEALD-YSZ electrolyte required for a consistently high open circuit voltage of 1.17 V at 500 °C is 70 nm, which is much thinner than the reported thickness of 180 nm using nonplasmatic ALD and is also the thinnest attainable value reported in the literatures on a porous supporting substrate. By further reducing the electrolyte thickness, the grain size reduction resulted in high surface grain boundary density at the cathode/electrolyte interface. PMID:25625537

  7. Oxidation and flow-injection amperometric determination of 5-hydroxytryptophan at an electrode modified by electrochemically assisted deposition of a sol-gel film with templated nanoscale pores

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, David; Zamponi, Silvia; Berrettoni, Mario; Mehdi, B. Layla; Cox, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The oxidation of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTPP) yielded a passivating polymeric film at an indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. Coating ITO with a nanoscale sol-gel film with a mesoporous structure was shown to change the pathway of the chemical reaction coupled to the electron transfer. The sol-gel film was deposited by an electrochemically assisted process, and the mesoporosity was imparted by including generation-4 poly(amidoamine) dendrimer in the precursor solution. The dendrimer was removed subsequently with an atmospheric oxygen plasma. This electrode remained active during cyclic voltammetry and controlled potential electrolysis of 5-HTPP, which was attributed to dimer, rather than polymer, formation from the oxidation product. Mass spectrometry confirmed this hypothesis. The anodic current was limited by the electron-transfer kinetics. Modification of the sol-gel film by inclusion of cobalt hexacyanoferrate, which catalyzes the oxidation, resulted in a diffusion-limited current. Determination of 5-HTPP by flow-injection amperometry had a detection limit of 17 nM. PMID:20801311

  8. Sustained Oxidative Stress Causes Late Acute Renal Failure via Duplex Regulation on p38 MAPK and Akt Phosphorylation in Severely Burned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiaoqing; Wang, Dexin; Wu, Kaimin; Chen, Hongli; Li, Jia; Lei, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical evidence indicates that late acute renal failure (ARF) predicts high mortality in severely burned patients but the pathophysiology of late ARF remains undefined. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that sustained reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced late ARF in a severely burned rat model and to investigate the signaling mechanisms involved. Materials and Methods Rats were exposed to 100°C bath for 15 s to induce severe burn injury (40% of total body surface area). Renal function, ROS generation, tubular necrosis and apoptosis, and phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt were measured during 72 hours after burn. Results Renal function as assessed by serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen deteriorated significantly at 3 h after burn, alleviated at 6 h but worsened at 48 h and 72 h, indicating a late ARF was induced. Apoptotic cells and cleavage caspase-3 in the kidney went up slowly and turned into significant at 48 h and 72 h. Tubular cell ROS production shot up at 6 h and continuously rose during the 72-h experiment. Scavenging ROS with tempol markedly attenuated tubular apoptosis and renal dysfunction at 72 h after burn. Interestingly, renal p38 MAPK phosphorylation elevated in a time dependent manner whereas Akt phosphorylation increased during the first 24 h but decreased at 48 h after burn. The p38 MAPK specific inhibitor SB203580 alleviated whereas Akt inhibitor exacerbated burn-induced tubular apoptosis and renal dysfunction. Furthermore, tempol treatment exerted a duplex regulation through inhibiting p38 MAPK phosphorylation but further increasing Akt phosphorylation at 72 h postburn. Conclusions These results demonstrate that sustained renal ROS overproduction induces continuous tubular cell apoptosis and thus a late ARF at 72 h after burn in severely burned rats, which may result from ROS-mediated activation of p38 MAPK but a late inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. PMID:23349934

  9. Nanoscale Wicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jijie; Sansom, Elijah; Gharib, Mory; Noca, Flavio

    2003-11-01

    A wick is a bundle of fibers that by capillary attraction draws up to be burned a steady supply of the oil in lamps. In textile research, wicking is the process by which liquids are transported across or along fibers by capillary action (of relevance to perspiration). A similar phenomenon was recently discovered in our lab with mats of nanoscale fibers. A droplet containing a surfactant solution was placed on top of a well-aligned mat of carbon nanotubes: wicking was then observed as a film of liquid propagating within the nanocarpet, such as a stain or drop absorbed into a textile fabric. The nanoscale wicking process in carbon nano-arrays offers a simple and enabling technology for the processing (transport, mixing, filtering) of picoliters of fluids without any need for confinement (nanochannel) or bulky driving pressure apparatus. In this work, nanoscale wicking properties are quantified as a function of surfactant activity and carbon nanoarray geometry. The biomolecular sieving capability of the nanotube arrays is also put to test by the addition of biomolecules, while using the wicking process as the fluid driving force.

  10. Oxidation of nanoscale Au–In alloy particles as a possible route toward stable Au-based catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Eli A.; Tong, Xiao; Jungjohann, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation of bimetallic alloy nanoparticles comprising a noble and a nonnoble metal is expected to cause the formation of a single-component surface oxide of the nonnoble metal, surrounding a core enriched with the noble metal. Studying the room temperature oxidation of Au–In nanoparticles, we show that this simple picture does not apply to an important class of bimetallic alloys, in which the oxidation proceeds via predominant oxygen diffusion. Instead of a crystalline In2O3 shell, such oxidation leads to an amorphous shell of mixed Au–In oxide that remains stable to high temperatures and whose surface layer is enriched with Au. The Au-rich mixed oxide is capable of adsorbing both CO and O2 and converting them to CO2, which desorbs near room temperature. The oxidation of Au–In alloys to a mixed Au–In oxide shows significant promise as a viable approach toward Au-based oxidation catalysts, which do not require any complex synthesis processes and resist deactivation up to at least 300 °C. PMID:23754412

  11. Switch to duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Quik, J.M.A.; Geudeke, M.

    1994-11-01

    Duplex stainless steels contain approximately equal proportions of ferrite and austenite. These stainless steels have become an established material of construction in the chemical process industries (CPI). Duplexes offer benefits over austenitic stainless steels and carbon steels because of their higher strength, and good toughness and ductility, in combination with equivalent resistance to general corrosion, as well as better resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Additionally, duplex materials have thermal-conductivity and thermal-expansion coefficients similar to those of ferritic materials, are tough at low (sub-zero) temperatures, and have a high resistance to erosion and abrasion. In some of the highly corrosive environments encountered in the CPI, the super duplex stainless steels offer cost-effective options not possible with the standard austenitic stainless steels. The initial applications were almost exclusively as heat exchanger tubing in water-cooled service. In recent times, duplex stainless steels have been used in the oil, gas, and chemical industries. Examples include service in sweet and mildly sour corrosive environments, on offshore platforms where weight savings can be realized, and as a replacement for standard austenitic stainless steel in chemical-processing plants.

  12. Electron-electron scattering-induced channel hot electron injection in nanoscale n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors with high-k/metal gate stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Liu, Xi-Wen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Ho, Szu-Han; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Lu, Ching-Sen

    2014-10-06

    This work investigates electron-electron scattering (EES)-induced channel hot electron (CHE) injection in nanoscale n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (n-MOSFETs) with high-k/metal gate stacks. Many groups have proposed new models (i.e., single-particle and multiple-particle process) to well explain the hot carrier degradation in nanoscale devices and all mechanisms focused on Si-H bond dissociation at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. However, for high-k dielectric devices, experiment results show that the channel hot carrier trapping in the pre-existing high-k bulk defects is the main degradation mechanism. Therefore, we propose a model of EES-induced CHE injection to illustrate the trapping-dominant mechanism in nanoscale n-MOSFETs with high-k/metal gate stacks.

  13. Duplex aluminized coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Grisaffe, S. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    The surface of a metallic base system is initially coated with a metallic alloy layer that is ductile and oxidation resistant. An aluminide coating is then applied to the metallic alloy layer. The chemistry of the metallic alloy layer is such that the oxidation resistance of the subsequently aluminized outermost layer is not seriously degraded.

  14. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; Rodriguez-Mendez, M. L.; Sutter, P.

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated with the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.

  15. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; Rodriguez-Mendez, M. L.; Sutter, P.

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated withmore » the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.« less

  16. Na-ion Storage Performances of FeSex and Fe2O3 Hollow Nanoparticles-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Balls prepared by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gi Dae; Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-02-01

    Uniquely structured FeSex-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders, in which hollow FeSex nanoparticles are uniformly distributed throughout the rGO matrix, were prepared by spray pyrolysis applying the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process. Iron oxide-rGO composite powders were transformed into FeSex-rGO composite powders by a two-step post-treatment process. Metallic Fe nanocrystals formed during the first-step post-treatment process were transformed into hollow FeSex nanoparticles during the selenization process. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had mixed crystal structures of FeSe and FeSe2 phases. A rGO content of 33% was estimated from the TG analysis of the FeSex-rGO composite powders. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had superior sodium-ion storage properties compared to those of the Fe2O3-rGO composite powders with similar morphological characteristics. The discharge capacities of the FeSex- and Fe2O3-rGO composite powders for the 200th cycle at a constant current density of 0.3 A g-1 were 434 and 174 mA h g-1, respectively. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had a high discharge capacity of 311 mA h g-1 for the 1000th cycle at a high current density of 1 A g-1.

  17. Performance enhancement of metal nanowire-based transparent electrodes by electrically driven nanoscale nucleation of metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Yu-Jeng; Chiang, Kai-Ming; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2015-07-01

    Solution-processed silver nanowire (AgNW) electrodes have been considered to be promising materials for next-generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. Despite the fact that a single AgNW has extremely high conductivities, the high junction resistance between nanowires limits the performance of the AgNW matrix. Therefore, post-treatments are usually required to approach better NW-NW contact. Herein, we report a novel linking method that uses joule heating to accumulate sol-gel ZnO near nanowire junctions. The nanoscale ZnO nucleation successfully restrained the thermal instability of the AgNW under current injection and acted as an efficient tightening medium to realize good NW-NW contacts. A low process temperature (<50 °C), and thus low energy consumption, are required for ZnO nucleation. This made the use of substrates with very low operating temperatures, such as PET and PEN, feasible. The optimized AgNW transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) fabricated using this promising linking method exhibited a low sheet resistance (13 Ω sq-1), a high transmission (92% at 550 nm), a high figure of merit (FOM; up to σDC/σOp = 340) and can be applied to wide range of next-generation flexible optoelectronic devices.Solution-processed silver nanowire (AgNW) electrodes have been considered to be promising materials for next-generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. Despite the fact that a single AgNW has extremely high conductivities, the high junction resistance between nanowires limits the performance of the AgNW matrix. Therefore, post-treatments are usually required to approach better NW-NW contact. Herein, we report a novel linking method that uses joule heating to accumulate sol-gel ZnO near nanowire junctions. The nanoscale ZnO nucleation successfully restrained the thermal instability of the AgNW under current injection and acted as an efficient tightening medium to realize good NW-NW contacts. A low process temperature (<50 °C), and thus

  18. Nanoscale Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Masselon, Christophe D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Camp, David G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes efforts to develop a liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) technology for ultra-sensitive proteomics studies, i.e. nanoscale proteomics. The approach combines high-efficiency nano-scale LC with advanced MS, including high sensitivity and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS, to perform both single-stage MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) proteomic analyses. The technology developed enables large-scale protein identification from nanogram size proteomic samples and characterization of more abundant proteins from sub-picogram size complex samples. Protein identification in such studies using MS is feasible from <75 zeptomole of a protein, and the average proteome measurement throughput is >200 proteins/h and ~3 h/sample. Higher throughput (>1000 proteins/h) and more sensitive detection limits can be obtained using a “accurate mass and time” tag approach developed at our laboratory. These capabilities lay the foundation for studies from single or limited numbers of cells.

  19. Performance enhancement of metal nanowire-based transparent electrodes by electrically driven nanoscale nucleation of metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Yu-Jeng; Chiang, Kai-Ming; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2015-08-01

    Solution-processed silver nanowire (AgNW) electrodes have been considered to be promising materials for next-generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. Despite the fact that a single AgNW has extremely high conductivities, the high junction resistance between nanowires limits the performance of the AgNW matrix. Therefore, post-treatments are usually required to approach better NW-NW contact. Herein, we report a novel linking method that uses joule heating to accumulate sol-gel ZnO near nanowire junctions. The nanoscale ZnO nucleation successfully restrained the thermal instability of the AgNW under current injection and acted as an efficient tightening medium to realize good NW-NW contacts. A low process temperature (<50 °C), and thus low energy consumption, are required for ZnO nucleation. This made the use of substrates with very low operating temperatures, such as PET and PEN, feasible. The optimized AgNW transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) fabricated using this promising linking method exhibited a low sheet resistance (13 Ω sq(-1)), a high transmission (92% at 550 nm), a high figure of merit (FOM; up to σDC/σOp = 340) and can be applied to wide range of next-generation flexible optoelectronic devices. PMID:26152810

  20. Crystallization, Crystal Orientation and Morphology of Poly(ethylene oxide) under 1D Defect-Free Nanoscale Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Ming-Siao; Zheng, Joseph X.; van Horn, Ryan M.; Quirk, Roderic P.; Thomas, Edwin L.; Lotz, Bernard; Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2009-03-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) defect-free nanoscale confinement is created by growing single crystals of PS-b-PEO block copolymers in dilute solution. Those defect-free, 1-D confined lamellae having different PEO layer thicknesses in PS-b-PEO lamellar single crystals (or crystal mats) were used to study the polymer recrystallization and crystal orientation evolution as a function of recrystallization temperature (Trx) because the Tg^PS is larger than Tm^PEO in the PS-b-PEO single crystal. The results are summarized as follows. First, by the combination of electron diffraction and known PEO crystallography, the crystallization of PEO only takes place at Trx<-5^oC. Meanwhile a unique tilted PEO orientation is formed at Trx >-5^oC after self-seeding. The origin of the formation of tilted chains in the PEO crystal will be addressed. Second, from the analysis of 2D WAXD patterns of crystal mats, it is shown that the change in PEO c-axis orientation from homogeneous at low Trx to homeotropic at higher Trx transitions sharply, within 1^oC. The mechanism inducing this dramatic change in crystal orientation will be investigated in detail.

  1. The effect of size and size distribution on the oxidation kinetics and plasmonics of nanoscale Ag particles.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hua; Alexson, Dimitri; Glembocki, Orest; Prokes, S M

    2010-05-28

    We employed a simple and effective electroless (EL) plating approach to produce silver nanoparticles (NPs) on bare silicon, on dielectric ZnO nanowires (NWs) and on Si NWs, respectively. The surface stability of the homogeneous Ag NPs formed on the ZnO NW surfaces was investigated by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), which show that the attachment of thiol to the Ag surface can slow down the oxidation process, and the SERS signal remains strong for more than ten days. To further examine the Ag NP oxidation process in air, the oxygen content in the silicon nanowire core/Ag sheath composites was monitored by the energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) method. The amount of oxygen in the system increases with time, indicating the silver NPs were continuously oxidized, and it is not clear if saturation is reached in this time period. To investigate the influence of the Ag NPs size distribution on the oxidation process, the oxygen amount in the NPs formed by EL deposition and e-beam (EB) evaporation on a bare silicon surface was compared. Results indicate a faster oxidation process in the EL formed Ag NPs than those produced by EB evaporation. We attribute this observation to the small diameter of the EL produced silver particles, which results in a higher surface energy. PMID:20431201

  2. The effect of size and size distribution on the oxidation kinetics and plasmonics of nanoscale Ag particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Hua; Alexson, Dimitri; Glembocki, Orest; Prokes, S. M.

    2010-05-01

    We employed a simple and effective electroless (EL) plating approach to produce silver nanoparticles (NPs) on bare silicon, on dielectric ZnO nanowires (NWs) and on Si NWs, respectively. The surface stability of the homogeneous Ag NPs formed on the ZnO NW surfaces was investigated by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), which show that the attachment of thiol to the Ag surface can slow down the oxidation process, and the SERS signal remains strong for more than ten days. To further examine the Ag NP oxidation process in air, the oxygen content in the silicon nanowire core/Ag sheath composites was monitored by the energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) method. The amount of oxygen in the system increases with time, indicating the silver NPs were continuously oxidized, and it is not clear if saturation is reached in this time period. To investigate the influence of the Ag NPs size distribution on the oxidation process, the oxygen amount in the NPs formed by EL deposition and e-beam (EB) evaporation on a bare silicon surface was compared. Results indicate a faster oxidation process in the EL formed Ag NPs than those produced by EB evaporation. We attribute this observation to the small diameter of the EL produced silver particles, which results in a higher surface energy.

  3. Nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic systems, thermal near-fields, and phase separation in complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Andrew C.

    Optical spectroscopy represents a powerful characterization technique with the ability to directly interact with the electronic, spin, and lattice excitations in matter. In addition, through implementation of ultrafast techniques, further insight into the real-time dynamics of elementary interactions can be gained. However, the resolution of far-field microscopy techniques is restricted by the diffraction limit setting a spatial resolution limit in the 100s nm to micron range for visible and IR light, respectively. This resolution is too coarse for the characterization of mesoscopic phenomena in condensed matter physics. The development of experimental techniques with nanoscale resolution and sensitivity to optical fields has been a long standing obstacle to the characterization of condensed matter systems on their natural length scales. This dissertation focuses on the fundamental near-field optical properties of surfaces and nanoscale systems as well as the utilization of nano-optical techniques, specifically apertureless scattering-type Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy (s-SNOM), to characterize said optical properties with nanometer scale resolution. First, the s-SNOM characterization of the field enhancement associated with the localized surface plasmon resonances on metallic structures is discussed. With their ability to localize light, plasmonic nano-structures are promising candidate systems to serve as molecular sensors and nano-photonic devices; however, it is well known that particle morphology and the plasmon resonance alone do not uniquely reflect the details of the local field distribution. Here, I demonstrate the use interferometric s-SNOM for imaging of the near-fields associated with plasmonic resonances of crystalline triangular silver nano-prisms in the visible spectral range. I subsequently show the extension of the concept of a localized plasmon into the mid-IR spectral range with the characterization of near-fields of silver nano

  4. Nanoscale 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenders, Ludger; Ducourtieux, Sebastien

    2014-04-01

    The accurate determination of the properties of micro- and nano-structures is essential in research and development. It is also a prerequisite in process control and quality assurance in industry. In most cases, especially at the nanometer range, knowledge of the dimensional properties of structures is the fundamental base, to which further physical properties are linked. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments, suitable measurement procedures as well as calibration artifacts and methods. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the NanoScale 2013 seminar held in Paris, France, on 25 and 26 April. It was the 6th Seminar on NanoScale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 10th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized with the Nanometrology Group of the Technical Committee-Length of EURAMET, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and the Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais. Three satellite meetings related to nanometrology were coupled to the seminar. The first one was an open Symposium on Scanning Probe Microscopy Standardization organized by the ISO/TC 201/SC9 technical committee. The two others were specific meetings focused on two European Metrology Research Projects funded by the European Association of National Metrology Institutes (EURAMET) (see www.euramet.org), the first one focused on the improvement of the traceability for high accuracy devices dealing with sub-nm length measurement and implementing optical interferometers or capacitive sensors (JRP SIB08 subnano), the second one aiming to develop a new metrological traceability for the measurement of the mechanical properties of nano-objects (JRP NEW05 MechProNo). More than 100 experts from industry, calibration laboratories and metrology institutes from around the world joined the NanoScale 2013 Seminar to attend 23 oral and 64 poster

  5. Proton-conducting Micro-solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Improved Cathode Reactions by a Nanoscale Thin Film Gadolinium-doped Ceria Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Shijie; Su, Pei-Chen

    2016-02-01

    An 8 nm-thick gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) layer was inserted as a cathodic interlayer between the nanoscale proton-conducting yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BZY) electrolyte and the porous platinum cathode of a micro-solid oxide fuel cell (μ-SOFC), which has effectively improved the cathode reaction kinetics and rendered high cell power density. The addition of the GDC interlayer significantly reduced the cathodic activation loss and increased the peak power density of the μ-SOFC by 33% at 400 °C. The peak power density reached 445 mW/cm2 at 425 °C, which is the highest among the reported μ-SOFCs using proton-conducting electrolytes. The impressive performance was attributed to the mixed protonic and oxygen ionic conducting properties of the nano-granular GDC, and also to the high densities of grain boundaries and lattice defects in GDC interlayer that favored the oxygen incorporation and transportation during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the water evolution reaction at cathode.

  6. Solar hydrogen generation by nanoscale p-n junction of p-type molybdenum disulfide/n-type nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanke; Li, Jiangtian; Cushing, Scott K; Zhi, Mingjia; Wu, Nianqiang

    2013-07-17

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a promising candidate for solar hydrogen generation but it alone has negligible photocatalytic activity. In this work, 5-20 nm sized p-type MoS2 nanoplatelets are deposited on the n-type nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (n-rGO) nanosheets to form multiple nanoscale p-n junctions in each rGO nanosheet. The p-MoS2/n-rGO heterostructure shows significant photocatalytic activity toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in the wavelength range from the ultraviolet light through the near-infrared light. The photoelectrochemical measurement shows that the p-MoS2/n-rGO junction greatly enhances the charge generation and suppresses the charge recombination, which is responsible for enhancement of solar hydrogen generation. The p-MoS2/n-rGO is an earth-abundant and environmentally benign photocatalyst for solar hydrogen generation. PMID:23808935

  7. Nanoscale Control Over Interfacial Properties in Mixed Reverse Micelles Formulated by Using Sodium 1,4-bis-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate and Tri-n-octyl Phosphine Oxide Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Odella, Emmanuel; Falcone, R Darío; Silber, Juana J; Correa, N Mariano

    2016-08-01

    The interfacial properties of pure reverse micelles (RMs) are a consequence of the magnitude and nature of noncovalent interactions between confined water and the surfactant polar head. Addition of a second surfactant to form mixed RMs is expected to influence these interactions and thus affect these properties at the nanoscale level. Herein, pure and mixed RMs stabilized by sodium 1,4-bis-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate and tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) surfactants in n-heptane were formulated and studied by varying both the water content and the TOPO mole fraction. The microenvironment generated was sensed by following the solvatochromic behavior of the 1-methyl-8-oxyquinolinium betaine probe and (31) P NMR spectroscopy. The results reveal unique properties of mixed RMs and we give experimental evidence that free water can be detected in the polar core of the mixed RMs at very low water content. We anticipate that these findings will have an impact on the use of such media as nanoreactors for many types of chemical reactions, such as enzymatic reactions and nanoparticle synthesis. PMID:27128745

  8. Proton-conducting Micro-solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Improved Cathode Reactions by a Nanoscale Thin Film Gadolinium-doped Ceria Interlayer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Wang, Shijie; Su, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    An 8 nm-thick gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) layer was inserted as a cathodic interlayer between the nanoscale proton-conducting yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BZY) electrolyte and the porous platinum cathode of a micro-solid oxide fuel cell (μ-SOFC), which has effectively improved the cathode reaction kinetics and rendered high cell power density. The addition of the GDC interlayer significantly reduced the cathodic activation loss and increased the peak power density of the μ-SOFC by 33% at 400 °C. The peak power density reached 445 mW/cm2 at 425 °C, which is the highest among the reported μ-SOFCs using proton-conducting electrolytes. The impressive performance was attributed to the mixed protonic and oxygen ionic conducting properties of the nano-granular GDC, and also to the high densities of grain boundaries and lattice defects in GDC interlayer that favored the oxygen incorporation and transportation during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the water evolution reaction at cathode. PMID:26928192

  9. Synthesis Methods, Microscopy Characterization and Device Integration of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H2, are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine an activation energy for the catalyst-assisted systems.

  10. Cavitation erosion of duplex and super duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.T.; Man, H.C.; Cheng, F.T.

    1998-10-05

    Owing to their excellent corrosion resistance, stainless steels are widely used both in the marine, urban water, chemical and food industries. In addition to the corrosive environment, high fluid flow speeds are always encountered for components used in these industries. The cavitation characteristics of S30400 and S31600 austenitic stainless steels and duplex stainless steels were studied in detail by a number of authors. It was generally agreed that S30400 has higher cavitation erosion resistance than that of S31600 due to higher tendency of strain induced martensitic transformation under high impulse of stress. A considerable number of results on stress corrosion cracking characteristics of SDSS and duplex stainless steels have been published but data concerning their cavitation erosion property are extremely rare.

  11. Sodium-ion storage properties of nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/reduced graphene oxide composite powders prepared by a spray drying process and the nanoscale Kirkendall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G. D.; Cho, J. S.; Kang, Y. C.

    2015-10-01

    Spray-drying and the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process are used to prepare nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders with excellent Na-ion storage properties. Metallic Ni nanopowder-decorated rGO powders, formed as intermediate products, are transformed into composite powders of nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/rGO with mixed crystal structures of Ni3S2 and Ni9S8 phases by the sulfidation process under H2S gas. Nickel sulfide/rGO composite powders with the main crystal structure of Ni3S2 are also prepared as comparison samples by the direct sulfidation of nickel acetate-graphene oxide (GO) composite powders obtained by spray-drying. In electrochemical properties, the discharge capacities at the 150th cycle of the nickel sulfide/rGO composite powders prepared by sulfidation of the Ni/rGO composite and nickel acetate/GO composite powders at a current density of 0.3 A g-1 are 449 and 363 mA h g-1, respectively; their capacity retentions, calculated from the tenth cycle, are 100 and 87%. The nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/rGO composite powders possess structural stability over repeated Na-ion insertion and extraction processes, and also show excellent rate performance for Na-ion storage.Spray-drying and the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process are used to prepare nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders with excellent Na-ion storage properties. Metallic Ni nanopowder-decorated rGO powders, formed as intermediate products, are transformed into composite powders of nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/rGO with mixed crystal structures of Ni3S2 and Ni9S8 phases by the sulfidation process under H2S gas. Nickel sulfide/rGO composite powders with the main crystal structure of Ni3S2 are also prepared as comparison samples by the direct sulfidation of nickel acetate-graphene oxide (GO) composite powders obtained by spray-drying. In electrochemical properties, the discharge capacities at the

  12. Orientation-dependent recrystallization in an oxide dispersion strengthened steel after dynamic plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. B.; Tao, N. R.; Mishin, O. V.; Pantleon, W.

    2015-08-01

    The microstructure of the oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel PM2000 has been investigated after compression by dynamic plastic deformation to a strain of 2.1 and after subsequent annealing at 715 °C. Nanoscale lamellae, exhibiting a strong <100> + <111> duplex fibre texture, form during dynamic plastic deformation. Different boundary spacings and different stored energy densities for regions belonging to either of the two fibre texture components result in a quite heterogeneous deformation microstructure. Upon annealing, preferential recovery and preferential nucleation of recrystallization are found in the <111>- oriented lamellae, which had a higher stored energy density in the as-deformed condition. In the course of recrystallization, the initial duplex fibre texture is replaced by a strong <111> fibre recrystallization texture.

  13. Na-ion Storage Performances of FeSex and Fe2O3 Hollow Nanoparticles-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Balls prepared by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion Process

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi Dae; Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-01-01

    Uniquely structured FeSex-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders, in which hollow FeSex nanoparticles are uniformly distributed throughout the rGO matrix, were prepared by spray pyrolysis applying the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process. Iron oxide-rGO composite powders were transformed into FeSex-rGO composite powders by a two-step post-treatment process. Metallic Fe nanocrystals formed during the first-step post-treatment process were transformed into hollow FeSex nanoparticles during the selenization process. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had mixed crystal structures of FeSe and FeSe2 phases. A rGO content of 33% was estimated from the TG analysis of the FeSex-rGO composite powders. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had superior sodium-ion storage properties compared to those of the Fe2O3-rGO composite powders with similar morphological characteristics. The discharge capacities of the FeSex- and Fe2O3-rGO composite powders for the 200th cycle at a constant current density of 0.3 A g−1 were 434 and 174 mA h g−1, respectively. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had a high discharge capacity of 311 mA h g−1 for the 1000th cycle at a high current density of 1 A g−1. PMID:26928312

  14. Applications and experiences with super duplex stainless steel in wet FGD scrubber systems

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, R.; Byrne, G.; Warburton, G.; Hebdon, S.

    1998-12-31

    The paper presents the properties of the author`s company`s proprietary super duplex stainless steel. Work is presented showing the development of a more realistic laboratory solution representing typical limestone slurries found in real flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The importance of additions of metal ions such as Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} as well as partially oxidized sulfur species is demonstrated. Results are presented comparing the crevice corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel in these slurries with other commonly used wrought and cast stainless steels, for both simulated anthracite and lignite type slurries. Data from loop tests on the erosion resistance of a range of alloys in simulated FGD slurries is presented. The results clearly show the superior resistance of super duplex stainless steel to both crevice corrosion and erosion in FGD slurries. Finally the experiences in UK FGD systems with both cast and wrought super duplex stainless steel are presented.

  15. Role of oxidative stress in inactivation of Escherichia coli BW25113 by nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Chaithawiwat, Krittanut; Vangnai, Alisa; McEvoy, John M; Pruess, Birgit; Krajangpan, Sita; Khan, Eakalak

    2016-09-15

    An Escherichia coli BW25113 wildtype strain and mutant strains lacking genes that protect against oxidative stress were examined at different growth phases for susceptibility to zero-valent iron (nZVI). Viability of cells was determined by the plate count method. All mutant strains were more susceptible than the wild type strain to nZVI; however, susceptibility differed among the mutant strains. Consistent with the role of rpoS as a global stress regulator, an rpoS gene knockout mutant exhibited the greatest susceptibility to nZVI under the majority of conditions tested (except exponential and declining phases at longer exposure time). Mutants lacking genes encoding the inducible and constitutively expressed cytosolic superoxide dismutases, sodA and sodB, respectively, were more susceptible to nZVI than a mutant lacking the gene encoding sodC, a periplasmic superoxide dismutase. This suggests that nZVI induces oxidative stress inside the cells via superoxide generation. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to examine the expression of katG, a gene encoding the catalase-peroxidase enzyme, in nZVI-treated E. coli at different growth phases. Results showed that nZVI repressed the expression of katG in all but lag phases. PMID:26953142

  16. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale metrology Nanoscale metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picotto, G. B.; Koenders, L.; Wilkening, G.

    2009-08-01

    Instrumentation and measurement techniques at the nanoscale play a crucial role not only in extending our knowledge of the properties of matter and processes in nanosciences, but also in addressing new measurement needs in process control and quality assurance in industry. Micro- and nanotechnologies are now facing a growing demand for quantitative measurements to support the reliability, safety and competitiveness of products and services. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments and measurement procedures as well as suitable calibration artefacts to ensure the quality of measurements and traceability to standards. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the Nanoscale 2008 seminar held at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), Torino, in September 2008. This was the 4th Seminar on Nanoscale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 8th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized by the Nanometrology Group within EUROMET (The European Collaboration in Measurement Standards), the German Nanotechnology Competence Centre 'Ultraprecise Surface Figuring' (CC-UPOB), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and INRIM. A special event during the seminar was the 'knighting' of Günter Wilkening from PTB, Braunschweig, Germany, as the 1st Knight of Dimensional Nanometrology. Günter Wilkening received the NanoKnight Award for his outstanding work in the field of dimensional nanometrology over the last 20 years. The contributions in this special issue deal with the developments and improvements of instrumentation and measurement methods for scanning force microscopy (SFM), electron and optical microscopy, high-resolution interferometry, calibration of instruments and new standards, new facilities and applications including critical dimension (CD) measurements on small and medium structures and nanoparticle

  17. Probing Ligand Binding to Duplex DNA using KMnO4 Reactions and Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mazzitelli, Carolyn L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    An ESI-MS/MS strategy employing the thymine-selective KMnO4 oxidation reaction to detect conformational changes and ligand binding sites in non-covalent DNA/drug complexes is reported. ESI-MS/MS is used to detect specific mass shifts of the DNA ions that are associated with the oxidation of thymines. This KMnO4 oxidation/ESI-MS/MS approach is an alternative to conventional gel-based oxidation methods and affords excellent sensitivity while eliminating the reliance on radiolabelled DNA. Comparison of single strand versus duplex DNA indicates that the duplexes exhibit a significant resistance to the reaction, thus confirming that the oxidation process is favored for unwound or single strand regions of DNA. DNA complexes containing different drugs including echinomycin, actinomycin-D, ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342 and cis-C1 were subjected to the oxidation reaction. Echinomycin, a ligand with a bisintercalative binding mode, was found to induce the greatest KMnO4 reactivity, while Hoechst 33342, a minor groove binder, caused no increase in the oxidation of DNA. The oxidation of echinomycin/DNA containing duplexes with different sequences and lengths was also assessed. Duplexes with thymines closer to the terminal ends of the duplex demonstrated a greater increase in the degree of oxidation than those with thymines in the middle of the sequence. CAD and IRMPD experiments were used to determine the site of oxidation based on oligonucleotide fragmentation patterns. PMID:17508717

  18. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Roberts, Nicholas A.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributed to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.

  19. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Roberts, Nicholas A.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributedmore » to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.« less

  20. Direct fabrication of thin layer MoS{sub 2} field-effect nanoscale transistors by oxidation scanning probe lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, Francisco M.; Ryu, Yu K.; Garcia, Ricardo; Marinov, Kolyo; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras

    2015-03-09

    Thin layer MoS{sub 2}-based field effect transistors (FET) are emerging candidates to fabricate very fast and sensitive devices. Here, we demonstrate a method to fabricate very narrow transistor channel widths on a single layer MoS{sub 2} flake connected to gold electrodes. Oxidation scanning probe lithography is applied to pattern insulating barriers on the flake. The process narrows the electron path to about 200 nm. The output and transfer characteristics of the fabricated FET show a behavior that is consistent with the minimum channel width of the device. The method relies on the direct and local chemical modification of MoS{sub 2}. The straightforward character and the lack of specific requirements envisage the controlled patterning of sub-100 nm electron channels in MoS{sub 2} FETs.

  1. 60 Years of duplex stainless steel applications

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, J.; Liljas, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the history of wrought duplex stainless steel development and applications is described. Ferritic-austenitic stainless steels were introduced only a few decades after stainless steels were developed. The paper gives details from the first duplex stainless steels in the 1930`s to the super duplex stainless steel development during the 1980`s. During the years much effort has been devoted to production and welding metallurgy as well as corrosion research of the duplex stainless steels. Therefore, duplex stainless steels are to-day established in a wide product range. Numerous important applications are exemplified. In most cases the selection of a duplex steel has been a result of the combination high strength excellent corrosion resistance. In the pulp and paper industry the most interesting use is as vessel material in digesters. For chemical process industry, the duplex steels are currently used in heat exchangers. The largest application of duplex steels exists in the oil and gas/offshore industry. Hundreds of kms of pipelines are installed and are still being installed. An increased use of duplex steels is foreseen in areas where the strength is of prime importance.

  2. Fabrication of long-term stable superoleophobic surface based on copper oxide/cobalt oxide with micro-nanoscale hierarchical roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthwal, Sumit; Lim, Si-Hyung

    2015-02-01

    We have demonstrated a simple and cost-effective technique for the large-area fabrication of a superoleophobic surface using copper as a substrate. The whole process included three simple steps: First, the copper substrate was oxidized under hot alkaline conditions to fabricate flower-like copper oxide microspheres by heating at a particular temperature for an interval of time. Second, the copper-oxide-covered copper substrate was further heated in a solution of cobalt nitrate and ammonium nitrate in the presence of an ammonia solution to fabricate cobalt oxide nanostructures. We applied this second step to increase the surface roughness because it is an important criterion for improved superoleophobicity. Finally, to reduce the surface energy of the fabricated structures, the surfaces were chemically modified with perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane. Contact-angle measurements indicate that the micro-nano binary (MNB) hierarchical structures fabricated on the copper substrate became super-repellent toward a broad range of liquids with surface tension in the range of 21.5-72 mN/m. In an attempt to significantly improve the superoleophobic property of the surface, we also examined and compared the role of nanostructures in MNB hierarchical structures with only micro-fabricated surfaces. The fabricated MNB hierarchical structures also displays thermal stability and excellent long-term stability after exposure in air for more than 9 months. Our method might provide a general route toward the preparation of novel hierarchical films on metal substrates for various industrial applications.

  3. Adsorption and decomposition of organophosphorus compounds on nanoscale metal oxide particle. In situ GC-MS studies of pulsed microreactions over magnesium oxide. (Reannouncement with new availability information). Progress report, 31 December 1991-30 June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.X.; Koper, O.; Atteya, M.; Klabunde, K.J.

    1992-12-31

    Using an in situ reactor GC-MS system, the thermal decomposition of organophosphorus compound (as models of nerve agents) has been compared with their destructive adsorption on high surface area magnesium oxide. Dramatically lower temperatures are required when MgO is present. Volatile products evolved were formic acid, water, alcohols, and alkenes. At higher temperatures CO, CH4, and water predominated. Phosphorus residues remained completed immobilized. Addition of water enhanced the facility of MgO to destroy these compounds, and in fact, water pulses were found to partially regenerate a spent MgO bed. Using 18O labeling some aspects of the reaction mechanisms were clarified and in particular showed that oxygen scrambling occurred. Surface OH and MgO groups transferred oxygen in the formation of formic acid, and surface mobility and reactivity of adsorbed groups was very high. The substantial capacity of high surface area MgO for destruction and immobilization of such toxic substance makes it attractive for air purification schemes as well as solid reagents for destruction and immobilization of bulk quantities of hazardous phosphorus compounds or organohalides. Organophosphorus, ultrafine powder, destructive adsorption, magnesium oxide, immobilization, nanoscale powder.

  4. Characterizing the bending and flexibility induced by bulges in DNA duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, John S.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Romano, Flavio; Louis, Ard A.; Doye, Jonathan P. K.

    2015-04-01

    Advances in DNA nanotechnology have stimulated the search for simple motifs that can be used to control the properties of DNA nanostructures. One such motif, which has been used extensively in structures such as polyhedral cages, two-dimensional arrays, and ribbons, is a bulged duplex, that is, two helical segments that connect at a bulge loop. We use a coarse-grained model of DNA to characterize such bulged duplexes. We find that this motif can adopt structures belonging to two main classes: one where the stacking of the helices at the center of the system is preserved, the geometry is roughly straight, and the bulge is on one side of the duplex and the other where the stacking at the center is broken, thus allowing this junction to act as a hinge and increasing flexibility. Small loops favor states where stacking at the center of the duplex is preserved, with loop bases either flipped out or incorporated into the duplex. Duplexes with longer loops show more of a tendency to unstack at the bulge and adopt an open structure. The unstacking probability, however, is highest for loops of intermediate lengths, when the rigidity of single-stranded DNA is significant and the loop resists compression. The properties of this basic structural motif clearly correlate with the structural behavior of certain nano-scale objects, where the enhanced flexibility associated with larger bulges has been used to tune the self-assembly product as well as the detailed geometry of the resulting nanostructures. We further demonstrate the role of bulges in determining the structure of a "Z-tile," a basic building block for nanostructures.

  5. Nanoscale connectivity in a TiO2/CdSe quantum dots/functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets/Au nanoparticles composite for enhanced photoelectrochemical solar cell performance.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Remya; Deepa, Melepurath; Srivastava, Avanish Kumar

    2012-01-14

    Electron transfer dynamics in a photoactive coating made of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and Au nanoparticles (NPs) tethered to a framework of ionic liquid functionalized graphene oxide (FGO) nanosheets and mesoporous titania (TiO(2)) was studied. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analyses on TiO(2)/CdSe/FGO/Au not only revealed the linker mediated binding of CdSe QDs with TiO(2) but also, surprisingly, revealed a nanoscale connectivity between CdSe QDs, Au NPs and TiO(2) with FGO nanosheets, achieved by a simple solution processing method. Time resolved fluorescence decay experiments coupled with the systematic quenching of CdSe emission by Au NPs or FGO nanosheets or by a combination of the latter two provide concrete evidences favoring the most likely pathway of ultrafast decay of excited CdSe in the composite to be a relay mechanism. A balance between energetics and kinetics of the system is realized by alignment of conduction band edges, whereby, CdSe QDs inject photogenerated electrons into the conduction band of TiO(2), from where, electrons are promptly transferred to FGO nanosheets and then through Au NPs to the current collector. Conductive-atomic force microscopy also provided a direct correlation between the local nanostructure and the enhanced ability of composite to conduct electrons. Point contact I-V measurements and average photoconductivity results demonstrated the current distribution as well as the population of conducting domains to be uniform across the TiO(2)/CdSe/FGO/Au composite, thus validating the higher photocurrent generation. A six-fold enhancement in photocurrent and a 100 mV increment in photovoltage combined with an incident photon to current conversion efficiency of 27%, achieved in the composite, compared to the inferior performance of the TiO(2)/CdSe/Au composite imply that FGO nanosheets and Au NPs work in tandem to promote charge separation and furnish less impeded pathways for electron transfer and transport. Such a

  6. Duplex Direct Data Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenfield, Israel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing and demonstrating communications and network technologies that are helping to enable the near-Earth space Internet. GRC envisions several service categories. The first of these categories is direct data distribution or D3 (pronounced "D-cubed"). Commercially provided D3 will make it possible to download a data set from a spacecraft, like the International Space Station. as easily as one can extract a file from a remote server today, using a file transfer protocol. In a second category, NASA spacecraft will make use of commercial satellite communication (SATCOM) systems. Some of those services will come from purchasing time on unused transponders that cover landmasses. While it is likely there will be gaps in service coverage, Internet services should be available using these systems. This report addresses alternative methods of implementing a full duplex enhancement of the GRC developed experimental Ka-Band Direct Data Distribution (D3) space-to-ground communication link. The resulting duplex version is called the Duplex Direct Data Distribution (D4) system. The D4 system is intended to provide high-data-rate commercial direct or internet-based communications service between the NASA spacecraft in low earth orbit (LEO) and the respective principal investigators associated with these spacecraft. Candidate commercial services were assessed regarding their near-term potential to meet NASA requirements. Candidates included Ka-band and V-band geostationary orbit and non-geostationary orbit satellite relay services and direct downlink ("LEO teleport") services. End-to-end systems concepts were examined and characterized in terms of alternative link layer architectures. Alternatives included a Direct Link, a Relay Link, a Hybrid Link, and a Dual Mode Link. The direct link assessment examined sample ground terminal placements and antenna angle issues. The SATCOM-based alternatives examined existing or proposed commercial

  7. Nanoscale thermal probing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem. PMID:22419968

  8. Effect of Nanosize Yittria and Tungsten Addition to Duplex Stainless Steel During High Energy Planetary Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A. K.; Shashanka, R.; Chaira, D.

    2016-02-01

    In this present investigation, elemental powders of duplex stainless steel composition (Fe-18Cr-13Ni) with 1 wt. % nano yittria and tungsten were milled separately in dual drive planetary mill (DDPM) for 10 h to fabricate yittria dispersed and tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel powders. The milled powder samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the size, morphology and phase evolution during milling. The gradual transformation from ferrite to austenite is evident from XRD spectra during milling. The crystallite size and lattice strain of yittria dispersed duplex stainless steel after 10 h milling were found to be 7 nm and 1.1% respectively. The crystallite size of tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel was 5 nm. It has been observed from SEM analysis that particles size has been reduced from 40 to 5 μm in both cases. Annealing of 10 h milled powder was performed at 750°C for 1 h under argon atmosphere to study phase transformation in both yittria and tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel. The XRD analysis of annealed stainless steel depicts the phase transformation from α-Fe to γ-Fe with the formation of oxides of Y,Fe and Cr. The differential scanning calorimetry analysis was conducted by heating the milled powder from room temperature to 1200°C under argon atmosphere to investigate the thermal analysis of both the stainless steel powders.

  9. In situ TEM Studies of the Initial Oxidation stage of Cu and Cu Alloy Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Judith; Kang, Yihong; Luo, Langli; Ciston, James; Stach, Eric; Zhou, Guangwen

    2012-02-01

    The fundamental understanding of oxidation at the nanoscale is important for the environmental stability of coating materials as well as processing of oxide nanostructures. Our previous studies show the epitaxial growth of Cu2O islands during the initial stages of oxidation of Cu thin films, where surface diffusion and strain impact the oxide development and morphologies. The addition of secondary elements changes the oxidation mechanism. If the secondary element is non-oxidizing, such as Au, it will limit the Cu2O island growth due to the depletion of Cu near the oxide islands. When the secondary element is oxidizing, for example Ni, the alloy will show more complex behaviour, where duplex oxide islands were observed. Nucleation density and growth rate of oxide islands are observed under various temperatures and oxygen partial pressures (pO2) as a function of time by in situ ultra high vacuum (UHV)-transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our initial results of Cu-Ni(001) oxidation is that the oxide epitaxy and morphologies change as function of Ni concentration. For higher spatial resolution, we are examining the atomic scale oxidation by aberration-corrected ETEM with 1å resolution.

  10. Duplex sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Paul E.; Lloyd, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a duplex sampling apparatus. The apparatus is adapted to independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved in the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

  11. Structure sensitivity and nanoscale effects in electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koper, Marc T. M.

    2011-05-01

    This review discusses the role of the detailed nanoscale structure of catalytic surfaces on the activity of various electrocatalytic reactions of importance for fuel cells, hydrogen production, and other environmentally important catalytic reactions, such as carbon monoxide oxidation, methanol and ethanol oxidation, ammonia oxidation, nitric oxide reduction, hydrogen evolution, and oxygen reduction. Specifically, results and insights obtained from surface-science single-crystal-based model experiments are linked to experiments on well-defined shape-controlled nanoparticles. A classification of structure sensitive effects in electrocatalysis is suggested, based both on empirical grounds and on quantum-chemical viz. thermochemical considerations. The mutual relation between the two classification schemes is also discussed. The review underscores the relevance of single-crystal modeling of nanoscale effects in catalysis, and points to the special role of two kinds of active sites for electrocatalysis on nanoparticulate surfaces: (i) steps and defects in (111) terraces or facets, and (ii) long-range (100) terraces or facets.

  12. FACILITY 810, REAR OF DUPLEX SHOWING COURTYARD BETWEEN WINGS, OBLIQUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 810, REAR OF DUPLEX SHOWING COURTYARD BETWEEN WINGS, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING EAST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Duplex Housing Type with Corner Entries, Between Hamilton & Tidball Streets near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  13. Extensional duplex in the Purcell Mountains of southeastern British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Root, K.G. )

    1990-05-01

    An extensional duplex consisting of fault-bounded blocks (horses) located between how-angle normal faults is exposed in Proterozoic strata in the Purcell Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. This is one of the first documented extensional duplexes, and it is geometrically and kinematically analogous to duplexes developed in contractional and strike-slip fault systems. The duplex formed within an extensional fault with a ramp and flat geometry when horses were sliced from the ramp and transported within the fault system.

  14. Multiphase and Double-Layer NiFe2O4@NiO-Hollow-Nanosphere-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Composite Powders Prepared by Spray Pyrolysis Applying Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Park, Gi Dae; Cho, Jung Sang; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-08-01

    Multicomponent metal oxide hollow-nanosphere decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders are prepared by spray pyrolysis with nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion. The double-layer NiFe2O4@NiO-hollow-nanosphere decorated rGO composite powders are prepared using the first target material. The NiFe-alloy-nanopowder decorated rGO powders are prepared as an intermediate product by post-treatment under the reducing atmosphere of the NiFe2O4/NiO-decorated rGO composite powders obtained by spray pyrolysis. The different diffusion rates of Ni (83 pm for Ni(2+)) and Fe (76 pm for Fe(2+), 65 pm for Fe(3+)) cations with different radii during nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion result in multiphase and double-layer NiFe2O4@NiO hollow nanospheres. The mean size of the hollow NiFe2O4@NiO nanospheres decorated uniformly within crumpled rGO is 14 nm. The first discharge capacities of the nanosphere-decorated rGO composite powders with filled NiFe2O4/NiO and hollow NiFe2O4@NiO at a current density of 1 A g(-1) are 1168 and 1319 mA h g(-1), respectively. Their discharge capacities for the 100th cycle are 597 and 951 mA h g(-1), respectively. The discharge capacity of the NiFe2O4@NiO-hollow-nanosphere-decorated rGO composite powders at the high current density of 4 A g(-1) for the 400th cycle is 789 mA h g(-1). PMID:26186601

  15. Performance and properties of nanoscale calcium peroxide for toluene removal.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yajie; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei; Zhang, Weixian; Chen, Jiabin

    2013-04-01

    Due to the large diameter and small surface, the contaminant degradation by conventional calcium peroxide (CaO2) is slow with high dosage required. The aggregation of conventional CaO2 also makes it difficult to operate. Nanoscale CaO2 was therefore synthesized and applied to remove toluene in this study. Prepared from nanoscale Ca(OH)2 and H2O2 in the ratio of 1:7, the finely dispersed nanoscale CaO2 particles were confirmed by the scanning electron microscope to be in the range of 100-200nm in size. Compared to their non nanoscale counterparts, the synthesized nanoscale CaO2 demonstrated a superior performance in the degradation of toluene, which could be eliminated in 3d at pH 6. The oxidation products of toluene were analyzed to include benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde and three cresol isomers. With the addition of 2-propanol, hydroxyl radicals were indicated as the main reactive oxygen species in the oxidation of toluene by nanoscale CaO2. Superoxide radicals were also investigated as the marker of nanoscale CaO2 in the solution. Our study thus provides an important insight into the application of nanoscale CaO2 in the removal of toluene contaminants, which is significant, especially for controlling the petroleum contaminations. PMID:23466092

  16. Bench-scale synthesis of nanoscale materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. F.; Darab, J. G.; Matson, D. W.; Linehan, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    A novel flow-through hydrothermal method used to synthesize nanoscale powders is introduced by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The process, Rapid Thermal Decomposition of precursors in Solution (RTDS), uniquely combines high-pressure and high-temperature conditions to rapidly form nanoscale particles. The RTDS process was initially demonstrated on a laboratory scale and was subsequently scaled up to accommodate production rates attractive to industry. The process is able to produce a wide variety of metal oxides and oxyhydroxides. The powders are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopic methods, surface-area measurements, and x-ray diffraction. Typical crystallite sizes are less than 20 nanometers, with BET surface areas ranging from 100 to 400 sq m/g. A description of the RTDS process is presented along with powder characterization results. In addition, data on the sintering of nanoscale ZrO2 produced by RTDS are included.

  17. Bench-scale synthesis of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, M.F.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.; Linehan, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    A novel flow-through hydrothermal method used to synthesize nanoscale powders is introduced by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The process, Rapid Thermal Decomposition of precursors in Solution (RTDS), combines high-pressure and high-temperature conditions to rapidly form nanoscale particles. The RTDS process was demonstrated on a laboratory scale and scaled up to accommodate production rates attractive to industry. The process is able to produce a wide variety of metal oxides and oxyhydroxides. The powders are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopic methods, surface-area measurements, and x-ray diffraction. Typical crystallite sizes are less than 20 nanometers, with BET surface areas ranging from 100 to 400 m{sup 2}/g. A description of the RTDS process is presented along with powder characterization results. In addition, data on the sintering of nanoscale ZrO{sub 2} produced by RTDS are included.

  18. Measuring secondary phases in duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calliari, I.; Brunelli, K.; Dabalà, M.; Ramous, E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of duplex stainless steels is limited by their susceptibility to the formation of dangerous intermetallic phases resulting in detrimental effects on impact toughness and corrosion resistance. This precipitation and the quantitative determinations of the phases have received considerable attention and different precipitation sequences (σ phase, χ phase, and carbides) have been suggested. This study investigates the phase transformation during continuous cooling and isothermal treatments in commercial duplex stainless steel grades and the effects on alloy properties, and compares the most common techniques of analysis.

  19. Case of herpes zoster duplex bilateralis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Bong Seok; Seo, Hyun Deok; Na, Chan Ho; Choi, Kyu Chul

    2009-02-01

    Non-contiguously simultaneous development of herpes zoster is very rare. It is named either herpes zoster duplex unilateralis or bilaterarlis, depending on whether one or both sides of the body are involved. Herein, we report a 21-year-old man, who had been treated for ulcerative colitis with prednisolone, and presented with painful grouped vesicles of the lower abdomen and back in a relatively symmetrical distribution. A Tzanck smear and punch biopsy were performed on the vesicles of the back. We report a rare case of symmetrical herpes zoster duplex bilateralis. PMID:19284453

  20. Full-duplex optical communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M. (Inventor); Hazzard, David A. (Inventor); Horan, Stephen (Inventor); Payne, Jason A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method of full-duplex electromagnetic communication wherein a pair of data modulation formats are selected for the forward and return data links respectively such that the forward data electro-magnetic beam serves as a carrier for the return data. A method of encoding optical information is used wherein right-hand and left-hand circular polarizations are assigned to optical information to represent binary states. An application for an earth to low earth orbit optical communications system is presented which implements the full-duplex communication and circular polarization keying modulation format.

  1. DIET at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujardin, G.; Boer-Duchemin, E.; Le Moal, E.; Mayne, A. J.; Riedel, D.

    2016-01-01

    We review the long evolution of DIET (Dynamics at surfaces Induced by Electronic Transitions) that began in the 1960s when Menzel, Gomer and Redhead proposed their famous stimulated desorption model. DIET entered the "nanoscale" in the 1990s when researchers at Bell Labs and IBM realized that the Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) could be used as an atomic size source of electrons to electronically excite individual atoms and molecules on surfaces. Resonant and radiant Inelastic Electron Tunneling (IET) using the STM have considerably enlarged the range of applications of DIET. Nowadays, "DIET at the nanoscale" covers a broad range of phenomena at the atomic-scale. This includes molecular dynamics (dissociation, desorption, isomerization, displacement, chemical reactions), vibrational spectroscopy and dynamics, spin spectroscopy and manipulation, luminescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and plasmonics. Future trends of DIET at the nanoscale offer exciting prospects for new methods to control light and matter at the nanoscale.

  2. Simulation of Nanoscale Two-Bit Not-And-type Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon Nonvolatile Memory Devices with a Separated Double-Gate Fin Field Effect Transistor Structure Containing Different Tunneling Oxide Thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Se Woong; Park, Sang Su; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Hyun Woo; Kim, Tae Whan

    2009-06-01

    Not-and (NAND)-type silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices with a separated double-gate (SDG) Fin field effect transistor structure were proposed to reduce the unit cell size of such memory devices and increase their memory density in comparison with that of conventional NVM devices. The proposed memory device consisted of a pair of control gates separated along the length of the Fin channel direction. Each SDG had a different thickness of the tunneling oxide to operate the proposed memory device as a two-bit/cell device. A technology computer-aided design simulation was performed to investigate the program/erase and two-bit characteristics. The simulation results show that the proposed devices can be used to increase the scaling down capability and charge storage density of NAND-type SONOS NVM devices.

  3. Duplex stainless steels for osteosynthesis devices.

    PubMed

    Cigada, A; Rondelli, G; Vicentini, B; Giacomazzi, M; Roos, A

    1989-09-01

    The austenitic stainless steels used today for the manufacture of osteosynthesis devices are sensitive to crevice corrosion. In this study the corrosion properties of some duplex stainless steels were evaluated and compared to traditional austenitic stainless steels. According to our results the following ranking was established: 23Cr-4Ni less than AISI 316L less than ASTM F138 less than 22Cr-5Ni-3Mo less than 27Cr-31Ni-3.5Mo less than 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N. In particular the results showed that the high-performance 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N duplex stainless steel, with high molybdenum and nitrogen contents, can be considered not susceptible to crevice corrosion in the human body. The duplex stainless steels have also better mechanical properties at the same degree of cold working compared with austenitic stainless steels. Hence the 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N duplex stainless steel can be considered a convenient substitute of ASTM F138 for orthopedic and osteosynthesis devices. PMID:2777835

  4. Ultra-short silicon MMI duplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Huaxiang; Huang, Yawen; Wang, Xingjun; Zhou, Zhiping

    2012-11-01

    The fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) systems are growing fast these days, where two different wavelengths are used for upstream and downstream traffic, typically 1310nm and 1490nm. The duplexers are the key elements to separate these wavelengths into different path in central offices (CO) and optical network unit (ONU) in passive optical network (PON). Multimode interference (MMI) has some benefits to be a duplexer including large fabrication tolerance, low-temperature dependence, and low-polarization dependence, but its size is too large to integrate in conventional case. Based on the silicon photonics platform, ultra-short silicon MMI duplexer was demonstrated to separate the 1310nm and 1490nm lights. By studying the theory of self-image phenomena in MMI, the first order images are adopted in order to keep the device short. A cascaded MMI structure was investigated to implement the wavelength splitting, where both the light of 1310nm and 1490nm was input from the same port, and the 1490nm light was coupling cross the first MMI and output at the cross-port in the device while the 1310nm light was coupling through the first and second MMI and output at the bar-port in the device. The experiment was carried on with the SOI wafer of 340nm top silicon. The cascaded MMI was investigated to fold the length of the duplexer as short as 117μm with the extinct ratio over 10dB.

  5. Duplex Design Project: Science Pilot Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing, Los Angeles, CA.

    Work is reported towards the completion of a prototype duplex-design assessment instrument for grade-12 science. The student course-background questionnaire and the pretest section of the two-stage instrument that was developed were administered to all 134 12th-grade students at St. Clairsville High School (Ohio). Based on the information obtained…

  6. Base pairing and structural insights into the 5-formylcytosine in RNA duplex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Luo, Zhipu; He, Kaizhang; Delaney, Michael O.; Chen, Doris; Sheng, Jia

    2016-01-01

    5-Formylcytidine (f5C), a previously discovered natural nucleotide in the mitochondrial tRNA of many species including human, has been recently detected as the oxidative product of 5-methylcytidine (m5C) through 5-hydroxymethylcytidine (hm5C) in total RNA of mammalian cells. The discovery indicated that these cytosine derivatives in RNA might also play important epigenetic roles similar as in DNA, which has been intensively investigated in the past few years. In this paper, we studied the base pairing specificity of f5C in different RNA duplex contexts. We found that the 5-formyl group could increase duplex thermal stability and enhance base pairing specificity. We present three high-resolution crystal structures of an octamer RNA duplex [5′-GUA(f5C)GUAC-3′]2 that have been solved under three crystallization conditions with different buffers and pH values. Our results showed that the 5-formyl group is located in the same plane as the cytosine base and forms an intra-residue hydrogen bond with the amino group in the N4 position. In addition, this modification increases the base stacking between the f5C and the neighboring bases while not causing significant global and local structure perturbations. This work provides insights into the effects of 5-formylcytosine on RNA duplex. PMID:27079978

  7. Base pairing and structural insights into the 5-formylcytosine in RNA duplex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Luo, Zhipu; He, Kaizhang; Delaney, Michael O; Chen, Doris; Sheng, Jia

    2016-06-01

    5-Formylcytidine (f(5)C), a previously discovered natural nucleotide in the mitochondrial tRNA of many species including human, has been recently detected as the oxidative product of 5-methylcytidine (m(5)C) through 5-hydroxymethylcytidine (hm(5)C) in total RNA of mammalian cells. The discovery indicated that these cytosine derivatives in RNA might also play important epigenetic roles similar as in DNA, which has been intensively investigated in the past few years. In this paper, we studied the base pairing specificity of f(5)C in different RNA duplex contexts. We found that the 5-formyl group could increase duplex thermal stability and enhance base pairing specificity. We present three high-resolution crystal structures of an octamer RNA duplex [5'-GUA(f(5)C)GUAC-3']2 that have been solved under three crystallization conditions with different buffers and pH values. Our results showed that the 5-formyl group is located in the same plane as the cytosine base and forms an intra-residue hydrogen bond with the amino group in the N4 position. In addition, this modification increases the base stacking between the f(5)C and the neighboring bases while not causing significant global and local structure perturbations. This work provides insights into the effects of 5-formylcytosine on RNA duplex. PMID:27079978

  8. Sensing at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    The merits of nanostructures in sensing may seem obvious, yet playing these attributes to their maximum advantage can be a work of genius. As fast as sensing technology is improving, expectations are growing, with demands for cheaper devices with higher sensitivities and an ever increasing range of functionalities and compatibilities. At the same time tough scientific challenges like low power operation, noise and low selectivity are keeping researchers busy. This special issue on sensing at the nanoscale with guest editor Christofer Hierold from ETH Zurich features some of the latest developments in sensing research pushing at the limits of current capabilities. Cheap and easy fabrication is a top priority. Among the most popular nanomaterials in sensing are ZnO nanowires and in this issue Dario Zappa and colleagues at Brescia University in Italy simplify an already cheap and efficient synthesis method, demonstrating ZnO nanowire fabrication directly onto silicon substrates [1]. Meanwhile Nicolae Barson and colleagues in Germany point out the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis fabrication in a topical review [2] and, maximizing on existing resources, researchers in Denmark and Taiwan report cantilever sensing using a US20 commercial DVD-ROM optical pickup unit as the readout source [3]. The sensor is designed to detect physiological concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a protein associated with inflammation due to HIV, cancer and other infectious diseases. With their extreme properties carbon nanostructures feature prominently in the issue, including the demonstration of a versatile and flexible carbon nanotube strain sensor [4] and a graphene charge sensor with sensitivities of the order of 1.3 × 10-3 e Hz-1/2 [5]. The issue of patterning for sensing devices is also tackled by researchers in the US who demonstrate a novel approach for multicomponent pattering metal/metal oxide nanoparticles on graphene [6]. Changes in electrical

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  10. Adsorption on ordered and disordered duplex layers of porous anodic alumina.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Lorenzo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Phadungbut, Poomiwat; Do, D D; Nicholson, D; Mayamei, Yashar; Lee, Woo

    2015-05-01

    We have carried out systematic experiments and numerical simulations of the adsorption on porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) duplex layers presenting either an ordered or a disordered interconnecting interface between the large (cavity) and small (constriction) sections of the structured pores. Selective blocking of the pore openings resulted in three different pore topologies: open structured pores, funnel pores, and ink-bottle pores. In the case of the structured pores having an ordered interface, the adsorption isotherms present a rich phenomenology characterized by the presence of two steps in the condensation branch and the opening of one (two) hysteresis loops during evaporation for the ink-bottle (open and funnel) pores. The isotherms can be obtained by summing the isotherms measured on uniform pores having the dimensions of the constrictions or of the cavities. The numerical analysis of the three different pore topologies indicates that the shape of the junction between the two pore sections is only important for the adsorption branch. In particular, a conic junction which resembles that of the AAO pores represents the experimental isotherms for the open and funnel pores better, but the shape of the junction in the ink bottle pores does not matter. The isotherms for the duplex layers with a disordered interface display the same general features found for the ordered duplex layers. In both cases, the adsorption branches coincide and have two steps which are shifted to lower relative pressures compared to those for the ordered duplex. Furthermore, the desorption branches comprise hysteresis loops much wider than those of the ordered duplex layers. Overall, this study highlights the important role played by morphologies where there are interconnections between large and small pores. PMID:25871845

  11. Symptomatic “H” Type Duplex Gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Radha Govind; Srinivasa Reddy, Thallu Venkata; Swamy Balachandar, Tirupporur Govinda; Palaniswamy, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Gallbladder duplication with an incidence at autopsy of about 1 in 4000 is important in clinical practice, because it may cause some clinical, surgical, and diagnostic problems. Preoperative identification of this rare anomaly avoids biliary injuries and the other consequences of missed diagnosis. In this report, we present a case of ductular type duplex gallbladder diagnosed preoperatively by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and ultrasound and managed successfully by laparoscopy. PMID:21605535

  12. A Duplex Stainless Steel for Chloride Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, N.; Kolts, J.; Flasche, L. H.

    1985-03-01

    This paper examines the effects of microstructural changes on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue resistance of a duplex stainless steel to chloride environments. The microstructural changes can be precipitation of phases such as sigma and carbides, or changes in the distribution of austenite and ferrite. The former can be important in hot forming operations while the latter is important in welding. The methods of minimizing these deleterious effects can sometimes be different from those used for austenitic stainless steel.

  13. Nanoscale science and engineering forum (706c) design of solid lipid particles with iron oxide quantum dots for the delivery of therapeutic agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid lipid particles provide a method to encapsulate and control the release of drugs in vivo but lack the imaging capability provided by CdS quantum dots. This shortcoming was addressed by combining these two technologies into a model system that uses iron oxide as a non-toxic imaging component in...

  14. Electron Beam Welding of Duplex Steels with using Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Ladislav; Vrtochová, Tatiana; Ulrich, Koloman

    2010-01-01

    This contribution presents characteristics, metallurgy and weldability of duplex steels with using concentrated energy source. The first part of the article describes metallurgy of duplex steels and the influence of nitrogen on their solidification. The second part focuses on weldability of duplex steels with using electron beam aimed on acceptable structure and corrosion resistance performed by multiple runs of defocused beam over the penetration weld.

  15. The influence of MoO{sub x} gap states on hole injection from aluminum doped zinc oxide with nanoscale MoO{sub x} surface layer anodes for organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Jitendra Kumar; Santos-Ortiz, Reinaldo; Du, Jincheng; Shepherd, Nigel D.

    2015-08-14

    The effective workfunction of Al doped ZnO films (AZO) increased from 4.1 eV to 5.55 eV after surface modification with nanoscale molybdenum sub-oxides (MoO{sub x}). Hole only devices with anodes consisting of 3 nm of MoO{sub x} on AZO exhibited a lower turn-on voltage (1.5 vs 1.8 V), and larger charge injection (190 vs 118 mA/cm{sup 2}) at the reference voltage, compared to indium tin oxide (ITO). AZO devices with 10 nm of MoO{sub x} exhibited the highest workfunction but performed poorly compared to devices with 3 nm of MoO{sub x}, or standard ITO. Ultraviolet photoelectron, X-ray photoelectron, and optical spectroscopies indicate that the 3 nm MoO{sub x} films are more reduced and farther away from MoO{sub 3} stoichiometry than their 10 nm equivalents. The vacancies associated with non-stoichiometry result in donor-like gap states which we assign to partially occupied Mo 4d levels. We propose that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling from these levels is responsible for the reduction in threshold voltage measured in devices with 3 nm of MoO{sub x}. A schematic band diagram is proposed. The thicker MoO{sub x} layers are more stoichiometric and resistive, and the voltage drop across these layers dominates their electrical performance, leading to an increase in threshold voltage. The results indicate that AZO with MoO{sub x} layers of optimal thickness may be potential candidates for anode use in organic light emitting diodes.

  16. Na-ion Storage Performances of FeSe(x) and Fe2O3 Hollow Nanoparticles-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Balls prepared by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion Process.

    PubMed

    Park, Gi Dae; Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-01-01

    Uniquely structured FeSe(x)-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders, in which hollow FeSe(x) nanoparticles are uniformly distributed throughout the rGO matrix, were prepared by spray pyrolysis applying the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process. Iron oxide-rGO composite powders were transformed into FeSe(x)-rGO composite powders by a two-step post-treatment process. Metallic Fe nanocrystals formed during the first-step post-treatment process were transformed into hollow FeSe(x) nanoparticles during the selenization process. The FeSe(x)-rGO composite powders had mixed crystal structures of FeSe and FeSe2 phases. A rGO content of 33% was estimated from the TG analysis of the FeSe(x)-rGO composite powders. The FeSe(x)-rGO composite powders had superior sodium-ion storage properties compared to those of the Fe2O3-rGO composite powders with similar morphological characteristics. The discharge capacities of the FeSe(x)- and Fe2O3-rGO composite powders for the 200(th) cycle at a constant current density of 0.3 A g(-1) were 434 and 174 mA h g(-1), respectively. The FeSe(x)-rGO composite powders had a high discharge capacity of 311 mA h g(-1) for the 1000(th) cycle at a high current density of 1 A g(-1). PMID:26928312

  17. The influence of MoOx gap states on hole injection from aluminum doped zinc oxide with nanoscale MoOx surface layer anodes for organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Jitendra Kumar; Santos-Ortiz, Reinaldo; Du, Jincheng; Shepherd, Nigel D.

    2015-08-01

    The effective workfunction of Al doped ZnO films (AZO) increased from 4.1 eV to 5.55 eV after surface modification with nanoscale molybdenum sub-oxides (MoOx). Hole only devices with anodes consisting of 3 nm of MoOx on AZO exhibited a lower turn-on voltage (1.5 vs 1.8 V), and larger charge injection (190 vs 118 mA/cm2) at the reference voltage, compared to indium tin oxide (ITO). AZO devices with 10 nm of MoOx exhibited the highest workfunction but performed poorly compared to devices with 3 nm of MoOx, or standard ITO. Ultraviolet photoelectron, X-ray photoelectron, and optical spectroscopies indicate that the 3 nm MoOx films are more reduced and farther away from MoO3 stoichiometry than their 10 nm equivalents. The vacancies associated with non-stoichiometry result in donor-like gap states which we assign to partially occupied Mo 4d levels. We propose that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling from these levels is responsible for the reduction in threshold voltage measured in devices with 3 nm of MoOx. A schematic band diagram is proposed. The thicker MoOx layers are more stoichiometric and resistive, and the voltage drop across these layers dominates their electrical performance, leading to an increase in threshold voltage. The results indicate that AZO with MoOx layers of optimal thickness may be potential candidates for anode use in organic light emitting diodes.

  18. Excess electron trapping in duplex DNA: long range transfer via stacked adenines.

    PubMed

    Black, Paul J; Bernhard, William A

    2012-11-01

    An understanding of charge transfer (CT) in DNA lies at the root of assessing the risks and benefits of exposure to ionizing radiation. Energy deposition by high-energy photons and fast-charged particles creates holes and excess electrons (EEs) in DNA, and the subsequent reactions determine the complexity of DNA damage and ultimately the risk of disease. Further interest in CT comes from the possibility that hole transfer, excess electron transfer (EET), or both in DNA might be used to develop nanoscale circuits. To study EET in DNA, EPR spectroscopy was used to determine the distribution of EE trapping by oligodeoxynucleotides irradiated and observed at 4 K. Our results indicate that stretches of consecutive adenine bases on the same strand serve as an ideal conduit for intrastrand EET in duplex DNA at 4 K. Specifically, we show that A is an efficient trap for EE at 4 K if, and only if, the A strand of the duplex does not contain one of the other three bases. If there is a T, C, or G on the A strand, then trapping occurs at T or C instead of A. This holds true for stretches up to 32 A's. Whereas T competes effectively against A for the EE, it does not compete effectively against C. Long stretches of T pass the majority of EE to C. Our results show that AT stretches channel EE to cytosine, an end point with significance to both radiation damage and the photochemical repair of pyrimidine dimers. PMID:23067129

  19. Nano-scale investigation of the association of microbial nitrogen residues with iron (hydr)oxides in a forest soil O-horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Bougoure, Jeremy J.; Zeglin, Lydia H.; Myrold, David D.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus; Nico, Peter S.

    2012-10-01

    Amino sugars in fungal cell walls (such as chitin) represent an important source of nitrogen (N) in many forest soil ecosystems. Despite the importance of this material in soil nitrogen cycling, comparatively little is known about abiotic and biotic controls on and the timescale of its turnover. Part of the reason for this lack of information is the inaccessibility of these materials to classic bulk extraction methods. To address this issue, we used advanced visualization tools to examine transformation pathways of chitin-rich fungal cell wall residues as they interact with microorganisms, soil organic matter and mineral surfaces. Our goal was to document initial micro-scale dynamics of the incorporation of 13C- and 15N-labeled chitin into fungi-dominated microenvironments in O-horizons of old-growth forest soils. At the end of a 3-week incubation experiment, high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging of hyphae-associated soil microstructures revealed a preferential association of 15N with Fe-rich particles. Synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) of the same samples showed that thin organic coatings on these soil microstructures are enriched in aliphatic C and amide N on Fe (hydr)oxides, suggesting a concentration of microbial lipids and proteins on these surfaces. A possible explanation for the results of our micro-scale investigation of chemical and spatial patterns is that amide N from chitinous fungal cell walls was assimilated by hyphae-associated bacteria, resynthesized into proteinaceous amide N, and subsequently concentrated onto Fe (hydr)oxide surfaces. If confirmed in other soil ecosystems, such rapid association of microbial N with hydroxylated Fe oxide surfaces may have important implications for mechanistic models of microbial cycling of C and N.

  20. Sensing at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    The merits of nanostructures in sensing may seem obvious, yet playing these attributes to their maximum advantage can be a work of genius. As fast as sensing technology is improving, expectations are growing, with demands for cheaper devices with higher sensitivities and an ever increasing range of functionalities and compatibilities. At the same time tough scientific challenges like low power operation, noise and low selectivity are keeping researchers busy. This special issue on sensing at the nanoscale with guest editor Christofer Hierold from ETH Zurich features some of the latest developments in sensing research pushing at the limits of current capabilities. Cheap and easy fabrication is a top priority. Among the most popular nanomaterials in sensing are ZnO nanowires and in this issue Dario Zappa and colleagues at Brescia University in Italy simplify an already cheap and efficient synthesis method, demonstrating ZnO nanowire fabrication directly onto silicon substrates [1]. Meanwhile Nicolae Barson and colleagues in Germany point out the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis fabrication in a topical review [2] and, maximizing on existing resources, researchers in Denmark and Taiwan report cantilever sensing using a US20 commercial DVD-ROM optical pickup unit as the readout source [3]. The sensor is designed to detect physiological concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a protein associated with inflammation due to HIV, cancer and other infectious diseases. With their extreme properties carbon nanostructures feature prominently in the issue, including the demonstration of a versatile and flexible carbon nanotube strain sensor [4] and a graphene charge sensor with sensitivities of the order of 1.3 × 10-3 e Hz-1/2 [5]. The issue of patterning for sensing devices is also tackled by researchers in the US who demonstrate a novel approach for multicomponent pattering metal/metal oxide nanoparticles on graphene [6]. Changes in electrical

  1. Insight into the Nanoscale Mechanism of Rapid H2O Transport within a Graphene Oxide Membrane: Impact of Oxygen Functional Group Clustering.

    PubMed

    Ban, Shuai; Xie, Jing; Wang, Yajun; Jing, Bo; Liu, Bei; Zhou, Hongjun

    2016-01-13

    Realistic models of graphene oxide membranes were developed and validated to interpret the exceptional water permeation in association with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry analysis, and dynamic vapor sorption measurements. With respect to the GO oxidization level, surface distributions of functionalized domains were analyzed in line with TEM observations, and 3 types of interlayer domains in slit pores of GO membranes were identified. The hydrophilicity degrees of as-defined domains strongly influence their H2O uptake capacities. Calculated sorption enthalpies and isotherms are in good agreement with experimental data, and the results indicate the dominant role of dipole interactions. GO expansion shows a transition from the interstratification of an H2O monolayer to the accumulation of H2O multilayers at an interlayer distance of 0.8 nm. The evolution of both hydrogen bonds and H2O diffusivities suggests the existence of three types of H2O species with different binding states and molecular mobilities. The computed H2O permeability on the basis of sorption-diffusion theory supports the exceptional H2O transport capacity in GO membranes. PMID:26653332

  2. DNA in Nanoscale Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason

    2012-10-01

    DNA, the quintessential molecule of life, possesses a number of attractive properties for use in nanoscale circuits. Charge transport (CT) through DNA itself is of both fundamental and practical interest. Fundamentally, DNA has a unique configuration of π-stacked bases in a well ordered, double helical structure. Given its unparalleled importance to life processes and its arrangement of conjugated subunits, DNA has been a compelling target of conductivity studies. In addition, further understanding of DNA CT will elucidate the biological implications of this process and advance its use in sensing technologies. We have investigated the fundamentals of DNA CT by measuring the electrochemistry of DNA monolayers under biologically-relevant conditions. We have uncovered both fundamental kinetic parameters to distinguish between competing models of operation as well as the practical implications of DNA CT for sensing. Furthermore, we are leveraging our studies of DNA conductivity for the manufacture of nanoscale circuits. We are investigating the electrical properties and self-assembly of DNA nanowires containing artificial base pair surrogates, which can be prepared through low cost and high throughput automated DNA synthesis. This unique and economically viable approach will establish a new paradigm for the scalable manufacture of nanoscale semiconductor devices.

  3. An exploration of sequence specific DNA-duplex/pyrene interactions for intercalated and surface-associated pyrene species. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, T.L.

    1994-01-07

    The use of both short (5-atom) and long (12-atom) covalent linking chains to attach, respectively, a pyrenesulfonate or a pyrenebutyrate moiety to a central region of a DNA duplex allows construction of DNA-duplex/pyrene assemblies of two types. Long linking chains permit pyrene to intercalate within the DNA duplex, while the short chains constrain pyrene to remain in the outer-surface region of the major-groove of the duplex. Electrochemical data suggest that reductive electron-transfer (ET) quenching of photoexcited pyrene (pyrene*) labels will be most exothermic for guanosine than for the other three DNA nucleosides and that oxidative ET quenching of pyrene* will be most exothermic for thymidine than for the other three DNA nucleosides. The study combines two effects, (1) differential DNA/pyrene geometries in covalent assemblies with different length linking chains and (2) differential ET quenching reactivities among the DNA nucleotides to explore sequence specific and duplex/pyrene association specific effects on DNA-base ionization reactions. This report describes progress in synthesizing target pyrene-labeled nucleosides and oligonucleotides, in commissioning our fluorescence lifetime measurement system, and in the photochemical behavior of pyrene-labeled nucleosides, single strands of DNA, and duplexes of DNA.

  4. JAEA Fatigue Analysis of EBR-II Duplex Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Jackson; D. L. Porter; W. R. Lloyd

    2009-07-01

    This work addresses questions brought up concerning the mechanisms associated with fatigue crack growth retardation and/or arrest within the nickel bond layer in duplex 2¼ Cr-1Mo steel superheater tubes. Previous work performed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) indicated that the nickel bond layer did not function as a crack arrestor during fatigue crack propagation with the exception of one, isolated case involving an exceptionally low fatigue load and a high temperature (400 0C) environment. Since it is atypical for a fatigue crack to propagate from a relatively soft material (the nickel bond layer) to a harder material (the 2¼ Cr-1Mo steel) there has been speculation that the nickel bond layer was hardened in service. Additionally, there are questions surrounding the nature of the fatigue crack propagation within the nickel bond layer; specifically with regard to the presence of voids seen on micrographs of the bond layer and oxidation within the steel along the edge of the nickel bond layer. There is uncertainty as to the effect of these voids and/or oxide barriers with respect to potential fatigue crack arrest.

  5. Effect of Solution Conditions on the Nanoscale Intermolecular Interactions Between Human Serum Albumin and Low Grafting Density Surfaces of Poly(ethylene oxide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixman, Monica; Macias, Celia; Dean, Delphine; Ortiz, Christine

    2003-03-01

    The first step in the biological rejection response to an implanted blood-contacting biomaterial is the non-covalent adsorption of proteins onto the surface, which triggers a cascade reaction ultimately resulting in thrombus formation. Using the technique of high resolution force spectroscopy, we have quantified the nonspecific intermolecular forces between fatty acid-complexed human serum albumin (HSA) covalently attached to a cantilever probe tip and individual end-grafted poly(ethylene oxide) mushrooms. In order to help elucidate the molecular origins of the constituent forces (e.g. steric, electrostatic, van der Waals), experiments were performed varying both the solution environmental conditions (e.g. ionic strength, removal of the bound fatty acids, and the addition of the antihydrophobic agent isopropanol), and the probe deflection rate.

  6. Full Duplex, Spread Spectrum Radio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to support the development of a full duplex, spread spectrum voice communications system. The assembly and testing of a prototype system consisting of a Harris PRISM spread spectrum radio, a TMS320C54x signal processing development board and a Zilog Z80180 microprocessor was underway at the start of this project. The efforts under this project were the development of multiple access schemes, analysis of full duplex voice feedback delays, and the development and analysis of forward error correction (FEC) algorithms. The multiple access analysis involved the selection between code division multiple access (CDMA), frequency division multiple access (FDMA) and time division multiple access (TDMA). Full duplex voice feedback analysis involved the analysis of packet size and delays associated with full loop voice feedback for confirmation of radio system performance. FEC analysis included studies of the performance under the expected burst error scenario with the relatively short packet lengths, and analysis of implementation in the TMS320C54x digital signal processor. When the capabilities and the limitations of the components used were considered, the multiple access scheme chosen was a combination TDMA/FDMA scheme that will provide up to eight users on each of three separate frequencies. Packets to and from each user will consist of 16 samples at a rate of 8,000 samples per second for a total of 2 ms of voice information. The resulting voice feedback delay will therefore be 4 - 6 ms. The most practical FEC algorithm for implementation was a convolutional code with a Viterbi decoder. Interleaving of the bits of each packet will be required to offset the effects of burst errors.

  7. 53. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by A.G.D., 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Electrical - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  8. 51. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by B.S. Elliott, 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Plumbing - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  9. FACILITY 209, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, VIEW OF FRONT FROM CENTER DRIVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 209, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, VIEW OF FRONT FROM CENTER DRIVE, FACING SE. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. FACILITY 209, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, VIEW OF SIDE FROM FACILITY 210 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 209, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, VIEW OF SIDE FROM FACILITY 210 SIDE, FACING SW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. FACILITY 224, TWOSTORY DUPLEX, UNIT 319 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR OF UPSTAIRS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 224, TWO-STORY DUPLEX, UNIT 319 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR OF UPSTAIRS HALL FROM BATH, VIEW FACING NW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. FACILITY 209, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 209, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT FROM CENTER DRIVE, FACING SW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. FACILITY 210, TWOSTORY DUPLEX, REAR OBLIQUE FROM CENTER DRIVE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 210, TWO-STORY DUPLEX, REAR OBLIQUE FROM CENTER DRIVE, VIEW FACING EAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. FACILITY 210, TWOSTORY DUPLEX, VIEW FROM CENTER DRIVE BY FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 210, TWO-STORY DUPLEX, VIEW FROM CENTER DRIVE BY FACILITY 201 FACING SE. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. FACILITY 226, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, UNIT 327 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR FROM HALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 226, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, UNIT 327 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR FROM HALL LOOKING INTO BEDROOMS WITH DIFFERENT WINDOW ARRANGEMENTS. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. FACILITY 224, TWOSTORY DUPLEX, UNIT 319 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR OF LIVING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 224, TWO-STORY DUPLEX, UNIT 319 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM FROM DINING AREA. KITCHEN TO LEFT, VIEW FACING SW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. FACILITY 226, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, UNIT 327 (UNOCCUPIED ). INTERIOR OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 226, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, UNIT 327 (UNOCCUPIED ). INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM LOOKING TOWARD FRONT DOOR FROM DINING AREA - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. FACILITY 210, TWO STORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE. FACILITY 209 TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 210, TWO STORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE. FACILITY 209 TO LEFT, 201 TO RIGHT, VIEW FACING NW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. 52. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by Copeland, 7 April 1932 (Original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Heating - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  20. 50. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by Turner, 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University. Detail of front entrance and of gable dormer - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  1. 48. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by Turner, 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Attic and roof, basement, first floor, and second floor plans - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  2. 49. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by Turner, 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Front, rear, and side elevations, and cross-section - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  3. Structural properties of g,t-parallel duplexes.

    PubMed

    Aviñó, Anna; Cubero, Elena; Gargallo, Raimundo; González, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto; Eritja, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    The structure of G,T-parallel-stranded duplexes of DNA carrying similar amounts of adenine and guanine residues is studied by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and UV- and CD spectroscopies. In addition the impact of the substitution of adenine by 8-aminoadenine and guanine by 8-aminoguanine is analyzed. The presence of 8-aminoadenine and 8-aminoguanine stabilizes the parallel duplex structure. Binding of these oligonucleotides to their target polypyrimidine sequences to form the corresponding G,T-parallel triplex was not observed. Instead, when unmodified parallel-stranded duplexes were mixed with their polypyrimidine target, an interstrand Watson-Crick duplex was formed. As predicted by theoretical calculations parallel-stranded duplexes carrying 8-aminopurines did not bind to their target. The preference for the parallel-duplex over the Watson-Crick antiparallel duplex is attributed to the strong stabilization of the parallel duplex produced by the 8-aminopurines. Theoretical studies show that the isomorphism of the triads is crucial for the stability of the parallel triplex. PMID:20798879

  4. Acoustical and perceptual influence of duplex stringing in grand pianos.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Fredrik; Askenfelt, Anders

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the acoustical and perceptual influence of the string parts outside the speaking length in grand pianos (front and rear duplex strings). Acoustical measurements on a grand piano in concert condition were conducted, measuring the fundamental frequencies of all main and duplex strings in the four octaves D4-C8. Considerable deviations from the nominal harmonic relations between the rear duplex and main string frequencies, as described by the manufacturer in a patent, were observed. Generally the rear duplex strings were tuned higher than the nominal harmonic relations with average and median deviations approaching +50 cent. Single keys reached +190 and -100 cent. The spread in deviation from harmonic relations within trichords was also substantial with average and median values around 25 cent, occasionally reaching 60 cent. Contributions from both front and rear duplex strings were observed in the bridge motion and sound. The audibility of the duplex strings was studied in an ABX listening test. Complete dampening of the front duplex was clearly perceptible both for an experiment group consisting of musicians and a control group with naive subjects. The contribution from the rear duplex could also be perceived, but less pronounced. PMID:22280708

  5. Methods And Devices For Characterizing Duplex Nucleic Acid Molecules

    DOEpatents

    Akeson, Mark; Vercoutere, Wenonah; Haussler, David; Winters-Hilt, Stephen

    2005-08-30

    Methods and devices are provided for characterizing a duplex nucleic acid, e.g., a duplex DNA molecule. In the subject methods, a fluid conducting medium that includes a duplex nucleic acid molecule is contacted with a nanopore under the influence of an applied electric field and the resulting changes in current through the nanopore caused by the duplex nucleic acid molecule are monitored. The observed changes in current through the nanopore are then employed as a set of data values to characterize the duplex nucleic acid, where the set of data values may be employed in raw form or manipulated, e.g., into a current blockade profile. Also provided are nanopore devices for practicing the subject methods, where the subject nanopore devices are characterized by the presence of an algorithm which directs a processing means to employ monitored changes in current through a nanopore to characterize a duplex nucleic acid molecule responsible for the current changes. The subject methods and devices find use in a variety of applications, including, among other applications, the identification of an analyte duplex DNA molecule in a sample, the specific base sequence at a single nulceotide polymorphism (SNP), and the sequencing of duplex DNA molecules.

  6. Zoster duplex: a clinical report and etiologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Herpes zoster (HZ) duplex is a rare disease presentation. The mechanisms of varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation in multiple dermal regions are unknown. To present a HZ duplex case occurring in an immunocompetent woman and to analyze the possible underlying causes of HZ duplex. Methods: We present a HZ duplex case in an immunocompetent woman and analyzed the possible contributing factors in 36 HZ duplex cases. Continuously distributed variables were categorized by numbers and percentages. Results: In our study, 24 cases (66.7%) were from Asia, 16 cases (44.4%) were in individuals ≥ 50 years of age, and 17 cases (47.2%) occurred in immunocompromised patients. Of the 36 cases, 23 involved women (63.9%) and 13 involved men. Eighteen patients suffering from HZ duplex, 13 of which were women (72.2%), did not suffer from any chronic systemic disease or have a long history of taking drugs. Conclusion: HZ duplex is a rare event that can occur in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals. HZ duplex might be associated with the Asia region, advanced age, immunosuppression, and being female. PMID:26379899

  7. Systematic review of potential health risks posed by pharmaceutical, occupational and consumer exposures to metallic and nanoscale aluminum, aluminum oxides, aluminum hydroxide and its soluble salts

    PubMed Central

    Willhite, Calvin C.; Karyakina, Nataliya A.; Yokel, Robert A.; Yenugadhati, Nagarajkumar; Wisniewski, Thomas M.; Arnold, Ian M. F.; Momoli, Franco; Krewski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a ubiquitous substance encountered both naturally (as the third most abundant element) and intentionally (used in water, foods, pharmaceuticals, and vaccines); it is also present in ambient and occupational airborne particulates. Existing data underscore the importance of Al physical and chemical forms in relation to its uptake, accumulation, and systemic bioavailability. The present review represents a systematic examination of the peer-reviewed literature on the adverse health effects of Al materials published since a previous critical evaluation compiled by Krewski et al. (2007). Challenges encountered in carrying out the present review reflected the experimental use of different physical and chemical Al forms, different routes of administration, and different target organs in relation to the magnitude, frequency, and duration of exposure. Wide variations in diet can result in Al intakes that are often higher than the World Health Organization provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI), which is based on studies with Al citrate. Comparing daily dietary Al exposures on the basis of “total Al” assumes that gastrointestinal bioavailability for all dietary Al forms is equivalent to that for Al citrate, an approach that requires validation. Current occupational exposure limits (OELs) for identical Al substances vary as much as 15-fold. The toxicity of different Al forms depends in large measure on their physical behavior and relative solubility in water. The toxicity of soluble Al forms depends upon the delivered dose of Al+3 to target tissues. Trivalent Al reacts with water to produce bidentate superoxide coordination spheres [Al(O2)(H2O4)+2 and Al(H2O)6+3] that after complexation with O2•−, generate Al superoxides [Al(O2•)](H2O5)]+2. Semireduced AlO2• radicals deplete mitochondrial Fe and promote generation of H2O2, O2•− and OH•. Thus, it is the Al+3-induced formation of oxygen radicals that accounts for the oxidative damage that

  8. Systematic review of potential health risks posed by pharmaceutical, occupational and consumer exposures to metallic and nanoscale aluminum, aluminum oxides, aluminum hydroxide and its soluble salts.

    PubMed

    Willhite, Calvin C; Karyakina, Nataliya A; Yokel, Robert A; Yenugadhati, Nagarajkumar; Wisniewski, Thomas M; Arnold, Ian M F; Momoli, Franco; Krewski, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    oxidative damage that leads to intrinsic apoptosis. In contrast, the toxicity of the insoluble Al oxides depends primarily on their behavior as particulates. Aluminum has been held responsible for human morbidity and mortality, but there is no consistent and convincing evidence to associate the Al found in food and drinking water at the doses and chemical forms presently consumed by people living in North America and Western Europe with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neither is there clear evidence to show use of Al-containing underarm antiperspirants or cosmetics increases the risk of AD or breast cancer. Metallic Al, its oxides, and common Al salts have not been shown to be either genotoxic or carcinogenic. Aluminum exposures during neonatal and pediatric parenteral nutrition (PN) can impair bone mineralization and delay neurological development. Adverse effects to vaccines with Al adjuvants have occurred; however, recent controlled trials found that the immunologic response to certain vaccines with Al adjuvants was no greater, and in some cases less than, that after identical vaccination without Al adjuvants. The scientific literature on the adverse health effects of Al is extensive. Health risk assessments for Al must take into account individual co-factors (e.g., age, renal function, diet, gastric pH). Conclusions from the current review point to the need for refinement of the PTWI, reduction of Al contamination in PN solutions, justification for routine addition of Al to vaccines, and harmonization of OELs for Al substances. PMID:25233067

  9. Linking Precursor Alterations to Nanoscale Structure and Optical Transparency in Polymer Assisted Fast-Rate Dip-Coating of Vanadium Oxide Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Colm; Creedon, Donal; Geaney, Hugh; Armstrong, Eileen; Collins, Timothy; Morris, Michael A.; Dwyer, Colm O’

    2015-01-01

    Solution processed metal oxide thin films are important for modern optoelectronic devices ranging from thin film transistors to photovoltaics and for functional optical coatings. Solution processed techniques such as dip-coating, allow thin films to be rapidly deposited over a large range of surfaces including curved, flexible or plastic substrates without extensive processing of comparative vapour or physical deposition methods. To increase the effectiveness and versatility of dip-coated thin films, alterations to commonly used precursors can be made that facilitate controlled thin film deposition. The effects of polymer assisted deposition and changes in solvent-alkoxide dilution on the morphology, structure, optoelectronic properties and crystallinity of vanadium pentoxide thin films was studied using a dip-coating method using a substrate withdrawal speed within the fast-rate draining regime. The formation of sub-100 nm thin films could be achieved rapidly from dilute alkoxide based precursor solutions with high optical transmission in the visible, linked to the phase and film structure. The effects of the polymer addition was shown to change the crystallized vanadium pentoxide thin films from a granular surface structure to a polycrystalline structure composed of a high density of smaller in-plane grains, resulting in a uniform surface morphology with lower thickness and roughness. PMID:26123117

  10. Corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Platt, J A; Guzman, A; Zuccari, A; Thornburg, D W; Rhodes, B F; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1997-07-01

    The corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel was compared with that of AISI type 316L stainless steel. The 2205 stainless steel is a potential orthodontic bracket material with low nickel content (4 to 6 wt%), whereas the 316L stainless steel (nickel content: 10 to 14 wt%) is a currently used bracket material. Both stainless steels were subjected to electrochemical and immersion (crevice) corrosion tests in 37 degrees C, 0.9 wt% sodium chloride solution. Electrochemical testing indicates that 2205 has a longer passivation range than 316L. The corrosion rate of 2205 was 0.416 MPY (milli-inch per year), whereas 316L exhibited 0.647 MPY. When 2205 was coupled to 316L with equal surface area ratio, the corrosion rate of 2205 reduced to 0.260 MPY, indicating that 316L stainless steel behaved like a sacrificial anode. When 316L is coupled with NiTi, TMA, or stainless steel arch wire and was subjected to the immersion corrosion test, it was found that 316L suffered from crevice corrosion. On the other hand, 2205 stainless steel did not show any localized crevice corrosion, although the surface of 2205 was covered with corrosion products, formed when coupled to NiTi and stainless steel wires. This study indicates that considering corrosion resistance, 2205 duplex stainless steel is an improved alternative to 316L for orthodontic bracket fabrication when used in conjunction with titanium, its alloys, or stainless steel arch wires. PMID:9228844

  11. Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Qu, Zhihua; Braiman, Yehuda; Zhang, Zhenyu; Barhen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

  12. Nanoscale Optoelectronic Photosynthetic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Elias; Lee, Ida; Guillorn, Michael; Lee, James W.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2001-03-01

    This presentation provides an overview and recent progress in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory research program in molecular electronics and green plant photosynthesis. The photosynthetic reaction center is a nanoscale molecular diode and photovoltaic device. The key thrust of our research program is the construction of molecular electronic devices from these nanoscale structures. Progress in this multidisciplinary research program has been demonstrated by direct electrical contact of emergent electrons with the Photosystem I (PS I) reaction center by nanoparticle precipitation. Demonstration of stable diode properties of isolated reaction centers combined with the ability to orient PS I by self-assembly on a planar surface, makes this structure a good building block for 2-D and potentially 3-D devices. Metallization of isolated PS I does not alter their fundamental photophysical properties and they can be bonded to metal surfaces. We report here the first measurement of photovoltage from single PS I reaction centers. Working at the Cornell University National Nanofabrication Facility, we have constructed sets of dissimilar metal electrodes separated by distances as small as 6 nm. We plan to use these structures to make electrical contact to both ends of oriented PSI reaction centers and thereby realize biomolecular logic circuits. Potential applications of PSI reaction centers for optoelectronic applications as well as molecular logic device construction will be discussed.

  13. Characterizing Nanoscale Transient Communication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Anwar, Putri Santi; Huang, Limin; Asvial, Muhamad

    2016-04-01

    We consider the novel paradigm of nanoscale transient communication (NTC), where certain components of the small-scale communication link are physically transient. As such, the transmitter and the receiver may change their properties over a prescribed lifespan due to their time-varying structures. The NTC systems may find important applications in the biomedical, environmental, and military fields, where system degradability allows for benign integration into life and environment. In this paper, we analyze the NTC systems from the channel-modeling and capacity-analysis perspectives and focus on the stochastically meaningful slow transience scenario, where the coherence time of degeneration Td is much longer than the coding delay Tc. We first develop novel and parsimonious models to characterize the NTC channels, where three types of physical layers are considered: electromagnetism-based terahertz (THz) communication, diffusion-based molecular communication (DMC), and nanobots-assisted touchable communication (TouchCom). We then revisit the classical performance measure of ϵ-outage channel capacity and take a fresh look at its formulations in the NTC context. Next, we present the notion of capacity degeneration profile (CDP), which describes the reduction of channel capacity with respect to the degeneration time. Finally, we provide numerical examples to demonstrate the features of CDP. To the best of our knowledge, the current work represents a first attempt to systematically evaluate the quality of nanoscale communication systems deteriorating with time. PMID:26955048

  14. Nitrogen containing shielding gases for GTAW duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Creffield, G.K.; Cole, M.H.; Paciej, R.; Huang, W.; Urmston, S.

    1993-12-31

    The duplex stainless steel are alloys characterized as consisting of two phases; austenite and ferrite. As such, they combine the benefits of both phases i.e. good ductility and general corrosion resistance of austenite, but with improved stress corrosion cracking resistance and strength associate with ferrite. Carefully controlled manufacturing techniques are employed to produce this combination in roughly equal proportions to ensure optimum properties. The range of duplex alloys studied in this work covered both the standard grade (2205) and the latest generation of super duplex (2507) alloys; typical compositions are shown in Table 1. Although the standard duplex is the most commonly available and widely used, super duplexes, which are characterized by higher chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen contents, have even better corrosion properties and are finding increasing applications in the offshore industry. To benefit from the superior properties of duplex, it is vital that these alloys can be welded effectively and that the properties of the welded joint match those of the parent weld. The objective of the current investigation was to study the effect of nitrogen, in both the shielding and purge gas, on the weld metal nitrogen content, microstructure and corrosion resistance, with the eventual aim of recommending an effective shielding gas mixture for duplex stainless steels.

  15. Nanoscale control designs for systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Yue

    2014-02-01

    Nanoscale control is the science of the control of objects at dimensions with 100 nm or less and the manipulation of them at this level of precision. The desired attributes of systems under nanoscale control design are extreme high resolution, accuracy, stability, and fast response. An important perspective of investigation in nanoscale control design includes system modeling and precision control devices and materials at a nanoscale dimension, i.e., design of nanopositioners. Nanopositioners are mechatronic systems with an ultraprecise resolution down to a fraction of an atomic diameter and developed to move objects over a small range in nanoscale dimension. After reviewing a lot of existing literatures for nanoscale control designs, the way to successful nanoscale control is accurate position sensing and feedback control of the motion. An overview of nanoscale identification, linear, and nonlinear control technologies, and devices that are playing a key role in improving precision, accuracy, and response of operation of these systems are introduced in this research. PMID:24749455

  16. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale. PMID:27219742

  17. Streamlined analysis of duplex sequencing data with Du Novo.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Nicholas; Arbeithuber, Barbara; Guiblet, Wilfried; Makova, Kateryna D; Nekrutenko, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Duplex sequencing was originally developed to detect rare nucleotide polymorphisms normally obscured by the noise of high-throughput sequencing. Here we describe a new, streamlined, reference-free approach for the analysis of duplex sequencing data. We show the approach performs well on simulated data and precisely reproduces previously published results and apply it to a newly produced dataset, enabling us to type low-frequency variants in human mitochondrial DNA. Finally, we provide all necessary tools as stand-alone components as well as integrate them into the Galaxy platform. All analyses performed in this manuscript can be repeated exactly as described at http://usegalaxy.org/duplex . PMID:27566673

  18. Mechanism for radical cation transport in duplex DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chu-Sheng; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Schuster, Gary B

    2004-03-10

    We investigated the photoinduced one-electron oxidation of a series of DNA oligomers having a covalently linked anthraquinone group (AQ) and containing [(A)(n)GG](m) or [(T)(n)GG](m) segments. These oligomers have m GG steps, where m = 4 or 6, separated by (A)(n) or (T)(n) segments, where n = 1-7 for the (A)(n) set and 1-5 for the (T)(n) set. Irradiation with UV light that is absorbed by the AQ causes injection of a radical cation into the DNA. The radical cation migrates through the DNA, causing chemical reaction, primarily at GG steps, that leads to strand cleavage after piperidine treatment. The uniform, systematic structure of the DNA oligonucleotides investigated permits the numerical solution of a kinetic scheme that models these reactions. This analysis yields two rate constants, k(hop), for hopping of the radical cation from one site to adjacent sites, and k(trap), for irreversible reaction of the radical cation with H(2)O or O(2). Analysis of these findings indicates that radical cation hopping in these duplex DNA oligomers is a process that occurs on a microsecond time scale. The value of k(hop) depends on the number of base pairs in the (A)(n) and (T)(n) segments in a systematic way. We interpret these results in terms of a thermally activated adiabatic mechanism for radical cation hopping that we identify as phonon-assisted polaron hopping. PMID:14995205

  19. Lubrication for high load duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-08-01

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for high load duplex bearing applications were evaluated and compared against trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE extracted from Vydax AR/IPA, bearings with titanium carbide coated balls, and bearings with diamond-like carbon races and retainers were evaluated. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE from Vydax AR/IPA performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax.

  20. Corrosion behavior of sensitized duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Torres, F J; Panyayong, W; Rogers, W; Velasquez-Plata, D; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1998-01-01

    The present work investigates the corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel in 0.9% NaCl solution after various heat-treatments, and compares it to that of 316L austenitic stainless steel. Both stainless steels were heat-treated at 500, 650, and 800 degrees C in air for 1 h, followed by furnace cooling. Each heat-treated sample was examined for their microstructures and Vickers micro-hardness, and subjected to the X-ray diffraction for the phase identification. Using potentiostatic polarization method, each heat-treated sample was corrosion-tested in 37 degrees C 0.9% NaCl solution to estimate its corrosion rate. It was found that simulated sensitization showed an adverse influence on both steels, indicating that corrosion rates increased by increasing the sensitization temperatures. PMID:9713683

  1. Reverse micelle synthesis of nanoscale metal containing catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Darab, J.G.; Fulton, J.L.; Linehan, J.C.

    1993-03-01

    The need for morphological control during the synthesis of catalyst precursor powders is generally accepted to be important. In the liquefaction of coal, for example, iron-bearing catalyst precursor particles containing individual crystallites with diameters in the 1-100 nanometer range are believed to achieve good dispersion through out the coal-solvent slurry during liquefaction 2 runs and to undergo chemical transformations to catalytically active iron sulfide phases. The production of the nanoscale powders described here employs the confining spherical microdomains comprising the aqueous phase of a modified reverse micelle (MRM) microemulsion system as nanoscale reaction vessels in which polymerization, electrochemical reduction and precipitation of solvated salts can occur. The goal is to take advantage of the confining nature of micelles to kinetically hinder transformation processes which readily occur in bulk aqueous solution in order to control the morphology and phase of the resulting powder. We have prepared a variety of metal, alloy, and metal- and mixed metal-oxide nanoscale powders from appropriate MRM systems. Examples of nanoscale powders produced include Co, Mo-Co, Ni{sub 3}Fe, Ni, and various oxides and oxyhydroxides of iron. Here, we discuss the preparation and characterization of nickel metal (with a nickel oxide surface layer) and iron oxyhydroxide MRM nanoscale powders. We have used extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to study the chemical polymerization process in situ, x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microcroscopies (SEM and TEM), elemental analysis and structural modelling to characterize the nanoscale powders produced. The catalytic activity of these powders is currently being studied.

  2. Nanoscale Thermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloch, Kamal; Brintlinger, Todd; Qi, Yi; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Cumings, John

    2007-03-01

    We present real time, in-situ, high resolution thermal imaging of metallic nanowires. The nanowires are grown on the front-side of silicon nitride membranes. Resistive heating along the wires produces thermal gradients which melt/freeze 20-200nm diameter indium islands deposited by thermal evaporation on the back-side of the membrane. These transitions can be imaged using a transmission electron microscope operating in dark-field mode such that contrast corresponds to the phase of an individual island. Global changes in temperature can be used to calibrate the melting point of individual islands and to account for the presence of the ˜100nm thick silicon nitride membrane. Thermal modeling confirms the imaged thermal behavior. This technique could be generally employed for thermal imaging of nanowires and nanotubes, wherein the nanoscale systems are imaged in-situ and under electrical bias. Results of local resistive heating in a carbon nanotube device will also be shown

  3. Anatomy of Nanoscale Propulsion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vinita; Duan, Wentao; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-01-01

    Nature supports multifaceted forms of life. Despite the variety and complexity of these forms, motility remains the epicenter of life. The applicable laws of physics change upon going from macroscales to microscales and nanoscales, which are characterized by low Reynolds number (Re). We discuss motion at low Re in natural and synthetic systems, along with various propulsion mechanisms, including electrophoresis, electrolyte diffusiophoresis, and nonelectrolyte diffusiophoresis. We also describe the newly uncovered phenomena of motility in non-ATP-driven self-powered enzymes and the directional movement of these enzymes in response to substrate gradients. These enzymes can also be immobilized to function as fluid pumps in response to the presence of their substrates. Finally, we review emergent collective behavior arising from interacting motile species, and we discuss the possible biomedical applications of the synthetic nanobots and microbots. PMID:26098511

  4. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C.; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-06-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 1012 with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications.

  5. Dissipation in Nanoscale Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Maestro, Adrian; Rosenow, Bernd

    Pressure driven flow of a superfluid inside a narrow channel can be maintained by the nucleation of vortices and their resulting motion across the flow lines. The maximum velocity of the superfluid is set by a nucleation rate which crucially depends on the microscopic details of the vortices and flow profile. Within the kinetic vortex theory, we have determined the critical superfluid velocity inside a nanoscale constriction and obtain agreement with experimental results for superfluid helium-4 in nanopores. In the small pore limit, when the ratio of pore radius to correlation length is of order unity, we find a drastic suppression of the superfluid velocity that can be understood within the Langer-Ambegaokar-McCumber-Halperin theory of resistive fluctuations in thin superconducting wires.

  6. 43. View of station from southwest side with duplex keepers' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. View of station from southwest side with duplex keepers' dwelling to the left. USLHB photo by Herbert Bamber, June 9, 1893. - Bodie Island Light Station, Off Highway 12, Nags Head, Dare County, NC

  7. Thermoacoustic Duplex Technology for Cooling and Powering a Venus Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R.; Haberbusch, M. S.; Sasson, J.

    2015-04-01

    A Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engine (TASHE) is directly coupled to a Pulse Tube Refrigerator (PTR) in a duplex configuration, providing simultaneous cooling and electrical power, thereby suiting the needs of a long-lived Venus lander.

  8. Perspective view of Building No. 61 from northwest. These duplex ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of Building No. 61 from northwest. These duplex quarters were built during the 1920s on the south edge of the Northwestern Branch campus. This building is sited on a rise and shares paths and lawn with two similar structures - Buildings 56 and 79. Now located directly adjacent to the current hospital complex (background), all three duplexes are slated for demolition. - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, Quarters, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  9. Probing the duplex stainless steel phases via magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheno, S. M.; Santos, F. S.; Kuri, S. E.

    2008-03-01

    Duplex stainless steels are austenitic-ferritic alloys used in many applications, thanks to their excellent mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. In this work, chemical analyses, x-ray diffraction, and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were employed to characterize the solution annealed and aged duplex stainless steel. The samples exhibited no changes in lattice parameters and the MFM technique proved successful in clearly imaging the magnetic domain structure of the ferrite phase.

  10. Phase transformations in cast duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma (sigma) and chi (chi) can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (sigma + chi) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, a was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and chi by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  11. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon-Jun Kim

    2004-12-19

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  12. Topologically non-linked circular duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Biegeleisen, Ken

    2002-05-01

    The discovery of circular DNA, over 30 years ago, introduced an element of uneasiness in what had been, up to that point, the almost picture-perfect story of the elucidation of the molecular biology of heredity. If DNA indeed has the Watson-Crick right-handed helical secondary structure, then in circular DNA, thousands, or perhaps even millions of twists must be removed in each generation, and re-wound in the next generation. Although enzyme systems adequate for this task have long since been found and characterized, there have nevertheless arisen a number of proposals for alternative DNA structures in which the strands are topologically non-linked, so that they might separate during replication without having to be unwound. These structures have generally been put forth as theory only, and have been largely unaccompanied by experimental evidence to support their applicability to native DNA from living systems. Recently, however, a report has emerged suggesting that it might be possible to separate, intact, the individual single-stranded circular half-chromosomes which constitute the double-stranded circular chromosomes of certain plasmids. This would not be possible unless the chromosomes had one of the alternative, topologically non-linked structures. It is widely believed that after a half-century of worldwide DNA research, any significant change to the Watson-Crick structure is unlikely to stand up to scrutiny. Nevertheless, the present author has found that in many instances in which the behavior of circular duplex DNA is considered to be explicable only in terms of the topologically linked helical model, it is also possible to explain that same behavior in terms of a topologically non-linked model. It is necessary, in these instances, to make certain logical assumptions which cannot be conclusively proven at the present time. The author herein offers an example of one such instance, namely an examination of the behavior of circular duplex DNA in an alkaline

  13. Nanoscale surface photoreactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Garrett Austin

    Subnanometer-scale properties of molecules and materials have become extremely important to the development of nanoscale and molecular electronics devices, including advanced biological and chemical sensors. The energies (i.e., wavelengths) at which the LSPRs of individual nanoparticles are excited varies depending on their size, thickness, and shape, all of which can be controlled synthetically. Photon-coupled scanning tunneling microscopy uses a total internal reflection scheme to couple light into a tunneling junction, generating this specific LSPR in individual Au and Ag nanoprisms. By controlling and coupling this specific excitation to molecular assemblies, the effective photoreactivities and photoconductances of organic molecules can be measured and manipulated. Nanoparticle synthesis methods were developed to produce nanoprisms with appropriate dimensions and homogeneity. Functionalization of the sample surface using alkanedithiols and p-terphenyl-4,4"-dithiol enabled the adsorption dispersion of nanoprisms onto substrates with high density yet minimal stacking. Insertion into self-assembled monolayers was used to arrange single molecules on Au{111} and Ag{111} nanoprisms for selective surface plasmonic enhancement. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements were collected for molecules adsorbed on the dispersed nanoprisms. Photon STM will be used to monitor the photoactivities of molecules on these substrates, such as photocurrent, photoconductance, and photoreaction.

  14. Nanoscale Electrostatics in Mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, L. John; West, Patrick Michael

    2001-04-01

    Primitive biological cells had to divide with very little biology. This work simulates a physicochemical mechanism, based upon nanoscale electrostatics, which explains the anaphase A poleward motion of chromosomes. In the cytoplasmic medium that exists in biological cells, electrostatic fields are subject to strong attenuation by Debye screening, and therefore decrease rapidly over a distance equal to several Debye lengths. However, the existence of microtubules within cells changes the situation completely. Microtubule dimer subunits are electric dipolar structures, and can act as intermediaries that extend the reach of the electrostatic interaction over cellular distances. Experimental studies have shown that intracellular pH rises to a peak at mitosis, and decreases through cytokinesis. This result, in conjunction with the electric dipole nature of microtubule subunits and the Debye screened electrostatic force is sufficient to explain and unify the basic events during mitosis and cytokinesis: (1) assembly of asters, (2) motion of the asters to poles, (3) poleward motion of chromosomes (anaphase A), (4) cell elongation, and (5) cytokinesis. This paper will focus on a simulation of the dynamics if anaphase A motion based on this comprehensive model. The physicochemical mechanisms utilized by primitive cells could provide important clues regarding our understanding of cell division in modern eukaryotic cells.

  15. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 10(12) with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications. PMID:26108890

  16. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    the molecular level. Nanoscale charge transport experiments in ionic liquids extend the field to high temperatures and to systems with intriguing interfacial potential distributions. Other directions may include dye-sensitized solar cells, new sensor applications and diagnostic tools for the study of surface-bound single molecules. Another motivation for this special issue is thus to highlight activities across different research communities with nanoscale charge transport as a common denominator. This special issue gathers 27 articles by scientists from the United States, Germany, the UK, Denmark, Russia, France, Israel, Canada, Australia, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Belgium and Singapore; it gives us a flavour of the current state-of-the-art of this diverse research area. While based on contributions from many renowned groups and institutions, it obviously cannot claim to represent all groups active in this very broad area. Moreover, a number of world-leading groups were unable to take part in this project within the allocated time limit. Nevertheless, we regard the current selection of papers to be representative enough for the reader to draw their own conclusions about the current status of the field. Each paper is original and has its own merit, as all papers in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter special issues are subjected to the same scrutiny as regular contributions. The Guest Editors have deliberately not defined the specific subjects covered in this issue. These came out logically from the development of this area, for example: 'Traditional' solid state nanojunctions based on adsorbed layers, oxide films or nanowires sandwiched between two electrodes: effects of molecular structure (aromaticity, anchoring groups), symmetry, orientation, dynamics (noise patterns) and current-induced heating. Various 'physical effects': inelastic tunnelling and Coulomb blockade, polaron effects, switching modes, and negative differential resistance; the role of

  17. DNA duplexes with reactive dialdehyde groups as novel reagents for cross-linking to restriction- modification enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Brevnov, M G; Gritsenko, O M; Mikhailov, S N; Efimtseva, E V; Ermolinsky, B S; Van Aerschot, A; Herdewijn, P; Repyk, A V; Gromova, E S

    1997-01-01

    To create new, effective reagents for affinity modification of restriction-modification (R-M) enzymes, a regioselective method for reactive dialdehyde group incorporation into oligonucleotides, based on insertion of a 1-beta-D-galactopyranosylthymine residue, has been developed. We synthesized DNA duplex analogs of the substrates of the Eco RII and Mva I R-M enzymes that contained a galactose or periodate-oxidized galactose residue as single substituents either in the center of the Eco RII (Mva I) recognition site or in the flanking nucleotide sequence. The dependence of binding, cleavage and methylation of these substrate analogs on the modified sugar location in the duplex was determined. Cross-linking of the reagents to the enzymes under different conditions was examined. M. Eco RII covalent attachment to periodate-oxidized substrate analogs proceeded in a specific way and to a large extent depended on the location of the reactive dialdehyde group in the substrate. The yield of covalent attachment to a DNA duplex with a dialdehyde group in the flanking sequence with Eco RII or Mva I methylases was 9-20% and did not exceed 4% for R. Eco RII. PMID:9241245

  18. New Economical 19Cr Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Zixing; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Xueshan; Zhao, Junliang; Jiang, Laizhu

    2012-02-01

    New economical duplex stainless steels (DSSs) containing 19Cr-6Mn- xNi-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.5Cu-0.2N ( x = 0.5 to 2.0) were developed, and the microstructure, impact property, and corrosion resistance of the alloys were studied. The ferrite content increases with the solution treatment temperature, but decreases with an increase in nickel. The sigma phase is not found precipitating in the alloys treated with solution from 1023 K to 1523 K (750 °C to 1250 °C). The low-temperature impact energy of the experimental alloys increases first and then decreases rapidly with an increase in nickel, which is mainly due to the martensite transformation with an increase in austenite. The alloys have a better mechanical property and pitting corrosion resistance than AISI 304. Among the designed DSS alloys, 19Cr-6Mn-1.3Ni-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.5Cu-0.2N is found to be an optimum alloy with proper phase proportion, a better combination of mechanical strength and elongation, and higher pitting corrosion resistance compared with those of the other alloys.

  19. ES and H-compatible lubrication for duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-10-01

    Two ES and H-compatible lubricants (environment, safety, and health) for duplex bearing applications and one hybrid material duplex bearing were evaluated and compared against duplex bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in strong link mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid duplex bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, duplex bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and duplex bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. Bearings with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls performed worse than bearings lubricated with Vydax, but their performance would still be acceptable for most applications. Bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers had varying amounts of film on the bearings. This affected the performance of the bearings. Bearings with a uniform coating performed to acceptable levels, but bearings with no visible MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers did not perform as well as bearings with the other coatings. Unless process controls are incorporated in the sputtering process or the bearings are screened, they do not appear to be acceptable for duplex bearing applications.

  20. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    systems. In addition, the role of thermodynamic fluctuations on superconducting properties has been extensively studied in the context of nanoparticles and nanowires both experimentally and theoretically. In the past decade, a lot of work has been initiated in the area of interface superconductivity where different techniques have been demonstrated to tune Tc. Although the progress in this field has deepened our understanding of nanoscale superconductors, there are several open and key questions which need to be addressed. Some of these are: (1) can superconductivity be enhanced and Tc increased in nanostructures with respect to the bulk limit and if so, how can it be controlled? (2) What are the theoretical and experimental limits for the enhancement and control of superconductivity? (3) Can the phenomena identified in conventional nanostructures shed light on phenomena in high Tc superconductors and vice versa? (4) How will the new fundamental physics of superconductivity at the nanoscale promote advances in nanotechnology applications and vice versa? The papers in this focus section reflect the advances made in this field, in particular in nanowires and nanofilms, but also attempt to answer some of the key open questions outlined above. The theoretical papers explore unconventional quantum phenomena such as the role of confinement in the dynamics of single Cooper pairs in isolated grains [1] and Fano resonances in superconducting gaps in multi-condensate superconductors near a 2.5 Lifshitz transition [2]. Here a new emerging class of quantum phenomena of fundamental physics appear at the Bose-BCS crossover in multi-condensate superconductors [2]. Nanosize effects can now be manipulated by controlling defects in layered oxides [3]. A new approach is provided by controlling the self-organization of oxygen interstitials in layered copper oxides that show an intrinsic nanoscale phase separation [4]. In this case a non-trivial distribution of superconducting nanograins

  1. Dustiness of Fine and Nanoscale Powders

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Douglas E.; Baron, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Dustiness may be defined as the propensity of a powder to form airborne dust by a prescribed mechanical stimulus; dustiness testing is typically intended to replicate mechanisms of dust generation encountered in workplaces. A novel dustiness testing device, developed for pharmaceutical application, was evaluated in the dustiness investigation of 27 fine and nanoscale powders. The device efficiently dispersed small (mg) quantities of a wide variety of fine and nanoscale powders, into a small sampling chamber. Measurements consisted of gravimetrically determined total and respirable dustiness. The following materials were studied: single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and carbon blacks; fumed oxides of titanium, aluminum, silicon, and cerium; metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, manganese, and silver) silicon carbide, Arizona road dust; nanoclays; and lithium titanate. Both the total and respirable dustiness spanned two orders of magnitude (0.3–37.9% and 0.1–31.8% of the predispersed test powders, respectively). For many powders, a significant respirable dustiness was observed. For most powders studied, the respirable dustiness accounted for approximately one-third of the total dustiness. It is believed that this relationship holds for many fine and nanoscale test powders (i.e. those primarily selected for this study), but may not hold for coarse powders. Neither total nor respirable dustiness was found to be correlated with BET surface area, therefore dustiness is not determined by primary particle size. For a subset of test powders, aerodynamic particle size distributions by number were measured (with an electrical low-pressure impactor and an aerodynamic particle sizer). Particle size modes ranged from approximately 300nm to several micrometers, but no modes below 100nm, were observed. It is therefore unlikely that these materials would exhibit a substantial sub-100nm particle contribution in a workplace. PMID:23065675

  2. Duplex Ultrasonography in Assessing Restenosis of Renal Artery Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, Jeannette; Beutler, Jaap J.; Elgersma, Otto E.H.; Lange, Eduard E. de; Kort, Gerard A.P. de; Beek, Frederik J. A.

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy and optimal threshold values of duplex ultrasonography (US) in assessing restenosis of renal artery stents. Methods: Twenty-four consecutive patients with 33 renal arteries that had previously been treated with placement of a Palmaz stent underwent duplex US prior to intraarterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA), which was the reference standard. Diagnostic accuracy of in-stent peak systolic velocity (PSV) and reno-aortic ratio (RAR = PSV renal stent/PSV aorta) in detecting > 50% in-stent restenosis were evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic curve. Sensitivity and specificity were determined using the optimal threshold values, and using published threshold values: RAR > 3.5 and in-stent PSV > 180 cm/sec. Results: Six examinations were technically inadequate. Nine stents had residual or restenosis > 50% at DSA. The two duplex parameters were equally accurate since areas under the curves were similar (0.943). With optimal threshold values of 226 cm/sec for PSV and 2.7 for RAR, sensitivities and specificities were 100% and 90%, and 100% and 84%, respectively. Using the published duplex criteria resulted in sensitivities and specificities of 100% and 74% for PSV, and 50% and 89% for RAR. Conclusion: Duplex US is a sensitive modality for detecting in-stent restenosis if laboratory-specific threshold values are used.

  3. FACILITY 210, TWOSTORY DUPLEX, VIEW FACING SW. U.S. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 210, TWO-STORY DUPLEX, VIEW FACING SW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Directed Nanoscale Assembly of Graphene Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Ouk

    Graphene based materials, including fullerene, carbon nanotubes and graphene, are two-dimensional polymeric materials consisting of sp2 hybrid carbons. Those carbon materials have attracted enormous research attention for their outstanding material properties along with molecular scale dimension. The optimized utilization of those materials in various application fields inevitably requires the subtle controllability of their structures and properties. In this presentation, our research achievements associated to directed nanoscale assembly of B- or N-doped graphene based materials will be introduced. Graphene based materials can be efficiently processed into various three-dimensional structures via self-assembly principles. Those carbon assembled structures with extremely large surface and high electro-conductivity are potentially useful for energy and environmental applications. Aqueous dispersion of graphene oxide shows liquid crystalline phase, whose spontaneous molecular ordering is useful for display or fiber spinning. Along with the structure control by directed nanoscale assembly, substitutional doping of graphene based materials with B- or N- can be attained via various chemical treatment methods. The resultant chemically modified carbon materials with tunable workfunction, charge carrier density and enhanced surface activity could be employed for various nanomaterials and nanodevices for improved functionalities and performances.

  5. Synthesis and properties of nanoscale titanium boride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, K. A.; Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the scientific and technological grounds for plasma synthesis of titanium diboride, including thermodynamic and kinetic conditions of boride formation when titanium and titanium dioxide are interacting with products resulting from boron gasification in the nitrogen - hydrogen plasma flow, and two variations of its behavior using the powder mixtures: titanium - boron and titanium dioxide - boron. To study these technology variations, the mathematical models were derived, describing the relation between element contents in the synthesized products of titanium and free boron and basic parameters. The probable mechanism proposed for forming titanium diboride according to a "vapour - melt - crystal" pattern was examined, covering condensation of titanium vapour in the form of aerosol, boriding of nanoscale melt droplets by boron hydrides and crystallization of titanium - boron melt. The comprehensive physical - chemical certification of titanium diboride was carried out, including the study of its crystal structure, phase and chemical composition, dispersion, morphology and particle oxidation. Technological application prospects for use of titanium diboride nanoscale powder as constituent element in the wettable coating for carbon cathodes having excellent physical and mechanical performance and protective properties.

  6. Austenitic and duplex stainless steels in simulated physiological solution characterized by electrochemical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Kocijan, Aleksandra; Conradi, Marjetka; Schön, Peter M

    2012-04-01

    A study of oxide layers grown on 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel in simulated physiological solution is presented here in order to establish the possibility of replacement of AISI 316 L with 2205 DSS in biomedical applications. The results of the potentiodynamic measurements show that the extent of the passive range significantly increased for DSS 2205 compared to AISI 316L stainless steel. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate electrochemical processes taking place on the steel surfaces. Oxide layers formed by electrochemical oxidation at different oxidation potentials were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and their compositions were analyzed as a function of depth. The main constituents on both the investigated materials were Cr- and Fe-oxides. Atomic force microscopy topography studies revealed the higher corrosion resistance of the DSS 2205 compared to the AISI 316L under the chosen experimental conditions. PMID:22331841

  7. Transition characteristics and thermodynamic analysis of DNA duplex formation: a quantitative consideration for the extent of duplex association

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2000-01-01

    Transition characteristics and thermodynamic properties of the single-stranded self-transition and the double-stranded association were investigated and analyzed for 9-, 15- and 21-bp non-self-complementary DNA sequences. The multiple transition processes for the single-stranded self-transition and the double-stranded association were further put forth. The experimental results confirmed that the double-stranded association transition was generally imperfect and the thermodynamic properties of the single-stranded self-transition would exert an influence on a duplex formation. Combining ultraviolet melting experiments in various molar ratios, the extent of duplex association was estimated for three double-stranded DNAs. In our experimental range, the extent of duplex association decreases with increasing the number of base pairs in DNA sequences, which suggest that the short oligonucleotides may proceed in a two-state transition while the long oligonucleotides may not. When the extent of duplex association was considered, the true transition enthalpies of a duplex formation derived from UV and differential scanning calorimetry measurements were in good agreement. PMID:11095688

  8. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-05-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  9. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-04-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  10. In vivo behavior of a high performance duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Cigada, A; De Santis, G; Gatti, A M; Roos, A; Zaffe, D

    1993-01-01

    An in vivo investigation of a new high molybdenum and nitrogen duplex stainless steel (25Cr--7Ni--4Mo--0.3N) has been performed. Cylindrical pins and specially developed devices, to test in static conditions the in vivo localized corrosion resistance, made of this new duplex steel and of a common austenitic stainless steel were implanted in rabbit's femurs for 6 and 12 months. After sacrifice, SEM observations and EDS microanalyses to detect metallic ion release were carried out on the femur sections surrounding the pins. Morphologic observations with stereoscope and SEM were performed on the metallic surfaces of the special devices in order to detect the presence of localized corrosion. Both ion release and localized corrosion were observed for the specimens made of austenitic stainless steel, but not for those made of 25Cr--7Ni--4Mo--0.3N duplex stainless steel. PMID:10148344

  11. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    systems. In addition, the role of thermodynamic fluctuations on superconducting properties has been extensively studied in the context of nanoparticles and nanowires both experimentally and theoretically. In the past decade, a lot of work has been initiated in the area of interface superconductivity where different techniques have been demonstrated to tune Tc. Although the progress in this field has deepened our understanding of nanoscale superconductors, there are several open and key questions which need to be addressed. Some of these are: (1) can superconductivity be enhanced and Tc increased in nanostructures with respect to the bulk limit and if so, how can it be controlled? (2) What are the theoretical and experimental limits for the enhancement and control of superconductivity? (3) Can the phenomena identified in conventional nanostructures shed light on phenomena in high Tc superconductors and vice versa? (4) How will the new fundamental physics of superconductivity at the nanoscale promote advances in nanotechnology applications and vice versa? The papers in this focus section reflect the advances made in this field, in particular in nanowires and nanofilms, but also attempt to answer some of the key open questions outlined above. The theoretical papers explore unconventional quantum phenomena such as the role of confinement in the dynamics of single Cooper pairs in isolated grains [1] and Fano resonances in superconducting gaps in multi-condensate superconductors near a 2.5 Lifshitz transition [2]. Here a new emerging class of quantum phenomena of fundamental physics appear at the Bose-BCS crossover in multi-condensate superconductors [2]. Nanosize effects can now be manipulated by controlling defects in layered oxides [3]. A new approach is provided by controlling the self-organization of oxygen interstitials in layered copper oxides that show an intrinsic nanoscale phase separation [4]. In this case a non-trivial distribution of superconducting nanograins

  12. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions. PMID:19072125

  13. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  14. Interstrand cross-link formation in duplex and triplex DNA by modified pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaohua; Hong, In Seok; Li, Hong; Seidman, Michael M; Greenberg, Marc M

    2008-08-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links have important biological consequences and are useful biotechnology tools. Phenylselenyl substituted derivatives of thymidine (1) and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5) produce interstrand cross-links in duplex DNA when oxidized by NaIO4. The mechanism involves a [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of the respective selenoxides to the corresponding methide type intermediates, which ultimately produce the interstrand cross-links. Determination of the rate constants for the selenoxide rearrangements indicates that the rate-determining step for cross-linking is after methide formation. Cross-linking by the thymidine derivative in duplex DNA shows a modest kinetic preference when flanked by pyrimidines as opposed to purines. In contrast, the rate constant for cross-link formation from 5 opposite dG in duplex DNA is strongly dependent upon the flanking sequence and, in general, is at least an order of magnitude slower than that for 1 in an otherwise identical sequence. Introduction of mispairs at the base pairs flanking 5 or substitution of the opposing dG by dI significantly increases the rate constant and yield for cross-linking, indicating that stronger hydrogen bonding between the methide derived from it and dG compared to dA and the respective electrophile derived from 1 limits reaction by increasing the barrier to rotation into the required syn-conformation. Incorporation of 1 or 5 in triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) that utilize Hoogsteen base pairing also yields interstrand cross-links. The dC derivative produces ICLs approximately 10x faster than the thymidine derivative when incorporated at the 5'-termini of the TFOs and higher yields when incorporated at internal sites. The slower, less efficient ICL formation emanating from 1 is attributed to reaction at N1-dA, which requires local melting of the duplex. In contrast, 5 produces cross-links by reacting with N7-dG. The cross-linking reactions of 1 and 5 illustrate the versatility and

  15. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Helble, Joseph J.; Moniz, Gary A.; Morse, Theodore F.

    1995-09-05

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  16. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Helble, Joseph J.; Moniz, Gary A.; Morse, Theodore F.

    1997-02-04

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  17. Corrosion induced by cathodic hydrogen in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.

    2011-05-01

    In this work new results about the influence of cathodic hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel are described. The results were discussed by taking into account hydrogen charged samples and without hydrogen. The corrosion resistance to pitting was qualified with the polarization curves. The conclusion is that, hydrogen deteriorated the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 duplex stainless steel. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen action was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions.

  18. Renal cell carcinoma arising in ipsilateral duplex system.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Harsh; Kundu, Reetu; Dalal, Usha

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract are common and include a wide anatomic spectrum. Duplex systems are one of the more common renal anomalies, with the majority being asymptomatic. Little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of these anomalies; however, certain causative genes have been implicated. The finding of renal cell carcinoma arising in a kidney with the duplication of pelvicalyceal system and ureters, as in the present case, is uncommon. The association between a duplex system and renal cell carcinoma may be more than a coincidence, requiring a deeper insight and further elucidation. PMID:26328175

  19. Computer Simulation Methods for Defect Configurations and Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will describe general computer simulation methods, including ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte-Carlo method, and their applications to the calculations of defect configurations in various materials (metals, ceramics and oxides) and the simulations of nanoscale structures due to ion-solid interactions. The multiscale theory, modeling, and simulation techniques (both time scale and space scale) will be emphasized, and the comparisons between computer simulation results and exprimental observations will be made.

  20. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  1. Superthermostability of nanoscale TIC-reinforced copper alloys manufactured by a two-step ball-milling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fenglin; Li, Yunping; Xu, Xiandong; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Yamanaka, Kenta; Bian, Huakang; Chiba, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    A Cu-TiC alloy, with nanoscale TiC particles highly dispersed in the submicron-grained Cu matrix, was manufactured by a self-developed two-step ball-milling process on Cu, Ti and C powders. The thermostability of the composite was evaluated by high-temperature isothermal annealing treatments, with temperatures ranging from 727 to 1273 K. The semicoherent nanoscale TiC particles with Cu matrix, mainly located along the grain boundaries, were found to exhibit the promising trait of blocking grain boundary migrations, which leads to a super-stabilized microstructures up to approximately the melting point of copper (1223 K). Furthermore, the Cu-TiC alloys after annealing at 1323 K showed a slight decrease in Vickers hardness as well as the duplex microstructure due to selective grain growth, which were discussed in terms of hardness contributions from various mechanisms.

  2. Nanoscale wicking methods and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Jijie (Inventor); Bronikowski, Michael (Inventor); Noca, Flavio (Inventor); Sansom, Elijah B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A fluid transport method and fluid transport device are disclosed. Nanoscale fibers disposed in a patterned configuration allow transport of a fluid in absence of an external power source. The device may include two or more fluid transport components having different fluid transport efficiencies. The components may be separated by additional fluid transport components, to control fluid flow.

  3. Recent advances in superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems.

    PubMed

    Nagappan, Saravanan; Park, Sung Soo; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2014-02-01

    This review describes the recent advances in the field of superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems. The term superhydrophobic is defined from the surface properties when the surface shows the contact angle (CA) higher than 150 degrees. This could be well known from the lotus effect due to the non-stick and self-cleaning properties of the lotus leaf (LL). We briefly introduced the methods of preparing superhydrophobic surfaces using top-down approaches, bottom-up approaches and a combination of top-down and bottom-up approaches and various ways to prepare superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems using the bio-inspired materials, polymer nanocomposites, metal nanoparticles graphene oxide (GO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We also pointed out the recent applications of the superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems in oil-spill capture and separations, self-cleaning and self-healing systems, bio-medicals, anti-icing and anti-corrosive, electronics, catalysis, textile fabrics and papers etc. The review also highlights the visionary outlook for the future development and use of the superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems for a wide variety of applications. PMID:24749434

  4. Duplex Doppler ultrasound study of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Stagnitti, A.; Marini, A.; Impara, L.; Drudi, F.M.; Lo mele, L.; Lillo Odoardi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The anatomy and physiology of the temporomandibular joint can be studied clinically and by diagnostic imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiography (X-ray) and computed tomography (CT) have thus for many years contributed to the study of the kinetics in the mandibular condyle. However, also duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) examination is widely used in the study of structures during movement, particularly vascular structures. Materials and methods A total of 30 patients were referred by the Department of Orthodontics to the Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, University of Rome “La Sapienza”. All patients underwent duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) examination of the temporomandibular joint using Toshiba APLIO SSA-770A equipment and duplex Doppler multi-display technique, which allows simultaneous display of US images and color Doppler signals. A linear phased array probe with crystal elements was used operating at a basic frequency of 6 MHz during pulsed Doppler spectral analysis and 7.5 MHz during US imaging. Results In normal patients a regular alternation in the spectral Doppler waveforms was obtained, while in patients with temporomandibular joint meniscus dysfunction there was no regularity in the sum of the Fourier series with an unsteady waveform pattern related to irregular movements of the temporomandibular joint. Conclusions In all cases duplex Doppler US examination proved able to differentiate between normal and pathological patients and among the latter this technique permitted identification of the most significant aspects of the dysfunctional diseases. PMID:23397016

  5. Perspective view from northeast of former Surgeon's Quarters. This duplex ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view from northeast of former Surgeon's Quarters. This duplex structure also housed the Secretary and was built in 1887. It is attributed to architect Henry C. Koch, due to the similarity between this Shingle Style house and his contemporary design for the Soldiers' Home Chapel. - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, Surgeon's Quarters, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  6. FRONT VIEW OF FACILITY 561, WHICH WAS ORIGINALLY A DUPLEX. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT VIEW OF FACILITY 561, WHICH WAS ORIGINALLY A DUPLEX. PHOTO SHOWS THE ONLY UNIT REMAINING, UNIT B (UNIT A WAS DEMOLISHED AFTER A FIRE). VIEW FACING NORTH - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), showing duplexed cyber 170174 computers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), showing duplexed cyber 170-174 computers - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  8. Renal pelvis urothelial carcinoma of the upper moiety in complete right renal duplex: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiran; Yu, Quanfeng; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ranlu; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) originated from renal pelvis is the common tumor of the urinary system, however, neoplasia of the renal pelvis in duplex kidneys is extremely rare, especially in the complete renal and ureteral duplex cases. We present the first case of renal pelvis UC of the upper moiety in a complete right renal duplex. This male patient has bilateral complete renal and ureteral duplex. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of renal pelvis UC in a complete renal duplex system. After this experience we feel that the diagnosis of renal pelvis UC in duplex kidneys is not so easy, and once the diagnosis is determined, the whole renal duplex units and bladder cuff or ectopic orifice should be excised radically. PMID:26823906

  9. Formation of hollow nanocrystals through the nanoscale kirkendall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yadong; Rioux, Robert M.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Hughes, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2004-03-11

    We demonstrate that hollow nanocrystals can be synthesized through a mechanism analogous to the Kirkendall Effect, in which pores form due to the difference in diffusion rates between two components in a diffusion couple. Cobalt nanocrystals are chosen as a primary example to show that their reaction in solution with oxygen, sulfur or selenium leads to the formation of hollow nanocrystals of the resulting oxide and chalcogenides. This process provides a general route to the synthesis of hollow nanostructures of large numbers of compounds. A simple extension of this process yields platinum-cobalt oxide yolk-shell nanostructures which may serve as nanoscale reactors in catalytic applications.

  10. Development of WO3 Thin Films Using Nanoscale Silicon Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Park, Chul

    2000-06-01

    The WO3-x-0.1TiO2-y thin films prepared by the sol-gel route exhibit increased lifetime and stability. A sol-gel solution mixed with nanoscopic silicon oxide particles (40 nm, 200 nm) was spin-coated onto an indium tin oxide (ITO)-covered glass substrate followed by further surface development by chemical etching. A significantly faster response time of the electrochromic cell due to the increase of the surface area of the WO3/electrolyte interface and enhancement of the lithium ion diffusion rate have been obtained. The coloration efficiency was found to be much higher in the areas surrounding incorporated nanoscale particles.

  11. Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Al/Al2O3 Duplex Coating on Pipeline Steel X80 in Simulated Oil and Gas Well Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min; Wang, Yu; Wang, Ping-Gu; Shi, Qin-Yi; Zhang, Meng-Xian

    2015-04-01

    Corrosion resistant Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating for pipeline steel X80 was prepared by a combined treatment of low-temperature aluminizing and micro-arc oxidation (MAO). Phase composition and microstructure of mono-layer Fe-Al coating and Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Corrosion resistance of the coated pipeline steel X80 in a simulated oil and gas well condition was also investigated. Mono-layer Fe-Al coating consists of Fe2Al5 and FeAl, which is a suitable transitional layer for the preparation of ceramic coating by MAO on the surface of pipeline steel X80. Under the same corrosion condition at 373 K for 168 h with 1 MPa CO2 and 0.1 MPa H2S, corrosion weight loss rate of pipeline steel X80 with Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating decreased to 23% of original pipeline steel X80, which improved by 10% than that of pipeline steel X80 with mono-layer Fe-Al coating. It cannot find obvious cracks and pits on the corrosion surface of pipeline steel X80 with Fe-Al/Al2O3 duplex coating.

  12. Ion Mobility Spectrometry Reveals Duplex DNA Dissociation Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrova, Anastasia; Gabelica, Valérie; Duwez, Anne-Sophie; De Pauw, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) soft desolvation is widely used to investigate fragile species such as nucleic acids. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) gives access to the gas phase energetics of the intermolecular interactions in the absence of solvent, by following the dissociation of mass-selected ions. Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) provides indications on the tridimensional oligonucleotide structure by attributing a collision cross section (CCS) to the studied ion. Electrosprayed duplexes longer than eight bases pairs retain their helical structure in a solvent-free environment. However, the question of conformational changes under activation in MS/MS studies remains open. The objective of this study is to probe binding energetics and characterize the unfolding steps occurring prior to oligonucleotide duplex dissociation. Comparing the evolution of CCS with collision energy and breakdown curves, we characterize dissociation pathways involved in CID-activated DNA duplex separation into single strands, and we demonstrate here the existence of stable dissociation intermediates. At fixed duplex length, dissociation pathways were found to depend on the percentage of GC base pairs and on their position in the duplex. Our results show that pure GC sequences undergo a gradual compaction until reaching the dissociation intermediate: A-helix. Mixed AT-GC sequences were found to present at least two conformers: a classic B-helix and an extended structure where the GC tract is a B-helix and the AT tract(s) fray. The dissociation in single strands takes place from both conformers when the AT base pairs are enclosed between two GC tracts or only from the extended conformer when the AT tract is situated at the end(s) of the sequence.

  13. Deposition of adherent Ag-Ti duplex films on ceramics in a multiple-cathode sputter deposition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honecy, Frank S.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesion of Ag films deposited on oxide ceramics can be increased by first depositing intermediate films of active metals such as Ti. Such duplex coatings can be fabricated in a widely used three target sputter deposition system. It is shown here that the beneficial effect of the intermediate Ti film can be defeated by commonly used in situ target and substrate sputter cleaning procedures which result in Ag under the Ti. Auger electron spectroscopy and wear testing of the coatings are used to develop a cleaning strategy resulting in an adherent film system.

  14. Biosafe Nanoscale Pharmaceutical Adjuvant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shubin; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Chongxi; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Paul C.; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to developments in the field of nanotechnology over the past decades, more and more biosafe nanoscale materials have become available for use as pharmaceutical adjuvants in medical research. Nanomaterials possess unique properties which could be employed to develop drug carriers with longer circulation time, higher loading capacity, better stability in physiological conditions, controlled drug release, and targeted drug delivery. In this review article, we will review recent progress in the application of representative organic, inorganic and hybrid biosafe nanoscale materials in pharmaceutical research, especially focusing on nanomaterial-based novel drug delivery systems. In addition, we briefly discuss the advantages and notable functions that make these nanomaterials suitable for the design of new medicines; the biosafety of each material discussed in this article is also highlighted to provide a comprehensive understanding of their adjuvant attributes. PMID:25429253

  15. Nanoscale plasticity in silica glass

    SciTech Connect

    Glosli, J.N.; Boercker, D.B.; Tesar, A.; Belak, J.

    1993-10-01

    Mechanisms of nano-scale plasticity and damage initiation in silica glass is examined using molecular dynamics simulation. Computer experiments are carried out by indenting a sharp diamond-like tool, containing 4496 atoms, into a silica slab consisting of 12288 atoms. Both elastic and plastic deformation of silica is observed during nanoindentation simulation; this transition occurs at an indentation of 1.25 nm, and the calculated hardness (15GPa for 1.5 nm indentation) agrees with experiment.

  16. Cavitation dynamics on the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kotaidis, Vassilios; Plech, Anton

    2005-11-21

    The ultrafast excitation of gold nanoparticle sols causes a strong nonequilibrium heating of the particle lattice and subsequently of the water shell close to the particle surface. Above a threshold in laser fluence, which is defined by the onset of homogeneous nucleation, nanoscale vapor bubbles develop around the particles, expand and collapse again within the first nanosecond after excitation. We show the existence of cavitation on the nanometer and subnanosecond time scale, described within the framework of continuum thermodynamics.

  17. Nanoscale directional motion towards regions of stiffness.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tienchong; Zhang, Hongwei; Guo, Zhengrong; Guo, Xingming; Gao, Huajian

    2015-01-01

    How to induce nanoscale directional motion via some intrinsic mechanisms pertaining to a nanosystem remains a challenge in nanotechnology. Here we show via molecular dynamics simulations that there exists a fundamental driving force for a nanoscale object to move from a region of lower stiffness toward one of higher stiffness on a substrate. Such nanoscale directional motion is induced by the difference in effective van der Waals potential energy due to the variation in stiffness of the substrate; i.e., all other conditions being equal, a nanoscale object on a stiffer substrate has lower van der Waals potential energy. This fundamental law of nanoscale directional motion could lead to promising routes for nanoscale actuation and energy conversion. PMID:25615480

  18. Nanoscale Directional Motion towards Regions of Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tienchong; Zhang, Hongwei; Guo, Zhengrong; Guo, Xingming; Gao, Huajian

    2015-01-01

    How to induce nanoscale directional motion via some intrinsic mechanisms pertaining to a nanosystem remains a challenge in nanotechnology. Here we show via molecular dynamics simulations that there exists a fundamental driving force for a nanoscale object to move from a region of lower stiffness toward one of higher stiffness on a substrate. Such nanoscale directional motion is induced by the difference in effective van der Waals potential energy due to the variation in stiffness of the substrate; i.e., all other conditions being equal, a nanoscale object on a stiffer substrate has lower van der Waals potential energy. This fundamental law of nanoscale directional motion could lead to promising routes for nanoscale actuation and energy conversion.

  19. Exposure and Health Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Dioxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive - NOW IN PRINT IN THE JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels that are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (Ce02) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coatin...

  20. Electrochemical discrimination between G-quadruplex and duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    De Rache, Aurore; Doneux, Thomas; Buess-Herman, Claudine

    2014-08-19

    Analytical tools enabling the discrimination between duplex DNA and G-quadruplex DNA are necessary to unravel the biological function(s) of G-quadruplexes. A methodology relying on the electrochemical response of the electroactive hexaammineruthenium(III) cation at DNA-modified surfaces is presented. A characteristic voltammetric peak is evidenced for all the investigated G-quadruplex sequences, encompassing various types of folding and numbers of quartets. In contrast, no such peak is detected for dsDNA sequences. The occurrence of the voltammetric peak is the consequence of a strong association between the hexaammineruthenium ligand and the surface-immobilized G-quadruplexes. The peak potential points to a significant contribution of nonelectrostatic interactions between the electroactive ligand and G-quadruplexes. The very good efficiency of the discrimination methodology is demonstrated by comparing a G-quadruplex and its corresponding duplex. PMID:25048277

  1. Hangingwall strain: A function of duplex shape and footwall topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Robert W. H.

    1982-10-01

    The concept of piggy-back thrust tectonics implies that foreland is progressively accreted onto a developing thrust sheet during duplex formation. Lateral shape changes in duplexes in the hangingwall of a thrust and corrugations in the footwall will fold higher thrust sheets to give culminations and depressions. Balancing of parts of high level thrust sheets with lower sheets and foreland requires a sequence of extensional and compressional strains orientated normal to the thrust transport direction. Culmination walls will be sites of strike-parallel extension. Subsequent adjacent culminations will compress early culmination walls which will result in a sequence of irrotational strains. Examples of this geometry are given from the Moine Thrust zone of Northwest Scotland. The model allows a re-examination of strains and hangingwall evolution in some thrust sheets in the Helvetic and external zones of the Alps.

  2. Gas-fired duplex free-piston Stirling refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urieli, L.

    1984-03-01

    The duplex free-piston Stirling refrigerator is a potentially high efficiency, high reliability device which is ideally suited to the home appliance field, in particular as a gas-fired refrigerator. It has significant advantages over other equivalent devices including freedom from halogenated hydrocarbons, extremely low temperatures available at a high efficiency, integrated water heating, and simple burner system control. The design and development of a portable working demonstration gas-fired duplex Stirling refrigeration unit is described. A unique combination of computer aided development and experimental development was used, enabling a continued interaction between the theoretical analysis and practical testing and evaluation. A universal test rig was developed in order to separately test and evaluate major subunits, enabling a smooth system integration phase.

  3. Duplex stainless steels for the pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsson, E.; Olsson, J.

    1999-07-01

    The metallurgy and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel, particularly with regards to applications in the pulp and paper industry, are described. Practical experiences from pressure vessel installations in cooking plants and bleach plants as well as from non-pressurized items in different parts along the fiber line, are given. The paper also reviews corrosion test results presented previously and compares these with recent test data and the practical experiences. Though most of the installations have been successful, some cases of corrosion attacks on duplex stainless steel have been reported, although these are very limited in number: one digester, one calorifier, two pulp storage towers, and two bleach plant filter washers, of a total of more than 700 identified installations.

  4. Laser Safety Method For Duplex Open Loop Parallel Optical Link

    DOEpatents

    Baumgartner, Steven John; Hedin, Daniel Scott; Paschal, Matthew James

    2003-12-02

    A method and apparatus are provided to ensure that laser optical power does not exceed a "safe" level in an open loop parallel optical link in the event that a fiber optic ribbon cable is broken or otherwise severed. A duplex parallel optical link includes a transmitter and receiver pair and a fiber optic ribbon that includes a designated number of channels that cannot be split. The duplex transceiver includes a corresponding transmitter and receiver that are physically attached to each other and cannot be detached therefrom, so as to ensure safe, laser optical power in the event that the fiber optic ribbon cable is broken or severed. Safe optical power is ensured by redundant current and voltage safety checks.

  5. Direct surface-enhanced Raman scattering analysis of DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Luca; Krpetić, Željka; van Lierop, Danny; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Graham, Duncan

    2015-01-19

    The exploration of the genetic information carried by DNA has become a major scientific challenge. Routine DNA analysis, such as PCR, still suffers from important intrinsic limitations. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has emerged as an outstanding opportunity for the development of DNA analysis, but its application to duplexes (dsDNA) has been largely hampered by reproducibility and/or sensitivity issues. A simple strategy is presented to perform ultrasensitive direct label-free analysis of unmodified dsDNA with the means of SERS by using positively charged silver colloids. Electrostatic adhesion of DNA promotes nanoparticle aggregation into stable clusters yielding intense and reproducible SERS spectra at nanogram level. As potential applications, we report the quantitative recognition of hybridization events as well as the first examples of SERS recognition of single base mismatches and base methylations (5-methylated cytosine and N6-methylated Adenine) in duplexes. PMID:25414148

  6. Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (Program website, free access)   Currently there is no database matching your keyword search, but the NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology website may be of interest. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology enables science and industry by providing essential measurement methods, instrumentation, and standards to support all phases of nanotechnology development, from discovery to production.

  7. Preface: Charge transport in nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    the molecular level. Nanoscale charge transport experiments in ionic liquids extend the field to high temperatures and to systems with intriguing interfacial potential distributions. Other directions may include dye-sensitized solar cells, new sensor applications and diagnostic tools for the study of surface-bound single molecules. Another motivation for this special issue is thus to highlight activities across different research communities with nanoscale charge transport as a common denominator. This special issue gathers 27 articles by scientists from the United States, Germany, the UK, Denmark, Russia, France, Israel, Canada, Australia, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Belgium and Singapore; it gives us a flavour of the current state-of-the-art of this diverse research area. While based on contributions from many renowned groups and institutions, it obviously cannot claim to represent all groups active in this very broad area. Moreover, a number of world-leading groups were unable to take part in this project within the allocated time limit. Nevertheless, we regard the current selection of papers to be representative enough for the reader to draw their own conclusions about the current status of the field. Each paper is original and has its own merit, as all papers in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter special issues are subjected to the same scrutiny as regular contributions. The Guest Editors have deliberately not defined the specific subjects covered in this issue. These came out logically from the development of this area, for example: 'Traditional' solid state nanojunctions based on adsorbed layers, oxide films or nanowires sandwiched between two electrodes: effects of molecular structure (aromaticity, anchoring groups), symmetry, orientation, dynamics (noise patterns) and current-induced heating. Various 'physical effects': inelastic tunnelling and Coulomb blockade, polaron effects, switching modes, and negative differential resistance; the role of

  8. Compact, precision duplex bearing mount for high vibration environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouzakis, George Elias (Inventor); Bowman, James Edward (Inventor); Devine, Edward J. (Inventor); Joffe, Benjamin (Inventor); Segal, Kenneth Neal (Inventor); Webb, Merritt J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A duplex bearing mount including at least one duplex bearing having an inner race and an outer race, the inner race disposed within the outer race and being rotatable relative to the outer race about an axis, the inner race having substantially no relative movement relative to the outer race in at least one direction along the axis, the inner and outer races each having first and second axial faces which are respectively located at the same axial end of the duplex bearing. The duplex bearing is radially supported by a housing, and a shaft extends through the inner race, the shaft radially and axially supported by the inner race. A first retainer is connected to the housing and engages the first axial surface of a bearing race, the movement of which race in a first direction along the axis being constrained by the first retainer. A second, resilient retainer is connected to the housing or the shaft and is deflected through engagement with the second axial face of a bearing race, the movement of which race in a second direction along the axis, opposite to the first direction, being constrained by the deflected second retainer. The bearing is preloaded by its being clamped between the first and second retainers, and the second retainer forms at least a portion of a spring having the characteristic of a substantially constant force value correlating to a range of various deflection values, whereby the preload of the bearing is substantially unaffected by variations in the deflection of the second retainer.

  9. SURVEY AND SUMMARY: Unusual DNA duplex and hairpin motifs

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2003-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA or double-stranded DNA has the potential to adopt a wide variety of unusual duplex and hairpin motifs in the presence (trans) or absence (cis) of ligands. Several principles for the formation of those unusual structures have been established through the observation of a number of recurring structural motifs associated with different sequences. These include: (i) internal loops of consecutive mismatches can occur in a B-DNA duplex when sheared base pairs are adjacent to each other to confer extensive cross- and intra-strand base stacking; (ii) interdigitated (zipper-like) duplex structures form instead when sheared G·A base pairs are separated by one or two pairs of purine·purine mismatches; (iii) stacking is not restricted to base, deoxyribose also exhibits the potential to do so; (iv) canonical G·C or A·T base pairs are flexible enough to exhibit considerable changes from the regular H-bonded conformation. The paired bases become stacked when bracketed by sheared G·A base pairs, or become extruded out and perpendicular to their neighboring bases in the presence of interacting drugs; (v) the purine-rich and pyrimidine-rich loop structures are notably different in nature. The purine-rich loops form compact triloop structures closed by a sheared G·A, A·A, A·C or sheared-like Ganti·Csyn base pair that is stacked by a single residue. On the other hand, the pyrimidine-rich loops with a thymidine in the first position exhibit no base pairing but are characterized by the folding of the thymidine residue into the minor groove to form a compact loop structure. Identification of such diverse duplex or hairpin motifs greatly enlarges the repertoire for unusual DNA structural formation. PMID:12736295

  10. View from east to west of family housing unit (duplex; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from east to west of family housing unit (duplex; either #27 or #87, as only the 7 is visible). Unit #27 was three-bedroom and located on 9th Street south. Unit #87 was a two-bedroom located on 4th Street north. These housing units have been removed - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Family Housing Units, In area bounded by Tenth Street North, Avenue A, & Avenue J, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  11. Herpes zoster duplex bilateralis in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Gahalaut, Pratik; Chauhan, Sandhya

    2012-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus causes both chicken pox and herpes zoster. The phenomenon of herpes zoster occurring concurrently in two non-contiguous dermatomes involving different halves of the body is termed herpes zoster duplex bilateralis (HZDB). Few cases, reported in the literature, were seen in either an immunosuppressed host or in the older age group. Here we present a case of HZDB in an immunocompetent host, probably the first in India. PMID:23130258

  12. All-atom crystal simulations of DNA and RNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunmei; Janowski, Pawel A.; Case, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics simulations can complement experimental measures of structure and dynamics of biomolecules. The quality of such simulations can be tested by comparisons to models refined against experimental crystallographic data. Methods We report simulations of a DNA and RNA duplex in their crystalline environment. The calculations mimic the conditions for PDB entries 1D23 [d(CGATCGATCG)2] and 1RNA [(UUAUAUAUAUAUAA)2], and contain 8 unit cells, each with 4 copies of the Watson-Crick duplex; this yields in aggregate 64 µs of duplex sampling for DNA and 16 µs for RNA. Results The duplex structures conform much more closely to the average structure seen in the crystal than do structures extracted from a solution simulation with the same force field. Sequence-dependent variations in helical parameters, and in groove widths, are largely maintained in the crystal structure, but are smoothed out in solution. However, the integrity of the crystal lattice is slowly degraded in both simulations, with the result that the interfaces between chains become heterogeneous. This problem is more severe for the DNA crystal, which has fewer inter-chain hydrogen bond contacts than does the RNA crystal. Conclusions Crystal simulations using current force fields reproduce many features of observed crystal structures, but suffer from a gradual degradation of the integrity of the crystal lattice. General significance The results offer insights into force-field simulations that tests their ability to preserve weak interactions between chains, which will be of importance also in non-crystalline applications that involve binding and recognition. PMID:25255706

  13. Duplex structures and imbricate thrust systems: geometry, structural position, and hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.

    1986-09-01

    Duplexes and imbricate thrust systems form some of the most complex hydrocarbon traps in overthrust belts. The geometry of a duplex is controlled by the ramp angle (theta) and height (h/sub r/), the final spacing between adjacent thrusts (a'), and the relative displacements on them (d/sub 1/-d/sub 2/). For constant theta and h/sub r/, three different classes are recognized: (1) independent ramp anticlines and hinterland sloping duplexes, (2) true duplexes, and (3) overlapping ramp anticlines. Several types of duplexes and imbricate thrust systems form important hydrocarbon traps. Examples include the system of independent anticlines of the Turner Valley and Highwood oil and gas fields, the hinterland sloping duplex consisting of the Chestnut Ridge-Sandy Ridge system of the Ben Hur oil field, the partly overlapping anticlines of the Waterton and Savanna Creek gas fields, and the completely overlapping anticlines of the Rose Hill oil field. 27 figures.

  14. An evaluation method for nanoscale wrinkle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. P.; Wang, C. G.; Zhang, L. M.; Tan, H. F.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a spectrum-based wrinkling analysis method via two-dimensional Fourier transformation is proposed aiming to solve the difficulty of nanoscale wrinkle evaluation. It evaluates the wrinkle characteristics including wrinkling wavelength and direction simply using a single wrinkling image. Based on this method, the evaluation results of nanoscale wrinkle characteristics show agreement with the open experimental results within an error of 6%. It is also verified to be appropriate for the macro wrinkle evaluation without scale limitations. The spectrum-based wrinkling analysis is an effective method for nanoscale evaluation, which contributes to reveal the mechanism of nanoscale wrinkling.

  15. Duplex-Selective Ruthenium-based DNA Intercalators

    PubMed Central

    Shade, Chad M.; Kennedy, Robert D.; Rouge, Jessica L.; Rosen, Mari S.; Wang, Mary X.; Seo, Soyoung E.; Clingerman, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and synthesis of small molecules that exhibit enhanced luminescence in the presence of duplex rather than single-stranded DNA. The local environment presented by a well-known [Ru(dipyrido[2,3-a:3',2'-c]phenazine)L2]2+-based DNA intercalator was modified by functionalizing the bipyridine ligands with esters and carboxylic acids. By systematically varying the number and charge of the pendant groups, it was determined that decreasing the electrostatic interaction between the intercalator and the anionic DNA backbone reduced single-strand interactions and translated to better duplex specificity. In studying this class of complexes, a single RuII complex emerged that selectively luminesces in the presence of duplex DNA with little to no background from interacting with single stranded DNA. This complex shows promise as a new dye capable of selectively staining double versus single-stranded DNA in gel electrophoresis, which cannot be done with conventional SYBR dyes. PMID:26119581

  16. Development and Evaluation of Nanoscale Sorbents for Mercury Capture from Warm Fuel Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Raja A. Jadhav; Howard Meyer; Slawomir Winecki

    2006-03-01

    Several nanocrystalline sorbents were synthesized by GTI's subcontractor NanoScale Materials, Inc. (NanoScale) and submitted to GTI for evaluation. A total of seventeen sorbent formulations were synthesized and characterized by NanoScale, including four existing sorbent formulations (NanoActive{trademark} TiO{sub 2}, NanoActive CeO{sub 2}, NanoActive ZnO, and NanoActive CuO), three developmental nanocrystalline metal oxides (MnO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 3}, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and ten supported forms of metal oxides. These sorbents were characterized for physical and chemical properties using a variety of analytical equipments, which confirmed their nanocrystalline structure.

  17. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Salgado, J.; Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A.; Castro-Domínguez, B.; Hernández-Hernández, P.; Newman, R.C.

    2013-12-15

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  18. Young's Equation at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seveno, David; Blake, Terence D.; De Coninck, Joël

    2013-08-01

    In 1805, Thomas Young was the first to propose an equation to predict the value of the equilibrium contact angle of a liquid on a solid. Today, the force exerted by a liquid on a solid, such as a flat plate or fiber, is routinely used to assess this angle. Moreover, it has recently become possible to study wetting at the nanoscale using an atomic force microscope. Here, we report the use of molecular-dynamics simulations to investigate the force distribution along a 15 nm fiber dipped into a liquid meniscus. We find very good agreement between the measured force and that predicted by Young’s equation.

  19. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, D.

    2016-04-01

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined.

  20. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, D

    2016-04-27

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined. PMID:27001949

  1. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by super duplex filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    In the present paper, microstructural changes across an as-welded dissimilar austenitic/duplex stainless steel couple welded by a super duplex stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process is characterized with optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction techniques. Accordingly, variations of microstructure, texture, and grain boundary character distribution of base metals, heat affected zones, and weld metal were investigated. The results showed that the weld metal, which was composed of Widmanstätten austenite side-plates and allotriomorphic grain boundary austenite morphologies, had the weakest texture and was dominated by low angle boundaries. The welding process increased the ferrite content but decreased the texture intensity at the heat affected zone of the super duplex stainless steel base metal. In addition, through partial ferritization, it changed the morphology of elongated grains of the rolled microstructure to twinned partially transformed austenite plateaus scattered between ferrite textured colonies. However, the texture of the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone was strengthened via encouraging recrystallization and formation of annealing twins. At both interfaces, an increase in the special character coincident site lattice boundaries of the primary phase as well as a strong texture with <100> orientation, mainly of Goss component, was observed. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Weld metal showed local orientation at microscale but random texture at macroscale. • Intensification of <100> orientated grains was observed adjacent to the fusion lines. • The austenite texture was weaker than that of the ferrite in all duplex regions. • Welding caused twinned partially transformed austenites to form at SDSS HAZ. • At both interfaces, the ratio of special CSL boundaries of the primary phase increased.

  2. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. PMID:26952459

  3. M23C6 carbides and Cr2N nitrides in aged duplex stainless steel: A SEM, TEM and FIB tomography investigation.

    PubMed

    Maetz, J-Y; Douillard, T; Cazottes, S; Verdu, C; Kléber, X

    2016-05-01

    The precipitation evolution during ageing of a 2101 lean duplex stainless steel was investigated, revealing that the precipitate type and morphology depends on the nature of the grain boundary. Triangular M23C6 carbides precipitate only at γ/δ interfaces and rod-like Cr2N nitrides precipitate at both γ/δ and δ/δ interfaces. After 15min of ageing, the M23C6 size no longer evolves, whereas that of the Cr2N continues to evolve. For Cr2N, the morphology is maintained at γ/δ interfaces, whereas percolation occurs to form a continuous layer at δ/δ interfaces. By combining 2D and 3D characterisation at the nanoscale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, a complete description of the precipitation evolution was obtained, including the composition, crystallographic structure, orientation relationship with the matrix phases, location, morphology, size and volume fraction. PMID:26925831

  4. The effect of chloride ions on the corroded surface layer of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Tong; Xiao, Ning; Shen, Hanjie; Yong, Xingyue

    2016-11-01

    The effects of Cl(-) on the corroded surface layer of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation in chloride solutions were investigated using nanoindentation in conjunction with XRD and XPS. The results demonstrate that Cl(-) had a strong effect on the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer under cavitation, and there was a threshold Cl(-) concentration. Furthermore, a close relationship between the nano-mechanical properties and the cavitation corrosion resistance of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel was observed. The degradation of the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer was accelerated by the synergistic effect between cavitation erosion and corrosion. A key factor was the adsorption of Cl(-), which caused a preferential dissolution of the ferrous oxides in the passive film layer on the corroded surface layer. Cavitation further promoted the preferential dissolution of the ferrous oxides in the passive film layer. Simultaneously, cavitation accelerated the erosion of the ferrite in the corroded surface layer, resulting in the degradation of the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer on 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation. PMID:27245950

  5. Properties of nanoscale dielectrics from first principles computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ning

    In recent years, dielectric materials of nanoscale dimensions have aroused considerable interest. We mention two examples. First, in the semiconductor industry, in order to keep pace with Moore's law scaling, the thickness of gate oxide dielectric material is reaching nanoscale dimensions. Second, the high energy density capacitor industry is currently considering dielectric composites with a polymer host matrix filled with inorganic dielectric nanoparticles or polarizable organic molecules. The driving force for the former application is high dielectric constants (or high-k), and those for the latter are high-k and/or high dielectric breakdown strengths. Thus, it is important to characterize the electronic and dielectric properties of materials in the nano-regime, where surface and interface effects naturally play a dominant role. The primary goal of this work is to determine the extent to which such surface/interface effects modify the dielectric constants, band edges, and dielectric breakdown strengths of systems with at least one of their dimensions in the nano-regime. Towards that end, we have developed new computational methodologies at the first principles (density functional) level of theory. These methods have then been applied to several relevant and critical nanoscale systems, including Si:SiO2 and Si:HfO2 heterojunctions, and polymeric composites containing Cu-phthalocyanine and SiO2 nanoparticles.

  6. INDEP approach for leakage reduction in nanoscale CMOS circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Pattanaik, Manisha; Raj, Balwinder

    2015-02-01

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology scaling for improving speed and functionality turns leakage power one of the major concerns for nanoscale circuits design. The minimization of leakage power is a rising challenge for the design of the existing and future nanoscale CMOS circuits. This paper presents a novel, input-dependent, transistor-level, low leakage and reliable INput DEPendent (INDEP) approach for nanoscale CMOS circuits. INDEP approach is based on Boolean logic calculations for the input signals of the extra inserted transistors within the logic circuit. The gate terminals of extra inserted transistors depend on the primary input combinations of the logic circuits. The appropriate selection of input gate voltages of INDEP transistors are reducing the leakage current efficiently along with rail to rail output voltage swing. The important characteristic of INDEP approach is that it works well in both active as well as standby modes of the circuits. This approach overcomes the limitations created by the prevalent current leakage reduction techniques. The simulation results indicate that INDEP approach mitigates 41.6% and 35% leakage power for 1-bit full adder and ISCAS-85 c17 benchmark circuit, respectively, at 32 nm bulk CMOS technology node.

  7. Superstatistics in nanoscale electrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Vladimir; Krischer, Katharina

    2011-12-01

    Stochastic electrochemical reaction steps on nanosized electrodes are non-Markovian when externally driven by an applied voltage. We show that, compared to the Markovian case (when external driving is absent), nanoscale electrochemical systems obey a superstatistics characterized by a superposition of Tsallis' q indices. The distribution of Tsallis' q indices along stochastic trajectories can be calculated from the electrochemical master equation and normal distributions from Boltzmann-Gibbs thermostatistics are recovered in the thermodynamic limit (the infinite electrode size limit). Although on the nanoscale the external control makes intricate correlations between the microstates, in the superstatistical frame one can still address the microstates as if they were uncorrelated. The resulting superstatistical entropic form is additive in this frame and Tsallis' indices have on the time-average values ≤ 1, which is, indeed, an example of a superstatistical system where no ad hoc distribution has to be assumed for the fluctuations; rather, the distribution is directly calculated from a mesoscopic master equation without freely adjustable parameters. PMID:22106266

  8. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption. PMID:19420657

  9. Investigation of graphene-based nanoscale radiation sensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Joshua A.; Wetherington, Maxwell; Hughes, Zachary; LaBella, Michael, III; Bresnehan, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Current state-of-the-art nanotechnology offers multiple benefits for radiation sensing applications. These include the ability to incorporate nano-sized radiation indicators into widely used materials such as paint, corrosion-resistant coatings, and ceramics to create nano-composite materials that can be widely used in everyday life. Additionally, nanotechnology may lead to the development of ultra-low power, flexible detection systems that can be embedded in clothing or other systems. Graphene, a single layer of graphite, exhibits exceptional electronic and structural properties, and is being investigated for high-frequency devices and sensors. Previous work indicates that graphene-oxide (GO) - a derivative of graphene - exhibits luminescent properties that can be tailored based on chemistry; however, exploration of graphene-oxide's ability to provide a sufficient change in luminescent properties when exposed to gamma or neutron radiation has not been carried out. We investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced chemical modifications and radiation damage induced shifts in luminescence in graphene-oxide materials to provide a fundamental foundation for further development of radiation sensitive detection architectures. Additionally, we investigate the integration of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) with graphene-based devices to evaluate radiation induced conductivity in nanoscale devices. Importantly, we demonstrate the sensitivity of graphene transport properties to the presence of alpha particles, and discuss the successful integration of hBN with large area graphene electrodes as a means to provide the foundation for large-area nanoscale radiation sensors.

  10. Resonant Raman scattering in nanoscale pentacene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rui; Dujovne, Irene; Chen, Liwei; Miao, Qian; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.; Pinczuk, Aron; Nuckolls, Colin; Kloc, Christian; Ron, Arza

    2004-02-01

    Resonant Raman scattering intensities from nanoscale films of pentacene display large resonant enhancements that enable observation of vibrational modes in monolayer cluster films. The resonant enhancements occur when the outgoing photon energy overlaps the free exciton optical transitions observed in luminescence. The results point to the significant potential of resonant Raman methods in the characterization of nanoscale structures of organic molecular semiconductors.

  11. Force-Induced Rupture of a DNA Duplex: From Fundamentals to Force Sensors.

    PubMed

    Mosayebi, Majid; Louis, Ard A; Doye, Jonathan P K; Ouldridge, Thomas E

    2015-12-22

    The rupture of double-stranded DNA under stress is a key process in biophysics and nanotechnology. In this article, we consider the shear-induced rupture of short DNA duplexes, a system that has been given new importance by recently designed force sensors and nanotechnological devices. We argue that rupture must be understood as an activated process, where the duplex state is metastable and the strands will separate in a finite time that depends on the duplex length and the force applied. Thus, the critical shearing force required to rupture a duplex depends strongly on the time scale of observation. We use simple models of DNA to show that this approach naturally captures the observed dependence of the force required to rupture a duplex within a given time on duplex length. In particular, this critical force is zero for the shortest duplexes, before rising sharply and then plateauing in the long length limit. The prevailing approach, based on identifying when the presence of each additional base pair within the duplex is thermodynamically unfavorable rather than allowing for metastability, does not predict a time-scale-dependent critical force and does not naturally incorporate a critical force of zero for the shortest duplexes. We demonstrate that our findings have important consequences for the behavior of a new force-sensing nanodevice, which operates in a mixed mode that interpolates between shearing and unzipping. At a fixed time scale and duplex length, the critical force exhibits a sigmoidal dependence on the fraction of the duplex that is subject to shearing. PMID:26575598

  12. Nanoscale Building Blocks and Nanoassembly of Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkan, Cengiz

    2003-03-01

    Electronics and photonics industries are highly interested in developing new methods for nanofabrication in order to be able to continue their long-term trend of building ever smaller, faster and less expensive devices. Conventional patterning strategies must be augmented by new techniques in order to truly take advantage of the quantum nature of novel nanoscale devices. In our research, we are developing a bottom-up approach to fabricate building blocks, which can be used to assemble nanostructures and devices. This involves the assembly of atom- and molecule-like nanostructures into functional 2-D and 3-D units. This will take advantage of the unique optical, electronic, and size-tunable properties of nanostructures and permit the use of these properties for "real" applications in a larger system (> 10 nm and < 1 um). Here, we demonstrate a novel technique for the fabrication of nano-assemblies of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and quantum dots (QD) (CNT-QD conjugates) for the first time using a zero length cross-linker. CNT's are primarily functionalized with carboxylic end groups by oxidation in concentrated sulfuric acid. Thiol stabilized QD's in aqueous solution with amino end groups were prepared in the laboratory. The ethylene carbodiimide coupling reaction was used to achieve the CNT-QD conjugation. Sulfo-N-Hydroxysuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) was used to enhance this coupling procedure. We present EDS and FTIR data for the chemical modification and SEM images of the first nano-building blocks. Current work includes the more complex 3-D assembly of QD's and nanotubes on Anodized Aluminum Oxide (AAO) template for nanodevices. Potential future applications of our method include the fabrication of novel electronic and photonic devices, crystal displays and biosensors.

  13. Integrated nanoscale tools for interrogating living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgolli, Marsela

    The development of next-generation, nanoscale technologies that interface biological systems will pave the way towards new understanding of such complex systems. Nanowires -- one-dimensional nanoscale structures -- have shown unique potential as an ideal physical interface to biological systems. Herein, we focus on the development of nanowire-based devices that can enable a wide variety of biological studies. First, we built upon standard nanofabrication techniques to optimize nanowire devices, resulting in perfectly ordered arrays of both opaque (Silicon) and transparent (Silicon dioxide) nanowires with user defined structural profile, densities, and overall patterns, as well as high sample consistency and large scale production. The high-precision and well-controlled fabrication method in conjunction with additional technologies laid the foundation for the generation of highly specialized platforms for imaging, electrochemical interrogation, and molecular biology. Next, we utilized nanowires as the fundamental structure in the development of integrated nanoelectronic platforms to directly interrogate the electrical activity of biological systems. Initially, we generated a scalable intracellular electrode platform based on vertical nanowires that allows for parallel electrical interfacing to multiple mammalian neurons. Our prototype device consisted of 16 individually addressable stimulation/recording sites, each containing an array of 9 electrically active silicon nanowires. We showed that these vertical nanowire electrode arrays could intracellularly record and stimulate neuronal activity in dissociated cultures of rat cortical neurons similar to patch clamp electrodes. In addition, we used our intracellular electrode platform to measure multiple individual synaptic connections, which enables the reconstruction of the functional connectivity maps of neuronal circuits. In order to expand and improve the capability of this functional prototype device we designed

  14. Ladderphanes: a new type of duplex polymers.

    PubMed

    Luh, Tien-Yau

    2013-02-19

    Soret band splitting experiments suggest that strong interactions take place between the linkers. The antiferromagnetism of the oxidized ferrocene-based ladderphanes further indicates strong coupling between linkers in these ladderphanes. These polynorbornene-based ladderphanes can easily aggregate to form a two-dimensional, highly ordered array on the graphite surface with areas that can reach the submicrometer range. These morphological patterns result from interactions between vinyl and styryl end groups via π-π stacking along the longitudinal axis of the polymer and van der Waals interaction between backbones of polymers. Such assembly orients planar arene moieties cofacially, and polynorbornene backbones insulate each linear array of arenes from the adjacent arrays. Dihydroxylation converts the double bonds in polynorbornene backbones of ladderphanes into more hydrophilic polyols. Hydrogen bonding between these polyol molecules leads to self-assembly and produces structures with longitudinally staggered morphologies on the graphite surface. PMID:23102096

  15. FACILITY 209, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR FROM 6TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 209, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, OBLIQUE VIEW OF REAR FROM 6TH STREET, FACING NORTH. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Isolated hydatid cyst in a single moiety of an incomplete duplex kidney.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshi, Vinod; Mishra, Shwetank; Bera, Malay Kumar; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Isolated hydatid cyst of kidney is very rare. Hydatid cyst of a duplex renal system is even more rare. We report a 13-year old girl with duplex system of right kidney with isolated hydatid cyst in upper moiety. Right nephrectomy was done to cure the condition. PMID:25628991

  17. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-18

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. Our mini review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.

  18. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-18

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. Our mini review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reducemore » angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.« less

  19. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. This mini-review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods. PMID:25816102

  20. Nanoscale cryptography: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Massoud; Shi, Weidong; Xu, Lei

    2015-11-01

    While most of the electronics industry is dependent on the ever-decreasing size of lithographic transistors, this scaling cannot continue indefinitely. To improve the performance of the integrated circuits, new emerging and paradigms are needed. In recent years, nanoelectronics has become one of the most important and exciting forefront in science and engineering. It shows a great promise for providing us in the near future with many breakthroughs that change the direction of technological advances in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we discuss the contribution that nanotechnology may offer to the evolution of cryptographic hardware and embedded systems and demonstrate how nanoscale devices can be used for constructing security primitives. Using a custom set of design automation tools, it is demonstrated that relative to a conventional 45-nm CMOS system, performance gains can be obtained up to two orders of magnitude reduction in area and up to 50 % improvement in speed.

  1. Nanoscale Engineering of Designer Cellulosomes.

    PubMed

    Gunnoo, Melissabye; Cazade, Pierre-André; Galera-Prat, Albert; Nash, Michael A; Czjzek, Mirjam; Cieplak, Marek; Alvarez, Beatriz; Aguilar, Marina; Karpol, Alon; Gaub, Hermann; Carrión-Vázquez, Mariano; Bayer, Edward A; Thompson, Damien

    2016-07-01

    Biocatalysts showcase the upper limit obtainable for high-speed molecular processing and transformation. Efforts to engineer functionality in synthetic nanostructured materials are guided by the increasing knowledge of evolving architectures, which enable controlled molecular motion and precise molecular recognition. The cellulosome is a biological nanomachine, which, as a fundamental component of the plant-digestion machinery from bacterial cells, has a key potential role in the successful development of environmentally-friendly processes to produce biofuels and fine chemicals from the breakdown of biomass waste. Here, the progress toward so-called "designer cellulosomes", which provide an elegant alternative to enzyme cocktails for lignocellulose breakdown, is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to rational design via computational modeling coupled with nanoscale characterization and engineering tools. Remaining challenges and potential routes to industrial application are put forward. PMID:26748482

  2. Mapping Elasticity at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Gheorghe; Price, William

    2006-03-01

    In the last few years Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy has been developed to investigate the elastic response of materials at the nanoscale ^[1],[2]. We have extended this technique to the real-time mapping of nanomechanical properties of material surfaces. This mapping allows us to investigate the local variation of elastic properties with nanometer resolution and to reduce the uncertainties that arise from single measurements. Quantitative measurements are acquired by first performing an accurate calibration of the elastic properties of the Atomic Force Microscope’s probes with respect to single crystal reference materials. A wide variety of surfaces with different mechanical properties have been investigated to illustrate the applicability of this technique. ^[1] U. Rabe et al., Surf. Interface Anal. 33 , 65 (2002)^[2] D.C. Hurley et al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 2347 (2003)

  3. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bennett E; Roder, Paden B; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J

    2015-04-28

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. This mini-review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods. PMID:25816102

  4. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-04-01

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. This mini-review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.

  5. Optical Spectroscopy at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiaoping

    Recent advances in material science and fabrication techniques enabled development of nanoscale applications and devices with superior performances and high degree of integration. Exotic physics also emerges at nanoscale where confinement of electrons and phonons leads to drastically different behavior from those in the bulk materials. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to investigate and understand material properties at the nanoscale. Optical spectroscopy, one of the most versatile techniques for studying material properties and light-matter interactions, can provide new insights into the nanomaterials. In this thesis, I explore advanced laser spectroscopic techniques to probe a variety of different nanoscale phenomena. A powerful tool in nanoscience and engineering is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Its capability in atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy unveiled the mystical quantum world of atoms and molecules. However identification of molecular species under investigation is one of the limiting functionalities of the STM. To address this need, we take advantage of the molecular `fingerprints' - vibrational spectroscopy, by combining an infrared light sources with scanning tunneling microscopy. In order to map out sharp molecular resonances, an infrared continuous wave broadly tunable optical parametric oscillator was developed with mode-hop free fine tuning capabilities. We then combine this laser with STM by shooting the beam onto the STM substrate with sub-monolayer diamondoids deposition. Thermal expansion of the substrate is detected by the ultrasensitive tunneling current when infrared frequency is tuned across the molecular vibrational range. Molecular vibrational spectroscopy could be obtained by recording the thermal expansion as a function of the excitation wavelength. Another interesting field of the nanoscience is carbon nanotube, an ideal model of one dimensional physics and applications. Due to the small light absorption with

  6. Use of duplex stainless steel castings in control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gossett, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    Duplex stainless steels have enjoyed rapidly increasing popularity in recent years. For numerous reasons the availability of these alloys in the cast form has lagged behind the availability of the wrought form. Commercial demand for control valves in these alloys has driven development of needed information to move into production. A systematic approach was used to develop specifications, suppliers and weld procedures. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), sulfide stress cracking (SSC) and hardness results are also presented for several alloys including; CD3MN (UNS J92205), CD4MCu (UNS J93370) and CD7MCuN (cast UNS S32550).

  7. Local Skin Warming Enhances Color Duplex Imaging of Cutaneous Perforators.

    PubMed

    Li, Haizhou; Du, Zijing; Xie, Feng; Zan, Tao; Li, QingFeng

    2015-07-01

    The perforator flap is one of the most useful techniques in reconstructive surgery. The operative procedure for these flaps will be greatly simplified if accurate localization of the course of the perforator can be preoperatively confirmed. However, small vessels with diameters less than 0.5 mm cannot be readily traced with conventional imaging techniques. Local skin warming temporarily increases cutaneous blood flow and vasodilation. In this study, we established a local skin warming procedure, and performed this before color duplex imaging to improve preoperative perforator mapping and enable precise flap design. PMID:23903089

  8. Microstructures of duplex (beta + gamma) silver-tin alloys.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J R; Miller, D R; Netherway, D J

    1985-05-01

    The microstructures of (beta + gamma) silver-tin alloys are especially influenced by both homogenization temperature and subsequent heat treatment. When the alloy is cooled from homogenization temperatures above approximately 200 degrees C, lenticular regions of the ordered orthorhombic gamma phase precipitate from within the disordered h.c.p. beta phase on three structurally equivalent planes, (1210), (1120), and (2110), to form a Widmanstatten structure. When the duplex alloys were homogenized at temperatures below approximately 200 degrees C, where the beta/(beta + gamma) phase boundary is vertical, these structures were not observed. PMID:3858310

  9. Simulations of Metallic Nanoscale Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    2003-03-01

    Density-functional-theory calculations can be used to understand and predict materials properties based on their nanoscale composition and structure. In combination with efficient search algorithms DFT can furthermore be applied in the nanoscale design of optimized materials. The first part of the talk will focus on two different types of nanostructures with an interesting interplay between chemical activity and conducting states. MoS2 nanoclusters are known for their catalyzing effect in the hydrodesulfurization process which removes sulfur-containing molecules from oil products. MoS2 is a layered material which is insulating. However, DFT calculations indicates the exsistence of metallic states at some of the edges of MoS2 nanoclusters, and the calculations show that the conducting states are not passivated by for example the presence of hydrogen gas. The edge states may play an important role for the chemical activity of MoS_2. Metallic nanocontacts can be formed during the breaking of a piece of metal, and atomically thin structures with conductance of only a single quantum unit may be formed. Such open metallic structures are chemically very active and susceptible to restructuring through interactions with molecular gases. DFT calculations show for example that atomically thin gold wires may incorporate oxygen atoms forming a new type of metallic nanowire. Adsorbates like hydrogen may also affect the conductance. In the last part of the talk I shall discuss the possibilities for designing alloys with optimal mechanical properties based on a combination of DFT calculations with genetic search algorithms. Simulaneous optimization of several parameters (stability, price, compressibility) is addressed through the determination of Pareto optimal alloy compositions within a large database of more than 64000 alloys.

  10. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, F.; Sogne, E.; Lenardi, C.; Podestà, A.; Merlini, M.; Ducati, C.; Milani, P.

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments.

  11. Drain current modulation in a nanoscale field-effect-transistor channel by single dopant implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Tettamanzi, G. C.; Alves, A. D. C.; Thompson, S.; Yang, C.; Verduijn, J.; Mol, J. A.; Wacquez, R.; Vinet, M.; Sanquer, M.; Rogge, S.; Jamieson, D. N.

    2010-06-01

    We demonstrate single dopant implantation into the channel of a silicon nanoscale metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor. This is achieved by monitoring the drain current modulation during ion irradiation. Deterministic doping is crucial for overcoming dopant number variability in present nanoscale devices and for exploiting single atom degrees of freedom. The two main ion stopping processes that induce drain current modulation are examined. We employ 500 keV He ions, in which electronic stopping is dominant, leading to discrete increases in drain current and 14 keV P dopants for which nuclear stopping is dominant leading to discrete decreases in drain current.

  12. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Dissimilar Austenitic/Super Duplex Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of chemical composition on microstructural features and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex and austenitic stainless steels, welding was attempted by gas tungsten arc welding process with a super duplex (ER2594) and an austenitic (ER309LMo) stainless steel filler metal. While the austenitic weld metal had vermicular delta ferrite within austenitic matrix, super duplex stainless steel was mainly comprised of allotriomorphic grain boundary and Widmanstätten side plate austenite morphologies in the ferrite matrix. Also the heat-affected zone of austenitic base metal comprised of large austenite grains with little amounts of ferrite, whereas a coarse-grained ferritic region was observed in the heat-affected zone of super duplex base metal. Although both welded joints showed acceptable mechanical properties, the hardness and impact strength of the weld metal produced using super duplex filler metal were found to be better than that obtained by austenitic filler metal.

  13. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    optical throughput of the probe and scanning position accuracy. Prato showed a method to characterize force sensitivity of piezoelectric transducers and we've implemented a test system for off line characterization of probes. Recent improvements in aperture SNOM were also illustrated in this talk by some biological applications. H Stadler showed the development of a new instrumentation, combining optical and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) multimodal characterization, specifically designed for SPM based life science research and full integration with optical microscopy. The prerequisites and design of such equipment besides newer application examples in this area were discussed. Stadler also overviewed work on improving quantitative mechanical characterization on the nanoscale. This included hardware like SPM control electronics and probe development as theoretical aspects and software for data evaluation. Comparative field emission studies of as-produced CNTs vis á vis commercially obtained SWCNT were presented by A Tiberia. Carbon nanotubes synthesized at INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati in the nanotechnology group of S Bellucci by DC thermal plasma process were analyzed by electron microscope and studied for their field emission properties. These carbon nanotubes were deposited on a tungsten wire, which acted as the cathode. Care was taken to ensure complete covering of the wire. The emission studies were performed in a stainless steel chamber under a dynamic vacuum in the range of 10-8 Torr. The field emitted current was detected using a phosphorous coated ITO (indium tin oxide) glass plate. The phosphorous coat also helped in imaging the tips of the nanotubes. This was crucial in accurately estimating the emitting area and thus the field enhancement factor. The I-V curves for the field emission were recorded for various distances between the electrodes. Similar studies were performed for commercially obtained single walled carbon nanotubes and the results

  14. New directions for nanoscale thermoelectric materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dresselhaus, M. S.; Chen, G.; Tang, M. Y.; Yang, R. G.; Lee, H.; Wang, D. Z.; Ren, F.; Fleurial, J. P.; Gogna, P.

    2005-01-01

    Many of the recent advances in enhancing the thermoelectric figure of merit are linked to nanoscale phenomena with both bulk samples containing nanoscale constituents and nanoscale materials exhibiting enhanced thermoelectric performance in their own right. Prior theoretical and experimental proof of principle studies on isolated quantum well and quantum wire samples have now evolved into studies on bulk samples containing nanostructured constituents. In this review, nanostructural composites are shown to exhibit nanostructures and properties that show promise for thermoelectric applications. A review of some of the results obtained to date are presented.

  15. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  16. Duplex development and abandonment during evolution of the Lewis thrust system, southern Glacier National Park, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, An; Kelty, Thomas K.; Davis, Gregory A.

    1989-09-01

    Geologic mapping in southern Glacier National Park, Montana, reveals the presence of two duplexes sharing the same floor thrust fault, the Lewis thrust. The westernmost duplex (Brave Dog Mountain) includes the low-angle Brave Dog roof fault and Elk Mountain imbricate system, and the easternmost (Rising Wolf Mountain) duplex includes the low-angle Rockwell roof fault and Mt. Henry imbricate system. The geometry of these duplexes suggests that they differ from previously described geometric-kinematic models for duplex development. Their low-angle roof faults were preexisting structures that were locally utilized as roof faults during the formation of the imbricate systems. Crosscutting of the Brave Dog fault by the Mt. Henry imbricate system indicates that the two duplexes formed at different times. The younger Rockwell-Mt. Henry duplex developed 20 km east of the older Brave Dog-Elk Mountain duplex; the roof fault of the former is at a higher structural level. Field relations confirm that the low-angle Rockwell fault existed across the southern Glacier Park area prior to localized formation of the Mt. Henry imbricate thrusts beneath it. These thrusts kinematically link the Rockwell and Lewis faults and may be analogous to P shears that form between two synchronously active faults bounding a simple shear system. The abandonment of one duplex and its replacement by another with a new and higher roof fault may have been caused by (1) warping of the older and lower Brave Dog roof fault during the formation of the imbricate system (Elk Mountain) beneath it, (2) an upward shifting of the highest level of a simple shear system in the Lewis plate to a new decollement level in subhorizontal belt strata (= the Rockwell fault) that lay above inclined strata within the first duplex, and (3) a reinitiation of P-shear development (= Mt. Henry imbricate faults) between the Lewis thrust and the subparallel, synkinematic Rockwell fault.

  17. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Cast stainless steels (CASSs) have been extensively used for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich α'-phase by Spinodal decomposition of δ-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. An approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. These results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  18. Thermal treatment effects on laser surface remelting duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Alex M.; Ierardi, Maria Clara F.; Aparecida Pinto, M.; Tavares, Sérgio S. M.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the microstructural changes and effects on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels UNS S32304 and UNS S32205, commonly used by the petroleum industry, were studied, following the execution of laser surface remelting (LSM) and post-thermal treatments (TT). In this way, data was obtained, which could then be compared with the starting condition of the alloys. In order to analyze the corrosion behaviour of the alloys in the as-received conditions, treated with laser and after post-thermal treatments, cyclic polarization tests were carried out. A solution of 3.5% NaCl (artificial sea water) was used, as duplex stainless steels are regularly used by the petroleum industry in offshore locations. The results obtained showed that when laser surface treated, due to rapid resolidification, the alloys became almost ferritic, and since the level of nitrogen in the composition of both alloys is superior to their solubility limit in ferrite, a precipitation of Cr2N (chromium nitrides) occurred in the ferritic matrix, causing loss of corrosion resistance, thus resulting in an increase in surface hardness. However, after the post-thermal treatment the alloys corrosion resistance was restored to values close to those of the as-received condition.

  19. Duplex Identification of Staphylococcus aureus by Aptamer and Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tianjun; Wang, Libo; Zhao, Kexu; Ge, Yu; He, Meng; Li, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the top common pathogen causing infections and food poisoning. Identification of S. aureus is crucial for the disease diagnosis and regulation of food hygiene. Herein, we report an aptamer-AuNPs based method for duplex identification of S. aureus. Using AuNPs as an indicator, SA23, an aptamer against S. aureus, can well identify its target from Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Furthermore, we find citrate-coated AuNPs can strongly bind to S. aureus, but not bind to Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, which leads to different color changes in salt solution. This colorimetric response is capable of distinguishing S. aureus from S. enteritidis and P. mirabilis. Thus, using the aptasensor and AuNPs together, S. aureus can be accurately identified from the common pathogens. This duplex identification system is a promising platform for simple visual identification of S. aureus. Additionally, in the aptasensing process, bacteria are incubated with aptamers and then be removed before the aptamers adding to AuNPs, which may avoid the interactions between bacteria and AuNPs. This strategy can be potentially applied in principle to detect other cells by AuNPs-based aptasensors. PMID:27427591

  20. Resonance energy transfer in DNA duplexes labeled with localized dyes.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Paul D; Khachatrian, Ani; Buckhout-White, Susan; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Goldman, Ellen R; Medintz, Igor L; Melinger, Joseph S

    2014-12-18

    The growing maturity of DNA-based architectures has raised considerable interest in applying them to create photoactive light harvesting and sensing devices. Toward optimizing efficiency in such structures, resonant energy transfer was systematically examined in a series of dye-labeled DNA duplexes where donor-acceptor separation was incrementally changed from 0 to 16 base pairs. Cyanine dyes were localized on the DNA using double phosphoramidite attachment chemistry. Steady state spectroscopy, single-pair fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, and ultrafast two-color pump-probe methods were utilized to examine the energy transfer processes. Energy transfer rates were found to be more sensitive to the distance between the Cy3 donor and Cy5 acceptor dye molecules than efficiency measurements. Picosecond energy transfer and near-unity efficiencies were observed for the closest separations. Comparison between our measurements and the predictions of Förster theory based on structural modeling of the dye-labeled DNA duplex suggest that the double phosphoramidite linkage leads to a distribution of intercalated and nonintercalated dye orientations. Deviations from the predictions of Förster theory point to a failure of the point dipole approximation for separations of less than 10 base pairs. Interactions between the dyes that alter their optical properties and violate the weak-coupling assumption of Förster theory were observed for separations of less than four base pairs, suggesting the removal of nucleobases causes DNA deformation and leads to enhanced dye-dye interaction. PMID:25397906

  1. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-12

    We used cast stainless steels (CASSs)for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich alpha-phase by Spinodal decomposition of delta-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. Moreover, an approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. Our results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  2. Comparative study of different venous reflux duplex quantitation parameters.

    PubMed

    Valentín, L I; Valentín, W H

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare different quantitation parameters of venous reflux by duplex scan in different venous disease manifestations. Duplex scan is a new modality to quantify venous reflux. Several studies propose different parameters. In addition, there is controversy about the importance of deep and superficial involvement in different disease manifestations. It is not clear whether there is an increased venous reflux associated with varied clinical stages. Venous conditions were classified in seven stages and their differences for several quantitation variables studied. Most quantitation variables, such as average and peak velocity, average and peak flow, and reflux volume disclosed significantly increased reflux from normal, pain only, and edema group to varicose vein, with or without edema, to lipodermatosclerosis and ulcer groups at every location in the lower extremity. Reflux time was not as consistent as other variables. Totalization of the results of every parameter for the whole extremity points to an increased reflux from pain only to edema and from lipodermatosclerosis to ulcer group. Chronic edema is not usually associated with increased venous reflux. The greater saphenous vein (superficial system) seems to be the main contributor to reflux in all stages of disease. Different quantitation methods of venous reflux are equivalent. Increased deep and superficial reflux and its totalization are associated with a more advanced disease stage. Reflux time may be the least useful variable. Chronic edema is frequently not associated with venous reflux. Greater saphenectomy may be the most useful intervention, even in the presence of deep vein reflux. PMID:10496498

  3. The Effect of Nano-Scale Topography on Keratinocyte Phenotype and Wound Healing Following Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Suzanne M.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Wood, Fiona M.; Fear, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic modulation of tissue response is an important consideration in the design and manufacture of a biomaterial. In developing new tissue therapies for skin, all levels of architecture, including the nanoscale need to be considered. Here we show that keratinocyte phenotype is affected by nanoscale changes in topography with cell morphology, proliferation, and migration influenced by the pore size in anodic aluminum oxide membranes. A membrane with a pore size of 300 nm, which enhanced cell phenotype in vitro, was used as a dressing to cover a partial thickness burn injury in the pig. Wounds dressed with the membrane showed evidence of advanced healing with significantly less organizing granulation tissue and more mature epidermal layers than control wounds dressed with a standard burns dressing. The results demonstrate the importance of nanoscale topography in modulating keratinocyte phenotype and skin wound healing. PMID:21988618

  4. Direct Optical Visualization of Graphene and Its Nanoscale Defects on Transparent Substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Wojcik, Michal; Xu, Ke

    2016-08-10

    The discovery and rise of graphene were historically enabled by its ∼10% optical contrast on specialized substrates like oxide-capped silicon. However, substantially lower contrast is obtained on transparent substrates. Moreover, it remains difficult to visualize nanoscale defects in graphene, including voids, cracks, wrinkles, and multilayers, on most device substrates. We report the use of interference reflection microscopy (IRM), a facile, label-free optical microscopy method originated in cell biology, to directly visualize graphene on transparent inorganic and polymer substrates at 30-40% image contrast per graphene layer. Our noninvasive approach overcomes typical challenges associated with transparent substrates, including insulating and rough surfaces, enables unambiguous identification of local graphene layer numbers and reveals nanoscale structures and defects with outstanding contrast and throughput. We thus demonstrate in situ monitoring of nanoscale defects in graphene, including the generation of nanocracks under uniaxial strain, at up to 4× video rate. PMID:27351749

  5. Nanoscale drug delivery for targeted chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yong; Huang, Qian; Tang, Jian-Qin; Hou, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Long Zhen; Jiang, Guan

    2016-08-28

    Despite significant improvements in diagnostic methods and innovations in therapies for specific cancers, effective treatments for neoplastic diseases still represent major challenges. Nanotechnology as an emerging technology has been widely used in many fields and also provides a new opportunity for the targeted delivery of cancer drugs. Nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy drugs to the tumor site is highly desirable. Recent studies have shown that nanoscale drug delivery systems not only have the ability to destroy cancer cells but may also be carriers for chemotherapy drugs. Some studies have demonstrated that delivery of chemotherapy via nanoscale carriers has greater therapeutic benefit than either treatment modality alone. In this review, novel approaches to nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy are described and recent progress in this field is discussed. PMID:27235607

  6. Advanced STEM Characterization of Nanoscale Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sanchita

    Nanoscale materials are the key structures in determining the properties of many technologically-important materials. Two such important nanoscale materials for different technological applications are investigated in this dissertation. They are: Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts and irradiated metallic bi-layers. Catalytic activity depends on the structural parameters such as size, shape, and distribution on support. On the other hand, the radiation resistance of the model metallic multi-layers is influenced by the presence of interphase, phase-boundaries, and grain-boundaries. The focus of this dissertation is to use different TEM and STEM techniques to understand the structure of these materials. This dissertation begins with a review of the microscopy techniques used in the experiments. Then, in the next two chapters, literature review followed by results and discussions on the two above-mentioned nano materials are presented. Future research directions are included in the concluding chapter. To obtain three-dimensional morphological information of the FT catalysts during reduced/active state, STEM tomography is used. The oxidized state and reduced state is clarified by using STEM-EELS (in the form of spectrum imaging). We used a special vacuum transfer tomography holder and ex-situ gas assembly for reduction, and the reduction parameters are optimized for complete reduction. It was observed that the particle was reduced with 99.99% H2, and at 400°C for 15 minutes. The tomographic results in before-reduction condition depict that the Co-oxide particles are distributed randomly inside the alumina support. After reduction, the tomogram reveals that metallic Co nucleated and sintered towards the surface of the alumina support. The overall metallic Co distribution shows an outward segregation by subsurface diffusion mechanism. In the study of metallic bi-layer, He-irradiated gold twist grain boundary (AuTGB) was chosen as it is one of the least-studied systems in the

  7. Nanoscale Architectures for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Stanislaus

    2009-03-01

    In my group, we have developed a number of different potential architecture systems for gaining insights into energy storage and photovoltaics. In one manifestation of our efforts, generating a heterojunction comprising nanotubes and nanocrystals, externally bound and connected, has been significant. The unique, innovative, and important aspect of this particular nanoscale architecture is that it takes advantage of the tunability, in terms of size, shape, and chemistry, of nanotubes and nanocrystals, to create a sharp junction interface, whose properties are inherently manipulable, tailorable, and hence, predictable. For example, the electrical resistance of nanotube-nanoparticle networks is dependent on the nanoscale junctions that exist between these constituent nanomaterials as well as on microscale and macroscale connectivity. Thus, rational design of these nanomaterials is critical to a fundamental understanding of charge transport in single molecules and the determination of their conductance. Results on these systems can therefore be used to increase understanding of intrinsic factors affecting carrier mobility, such as electronic structure, carrier trapping, and delocalization. In a second manifestation, three-dimensional, dendritic micron- scale spheres of alkali metal hydrogen titanate 1D nanostructures (i.e.: nanowires and nanotubes) have been generated using a modified hydrothermal technique in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and an alkali metal hydroxide solution. Sea-urchin-like assemblies of these 1D nanostructures have been transformed into their hydrogen titanate analogues by neutralization as well as into their corresponding semiconducting, anatase titania nanostructured counterparts through a moderate high-temperature annealing dehydration process without destroying the 3D hierarchical structural motif. The as-prepared hollow spheres of titanate and titania 1D nanostructures have overall diameters, ranging from 0.8 μm to 1.2 μm, while the

  8. A new diffusion-inhibited oxidation-resistant coating for superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Glasgow, T. K.; Levine, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A concept for enhanced protection of superalloys consists of adding an oxidation- and diffusion-resistant cermet layer between the superalloy and the outer oxidation-resistant metallic alloy coating. Such a duplex coating was compared with a physical-vapor-deposited (PVD) NiCrAlY coating in cyclic oxidation at 1150 C. The substrate alloy was MA 754 - an oxide-dispersion-strengthened superalloy that is difficult to coat. The duplex coating, applied by plasma spraying, outperformed the PVD coating on the basis of weight change and both macroscopic and metallographic observations.

  9. Nanoscale silicon surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: environment stability and activation by simple vacuum oven desiccation.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chia-Wen; Lin, Yuan-Jing; Chen, Pi-Yu; Yang, Yu-Liang; Tan, Say Hwa

    2016-08-01

    Nanoscale silicon surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) is an emerging matrix-free, highly sensitive MS analysis method. An important challenge in using nanoscale silicon SALDI-MS analysis is the aging and stability of silicon after storage in various environments. No proper nanoscale silicon SALDI-MS activation procedure has been reported to solve this issue. This study investigated the sensitivity, wettability, and surface oxidation behavior of nanoscale silicon surface SALDI-MS in a room, an inert gas atmosphere, and a vacuum environment. A simple vacuum oven desiccation was proposed to activate the SALDI-MS surface, and the limit of detection was further enhanced 1000 times to a 500 attomole level using this approach. The long-term stability and desorption/ionization mechanism were also investigated. PMID:27315049

  10. Fabricating Ohmic contact on Nb-doped SrTiO3 surface in nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhang; Shi, Xiaolan; Lai, Xubo; Gao, Zhipeng; Liu, Lixin; Wang, Yuan; Zhu, Wenjun; Meng, Chuanmin; Zhang, Liuwan

    2016-05-01

    Fabricating reliable nano-Ohmic contact on wide gap semiconductors is an important yet difficult step in oxide nanoelectronics. We fabricated Ohmic contact on the n-type wide gap oxide Nb-doped SrTiO3 in nanoscale by mechanically scratching the surface using an atomic force microscopy tip. Although contacted to high work function metal, the scratched area exhibits nearly linear IV behavior with low contact resistance, which maintains for hours in vacuum. In contrast, the unscratched area shows Fowler-Nordheim tunneling dominated Schottky rectifying behavior with high contact resistance. It was found that the Ohmic conductivity in the scratched area was drastically suppressed by oxygen gas indicating the oxygen vacancy origin of the Ohmic behavior. The surface oxygen vacancy induced barrier width reduction was proposed to explain the phenomena. The nanoscale approach is also applicable to macroscopic devices and has potential application in all-oxide devices.

  11. Shear piezoelectricity in bone at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Recent demonstration of shear piezoelectricity in an isolated collagen fibril, which is the origin of piezoelectricity in bone, necessitates investigation of shear piezoelectric behavior in bone at the nanoscale. Using high resolution lateral piezoresponse force microcopy (PFM), shear piezoelectricity in a cortical bone sample was studied at the nanoscale. Subfibrillar structure of individual collagen fibrils with a periodicity of 60-70 nm were revealed in PFM map, indicating the direct contribution of collagen fibrils to the shear piezoelectricity of bone.

  12. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. |

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Nanoscale platinum and iron-cobalt catalysts deposited in microchannel microreactors for use in hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of cyclohexene, selective oxidation of carbon monoxide and Fischer-Tropsch process to higher alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shihuai

    reactions of enormous commercial potential: Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis, and preferential oxidation of CO in fuel cell. An over 50% conversion of CO and 78% selectivity to propane in F-T synthesis has been achieved. Meanwhile, a 70% conversion of CO and 80% selectivity to CO2 in preferential oxidation is reached in the fuel cell feed gas reaction. Statistical modeling studies were done using a Central Composite Design (CCD) to achieve the optimal condition (temperature 158°C, CO: O2 ratio 1.77 and total flow rate 0.207 sccm) for preferential oxidation of CO in fuel cells.

  14. Molecular Photovoltaics in Nanoscale Dimension

    PubMed Central

    Burtman, Vladimir; Zelichonok, Alexander; Pakoulev, Andrei V.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the intrinsic charge transport in organic photovoltaic (PVC) devices and field-effect transistors (SAM-OFETs) fabricated by vapor phase molecular self-assembly (VP-SAM) method. The dynamics of charge transport are determined and used to clarify a transport mechanism. The 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic diphenylimide (NTCDI) SAM devices provide a useful tool to study the fundamentals of polaronic transport at organic surfaces and to discuss the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in nanoscale. Time-resolved photovoltaic studies allow us to separate the charge annihilation kinetics in the conductive NTCDI channel from the overall charge kinetic in a SAM-OFET device. It has been demonstrated that tuning of the type of conductivity in NTCDI SAM-OFET devices is possible by changing Si substrate doping. Our study of the polaron charge transfer in organic materials proposes that a cation-radical exchange (redox) mechanism is the major transport mechanism in the studied SAM-PVC devices. The role and contribution of the transport through delocalized states of redox active surface molecular aggregates of NTCDI are exposed and investigated. This example of technological development is used to highlight the significance of future technological development of nanotechnologies and to appreciate a structure-property paradigm in organic nanostructures. PMID:21339983

  15. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-rangingmore » lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.« less

  16. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-ranging lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.

  17. Nanoscale Mixing of Soft Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Sangwoo; Soto, Haidy E.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2013-03-07

    Assessing the state of mixing on the molecular scale in soft solids is challenging. Concentrated solutions of micelles formed by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers in squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}) adopt a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice, with glassy PS cores. Utilizing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and isotopic labeling ({sup 1}H and {sup 2}H (D) polystyrene blocks) in a contrast-matching solvent (a mixture of squalane and perdeuterated squalane), we demonstrate quantitatively the remarkable fact that a commercial mixer can create completely random mixtures of micelles with either normal, PS(H), or deuterium-labeled, PS(D), cores on a well-defined bcc lattice. The resulting SANS intensity is quantitatively modeled by the form factor of a single spherical core. These results demonstrate both the possibility of achieving complete nanoscale mixing in a soft solid and the use of SANS to quantify the randomness.

  18. Preface: Charge transport in nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    the molecular level. Nanoscale charge transport experiments in ionic liquids extend the field to high temperatures and to systems with intriguing interfacial potential distributions. Other directions may include dye-sensitized solar cells, new sensor applications and diagnostic tools for the study of surface-bound single molecules. Another motivation for this special issue is thus to highlight activities across different research communities with nanoscale charge transport as a common denominator. This special issue gathers 27 articles by scientists from the United States, Germany, the UK, Denmark, Russia, France, Israel, Canada, Australia, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Belgium and Singapore; it gives us a flavour of the current state-of-the-art of this diverse research area. While based on contributions from many renowned groups and institutions, it obviously cannot claim to represent all groups active in this very broad area. Moreover, a number of world-leading groups were unable to take part in this project within the allocated time limit. Nevertheless, we regard the current selection of papers to be representative enough for the reader to draw their own conclusions about the current status of the field. Each paper is original and has its own merit, as all papers in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter special issues are subjected to the same scrutiny as regular contributions. The Guest Editors have deliberately not defined the specific subjects covered in this issue. These came out logically from the development of this area, for example: 'Traditional' solid state nanojunctions based on adsorbed layers, oxide films or nanowires sandwiched between two electrodes: effects of molecular structure (aromaticity, anchoring groups), symmetry, orientation, dynamics (noise patterns) and current-induced heating. Various 'physical effects': inelastic tunnelling and Coulomb blockade, polaron effects, switching modes, and negative differential resistance; the role of

  19. Base Pair Opening in a Deoxynucleotide Duplex Containing a cis-syn Thymine Cyclobutane Dimer Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Wenke, Belinda B.; Huiting, Leah N.; Frankel, Elisa B.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Núñez, Megan E.

    2014-01-01

    The cis-syn thymine cyclobutane dimer is a DNA photoproduct implicated in skin cancer. We compared the stability of individual base pairs in thymine dimer-containing duplexes to undamaged parent 10-mer duplexes. UV melting thermodynamic measurements, CD spectroscopy, and 2D NOESY NMR spectroscopy confirm that the thymine dimer lesion is locally and moderately destabilizing within an overall B-form duplex conformation. We measured the rates of exchange of individual imino protons by NMR using magnetization transfer from water and determined the equilibrium constant for the opening of each base pair Kop. In the normal duplex Kop decreases from the frayed ends of the duplex toward the center, such that the central TA pair is the most stable with a Kop of 8×10−7. In contrast, base pair opening at the 5’T of the thymine dimer is facile. The 5’T of the dimer has the largest equilibrium constant (Kop =3×10−4) in its duplex, considerably larger than even the frayed penultimate base pairs. Notably, base pairing by the 3’T of the dimer is much more stable than by the 5’T, indicating that the predominant opening mechanism for the thymine dimer lesion is not likely to be flipping out into solution as a single unit. The dimer asymmetrically affects the stability of the duplex in its vicinity, destabilizing base pairing on its 5’ side more than on the 3’ side. The striking differences in base pair opening between parent and dimer duplexes occur independently of the duplex-single strand melting transitions. PMID:24328089

  20. Hybridization accompanying FRET event in labeled natural nucleoside-unnatural nucleoside containing chimeric DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Das, Suman K; Pradhan, Manoj Kumar; Jana, Subhashis

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a highly efficient strategy in illuminating the structures, structural changes and dynamics of DNA, proteins and other biomolecules and thus is being widely utilized in studying such phenomena, in designing molecular/biomolecular probes for monitoring the hybridization event of two single stranded DNA to form duplex, in gene detection and in many other sensory applications in chemistry, biology and material sciences. Moreover, FRET can give information about the positional status of chromophores within the associated biomolecules with much more accuracy than other methods can yield. Toward this end, we want to report here the ability of fluorescent unnatural nucleoside, triazolylphenanthrene ((TPhen)BDo) to show FRET interaction upon hybridization with fluorescently labeled natural nucleosides, (Per)U or (OxoPy)U or (Per)U, forming two stable chimeric DNA duplexes. The pairing selectivity and the thermal duplex stability of the chimeric duplexes are higher than any of the duplexes with natural nucleoside formed. The hybridization results in a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from donor triazolylphenanthrene of (TPhen)BDo to acceptor oxopyrene of (OxoPy)U and/or to perylene chromophore of (Per)U, respectively, in two chimeric DNA duplexes. Therefore, we have established the FRET process in two chimeric DNA duplexes wherein a fluorescently labeled natural nucleoside ((OxoPy)U or (Per)U) paired against an unnatural nucleoside ((TPhen)BDo) without sacrificing the duplex stability and B-DNA conformation. The hybridization accompanying FRET event in these classes of interacting fluorophores is new. Moreover, there is no report of such designed system of chimeric DNA duplex. Our observed phenomenon and the design can potentially be exploited in designing more of such efficient FRET pairs for useful application in the detection and analysis of biomolecular interactions and in material science application. PMID:27498231

  1. The Crystal Structure of Non-Modified and Bipyridine-Modified PNA Duplexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Pohl, Ehmke; Truan, Daphne; He, Wei; Sheldrick, George M.; Du, Shoucheng; Achim, Catalina

    2011-09-28

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a synthetic analogue of DNA that commonly has an N-aminoethyl glycine backbone. The crystal structures of two PNA duplexes, one containing eight standard nucleobase pairs (GGCATGCC)2, and the other containing the same nucleobase pairs and a central pair of bipyridine ligands, have been solved with a resolution of 1.22 and 1.10 {angstrom}, respectively. The non-modified PNA duplex adopts a P-type helical structure similar to that of previously characterized PNAs. The atomic-level resolution of the structures allowed us to observe for the first time specific modes of interaction between the terminal lysines of the PNA and the backbone and the nucleobases situated in the vicinity of the lysines, which are considered an important factor in the induction of a preferred handedness in PNA duplexes. Our results support the notion that whereas PNA typically adopts a P-type helical structure, its flexibility is relatively high. For example, the base-pair rise in the bipyridine-containing PNA is the largest measured to date in a PNA homoduplex. The two bipyridines bulge out of the duplex and are aligned parallel to the major groove of the PNA. In addition, two bipyridines from adjacent PNA duplexes form a p-stacked pair that relates the duplexes within the crystal. The bulging out of the bipyridines causes bending of the PNA duplex, which is in contrast to the structure previously reported for biphenyl-modified DNA duplexes in solution, where the biphenyls are p stacked with adjacent nucleobase pairs and adopt an intrahelical geometry. This difference shows that relatively small perturbations can significantly impact the relative position of nucleobase analogues in nucleic acid duplexes.

  2. The Crystal Structure of Non-Modified and Bipyridine-Modified PNA Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Pohl, Ehmke; Truan, Daphne; He, Wei; Sheldrick, George M.; Du, Shoucheng; Achim, Catalina

    2011-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a synthetic analogue of DNA that commonly has an N-aminoethlyl-glycine backbone. The crystal structure of two PNA duplexes, one containing eight standard nucleobase pairs (GGCATCGG)2 (pdb: 3MBS), and the other containing the same nucleobase pairs and a central pair of bipyridine ligands (pdb: 3MBU), has been solved with a resolution of 1.2 Å and 1.05 Å, respectively. The non-modified PNA duplex adopts a P-type helical structure s i m i l a r t o that of previously characterized PNAs. The atomic-level resolution of the structures allowed us to observe for the first time specific modes of interaction between the terminal lysines of the PNA and the backbone and nucleobases situated in the vicinity of the lysines, which are considered an important factor in the induction of a preferred handedness in PNA duplexes. These results support the notion that while PNA typically adopts a P-type helical structure, its flexibility is relatively high. For example, the base pair rise in the bipyridine-containing PNA is the largest measured to date in a PNA homoduplex. The two bipyridines are bulged out of the duplex and are aligned parallel to the minor groove of the PNA. In the case of the bipyridine-containing PNA, two bipyridines from adjacent PNA duplexes form a π-stacked pair that relates the duplexes within the crystal. The bulging out of the bipyridines causes bending of the PNA duplex, which is in contrast to the structure previously reported for biphenyl-modified DNA duplexes in solution, where the biphenyls are π-stacking with adjacent nucleobase pairs and adopt an intrahelical geometry [Johar et al., Chem. Eur. J., 2008, 14, 2080]. This difference shows that relatively small perturbations can significantly impact the relative position of nucleobase analogues in nucleic acid duplexes. PMID:20859960

  3. Duplex development and abandonment during evolution of the Lewis thrust system, southern Glacier National Park, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, An; Kelty, T.K.; Davis, G.A. )

    1989-09-01

    The westernmost duplex (Brave Dog Mountain) includes the low-angle Brave Dog roof fault and Elk Mountain imbricate system, and the easternmost (Rising Wolf Mountain) duplex includes the low-angle Rockwell roof fault and Mt. Henry imbricate system. The geometry of these duplexes suggests that they differ from previously described geometric-kinematic models for duplex development. Their low-angle roof faults were preexisting structures that were locally utilized as roof faults during the formation of the imbricate systems. Crosscutting of the Brave Dog fault by the Mt. Henry imbricate system indicates that the two duplexes formed at different times. The younger Rockwell-Mt. Henry duplex developed 20 km east of the older Brave Dog-Elk Mountain duplex; the roof fault of the former is at a higher structural level. Field relations confirm that the low-angle Rockwell fault existed across the southern Glacier Park area prior to localized formation of the Mt. Henry imbricate thrusts beneath it. These thrusts kinematically link the Rockwell and Lewis faults and may be analogous to P shears that form between two synchronously active faults bounding a simple shear system. The abandonment of one duplex and its replacement by another with a new and higher roof fault may have been caused by (1) warping of the older and lower Brave Dog roof fault during the formation of the imbricate system (Elk Mountain) beneath it, (2) an upward shifting of the highest level of a simple shear system in the Lewis plate to a new decollement level in subhorizontal belt strata (= the Rockwell fault) that lay above inclined strata within the first duplex, and (3) a reinitiation of P-shear development (= Mt. Henry imbricate faults) between the Lewis thrust and the subparallel, synkinematic Rockwell fault.

  4. Nanoscale metals and semiconductors for the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manthiram, Karthish

    The transduction of electrical energy into chemical bonds represents one potential strategy for storing energy derived from intermittent sources such as solar and wind. Driving the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide using light requires (1) developing light absorbers which convert photons into electron-hole pairs and (2) catalysts which utilize these electrons and holes to reduce carbon dioxide and oxidize water, respectively. For both the light absorbers and catalysts, the use of nanoscale particles is advantageous, as charge transport length scales are minimized in the case of nanoscale light absorbers and catalytic surface-area-to-volume ratio is maximized for nanoscale catalysts. In many cases, although semiconductors and metals in the form of thin films and foils are increasingly well-characterized as photoabsorbers and electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide reduction, respectively, the properties of their nanoscale counterparts remain poorly understood. This dissertation explores the nature of the light absorption mode of non-stoichiometric semiconductors which are utilized as light absorbers and the development of catalysts with enhanced stability, activity, and selectivity for carbon dioxide reduction. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the state of development of methods of transducing the energy of photons into chemical bonds. Chapters 2 and 3 investigate the development of stable, active, and selective catalysts for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide. Chapter 2 examines how copper nanoparticles have enhanced activities and selectivities for methanation compared to copper foils. Chapter 3 focuses on the development of strategies to stabilize high-surface-area catalysts to prevent surface area loss during electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction. Chapters 4 and 5 entail a fundamental understanding of the light absorption mode of nanoscale photoabsorbers used in both photoelectrochemical cells and in photovoltaics. Chapter 4 focuses on the

  5. SnO2:F Coated Duplex Stainless Steel for PEM Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Duplex 2205 stainless steel was deposited with 0.6 {micro}m thick SnO2:F coating; coated steel was characterized for PEMFC bipolar plate application. Compared with bare alloy, interfacial contact resistance (ICR) values of the coated 2205 steel are higher. SnO2:F coating adds its own resistance to the air-formed film on the steel. In a PEMFC anode environment, a current peak of ca. 25 {micro}A/cm2 registered at ca. 30 min for coated 2205 steel. It stabilized at ca. 2.0 {approx} -1.0 {micro}A/cm2. This peak is related to the complicated process of coating dissolution and oxide-layer formation. Anodic-cathodic current transfer occurred at ca. 200 min polarization. In a PEMFC cathode environment, current was stable immediately after polarization. The stable current was ca. 0.5 {approx} 2.0 {micro}A/cm2 during the entire polarization period. AES depth profiles with tested samples and ICP analysis with the tested solutions confirmed the excellent corrosion resistance of the SnO2:F coated 2205 alloy in simulated PEMFC environments.

  6. Detection of DNA damage: effect of thymidine glycol residues on the thermodynamic, substrate and interfacial acoustic properties of oligonucleotide duplexes.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Romanova, E; Kubareva, E; Dolinnaya, N; Gajdos, V; Burenina, O; Fedotova, E; Ellis, J S; Oretskaya, T; Hianik, T; Thompson, M

    2009-01-01

    Thymidine glycol residues in DNA are biologically active oxidative molecular damage sites caused by ionizing radiation and other factors. One or two thymidine glycol residues were incorporated in 19- to 31-mer DNA fragments during automatic oligonucleotide synthesis. These oligonucleotide models were used to estimate the effect of oxidized thymidines on the thermodynamic, substrate and interfacial acoustic properties of DNA. UV-monitoring melting data revealed that modified residues in place of thymidines destabilize the DNA double helix by 8-22 degrees C, depending on the number of lesions, the length of oligonucleotide duplexes and their GC-content. The diminished hybridizing capacity of modified oligonucleotides is presumably due to the loss of aromaticity and elevated hydrophilicity of thymine glycol in comparison to the thymine base. According to circular dichroism (CD) data, the modified DNA duplexes retain B-form geometry, and the thymidine glycol residue introduces only local perturbations limited to the lesion site. The rate of DNA hydrolysis by restriction endonucleases R.MvaI, R.Bst2UI, R.MspR9I and R.Bme1390I is significantly decreased as the thymidine glycol is located in the central position of the double-stranded recognition sequences 5'-CC / WGG-3' (W = A, T) or 5'-CC / NGG-3' (N = A, T, G, C) adjacent to the cleavage site. On the other hand, the catalytic properties of enzymes R.Psp6I and R.BstSCI recognizing the similar sequence are not changed dramatically, since their cleavage site is separated from the point of modification by several base-pairs. Data obtained by gel-electrophoretic analysis of radioactive DNA substrates were confirmed by direct spectrophotometric assay developed by the authors. The effect of thymidine glycol was also observed on DNA hybridization at the surface of a thickness-shear mode acoustic wave device. A 1.9-fold decrease in the rate of duplex formation was noted for oligonucleotides carrying one or two thymidine glycol

  7. Isothermal DNA amplification strategies for duplex microorganism detection.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Felipe, Sara; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis Antonio; Morais, Sergi; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Ángel

    2015-05-01

    A valid solution for micro-analytical systems is the selection of a compatible amplification reaction with a simple, highly-integrated efficient design that allows the detection of multiple genomic targets. Two approaches under isothermal conditions are presented: recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and multiple displacement amplification (MDA). Both methods were applied to a duplex assay specific for Salmonella spp. and Cronobacter spp., with excellent amplification yields (0.2-8.6 · 10(8) fold). The proposed approaches were successfully compared to conventional PCR and tested for the milk sample analysis as a microarray format on a compact disc (support and driver). Satisfactory results were obtained in terms of resistance to inhibition, selectivity, sensitivity (10(1)-10(2)CFU/mL) and reproducibility (below 12.5%). The methods studied are efficient and cost-effective, with a high potential to automate microorganisms detection by integrated analytical systems working at a constant low temperature. PMID:25529713

  8. Fault Injection Campaign for a Fault Tolerant Duplex Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Gian Franco; Ferraro, Robert D.; von llmen, Paul; Rennels, Dave A.

    2007-01-01

    Fault tolerance is an efficient approach adopted to avoid or reduce the damage of a system failure. In this work we present the results of a fault injection campaign we conducted on the Duplex Framework (DF). The DF is a software developed by the UCLA group [1, 2] that uses a fault tolerant approach and allows to run two replicas of the same process on two different nodes of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) computer cluster. A third process running on a different node, constantly monitors the results computed by the two replicas, and eventually restarts the two replica processes if an inconsistency in their computation is detected. This approach is very cost efficient and can be adopted to control processes on spacecrafts where the fault rate produced by cosmic rays is not very high.

  9. Hydrogen effects in duplex stainless steel welded joints - electrochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.; Łabanowski, J.; Ćwiek, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this work results on the influence of hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded joints are described. The results were discussed by taking into account three different areas on the welded joint: weld metal (WM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and parent metal. The corrosion resistance was qualified with the polarization curves registered in a synthetic sea water. The conclusion is that, hydrogen may seriously deteriorate the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 DSS welded joints. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen degradation was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions. WM region has been revealed as the most sensitive to hydrogen action.

  10. Electromagnetic non-destructive technique for duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, João Vicente; Camerini, Cesar; Pereira, Gabriela

    2016-02-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a two-phase (ferrite and austenite) material, which exhibits an attractive combination of mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance, being commonly employed for equipment of petrochemical plants, refining units and oil & gas platforms. The best properties of DSS are achieved when the phases are in equal proportions. However, exposition to high temperatures (e.g. welding process) may entail undesired consequences, such as deleterious phases precipitation (e.g. sigma, chi) and different proportion of the original phases, impairing dramatically the mechanical and corrosion properties of the material. A detailed study of the magnetic behavior of DSS microstructure with different ferrite austenite ratios and deleterious phases content was accomplished. The non destructive method evaluates the electromagnetic properties changes in the material and is capable to identify the presence of deleterious phases into DSS microstructure.

  11. Researches upon cavitation erosion behavior of some duplex steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Mitelea, I.; Micu, L. M.; Bordeasu, C.; Ghera, C.; Iosif, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the cavitation erosion behavior of two stainless steels having a duplex structure formed by austenite and ferrite. The conclusions were obtained by using both the cavitation erosion characteristic curves and the pictures of the eroded surfaces obtained with performing optic microscopes. The researches were focused upon the optimal correlation between the cavitation erosion resistance and the rate of the two structural constituents. The tests were done with T2 facility, with ceramic crystals, which integrally respects the ASTM G32-2010 Standard. The obtained results present the cumulative effect upon cavitation erosion of the chemical composition, mechanical properties and the structural constituents. The results of the researches are of importance for the specialists which establishes the composition of the stainless steels used for manufacturing hydraulic machineries or other devices subjected to cavitation erosion.

  12. Pyrazinetetracarboxamide: A Duplex Ligand for Palladium(II).

    PubMed

    Lohrman, Jessica; Telikepalli, Hanumaiah; Johnson, Thomas S; Jackson, Timothy A; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2016-06-01

    Tetraethylpyrazine-2,3,5,6-tetracarboxamide forms a dipalladium(II) complex with acetates occupying the fourth coordination sites of the two bound metal ions. Crystallographic results indicate that the "duplex" dipincer has captured two protons that serve as the counterions. The protons lie between adjacent amide carbonyl groups with very short O···O distances of 2.435(5) Å. In the free base, the adjacent carbonyl groups are farther apart, averaging 3.196(3) Å. While the dipalladium(II) complexes stack in an ordered stepwise fashion along the a axis, the free base molecules stack on top of each other, with each pincer rotated by about 60° from the one below. PMID:27187158

  13. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, K.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure.

  14. Plastic anisotropy in a superplastic duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.L.; Bate, P.S.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of the plastic anisotropy in uniaxial tension of the duplex stainless steel, SAF2304, have been made at room temperature and under conditions where the material was superplastic. There was significant plastic anisotropy in both types of deformation and there were some similarities between the low and high temperature variations with tensile axis orientation. Although it was possible to model the high temperature anisotropy using a grain boundary sliding model, the assumed distribution of sliding boundaries was considered to be unrealistic. This, together with aspects of microstructural and textural development, indicated that deformation was principally occurring by intragranular slip with a significant contribution caused by mechanical inhomogeneity in the two-phase material.

  15. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair.

    PubMed

    Gao, K; Orgel, L E

    1999-12-21

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure. PMID:10611299

  16. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-12

    We used cast stainless steels (CASSs)for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich alpha-phase by Spinodal decomposition of delta-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to providemore » an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. Moreover, an approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. Our results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.« less

  17. Light Scattering and Intermediate Range Order in Glasses: Nanoscale Inhomogeneities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, John; Kratzer, Joseph H.; Moynihan, Cornelius T.; Hwa, Luu-Gen

    2002-03-01

    Light scattering from oxide and halide glasses at temperatures up to the glass transition region exhibits anomalous Rayleigh scattering. In all glasses a hysteresis effect is seen in the Rayleigh scattering intensity behavior when heating and cooling experiments are compared. This hysteresis effect in the Rayleigh scattering is an indication that an intermediate range order exists in these glasses. Measurements of the Boson peak, a low lying Raman line that is intrinsic to all glass systems, located about 20/cm to 110/cm from the exciting line frequency are identified with the existence of intermediate range order in glass. Large pressure induced changes in the Boson peak frequency location are observed and predicted from existing theory. The non-coincidence effect, a comparison of the Boson peak maximum location for isotropic versus anisotropic spectra, gives additional evidence that glasses have tendencies to form intermediate range order. This intermediate range order or nanoscale inhomogeneities extend from about two to five nanometers in size for the glasses under consideration. These nanoscale inhomogeneities will be identified as a possible source for non-exponential structural relaxation kinetics in all glasses. The nature of the Boson peak, the anomalous Rayleigh scattering and non-coincidence effect in glasses, is discussed with respect to their interrelationships in terms of existing theories.

  18. Macro- to nanoscale wear prevention via molecular adsorption.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seong H.; Asay, David B.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Ohlhausen, James Anthony

    2007-04-01

    As the size of mechanical systems shrinks from macro- to nanoscales, surface phenomena such as adhesion, friction, and wear become increasingly significant. This paper demonstrates the use of alcohol adsorption as a means of continuously replenishing the lubricating layer on the working device surfaces and elucidates the tribochemical reaction products formed in the sliding contact region. Friction and wear of native silicon oxide were studied over a wide range of length scales from macro- to nanoscales using a ball-on-flat tribometer (millimeter scale), sidewall microelectromechanical system (MEMS) tribometer (micrometer scale), and atomic force microscopy (nanometer scale). In all cases, the alcohol vapor adsorption successfully lubricated and prevented wear. Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis of the sliding contact region revealed that high molecular weight oligomeric species were formed via tribochemical reactions of the adsorbed linear alcohol molecules. These tribochemical products seemed to enhance the lubrication and wear prevention. In the case of sidewall MEMS tests, the lifetime of the MEMS device was radically increased via vapor-phase lubrication with alcohol.

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nanoscale transport properties at silicon carbide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccaforte, F.; Giannazzo, F.; Raineri, V.

    2010-06-01

    Wide bandgap semiconductors promise devices with performances not achievable using silicon technology. Among them, silicon carbide (SiC) is considered the top-notch material for a new generation of power electronic devices, ensuring the improved energy efficiency required in modern society. In spite of the significant progress achieved in the last decade in the material quality, there are still several scientific open issues related to the basic transport properties at SiC interfaces and ion-doped regions that can affect the devices' performances, keeping them still far from their theoretical limits. Hence, significant efforts in fundamental research at the nanoscale have become mandatory to better understand the carrier transport phenomena, both at surfaces and interfaces. In this paper, the most recent experiences on nanoscale transport properties will be addressed, reviewing the relevant key points for the basic devices' building blocks. The selected topics include the major concerns related to the electronic transport at metal/SiC interfaces, to the carrier concentration and mobility in ion-doped regions and to channel mobility in metal/oxide/SiC systems. Some aspects related to interfaces between different SiC polytypes are also presented. All these issues will be discussed considering the current status and the drawbacks of SiC devices.

  20. Electrochemical Investigation of Interaction between a Bifunctional Probe and GG Mismatch Duplex.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; He, Hanping; Peng, Xiaoqian; Huang, Min; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-01-01

    A bifunctional probe (FecNC), containing a recognition part and an electrochemical active center, was applied to electrochemical detection of GG mismatch duplexes. The preparation of gold electrodes modified by mismatch and complementatry duplexes was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and optimized for better detection in terms of self-assembly time, hybridization time, and incubation time. The interaction between FecNC and DNA duplexes modified on the surface of a gold electrode was explored by square wave voltammetry (SWV) and EIS. The results showed that the DNA duplexes with GG mismatch on the surface of a gold electrode was easily detected by the largest electrochemical signal of the bifunctional probe because of its selective binding to GG mismatches. The bifunctional probe could offer a simple, effective electrochemical detection of GG mismatches, and theoretical bases for development of electrochemical biosensors. Further, the method would be favorable for diagnosis of genetic diseases. PMID:26165289

  1. Rapid method to detect duplex formation in sequencing by hybridization methods

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, A.D.; Timofeev, E.N.; Florentiev, V.L.; Kirillov, E.V.

    1999-01-19

    A method for determining the existence of duplexes of oligonucleotide complementary molecules is provided. A plurality of immobilized oligonucleotide molecules, each of a specific length and each having a specific base sequence, is contacted with complementary, single stranded oligonucleotide molecules to form a duplex. Each duplex facilitates intercalation of a fluorescent dye between the base planes of the duplex. The invention also provides for a method for constructing oligonucleotide matrices comprising confining light sensitive fluid to a surface and exposing the light-sensitive fluid to a light pattern. This causes the fluid exposed to the light to coalesce into discrete units and adhere to the surface. This places each of the units in contact with a set of different oligonucleotide molecules so as to allow the molecules to disperse into the units. 13 figs.

  2. Helically Assembled Pyrene Arrays on an RNA Duplex That Exhibit Circularly Polarized Luminescence with Excimer Formation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsunobu; Suzuki, Junpei; Ota, Fuyuki; Takada, Tadao; Akagi, Kazuo; Yamana, Kazushige

    2016-06-27

    Circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) was observed in pyrene zipper arrays helically arranged on an RNA duplex. Hybridization of complementary RNA strands having multiple (two to five) 2'-O-pyrenylmethyl modified nucleosides affords an RNA duplex with normal thermal stability. The pyrene fluorophores are assembled like a zipper in a well-defined helical manner along the axis of RNA duplex, which, upon 350 nm UV illumination, resulted in CPL emission with pyrene excimer formation. CPL (glum ) levels observed for the pyrene arrays in dilute aqueous solution were +2×10(-2) -+3.5×10(-2) , which are comparable with |glum | for chiral organic molecules and related systems. The positive CPL signals are consistent with a right-handed helical structure. Temperature dependence on CPL emission indicates that the stable rigid RNA structure is responsible for the strong CPL signals. The single pyrene-modified RNA duplex did not show any CPL signal. PMID:27150679

  3. Replication of linear duplex DNA in vitro with bacteriophage T5 DNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimura, R. K.; Das, S. K.; Allison, D. P.; Roop, B. C.

    1980-01-01

    Two sets of experiments are presented that attempt to contribute to understanding the mechanisms of DNA replication. The specific areas discussed are fidelity of DNA replication and initiation of replication of duplex DNA. (ACR)

  4. A γ-cyclodextrin duplex connected with two disulfide bonds: synthesis, structure and inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Sergey; Kumprecht, Lukáš; Buděšínský, Miloš; Lepšík, Martin; Dušek, Michal; Kraus, Tomáš

    2015-03-14

    Per(2,3,6-tri-O-benzyl)-γ-cyclodextrin was debenzylated by DIBAL-H to produce a mixture of C6(I),C6(IV) and C6(I),C6(V) isomeric diols, which were separated and isolated. The C2-symmetrical C6(I),C6(V) diol was transformed into dithiol and dimerized to produce a γ-cyclodextrin duplex structure. A crystal structure revealed tubular cavity whose peripheries are slightly elliptically distorted. The solvent accessible volume of the cavity of the γ-CD duplex is about 740 Å(3). Due to this large inner space the duplex forms very stable inclusion complexes with steroids; bile acids examined in this study show binding affinities to the γ-cyclodextrin duplex in the range of 5.3 × 10(7) M(-1)-1.9 × 10(8) M(-1). PMID:25616110

  5. Comparison of intraoperative completion flowmeter versus duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography for carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gabor A; Calligaro, Keith D; Kolakowski, Steven; Doerr, Kevin J; McAffee-Bennett, Sandy; Muller, Kathy; Dougherty, Matthew J

    Intraoperative completion studies of the internal carotid artery following carotid endarterectomy are recommended to ensure technical perfection of the repair. Transit time ultrasound flowmeter does not require trained technicians, requires less time than other completion studies such as duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography, and is noninvasive. Flowmetry was compared with duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography to determine if the relatively simpler flowmetry could replace these two more widely accepted completion studies in the intraoperative assessment of carotid endarterectomy. Comparative intraoperative assessment was performed in 116 carotid endarterectomies using all three techniques between December 1, 2000 and November 30, 2003. Eversion endarterectomy was performed in 51 cases and standard endarterectomy with prosthetic patching in 65 cases. Patients underwent completion flowmetry, duplex ultrasonography, and contrast arteriography studies of the exposed arteries, which were performed by vascular fellows or senior surgical residents under direct supervision of board-certified vascular surgeons. Duplex ultrasonography surveillance was performed 1 and 6 months postoperatively and annually thereafter. Mean follow-up was 18 months (range, 6-42 months). The combined ipsilateral stroke and death rate was 0%. The mean internal carotid artery flow using flowmetry was 249 mL/min (range, 60-750 mL/min). Five (4.3%) patients had flow < 100 mL/min as measured with flowmetry, but completion contrast arteriography and duplex ultrasonography were normal and none of the arteries were re-explored. One carotid endarterectomy was re-explored based on completion duplex ultrasonography that showed markedly elevated internal carotid artery peak systolic velocity (> 500 cm/sec); however, exploration was normal and completion flowmetry and contrast arteriography were normal. Duplex ultrasonography studies revealed internal carotid artery peak systolic

  6. The first crystal structures of RNA–PNA duplexes and a PNA-PNA duplex containing mismatches—toward anti-sense therapy against TREDs

    PubMed Central

    Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Banaszak, Katarzyna; Dauter, Zbigniew; Rypniewski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    PNA is a promising molecule for antisense therapy of trinucleotide repeat disorders. We present the first crystal structures of RNA–PNA duplexes. They contain CUG repeats, relevant to myotonic dystrophy type I, and CAG repeats associated with poly-glutamine diseases. We also report the first PNA–PNA duplex containing mismatches. A comparison of the PNA homoduplex and the PNA–RNA heteroduplexes reveals PNA's intrinsic structural properties, shedding light on its reported sequence selectivity or intolerance of mismatches when it interacts with nucleic acids. PNA has a much lower helical twist than RNA and the resulting duplex has an intermediate conformation. PNA retains its overall conformation while locally there is much disorder, especially peptide bond flipping. In addition to the Watson–Crick pairing, the structures contain interesting interactions between the RNA's phosphate groups and the Π electrons of the peptide bonds in PNA. PMID:26717983

  7. Controlling and Measuring Electrochemical Processes at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, Albert Leonard

    New applications for electrochemistry require an improved ability to characterize and influence processes at the nanoscale. For instance, the ability to create controllable nanostructures in a scalable manner can enable the wide use of nanotechnology. Furthermore, batteries that are used in electric vehicles and other mobile applications need to be lighter, safer and last longer. The performance of batteries is often controlled by nanoscale phenomena such as the breakdown of the electrolyte into a solid electrolyte interphase layer (SEI). In this thesis, a variety of techniques are discussed that address these deficiencies in our abilities to understand and control nanoscale phenomena. In particular, the use of nanosphere lithography to pattern thin films of aluminum prior to anodization is described, which allows for nearly arbitrary control of the pore size, interpore spacing and aspect ratio. Next, the ability to enhance the lithiation capacity of crystalline SiC via high temperature graphitization is explored. In particular, it is shown that if the SiC is doped and has the native oxide removed that the lithiation capacity of the SiC can be approximately double that of graphite. Characterization of nanoscale electrochemical phenomena can be performed by a wide variety of in situ and ex situ techniques. For instance, the same graphitized SiC can be exploited as a model system that mimics the basal planes of graphite, which is amenable to in situ X-ray characterization. By this method crystalline and textured LiF was found to grow on this surface during cycling along with other amorphous solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) components. Scanning probe microscopy can also be employed to study Li-ion battery electrodes and the formation of SEI. In particular, the development of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) as a technique for mapping both the topography and local ion current is examined. The application of SICM to study the inhibition of SEI formation via

  8. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplex. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. (2011) Journal of Organic Chemistry 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γMPPNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that γMPPNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ∼ 0.030 ± 0.01 sec-1 for γMPPNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs. 0.375 ± 0.18 sec-1 for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γMPPNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γMPPNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  9. Long-lived fluorescence of homopolymeric guanine-cytosine DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Ignacio; Changenet-Barret, Pascale; Gustavsson, Thomas; Zikich, Dragoslav; Kotlyar, Alexander B; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2010-09-24

    The fluorescence spectrum of the homopolymeric double helix poly(dG) x poly(dC) is dominated by emission decaying on the nanosecond time-scale, as previously reported for the alternating homologue poly(dGdC) x poly(dGdC). Thus, energy trapping over long periods of time is a common feature of GC duplexes which contrast with AT duplexes. The impact of such behaviour on DNA photodamage needs to be evaluated. PMID:20714677

  10. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-03-15

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplexes. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γ(MP)PNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that the γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ≈ 0.030 ± 0.01 s⁻¹ for γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs 0.375 ± 0.18 s⁻¹ for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γ(MP)PNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γ(MP)PNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  11. Resonant Effects in Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Guo, Songpo; Liu, Tao; Kinzel, Edward; Wang, Liang

    2016-06-01

    Nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas can be used to focus light well below the diffraction limit with extremely high transmission efficiencies. This paper studies the spectral dependence of the transmission through nanoscale bowtie apertures defined in a silver film. A realistic bowtie aperture is numerically modeled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Results show that the transmission spectrum is dominated by Fabry-Pérot (F-P) waveguide modes and plasmonic modes. The F-P resonance is sensitive to the thickness of the film and the plasmonic resonant mode is closely related to the gap distance of the bowtie aperture. Both characteristics significantly affect the transmission spectrum. To verify these numerical results, bowtie apertures are FIB milled in a silver film. Experimental transmission measurements agree with simulation data. Based on this result, nanoscale bowtie apertures can be optimized to realize deep sub-wavelength confinement with high transmission efficiency with applications to nanolithography, data storage, and bio-chemical sensing.

  12. Nanoscale assemblies and their biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Tais A. P. F.; Raman, Senthilkumar; Dey, Raja; Burkhard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale assemblies are a unique class of materials, which can be synthesized from inorganic, polymeric or biological building blocks. The multitude of applications of this class of materials ranges from solar and electrical to uses in food, cosmetics and medicine. In this review, we initially highlight characteristic features of polymeric nanoscale assemblies as well as those built from biological units (lipids, nucleic acids and proteins). We give special consideration to protein nanoassemblies found in nature such as ferritin protein cages, bacterial microcompartments and vaults found in eukaryotic cells and designed protein nanoassemblies, such as peptide nanofibres and peptide nanotubes. Next, we focus on biomedical applications of these nanoscale assemblies, such as cell targeting, drug delivery, bioimaging and vaccine development. In the vaccine development section, we report in more detail the use of virus-like particles and self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticles as new vaccine delivery platforms. PMID:23303217

  13. Is carotid duplex scanning sufficient as the sole investigation prior to carotid endarterectomy?

    PubMed

    Collins, P; McKay, I; Rajagoplan, S; Bachoo, P; Robb, O; Brittenden, J

    2005-11-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is the accepted treatment for certain patients who have had, or who are at risk of having, a stroke if they have a significant narrowing of the internal carotid artery. Rapid and accurate classification of the degree of stenosis is important as the benefit of surgery is highly dependent on this. The aim of this study was to assess whether the addition of angiography to duplex scanning resulted in a change in patient management in a unit where duplex scanning was used as the sole imaging investigation prior to CEA. The study population consisted of 64 patients with significant internal carotid artery stenosis on duplex scanning who were suitable for, and wished to be considered for, CEA. All patients underwent an angiogram. In this study 9 (14%) patients did not proceed to surgery on the basis of angiography and in a further 11 (17%) patients insufficient views of the distal vessel were obtained on duplex scanning. Three of these patients had extensive disease which excluded surgery. One patient experienced a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) at the time of angiography. In conclusion, this audit has highlighted the limitations in performing duplex scanning alone, and the costs that this can incur on the patient who may undergo an unnecessary operation. We cannot recommend duplex scanning as the sole investigation prior to CEA. There is need to evaluate the role of additional non-invasive carotid imaging such as magnetic resonance angiography or CT angiography in the assessment of these patients. PMID:16249605

  14. ARGONAUTE PIWI domain and microRNA duplex structure regulate small RNA sorting in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Niu, DongDong; Carbonell, Alberto; Wang, Airong; Lee, Angel; Tun, Vinnary; Wang, Zonghua; Carrington, James C.; Chang, Chia-en A.; Jin, Hailing

    2014-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are loaded into ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins to induce gene silencing. In plants, the 5′-terminal nucleotide is important for sRNA sorting into different AGOs. Here, we show that miRNA duplex structure also contributes to miRNA sorting. Base-pairing at the 15th nucleotide of a miRNA duplex is important for miRNA sorting in both Arabidopsis AGO1 and AGO2. AGO2 favors miRNA duplexes with no middle mismatches, whereas AGO1 tolerates, or prefers, duplexes with central mismatches. AGO structure modeling and mutational analyses reveal that the QF-V motif within the conserved PIWI domain contributes to recognition of base-pairing at the 15th nucleotide of a duplex, while the DDDE catalytic core of AtAGO2 is important for recognition of the central nucleotides. Finally, we rescued the adaxialized phenotype of ago1-12, which is largely due to miR165 loss-of-function, by changing miR165 duplex structure which we predict redirects it to AGO2. PMID:25406978

  15. Excited-State Dynamics of DNA Duplexes with Different H-Bonding Motifs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; de La Harpe, Kimberly; Beckstead, Ashley A; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2016-03-17

    The excited-state dynamics of three distinct forms of the d(GC)9·d(GC)9 DNA duplex were studied by combined time-resolved infrared experiments and quantum mechanical calculations. In the B- and Z-forms, bases on opposite strands form Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs but stack differently because of salt-induced changes in backbone conformation. At low pH, the two strands associate by Hoogsteen (HG) base pairing. Ultraviolet-induced intrastrand electron transfer (ET) triggers interstrand proton transfer (PT) in the B- and Z-forms, but the PT pathway is blocked in the HG duplex. Despite the different decay mechanisms, a common excited-state lifetime of ∼ 30 ps is observed in all three duplex forms. The ET-PT pathway in the WC duplexes and the solely intrastrand ET pathway in the HG duplex yield the same pair of π-stacked radicals on one strand. Back ET between these radicals is proposed to be the rate-limiting step behind excited-state deactivation in all three duplexes. PMID:26886244

  16. Site-selective nanoscale-polymerization of pyrrole on gold nanoparticles via plasmon induced charge separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Furukawa, Y.; Ishida, T.; Yamada, S.

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a nanoscale oxidative polymerization method which enables site-selective deposition on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with TiO2 by using plasmon induced charge separation (PICS) under visible-to-near infrared (IR) light irradiation. The method also revealed that the anodic site of PICS was located at the surface of AuNPs.We proposed a nanoscale oxidative polymerization method which enables site-selective deposition on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with TiO2 by using plasmon induced charge separation (PICS) under visible-to-near infrared (IR) light irradiation. The method also revealed that the anodic site of PICS was located at the surface of AuNPs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01531j

  17. Self-Size-Limiting Nanoscale Perforation of Graphene for Dense Heteroatom Doping.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Uday Narayan; Thapa, Ranjit; Lim, Joonwon; Li, Dong Jun; Kim, Kwang Ho; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-11-25

    A scalable and controllable nanoscale perforation method for graphene is developed on the basis of the two-step thermal activation of a graphene aerogel. Different resistance to the thermal oxidation between graphitic and defective domains in the weakly reduced graphene oxide is exploited for the self-limiting nanoscale perforation in the graphene basal plane via selective thermal degradation of the defective domains. The resultant nanoporous graphene with a narrow pore-size distribution addresses the long-standing challenge for the high-level doping of graphene with lattice-mismatched large-size heteroatoms (S and P). Noticeably, this novel heteroatom doping strategy is demonstrated to be highly effective for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysis. Not only the higher level of heteroatom doping but also favorable spin and charge redistribution around the pore edges leads to a strong ORR activity as supported by density functional theory calculations. PMID:26524473

  18. Nanoscale thin film ceramic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Joon Hyung

    The ceramic fuel cell (CFC) refers to fuel cells employing solid state ceramic electrolytes, including two types of fuel cells: the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and the proton-conducting oxide fuel cell (PCOFC). The goal of this study is to minimize Ohmic losses and activation losses at the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interface respectively by engineering CFC components to run fuel cells at reduced temperatures. Successful synthesis of nano-scale oxide ion-conducting yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with an optimal Y:Zr composition of 8 molar % yttria was demonstrated using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Structural analyses of ALD YSZ films grown on amorphous Si3N4 showed a polycrystalline morphology with volume expansion confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray reflection (XRR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Fine spherical grains were observed in atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. Fuel cell performance data between 265˜450°C showed maximum power densities of 28˜587mW/cm 2, respectively. Performance enhancement originated from an increase in exchange current density at the electrode-electrolyte interface. Our hypothesis is that the polycrystalline surface of the membrane with grains in several tens of nanometers is responsible for the high exchange current density through the introduction of many grains and grain boundaries. This speculation is based on the surface morphology of the ALD YSZ or RF sputtered YSZ consisting of 20˜30nm grains measured by AFM. In contrast, the size of grains in bulk YSZ is on the order of several microns. To investigate relationship between surface morphology and fuel cell performance, we traced the surface incorporation and diffusion of oxygen ions using 18O isotopes and the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) technique. ALD films were grown on top of Si3N4-buffered Si(100) wafers and single crystal YSZ(100) substrates. 100mum thick polycrystalline YSZ samples were used to investigate the

  19. Visualizing Optoelectronic Processes at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Puneet; Komeda, Tadahiro

    2015-11-24

    In this issue of ACS Nano, Nienhaus et al. report the optoelectronic properties of carbon nanotube chiral junctions with nanometer resolution in the presence of strong electric fields (∼1 V/nm). Here, we provide an overview of recent studies that combine scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and laser or microwave illumination. These techniques reveal nanoscale laser- or microwave-induced phenomena utilizing the intrinsic atomic resolution of the tunneling current, and do not require substantial modification of the STM itself. The merits of atomic-scale spatial resolution and chemical sensitivity of the laser or microwave spectroscopes make these techniques useful for nanoscale characterization. PMID:26524228

  20. Theory of nanoscale friction on chemically modified graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2013-03-01

    Recently, it is known from FFM experiments that friction force on graphene is significantly increased by chemical modification such as hydrogenation, oxidization, and fluorination, whereas adhesion properties are altered marginally. A novel nanotribological theory on two-dimensional materials is proposed on the basis of experimental results and first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The proposed theory indicates that the total lateral stiffness that is the proportional constant of friction force is mostly associated with the out-of-plane bending stiffness of two-dimensional materials. This contrasts to the case of three-dimensional materials, in which the shear strength of materials determines nanoscale friction. We will discuss details of DFT calculations and how to generalize the current theory to three dimensional materials.

  1. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  2. Probing Redox Reactions at the Nanoscale with Electrochemical Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Mattei, Michael; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental understanding of electrochemical processes at the nanoscale is crucial to solving problems in research areas as diverse as electrocatalysis, energy storage, biological electron transfer, and plasmon-driven chemistry. However, there is currently no technique capable of directly providing chemical information about molecules undergoing heterogeneous charge transfer at the nanoscale. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) uniquely offers subnanometer spatial resolution and single-molecule sensitivity, making it the ideal tool for studying nanoscale electrochemical processes with high chemical specificity. In this work, we demonstrate the first electrochemical TERS (EC-TERS) study of the nanoscale redox behavior of Nile Blue (NB), and compare these results with conventional cyclic voltammetry (CV). We successfully monitor the disappearance of the 591 cm(-1) band of NB upon reduction and its reversible reappearance upon oxidation during the CV. Interestingly, we observe a negative shift of more than 100 mV in the onset of the potential response of the TERS intensity of the 591 cm(-1) band, compared to the onset of faradaic current in the CV. We hypothesize that perturbation of the electrical double-layer by the TERS tip locally alters the effective potential experienced by NB molecules in the tip-sample junction. However, we demonstrate that the tip has no effect on the local charge transfer kinetics. Additionally, we observe step-like behavior in some TERS voltammograms corresponding to reduction and oxidation of single or few NB molecules. We also show that the coverage of NB is nonuniform across the ITO surface. We conclude with a discussion of methods to overcome the perturbation of the double-layer and general considerations for using TERS to study nanoscale electrochemical processes. PMID:26580153

  3. Structural Aspects of the Antiparallel and Parallel Duplexes Formed by DNA, 2’-O-Methyl RNA and RNA Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Szabat, Marta; Pedzinski, Tomasz; Czapik, Tomasz; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of the nature of oligonucleotides on the abilities to form antiparallel and parallel duplexes. Base pairing of homopurine DNA, 2’-O-MeRNA and RNA oligonucleotides with respective homopyrimidine DNA, 2’-O-MeRNA and RNA as well as chimeric oligonucleotides containing LNA resulted in the formation of 18 various duplexes. UV melting, circular dichroism and fluorescence studies revealed the influence of nucleotide composition on duplex structure and thermal stability depending on the buffer pH value. Most duplexes simultaneously adopted both orientations. However, at pH 5.0, parallel duplexes were more favorable. Moreover, the presence of LNA nucleotides within a homopyrimidine strand favored the formation of parallel duplexes. PMID:26579720

  4. Atomistic Design and Simulations of Nanoscale Machines and Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, William A., III; Cagin, Tahir; Walch, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    Over the three years of this project, we made significant progress on critical theoretical and computational issues in nanoscale science and technology, particularly in:(1) Fullerenes and nanotubes, (2) Characterization of surfaces of diamond and silicon for NEMS applications, (3) Nanoscale machine and assemblies, (4) Organic nanostructures and dendrimers, (5) Nanoscale confinement and nanotribology, (6) Dynamic response of nanoscale structures nanowires (metals, tubes, fullerenes), (7) Thermal transport in nanostructures.

  5. 2D Quantum Mechanical Study of Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density-gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions and oxide tunneling are treated on an equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. We present the results of our simulations of MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well-tempered" MOSFETs and compare them to those of classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. Surprisingly, the self-consistent potential profile shows lower injection barrier in the channel in quantum case. These results are qualitatively consistent with ID Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and subthreshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  6. Fabrication and nanoscale characterization of magnetic multilayer nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elawayeb, Mohamed

    Magnetic multilayers nanowires are scientifically fascinating and have potential industrial applications in many areas of advanced nanotechnology. These applications arise due to the nanoscale dimensions of nanostructures that lead to unique physical properties. Magnetic multilayer nanowires have been successfully produced by electrodeposition into templates. Anodic Aluminium Oxide (AAO) membranes were used as templates in this process; the templates were fabricated by anodization method in acidic solutions at a fixed voltage. The fabrication method of a range of magnetic multilayer nanowires is described in this study and their structure and dimensions were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). This study is focused on the first growth of NiFe/Pt and NiFe/Fe magnetic multilayer nanowires, which were successfully fabricated by pulse electrodeposition into the channels of porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) templates, and characterized at the nanoscale. Individual nanowires have uniform structure and regular periodicity. The magnetic and nonmagnetic layers are polycrystalline, with randomly oriented fcc lattice structure crystallites. Chemical compositions of the individual nanowires were analyzed using TEM equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS). The electrical and magnetoresistance properties of individual magnetic multilayer nanowires have been measured inside a SEM using two sharp tip electrodes attached to in situ nanomanipulators and a new electromagnet technique. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect of individual magnetic multilayer nanowires was measured in the current - perpendicular to the plane (CPP) geometry using a new in situ method at variable magnetic field strength and different orientations..

  7. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  8. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zengguo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Du, Qian; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR) that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus) and PCV2 (DNA virus) from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29%) and TGEV (11.7%) preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility. PMID:26544710

  9. Preface: Friction at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusc, Claudio; Smith, Roger; Urbakh, Michael; Vanossi, Andrea

    2008-09-01

    Interfacial friction is one of the oldest problems in physics and chemistry, and certainly one of the most important from a practical point of view. Everyday operations on a broad range of scales, from nanometer and up, depend upon the smooth and satisfactory functioning of countless tribological systems. Friction imposes serious constraints and limitations on the performance and lifetime of micro-machines and, undoubtedly, will impose even more severe constraints on the emerging technology of nano-machines. Standard lubrication techniques used for large objects are expected to be less effective in the nano-world. Novel methods for control and manipulation are therefore needed. What has been missing is a molecular level understanding of processes occurring between and close to interacting surfaces to help understand, and later manipulate friction. Friction is intimately related to both adhesion and wear, and all three require an understanding of highly non-equilibrium processes occurring at the molecular level to determine what happens at the macroscopic level. Due to its practical importance and the relevance to basic scientific questions there has been major increase in activity in the study of interfacial friction on the microscopic level during the last decade. Intriguing structural and dynamical features have been observed experimentally. These observations have motivated theoretical efforts, both numerical and analytical. This special issue focusses primarily on discussion of microscopic mechanisms of friction and adhesion at the nanoscale level. The contributions cover many important aspects of frictional behaviour, including the origin of stick-slip motion, the dependence of measured forces on the material properties, effects of thermal fluctuations, surface roughness and instabilities in boundary lubricants on both static and kinetic friction. An important problem that has been raised in this issue, and which has still to be resolved, concerns the

  10. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I.

    2012-06-29

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  11. Adsorption Kinetics in Nanoscale Porous Coordination Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, Benard Peter; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Karri, Naveen; Alvine, Kyle J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2015-10-07

    Nanoscale porous coordination polymers were synthesized using simple wet chemical method. The effect of various polymer surfactants on colloidal stability and shape selectivity was investigated. Our results suggest that the nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved adsorption kinetics compared to bulk crystals due to decreased diffusion path lengths and preferred crystal plane interaction.

  12. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D.

    2014-04-07

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of “dynamic structural disorder” (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale.

  13. Benchtop Nanoscale Patterning Using Soft Lithography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meenakshi, Viswanathan; Babayan, Yelizaveta; Odom, Teri W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines several benchtop nanoscale patterning experiments that can be incorporated into undergraduate laboratories or advanced high school chemistry curricula. The experiments, supplemented by an online video lab manual, are based on soft lithographic techniques such as replica molding, micro-molding in capillaries, and micro-contact…

  14. Fats, Oils, & Colors of a Nanoscale Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisensky, George C.; Horoszewski, Dana; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Zenner, Greta M.; Crone, Wendy C .

    2006-01-01

    Phase changes and intermolecular forces are important physical science concepts but are not always easy to present in an active learning format. This article presents several interactive activities in which students plot the melting points of some fatty acids and explore the effect that the nanoscale size and shape of molecules have on the…

  15. Nanoscale growth twins in sputtered metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Anderoglu, O.; Hoagland, R. G.; Misra, A.

    2008-09-01

    This article reviews recent studies on the mechanical properties of sputtered copper and 330 stainless-steel films with {111} nanoscale growth twins preferentially oriented perpendicular to growth direction. The mechanisms of formation of growth twins during sputtering, unusually high strengths, and excellent thermal stability of nanotwinned structures are highlighted.

  16. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts.

    PubMed

    Rehr, J J; Vila, F D

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of "dynamic structural disorder" (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale. PMID:24712802

  17. The impact of defect scattering on the quasi-ballistic transport of nanoscale conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Esqueda, I. S. Fritze, M.; Cress, C. D.; Cao, Y.; Che, Y.; Zhou, C.

    2015-02-28

    Using the Landauer approach for carrier transport, we analyze the impact of defects induced by ion irradiation on the transport properties of nanoscale conductors that operate in the quasi-ballistic regime. Degradation of conductance results from a reduction of carrier mean free path due to the introduction of defects in the conducting channel. We incorporate scattering mechanisms from radiation-induced defects into calculations of the transmission coefficient and present a technique for extracting modeling parameters from near-equilibrium transport measurements. These parameters are used to describe degradation in the transport properties of nanoscale devices using a formalism that is valid under quasi-ballistic operation. The analysis includes the effects of bandstructure and dimensionality on the impact of defect scattering and discusses transport properties of nanoscale devices from the diffusive to the ballistic limit. We compare calculations with recently published measurements of irradiated nanoscale devices such as single-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene, and deep-submicron Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  18. Beamforming Based Full-Duplex for Millimeter-Wave Communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Zhenyu; Bai, Lin; Choi, Jinho; Xia, Pengfei; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study beamforming based full-duplex (FD) systems in millimeter-wave (mmWave) communications. A joint transmission and reception (Tx/Rx) beamforming problem is formulated to maximize the achievable rate by mitigating self-interference (SI). Since the optimal solution is difficult to find due to the non-convexity of the objective function, suboptimal schemes are proposed in this paper. A low-complexity algorithm, which iteratively maximizes signal power while suppressing SI, is proposed and its convergence is proven. Moreover, two closed-form solutions, which do not require iterations, are also derived under minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE), zero-forcing (ZF), and maximum-ratio transmission (MRT) criteria. Performance evaluations show that the proposed iterative scheme converges fast (within only two iterations on average) and approaches an upper-bound performance, while the two closed-form solutions also achieve appealing performances, although there are noticeable differences from the upper bound depending on channel conditions. Interestingly, these three schemes show different robustness against the geometry of Tx/Rx antenna arrays and channel estimation errors. PMID:27455256

  19. Superplastic Forming of Duplex Stainless Steel for Aerospace Part

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Yoon, Jong-Hoon; Yoo, Joon-Tae; Yi, Young-Moo

    2011-08-22

    In this study, the high temperature forming behavior of duplex stainless steel has been characterized and the outer shell of a combustion chamber was fabricated with pressure difference of hot gas. It consists of two parts which are the outer skin made of stainless steel to sustain the internal pressure and the inner shell made of copper alloy for regenerative cooling channels. Two outer skins partitioned to half with respect to the symmetric axis was prepared by hot gas forming process with a maximum pressure of 7 MPa following to FEM analysis. For inner layer, copper alloy was machined for cooling channels and then placed in the gas pressure welding fixture. It is shown that the optimum condition of gas pressure welding is 7 MPa at 890 deg. C, for one hour. EDX analysis and scanning electron microscope micrograph confirm the atomic diffusion process is observed at the interface and copper atoms diffuse into steel, while iron and chrome atoms diffuse into copper. The result shows that the manufacturing method with superplastic forming and gas pressure welding of steel and copper alloy has been successful for near net shape manufacturing of scaled combustion chamber of launch vehicle.

  20. A duplex "Gemini" prodrug of naltrexone for transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Hammell, Dana C; Hamad, Mohamed; Vaddi, Haranath K; Crooks, Peter A; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2004-06-18

    Transdermal naltrexone delivery is desirable in the treatment of narcotic dependence and alcoholism. The purpose of this study was to increase the delivery rate of naltrexone (NTX) across human skin by using a novel prodrug. A duplex "gemini" prodrug of naltrexone was synthesized and evaluated. In vitro human skin permeation rates of naltrexone and prodrug were measured using a flow-through diffusion cell system. Drug concentrations in the skin were quantitated at the end of the diffusion experiment. The prodrug was hydrolyzed on passing through the skin and appeared mainly as naltrexone in the receiver compartment. The prodrug provided a significantly higher naltrexone equivalent flux across human skin in vitro than naltrexone base. The naltrexone equivalent solubilities of naltrexone and the prodrug in the donor solution were not significantly different. No significant increase in drug concentration in the skin after prodrug treatment, as compared to naltrexone, was observed. The naltrexone equivalent permeability from the prodrug exceeded the permeability of naltrexone base by two-fold. Due to the design of this prodrug, toxicities associated with this compound should be nonexistent, because only naltrexone and carbon dioxide (carbonic acid) are released when the prodrug is cleaved. PMID:15196755

  1. Detecting ultralow-frequency mutations by Duplex Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Scott R; Schmitt, Michael W; Fox, Edward J; Kohrn, Brendan F; Salk, Jesse J; Ahn, Eun Hyun; Prindle, Marc J; Kuong, Kawai J; Shen, Jiang-Cheng; Risques, Rosa-Ana; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2014-01-01

    Duplex Sequencing (DS) is a next-generation sequencing methodology capable of detecting a single mutation among >1 × 107 wild-type nucleotides, thereby enabling the study of heterogeneous populations and very-low-frequency genetic alterations. DS can be applied to any double-stranded DNA sample, but it is ideal for small genomic regions of <1 Mb in size. The method relies on the ligation of sequencing adapters harboring random yet complementary double-stranded nucleotide sequences to the sample DNA of interest. Individually labeled strands are then PCR-amplified, creating sequence ‘families’ that share a common tag sequence derived from the two original complementary strands. Mutations are scored only if the variant is present in the PCR families arising from both of the two DNA strands. Here we provide a detailed protocol for efficient DS adapter synthesis, library preparation and target enrichment, as well as an overview of the data analysis workflow. The protocol typically takes 1–3 d. PMID:25299156

  2. Phase Separation in Lean-Grade Duplex Stainless Steel 2101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, David A.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; Young, George A.; Tucker, Julie D.

    2015-08-01

    The use of duplex stainless steels (DSS) in nuclear power generation systems is limited by thermal instability that leads to embrittlement in the temperature range of 204°C to 538°C. New lean-grade alloys, such as 2101, offer the potential to mitigate these effects. Thermal embrittlement was quantified through impact toughness and hardness testing on samples of alloy 2101 after aging at 427°C for various durations (1-10,000 h). Additionally, atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized in order to observe the kinetics of α-α' separation and G-phase formation. Mechanical testing and APT data for two other DSS alloys, 2003 and 2205, were used as a reference to 2101. The results show that alloy 2101 exhibits superior performance compared to the standard-grade DSS alloy 2205 but inferior to the lean-grade alloy 2003 in mechanical testing. APT data demonstrate that the degree of α-α' separation found in alloy 2101 closely resembles that of 2205 and greatly exceeds 2003. Additionally, contrary to what was observed in 2003, 2101 demonstrated G-phase like precipitates after long aging times, although precipitates were not as abundant as was observed in 2205.

  3. Cracking of duplex stainless steel due to dissolved hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.H.; Altstetter, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Ferallium 255 duplex stainless steel was cathodically precharged with hydrogen at 265 C in a molten salt electrolyte. Sustained load tests were carried out in air at 0 C, 25 C and 50 C with average hydrogen contents from 3 to 15 wt ppm. The DC potential drop method was calibrated with optical measurements to continuously monitor the crack position and allow calculation of crack velocity and stress intensity. The crack velocity vs stress intensity (K) curves generally rose gradually over a large range in K and had definite thresholds for subcritical crack growth. Second and third stages were not always clearly delineated. Threshold stress intensities decreased as hydrogen content increased. An identifiable stage 2 occurred most often for alloys containing about 10 wt ppm dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth velocities generally increased with increasing temperature or hydrogen content. As the dissolved hydrogen increased, the fracture mode changed from microvoid coalescence (MVC) to microcrack coalescence (MCC) with some tearing ridges. At high hydrogen content, both ferrite and austenite phases showed brittle morphology, which was identical to the fracture surface of the uncharged specimens tested in hydrogen gas at 108 kPa pressure. Comparing the embrittling effect of internal hydrogen with that of external hydrogen it is found that the threshold stress intensity in hydrogen gas at 1 atm is lower than that at the highest internal hydrogen concentration (15 wt ppm).

  4. A Self-Assembling Short Oligonucleotide Duplex Suitable for Pretargeting

    PubMed Central

    Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika; Gardner, Jeffery; Nordstrøm, Lars Ulrik R.; Veomett, Nicholas J.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Heaney, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have naturally evolved as suitable, high affinity and specificity targeting molecules. However, the large size of full-length mAbs yields poor pharmacokinetic properties. A solution to this issue is the use of a multistep administration approach, in which the slower clearing mAb is administered first and allowed to reach the target site selectively, followed by administration of a rapidly clearing small molecule carrier of the cytotoxic or imaging ligand, which bears a cognate receptor for the mAb. Here, we introduce a novel pretargetable RNA based system comprised of locked nucleic acids (LNA) and 2′O-Methyloligoribonucleotides (2′OMe-RNA). The duplex shows fast hybridization, high melting temperatures, excellent affinity, and high nuclease stability in plasma. Using a prototype model system with rituximab conjugated to 2′OMe-RNA (oligo), we demonstrate that LNA-based complementary strand (c-oligo) effectively hybridizes with rituximab–oligo, which is slowly circulating in vivo, despite the high clearance rates of c-oligo. PMID:23848521

  5. Phase Separation in Lean Grade Duplex Stainless Steel 2101

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkel, D.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; Young, Jr., George A.; Tucker, Julie

    2015-08-19

    The use of duplex stainless steels (DSS) in nuclear power generation systems is limited by thermal instability that leads to embrittlement in the temperature range of 204°C - 538°C. New lean grade alloys, such as 2101, offer the potential to mitigate these effects. Thermal embrittlement was quantified through impact toughness and hardness testing on samples of alloy 2101 after aging at 427°C for various durations (1-10,000 hours). Additionally, atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized in order to observe the kinetics of α-α’ separation and G-phase formation. Mechanical testing and APT data for two other DSS alloys, 2003 and 2205 were used as a reference to 2101. The results show that alloy 2101 exhibits superior performance compared to the standard grade DSS alloy, 2205, but inferior to the lean grade alloy, 2003, in mechanical testing. APT data demonstrates that the degree of α-α’ separation found in alloy 2101 closely resembles that of 2205, and greatly exceeds 2003. Additionally, contrary to what was observed in 2003, 2101 demonstrated G-phase like precipitates after long aging times, though precipitates were not as abundant as was observed in 2205.

  6. Phase Separation in Lean Grade Duplex Stainless Steel 2101

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garfinkel, D.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; Young, Jr., George A.; Tucker, Julie

    2015-08-19

    The use of duplex stainless steels (DSS) in nuclear power generation systems is limited by thermal instability that leads to embrittlement in the temperature range of 204°C - 538°C. New lean grade alloys, such as 2101, offer the potential to mitigate these effects. Thermal embrittlement was quantified through impact toughness and hardness testing on samples of alloy 2101 after aging at 427°C for various durations (1-10,000 hours). Additionally, atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized in order to observe the kinetics of α-α’ separation and G-phase formation. Mechanical testing and APT data for two other DSS alloys, 2003 and 2205 weremore » used as a reference to 2101. The results show that alloy 2101 exhibits superior performance compared to the standard grade DSS alloy, 2205, but inferior to the lean grade alloy, 2003, in mechanical testing. APT data demonstrates that the degree of α-α’ separation found in alloy 2101 closely resembles that of 2205, and greatly exceeds 2003. Additionally, contrary to what was observed in 2003, 2101 demonstrated G-phase like precipitates after long aging times, though precipitates were not as abundant as was observed in 2205.« less

  7. JAEA Fatigue Analysis of EBR-II Duplex Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Jackson; D. L. Porter; W. R. Lloyd; N. Kisohara

    2011-03-01

    Small, notched three-point bend specimens machined from duplex tubes, which were extracted from an EBR-II superheater, were fatigued through the nickel interlayer to determine propensity for crack arrest within this interlayer. Several of these specimens were fatigued in the near threshold, and steady state regimes of Paris Law behavior. Additionally, two specimens were fatigued to the edge of the nickel interlayer and then monotonically loaded. Micro-hardness profiles of the nickel interlayer were also measured. Fatigue behavior was found to be similar to previous studies in that arrest was only noted in the near threshold Paris regime (attributed to the presence of voids) and in the steady state regime exhibited an acceleration of crack growth rate through the nickel interlayer followed by a slight retardation. Monotonic loading resulted in crack branching or delamination along the interlayer. Although archival material was not available for this study, the hardness of the nickel interlayer was determined to have been lowered slightly during service by comparison to the expected hardness of a similar nickel braze prepared as specified for fabrication of these tubes.

  8. Beamforming Based Full-Duplex for Millimeter-Wave Communication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Zhenyu; Bai, Lin; Choi, Jinho; Xia, Pengfei; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study beamforming based full-duplex (FD) systems in millimeter-wave (mmWave) communications. A joint transmission and reception (Tx/Rx) beamforming problem is formulated to maximize the achievable rate by mitigating self-interference (SI). Since the optimal solution is difficult to find due to the non-convexity of the objective function, suboptimal schemes are proposed in this paper. A low-complexity algorithm, which iteratively maximizes signal power while suppressing SI, is proposed and its convergence is proven. Moreover, two closed-form solutions, which do not require iterations, are also derived under minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE), zero-forcing (ZF), and maximum-ratio transmission (MRT) criteria. Performance evaluations show that the proposed iterative scheme converges fast (within only two iterations on average) and approaches an upper-bound performance, while the two closed-form solutions also achieve appealing performances, although there are noticeable differences from the upper bound depending on channel conditions. Interestingly, these three schemes show different robustness against the geometry of Tx/Rx antenna arrays and channel estimation errors. PMID:27455256

  9. Eddy current techniques for super duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerini, C.; Sacramento, R.; Areiza, M. C.; Rocha, A.; Santos, R.; Rebello, J. M.; Pereira, G.

    2015-08-01

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is a two-phase material where the microstructure consists of grains of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ). SDSS exhibit an attractive combination of properties, such as: strength, toughness and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Nevertheless, SDSS attain these properties after a controlled solution heat treatment, leading to a similar volumetric fraction of δ and γ. Any further heat treatment, welding operation for example, can change the balance of the original phases, or may also lead to precipitation of a deleterious phase, such as sigma (σ). For these situations, the material corrosion resistance is severely impaired. In the present study, several SDSS samples with low σ phase content and non-balanced microstructure were intentionally obtained by thermally treating SDSS specimens. Electromagnetic techniques, conventional Eddy Current Testing (ECT) and Saturated Low Frequency Eddy Current (SLOFEC), were employed to characterize the SDSS samples. The results showed that ECT and SLOFEC are reliable techniques to evaluate σ phase presence in SDSS and can provide an estimation of the δ content.

  10. Nanoscale precipitation in hot rolled sheet steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun

    Some newer hot rolled high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels with a single phase ferrite matrix have obtained substantial strengthening from nanoscale precipitation. These HSLA are reported to have a good combination of strength, ductility and hole-expansion ability. In the current work, Gleeble ® 3500 torsion testing was employed to simulate the hot rolling process with varying run-out table cooling rates and coiling temperatures on five microalloyed steels with additions of Ti, Nb, Mo, Cr and V, to investigate the effects of microalloy additions and processing conditions on microstructures as well as mechanical properties. Subsized tensile specimens obtained from as-twisted torsion samples were used to evaluate mechanical properties. The precipitation states of the five steels with different processing conditions were characterized using extraction replica TEM. Comparison of microstructures and mechanical properties was discussed. Characterization of the microstructure via light optical microscopy showed the matrix microstructure was mainly influenced by coiling temperature, which indicates that the transformation from austenite to ferrite occurred during the coiling period. A higher Ti content was shown to reduce the second constituent fractions. Investigation of carbon extraction replica specimens via TEM revealed the presence of nanoscale precipitation. Extensive nanoscale precipitation was observed in most of the specimens having a polygonal ferrite matrix, while in the granular bainite/ferrite microstructure at lower temperatures, fewer microalloy carbides were present. The specimens with polygonal ferrite had similar or higher yield strength than the specimens with granular bainite microstructure, which suggests the effectiveness of precipitation strengthening from extensive nanoscale precipitates. In the Nb-Mo steel, more significant strengthening due to grain refinement was evident. Yield strength values were less than reported for JFE's "NANOHITEN

  11. In situ characterization of nanoscale catalysts during anodic redox processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Renu; Crozier, Peter; Adams, James

    2013-09-19

    Controlling the structure and composition of the anode is critical to achieving high efficiency and good long-term performance. In addition to being a mixed electronic and ionic conductor, the ideal anode material should act as an efficient catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dry hydrocarbons without de-activating through either sintering or coking. It is also important to develop novel anode materials that can operate at lower temperatures to reduce costs and minimized materials failure associated with high temperature cycling. We proposed to synthesize and characterize novel anode cermets materials based on ceria doped with Pr and/or Gd together with either a Ni or Cu metallic components. Ceria is a good oxidation catalyst and is an ionic conductor at room temperature. Doping it with trivalent rare earths such as Pr or Gd retards sintering and makes it a mixed ion conductor (ionic and electronic). We have developed a fundamental scientific understanding of the behavior of the cermet material under reaction conditions by following the catalytic oxidation process at the atomic scale using a powerful Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (ESTEM). The ESTEM allowed in situ monitoring of structural, chemical and morphological changes occurring at the cermet under conditions approximating that of typical fuel-cell operation. Density functional calculations were employed to determine the underlying mechanisms and reaction pathways during anode oxidation reactions. The dynamic behavior of nanoscale catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and methane were used to determine: ? Fundamental processes during anodic reactions in hydrogen and carbonaceous atmospheres ? Interfacial effects between metal particles and doped ceria ? Kinetics of redox reaction in the anode material

  12. Nanoscale contact engineering for Silicon/Silicide nanowire devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yung-Chen

    attributed to the high compressive stress built-in in the core/shell NW structure that retards the diffusion of the nickel atom as well as limits the volume expansion of the metal-rich phases. As a result, the high stress at this finite scale hinders the continuous growth of Ni31Si 12 into the core/shell NWs and totally eliminates the formation of Ni 2Si in core/shell NWs with thick oxide shells (˜ 50 nm). Through these studies, we have demonstrated first time the phase formation sequences of nickel silicides in Si and Si/SiOx NW structures, which is of great importance for reliable contact engineering for Si NW devices. Furthermore, we have provided a clear picture of the hindered nickel silicide growth in confined nanoscale environment and showed the deviated behavior of silicides growth under stress. The information rendered here will be useful for Si NW device applications as well as for the silicon device engineering at nanoscale in general. To further investigate the oxide shell effect, Mn5Si 3 and Fe5Ge3 NW were grown within various oxide thickness to explore the nucleation and growth in the nanowire structure. A oxide shell exerted a compressive stress on the silicide or germanide materials will make those materials with single-crystal properties. Interestingly, single-crystal growth of contact materials can be also implemented for germanide materials. The iron-rich germanide, Fe5Ge3, was successfully grown with single-crystal properties. It shows ferromagnetic properties with a Curie temperature above the room temperature verified by magnetic force microscope (MFM). Two different epitaxial relations found at germanide/germanium interface due to the different sizes of the germanium NW templates. These two different crystal structures exhibited magnetic anisotropy in magnetic force microscope (MFM) measurement, showing differently preferred domain orientations. In-plane and out-of-plane magnetization in the Fe5Ge3 NWs are observed in our experiment. The crystal

  13. Nanoscale assembly of amine functionalized colloidal iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Barick, K C; Aslam, M; Prasad, Pottumarthi V; Dravid, Vinayak P; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate a single-step facile approach for highly water stable assembly of amine-functionalized Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles using thermal decomposition of Fe-chloride precursors in ethylene glycol medium in the presence of ethylenediamine. The average size of nanoassemblies is 40±1 nm, wherein the individual nanoparticles are about 6 nm. Amine functionalized properties are evident from FTIR, thermal and elemental analysis. The saturation magnetization and spin-echo r(2) of the nanoassemblies were measured to be 64.3 emu/g and 314.6 mM(-1)s(-1), respectively. The higher value of relaxivity ratio (r(2)/r(1)=143) indicates that nanoassemblies are a promising high efficiency T2 contrast agent platform. PMID:20160860

  14. Microstructure and cytotoxicity evaluation of duplex-treated silver-containing antibacterial TiO₂ coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Wu, Haibo; Geng, Zhenhua; Huang, Xiaobo; Hang, Ruiqiang; Ma, Yong; Yao, Xiaohong; Tang, Bin

    2014-12-01

    Implant-related infection is one of the most common and serious complications associated with biomedical implantation. To prevent bacterial adhesion, a series of porous TiO2 coatings with different concentrations of silver (designated as M0, M1, M2 and M3) were prepared on pure titanium substrates by a duplex-treatment technique combining magnetron sputtering with micro-arc oxidation. All coatings are porous with pore size less than 5 μm and the concentrations of silver in the M0, M1, M2 and M3 are 0, 0.95, 1.36 and 1.93 wt.%, respectively. Silver is found to be distributed throughout the thickness of the coatings by scanning electron microscopy. The release of silver from the TiO2 coatings was confirmed by an inductively-coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The antibacterial effects of these coatings were tested against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli), and the cytotoxicity was evaluated using the mouse pre-osteoblast cells. The results indicate that the antibacterial activities of TiO2 coatings are greatly improved due to the incorporation of silver. No cytotoxic effect is found for the M1 surfaces from the observation of pre-osteoblast cell by MTT assay and fluorescence microscopy. Although the M2 and M3 coatings appeared to be toxic for pre-osteoblast cells after 1 day in culture, the cell viability on M2 and M3 surfaces was greatly raised after culturing for 2 days. Our results suggested that the TiO2 coatings incorporated with an optimum amount of silver can possess excellent antibacterial activities without cytotoxic effect, which has promising applications in biomedical devices. PMID:25491845

  15. Cytotoxicity and antileukaemic activity of new duplexes linking 3-C-ethynylcytidine and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Novotny, L; Rauko, P; Schott, H

    2010-12-01

    The cytotoxic and antineoplastic potential of two new duplex drugs, ECyd-5-FdU and ECyd- lipid- 5-FdU, were compared with the activity of the parent single-nucleoside analogues, 3-C-ethynylcytidine (ECyd) and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (5-FdU), either applied as monotherapy or simultaneously in equimolar concentrations simulating their ratio in a duplex drug. Murine leukaemia L1210 cells were used for comparative in vitro tests of the duplex and the single drugs. The tested substances were evaluated for their cytotoxicity, combinatory potential and revitalisation properties. Additionally, an in vivo model of leukaemia L1210-bearing mice of the DBA/2J strain was used for testing of acute toxicity and antileukaemic activity using various chemotherapeutic regimes. Based on the results of this study, the suitability of ECyd and 5-FdU for forming a duplex drug was discussed from the perspective of their expected synergistic anticancer activities. We found an improvement of chemotherapy outcomes of the new duplex drugs tested by comparing their in vitro cytotoxicity and an increase of the time of survival of experimental leukaemia-bearing mice in a statistically significant manner. PMID:21187467

  16. Structural model of the p14/SF3b155·branch duplex complex

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberg, Matthew J.; Dul, Erin L.; MacMillan, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Human p14 (SF3b14), a component of the spliceosomal U2 snRNP, interacts directly with the pre-mRNA branch adenosine within the context of the bulged duplex formed between the pre-mRNA branch region and U2 snRNA. This association occurs early in spliceosome assembly and persists within the fully assembled spliceosome. Analysis of the crystal structure of a complex containing p14 and a peptide derived from p14-associated SF3b155 combined with the results of cross-linking studies has suggested that the branch nucleotide interacts with a pocket on a non-canonical RNA binding surface formed by the complex. Here we report a structural model of the p14•bulged duplex interaction based on a combination of X-ray crystallography of an adenine p14/SF3b155 peptide complex, biochemical comparison of a panel of disulfide cross-linked protein–RNA complexes, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). These studies reveal specific recognition of the branch adenosine within the p14 pocket and establish the orientation of the bulged duplex RNA bound on the protein surface. The intimate association of one surface of the bulged duplex with the p14/SF3b155 peptide complex described by this model buries the branch nucleotide at the interface and suggests that p14•duplex interaction must be disrupted before the first step of splicing. PMID:21062891

  17. Nearest-neighbor parameters for 7-deaza-adenosine·uridine base pairs in RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Katherine E; Znosko, Brent M

    2016-06-01

    One of the major limitations in RNA structure prediction is the lack of information about the effect of nonstandard nucleotides on stability. The nonstandard nucleotide 7-deaza-adenosine (7DA) is a naturally occurring analog of adenosine that has been studied for medicinal purposes and is commonly referred to as tubercidin. In 7DA, the nitrogen in the 7 position of adenosine is replaced by a carbon. Differences in RNA duplex stability due to the removal of this nitrogen can be attributed to a possible change in hydration and a difference in base stacking interactions resulting from changes in the electrostatics of the ring. In order to determine how 7DA affects the stability of RNA, optical melting experiments were conducted on RNA duplexes that contain either internal or terminal 7DA·U pairs with all possible nearest-neighbor combinations. On average, duplexes containing 7DA·U pairs are 0.43 and 0.07 kcal/mol less stable than what is predicted for the same duplex containing internal and terminal A-U pairs, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters for all nearest-neighbor combinations of 7DA·U pairs were derived from the data. These parameters can be used to more accurately predict the secondary structure and stability of RNA duplexes containing 7DA·U pairs. PMID:27099368

  18. Recognition of base pair inversions in duplex by chimeric (alpha,beta) triplex-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Timofeev, Edward N; Goryaeva, Baira V; Florentiev, Vladimir L

    2006-10-01

    DNA recognition by triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) is usually limited by homopurine-homopyrimidine sequence in duplexes. Modifications of the third strand may overcome this limitation. Chimeric alpha-beta TFOs are expected to form triplex DNA upon binding to non-regular sequence duplexes. In the present study we describe binding properties of chimeric alpha-beta oligodeoxynucleotides in the respect to short DNA duplexes with one, three, and five base pair inversions. Non-natural chimeric TFO's contained alpha-thymidine residues inside (GT) or (GA) core sequences. Modified residues were addressed to AT/TA inversions in duplexes. It was found in the non-denaturing gel-electrophoresis experiments that single or five adjacent base pair inversions in duplexes may be recognized by chimeric alpha-beta TFO's at 10 degrees C and pH 7.8. Three dispersed base pair inversions in the double stranded DNA prevented triplex formation by either (GT) or (GA) chimeras. Estimation of thermal stability of chimeric alpha-beta triplexes showed decrease in T(m) values as compared with unmodified complexes. PMID:16928141

  19. Stability of mRNA/DNA and DNA/DNA Duplexes Affects mRNA Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kraeva, Rayna I.; Krastev, Dragomir B.; Roguev, Assen; Ivanova, Anna; Nedelcheva-Veleva, Marina N.; Stoynov, Stoyno S.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acids, due to their structural and chemical properties, can form double-stranded secondary structures that assist the transfer of genetic information and can modulate gene expression. However, the nucleotide sequence alone is insufficient in explaining phenomena like intron-exon recognition during RNA processing. This raises the question whether nucleic acids are endowed with other attributes that can contribute to their biological functions. In this work, we present a calculation of thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes across the genomes of four species in the genus Saccharomyces by nearest-neighbor method. The results show that coding regions are more thermodynamically stable than introns, 3′-untranslated regions and intergenic sequences. Furthermore, open reading frames have more stable sense mRNA/DNA duplexes than the potential antisense duplexes, a property that can aid gene discovery. The lower stability of the DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes of 3′-untranslated regions and the higher stability of genes correlates with increased mRNA level. These results suggest that the thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes affects mRNA transcription. PMID:17356699

  20. Assembly of an antiparallel homo-adenine DNA duplex by small-molecule binding.

    PubMed

    Persil, Ozgül; Santai, Catherine T; Jain, Swapan S; Hud, Nicholas V

    2004-07-21

    Molecules that reversibly bind DNA and trigger the formation of non-Watson-Crick secondary structures would be useful in the design of dynamic DNA nanostructures and as potential leads for new therapeutic agents. We demonstrate that coralyne, a small crescent-shaped molecule, promotes the formation of a duplex secondary structure from homo-adenine oligonucleotides. AFM studies reveal that the staggered alignment of homo-adenine oligonucleotides upon coralyne binding produces polymers of micrometers in length, but only 2 nm in height. A DNA duplex was also studied that contained eight A.A mismatches between two flanking 7-bp Watson-Crick helices. CD spectra confirm that the multiple A.A mismatches of this duplex bind coralyne in manner similar to that of homo-adenine oligonucleotides. Furthermore, the melting temperature of this hybrid duplex increases by 13 degrees C upon coralyne binding. These observations illustrate that the helical structure of the homo-adenine-coralyne duplex is compatible with the B-form DNA helix. PMID:15250704

  1. Mechanism of hairpin-duplex conversion for the HIV-1 dimerization initiation site.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Ennifar, Eric; Tóth, Katalin; Walter, Philippe; Langowski, Jörg; Dumas, Philippe

    2005-12-01

    We have used the dimerization initiation site of HIV-1 genomic RNA as a model to investigate hairpin-duplex interconversion with a combination of fluorescence, UV melting, gel electrophoresis, and x-ray crystallographic techniques. Fluorescence studies with molecular beacons and crystallization experiments with 23-nucleotide dimerization initiation site fragments showed that the ratio of hairpin to duplex formed after annealing in water essentially depends on RNA concentration and not on cooling kinetics. With natural sequences allowing to form the most stable duplex, and thus also the loop-loop complex (or "kissing complex"), concentrations as low as 3 mum in strands are necessary to obtain a majority of the hairpin form. With a mutated sequence preventing kissing complex formation, a majority of hairpins was even obtained at 80 mum in strands. However, this did not prevent an efficient conversion from hairpin to duplex in the presence of salts. Kinetic considerations are in favor of duplex formation from intermediates involving hairpins engaged in cruciform dimers rather than from free strands. The very first step of formation of such a cruciform intermediate could be trapped in a crystal structure. This mechanism might be significant for the dynamics of small RNAs beyond the strict field of HIV-1. PMID:16169845

  2. Different duplex/quadruplex junctions determine the properties of anti-thrombin aptamers with mixed folding.

    PubMed

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Spiridonova, Vera; Pica, Andrea; Napolitano, Valeria; Sica, Filomena

    2016-01-29

    Mixed duplex/quadruplex oligonucleotides have attracted great interest as therapeutic targets as well as effective biomedical aptamers. In the case of thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA), the addition of a duplex motif to the G-quadruplex module improves the aptamer resistance to biodegradation and the affinity for thrombin. In particular, the mixed oligonucleotide RE31 is significantly more effective than TBA in anticoagulation experiments and shows a slower disappearance rate in human plasma and blood. In the crystal structure of the complex with thrombin, RE31 adopts an elongated structure in which the duplex and quadruplex regions are perfectly stacked on top of each other, firmly connected by a well-structured junction. The lock-and-key shape complementarity between the TT loops of the G-quadruplex and the protein exosite I gives rise to the basic interaction that stabilizes the complex. However, our data suggest that the duplex motif may have an active role in determining the greater anti-thrombin activity in biological fluids with respect to TBA. This work gives new information on mixed oligonucleotides and highlights the importance of structural data on duplex/quadruplex junctions, which appear to be varied, unpredictable, and fundamental in determining the aptamer functional properties. PMID:26673709

  3. Different duplex/quadruplex junctions determine the properties of anti-thrombin aptamers with mixed folding

    PubMed Central

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Spiridonova, Vera; Pica, Andrea; Napolitano, Valeria; Sica, Filomena

    2016-01-01

    Mixed duplex/quadruplex oligonucleotides have attracted great interest as therapeutic targets as well as effective biomedical aptamers. In the case of thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA), the addition of a duplex motif to the G-quadruplex module improves the aptamer resistance to biodegradation and the affinity for thrombin. In particular, the mixed oligonucleotide RE31 is significantly more effective than TBA in anticoagulation experiments and shows a slower disappearance rate in human plasma and blood. In the crystal structure of the complex with thrombin, RE31 adopts an elongated structure in which the duplex and quadruplex regions are perfectly stacked on top of each other, firmly connected by a well-structured junction. The lock-and-key shape complementarity between the TT loops of the G-quadruplex and the protein exosite I gives rise to the basic interaction that stabilizes the complex. However, our data suggest that the duplex motif may have an active role in determining the greater anti-thrombin activity in biological fluids with respect to TBA. This work gives new information on mixed oligonucleotides and highlights the importance of structural data on duplex/quadruplex junctions, which appear to be varied, unpredictable, and fundamental in determining the aptamer functional properties. PMID:26673709

  4. Heat treatment temperature influence on ASTM A890 GR 6A super duplex stainless steel microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Marcelo; E-mail: marcelo.martins@sulzer.com; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2005-09-15

    Duplex and super duplex stainless steels are ferrous alloys with up to 26% chromium, 8% nickel, 5% molybdenum and 0.3% nitrogen, which are largely used in applications in media containing ions from the halogen family, mainly the chloride ion (Cl{sup -}). The emergence of this material aimed at substituting Copper-Nickel alloys (Cupro-Nickel) that despite presenting good corrosion resistance, has mechanical properties quite inferior to steel properties. The metallurgy of duplex and super duplex stainless steel is complex due to high sensitiveness to sigma phase precipitation that becomes apparent, due to the temperatures they are exposed on cooling from solidification as well as from heat treatment processes. The objective of this study was to verify the influence of heat treating temperatures on the microstructure and hardness of ASTM A890/A890M Gr 6A super duplex stainless steel type. Microstructure control is of extreme importance for castings, as the chemical composition and cooling during solidification inevitably provide conditions for precipitation of sigma phase. Higher hardness in these materials is directly associated to high sigma phase concentration in the microstructure, precipitated in the ferrite/austenite interface. While heat treatment temperature during solution treatment increases, the sigma phase content in the microstructure decreases and consequently, the material hardness diminishes. When the sigma phase was completely dissolved by the heat treatment, the material hardness was influenced only due to ferrite and austenite contents in the microstructure.

  5. Tube Formation in Nanoscale Materials

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The formation of tubular nanostructures normally requires layered, anisotropic, or pseudo-layered crystal structures, while inorganic compounds typically do not possess such structures, inorganic nanotubes thus have been a hot topic in the past decade. In this article, we review recent research activities on nanotubes fabrication and focus on three novel synthetic strategies for generating nanotubes from inorganic materials that do not have a layered structure. Specifically, thermal oxidation method based on gas–solid reaction to porous CuO nanotubes has been successfully established, semiconductor ZnS and Nb2O5nanotubes have been prepared by employing sacrificial template strategy based on liquid–solid reaction, and an in situ template method has been developed for the preparation of ZnO taper tubes through a chemical etching reaction. We have described the nanotube formation processes and illustrated the detailed key factors during their growth. The proposed mechanisms are presented for nanotube fabrication and the important pioneering studies are discussed on the rational design and fabrication of functional materials with tubular structures. It is the intention of this contribution to provide a brief account of these research activities. PMID:20592945

  6. Dimensional reduction of duplex DNA under confinement to nanofluidic slits.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Lara, Fernando; Stavis, Samuel M; Strychalski, Elizabeth A; Nablo, Brian J; Geist, Jon; Starr, Francis W; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-11-14

    There has been much interest in the dimensional properties of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) confined to nanoscale environments as a problem of fundamental importance in both biological and technological fields. This has led to a series of measurements by fluorescence microscopy of single dsDNA molecules under confinement to nanofluidic slits. Despite the efforts expended on such experiments and the corresponding theory and simulations of confined polymers, a consistent description of changes of the radius of gyration of dsDNA under strong confinement has not yet emerged. Here, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to identify relevant factors that might account for this inconsistency. Our simulations indicate a significant amplification of excluded volume interactions under confinement at the nanoscale due to the reduction of the effective dimensionality of the system. Thus, any factor influencing the excluded volume interaction of dsDNA, such as ionic strength, solution chemistry, and even fluorescent labels, can greatly influence the dsDNA size under strong confinement. These factors, which are normally less important in bulk solutions of dsDNA at moderate ionic strengths because of the relative weakness of the excluded volume interaction, must therefore be under tight control to achieve reproducible measurements of dsDNA under conditions of dimensional reduction. By simulating semi-flexible polymers over a range of parameter values relevant to the experimental systems and exploiting past theoretical treatments of the dimensional variation of swelling exponents and prefactors, we have developed a novel predictive relationship for the in-plane radius of gyration of long semi-flexible polymers under slit-like confinement. Importantly, these analytic expressions allow us to estimate the properties of dsDNA for the experimentally and biologically relevant range of contour lengths that is not currently accessible by state-of-the-art MD simulations. PMID

  7. Exposure of the Lesser Himalayan Duplex in Central Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Delores; Martin, Aaron

    2013-04-01

    In central Nepal, between the Main Central thrust and the Main Boundary thrust, only Lesser Himalayan rock is exposed in structurally complex relationships; whereas in other regions of Nepal, Lesser Himalayan rocks are buried under klippen of Greater Himalayan rock. Thus, central Nepal along the Modi Khola south through the Kali Gandaki River and the village of Tansen is one of the few locations along the Himalayan thrust belt where the entire Lesser Himalayan duplex is exposed. This location is critical to determining the kinematics of the thrust belt. The purpose of this study is to determine the structural architecture of central Nepal using the collected structural data, incorporating available age data, drawing and balancing cross sections and testing variations in shortening given different stratigraphic assumptions. The two balanced cross sections are constructed from the same topography but have different underlying assumptions and decisions made during the development. We tested whether major changes in the stratigraphy and simplifications regarding the evolution of the Lesser Himalayan duplex affected the amount of shortening. Cross section 1 has a shortening estimate from the Main Central thrust to the Main Boundary thrust, including motion on the Main Central thrust, of 359 km or 77.8%. Cross section 2 has a shortening estimate of 371 km or 78.4% over the same region. These shortening estimates do not include meso-scale and micro-scale shortening in the Lesser and Greater Himalayan rocks nor do they include intra-Greater Himalayan faults. The percentage of shortening between the two cross sections is the same and the amount of shortening is not significantly different. These are striking outcomes given the different choices made when constructing the cross sections especially with regards to the stratigraphy. This suggests that the different choices made when drawing a cross section may be fairly unimportant for the estimate of shortening and percentage

  8. The Effects of Nanoscale Exsolution on Magnetic Properties: Insights From FORC Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, S.; Hirt, A. M.; Harrison, R.; Robinson, P.; Brown, L.

    2005-12-01

    Samples of igneous and metamorphic rocks from the USA, Canada, Chile, Sweden, Norway and Australia contain oxides of either nearly `pure hematite' or from the hematite-ilmenite solid solution series. Samples with oxides from the hematite-ilmenite solid solution series all have nanoscale exsolution of hematite and ilmenite that formed as a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) during cooling from igneous or metamorphic settings. The nearly pure hematite samples show relic exsolution of spinel and/or extensive twinning in the hematite. Hysteresis properties have been measured from 10 K to 300 K on most samples and to 900K on selected samples. All samples contain a hematite component either as exsolution lamellae, as the host material, or as a nearly pure oxide phase. Variations in room temperature coercivity ranged from 9mT to 440mT. With this large range in hysteresis behavior FORC measurements were made to help separate the possibilities of 1) co-existing phases, 2) exchange coupling or interactions and 3) contributions from the nanoscale exsolution. It is important to note that a saturated state may not have been reached at the start of the FORC measurements for the higher coercivity samples. However, FORC diagrams on samples with two or more oxides were very helpful in determining the contributions to the bulk coercivity of the different minerals. Numerous samples with exsolution showed distinct negative peak value of Hu. Separating out whether this response is due to the fact that these samples contain hematite, or due to interaction within the oxides is open to speculation. Most of the examined samples contained nanoscale exsolution as imaged with TEM, all had a negative Hu and the amount of displacement varied strongly. The amount of displacement cannot be correlated directly to the size, or spacing of the lamellae. Correlation of the distribution of Hc and Hu with TEM images and other rock magnetic properties will be discussed.

  9. Use of Symmetry in Calibration of Looped Duplex DTS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Giesen, N.; van der Spek, A.

    2014-12-01

    A looped duplex Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) deployment uses a bifilar arrangement of two optical fibres in the same cable or conduit. On one end of the cable the ends of the fibres are spliced together. The other ends are connected to a (double ended) DTS system or one end is connected to a (single ended) DTS system. A light pulse shot from one end will eventually emerge from the other end and vice versa. Back scattered Raman-shifted photons will thus be detected twice for each posistion along the cable or conduit but delayed in time by twice the distance from the symmetry point (turn around sub) divided by the speed of light in the fibre.Calibration of a DTS system requires, first and foremost that differential loss; i.e. the difference in optical attenuation between Stokes and anti-Stokes backscattered signals, is compensated for. It will be shown that residual errors due to uncompensated differential loss can only be due to the uneven part of the (non-uniform) differential loss distribution. A bifilar deployment is therefore highly insensitive to uncompensated differential loss because ageing, chemical or mechanical damage to the cable as well as thermal or mechanical strain may vary over the length of the cable but remain symmetrical and therefore even with respect to the turn around sub.By writing the (non-)uniform differential loss as the sum of an even and an uneven part it is possible to derive an equation for the residual error of a DTS temperature measurement expressed as an integral over the uneven part of the differential loss distribution only. Thus it is possible to estimate any residual temperature error under field conditions. Such a capability is especially useful where no access to one end of the cable is possible, such as is the case in borehole applications.

  10. Full-Duplex Digital Communication on a Single Laser Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazzard, D. A.; MacCannell, J. A.; Lee, G.; Selves, E. R.; Moore, D.; Payne, J. A.; Garrett, C. D.; Dahlstrom, N.; Shay, T. M.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed free-space optical communication system would operate in a full-duplex mode, using a single constant-power laser beam for transmission and reception of binary signals at both ends of the free-space optical path. The system was conceived for two-way data communication between a ground station and a spacecraft in a low orbit around the Earth. It has been estimated that in this application, a data rate of 10 kb/s could be achieved at a ground-station-to-spacecraft distance of 320 km, using a laser power of only 100 mW. The basic system concept is also applicable to terrestrial free-space optical communications. The system (see figure) would include a diode laser at one end of the link (originally, the ground station) and a liquid-crystal- based retroreflecting modulator at the other end of the link (originally, the spacecraft). At the laser end, the beam to be transmitted would be made to pass through a quarter-wave plate, which would convert its linear polarization to right circular polarization. For transmission of data from the laser end to the retroreflector end, the laser beam would be modulated with subcarrier phase-shift keying (SC-PSK). The transmitted beam would then pass through an aperture- sharing element (ASE) - basically, a mirror with a hole in it, used to separate the paths of the transmitted and received light beams. The transmitted beam would continue outward through a telescope (which, in the original application, would be equipped with a spacecraft-tracking system) that would launch the transmitted beam along the free-space optical path to the retroreflector end.

  11. Probing physical properties at the nanoscale using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditzler, Lindsay Rachel

    Techniques that measure physical properties at the nanoscale with high sensitivity are significantly limited considering the number of new nanomaterials being developed. The development of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has lead to significant advancements in the ability to characterize physical properties of materials in all areas of science: chemistry, physics, engineering, and biology have made great scientific strides do to the versatility of the AFM. AFM is used for quantification of many physical properties such as morphology, electrical, mechanical, magnetic, electrochemical, binding interactions, and protein folding. This work examines the electrical and mechanical properties of materials applicable to the field of nano-electronics. As electronic devices are miniaturized the demand for materials with unique electrical properties, which can be developed and exploited, has increased. For example, discussed in this work, a derivative of tetrathiafulvalene, which exhibits a unique loss of conductivity upon compression of the self-assembled monolayer could be developed into a molecular switch. This work also compares tunable organic (tetraphenylethylene tetracarboxylic acid and bis(pyridine)s assemblies) and metal-organic (Silver-stilbizole coordination compounds) crystals which show high electrical conductivity. The electrical properties of these materials vary depending on their composition allowing for the development of compositionally tunable functional materials. Additional work was done to investigate the effects of molecular environment on redox active 11-ferroceneyl-1 undecanethiol (Fc) molecules. The redox process of mixed monolayers of Fc and decanethiol was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy. As the concentration of Fc increased large, variations in the force were observed. Using these variations the number of oxidized molecules in the monolayer was determined. AFM is additionally capable of investigating

  12. Nanoscale heat transfer and thermoelectrics for alternative energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In the area of alternative energy, thermoelectrics have experienced an unprecedented growth in popularity because of their ability to convert waste heat into electricity. Wired in reverse, thermoelectrics can act as refrigeration devices, where they are promising because they are small in size and lightweight, have no moving parts, and have rapid on/off cycles. However, due to their low efficiencies bulk thermoelectrics have historically been a niche market. Only in the last decade has thermoelectric efficiency exceeded ~ 20 % due to fabrication of nanostructured materials. Nanoscale materials have this advantage because electronic and acoustic confinement effects can greatly increase thermoelectric efficiency beyond bulk values. In this talk, I will introduce our work in the area of nanoscale heat transfer with the goal of more efficient thermoelectrics. I will discuss our experiments and methods to study acoustic confinement in nanostructures and present some of our new nanostructured thermoelectric materials. To study acoustic confinement we are building a nanoscale phonon spectrometer. The instrument can excite phonon modes in nanostructures in the ~ 100 s of GHz. Ballistic phonons from the generator are used to probe acoustic confinement and surface scattering effects. Transmission studies using this device will help optimize materials and morphologies for more efficient nanomaterial-based thermoelectrics. For materials, our group has synthesized nano-layer superlattices of Na x Co O2 . Sodium cobaltate was recently discovered to have a high Seebeck coeficent and is being studied as an oxide thermoelectric material. The thickness of our nano-layers ranges from 5 nm to 300 nm while the lengths can be varied between 10 μ m and 4 mm. Typical aspect ratios are 40 nm: 4 mm, or 1:100,000. Thermoelectric characterization of samples with tilted multiple-grains along the measurement axis indicate a thermoelectric efficiency on par with current polycrystalline samples

  13. From computational materials science to nanoscale device physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Avik

    2008-10-01

    I will outline formal, computational and device level challenges for modeling and simulation of nanoelectronic devices and systems. Formal challenges involve developing the basic equations for quantum transport in the presence of strong many-body correlations (Coulomb Blockade), incoherent scattering (phonons) and time-dependent effects at the nano-micro interface (hysteretic switching and random telegraph noise). Computational challenges involve translating these equations into quantitative, predictive models, particularly at surfaces and interfaces, where we need practical semi-empirical descriptions with transferable parameters to handle hybrid regions. In addition, we need multiscaling and embedding techniques to merge these models with more detailed ``ab-initio'' descriptions of chemically significant moieties. Finally, Device level challenges involve identifying fundamental limits of existing device paradigms, such as molecular FETs, as well as exploring novel device operational principles. I will touch upon the fundamental issues that arise in context of each challenge, and possible means of solving them. I will then apply these ideas to a specific device architecture, namely, an ordered array of quantum dots grown on the surface of a nanoscale silicon transistor. All of the challenges identified above manifest themselves prominently in this geometry that operates at the nano-micro interface. Specifically, I will discuss how the strongly correlated electrons in the nanoscale dots ``talk'' to their weakly interacting macroscopic counterparts, how the interfacial electronic structure captures both long-ranged band correlations and short-ranged chemical correlations, and how the tunable coupling with the localized dot degrees of freedom can lead to novel physics, such as the experimentally observed blocking and unblocking of a nanotube current by correlated interactions between multiple oxide traps.

  14. A Commentary on "Updating the Duplex Design for Test-Based Accountability in the Twenty-First Century"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's commentary on "Updating the Duplex Design for Test-Based Accountability in the Twenty-First Century," in which Isaac I. Bejar and E. Aurora Graf propose the application of a test design--the duplex design (which was proposed in 1988 by Bock and Mislevy) for application in current accountability assessments.…

  15. Nanoscale fluid transportation through individual carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin; Cao, Di; Pang, Pei; Luo, Tao; Lindsay, Stuart; Kristic, Predrag; Nuckolls, Colin

    2011-03-01

    There are great interest in both simulation and experiment of fluid flow on the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes, with their extremely small inner diameter (usually below 2 nm) and atomic smooth inner surface, are ideal materials for studying nanoconfinement and ion and molecule nanoscale translocation. The excellent electrical properties of CNTs can also be integrated to achieve nanoelectrofluidic device. This presentation describes our recent progress in studying fluid transport through individual carbon nanotubes, including simultaneously ionic and electronic measurements during water, ion and molecule translocation. This work was supported by the DNA Sequencing Technology Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute (1RC2HG005625-01, 1R21HG004770-01).

  16. Quantum Tunneling Current in Nanoscale Plasmonic Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Recently, electron tunneling between plasmonic resonators is found to support quantum plasmon resonances, which may introduce new regimes in nano-optoelectronics and nonlinear optics. This revelation is of substantial interest to the fundamental problem of electron transport in nano-scale, for example, in a metal-insulator-metal junction (MIM), which has been continuously studied for decades. Here, we present a self-consistent model of electron transport in a nano-scale MIM, by solving the coupled Schrödinger and Poisson equations. The effects of space charge, exchange-correlation, anode emission, and material properties of the electrodes and insulator are examined in detail. The self-consistent calculations are compared with the widely used Simmons formula. Transition from the direct tunneling regime to the space-charge-limited regime is demonstrated. This work was supported by AFOSR.

  17. Trapping atoms using nanoscale quantum vacuum forces

    PubMed Central

    Chang, D. E.; Sinha, K.; Taylor, J. M.; Kimble, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum vacuum forces dictate the interaction between individual atoms and dielectric surfaces at nanoscale distances. For example, their large strengths typically overwhelm externally applied forces, which makes it challenging to controllably interface cold atoms with nearby nanophotonic systems. Here we theoretically show that it is possible to tailor the vacuum forces themselves to provide strong trapping potentials. Our proposed trapping scheme takes advantage of the attractive ground-state potential and adiabatic dressing with an excited state whose potential is engineered to be resonantly enhanced and repulsive. This procedure yields a strong metastable trap, with the fraction of excited-state population scaling inversely with the quality factor of the resonance of the dielectric structure. We analyse realistic limitations to the trap lifetime and discuss possible applications that might emerge from the large trap depths and nanoscale confinement. PMID:25008119

  18. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jianhua; Russell, Scott; Morishetti, Kiran; Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P.; Kent, Michael Stuart

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  19. Light-driven nanoscale plasmonic motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Zentgraf, Thomas; Liu, Yongmin; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2010-08-01

    When Sir William Crookes developed a four-vaned radiometer, also known as the light-mill, in 1873, it was believed that this device confirmed the existence of linear momentum carried by photons, as predicted by Maxwell's equations. Although Reynolds later proved that the torque on the radiometer was caused by thermal transpiration, researchers continued to search for ways to take advantage of the momentum of photons and to use it for generating rotational forces. The ability to provide rotational force at the nanoscale could open up a range of applications in physics, biology and chemistry, including DNA unfolding and sequencing and nanoelectromechanical systems. Here, we demonstrate a nanoscale plasmonic structure that can, when illuminated with linearly polarized light, generate a rotational force that is capable of rotating a silica microdisk that is 4,000 times larger in volume. Furthermore, we can control the rotation velocity and direction by varying the wavelength of the incident light to excite different plasmonic modes.

  20. Nanoscale plasmonic stamp lithography on silicon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenglin; Luber, Erik J; Huck, Lawrence A; Olsen, Brian C; Buriak, Jillian M

    2015-02-24

    Nanoscale lithography on silicon is of interest for applications ranging from computer chip design to tissue interfacing. Block copolymer-based self-assembly, also called directed self-assembly (DSA) within the semiconductor industry, can produce a variety of complex nanopatterns on silicon, but these polymeric films typically require transformation into functional materials. Here we demonstrate how gold nanopatterns, produced via block copolymer self-assembly, can be incorporated into an optically transparent flexible PDMS stamp, termed a plasmonic stamp, and used to directly functionalize silicon surfaces on a sub-100 nm scale. We propose that the high intensity electric fields that result from the localized surface plasmons of the gold nanoparticles in the plasmonic stamps upon illumination with low intensity green light, lead to generation of electron-hole pairs in the silicon that drive spatially localized hydrosilylation. This approach demonstrates how localized surface plasmons can be used to enable functionalization of technologically relevant surfaces with nanoscale control. PMID:25654172

  1. Final Report, Volume 3, Guidance Document for the Evaluation of Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 3 is comprised of the Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (A890-5A) which is equivalent to wrought 2507. The objective of this work was to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). The various tests which were carried out were ASTM A923 Test Method A, B and C (Sodium Hydroxide Etch Test, Charpy Impact Test and Ferric Chloride Corrosion Test), ferrite measurement using Feritscope®, ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method and X-Ray Diffraction, hardness measurement using Rockwell B and C and microstructural analysis using SEM and EDS.

  2. Final Report, Volume 3, Guidance Document for the Evaluation of Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 3 comprises of the Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (A890-5A) which is equivalent to wrought 2507. The objective of this work was to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). The various tests which were carried out were ASTM A923 Test Method A, B and C (Sodium Hydroxide Etch Test, Charpy Impact Test and Ferric Chloride Corrosion Test), ferrite measurement using Feritscope{reg_sign}, ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method and X-Ray Diffraction, hardness measurement using Rockwell B and C and microstructural analysis using SEM and EDS.

  3. Duplex in the assessment of the free radial forearm flaps: Is it time to change practice?

    PubMed

    Ganesan, K; Stead, L; Smith, A B; Ong, T K; Mitchell, D A; Kanatas, A N

    2010-09-01

    Radial forearm free flaps (RFFFs) are safe, but critical ischaemia of the hand has been described and is catastrophic. Every effort should therefore be made to improve the safety margin even further. Colour flow duplex ultrasound (US) is a simple, non-invasive and effective assessment tool. We compared it with Allen's test to identify serious vascular anomalies. We studied 121 patients who were listed to have a RFFF harvested, all of whom had both duplex US assessment and Allen's testing of the selected arm. The significance of differences in proportions was assessed using McNemar's test. Five of the 121 patients had an alternative flap selected as a consequence of the duplex assessment. A single flap failed. There were no ischaemic vascular complications that affected the hand. PMID:19850378

  4. Rapid method to detect duplex formation in sequencing by hybridization methods

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich; Timofeev, Edward Nikolaevich; Florentiev, Vladimer Leonidovich; Kirillov, Eugene Vladislavovich

    1999-01-01

    A method for determining the existence of duplexes of oligonucleotide complementary molecules is provided whereby a plurality of immobilized oligonucleotide molecules, each of a specific length and each having a specific base sequence, is contacted with complementary, single stranded oligonucleotide molecules to form a duplex so as to facilitate intercalation of a fluorescent dye between the base planes of the duplex. The invention also provides for a method for constructing oligonucleotide matrices comprising confining light sensitive fluid to a surface, exposing said light-sensitive fluid to a light pattern so as to cause the fluid exposed to the light to coalesce into discrete units and adhere to the surface; and contacting each of the units with a set of different oligonucleotide molecules so as to allow the molecules to disperse into the units.

  5. Duplex End Breathing Determines Serum Stability and Intracellular Potency of siRNA-Au NPs

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pinal C.; Hao, Liangliang; Yeung, Weng Si Au; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2011-01-01

    Structural requirements of siRNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (siRNA-Au NPs) for Dicer recognition and serum stability were studied. We show that the 3′ overhang on the nucleic acids of these particles is preferentially recognized by Dicer but also makes the siRNA duplexes more susceptible to non-specific serum degradation. Dicer and serum nucleases show lower preference for blunt duplexes as opposed to those with 3′ overhangs. Importantly, gold nanoparticles functionalized with blunt duplexes with relatively less thermal breathing are up to 15 times more stable against serum degradation without compromising Dicer recognition. This increased stability leads to a 300% increase in cellular uptake of siRNA-Au NPs and improved gene knockdown. PMID:21630673

  6. Sequence independent duplex DNA opening reaction catalysed by SV40 large tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Scheffner, M; Wessel, R; Stahl, H

    1989-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen (T antigen) is mainly localized in the nucleus where it exhibits two biochemical properties: DNA binding and helicase activity. Both activities are necessary for viral DNA replication and may also enable T antigen to modulate cellular growth. Here we present biochemical and electron microscopic evidence that the helicase activity can start at internal sites of fully double-stranded DNA molecules not containing the SV40 origin or replication. Using T antigen specific monoclonal antibodies, this unwinding reaction can be biochemically divided in an initiation (duplex opening) and a propagation step. The duplex opening reaction (as well as the propagation step) does not depend on a specific DNA sequence or secondary structure. In addition, we have found that T antigen forms an ATP dependent nucleoprotein complex at double-stranded DNA, which may be an essential step for the sequence independent duplex DNA opening reaction. Images PMID:2536153

  7. Initial oxidation of brass induced by humidified air

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ping; Leygraf, Christofer

    2011-01-01

    Complementary surface and near-surface analytical techniques have been used to explore a brass (Cu–20Zn) surface before, during, and after exposure in air at 90% relative humidity. Volta potential variations along the unexposed surface are attributed to variations in surface composition and resulted in an accelerated localized growth of ZnO and a retarded more uniform growth of an amorphous Cu2O-like oxide. After 3 days the duplex oxide has a total mass of 1.3 μg/cm2, with improved corrosion protective properties compared to the oxides grown on pure Cu or Zn. A schematic model for the duplex oxide growth on brass is presented. PMID:23471205

  8. Initial oxidation of brass induced by humidified air.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ping; Leygraf, Christofer

    2011-11-15

    Complementary surface and near-surface analytical techniques have been used to explore a brass (Cu-20Zn) surface before, during, and after exposure in air at 90% relative humidity. Volta potential variations along the unexposed surface are attributed to variations in surface composition and resulted in an accelerated localized growth of ZnO and a retarded more uniform growth of an amorphous Cu2O-like oxide. After 3 days the duplex oxide has a total mass of 1.3 μg/cm(2), with improved corrosion protective properties compared to the oxides grown on pure Cu or Zn. A schematic model for the duplex oxide growth on brass is presented. PMID:23471205

  9. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, David G. Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-03-15

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ∼1 nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and

  10. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-03-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ˜ 1 nm , the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal

  11. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  12. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Bradley R.; Talley, Chad E.

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  13. Nanoscale Bonding between Human Bone and Titanium Surfaces: Osseohybridization

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok-Man; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Kim, Seong-Hun; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong

    2015-01-01

    Until now, the chemical bonding between titanium and bone has been examined only through a few mechanical detachment tests. Therefore, in this study, a sandblasted and acid-etched titanium mini-implant was removed from a human patient after 2 months of placement in order to identify the chemical integration mechanism for nanoscale osseointegration of titanium implants. To prepare a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen, the natural state was preserved as much as possible by cryofixation and scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam (SEM-FIB) milling without any chemical treatment. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning TEM (STEM)/electron energy loss spectroscopic analysis (EELS) were used to investigate the chemical composition and structure at the interface between the titanium and bone tissue. HRTEM and EDS data showed evidence of crystalline hydroxyapatite and intermixing of bone with the oxide layer of the implant. The STEM/EELS experiment provided particularly interesting results: carbon existed in polysaccharides, calcium and phosphorus existed as tricalcium phosphate (TCP), and titanium existed as oxidized titanium. In addition, the oxygen energy loss near edge structures (ELNESs) showed a possibility of the presence of CaTiO3. These STEM/EELS results can be explained by structures either with or without a chemical reaction layer. The possible existence of the osseohybridization area and the form of the carbon suggest that reconsideration of the standard definition of osseointegration is necessary. PMID:25667930

  14. Resonant Effects in Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Guo, Songpo; Liu, Tao; Kinzel, Edward; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas can be used to focus light well below the diffraction limit with extremely high transmission efficiencies. This paper studies the spectral dependence of the transmission through nanoscale bowtie apertures defined in a silver film. A realistic bowtie aperture is numerically modeled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Results show that the transmission spectrum is dominated by Fabry-Pérot (F-P) waveguide modes and plasmonic modes. The F-P resonance is sensitive to the thickness of the film and the plasmonic resonant mode is closely related to the gap distance of the bowtie aperture. Both characteristics significantly affect the transmission spectrum. To verify these numerical results, bowtie apertures are FIB milled in a silver film. Experimental transmission measurements agree with simulation data. Based on this result, nanoscale bowtie apertures can be optimized to realize deep sub-wavelength confinement with high transmission efficiency with applications to nanolithography, data storage, and bio-chemical sensing. PMID:27250995

  15. Mapping photovoltaic performance with nanoscale resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kutes, Yasemin; Aguirre, Brandon A.; Bosse, James L.; Cruz-Campa, Jose L.; Zubia, David; Huey, Bryan D.

    2015-10-16

    Photo-conductive AFM spectroscopy (‘pcAFMs’) is proposed as a high-resolution approach for investigating nanostructured photovoltaics, uniquely providing nanoscale maps of photovoltaic (PV) performance parameters such as the short circuit current, open circuit voltage, maximum power, or fill factor. The method is demonstrated with a stack of 21 images acquired during in situ illumination of micropatterned polycrystalline CdTe/CdS, providing more than 42,000 I/V curves spatially separated by ~5 nm. For these CdTe/CdS microcells, the calculated photoconduction ranges from 0 to 700 picoSiemens (pS) upon illumination with ~1.6 suns, depending on location and biasing conditions. Mean short circuit currents of 2 pA, maximum powers of 0.5 pW, and fill factors of 30% are determined. The mean voltage at which the detected photocurrent is zero is determined to be 0.7 V. Significantly, enhancements and reductions in these more commonly macroscopic PV performance metrics are observed to correlate with certain grains and grain boundaries, and are confirmed to be independent of topography. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the benefits of nanoscale resolved PV functional measurements, reiterate the importance of microstructural control down to the nanoscale for 'PV devices, and provide a widely applicable new approach for directly investigating PV materials.

  16. Mapping photovoltaic performance with nanoscale resolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kutes, Yasemin; Aguirre, Brandon A.; Bosse, James L.; Cruz-Campa, Jose L.; Zubia, David; Huey, Bryan D.

    2015-10-16

    Photo-conductive AFM spectroscopy (‘pcAFMs’) is proposed as a high-resolution approach for investigating nanostructured photovoltaics, uniquely providing nanoscale maps of photovoltaic (PV) performance parameters such as the short circuit current, open circuit voltage, maximum power, or fill factor. The method is demonstrated with a stack of 21 images acquired during in situ illumination of micropatterned polycrystalline CdTe/CdS, providing more than 42,000 I/V curves spatially separated by ~5 nm. For these CdTe/CdS microcells, the calculated photoconduction ranges from 0 to 700 picoSiemens (pS) upon illumination with ~1.6 suns, depending on location and biasing conditions. Mean short circuit currents of 2 pA, maximummore » powers of 0.5 pW, and fill factors of 30% are determined. The mean voltage at which the detected photocurrent is zero is determined to be 0.7 V. Significantly, enhancements and reductions in these more commonly macroscopic PV performance metrics are observed to correlate with certain grains and grain boundaries, and are confirmed to be independent of topography. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the benefits of nanoscale resolved PV functional measurements, reiterate the importance of microstructural control down to the nanoscale for 'PV devices, and provide a widely applicable new approach for directly investigating PV materials.« less

  17. Resonant Effects in Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Guo, Songpo; Liu, Tao; Kinzel, Edward; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas can be used to focus light well below the diffraction limit with extremely high transmission efficiencies. This paper studies the spectral dependence of the transmission through nanoscale bowtie apertures defined in a silver film. A realistic bowtie aperture is numerically modeled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Results show that the transmission spectrum is dominated by Fabry-Pérot (F-P) waveguide modes and plasmonic modes. The F-P resonance is sensitive to the thickness of the film and the plasmonic resonant mode is closely related to the gap distance of the bowtie aperture. Both characteristics significantly affect the transmission spectrum. To verify these numerical results, bowtie apertures are FIB milled in a silver film. Experimental transmission measurements agree with simulation data. Based on this result, nanoscale bowtie apertures can be optimized to realize deep sub-wavelength confinement with high transmission efficiency with applications to nanolithography, data storage, and bio-chemical sensing. PMID:27250995

  18. Nanoscale Spatial Heterogeneity in Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Supreet; Gupta, Aditya; Kashyap, Hemant K

    2016-07-14

    In this article, we report a molecular dynamics simulation study on the X-ray and neutron scattering structures of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) and show that the DESs studied possess unique spatial heterogeneity on molecular length scales. The simulated X-ray and neutron scattering structure functions (S(q)s) of the DESs made of alkylamide + Li(+)/ClO4(-) display two peaks in the intermolecular region of the S(q)s. As a signature of nanoscale structural organization/heterogeneity, a prepeak is observed at 0.1 < q/Å(-1) < 0.4. The principal peak observed at around 1.2 < q/Å(-1) < 2 is rendered by short-distance inter- and intraspecies correlations. For the DESs studied, we demonstrate that nanoscale spatial heterogeneity is exhibited profoundly by the segregated domains of the constituent electrolyte, and the principal peak in S(q) is because of all sorts of close-contact correlations. The extent of nanoscale morphology as well as the strength of ion pairing is enhanced for the longer-tail alkylamide DES. PMID:27314310

  19. Nanoscale structures and mechanics of barnacle cement.

    PubMed

    Sullan, Ruby May A; Gunari, Nikhil; Tanur, Adrienne E; Chan, Yuri; Dickinson, Gary H; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittschof, Dan; Walker, Gilbert C

    2009-01-01

    Polymerized barnacle glue was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and chemical staining. Nanoscale structures exhibiting rod-shaped, globular and irregularly-shaped morphologies were observed in the bulk cement of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite (=Balanus amphitrite) by AFM. SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) provided chemical composition information, making evident the organic nature of the rod-shaped nanoscale structures. FTIR spectroscopy gave signatures of beta-sheet and random coil conformations. The mechanical properties of these nanoscale structures were also probed using force spectroscopy and indentation with AFM. Indentation data yielded higher elastic moduli for the rod-shaped structures when compared with the other structures in the bulk cement. Single molecule AFM force-extension curves on the matrix of the bulk cement often exhibited a periodic sawtooth-like profile, observed in both the extend and retract portions of the force curve. Rod-shaped structures stained with amyloid protein-selective dyes (Congo red and thioflavin-T) revealed that about 5% of the bulk cement were amyloids. A dominant 100 kDa cement protein was found to be mechanically agile, using repeating hydrophobic structures that apparently associate within the same protein or with neighbors, creating toughness on the 1-100 nm length scale. PMID:19180351

  20. Recognition of RNA duplexes by chemically modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Loo, Zi Ping; Antonio, Meraldo; Yau, Yin Hoe; Chuah, York Wieo; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Kierzek, Ryszard; Chen, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Triplex is emerging as an important RNA tertiary structure motif, in which consecutive non-canonical base pairs form between a duplex and a third strand. RNA duplex region is also often functionally important site for protein binding. Thus, triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) may be developed to regulate various biological functions involving RNA, such as viral ribosomal frameshifting and reverse transcription. How chemical modification in TFOs affects RNA triplex stability, however, is not well understood. Here, we incorporated locked nucleic acid, 2-thio U- and 2′-O methyl-modified residues in a series of all pyrimidine RNA TFOs, and we studied the binding to two RNA hairpin structures. The 12-base-triple major-groove pyrimidine–purine–pyrimidine triplex structures form between the duplex regions of RNA/DNA hairpins and the complementary RNA TFOs. Ultraviolet-absorbance-detected thermal melting studies reveal that the locked nucleic acid and 2-thio U modifications in TFOs strongly enhance triplex formation with both parental RNA and DNA duplex regions. In addition, we found that incorporation of 2′-O methyl-modified residues in a TFO destabilizes and stabilizes triplex formation with RNA and DNA duplex regions, respectively. The (de)stabilization of RNA triplex formation may be facilitated through modulation of van der Waals contact, base stacking, hydrogen bonding, backbone pre-organization, geometric compatibility and/or dehydration energy. Better understanding of the molecular determinants of RNA triplex structure stability lays the foundation for designing and discovering novel sequence-specific duplex-binding ligands as diagnostic and therapeutic agents targeting RNA. PMID:23658228