Science.gov

Sample records for nanosphere self-assembly initiated

  1. A Solution NMR Investigation into the Early Events of Amelogenin Nanosphere Self-Assembly Initiated with Sodium Chloride or Calcium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Bekhazi, Jacky G.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2008-12-08

    Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy, new insights into the early intermolecular interactions stabilizing amelogenin supramolecular assembly and the potential role of calcium ions have been discovered. Two-dimensional 1H-15N spectra were recorded for 15N-labeled amelogenin as a function of increasing Ca2+ concentration starting from monomeric conditions. Evidence for protein-protein interactions were observed between residues E18 and E40 in the N-terminus. At higher Ca2+ concentrations there was concurrent involvement of residues in both the N- (Y12-Q56) and the C-terminus (Q144-T171). Neither specific residues nor their stepwise interaction have previously been identified in the initial stages of nanosphere assembly.

  2. One-pot synthesis, optical property and self-assembly of monodisperse silver nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Aiwei; Qu Shengchun; Hou Yanbing; Teng Feng; Wang Yongsheng; Wang Zhanguo

    2011-08-15

    High-quality spherical silver (Ag) nanocrystals have been synthesized by using a one-pot approach, in which pre-synthesis of organometallic precursors is not required. This reaction involves the thermolysis of a mixed solution of silver acetate and n-dodecanethiol in a non-coordinating organic solvent. The size of the as-obtained Ag nanospheres can be controlled by adjusting the reaction time, reaction temperature and the amount of silver acetate added. The growth and nucleation process of the resultant Ag nanospheres have been studied by employing UV-vis absorption spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Furthermore, these Ag nanospheres have good self-assembly behaviors, and they are easily self-assembled into two- or three-dimensional superlattice structures due to the bundling and interdigitation of thiolate molecules adsorbed on Ag nanospheres. This one-pot synthetic procedure is simple and highly reproducible, which may be extended to prepare other noble-metal nanocrystals. - Graphical abstract: Different sized and monodisperse silver nanospheres were prepared using a one-pot approach with no pre-synthesis of organometallic precursors, and the silver nanospheres can self-assemble into highly ordered superlattices. Highlights: > Monodisperse silver nanospheres have been synthesized by a one-pot approach. > The synthetic method does not need pre-synthesis of organometallic precursors. > The silver nanospheres can self-assemble into highly ordered superlattices. > This synthetic method can be extended to prepare other metal nanocrystals.

  3. Peptide nanospheres self-assembled from a modified β-annulus peptide of Sesbania mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Yusaku; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2016-11-01

    A novel β-annulus peptide of Sesbania mosaic virus bearing an FKFE sequence at the C terminus was synthesized, and its self-assembling behavior in water was investigated. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy showed that the β-annulus peptide bearing an FKFE sequence self-assembled into approximately 30 nm nanospheres in water at pH 3.8, whereas the β-annulus peptide without the FKFE sequence afforded only irregular aggregates. The peptide nanospheres possessed a definite critical aggregation concentration (CAC = 26 μM), above which the size of nanospheres were nearly unaffected by the peptide concentration. The formation of peptide nanospheres was significantly affected by pH; the peptide did not form any assemblies at pH 2.2, whereas larger aggregates were formed at pH 6.4-11.6. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 470-475, 2016. PMID:26573103

  4. Kinetically controlled self-assembly of redox-active ferrocene-diphenylalanine: from nanospheres to nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuefei; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Wu, Zhongjie; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2013-11-22

    Putting metals into organic compounds such as peptides can lead to many new desirable properties. Here we designed a novel bioorganometallic molecule, ferrocene-diphenylalanine (Fc-FF), and investigated its self-assembly behavior. We directly observed a morphological transition from metastable nanospheres to nanofibers, which led to the formation of a self-supporting hydrogel. The strong hydrophobic interaction of the Fc moiety was suggested to have a key role in this kinetically controlled self-assembly process. Moreover, the redox center of the ferrocene group further allowed us to reversibly control the self-assembly behavior of Fc-FF by altering its redox state. PMID:24157576

  5. Kinetically controlled self-assembly of redox-active ferrocene-diphenylalanine: from nanospheres to nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuefei; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Wu, Zhongjie; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2013-11-01

    Putting metals into organic compounds such as peptides can lead to many new desirable properties. Here we designed a novel bioorganometallic molecule, ferrocene-diphenylalanine (Fc-FF), and investigated its self-assembly behavior. We directly observed a morphological transition from metastable nanospheres to nanofibers, which led to the formation of a self-supporting hydrogel. The strong hydrophobic interaction of the Fc moiety was suggested to have a key role in this kinetically controlled self-assembly process. Moreover, the redox center of the ferrocene group further allowed us to reversibly control the self-assembly behavior of Fc-FF by altering its redox state.

  6. Amphiphilic Graft Copolymer Nanospheres: From Colloidal Self-Assembly to CO2 Capture Membranes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Harim; Kim, Dong Jun; Park, Min Su; Ryu, Du Yeol; Kim, Jong Hak

    2016-04-13

    Colloidal nanosphere self-assembly effectively generates ordered nanostructures, prompting tremendous interest in many applications such as photonic crystals and templates for inverse opal fabrication. Here we report the self-assembly of low-cost, graft copolymer nanospheres for CO2 capture membranes. Specifically, poly(dimethylsiloxane)-graft-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PDMS-g-P4VP) is synthesized via one-pot, free radical dispersion polymerization to give discrete monodisperse nanospheres. These nanospheres comprise a surface-anchored highly permeable PDMS layer and internal CO2-philic P4VP spherical core. Their diameter is controllable below the submicrometer range by varying grafting ratios. The colloidal dispersion forms a long-range, close-packed hexagonal array on a substrate by inclined deposition and convective assembly. The array shows dispersion medium-dependent packing characteristics. A thermodynamic correlation is determined using different solvents to obtain stable PDMS-g-P4VP dispersions and interpreted in terms of Flory-Huggins interaction parameter. As a proof-of-concept, the implementation of these nanospheres into membranes simultaneously enhances the CO2 permeability and CO2/N2 selectivity of PDMS-based transport matrixes. Upon physical aging of the solution, the CO2/N2 selectivity is improved up to 26, one of the highest values for highly permeable PDMS-based polymeric membranes. PMID:27004536

  7. Initial condition of stochastic self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jason K.; Sindi, Suzanne S.

    2016-02-01

    The formation of a stable protein aggregate is regarded as the rate limiting step in the establishment of prion diseases. In these systems, once aggregates reach a critical size the growth process accelerates and thus the waiting time until the appearance of the first critically sized aggregate is a key determinant of disease onset. In addition to prion diseases, aggregation and nucleation is a central step of many physical, chemical, and biological process. Previous studies have examined the first-arrival time at a critical nucleus size during homogeneous self-assembly under the assumption that at time t =0 the system was in the all-monomer state. However, in order to compare to in vivo biological experiments where protein constituents inherited by a newly born cell likely contain intermediate aggregates, other possibilities must be considered. We consider one such possibility by conditioning the unique ergodic size distribution on subcritical aggregate sizes; this least-informed distribution is then used as an initial condition. We make the claim that this initial condition carries fewer assumptions than an all-monomer one and verify that it can yield significantly different averaged waiting times relative to the all-monomer condition under various models of assembly.

  8. Initial condition of stochastic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jason K; Sindi, Suzanne S

    2016-02-01

    The formation of a stable protein aggregate is regarded as the rate limiting step in the establishment of prion diseases. In these systems, once aggregates reach a critical size the growth process accelerates and thus the waiting time until the appearance of the first critically sized aggregate is a key determinant of disease onset. In addition to prion diseases, aggregation and nucleation is a central step of many physical, chemical, and biological process. Previous studies have examined the first-arrival time at a critical nucleus size during homogeneous self-assembly under the assumption that at time t=0 the system was in the all-monomer state. However, in order to compare to in vivo biological experiments where protein constituents inherited by a newly born cell likely contain intermediate aggregates, other possibilities must be considered. We consider one such possibility by conditioning the unique ergodic size distribution on subcritical aggregate sizes; this least-informed distribution is then used as an initial condition. We make the claim that this initial condition carries fewer assumptions than an all-monomer one and verify that it can yield significantly different averaged waiting times relative to the all-monomer condition under various models of assembly. PMID:26986290

  9. Surface functional modification of self-assembled insulin nanospheres for improving intestinal absorption.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kai; Fang, Yan; Kan, Qiming; Zhao, Jian; Gan, Yanqiu; Liu, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    In this work we fabricated therapeutic protein drugs such as insulin as free-carrier delivery system to improve their oral absorption efficiency. The formulation involved self-assembly of insulin into nanospheres (INS) by a novel thermal induced phase separation method. In consideration of harsh environment in gastrointestinal tract, surface functional modification of INS with ɛ-poly-L-lysine (EPL) was employed to form a core-shell structure (INS@EPL) and protect them from too fast dissociation before their arriving at target uptake sites. Both INS and INS@EPL were characterized as uniformly spherical particles with mean diameter size of 150-300 nm. The process of transient thermal treatment did not change their biological potency retention significantly. In vitro dissolution studies showed that shell cross-linked of INS with EPL improved the release profiles of insulin from the self-assembled nanospheres at intestinal pH. Confocal microscopy visualization and transport experiments proved the enhanced paracellular permeability of INS@EPL in Caco-2 cells. Compared to that of INS, enteral administration of INS@EPL at 20 IU/kg resulted in more significant hypoglycemic effects in diabetic rats up to 12 h. Accordingly, the results indicated that surface functional modification of self-assembled insulin nanospheres with shell cross-linked polycationic peptide could be a promising candidate for oral therapeutic protein delivery. PMID:25433129

  10. A new route to self-assembled tin dioxide nanospheres: fabrication and characterization.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhengtao; Peng, Bo; Chen, Dong; Tang, Fangqiong; Muscat, Anthony J

    2008-10-01

    Nearly monodispersed self-assembled tin dioxide (SnO2) nanospheres with intense photoluminescence (PL) were synthesized using a new wet chemistry technique. Instead of coprecipitating stannous salts, bulk tin (Sn) metal was oxidized at room temperature in a solution of hydrogen peroxide and deionized water containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and ethylenediamine (EDA). SnO2 nanocrystals were produced with diameters of approximately 3.8 nm that spontaneously self-assembled into uniform SnO2 nanospheres with diameters of approximately 30 nm. Analysis was performed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, PL spectroscopy, and fluorescence lifetime measurements. The SnO2 nanospheres displayed room-temperature purple luminescence with an intense band at 394 nm (approximately 3.15 eV) and a high quantum yield of approximately 15%, likely as a result of emission from the surface states of SnO2/PVP complexes. The present study could open a new avenue to large-scale synthesis of self-assembled functional oxide nanostructures with technological applications as purple emitters, biological labels, gas sensors, lithium batteries, and dye-sensitized solar cells. PMID:18763816

  11. Self-assembly of poly(o-methoxyaniline) hollow nanospheres from a polymeric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Jing; Zhang, Lijuan; Peng, Hui; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Kilmartin, Paul A.

    2009-10-01

    Self-assembled poly(o-methoxyaniline) (POMA) hollow nanospheres were prepared in a solution of poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid) (PMVEA) by oxidative polymerization using ammonium persulfate as the oxidant. The weight ratio of PMVEA to o-methoxyaniline in the solution had a significant effect on the morphology of the poly(o-methoxyaniline) nanospheres as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The diameter of the hollow nanospheres decreased from 440 to 210 nm with an increase in the PMVEA concentration from 1% to 5%. Freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy results showed the presence of spherical micelles composed of PMVEA/ o-methoxyaniline prior to polymerization, which also decreased in size as more PMVEA was added to the solution, and can act as soft templates for the formation of the hollow POMA nanospheres. The POMA/PMVEA hollow nanospheres were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared, UV-visible, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental analysis and conductivity measurements.

  12. Nanofeatured anti-reflective films manufactured using hot roller imprinting and self-assembly nanosphere lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shih-Jung; Chen, Wei-An

    2013-06-01

    This paper details the continuous fabrication of nanofeatured anti-reflective films for solar cells, using hot roller imprinting and self-assembly nanosphere lithography. Polystyrene nanospheres of different sizes (471, 628, and 1200 nm) were first self-assembled onto Silicon substrates by a spin coater. A thin layer of aluminum was then deposited onto the surface of nanosphere-patterned substrates, using the plasma sputtering technique. After electroforming, nickel-cobalt membranes containing nano-arrays of different sizes were obtained. The membranes were then attached to the surface of the metallic roller in a hot roller imprinting facility. The imprinting facility was used to replicate the nanofeatures onto 60 μm thick polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films. The imprinted films were characterized using water contact angle measurement, a UV-vis spectrophotometer, atomic force microscope (AFM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM); the enhancement efficiency of the nanofeatured films for the solar cells was also measured by a solar simulator. The measured results suggested that the imprinted films could effectively reduce the reflectance and increase the conversion efficiency of solar cells.

  13. Epsilon-poly-L-lysine guided improving pulmonary delivery of supramolecular self-assembled insulin nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kai; Liu, Yang; Ke, Liyuan; Fang, Yan; Yang, Rui; Cui, Fude

    2015-01-01

    This work presents new spherical nanoparticles that are fabricated from supramolecular self-assembly of therapeutic proteins for inhalation treatment. The formation involved self-assembly of insulin into nanospheres (INS) by a novel thermal induced phase separation method. Surface functional modification of INS with ɛ-poly-L-lysine (EPL), a homopolymerized cationic peptide, was followed to form a core-shell structure (INS@EPL). Both INS and INS@EPL were characterized as spherical particles with mean diameter size of 150-250 nm. The process of transient thermal treatment did not change their biological potency retention significantly. FTIR and CD characterizations indicated that their secondary structures and biological potencies were not changed significantly after self-assembly. The in vivo investigation after pulmonary administration, including lung deposition, alveoli distribution, pharmacological effects and serum pharmacokinetics were investigated. Compared to that of INS, intratracheal administration of INS@EPL offered a pronounced and prolonged lung distribution, as well as pharmacological effects which were indicated by the 23.4% vs 11.7% of relative bioavailability. Accordingly, the work described here demonstrates the possibility of spherical supramolecular self-assembly of therapeutic proteins in nano-scale for pulmonary delivery application. PMID:25450837

  14. Self-assembled multifunctional DNA nanospheres for biosensing and drug delivery into specific target cells.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Dong, Ying; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Min; Zhong, Hua; Ji, Bin

    2015-04-28

    Self-assembly of three dimensional nucleic acid nanostructures is of great significance in nanotechnology, biosensing and biomedicine. Herein we present a novel class of multifunctional and programmable DNA nanostructures, termed nanospheres (NSs), with monodispersity, dense compaction and uniform size (∼ 200 nm) using only four DNAs based on not only Watson-Crick base pair hybridization between single-stranded DNA but also liquid crystallization and dense packing from periodic DNA duplexes. Due to the diversity of the internal structures, the present NSs can easily evolve into other kinds of DNA assemblies, such as DNA spherical structures with a larger size and a rough surface via rolling circle replication (RCR). Importantly, the functional arms incorporated in building units can be readily designed for biosensing and targeted cancer therapy with high payload capacity and excellent biocompatibility. Therefore, the proposed NSs could lead to novel routes for nucleic acid self-assembly, promising versatile applications in biosensing and biomedicine. PMID:25825266

  15. Self-assembled multifunctional DNA nanospheres for biosensing and drug delivery into specific target cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Sai; Dong, Ying; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Min; Zhong, Hua; Ji, Bin

    2015-04-01

    Self-assembly of three dimensional nucleic acid nanostructures is of great significance in nanotechnology, biosensing and biomedicine. Herein we present a novel class of multifunctional and programmable DNA nanostructures, termed nanospheres (NSs), with monodispersity, dense compaction and uniform size (~200 nm) using only four DNAs based on not only Watson-Crick base pair hybridization between single-stranded DNA but also liquid crystallization and dense packing from periodic DNA duplexes. Due to the diversity of the internal structures, the present NSs can easily evolve into other kinds of DNA assemblies, such as DNA spherical structures with a larger size and a rough surface via rolling circle replication (RCR). Importantly, the functional arms incorporated in building units can be readily designed for biosensing and targeted cancer therapy with high payload capacity and excellent biocompatibility. Therefore, the proposed NSs could lead to novel routes for nucleic acid self-assembly, promising versatile applications in biosensing and biomedicine.Self-assembly of three dimensional nucleic acid nanostructures is of great significance in nanotechnology, biosensing and biomedicine. Herein we present a novel class of multifunctional and programmable DNA nanostructures, termed nanospheres (NSs), with monodispersity, dense compaction and uniform size (~200 nm) using only four DNAs based on not only Watson-Crick base pair hybridization between single-stranded DNA but also liquid crystallization and dense packing from periodic DNA duplexes. Due to the diversity of the internal structures, the present NSs can easily evolve into other kinds of DNA assemblies, such as DNA spherical structures with a larger size and a rough surface via rolling circle replication (RCR). Importantly, the functional arms incorporated in building units can be readily designed for biosensing and targeted cancer therapy with high payload capacity and excellent biocompatibility. Therefore, the

  16. Electric field enhancement in a self-assembled 2D array of silver nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z. E-mail: wayne.hess@pnnl.gov; Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Abellan, Patricia; Browning, Nigel D.; Hess, Wayne P. E-mail: wayne.hess@pnnl.gov; Khon, Elena; Hu, Dehong; Zamkov, Mikhail; Evans, James E.

    2014-12-07

    We investigate the plasmonic properties of a self-assembled 2D array of Ag nanospheres (average particle diameter/inter-particle separation distance of 9/3.7 nm). The structures of the individual particles and their assemblies are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The plasmonic response of the nanoparticle network is probed using two-photon photoemission electron microscopy (TP-PEEM). HR-TEM and TP-PEEM statistics reveal the structure and plasmonic response of the network to be homogeneous on average. This translates into a relatively uniform surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response from biphenyl,4-4{sup ′}-dithiol (BPDT) molecules adsorbed onto different sites of the network. Reproducible, bright, and low-background SERS spectra are recorded and assigned on the basis of density functional theory calculations in which BPDT is chemisorbed onto the vertex of a finite tetrahedral Ag cluster consisting of 20 Ag atoms. A notable agreement between experiment and theory allows us to rigorously account for the observable vibrational states of BPDT in the ∼200–2200 cm{sup −1} region of the spectrum. Finite difference time domain simulations further reveal that physical enhancement factors on the order of 10{sup 6} are attainable at the nanogaps formed between the silver nanospheres in the 2D array. Combined with modest chemical enhancement factors, this study paves the way for reproducible single molecule signals from an easily self-assembled SERS substrate.

  17. Electric Field Enhancement in a Self-Assembled 2D Array of Silver Nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Khon, Elena; Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Abellan, Patricia; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.; Hu, Dehong; Zamkov, Mikhail; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-07

    We investigate the plasmonic properties of a self-assembled 2D array of Ag nanospheres (average particle diameter/inter-particle separation distance of ~9/~4 nm). The structures of the individual particles and their assemblies are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The plasmonic response of the nanoparticle network is probed using two-photon photoemission electron microscopy (TP-PEEM). HR-TEM and TP-PEEM statistics reveal the structure and plasmonic response of the network to be homogeneous on average. This translates into a relatively uniform surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response from biphenyl,4-4’-dithiol (BPDT) molecules adsorbed onto different sites of the network. Bright and background free SERS spectra are recorded, assigned on the basis of density 2 functional theory calculations in which BPDT is chemisorbed onto the vertex of a finitie tetrahedral Ag cluster consisting of 20 Ag atoms. A remarkable agreement between experiment and theory allows us to rigorously account for the observable vibrational states of BPDT in the ~200-2200 cm-1 region of the spectrum. Finite difference time domain simulations further reveal that physical enhancement factors on the order of 106 are attainable at the nanogaps formed between the silver nanospheres in the 2D array. Combined with modest chemical enhancement factors, this study paves the way for reproducible single molecule signals from an easily self-assembled SERS substrate.

  18. Effect of nanoparticle polydispersity on the self-assembly of polymer tethered nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Carolyn L; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2012-09-14

    Recent simulations predict that aggregating nanospheres functionalized with polymer "tethers" can self-assemble to form a cylinder, perforated lamellae, lamellae, and even the double gyroid phase, which are phases also seen in block copolymer and surfactant systems. Nanoparticle size polydispersity is likely to be a characteristic of these systems. If too high, polydispersity may destabilize a phase. Using multiple thermodynamic paths to explore the phase diagram as a function of temperature and polydispersity, we explore the effect of nanosphere size polydispersity on the phase diagram. We show that in the portions of the phase diagram characterized by an icosahedral local nanoparticle packing motif, a low amount of polydispersity lowers the energy and a large amount of polydispersity raises the energy of the system by disrupting the icosahedral packing. In general, regions of the phase diagram characterized by liquid-like icosahedral packing have high terminal polydispersities from 15% to more than 30%. In the regions of the phase diagram characterized by crystalline local packing, polydispersity raises the energy of the system and induces a phase transition from crystalline to liquid-like ordering within the nanosphere rich regions of the microphase. We find the bilayer crystalline lamellae phase has a terminal polydispersity of 6%, but may still be partially crystalline up to 12%. PMID:22979884

  19. Controllable preparation of multishelled NiO hollow nanospheres via layer-by-layer self-assembly for supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zeheng; Xu, Feifei; Zhang, Weixin; Mei, Zhousheng; Pei, Bo; Zhu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a facile layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly method for controllable preparation of single-, double-, and triple-shelled NiO hollow nanospheres by calcining Ni(OH)2/C precursors formed at different stage. It is observed that the external nanoflakes of the NiO hollow nanospheres are inherited from the Ni(OH)2 precursors organized on the surface of carbon spheres via a self-assembly growth process and the inner shells result from the formation of different Ni(OH)2 layers within the carbon spheres during different preparation cycles. Supercapacitive performance of the three types of NiO hollow nanospheres as active electrode materials has been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge. The results indicate that double-shelled NiO hollow nanosphere sample with largest surface area (92.99 m2 g-1) exhibits the best electrochemical properties among the three NiO hollow nanosphere samples. It delivers a high capacitance of 612.5 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and demonstrates a superior long-term cyclic stability, with over 90% specific capacitance retention after 1000 charge-discharge cycles. This excellent performance is ascribed to the short diffusion path and large surface area of the unique hollow structure with nanoflake building blocks for bulk accessibility of faradaic reaction.

  20. Inkjet Printing of Colloidal Nanospheres: Engineering the Evaporation-Driven Self-Assembly Process to Form Defined Layer Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowade, Enrico; Blaudeck, Thomas; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2015-09-01

    We report on inkjet printing of aqueous colloidal suspensions containing monodisperse silica and/or polystyrene nanosphere particles and a systematic study of the morphology of the deposits as a function of different parameters during inkjet printing and solvent evaporation. The colloidal suspensions act as a model ink for an understanding of layer formation processes and resulting morphologies in inkjet printing in general. We investigated the influence of the surface energy and the temperature of the substrate, the formulation of the suspensions, and the multi-pass printing aiming for layer stacks on the morphology of the deposits. We explain our findings with models of evaporation-driven self-assembly of the nanosphere particles in a liquid droplet and derive methods to direct the self-assembly processes into distinct one- and two-dimensional deposit morphologies.

  1. One-step synthesis of magnetic hollow mesoporous silica (MHMS) nanospheres for drug delivery nanosystems via electrostatic self-assembly templated approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Jingnan; Cao, Qingyun; Deng, Haidong; Shao, Guang; Deng, David Y B; Zhou, Wuyi

    2015-02-11

    In this work, yolk-shell structured magnetic hollow mesoporous silica (MHMS) nanospheres with controllable magnetic responsibility, high specific surface area, a huge cavity and ink-bottle type mesopores were successfully synthesized in one-step by an electrostatic self-assembly templated approach. The obtained MHMS nanospheres exhibited low cytotoxicity, excellent biocompatibility and potential application in the biomedical field. PMID:25563752

  2. Two-phase synthesis of monodisperse silica nanospheres with amines or ammonia catalyst and their controlled self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junzheng; Sugawara-Narutaki, Ayae; Fukao, Masashi; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Atsushi; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2011-05-01

    A significant progress has recently been made in the synthesis of monodisperse silica nanoparticles less than 30 nm in diameter by using basic amino acids (e.g., lysine) as a base catalyst for hydrolysis of silicon alkoxide. Alternatively, a more versatile and economical amino acid-free method has been developed to synthesize uniform silica nanospheres (SNSs) with low polydispersity (<12%) in liquid-liquid biphasic systems containing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), water, and primary amine (or ammonia) under precisely controlled pH conditions (pH 10.8-11.4). The diameter of the SNSs determined from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can be tuned from ∼12 to ∼36 nm by simply changing the initial pH of the aqueous phase in the reaction mixtures. Furthermore, the as-synthesized sol was taken as the starting material for studying the influences of the type of base catalysts on the solvent evaporation-induced three-dimensional (3D) self-assembly of SNSs. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption are used to characterize the degree of packing of the resulting 3D arrays. The assembled SNSs with large interparticle mesopores with the diameter of ca. 8.1 nm and low packing fraction of ca. 66.1% are observed upon solvent evaporation of as-synthesized sol in the presence of primary amine. This indicates that SNSs are loosely packed, compared with the packing fraction of 74% for a face-centered cubic array of ideal hard spheres. In contrast, with the aid of an organic buffer or lysine as additives, the assembly of SNSs having smaller mesopores (ca. 3.9 nm) and higher packing fraction of 70.5-71.5% are achieved. It is suggested that the chemical additives with the ability to maintain relatively strong repulsive interaction until the final stage of evaporation play a vital role in the fabrication of well-ordered SNSs arrays. PMID:21480630

  3. Supramolecular self-assembly carbazolyl radicals nanospheres triggered by ultraviolet light for explosives sensing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongwei; Li, Feng; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Xiaobai; Li, Tao; Shen, Fangzhong; Zhang, Ming

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we designed and synthesized a carbazole-type molecule that can form carbazolyl radicals in chloroform solution under the irradiation of UV light. The process is accompanied by an obvious change in the emission color from blue to bright green. The radicals and the neutral molecules assemble together and form nanospheres through synergistic effect of π-π stacking, intermolecular hydrogen bonds and charge transfer interaction. High resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to confirm the nanospheres. The radius sizes of the nanospheres are mainly in 80-100nm. Further, these nanospheres act as the fluorescence sensor for explosives detection, and they exhibit high selectivity and sensitivity to 2, 4, 6-trinitrophenol (TNP). The limit of detection for nanospheres is 1.2×10(-7)M. PMID:27591596

  4. GREEN AND CONTROLLED SYNTHESIS OF GOLD AND PLATINUM NANOMATERIALS USING VITAMIN B2: DENSITY-ASSISTED SELF-ASSEMBLY OF NANOSPHERES, WIRES AND RODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the first time, we report density-assisted self-assembly and efficient synthesis of gold (Au) and platinum (Pt) nanospheres, nanowires and nanorods using vitamin B2 (riboflavin) without employing any special capping or dispersing agent at room temperature; this env...

  5. Self-assembled Multilayers of Silica Nanospheres for Defect Reduction in Non- and Semipolar Gallium Nitride Epitaxial Layers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Non- and semipolar GaN have great potential to improve the efficiency of light emitting devices due to much reduced internal electric fields. However, heteroepitaxial GaN growth in these crystal orientations suffers from very high dislocation and stacking faults densities. Here, we report a facile method to obtain low defect density non- and semipolar heteroepitaxial GaN via selective area epitaxy using self-assembled multilayers of silica nanospheres (MSN). Nonpolar (11–20) and semipolar (11–22) GaN layers with high crystal quality have been achieved by epitaxial integration of the MSN and a simple one-step overgrowth process, by which both dislocation and basal plane stacking fault densities can be significantly reduced. The underlying defect reduction mechanisms include epitaxial growth through the MSN covered template, island nucleation via nanogaps in the MSN, and lateral overgrowth and coalescence above the MSN. InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells structures grown on a nonpolar GaN/MSN template show more than 30-fold increase in the luminescence intensity compared to a control sample without the MSN. This self-assembled MSN technique provides a new platform for epitaxial growth of nitride semiconductors and offers unique opportunities for improving the material quality of GaN grown on other orientations and foreign substrates or heteroepitaxial growth of other lattice-mismatched materials. PMID:27065755

  6. Dispersion and self-assembly of nanospheres and nanorods in polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Ranjan Deepak

    2007-12-01

    Polymer nanocomposites are hybrid nanomaterials in which electrical, opto-electronic, magnetic, mechanical and other properties can be precisely tuned by choosing an appropriate combination of nanoparticle (NP) and polymer. This dissertation explores in-situ and ex-situ routes to disperse metal NP in polymers as well as the fundamental thermodynamic and dynamic principles underlying the NP dispersion in polymers. "In-situ" silver NP are prepared by the thermal decomposition of an organometallic precursor (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonato)silver(I) or (AgHFA) in homopolymer poly(methyl methactyalate), PMMA and block copolymer poly(MMA-b-styrene), PS-b-PMMA films. A range of complementary characterization techniques including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), scanning force microscopy (SFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV-visible spectroscopy are used to characterize the polymer nanocomposites. The in-situ formed "spherical" silver NP are observed to segregate to the surface and the substrate regions in PMMA and PS-b-PMMA films. By showing that the precursor organizes into aggregates in as-cast films, our experiments uncover the mechanism of NP segregation. Upon annealing, diffusion of the precursor to the surface and substrate occurs concurrently with NP formation resulting in enrichment of Ag at both interfaces. In PS-b-PMMA films, the Ag NP form during the self-assembly of the block copolymer. At the surface, NP organize into well-defined arrays that are guided by the PMMA domains. For the first time, our experiments also show that the kinetics of block copolymer reorganization is slowed down by the incorporation of NP. This dissertation also explores the self-assembly of "ex-situ" synthesized NP with aspect ratio > 1, namely gold nanorods functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol), PEG. After solvent annealing PS-b-PMMA with 5-vol% Au, the nanorods are selectively located and confined in the "lamellar" PMMA domains due to favorable

  7. Rapid Synthesis of Monodisperse Au Nanospheres through a Laser Irradiation -Induced Shape Conversion, Self-Assembly and Their Electromagnetic Coupling SERS Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dilong; Li, Cuncheng; Zhou, Fei; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Honghua; Li, Xinyang; Duan, Guotao; Cai, Weiping; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We develop a facile and effective strategy to prepare monodispersed Au spherical nanoparticles by two steps. Large-scale monocrystalline Au nanooctahedra with uniform size were synthesized by a polyol-route and subsequently Au nanoparticles were transformed from octahedron to spherical shape in a liquid under ambient atmosphere by non-focused laser irradiation in very short time. High monodipersed, ultra-smooth gold nanospheres can be obtained by simply optimizing the laser fluence and irradiation time. Photothermal melting-evaporation model was employed to get a better understanding of the morphology transformation for the system of nanosecond pulsed-laser excitation. These Au nanoparticles were fabricated into periodic monolayer arrays by self-assembly utilizing their high monodispersity and perfect spherical shape. Importantly, such Au nanospheres arrays demonstrated very good SERS enhancement related to their periodic structure due to existence of many SERS hot spots between neighboring Au nanospheres caused by the electromagnetic coupling in an array. These gold nanospheres and their self-assembled arrays possess distinct physical and chemical properties. It will make them as an excellent and promising candidate for applying in sensing and spectroscopic enhancement, catalysis, energy, and biology. PMID:25566872

  8. Theoretical Study of the Initial Stages of Self-Assembly of a Carboxysome’s Facet

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mahalik, J. P.; Brown, Kirsten A.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2016-02-24

    Bacterial microcompartments, BMCs, are organelles that exist within wide variety of bacteria and act as nanofactories. Among the different types of known BMCs, the carboxysome has been studied the most. The carboxysome plays an important role in the light-independent part of the photosynthesis process, where its icosahedral-like proteinaceous shell acts as a membrane that controls the transport of metabolites. Although a structural model exists for the carboxysome shell, it remains largely unknown how the shell proteins self-assemble. Understanding the self-assembly process can provide insights into how the shell affects the carboxysome s function and how it can be modified tomore » create new functionalities, such as artificial nanoreactors and artificial protein membranes. Here, we explain a theoretical framework that employs Monte Carlo simulations with a coarse-grain potential that reproduces well the atomistic potential of mean force; employing this framework, we are able to capture the initial stages of the 2D self-assembly of CcmK2 hexamers, a major protein-shell component of the carboxysome's facet. The simulations reveal that CcmK2 hexamers self-assemble into clusters that resemble what was seen experimentally in 2D layers. Further analysis of the simulation results suggests that the 2D self-assembly of carboxysome s facets is driven by a nucleation growth process, which in turn could play an important role in the hierarchical self- assembly of BMC shells in general.« less

  9. Theoretical Study of the Initial Stages of Self-Assembly of a Carboxysome's Facet.

    PubMed

    Mahalik, J P; Brown, Kirsten A; Cheng, Xiaolin; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2016-06-28

    Bacterial microcompartments, BMCs, are organelles that exist within wide variety of bacteria and act as nanofactories. Among the different types of known BMCs, the carboxysome has been studied the most. The carboxysome plays an important role in the light-independent part of the photosynthesis process, where its icosahedral-like proteinaceous shell acts as a membrane that controls the transport of metabolites. Although a structural model exists for the carboxysome shell, it remains largely unknown how the shell proteins self-assemble. Understanding the self-assembly process can provide insights into how the shell affects the carboxysome's function and how it can be modified to create new functionalities, such as artificial nanoreactors and artificial protein membranes. Here, we describe a theoretical framework that employs Monte Carlo simulations with a coarse-grain potential that reproduces well the atomistic potential of mean force; employing this framework, we are able to capture the initial stages of the 2D self-assembly of CcmK2 hexamers, a major protein-shell component of the carboxysome's facet. The simulations reveal that CcmK2 hexamers self-assemble into clusters that resemble what was seen experimentally in 2D layers. Further analysis of the simulation results suggests that the 2D self-assembly of carboxysome's facets is driven by a nucleation-growth process, which in turn could play an important role in the hierarchical self-assembly of BMC shells in general. PMID:26906087

  10. Ordered silicon nanowire arrays prepared by an improved nanospheres self-assembly in combination with Ag-assisted wet chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guobin; Westphalen, Jasper; Drexler, Jan; Plentz, Jonathan; Dellith, Jan; Dellith, Andrea; Andrä, Gudrun; Falk, Fritz

    2016-04-01

    An improved Langmuir-Blodgett self-assembly process combined with Ag-assisted wet chemical etching for the preparation of ordered silicon nanowire arrays is presented in this paper. The new process is independent of the surface conditions (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) of the substrate, allowing for depositing a monolayer of closely packed polystyrene nanospheres onto any flat surface. A full control of the morphology of the silicon nanowire is achieved. Furthermore, it is observed that the formation of porous-Si at the tips of the nanowires is closely related to the release of Ag nanoparticles from the Ag mask during the etching, which subsequently redeposit on the surface initially free of Ag, and these Ag nanoparticles catalyze the etching of the tips and lead to the porous-Si formation. This finding will help to improve the resulting nano- and microstructures to get them free of pores, and renders it a promising technology for low-cost high throughput fabrication of specific optical devices, photonic crystals, sensors, MEMS, and NEMS by substituting the costly BOSCH process. It is shown that ordered nanowire arrays free of porous structures can be produced if all sources of Ag nanoparticles are excluded, and structures with aspect ratio more than 100 can be produced.

  11. Studies on formation mechanism of 3D Cu2O nanospheres through self-assembly of 0D nanodots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lun; Yu, Bing; Ying, Pengzhan; Wu, Ling; Chen, Shanliang; Wang, Jieru; Gu, Xiuquan; Zhou, Rui; Ni, Zhonghai

    2015-08-01

    Cu2O crystals with different morphologies (solid and porous) and sizes (from 25 to 282 nm) were synthesized controllably through a facile solvothermal route. The growth mechanism was investigated by SEM and TEM with varying the concentration of poly (vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP, K30), CH3COO- (Ac-) and NO3- acid ions in the precursor solution. The self-assembly of three types of Cu2O nano-structures was observed through a general route of zero-dimensional (0D) → 2D → 3D. When Cu(Ac)2ṡH2O was used as the copper sources, 0D Cu2O nanodots with size of 2-7 nm were firstly assembled to 2D quasi-spherical and bookmark-like structures via Oriented attachment (OA), and then converted into 3D hierarchical Cu2O nanoclusters (a few tens of nm) and porous sub-microspheres with an average size of 282 nm, respectively. While Cu(NO3)2ṡ3H2O was used instead of Cu(Ac)2ṡH2O, the similar assembly process occurred leading to the formation of Cu2O porous nanospheres of 40-140 nm which exhibit better adsorption ability toward methyl orange compared with activated carbon. In addition, we also investigated the dependence of Cu2O crystals on the concentration of acid ions (Ac- and NO3-). Compared with Ac-, the size and morphology of the obtained products were less dependent on the concentration of NO3- acid ions. This study might provide a new insight into the growth mechanism of Cu2O based micro- or nanostructures.

  12. SiO2@Au core-shell nanospheres self-assemble to form colloidal crystals that can be sintered and surface modified to produce pH-controlled membranes.

    PubMed

    Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia Anne A; Zharov, Ilya

    2013-03-19

    We prepared colloidal crystals by self-assembly of gold-coated silica nanospheres, and free-standing nanoporous membranes by sintering these colloidal crystals. We modified the nanopore surface with ionizable functional groups, by forming a monolayer of L-cysteine or by surface-initiated polymerization of methacrylic acid. Diffusion experiments for the cationic dye Rhodamine B through L-cysteine-modified membranes showed a decrease in flux upon addition of an acid due to the nanopore surface becoming positively charged. Diffusion experiments for the neutral dye, ferrocenecarboxaldehyde, through the PMAA-modified membranes showed a 13-fold increase in flux upon addition of an acid resulting from the protonated polymer collapsing onto the nanopore surface leading to larger pore size. Our results demonstrate that SiO2@Au core-shell nanospheres can self-assemble into colloidal crystals and that transport through the corresponding surface-modified Au-coated colloidal membranes can be controlled by pH. PMID:23398311

  13. Triphenylalanine peptides self-assemble into nanospheres and nanorods that are different from the nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine peptides.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cong; Luo, Yin; Zhou, Ruhong; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the nature of the self-assembly of peptide nanostructures at the molecular level is critical for rational design of functional bio-nanomaterials. Recent experimental studies have shown that triphenylalanine(FFF)-based peptides can self-assemble into solid plate-like nanostructures and nanospheres, which are different from the hollow nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine(FF)-based peptides. In spite of extensive studies, the assembly mechanism and the molecular basis for the structural differences between FFF and FF nanostructures remain poorly understood. In this work, we first investigate the assembly process and the structural features of FFF nanostructures using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, and then compare them with FF nanostructures. We find that FFF peptides spontaneously assemble into solid nanometer-sized nanospheres and nanorods with substantial β-sheet contents, consistent with the structural properties of hundred-nanometer-sized FFF nano-plates characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. Distinct from the formation mechanism of water-filled FF nanovesicles and nanotubes reported in our previous study, intermediate bilayers are not observed during the self-assembly process of FFF nanospheres and nanorods. The peptides in FFF nanostructures are predominantly anti-parallel-aligned, which can form larger sizes of β-sheet-like structures than the FF counterparts. In contrast, FF peptides exhibit lipid-like assembly behavior and assemble into bilayered nanostructures. Furthermore, although the self-assembly of FF and FFF peptides is mostly driven by side chain-side chain (SC-SC) aromatic stacking interactions, the main chain-main chain (MC-MC) interactions also play an important role in the formation of fine structures of the assemblies. The delicate interplay between MC-MC and SC-SC interactions results in the different nanostructures formed by the two peptides. These findings provide new insights into the structure

  14. Formation and Reversible Morphological Transition of Bicontinuous Nanospheres and Toroidal Micelles by the Self-Assembly of a Crystalline-b-Coil Diblock Copolymer.

    PubMed

    Presa-Soto, David; Carriedo, Gabino A; de la Campa, Raquel; Presa Soto, Alejandro

    2016-08-16

    We herein report the formation of two complex nanostructures, toroidal micelles and bicontinuous nanospheres, by the self-assembly of the single structurally simple crystalline-b-coil diblock copolymer poly[bis(trifluoroethoxy)phosphazene]-b-poly(styrene), PTFEP-b-PS, in one solvent (THF) and without additives. The nature of these nanostructures in solution was confirmed by DLS and cryo-TEM experiments. The two morphologies are related by means of a new type of reversible morphological evolution, bicontinuous-to-toroidal, triggered by changes in the polymer concentration. WAXS experiments showed that the degree of crystallinity of the PTFEP chains located at the core of the toroids was higher than that in the bicontinuous nanospheres, thus indicating that the final morphology of the aggregates is mostly determined by the ordering of the PTFEP core-forming blocks. PMID:27455871

  15. Triphenylalanine peptides self-assemble into nanospheres and nanorods that are different from the nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Cong; Luo, Yin; Zhou, Ruhong; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the nature of the self-assembly of peptide nanostructures at the molecular level is critical for rational design of functional bio-nanomaterials. Recent experimental studies have shown that triphenylalanine(FFF)-based peptides can self-assemble into solid plate-like nanostructures and nanospheres, which are different from the hollow nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine(FF)-based peptides. In spite of extensive studies, the assembly mechanism and the molecular basis for the structural differences between FFF and FF nanostructures remain poorly understood. In this work, we first investigate the assembly process and the structural features of FFF nanostructures using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, and then compare them with FF nanostructures. We find that FFF peptides spontaneously assemble into solid nanometer-sized nanospheres and nanorods with substantial β-sheet contents, consistent with the structural properties of hundred-nanometer-sized FFF nano-plates characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. Distinct from the formation mechanism of water-filled FF nanovesicles and nanotubes reported in our previous study, intermediate bilayers are not observed during the self-assembly process of FFF nanospheres and nanorods. The peptides in FFF nanostructures are predominantly anti-parallel-aligned, which can form larger sizes of β-sheet-like structures than the FF counterparts. In contrast, FF peptides exhibit lipid-like assembly behavior and assemble into bilayered nanostructures. Furthermore, although the self-assembly of FF and FFF peptides is mostly driven by side chain-side chain (SC-SC) aromatic stacking interactions, the main chain-main chain (MC-MC) interactions also play an important role in the formation of fine structures of the assemblies. The delicate interplay between MC-MC and SC-SC interactions results in the different nanostructures formed by the two peptides. These findings provide new insights into the structure

  16. Self-assembled TiO2 nanospheres by using a biopolymer as a template and its optoelectronic application.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saikat; Patra, Astam K; De, Sudipta; Bhaumik, Asim; Saha, Basudeb

    2012-03-01

    Self-assembled TiO(2) nanoparticulate materials with well-defined spherical morphologies were synthesized by using a biopolymer sodium alginate as a template under different synthesis conditions. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were used to characterize the TiO(2) nanoparticles. N(2) sorption analysis revealed the moderately good surface area (124.0 m(2) g(-1)) and pore volume (0.44 cm(3) g(-1)) of these TiO(2) nanoparticles. The biopolymer templating pathway leads to good-quality self-assembled TiO(2) nanoparticles with dimensions of ca. 10-12 nm within the synthesis temperature range of 0-60 °C. These porous TiO(2) nanomaterials showed high photogenerated current in the presence of a dye (Rose Bengal), used as a sensitizer for several photo on/off cycles. PMID:22335551

  17. Soft-Templated Self-Assembly of Mesoporous Anatase TiO2/Carbon Composite Nanospheres for High-Performance Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruofei; Shen, Shuiyun; Xia, Guofeng; Zhu, Fengjuan; Lastoskie, Christian; Zhang, Junliang

    2016-08-10

    Mesoporous anatase TiO2/carbon composite nanospheres (designated as meso-ATCCNs) were successfully synthesized via a facile soft-templated self-assembly followed by thermal treatment. Structural and morphological analyses reveal that the as-synthesized meso-ATCCNs are composed of primary TiO2 nanoparticles (∼5 nm), combined with in situ deposited carbon either on the surface or between the primary TiO2 nanoparticles. When cycled in an extended voltage window from 0.01 to 3.0 V, meso-ATCCNs exhibit excellent rate capabilities (413.7, 289.7, and 206.8 mAh g(-1) at 200, 1000, and 3000 mA g(-1), respectively) as well as stable cyclability (90% capacity retention over 500 cycles at 1000 mA g(-1)). Compared with both mesoporous TiO2 nanospheres and bulk TiO2, the superior electrochemical performance of the meso-ATCCNs electrode could be ascribed to a synergetic effect induced by hierarchical structure that includes uniform TiO2 nanoparticles, the presence of hydrothermal carbon derived from phenolic resols, a high surface area, and open mesoporosity. PMID:27442782

  18. Initiation of Chondrocyte Self-Assembly Requires an Intact Cytoskeletal Network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer K; Hu, Jerry C Y; Yamada, Soichiro; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2016-02-01

    Self-assembly and self-organization have recently emerged as robust scaffold-free tissue engineering methodologies that can be used to generate various tissues, including cartilage, vessel, and liver. Self-assembly, in particular, is a scaffold-free platform for tissue engineering that does not require the input of exogenous energy to the system. Although self-assembly can generate functional tissues, most notably neocartilage, the mechanisms of self-assembly remain unclear. To study the self-assembling process, we used articular chondrocytes as a model to identify parameters that can affect this process. Specifically, the roles of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules, surface-bound collagen, and the actin cytoskeletal network were investigated. Using time-lapse imaging, we analyzed the early stages of chondrocyte self-assembly. Within hours, chondrocytes rapidly coalesced into cell clusters before compacting to form tight cellular structures. Chondrocyte self-assembly was found to depend primarily on integrin function and secondarily on cadherin function. In addition, actin or myosin II inhibitors prevented chondrocyte self-assembly, suggesting that cell adhesion alone is not sufficient, but rather the active contractile actin cytoskeleton is essential for proper chondrocyte self-assembly and the formation of neocartilage. Better understanding of the self-assembly mechanisms allows for the rational modulation of this process toward generating neocartilages with improved properties. These findings are germane to understanding self-assembly, an emerging platform for tissue engineering of a plethora of tissues, especially as these neotissues are poised for translation. PMID:26729374

  19. Effect of curvature on the structural and magnetic properties of Ni film deposited on self-assembled nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Tripathi, S.; Gupta, Dileep; Halder, N.; Tripathi, J.

    2016-05-01

    Important experimental findings and their impact on physical properties of Ni thin film are presented with the focus on structural and magnetic property investigations. For this purpose, Ni film (40 nm) was deposited on polystyrene nanospheres (PS, diameter 800 nm) using electron beam evaporation technique simultaneously with a similar reference film on plane Si substrate. The structural properties of the films measured using XRD technique show nanocrystalline growth of Ni on both size PS spheres with an average grain size of ˜ 78 nm, while high crystallinity was observed in the film deposited onto plane Si substrate. A lower coercivity (9 mT) was observed in the Ni/(800 nm) PS as compared to the film deposited on 530 nm PS (23 mT) (our earlier study) and Ni/Si (20 mT). The observed changes in structural and magnetic properties are attributed to the curvature induced modifications at atomic level.

  20. Function-Led Design of Aerogels: Self-Assembly of Alloyed PdNi Hollow Nanospheres for Efficient Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Wen, Dan; Liu, Wei; Herrmann, Anne-Kristin; Benad, Albrecht; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2015-10-26

    One plausible approach to endow aerogels with specific properties while preserving their other attributes is to fine-tune the building blocks. However, the preparation of metallic aerogels with designated properties, for example catalytically beneficial morphologies and transition-metal doping, still remains a challenge. Here, we report on the first aerogel electrocatalyst composed entirely of alloyed PdNi hollow nanospheres (HNSs) with controllable chemical composition and shell thickness. The combination of transition-metal doping, hollow building blocks, and the three-dimensional network structure make the PdNi HNS aerogels promising electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation. The mass activity of the Pd83 Ni17 HNS aerogel is 5.6-fold higher than that of the commercial Pd/C catalyst. This work expands the exploitation of the electrocatalysis properties of aerogels through the morphology and composition control of its building blocks. PMID:26356131

  1. Self-assembly of an amphiphilic macromolecule under spherical confinement: An efficient route to generate hollow nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagoleva, A. A.; Vasilevskaya, V. V.; Yoshikawa, K.; Khokhlov, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In general, bio-macromolecules are composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties and are confined within small cavities, such as cell membranes and intracellular organelles. Here, we studied the self-organization of macromolecules having groups with different affinities to solvents under spherical nano-scale confinement by means of computer modeling. It is shown that depending on the interaction parameters of monomer units composed of side- and main-chain monomer groups along a single linear macromolecule and on cavity size, such amphiphilic polymers undergo the conformational transitions between hollow nanospheres, rod-like and folded cylindrical structures, and a necklace conformation with and without a particular ordering of beads. The diagram of the conformations in the variables the incompatibility parameter of monomer units and the cavity radius is constructed.

  2. Self-assembled nanospheres with multiple endohedral binding sites pre-organize catalysts and substrates for highly efficient reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Qiang; Gonell, Sergio; Leenders, Stefan H A M; Dürr, Maximilian; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Reek, Joost N H

    2016-03-01

    Tuning reagent and catalyst concentrations is crucial in the development of efficient catalytic transformations. In enzyme-catalysed reactions the substrate is bound-often by multiple non-covalent interactions-in a well-defined pocket close to the active site of the enzyme; this pre-organization facilitates highly efficient transformations. Here we report an artificial system that co-encapsulates multiple catalysts and substrates within the confined space defined by an M12L24 nanosphere that contains 24 endohedral guanidinium-binding sites. Cooperative binding means that sulfonate guests are bound much more strongly than carboxylates. This difference has been used to fix gold-based catalysts firmly, with the remaining binding sites left to pre-organize substrates. This strategy was applied to a Au(I)-catalysed cyclization of acetylenic acid to enol lactone in which the pre-organization resulted in much higher reaction rates. We also found that the encapsulated sulfonate-containing Au(I) catalysts did not convert neutral (acid) substrates, and so could have potential in the development of substrate-selective catalysis and base-triggered on/off switching of catalysis. PMID:26892553

  3. Self-assembled nanospheres with multiple endohedral binding sites pre-organize catalysts and substrates for highly efficient reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-Qiang; Gonell, Sergio; Leenders, Stefan H. A. M.; Dürr, Maximilian; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Reek, Joost N. H.

    2016-03-01

    Tuning reagent and catalyst concentrations is crucial in the development of efficient catalytic transformations. In enzyme-catalysed reactions the substrate is bound—often by multiple non-covalent interactions—in a well-defined pocket close to the active site of the enzyme; this pre-organization facilitates highly efficient transformations. Here we report an artificial system that co-encapsulates multiple catalysts and substrates within the confined space defined by an M12L24 nanosphere that contains 24 endohedral guanidinium-binding sites. Cooperative binding means that sulfonate guests are bound much more strongly than carboxylates. This difference has been used to fix gold-based catalysts firmly, with the remaining binding sites left to pre-organize substrates. This strategy was applied to a Au(I)-catalysed cyclization of acetylenic acid to enol lactone in which the pre-organization resulted in much higher reaction rates. We also found that the encapsulated sulfonate-containing Au(I) catalysts did not convert neutral (acid) substrates, and so could have potential in the development of substrate-selective catalysis and base-triggered on/off switching of catalysis.

  4. Quantitative Control of Pore Size of Mesoporous Carbon Nanospheres through the Self-Assembly of Diblock Copolymer Micelles in Solution.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hao; Lin, Zhixing; Xu, Fugui; Zheng, Jingxu; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Mai, Yiyong; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports facile synthesis of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon nanospheres (MCNSs) with average diameters of around 300 nm and well-controlled pore sizes ranging from 8 to 38 nm, by employing polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) diblocks with different PS block lengths as the soft templates and dopamine as the carbon-rich precursor. For the first time, a linear equation is achieved for the quantitative control of the average pore size of MCNSs by simply adjusting a block length of diblock copolymer. The resultant MCNSs possess high surface areas of up to 450 m(2) g(-1) and nitrogen doping contents of up to ≈3 wt%. As electrode materials of supercapacitors, the MCNSs exhibit excellent electrochemical performance with high specific capacitances of up to 350 F g(-1) at 0.1 A g(-1) , superior rate capability, and cycling stability. Interestingly, the specific capacitance of the MCNSs reduces linearly with increasing pore size, whereas the normalized capacitance by specific surface area remains invariable. This represents a new spectrum of the relationship between electrochemical capacitance and pore size (>5 nm) for porous carbons, which makes a complement to the existing spectra focusing on pore diameters of <5 nm. PMID:27120340

  5. Nanoscience and technology: An interdisciplinary initiative, self-assembling nanoscale quantum devices

    SciTech Connect

    Doolen, G.; Smith, D.; Mineev, M.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Our objective is to develop the devices, interconnection technologies, and self-assembling systems required for quantum-based information processing that permit ultra-dense integrated circuits and that allow continuation of the on-going silicon VLSI miniaturization process. That process is facing increasing difficulties related to switch performance, heat dissipation, interconnect failure, quantum effect complications, and rapidly escalating manufacturing costs. Our approach is intended to address these concerns and consists of the development of highly parallel stochastic computers utilizing quantum components and self-assembly methods; the development of self-assembling monolayers for use as resists and memory devices; and research on approaches to molecular self-assembly of the precursors to molecular transistors. The work will provide confirmation of principles, is intended to provide near-term results of potential relevance to the commercial sector, and has a range of applications that include high performance computing, biotechnology, and nanoscale chemistry.

  6. Anti-fouling surfaces by combined molecular self-assembly and surface-initiated ATRP for micropatterning active proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiu, K M; Cai, Q; Li, J S; Yang, X P; Yang, W T; Xu, F J

    2012-02-01

    A simple method by combined molecular self assembly and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) was proposed to prepare a biologically inert surface for micropatterning active proteins. The MPEG microdomains having a short terminal poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) unit were prepared by self assembly of 2-(methyoxy(polyethylenoxy) propyl)trimethoxy silane (MPEG-silane). The remaining local regions or poly(poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) (P(PEGMEMA-co-GMA)) microdomains were produced via SI-ATRP of PEGMEMA and GMA comonomers. The epoxy groups of the P(PEGMEMA-co-GMA) microdomains were used directly for covalent coupling of an active protein (human immunoglobulin or IgG) via the ring-opening reaction to produce the IgG-coupled microdomains. The IgG-coupled microdomains interact only and specifically with target anti-IgG, while the other antifouling microregions from self-assembled monolayers with short terminal PEG units effectively prevent specific and non-specific protein fouling. When extended to other active biomolecules, microarrays for specific and non-specific analyte interactions with a high signal-to-noise ratio could be readily tailored. PMID:22070897

  7. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy of high quality {101¯3¯} semipolar GaN on m-plane sapphire coated with self-assembled SiO2 nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiankun; Wei, Tongbo; Huo, Ziqiang; Hu, Qiang; Zhang, Yonghui; Duan, Ruifei; Wang, Junxi

    2014-02-01

    Semipolar {101¯3¯} GaN layers were grown on self-assembled SiO2 nanospheres sapphire (SSNS) by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The RMS roughness was 1.1 nm for the scan of 20×20 µm2 and the striated surface morphology almost disappeared. The full widths at half maximum of on-axis X-ray rocking curves were 324 arcsec rocking toward the [303¯2¯] direction and 413 arcsec rocking toward the [12¯10] direction, respectively. Compared to the GaN layer grown on the planar sapphire, the reduction of the defect density of semi-GaN grown on SSNS, such as basal stacking faults, partial dislocations and perfect dislocations, was demonstrated by both X-ray rocking curves and low-temperature photoluminescence. In addition, the Raman analyses also showed the partial relaxation of the stress using SSNS.

  8. Selective inhibition of MG-63 osteosarcoma cell proliferation induced by curcumin-loaded self-assembled arginine-rich-RGD nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Run; Sun, Linlin; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant form of bone cancer, comprising 30% of all bone cancer cases. The objective of this in vitro study was to develop a treatment against osteosarcoma with higher selectivity toward osteosarcoma cells and lower cytotoxicity toward normal healthy osteoblast cells. Curcumin (or diferuloylmethane) has been found to have antioxidant and anticancer effects by multiple cellular pathways. However, it has lower water solubility and a higher degradation rate in alkaline conditions. In this study, the amphiphilic peptide C18GR7RGDS was used as a curcumin carrier in aqueous solution. This peptide contains a hydrophobic aliphatic tail group leading to their self-assembly by hydrophobic interactions, as well as a hydrophilic head group composed of an arginine-rich and an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid structure. Through characterization by transmission electron microscopy, self-assembled structures of spherical amphiphilic nanoparticles (APNPs) with diameters of 10–20 nm in water and phosphate-buffered saline were observed, but this structure dissociated when the pH value was reduced to 4. Using a method of codissolution with acetic acid and dialysis tubing, the solubility of curcumin was enhanced and a homogeneous solution was formed in the presence of APNPs. Successful encapsulation of curcumin in APNPs was then confirmed by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction analyses. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of the APNP/curcumin complexes on both osteosarcoma and normal osteoblast cell lines were also evaluated by methyl-thiazolyl-tetrazolium assays and confocal fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the curcumin-loaded APNPs had significant selective cytotoxicity against MG-63 osteosarcoma cells when compared with normal osteoblasts. We have demonstrated for the first time that APNPs can encapsulate hydrophobic curcumin in their hydrophobic cores, and curcumin-loaded APNPs could be an innovative treatment

  9. Constructing Novel Si@SnO2 Core-Shell Heterostructures by Facile Self-Assembly of SnO2 Nanowires on Silicon Hollow Nanospheres for Large, Reversible Lithium Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng-Wei; Liu, Yi-Tao; Xie, Xu-Ming; Ye, Xiong-Ying

    2016-03-23

    Developing an industrially viable silicon anode, featured by the highest theoretical capacity (4200 mA h g(-1)) among common electrode materials, is still a huge challenge because of its large volume expansion during repeated lithiation-delithiation as well as low intrinsic conductivity. Here, we expect to address these inherent deficiencies simultaneously with an interesting hybridization design. A facile self-assembly approach is proposed to decorate silicon hollow nanospheres with SnO2 nanowires. The two building blocks, hand in hand, play a wonderful duet by bridging their appealing functionalities in a complementary way: (1) The silicon hollow nanospheres, in addition to the major role as a superior capacity contributor, also act as a host material (core) to partially accommodate the volume expansion, thus alleviating the capacity fading by providing abundant hollow interiors, void spaces, and surface areas. (2) The SnO2 nanowires serve as a conductive coating (shell) to enable efficient electron transport due to a relatively high conductivity, thereby improving the cyclability of silicon. Compared to other conductive dopants, the SnO2 nanowires with a high theoretical capacity (790 mA h g(-1)) can contribute outstanding electrochemical reaction kinetics, further adding value to the ultimate electrochemical performances. The resulting novel Si@SnO2 core-shell heterostructures exhibit remarkable synergy in large, reversible lithium storage, delivering a reversible capacity as high as 1869 mA h g(-1)@500 mA g(-1) after 100 charging-discharging cycles. PMID:26927734

  10. Modeling the self-assembly of silica-templated nanoparticles in the initial stages of zeolite formation.

    PubMed

    Chien, Szu-Chia; Auerbach, Scott M; Monson, Peter A

    2015-05-01

    The reaction ensemble Monte Carlo method was used to model the self-assembly and structure of silica nanoparticles found in the initial stages of the clear-solution synthesis of the silicalite-1 zeolite. Such nanoparticles, which comprise both silica and organic structure-directing agents (OSDAs), are believed to play a crucial role in the formation of silica nanoporous materials, yet very limited atomic-level structural information is available for these nanoparticles. We have modeled silica monomers as flexible tetrahedra with spring constants fitted in previous work to silica bulk moduli and OSDAs as spheres attracted to anionic silica monomers. We have studied one-step and two-step formation mechanisms, the latter involving the initial association of silica species and OSDAs driven by physical solution forces, followed by silica condensation/hydrolysis reactions simulated with reaction ensemble Monte Carlo. The two-step process with preassociation was found to be crucial for generating nearly spherical nanoparticles; otherwise, without preassociation they exhibited jagged, ramified structures. The two-step nanoparticles were found to exhibit a core-shell structure with mostly silica in the core surrounded by a diffuse shell of OSDAs, in agreement with SANS and SAXS data. The Qn distribution, quantifying silicon atoms bound to n bridging oxygens, found in the simulated nanoparticles is in broad agreement with (29)Si solid-state NMR data on smaller, 2 nm nanoparticle populations. Ring-size distributions from the simulated nanoparticles show that five-membered rings are prevalent when considering OSDA/silica mole fractions (∼0.2) that lead to silicalite-1, in agreement with a previous IR and modeling study. Nanoparticles simulated with higher OSDA concentrations show ring-size distributions shifted to smaller rings, with three-membered silica rings dominating at an OSDA/silica mole fraction of 0.8. Our simulations show no evidence of long-range silicalite-1

  11. Self-assembly of well-defined polyacrylamide-polystyrene copolymer on fibrillar clays via ultrasonic-assisted surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Tingmei; Su, Zhixing

    2006-06-01

    Well-defined polyacrylamide-polystyrene copolymers were grafted from the fibrillar clay, attapulgite, by a four-step self-assembly process: (i) the gamma-aminopropyltriethoxyl silane was self-assembled onto the surfaces of the attapulgite; (ii) the surface amino groups were amidated with bromoacetylbromide; (iii) the bromo-acetamide modified attapulgite was used as macro-initiator for the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene with the catalyst of the complex of 1,10-phenanthroline and Cu(I)Br; (iv) the polystyrene grafted attapulgite was then used as macroinitiator for the polymerization of acrylamide. The two steps of the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerizations were all conducted under ultrasonic irradiation at room temperature. The product, polyacrylamide-polystyrene copolymers grafted attapulgite, had been characterized with elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:17025071

  12. Reversible Morphological Evolution of Responsive Giant Vesicles to Nanospheres by the Self-Assembly of Crystalline-b-Coil Polyphosphazene Block Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Suárez, Silvia; Carriedo, Gabino A; Presa Soto, Alejandro

    2016-03-18

    The preparation of long-term-stable giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs, diameter ≥1000 nm) and large vesicles (diameter ≥500 nm) by self-assembly in THF of the crystalline-b-coil polyphosphazene block copolymers [N=P(OCH2 CF3 )2 ]n -b-[N=PMePh]m (4 a: n=30, m=20; 4 b: n=90, m=20; 4 c: n=200, m=85), which combine crystalline [N=P(OCH2 CF3 )2 ] and amorphous [N=PMePh] blocks, both of which are flexible, is reported. SEM, TEM, and wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments demonstrated that the stability of these GUVs is induced by crystallization of the [N=P(OCH2 CF3 )2 ] blocks at the capsule wall of the GUVS, with the [N=PMePh] blocks at the corona. Higher degrees of crystallinity of the capsule wall are found in the bigger vesicles, which suggests that the crystallinity of the [N=P(OCH2 CF3 )2 ] block facilitates the formation of large vesicles. The GUVs are responsive to strong acids (HOTf) and, after selective protonation of the [N=PMePh] block, they undergo a morphological evolution to smaller spherical micelles in which the core and corona roles have been inverted. This morphological evolution is totally reversible by neutralization with a base (NEt3 ), which regenerates the original GUVs. The monitoring of this process by dynamic light scattering allowed a mechanism to to be proposed for this reversible morphological evolution in which the block copolymer 4 a and its protonated form 4 a(+) are intermediates. This opens a route to the design of reversibly responsive polymeric systems in organic solvents. This is the first reversibly responsive vesicle system to operate in organic media. PMID:26880712

  13. Self-assembled SnO2 micro- and nanosphere-based gas sensor thick films from an alkoxide-derived high purity aqueous colloid precursor.

    PubMed

    Kelp, G; Tätte, T; Pikker, S; Mändar, H; Rozhin, A G; Rauwel, P; Vanetsev, A S; Gerst, A; Merisalu, M; Mäeorg, U; Natali, M; Persson, I; Kessler, V G

    2016-04-01

    Tin oxide is considered to be one of the most promising semiconductor oxide materials for use as a gas sensor. However, a simple route for the controllable build-up of nanostructured, sufficiently pure and hierarchical SnO2 structures for gas sensor applications is still a challenge. In the current work, an aqueous SnO2 nanoparticulate precursor sol, which is free of organic contaminants and sorbed ions and is fully stable over time, was prepared in a highly reproducible manner from an alkoxide Sn(OR)4 just by mixing it with a large excess of pure neutral water. The precursor is formed as a separate liquid phase. The structure and purity of the precursor is revealed using XRD, SAXS, EXAFS, HRTEM imaging, FTIR, and XRF analysis. An unconventional approach for the estimation of the particle size based on the quantification of the Sn-Sn contacts in the structure was developed using EXAFS spectroscopy and verified using HRTEM. To construct sensors with a hierarchical 3D structure, we employed an unusual emulsification technique not involving any additives or surfactants, using simply the extraction of the liquid phase, water, with the help of dry butanol under ambient conditions. The originally generated crystalline but yet highly reactive nanoparticles form relatively uniform spheres through self-assembly and solidify instantly. The spheres floating in butanol were left to deposit on the surface of quartz plates bearing sputtered gold electrodes, producing ready-for-use gas sensors in the form of ca. 50 μm thick sphere-based-films. The films were dried for 24 h and calcined at 300 °C in air before use. The gas sensitivity of the structures was tested in the temperature range of 150-400 °C. The materials showed a very quickly emerging and reversible (20-30 times) increase in electrical conductivity as a response to exposure to air containing 100 ppm of H2 or CO and short (10 s) recovery times when the gas flow was stopped. PMID:26960813

  14. Self-assembled SnO2 micro- and nanosphere-based gas sensor thick films from an alkoxide-derived high purity aqueous colloid precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelp, G.; Tätte, T.; Pikker, S.; Mändar, H.; Rozhin, A. G.; Rauwel, P.; Vanetsev, A. S.; Gerst, A.; Merisalu, M.; Mäeorg, U.; Natali, M.; Persson, I.; Kessler, V. G.

    2016-03-01

    Tin oxide is considered to be one of the most promising semiconductor oxide materials for use as a gas sensor. However, a simple route for the controllable build-up of nanostructured, sufficiently pure and hierarchical SnO2 structures for gas sensor applications is still a challenge. In the current work, an aqueous SnO2 nanoparticulate precursor sol, which is free of organic contaminants and sorbed ions and is fully stable over time, was prepared in a highly reproducible manner from an alkoxide Sn(OR)4 just by mixing it with a large excess of pure neutral water. The precursor is formed as a separate liquid phase. The structure and purity of the precursor is revealed using XRD, SAXS, EXAFS, HRTEM imaging, FTIR, and XRF analysis. An unconventional approach for the estimation of the particle size based on the quantification of the Sn-Sn contacts in the structure was developed using EXAFS spectroscopy and verified using HRTEM. To construct sensors with a hierarchical 3D structure, we employed an unusual emulsification technique not involving any additives or surfactants, using simply the extraction of the liquid phase, water, with the help of dry butanol under ambient conditions. The originally generated crystalline but yet highly reactive nanoparticles form relatively uniform spheres through self-assembly and solidify instantly. The spheres floating in butanol were left to deposit on the surface of quartz plates bearing sputtered gold electrodes, producing ready-for-use gas sensors in the form of ca. 50 μm thick sphere-based-films. The films were dried for 24 h and calcined at 300 °C in air before use. The gas sensitivity of the structures was tested in the temperature range of 150-400 °C. The materials showed a very quickly emerging and reversible (20-30 times) increase in electrical conductivity as a response to exposure to air containing 100 ppm of H2 or CO and short (10 s) recovery times when the gas flow was stopped.Tin oxide is considered to be one of the

  15. Initial Development and Characterization of PLGA Nanospheres Containing Ropivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Carolina Morales; de Matos, Angélica Prado; de Lima, Renata; Rosa, André Henrique; de Paula, Eneida

    2008-01-01

    Local anesthetics are able to induce pain relief by binding to the sodium channels of excitable membranes, blocking the influx of sodium ions and the propagation of the nervous impulse. Ropivacaine (RVC) is an amino amide, enantiomerically pure, local anesthetic largely used in surgical procedures, which present physico-chemical and therapeutic properties similar to those of bupivacaine but decreased toxicity and motor blockade. The present work focuses on the preparation and characterization of nanospheres containing RVC; 0.25% and 0.50% RVC were incorporated in poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) 50:50) nanospheres (PLGA-NS), prepared by the nanoprecipitation method. Characterization of the nanospheres was conducted through the measurement of pH, particle size, and zeta potential. The pH of the nanoparticle system with RVC was 6.58. The average diameters of the RVC-containing nanospheres was 162.7 ± 1.5 nm, and their zeta potentials were negative, with values of about −10.81 ± 1.16 mV, which promoted good stabilization of the particles in solution. The cytotoxicity experiments show that RVC-loaded PLGA-NS generate a less toxic formulation as compared with plain RVC. Since this polymer drug-delivery system can effectively generate an even less toxic RVC formulation, this study is fundamental due to its characterization of a potentially novel pharmaceutical form for the treatment of pain with RVC. PMID:19669531

  16. Initiator-catalyzed self-assembly of duplex-looped DNA hairpin motif based on strand displacement reaction for logic operations and amplified biosensing.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Yue, Shuzhen; Wu, Qiang; Ye, Jiayan

    2016-09-15

    Here we program an initiator-catalyzed self-assembly of duplex-looped DNA hairpin motif based on strand displacement reaction. Due to the recycling of initiator and performance in a cascade manner, this system is versatilely extended to logic operations, including the construction of concatenated logic circuits with a feedback function and a biocomputing keypad-lock security system. Compared with previously reported molecular security systems, the prominent feature of our keypad lock is that it can be spontaneously reset and recycled with no need of any external stimulus and human intervention. Moreover, through integrating with an isothermal amplification technique of rolling circle amplification (RCA), this programming catalytic DNA self-assembly strategy readily achieves sensitive and selective biosensing of initiator. Importantly, a magnetic graphene oxide (MGO) is introduced to remarkably reduced background, which plays an important role in enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio and improving the detection sensitivity. Therefore, the proposed sophisticated DNA strand displacement-based methodology with engineering dynamic functions may find broad applications in the construction of programming DNA nanostructures, amplification biosensing platform, and large-scale DNA circuits. PMID:27132002

  17. Photo-switched self-assembly of a gemini α-helical peptide into supramolecular architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang-Sheng; Xu, Xiao-Ding; Li, Shi-Ying; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2013-06-01

    An azobenzene-linked symmetrical gemini α-helical peptide was designed and prepared to realize the light-switched self-assembly. With the reversible molecular structure transition between Z- and U-structures, the morphology of the self-assembled gemini α-helical peptide can reversibly change between nanofibers and nanospheres in acidic medium, and between nanospheres and vesicles in basic medium.An azobenzene-linked symmetrical gemini α-helical peptide was designed and prepared to realize the light-switched self-assembly. With the reversible molecular structure transition between Z- and U-structures, the morphology of the self-assembled gemini α-helical peptide can reversibly change between nanofibers and nanospheres in acidic medium, and between nanospheres and vesicles in basic medium. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and characterizations of a gemini α-helical peptide. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01967e

  18. Self assembling proteins

    DOEpatents

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  19. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  20. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  1. Effect of Self-Assembled Monolayer Modification on Indium-Tin Oxide Surface for Surface-Initiated Vapor Deposition Polymerization of Carbazole Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuya Umemoto,; Seong-Ho Kim,; Rigoberto C. Advincula,; Kuniaki Tanaka,; Hiroaki Usui,

    2010-04-01

    With the aim of controlling the interface between an inorganic electrode and an organic layer, a surface-initiated vapor deposition polymerization method was employed to prepare carbazole polymer thin films that are chemically bound to an indium-tin oxide (ITO) surface. A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) that has an azo initiator as a terminal group was prepared on an ITO surface, on which carbazole acrylate monomers were evaporated under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The surface morphological characteristics of the films prepared with/without UV irradiation and with/without the SAM were compared. It was found that the UV irradiation leads to the polymerization of carbazole monomers irrespective of the type of substrate used. On the other hand, the surface morphological characteristics were largely dependent on the existence of the SAM. Uniform and smooth polymer thin films were obtained only when the monomers were evaporated on the SAM-modified surface under UV irradiation. A comparison of film growth characteristics on a UV-ozone-treated ITO surface suggested that the formation of uniform films was made possible not by the modification of surface energy but by the growth of the polymers chemically bound to the substrate surface.

  2. Adsorption of Amelogenin onto Self-Assembled and Fluoroapatite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Lea, Alan S.; Bernt, William; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2009-02-19

    Abstract. The interactions of proteins at surfaces are of great importance to biomineralizaton processes and to the development and function of biomaterials. Amelogenin is a unique biomineralization protein because it self-assembles to form supramolecular structures called “nanospheres,” spherical aggregates of monomers that are 20-60 nm in diameter. Although the nanosphere quaternary structure has been observed in solution, the quaternary structure of amelogenin adsorbed onto surfaces is also of great interest because the surface structure is critical to its function. We report studies of the adsorption of the amelogenin onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with COOH and CH3 end group functionality and single crystal fluoroapatite (FAP). Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments showed that the solutions contained nanospheres and aggregates of nanospheres. Protein adsorption onto the various substrates was evidenced by null ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and external reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ERFTIR). Although only nanospheres were observed in solution, ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the protein adsorbates were much smaller structures than the original nanospheres, from monomers to small oligomers in size. Monomer adsorption was promoted onto the CH3 surfaces and small oligomer adsorption was promoted onto the COOH and FAP substrates. In some cases, remnants of the original nanospheres adsorbed as multilayers on top of the underlying subnanosphere layers. This work suggests that amelogenin can adsorb by the “shedding” or disassembling of substructures from the nanospheres onto substrates and indicates that amelogenin may have a range of possible quaternary structures depending on whether it is in solution or interacting with surfaces.

  3. An enzyme-coupled artificial photosynthesis system prepared from antenna protein-mimetic tyrosyl bolaamphiphile self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jinyoung; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2016-08-11

    An artificial photosynthesis system coupled with an enzyme was constructed using the nanospherical self-assembly of tyrosyl bolaamphiphiles, which worked as a host matrix exhibiting an antenna effect that allowed enhanced energy transfer to the ZnDPEG photosensitizer. The excited electrons from the photosensitizer were transferred to NAD+ to produce NADH, which subsequently initiated the conversion of an aldehyde to ethanol by alcohol dehydrogenase. Production of NADH and ethanol was enhanced by increasing the concentration of tyrosyl bolaamphiphiles. Spectroscopic investigations proved that the photosensitizer closely associated with the surface of the bolaamphiphile assembly through hydrogen bonds that allowed energy transfer between the host matrix and the photosensitizer. This study demonstrates that the self-assembly of bolaamphiphiles could be applicable to the construction of biomimetic energy systems exploiting biochemical activity. PMID:27480074

  4. Self-assembly of nanocomposite materials

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sellinger, Alan; Lu, Yunfeng

    2001-01-01

    A method of making a nanocomposite self-assembly is provided where at least one hydrophilic compound, at least one hydrophobic compound, and at least one amphiphilic surfactant are mixed in an aqueous solvent with the solvent subsequently evaporated to form a self-assembled liquid crystalline mesophase material. Upon polymerization of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds, a robust nanocomposite self-assembled material is formed. Importantly, in the reaction mixture, the amphiphilic surfactant has an initial concentration below the critical micelle concentration to allow formation of the liquid-phase micellar mesophase material. A variety of nanocomposite structures can be formed, depending upon the solvent evaporazation process, including layered mesophases, tubular mesophases, and a hierarchical composite coating composed of an isotropic worm-like micellar overlayer bonded to an oriented, nanolaminated underlayer.

  5. Intrinsic defect formation in peptide self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Li; Zhao, Yurong; Xu, Hai; Wang, Yanting

    2015-07-01

    In contrast to extensively studied defects in traditional materials, we report here a systematic investigation of the formation mechanism of intrinsic defects in self-assembled peptide nanostructures. The Monte Carlo simulations with our simplified dynamic hierarchical model revealed that the symmetry breaking of layer bending mode at the two ends during morphological transformation is responsible for intrinsic defect formation, whose microscopic origin is the mismatch between layer stacking along the side-chain direction and layer growth along the hydrogen bond direction. Moreover, defect formation does not affect the chirality of the self-assembled structure, which is determined by the initial steps of the peptide self-assembly process.

  6. Computer simulations of block copolymer tethered nanoparticle self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Elaine R.; Ho, Lin C.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2006-08-01

    We perform molecular simulations to study the self-assembly of block copolymer tethered cubic nanoparticles. Minimal models of the tethered nanoscale building blocks (NBBs) are utilized to explore the structures arising from self-assembly. We demonstrate that attaching a rigid nanocube to a diblock copolymer affects the typical equilibrium morphologies exhibited by the pure copolymer. Lamellar and cylindrical phases are observed in both systems but not at the corresponding relative copolymer tether block fractions. The effect of nanoparticle geometry on phase behavior is investigated by comparing the self-assembled structures formed by the tethered NBBs with those of their linear ABC triblock copolymer counterparts. The tethered nanocubes exhibit the conventional triblock copolymer lamellar and cylindrical phases when the repulsive interactions between different blocks are symmetric. The rigid and bulky nature of the cube induces interfacial curvature in the tethered NBB phases compared to their linear ABC triblock copolymer counterparts. We compare our results with those structures obtained from ABC diblock copolymer tethered nanospheres to further elucidate the role of cubic nanoparticle geometry on self-assembly.

  7. Onset of self-assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Chitanvis, S.M.

    1998-02-01

    We have formulated a theory of self-assembly based on the notion of local gauge invariance at the mesoscale. Local gauge invariance at the mesoscale generates the required long-range entropic forces responsible for self-assembly in binary systems. Our theory was applied to study the onset of mesostructure formation above a critical temperature in estane, a diblock copolymer. We used diagrammatic methods to transcend the Gaussian approximation and obtain a correlation length {xi}{approximately}(c{minus}c{sup {asterisk}}){sup {minus}{gamma}}, where c{sup {asterisk}} is the minimum concentration below which self-assembly is impossible, c is the current concentration, and {gamma} was found numerically to be fairly close to 2/3. The renormalized diffusion constant vanishes as the critical concentration is approached, indicating the occurrence of critical slowing down, while the correlation function remains finite at the transition point. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Self-assembly via microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic building blocks has attracted extensive interest in myriad fields in recent years, due to their great potential in the nanoscale design of functional hybrid materials. Microfluidic techniques provide an intriguing method to control kinetic aspects of the self-assembly of molecular amphiphiles by the facile adjustment of the hydrodynamics of the fluids. Up to now, there have been several reports about one-step direct self-assembly of different building blocks with versatile and multi-shape products without templates, which demonstrated the advantages of microfluidics. These assemblies with different morphologies have great applications in various areas such as cancer therapy, micromotor fabrication, and controlled drug delivery. PMID:26486277

  9. Self-assembling amphiphilic peptides†

    PubMed Central

    Dehsorkhi, Ashkan; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembly of several classes of amphiphilic peptides is reviewed, and selected applications are discussed. We discuss recent work on the self-assembly of lipopeptides, surfactant-like peptides and amyloid peptides derived from the amyloid-β peptide. The influence of environmental variables such as pH and temperature on aggregate nanostructure is discussed. Enzyme-induced remodelling due to peptide cleavage and nanostructure control through photocleavage or photo-cross-linking are also considered. Lastly, selected applications of amphiphilic peptides in biomedicine and materials science are outlined. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Peptide Science published by European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24729276

  10. The structure of monomeric components of self-assembling CXCR4 antagonists determines the architecture of resulting nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngshim; Chen, Yuhong; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2011-12-01

    Self-assembling peptides play increasingly important roles in the development of novel materials and drug delivery vehicles. Understanding mechanisms governing the assembly of nanoarchitectures is essential for the generation of peptide-based nanodevices. We find that a cone-shaped derivative of the second transmembrane domain of CXCR4 receptor, x4-2-6 self-assembles into nanospheres, while a related cylindrical peptide, x4-2-9 forms fibrils. Stronger intermolecular interactions in nanospheres than in fibrils result in slow rates of particle disassembly and protection against proteolytic degradation.

  11. Restricted meniscus convective self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Stoianov, Stefan V; Bangerter, Justin; Robinson, Hans D

    2010-04-15

    Convective (or evaporation-induced) self-assembly is a standard technique for depositing uniform, poly-crystalline coatings of nanospheres across multiple square centimeters on the timescale of minutes. In this paper, we present a variation of this technique, where the drying meniscus is restricted by a straight-edge located approximately 100 microm above the substrate adjacent to the drying zone. Surprisingly, we find this technique to yield films at roughly twice the growth rate compared to the standard technique. We attribute this to differing rates of diffusion of vapor from the drying crystal in the two cases. We also investigate the crystal growth rate dependence on ambient relative humidity and find, contrary to some previous reports, that the growth rate depends strongly on the humidity. We introduce a model which indicates that while the length of the drying zone may increase with humidity, this alone cannot compensate for the simultaneous reduction in evaporation rate, so a lower humidity must always lead to a higher growth speed. Comparing the model to our experimental results, we find that the length of the drying zone is constant and mostly independent of parameters such as humidity and surface tension. PMID:20132947

  12. Final Report for Grant # DE-FG02-02ER46000 Simulations of Self-Assembly of Tethered Nanoparticle Shape Amphiphiles

    SciTech Connect

    Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2014-08-25

    Self-assembly of nanoparticle building blocks including nanospheres, nanorods, nanocubes, nano plates, nanoprisms, etc., may provide a promising means for manipulating these building blocks into functional and useful materials. One increasingly popular method for self-assembly involves functionalizing nanoparticles and nanostructured molecules with “tethers” of organic polymers or biomolecules with specific or nonspecific interactions to facilitate their assembly. However, there is little theory and little understanding of the general principles underlying self-assembly in these complex materials. Using computer simulation to elucidate the principles of self-assembly and develop a predictive theoretical framework was the central goal of this project.

  13. Mussel-inspired bolaamphiphile sticky self-assemblies for the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chaemyeong; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2015-03-01

    Adopting the strong metal binding moiety of a mussel protein, a novel bolaamphiphile molecule was prepared and applied to the fabrication of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles. The novel bolaamphiphile molecule with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) end groups was synthesized and its self-assembly was used as a template to adsorb metal ions and subsequently to produce magnetic nanoparticles. The DOPA bolaamphiphile molecule self-assembled in aqueous solution to produce nanospherical structures that exposed the catechol moiety of DOPA to the outer surface. The catechol groups adsorbed cobalt and iron ions to create magnetic metal oxide clusters on the self-assembly. Spectroscopic analysis showed that the cobalt and iron ions were coordinated with quinone, an oxidized form of the catechol. Exploiting the strong metal-adsorbing and binding properties of DOPA, dense cobalt oxide and iron oxide shell layers were created on the nanospherical self-assembly to produce magnetic core-shell nanoparticles. This study demonstrated a simple method for creating magnetic metal oxide nanoparticles that exploits the molecular binding forces and self-assembly property of DOPA. PMID:25658196

  14. Self-Assembly of Plasmonic Nanoclusters for Optical Metauids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, Nicholas Benjamin

    I discuss experimental progress towards developing a material with an isotropic, negative index of refraction at optical frequencies. The simplest way to make such a material is to create a metafluid, or a disordered collection of subwavelength, isotropic electromagnetic resonators. Small clusters of metal particles, such as tetrahedra, serve as these constituents. What is needed are methods for manufacturing these structures with high precision and in sufficient yield that their resonances are identical. Jonathan Fan et al. [Science, 328 (5982), 1135-1138, 2010] demonstrated that colloidal self-assembly is a means of preparing electromagnetic resonators from metal nanoparticles. However, the resonances are sensitive to the separation gaps between particles. Standard synthesis routes for metal nanoparticles yield crystals or nanoshells that are inadequate for metafluids due to polydispersity, faceting, and thermal instabilities. To ensure that the separation gaps and resonances are uniform, more monodisperse spherical particles are needed. An additional challenge is the self-assembly of tetrahedral clusters in high yield from these particles. In self-assembly approaches that others have examined previously, the yield of any particular type of cluster is low. In this dissertation I present solutions to several of these problems, developed in collaboration with my research group and others. We demonstrate that slow chemical etching can transform octahedral gold crystals into ultrasmooth, monodisperse nanospheres. The particles can serve as seeds for the growth of larger octahedra which can in turn be etched. The size of the gold nanospheres can therefore be adjusted as desired. We further show that in colloidal mixtures of two sphere species that strongly bind to one another, the sphere size ratio determines the size distribution of self-assembled clusters. At a critical size ratio, tetrahedral clusters assemble in high yield. We explain the experimentally observed

  15. Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles: Form and Function at Multiple Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Runye Helen

    Hierarchical self-assembly, the organization of molecules into supramolecular structures of increasing size and complexity, is a potent tool for materials synthesis and requires understanding the connections of structure across multiple length scales. Herein, self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs) into nanoscopic and macroscopic materials is explored, and their anti-cancer applications are investigated. First, nanoscale assembly is examined in the context of an anti-angiogenic PA bearing the G-helix motif of maspin, a tumor suppressor protein. Assembly of this maspin-mimetic PA (MMPA) stabilizes the native G-helix conformation and improves binding to endothelial cells. Furthermore, PA nanostructures significantly increase cell adhesion to fibronectin as compared to G-helix peptide alone. Combined with its inhibitory effect on cell migration, MMPA nanostructures thus show anti-angiogenic activity on par with maspin protein in vitro and in vivo. Second, assembly of cationic PAs with hyaluronic acid (HA), an anionic polyelectrolyte, into macroscopic membranes is explored using PAs with identical formal charge but systematically varied self-assembly domains. Results suggest that membrane formation is dictated by the initial moments of component aggregation and is highly sensitive to PA molecular structure via nanoscale assembly. Specifically, PAs with beta-sheet forming residues are nanofibrous and have high surface charge density, leading to robust membranes with aligned-fiber microstructure. PAs without beta-sheet forming residues are nanospherical and have low surface charge density, leading to weak membranes with non-fibrous finger-like microstructure. Lastly, the principles of PA-HA membrane assembly are applied towards development of anti-cancer therapeutic biomaterials. Here, cytotoxic PAs bearing the epitope (KLAKLAKbeta)2 are co-assembled with non-bioactive cationic PA in order to achieve varying nanoscale morphology. These nanostructures are then

  16. Self-assembly-driven nematization.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh Thuy; Sciortino, Francesco; De Michele, Cristiano

    2014-04-29

    The anisotropy of attractive interactions between particles can favor, through a self-assembly process, the formation of linear semi-flexible chains. In the appropriate temperatures and concentration ranges, the growing aspect ratio of the aggregates can induce formation of a nematic phase, as recently experimentally observed in several biologically relevant systems. We present here a numerical study of the isotropic-nematic phase boundary for a model of bifunctional polymerizing hard cylinders, to provide an accurate benchmark for recent theoretical approaches and to assess their ability to capture the coupling between self-assembly and orientational ordering. The comparison indicates the importance of properly modeling excluded volume and orientational entropy and provides a quantitative confirmation of some theoretical predictions. PMID:24701976

  17. Multifunctional self-assembled monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.; Bar, G.; Rubin, S.; Uribe, F.; Ferrais, J.

    1996-06-01

    This is the final report of at three year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The specific goals of this research project were threefold: to develop multifunctional self-assembled monolayers, to understand the role of monolayer structure on the functioning of such systems, and to apply this knowledge to the development of electrochemical enzyme sensors. An array of molecules that can be used to attach electrochemically active biomolecules to gold surfaces has been synthesized. Several members of a class of electroactive compounds have been characterized and the factors controlling surface modification are beginning to be characterized. Enzymes have been attached to self-assembled molecules arranged on the gold surface, a critical step toward the ultimate goal of this project. Several alternative enzyme attachment strategies to achieve robust enzyme- modified surfaces have been explored. Several means of juxtaposing enzymes and mediators, electroactive compounds through which the enzyme can exchange electrons with the electrode surface, have also been investigated. Finally, the development of sensitive biosensors based on films loaded with nanoscale-supported gold particles that have surface modified with the self-assembled enzyme and mediator have been explored.

  18. Self-assembly of subwavelength nanostructures with symmetry breaking in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiang-Dong; Chen, Shu; Zhang, Yue-Jiao; Dong, Jin-Chao; Panneerselvam, Rajapandiyan; Zhang, Yun; Yang, Zhi-Lin; Li, Jian-Feng; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructures with symmetry breaking can allow the coupling between dark and bright plasmon modes to induce strong Fano resonance. However, it is still a daunting challenge to prepare bottom-up self-assembled subwavelength asymmetric nanostructures with appropriate gaps between the nanostructures especially below 5 nm in solution. Here we present a viable self-assembly method to prepare symmetry-breaking nanostructures consisting of Ag nanocubes and Au nanospheres both with tunable size (90-250 nm for Au nanospheres; 100-160 nm for Ag nanocubes) and meanwhile control the nanogaps through ultrathin silica shells of 1-5 nm thickness. The Raman tag of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) assists the self-assembly process and endows the subwavelength asymmetric nanostructures with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. Moreover, thick silica shells (above 50 nm thickness) can be coated on the self-assembled nanostructures in situ to stabilize the whole nanostructures, paving the way toward bioapplications. Single particle scattering spectroscopy with a 360° polarization resolution is performed on individual Ag nanocube and Au nanosphere dimers, correlated with high-resolution TEM characterization. The asymmetric dimers exhibit strong configuration and polarization dependence Fano resonance properties. Overall, the solution-based self-assembly method reported here is opening up new opportunities to prepare diverse multicomponent nanomaterials with optimal performance.Nanostructures with symmetry breaking can allow the coupling between dark and bright plasmon modes to induce strong Fano resonance. However, it is still a daunting challenge to prepare bottom-up self-assembled subwavelength asymmetric nanostructures with appropriate gaps between the nanostructures especially below 5 nm in solution. Here we present a viable self-assembly method to prepare symmetry-breaking nanostructures consisting of Ag nanocubes and Au nanospheres both with tunable size (90-250 nm

  19. Structural and optical properties of self-assembled chains of plasmonic nanocubes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Klinkova, Anna; Gang, Oleg; Therien-Aubin, Heloise; Ahmed, Aftab; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Gagnon, Brandon; Muntyanu, Anastasiya; Walker, Gilbert C.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2014-10-10

    Solution-based linear self-assembly of metal nanoparticles offers a powerful strategy for creating plasmonic polymers, which, so far, have been formed from spherical nanoparticles and nanorods. Here, we report linear solution-based self-assembly of metal nanocubes (NCs), examine the structural characteristics of the NC chains and demonstrate their advanced optical characteristics. Predominant face-to-face assembly of large NCs coated with short polymer ligands led to a larger volume of hot spots in the chains, a nearly uniform E-field enhancement in the gaps between co-linear NCs and a new coupling mode for NC chains, in comparison with chains of nanospheres with similar dimensions, compositionmore » and surface chemistry. The NC chains exhibited a stronger surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal, in comparison with linear assemblies of nanospheres. The experimental results were in agreement with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations.« less

  20. Structural and optical properties of self-assembled chains of plasmonic nanocubes

    SciTech Connect

    Klinkova, Anna; Gang, Oleg; Therien-Aubin, Heloise; Ahmed, Aftab; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Gagnon, Brandon; Muntyanu, Anastasiya; Walker, Gilbert C.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2014-10-10

    Solution-based linear self-assembly of metal nanoparticles offers a powerful strategy for creating plasmonic polymers, which, so far, have been formed from spherical nanoparticles and nanorods. Here, we report linear solution-based self-assembly of metal nanocubes (NCs), examine the structural characteristics of the NC chains and demonstrate their advanced optical characteristics. Predominant face-to-face assembly of large NCs coated with short polymer ligands led to a larger volume of hot spots in the chains, a nearly uniform E-field enhancement in the gaps between co-linear NCs and a new coupling mode for NC chains, in comparison with chains of nanospheres with similar dimensions, composition and surface chemistry. The NC chains exhibited a stronger surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal, in comparison with linear assemblies of nanospheres. The experimental results were in agreement with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations.

  1. A self-assembled ionophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirumala, Sampath K.

    1997-11-01

    Ionophores are compounds that bind and transport ions. Ion binding and transport are fundamental to many biological and chemical processes. In this thesis we detail the structural characterization and cation binding properties of a self-assembled ionophore built from an isoguanosine (isoG) derivative, 5sp'-t-butyldimethylsilyl-2sp',3sp'-isopropylidene isoG 30. We begin with a summary of the themes that facilitate ionophore design and the definitions of "self-assembly" and "self-assembled ionophore" in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we describe the structural characterization of the isoG 30 self-assembly. IsoG possesses complementary hydrogen bond donor and acceptor sites suitable to form a Csb4-symmetric tetramer, (isoG)sb4 51, that is stable even in high dielectric organic solvents such as CDsb3CN and dsb6-acetone. The isoG tetramer 51 has been characterized by vapor phase osmometry, UV spectroscopy, and by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The isoG tetramer 51 organizes by hydrogen bonding between the Watson-Crick face of one isoG base and the complementary bottom edge of another purine. The tetramer 51 is stabilized by an inner and outer ring of hydrogen bonds. The inner ring forms between the imino NH1 proton of one monomer and the C2 carbonyl oxygen of an adjacent monomer, while the outer ring is made up of four NH6-N3 hydrogen bonds. The isoG tetramer 51 is thermodynamically stable, with an equilibrium constant (Ksba) of ca. 10sp9-10sp{10} Msp{-3} at room temperature, and a DeltaGsp° of tetramer formation of -12.5 kcal molsp{-1} in dsb6-acetone at 25sp°C. The van't Hoff plots indicated that the thermodynamic parameters for tetramer formation were DeltaHsp° = -18.2 ± 0.87 kcal molsp{-1} and DeltaSsp°sb{298} = -19.1 ± 5.45 eu. In Chapter 3, we describe the cation binding properties of isoG tetramer 51. The isoG tetramer 51 has a central cavity, containing four oxygen atoms, that is suitable for cation coordination. Depending on the cation, the resulting iso

  2. Self-assembling magnetic "snakes"

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Nickel particles float peacefully in a liquid medium until a giant snake seems to swim by and snatch several particles up, adding to its own mass. The self-assembled "snakes" act like biological systems, but they are not alive and are driven by a magnetic field. The research may someday offer some insight into the organization of life itself. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/03/snakes/ Research and video by Alex Snezhko and Igor Aronson, Argonne National Laboratory.

  3. Self-assembled plasmonic nanoring cavity arrays for SERS and LSPR biosensing.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyungsoon; Bantz, Kyle C; Lee, Si Hoon; Johnson, Timothy W; Haynes, Christy L; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2013-05-21

    Self-assembled plasmonic nanoring cavity arrays are formed alongside the curvature of highly packed metallic nanosphere gratings. The sub-10-nm gap size is precisely tuned via atomic layer deposition and highly ordered arrays are produced over a cm-sized area. The resulting hybrid nanostructure boosts coupling efficiency of light into plasmons, and shows an improved SERS detection limit. These substrates are used for SERS detection of the biological analyte, adenine, followed by concurrent localized surface plasmon resonance sensing. PMID:23436239

  4. Structural simulations of nanomaterials self-assembled from ionic macrocycles.

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank B.; Medforth, Craig John

    2010-10-01

    Recent research at Sandia has discovered a new class of organic binary ionic solids with tunable optical, electronic, and photochemical properties. These nanomaterials, consisting of a novel class of organic binary ionic solids, are currently being developed at Sandia for applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar energy technologies. They are composed of self-assembled oligomeric arrays of very large anions and large cations, but their crucial internal arrangement is thus far unknown. This report describes (a) the development of a relevant model of nonconvex particles decorated with ions interacting through short-ranged Yukawa potentials, and (b) the results of initial Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly binary ionic solids.

  5. Chemical Reactions Directed Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B.; Das, Apurba K.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly. PMID:25984603

  6. Self-assembled controllable microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosjean, Galien; Lagubeau, Guillaume; Darras, Alexis; Lumay, Geoffroy; Hubert, Maxime; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Because they cause a deformation of the interface, floating particles interact. In particular, identical particles attract each other. To counter this attraction, particles possessing a large magnetic moment m-> are used. When m-> is perpendicular to the surface, dipole-dipole interaction is repulsive. This competition of forces can lead to the spontaneous formation of organized structures. By using submillimetric steel spheres for which m-> ~ B-> , interdistances in the system can be precisely tuned. Here, we deform these self-assemblies by adding a horizontal contribution m-> to the magnetic moment. Time reversal symmetry is broken in the system, leading to locomotion at low Reynolds number. Moreover, swimming direction depends on the orientation of field, meaning that swimming trajectories can be finely controlled. A model allows to understand the breaking of symmetry, while a study of the vibration modes gives further informations on the dynamics of this sytem. Because this system forms by self-assembly, it allows miniaturization with applications such as cargo transport or solvent flows. It is highly versatile, being composed of simple passive particles and controlled by magnetic fields.

  7. Self-assembling RNA square

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; McLean, Jaime; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-12-22

    The three-dimensional structures of noncoding RNA molecules reveal recurring architectural motifs that have been exploited for the design of artificial RNA nanomaterials. Programmed assembly of RNA nanoobjects from autonomously folding tetraloop-receptor complexes as well as junction motifs has been achieved previously through sequence-directed hybridization of complex sets of long oligonucleotides. Due to size and complexity, structural characterization of artificial RNA nanoobjects has been limited to low-resolution microscopy studies. Here we present the design, construction, and crystal structure determination at 2.2 {angstrom} of the smallest yet square-shaped nanoobject made entirely of double-stranded RNA. The RNA square is comprised of 100 residues and self-assembles from four copies each of two oligonucleotides of 10 and 15 bases length. Despite the high symmetry on the level of secondary structure, the three-dimensional architecture of the square is asymmetric, with all four corners adopting distinct folding patterns. We demonstrate the programmed self-assembly of RNA squares from complex mixtures of corner units and establish a concept to exploit the RNA square as a combinatorial nanoscale platform.

  8. Stereochemistry in subcomponent self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Ana M; Ramsay, William J; Nitschke, Jonathan R

    2014-07-15

    incorporated in self-assembly reactions to control the stereochemistry of increasingly complex architectures. This strategy has also allowed exploration of the degree to which stereochemical information is propagated through tetrahedral frameworks cooperatively, leading to the observation of stereochemical coupling across more than 2 nm between metal stereocenters and the enantioselective synthesis of a face-capped tetrahedron containing no carbon stereocenters via a stereochemical memory effect. Several studies on the communication of stereochemistry between the configurationally flexible metal centers in tetrahedral metal-organic cages have shed light on the factors governing this process, allowing the synthesis of an asymmetric cage, obtained in racemic form, in which all symmetry elements have been broken. Finally, we discuss how stereochemical diversity leads to structural complexity in the structures prepared through subcomponent self-assembly. Initial use of octahedral metal templates with facial stereochemistry in subcomponent self-assembly, which predictably gave rise to structures of tetrahedral symmetry, was extended to meridional metal centers. These lower-symmetry linkages have allowed the assembly of a series of increasingly intricate 3D architectures of varying functionality. The knowledge gained from investigating different aspects of the stereochemistry of metal-templated assemblies thus not only leads to new means of structural control but also opens pathways toward functions such as stereoselective guest binding and transformation. PMID:24793652

  9. Characterization of electroosmotic flow through nanoporous self-assembled arrays.

    PubMed

    Bell, Kevan; Gomes, Mikel; Nazemifard, Neda

    2015-08-01

    Characterization of EOF mobility for Tris and TBE buffer solutions is performed in nanoporous arrays using the fluorescent marker method to examine the magnitude of EOFs through nanopores with mean diameters close to electric double layer thickness (Debye length). Structures made from solid silica nanospheres with effective pore sizes from 104 nm down to 8 nm are produced within the microchannel using an evaporation self-assembly method. EOF results in nanoporous matrices show higher EOF mobilities for stronger electrolyte solutions, which are drastically different compared to microchannel EOF. The effects of scaling are also examined by comparing the EOF mobility for varying ratios of pore diameters to the Debye length, which shows a surprising consistency across all particle sizes examined. This work demonstrates various factors which must be considered when designing nanofluidic devices, and discusses the causes of these small scale effects. PMID:25964193

  10. Self-assembly of 33-mer gliadin peptide oligomers.

    PubMed

    Herrera, M G; Benedini, L A; Lonez, C; Schilardi, P L; Hellweg, T; Ruysschaert, J-M; Dodero, V I

    2015-11-28

    The 33-mer gliadin peptide, LQLQPF(PQPQLPY)3PQPQPF, is a highly immunogenic peptide involved in celiac disease and probably in other immunopathologies associated with gliadin. Herein, dynamic light scattering measurements showed that 33-mer, in the micromolar concentration range, forms polydisperse nano- and micrometer range particles in aqueous media. This behaviour is reminiscent of classical association of colloids and we hypothesized that the 33-mer peptide self-assembles into micelles that could be the precursors of 33-mer oligomers in water. Deposition of 33-mer peptide aqueous solution on bare mica generated nano- and microstructures with different morphologies as revealed by atomic force microscopy. At 6 μM, the 33-mer is organised in isolated and clusters of spherical nanostructures. In the 60 to 250 μM concentration range, the spherical oligomers associated mainly in linear and annular arrangements and structures adopting a "sheet" type morphology appeared. At higher concentrations (610 μM), mainly filaments and plaques immersed in a background of nanospherical structures were detected. The occurrence of different morphologies of oligomers and finally the filaments suggests that the unique specific geometry of the 33-mer oligomers has a crucial role in the subsequent condensation and organization of their fractal structures into the final filaments. The self-assembly process on mica is described qualitatively and quantitatively by a fractal diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) behaviour with the fractal dimension in the range of 1.62 ± 0.02 to 1.73 ± 0.03. Secondary structure evaluation of the oligomers by Attenuated Total Reflection FTIR spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) revealed the existence of a conformational equilibrium of self-assembled structures, from an extended conformation to a more folded parallel beta elongated structures. Altogether, these findings provide structural and morphological information about supramolecular organization of the 33-mer

  11. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  12. Self-Assembly: How Nature Builds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Falvo, Michael R.; Broadwell, Bethany; Dotger, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly or spontaneous assembly is a process in which materials build themselves without assistance. This process plays a central role in the construction of biological structures and materials such as cells, viruses, and bone, and also in abiotic processes like phase transitions and crystal formation. The principles of self-assembly help…

  13. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging. PMID:26757620

  14. Virtual Screening for Dipeptide Aggregation: Toward Predictive Tools for Peptide Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Frederix, Pim W J M; Ulijn, Rein V; Hunt, Neil T; Tuttle, Tell

    2011-10-01

    Several short peptide sequences are known to self-assemble into supramolecular nanostructures with interesting properties. In this study, coarse-grained molecular dynamics is employed to rapidly screen all 400 dipeptide combinations and predict their ability to aggregate as a potential precursor to their self-assembly. The simulation protocol and scoring method proposed allows a rapid determination of whether a given peptide sequence is likely to aggregate (an indicator for the ability to self-assemble) under aqueous conditions. Systems that show strong aggregation tendencies in the initial screening are selected for longer simulations, which result in good agreement with the known self-assembly or aggregation of dipeptides reported in the literature. Our extended simulations of the diphenylalanine system show that the coarse-grain model is able to reproduce salient features of nanoscale systems and provide insight into the self-assembly process for this system. PMID:23795243

  15. Virtual Screening for Dipeptide Aggregation: Toward Predictive Tools for Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Several short peptide sequences are known to self-assemble into supramolecular nanostructures with interesting properties. In this study, coarse-grained molecular dynamics is employed to rapidly screen all 400 dipeptide combinations and predict their ability to aggregate as a potential precursor to their self-assembly. The simulation protocol and scoring method proposed allows a rapid determination of whether a given peptide sequence is likely to aggregate (an indicator for the ability to self-assemble) under aqueous conditions. Systems that show strong aggregation tendencies in the initial screening are selected for longer simulations, which result in good agreement with the known self-assembly or aggregation of dipeptides reported in the literature. Our extended simulations of the diphenylalanine system show that the coarse-grain model is able to reproduce salient features of nanoscale systems and provide insight into the self-assembly process for this system. PMID:23795243

  16. Heteropoly acids triggered self-assembly of cationic peptides into photo- and electro-chromic gels.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingfang; Xu, Jing; Li, Xiaodong; Gao, Wenmei; Wang, Liyan; Wu, Lixin; Lee, Myongsoo; Li, Wen

    2016-07-01

    A series of cationic peptides with alternating lysines and hydrophobic residues were designed and synthesized. These kinds of short peptides with protonated lysines can complex with anionic heteropoly acids (HPAs) to form a stable gel in water/ethanol mixed solution. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the short peptides adopted a mixed conformation (β-sheet and random-coil) within the gel matrix. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the heteropoly acids, acting as nanosized cross-linkers, first initiated the self-assembly of the cationic peptides into spherical nanostructures. Then these nanospheres accumulated with each other through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to form large sheet-like assemblies, which further interconnected with each other forming continuous 3D network structures. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the structural integrity of the HPAs was maintained during the gelation process. The resultant hybrid gels showed reversible photo- and elecrtro-chromic properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the hybrid gels, capable of persistent and reversible changes of their colour, are attributed to the intervalence charge-transfer transition of the HPAs. Reversible information writing and erasing were demonstrated through a repeated photo-lithograph or electric stimuli without significant loss of the gel performance. PMID:27240759

  17. Protein self-assembly via supramolecular strategies.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yushi; Luo, Quan; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-05-21

    Proteins, as the elemental basis of living organisms, mostly execute their biological tasks in the form of supramolecular self-assemblies with subtle architectures, dynamic interactions and versatile functionalities. Inspired by the structural harmony and functional beauty of natural protein self-assemblies to fabricate sophisticated yet highly ordered protein superstructures represents an adventure in the pursuit of nature's supreme wisdom. In this review, we focus on building protein self-assembly systems based on supramolecular strategies and classify recent progress by the types of utilized supramolecular driving forces. Especially, the design strategy, structure control and the thermodynamic/kinetic regulation of the self-assemblies, which will in turn provide insights into the natural biological self-assembly mechanism, are highlighted. In addition, recently, this research field is starting to extend its interest beyond constructing complex morphologies towards the potential applications of the self-assembly systems; several attempts to design functional protein complexes are also discussed. As such, we hope that this review will provide a panoramic sketch of the field and draw a roadmap towards the ultimate construction of advanced protein self-assemblies that even can serve as analogues of their natural counterparts. PMID:27080059

  18. Adaptive soft molecular self-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andong; Shi, Wenyue; Huang, Jianbin; Yan, Yun

    2016-01-14

    Adaptive molecular self-assemblies provide possibility of constructing smart and functional materials in a non-covalent bottom-up manner. Exploiting the intrinsic properties of responsiveness of non-covalent interactions, a great number of fancy self-assemblies have been achieved. In this review, we try to highlight the recent advances in this field. The following contents are focused: (1) environmental adaptiveness, including smart self-assemblies adaptive to pH, temperature, pressure, and moisture; (2) special chemical adaptiveness, including nanostructures adaptive to important chemicals, such as enzymes, CO2, metal ions, redox agents, explosives, biomolecules; (3) field adaptiveness, including self-assembled materials that are capable of adapting to external fields such as magnetic field, electric field, light irradiation, and shear forces. PMID:26509717

  19. Directed Self-Assembly of Nanodispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Furst, Eric M

    2013-11-15

    Directed self-assembly promises to be the technologically and economically optimal approach to industrial-scale nanotechnology, and will enable the realization of inexpensive, reproducible and active nanostructured materials with tailored photonic, transport and mechanical properties. These new nanomaterials will play a critical role in meeting the 21st century grand challenges of the US, including energy diversity and sustainability, national security and economic competitiveness. The goal of this work was to develop and fundamentally validate methods of directed selfassembly of nanomaterials and nanodispersion processing. The specific aims were: 1. Nanocolloid self-assembly and interactions in AC electric fields. In an effort to reduce the particle sizes used in AC electric field self-assembly to lengthscales, we propose detailed characterizations of field-driven structures and studies of the fundamental underlying particle interactions. We will utilize microscopy and light scattering to assess order-disorder transitions and self-assembled structures under a variety of field and physicochemical conditions. Optical trapping will be used to measure particle interactions. These experiments will be synergetic with calculations of the particle polarizability, enabling us to both validate interactions and predict the order-disorder transition for nanocolloids. 2. Assembly of anisotropic nanocolloids. Particle shape has profound effects on structure and flow behavior of dispersions, and greatly complicates their processing and self-assembly. The methods developed to study the self-assembled structures and underlying particle interactions for dispersions of isotropic nanocolloids will be extended to systems composed of anisotropic particles. This report reviews several key advances that have been made during this project, including, (1) advances in the measurement of particle polarization mechanisms underlying field-directed self-assembly, and (2) progress in the

  20. From Solvolysis to Self-Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    My sojourn from classical physical-organic chemistry and solvolysis to self-assembly and supramolecular chemistry, over the last forty years, is described. My contributions to unsaturated reactive intermediates, namely vinyl cations and unsaturated carbenes, along with my decade long involvement with polyvalent iodine chemistry, especially alkynyliodonium salts, as well as my more recent research with metal-ligand, coordination driven and directed self-assembly of finite supramolecular ensembles are discussed. PMID:19111062

  1. Silk Reconstitution Disrupts Fibroin Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Koebley, Sean R; Thorpe, Daniel; Pang, Pei; Chrisochoides, Panos; Greving, Imke; Vollrath, Fritz; Schniepp, Hannes C

    2015-09-14

    Using atomic force microscopy, we present the first molecular-scale comparison of two of the most important silk dopes, native (NSF) and reconstituted (RSF) silkworm fibroin. We found that both systems depended on shear to show self-assembly. Significant differences in the nature of self-assembly between NSF and RSF were shown. In the highest studied concentration of 1000 mg/L, NSF exhibited assembly into 20-30 nm-wide nanofibrils closely resembling the surface structures found in natural silk fibers. RSF, in contrast, showed no self-assembly whatsoever at the same concentration, which suggests that the reconstitution process significantly disrupts silk's inherent self-assembly capability. At lower concentrations, both RSF and NSF formed fibrils under shear, apparently denatured by the substrate. Using image analysis, we quantified the properties of these self-assembled fibrils as a function of concentration and found low-concentration fibrils of NSF to form larger continuous structures than those of RSF, further supporting NSF's superior self-assembly capabilities. PMID:26284914

  2. Phase behavior and complex crystal structures of self-assembled tethered nanoparticle telechelics.

    PubMed

    Marson, Ryan L; Phillips, Carolyn L; Anderson, Joshua A; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by growing interest in the self-assembly of nanoparticles for applications such as photonics, organic photovoltaics, and DNA-assisted designer crystals, we explore the phase behavior of tethered spherical nanoparticles. Here, a polymer tether is used to geometrically constrain a pair of nanoparticles creating a tethered nanoparticle "telechelic". Using simulation, we examine how varying architectural features, such as the size ratio of the two end-group nanospheres and the length of the flexible tether, affects the self-assembled morphologies. We demonstrate not only that this hybrid building block maintains the same phase diversity as linear triblock copolymers, allowing for a variety of nanoparticle materials to replace polymer blocks, but also that new structures not previously reported are accessible. Our findings imply a robust underlying ordering mechanism is common among these systems, thus allowing flexibility in synthesis approaches to achieve a target morphology. PMID:24641517

  3. Self-assembling holographic biosensors and biocomputers.

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Yooli Kim; Bachand, George David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Trent, Amanda M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-01

    We present concepts for self-assembly of diffractive optics with potential uses in biosensors and biocomputers. The simplest such optics, diffraction gratings, can potentially be made from chemically-stabilized microtubules migrating on nanopatterned tracks of the motor protein kinesin. We discuss the fabrication challenges involved in patterning sub-micron-scale structures with proteins that must be maintained in aqueous buffers to preserve their activity. A novel strategy is presented that employs dry contact printing onto glass-supported amino-silane monolayers of heterobifunctional crosslinkers, followed by solid-state reactions of these cross-linkers, to graft patterns of reactive groups onto the surface. Successive solution-phase addition of cysteine-mutant proteins and amine-reactive polyethylene glycol allows assembly of features onto the printed patterns. We present data from initial experiments showing successful micro- and nanopatterning of lines of single-cysteine mutants of kinesin interleaved with lines of polyethylene, indicating that this strategy can be employed to arrays of features with resolutions suitable for gratings.

  4. Strip-Pattern-Spheres Self-Assembled from Polypeptide-Based Polymer Mixtures: Structure and Defect Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xingyu; Guan, Zhou; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua

    2016-07-01

    We found that poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PBLG-b-PEG) rod-coil block copolymers and polystyrene (PS) homopolymers can cooperatively self-assemble into nano-spheres with striped patterns on their surfaces (strip-pattern-spheres) in aqueous solution. With assistance of dissipative particle dynamics simulation, it is discovered that the PS homopolymers form a spherical template core and the PBLG-b-PEG block copolymers assemble into striped patterns on the spherical surface. The hydrophobic PBLG rods are packed orderly in the strips, while the hydrophilic PEG blocks stabilize the strip-pattern-spheres in solution. Defects such as dislocations and disclinations can be observed in the striped patterns. Self-assembling temperature and sphere radius are found to affect defect densities in the striped patterns. A possible mechanism is proposed to illustrate how PBLG-b-PEG and PS cooperatively self-assemble into hierarchical spheres with striped patterns on surfaces.

  5. Charged diphenylalanine nanotubes and controlled hierarchical self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minjie; Du, Lingjie; Wu, Xinglong; Xiong, Shijie; Chu, Paul K

    2011-06-28

    Hexagonal hierarchical microtubular structures are produced by diphenylalanine self-assembly and the ratio of the relative humidity in the growth chamber to the diphenylalanine concentration (defined as the RH-FF ratio) determines the microtubular morphology. The hexagonal arrangement of the diphenylalanine molecules first induces the hexagonal nanotubes with opposite charges on the two ends, and the dipolar electric field on the nanotubes serves as the driving force. Side-by-side hexagonal aggregation and end-to-end arrangement ensue finally producing a hexagonal hierarchical microtubular structure. Staining experiments and the external electric field-induced parallel arrangement provide evidence of the existence of opposite charges and dipolar electric field. In this self-assembly, the different RH-FF ratios induce different contents of crystalline phases. This leads to different initial nanotube numbers finally yielding different microtubular morphologies. Our calculation based on the dipole model supports the dipole-field mechanism that leads to the different microtubular morphologies. PMID:21591732

  6. Directed self-assembly of performance materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealey, Paul

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) is a promising strategy for high-volume cost-effective manufacturing at the nanoscale. Over the past decades, manufacturing techniques have been developed with such remarkable efficiency that it is now possible to engineer complex systems of heterogeneous materials at the scale of a few tens of nanometers. Further evolution of these techniques, however, is faced with difficult challenges not only in feasibility of implementation at scales of 10 nm and below, but also in prohibitively high capital equipment costs. Materials that self-assemble, on the other hand, spontaneously form structures at the mesoscale, but the micrometer areas or volumes over which the materials self-assemble with adequate perfection in structure is incommensurate with the macroscopic dimensions of working devices and systems of devices of industrial relevance. Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) refers to the integration of self-assembling materials with traditional manufacturing processes. Here we will discuss DSA of block copolymers to revolutionize sub 10 nm lithography and the manufacture of integrated circuits and storage media, DSA of ex-situ synthesized nanoparticles for applications in nanophotonics, and DSA of liquid crystals for advanced optics.

  7. Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly of Galactose-Functionalized Biocompatible Diblock Copolymers for Intracellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in polymer science are enabling substantial progress in nanobiotechnology, particularly in the design of new tools for enhanced understanding of cell biology and for smart drug delivery formulations. Herein, a range of novel galactosylated diblock copolymer nano-objects is prepared directly in concentrated aqueous solution via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using polymerization-induced self-assembly. The resulting nanospheres, worm-like micelles, or vesicles interact in vitro with galectins as judged by a turbidity assay. In addition, galactosylated vesicles are highly biocompatible and allow intracellular delivery of an encapsulated molecular cargo. PMID:23941545

  8. Polymerization-induced self-assembly of galactose-functionalized biocompatible diblock copolymers for intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Ladmiral, Vincent; Semsarilar, Mona; Canton, Irene; Armes, Steven P

    2013-09-11

    Recent advances in polymer science are enabling substantial progress in nanobiotechnology, particularly in the design of new tools for enhanced understanding of cell biology and for smart drug delivery formulations. Herein, a range of novel galactosylated diblock copolymer nano-objects is prepared directly in concentrated aqueous solution via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using polymerization-induced self-assembly. The resulting nanospheres, worm-like micelles, or vesicles interact in vitro with galectins as judged by a turbidity assay. In addition, galactosylated vesicles are highly biocompatible and allow intracellular delivery of an encapsulated molecular cargo. PMID:23941545

  9. Self-Assembly of Peptides to Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Dindyal; Shirazi, Amir Nasrolahi; Parang, Keykavous

    2014-01-01

    The formation of well-ordered nanostructures through self-assembly of diverse organic and inorganic building blocks has drawn much attention owing to their potential applications in biology and chemistry. Among all organic building blocks, peptides are one of the most promising platforms due to their biocompatibility, chemical diversity, and resemblance with proteins. Inspired from the protein assembly in biological systems, various self-assembled peptide structures have been constructed using several amino acids and sequences. This review focuses on this emerging area, the recent advances in peptide self-assembly, and formation of different nanostructures, such as tubular, fibers, vesicles, spherical, and rod coil structures. While different peptide nanostructures are discovered, potential applications will be explored in drug delivery, tissue engineering, wound healing, and surfactants. PMID:24756480

  10. Self-assembled gelators for organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Babu, Sukumaran Santhosh; Prasanthkumar, Seelam; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2012-02-20

    Nature excels at engineering materials by using the principles of chemical synthesis and molecular self-assembly with the help of noncovalent forces. Learning from these phenomena, scientists have been able to create a variety of self-assembled artificial materials of different size, shapes, and properties for wide ranging applications. An area of great interest in this regard is solvent-assisted gel formation with functional organic molecules, thus leading to one-dimensional fibers. Such fibers have improved electronic properties and are potential soft materials for organic electronic devices, particularly in bulk heterojunction solar cells. Described herein is how molecular self-assembly, which was originally proposed as a simple laboratory curiosity, has helped the evolution of a variety of soft functional materials useful for advanced electronic devices such as organic field-effect transistors and organic solar cells. Highlights on some of the recent developments are discussed. PMID:22278754

  11. Intrinsic universality and the computational power of self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Woods, Damien

    2015-07-28

    Molecular self-assembly, the formation of large structures by small pieces of matter sticking together according to simple local interactions, is a ubiquitous phenomenon. A challenging engineering goal is to design a few molecules so that large numbers of them can self-assemble into desired complicated target objects. Indeed, we would like to understand the ultimate capabilities and limitations of this bottom-up fabrication process. We look to theoretical models of algorithmic self-assembly, where small square tiles stick together according to simple local rules in order to carry out a crystal growth process. In this survey, we focus on the use of simulation between such models to classify and separate their computational and expressive powers. Roughly speaking, one model simulates another if they grow the same structures, via the same dynamical growth processes. Our journey begins with the result that there is a single intrinsically universal tile set that, with appropriate initialization and spatial scaling, simulates any instance of Winfree's abstract Tile Assembly Model. This universal tile set exhibits something stronger than Turing universality: it captures the geometry and dynamics of any simulated system in a very direct way. From there we find that there is no such tile set in the more restrictive non-cooperative model, proving it weaker than the full Tile Assembly Model. In the two-handed model, where large structures can bind together in one step, we encounter an infinite set of infinite hierarchies of strictly increasing simulation power. Towards the end of our trip, we find one tile to rule them all: a single rotatable flipable polygonal tile that simulates any tile assembly system. We find another tile that aperiodically tiles the plane (but with small gaps). These and other recent results show that simulation is giving rise to a kind of computational complexity theory for self-assembly. It seems this could be the beginning of a much longer journey

  12. From self-assembled vesicles to protocells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Irene A; Walde, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Self-assembled vesicles are essential components of primitive cells. We review the importance of vesicles during the origins of life, fundamental thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, and experimental models of simple vesicles, focusing on prebiotically plausible fatty acids and their derivatives. We review recent work on interactions of simple vesicles with RNA and other studies of the transition from vesicles to protocells. Finally we discuss current challenges in understanding the biophysics of protocells, as well as conceptual questions in information transmission and self-replication. PMID:20519344

  13. From Self-Assembled Vesicles to Protocells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Irene A.; Walde, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled vesicles are essential components of primitive cells. We review the importance of vesicles during the origins of life, fundamental thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, and experimental models of simple vesicles, focusing on prebiotically plausible fatty acids and their derivatives. We review recent work on interactions of simple vesicles with RNA and other studies of the transition from vesicles to protocells. Finally we discuss current challenges in understanding the biophysics of protocells, as well as conceptual questions in information transmission and self-replication. PMID:20519344

  14. Remote control of self-assembled microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosjean, G.; Lagubeau, G.; Darras, A.; Hubert, M.; Lumay, G.; Vandewalle, N.

    2015-11-01

    Physics governing the locomotion of microorganisms and other microsystems is dominated by viscous damping. An effective swimming strategy involves the non-reciprocal and periodic deformations of the considered body. Here, we show that a magnetocapillary-driven self-assembly, composed of three soft ferromagnetic beads, is able to swim along a liquid-air interface when powered by an external magnetic field. More importantly, we demonstrate that trajectories can be fully controlled, opening ways to explore low Reynolds number swimming. This magnetocapillary system spontaneously forms by self-assembly, allowing miniaturization and other possible applications such as cargo transport or solvent flows.

  15. Computing by molecular self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jonoska, Nataša; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2012-01-01

    The paper reviews two computing models by DNA self-assembly whose proof of principal have recently been experimentally confirmed. The first model incorporates DNA nano-devices and triple crossover DNA molecules to algorithmically arrange non-DNA species. This is achieved by simulating a finite-state automaton with output where golden nanoparticles are assembled to read-out the result. In the second model, a complex DNA molecule representing a graph emerges as a solution of a computational problem. This supports the idea that in molecular self-assembly computing, it may be necessary to develop the notion of shape processing besides the classical approach through symbol processing. PMID:23919130

  16. Self-assembly of chlorophenols in water

    PubMed Central

    Rogalska, Ewa; Rogalski, Marek; Gulik-Krzywicki, Tadeusz; Gulik, Annette; Chipot, Christophe

    1999-01-01

    In saturated solutions of some di- and trichlorophenols, structures with complex morphologies, consisting of thin, transparent sheets often coiling into helices and ultimately twisting into filaments, were observed under the optical microscope. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, phase diagrams, and molecular modeling were performed to elucidate the observed phenomena. Here, we present evidence that the chlorophenols studied, when interacting with water, self-assemble into bilayers. The fact that some chlorophenols form the same supramolecular structures as those described previously for structurally nonrelated surfactants sheds light on the mechanisms of self-assembly. PMID:10359753

  17. Remote control of self-assembled microswimmers

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, G.; Lagubeau, G.; Darras, A.; Hubert, M.; Lumay, G.; Vandewalle, N.

    2015-01-01

    Physics governing the locomotion of microorganisms and other microsystems is dominated by viscous damping. An effective swimming strategy involves the non-reciprocal and periodic deformations of the considered body. Here, we show that a magnetocapillary-driven self-assembly, composed of three soft ferromagnetic beads, is able to swim along a liquid-air interface when powered by an external magnetic field. More importantly, we demonstrate that trajectories can be fully controlled, opening ways to explore low Reynolds number swimming. This magnetocapillary system spontaneously forms by self-assembly, allowing miniaturization and other possible applications such as cargo transport or solvent flows. PMID:26538006

  18. Nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions.

    PubMed

    Tesoro, S; Göpfrich, K; Kartanas, T; Keyser, U F; Ahnert, S E

    2016-08-01

    We investigate general properties of nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions, using a computational model and DNA tile assembly experiments. By contrasting symmetric and asymmetric interactions we show that the latter can lead to self-limiting cluster growth. Furthermore, by adjusting the relative abundance of self-assembly particles in a two-particle mixture, we are able to tune the final sizes of these clusters. We show that this is a fundamental property of asymmetric interactions, which has potential applications in bioengineering, and provides insights into the study of diseases caused by protein aggregation. PMID:27627332

  19. Nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesoro, S.; Göpfrich, K.; Kartanas, T.; Keyser, U. F.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate general properties of nondeterministic self-assembly with asymmetric interactions, using a computational model and DNA tile assembly experiments. By contrasting symmetric and asymmetric interactions we show that the latter can lead to self-limiting cluster growth. Furthermore, by adjusting the relative abundance of self-assembly particles in a two-particle mixture, we are able to tune the final sizes of these clusters. We show that this is a fundamental property of asymmetric interactions, which has potential applications in bioengineering, and provides insights into the study of diseases caused by protein aggregation.

  20. Self-assembled supramolecular nanotube yarn.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Tianyu; Huan, Yong; Li, Zhibo; He, Guowei; Liu, Minghua

    2013-11-01

    Metric length supramolecular nanotube yarns are fabricated though a spinning process from the diluted aqueous solution of self-assembled nanotubes, with bolaamphiphiles working as molecular building blocks. These non-covalent bonding based nanotube yarns show outstanding mechanical strength compared with some conventional polymers and could be operated under the macro conditions. PMID:23943418

  1. Nanopropulsion by biocatalytic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Joy; Hope, Alexander; Hughes, Meghan; Debnath, Sisir; Fleming, Scott; Wark, Alastair W; Ulijn, Rein V; Haw, Mark D

    2014-09-23

    A number of organisms and organelles are capable of self-propulsion at the micro- and nanoscales. Production of simple man-made mimics of biological transportation systems may prove relevant to achieving movement in artificial cells and nano/micronscale robotics that may be of biological and nanotechnological importance. We demonstrate the propulsion of particles based on catalytically controlled molecular self-assembly and fiber formation at the particle surface. Specifically, phosphatase enzymes (acting as the engine) are conjugated to a quantum dot (the vehicle), and are subsequently exposed to micellar aggregates (fuel) that upon biocatalytic dephosphorylation undergo fibrillar self-assembly, which in turn causes propulsion. The motion of individual enzyme/quantum dot conjugates is followed directly using fluorescence microscopy. While overall movement remains random, the enzyme-conjugates exhibit significantly faster transport in the presence of the fiber forming system, compared to controls without fuel, a non-self-assembling substrate, or a substrate which assembles into spherical, rather than fibrous structures upon enzymatic dephosphorylation. When increasing the concentration of the fiber-forming fuel, the speed of the conjugates increases compared to non-self-assembling substrate, although directionality remains random. PMID:25162764

  2. Self-assembly micro optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping (Cerina); Le, Kevin; Malalur-Nagaraja-Rao, Smitha; Hsu, Lun-Chen; Chiao, J.-C.

    2006-01-01

    Optical communication and sensor industry face critical challenges in manufacturing for system integration. Due to the assembly complexity and integration platform variety, micro optical components require costly alignment and assembly procedures, in which many required manual efforts. Consequently, self-assembly device architectures have become a great interest and could provide major advantages over the conventional optical devices. In this paper, we discussed a self-assembly integration platform for micro optical components. To demonstrate the adaptability and flexibility of the proposed optical device architectures, we chose a commercially available MEMS fabrication foundry service - MUMPs (Multi-User MEMS Process). In this work, polysilicon layers of MUMPS are used as the 3-D structural material for construction of micro component framework and actuators. However, because the polysilicon has high absorption in the visible and near infrared wavelength ranges, it is not suitable for optical interaction. To demonstrate the required optical performance, hybrid integration of materials was proposed and implemented. Organic compound materials were applied on the silicon-based framework to form the required optical interfaces. Organic compounds provide good optical transparency, flexibility to form filters or lens and inexpensive manufacturing procedures. In this paper, we have demonstrated a micro optical filter integrated with self-assembly structures. We will discuss the self-assembly mechanism, optical filter designs, fabrication issues and results.

  3. Self-assembling materials for therapeutic delivery✩

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Monica C.; Schneider, Joel P.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of medications must be administered through parenteral delivery, i.e., intravenous, intramuscular, or subcutaneous injection, to ensure effectiveness of the therapeutic. For some therapeutics, the use of delivery vehicles in conjunction with this delivery mechanism can improve drug efficacy and patient compliance. Macromolecular self-assembly has been exploited recently to engineer materials for the encapsulation and controlled delivery of therapeutics. Self-assembled materials offer the advantages of conventional crosslinked materials normally used for release, but also provide the ability to tailor specific bulk material properties, such as release profiles, at the molecular level via monomer design. As a result, the design of materials from the “bottom up” approach has generated a variety of supramolecular devices for biomedical applications. This review provides an overview of self-assembling molecules, their resultant structures, and their use in therapeutic delivery. It highlights the current progress in the design of polymer- and peptide-based self-assembled materials. PMID:19010748

  4. [INVITED] Self-assembled optical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Alexandre; Aradian, Ashod; Ponsinet, Virginie; Barois, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled metamaterials constitute a promising platform to achieving bulk and homogenous optical materials that exhibit unusual effective medium properties. For many years now, the research community has contemplated lithographically fabricated metasurfaces, with extraordinary optical features. However, achieving large volumes at low cost is still a challenge by top-down fabrication. Bottom-up fabrication, that relies both on nanochemistry and self-assembly, is capable of building such materials while greatly reducing the energy footprint in the formulation of the metamaterial. Self-assembled metamaterials have shown that they are capable of reaching unprecedented values of bulkiness and homogeneity figures of merit. This feat is achieved by synthesizing plasmonic nanoresonators (meta-atoms in the sense of artificial polarizable units) and assembling them into a fully three-dimensional matrix through a variety of methods. Furthermore it has been shown that a wide range of material parameters can be tailored by controlling the geometry and composition of the meta-atoms as well as the volume fraction of the nano-objects in the metamaterial. Here we conduct a non-comprehensive review of some of the recent trends in self-assembled optical metamaterials and illustrate these trends with our recent work.

  5. Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, H.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV

  6. Self-assembly of azide containing dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Yuran, Sivan; Razvag, Yair; Das, Priyadip; Reches, Meital

    2014-07-01

    Functional structures and materials are formed spontaneously in nature through the process of self-assembly. Mimicking this process in vitro will lead to the formation of new substances that would impact many areas including energy production and storage, biomaterials and implants, and drug delivery. The considerable structural diversity of peptides makes them appealing building blocks for self-assembly in vitro. This paper describes the self-assembly of three aromatic dipeptides containing an azide moiety: H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe(4-azido)-OH, H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe-OH, and H-Phe-Phe(4-azido)-OH. The peptide H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe(4-azido)-OH self-assembled into porous spherical structures, whereas the peptides H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe-OH and H-Phe-Phe(4-azido)-OH did not form any ordered structures under the examined experimental conditions. The azido group of the peptide can serve as a photo cross-linking agent upon irradiation with UV light. To examine the effect of this group and its activity on the self-assembled structures, we irradiated the assemblies in solution for different time periods. Using electron microscopy, we determined that the porous spherical assemblies formed by the peptide H-Phe(4-azido)-Phe(4-azido)-OH underwent a structural change upon irradiation. In addition, using FT-IR, we detected the chemical change of the peptide azido group. Moreover, using indentation experiments with atomic force microscopy, we showed that the Young's modulus of the spherical assemblies increased after 20 min of irradiation with UV light. Overall, irradiating the solution of the peptide assemblies containing the azido group resulted in a change both in the morphology and mechanical properties of the peptide-based structures. These ordered assemblies or their peptide monomer building blocks can potentially be incorporated into other peptide assemblies to generate stiffer and more stable materials. PMID:24889029

  7. The Role of Secondary Structure in the Entropically Driven Amelogenin Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Fan, Daming; Du, Chang; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2007-01-01

    Amelogenin, the major extracellular enamel matrix protein, plays critical roles in controlling enamel mineralization. This generally hydrophobic protein self-assembles to form nanosphere structures under certain solution conditions. To gain clearer insight into the mechanisms of amelogenin self-assembly, we first investigated the occurrences of secondary structures within its sequence. By applying isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we determined the thermodynamic parameters associated with protein-protein interactions and with conformational changes during self-assembly. The recombinant porcine full length (rP172) and a truncated amelogenin lacking the hydrophilic C-terminal (rP148) were used. Circular dichroism (CD) measurements performed at low concentrations (<5 μM) revealed the presence of the polyproline-type II (PPII) conformation in both amelogenins in addition to α-helix and unordered conformations. Structural transition from PPII/unordered to β-sheet was observed for both proteins at higher concentrations (>62.5 μM) and upon self-assembly. ITC measurements indicated that the self-assembly of rP172 and rP148 is entropically driven (+ΔSA) and energetically favorable (−ΔGA). The magnitude of enthalpy (ΔHA) and entropy changes of assembly (ΔSA) were smaller for rP148 than rP172, whereas the Gibbs free energy change of assembly (ΔGA) was not significantly different. It was found that rP172 had higher PPII content than rP148, and the monomer-multimer equilibrium for rP172 was observed in a narrower protein concentration range when compared to rP148. The large positive enthalpy and entropy changes in both cases are attributed to the release of ordered water molecules and the associated entropy gain (due to the hydrophobic effect). These findings suggest that PPII conformation plays an important role in amelogenin self-assembly and that rP172 assembly is more favorable than rP148. The data are direct evidence for the notion that hydrophobic

  8. Structure and dynamics of optically directed self-assembly of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debjit; Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles leading to the formation of colloidal clusters often serves as the representative analogue for understanding molecular assembly. Unravelling the in situ structure and dynamics of such clusters in liquid suspensions is highly challenging. Presently colloidal clusters are first isolated from their generating environment and then their structures are probed by light scattering methods. In order to measure the in situ structure and dynamics of colloidal clusters, we have generated them using the high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulse optical tweezer. Since the constituent of our dimer, trimer or tetramer clusters are 250 nm radius two-photon resonant fluorophore coated nanospheres under the optical trap, they inherently produce Two-Photon Fluorescence, which undergo intra-nanosphere Fluorescence Energy Transfer. This unique energy transfer signature, in turn, enables us to visualize structures and orientations of these colloidal clusters during the process of their formation and subsequent dynamics in a liquid suspension. We also show that due to shape-birefringence, orientation and structural control of these colloidal clusters are possible as the polarization of the trapping laser is changed from linear to circular. We thus report important progress in sampling the smallest possible aggregates of nanoparticles, dimers, trimers or tetramers, formed early in the self-assembly process. PMID:27006305

  9. Structure and dynamics of optically directed self-assembly of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Debjit; Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles leading to the formation of colloidal clusters often serves as the representative analogue for understanding molecular assembly. Unravelling the in situ structure and dynamics of such clusters in liquid suspensions is highly challenging. Presently colloidal clusters are first isolated from their generating environment and then their structures are probed by light scattering methods. In order to measure the in situ structure and dynamics of colloidal clusters, we have generated them using the high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulse optical tweezer. Since the constituent of our dimer, trimer or tetramer clusters are 250 nm radius two-photon resonant fluorophore coated nanospheres under the optical trap, they inherently produce Two-Photon Fluorescence, which undergo intra-nanosphere Fluorescence Energy Transfer. This unique energy transfer signature, in turn, enables us to visualize structures and orientations of these colloidal clusters during the process of their formation and subsequent dynamics in a liquid suspension. We also show that due to shape-birefringence, orientation and structural control of these colloidal clusters are possible as the polarization of the trapping laser is changed from linear to circular. We thus report important progress in sampling the smallest possible aggregates of nanoparticles, dimers, trimers or tetramers, formed early in the self-assembly process. PMID:27006305

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Fatty Acid/Amino Acid Self-Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Gajowy, Joanna; Bolikal, Durgadas; Kohn, Joachim; El Fray, Miroslawa

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the synthesis and self-assembling behavior of new copolymers derived from fatty acid/amino acid components, namely dimers of linoleic acid (DLA) and tyrosine derived diphenols containing alkyl ester pendent chains, designated as “R” (DTR). Specific pendent chains were ethyl (E) and hexyl (H). These poly(aliphatic/aromatic-ester-amide)s were further reacted with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether) of different molecular masses, thus resulting in ABA type (hydrophilic-hydrophobic-hydrophilic) triblock copolymers. We used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies to evaluate the chemical structure of the final materials. The molecular masses were estimated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) measurements. The self-organization of these new polymeric systems into micellar/nanospheric structures in aqueous environment was evaluated using ultraviolet/visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The polymers were found to spontaneously self-assemble into nanoparticles with sizes in the range 196–239 nm and critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 0.125–0.250 mg/mL. The results are quite promising and these materials are capable of self-organizing into well-defined micelles/nanospheres encapsulating bioactive molecules, e.g., vitamins or antibacterial peptides for antibacterial coatings on medical devices. PMID:25347356

  11. Structure and dynamics of optically directed self-assembly of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debjit; Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2016-03-01

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles leading to the formation of colloidal clusters often serves as the representative analogue for understanding molecular assembly. Unravelling the in situ structure and dynamics of such clusters in liquid suspensions is highly challenging. Presently colloidal clusters are first isolated from their generating environment and then their structures are probed by light scattering methods. In order to measure the in situ structure and dynamics of colloidal clusters, we have generated them using the high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulse optical tweezer. Since the constituent of our dimer, trimer or tetramer clusters are 250 nm radius two-photon resonant fluorophore coated nanospheres under the optical trap, they inherently produce Two-Photon Fluorescence, which undergo intra-nanosphere Fluorescence Energy Transfer. This unique energy transfer signature, in turn, enables us to visualize structures and orientations of these colloidal clusters during the process of their formation and subsequent dynamics in a liquid suspension. We also show that due to shape-birefringence, orientation and structural control of these colloidal clusters are possible as the polarization of the trapping laser is changed from linear to circular. We thus report important progress in sampling the smallest possible aggregates of nanoparticles, dimers, trimers or tetramers, formed early in the self-assembly process.

  12. Chemical Functionalization, Self-Assembly, and Applications of Nanomaterials and Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Tifeng; Yan, Xingbin; Balan, Lavinia; Stepanov, Andrey; Chen, Xinqing; Hu, Michael Z.

    2014-01-01

    This special issue addresses the research studies on chemical functionalization, self-assembly, and applications of nanomaterials and nanocomposites. It contains twentyfour articles including two reviews and twenty-two research articles. It is used to create new functional nanomaterials and nanocomposites with a variety of sizes and morphologies such as Zn/Al layered double hydroxide, tin oxide nanowires, FeOOH-modified anion resin, Au nanoclusters silica composite nanospheres, Ti-doped ZnO sol-composite films, TiO2/ZnO composite, graphene oxide nanocomposites, LiFePO4/C nanocomposites, and chitosan nanoparticles. These nanomaterials and nanocomposites have widespread applications in tissue engineering, antitumor, sensors, photoluminescence, electrochemical, and catalytic properties. In addition, this themed issue includes some research articles about self-assembly systems covering organogels and Langmuir films. Furthermore, B. Blasiak et al. performed a literature survey on the recent advances in production, functionalization, toxicity reduction, and application of nanoparticles in cancer diagnosis, treatment, and treatment monitoring. P. Colson et al. performed a literature survey on the recent advances in nanosphere lithography due to its compatibility with wafer-scale processes as well as its potential to manufacture a wide variety of homogeneous one-, two-, or three-dimensional nanostructures.

  13. A Theoretical and Experimental Study of DNA Self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Harish

    providing detailed designs for local molecular computations that involve spatially contiguous molecules arranged on addressable substrates via enzyme-free DNA hybridization reaction cascades. We use the Visual DSD simulation software in conjunction with localized reaction rates obtained from biophysical modeling to create chemical reaction networks of localized hybridization circuits that are then model checked using the PRISM model checking software. We develop a DNA detection system employing the triggered self-assembly of a novel DNA dendritic nanostructure. Detection begins when a specific, single-stranded target DNA strand triggers a hybridization chain reaction between two distinct DNA hairpins. Each hairpin opens and hybridizes up to two copies of the other, and hence each layer of the growing dendritic nanostructure can in principle accommodate an exponentially increasing number of cognate molecules, generating a nanostructure with high molecular weight. We build linear activatable assemblies employing a novel protection/deprotection strategy to strictly enforce the direction of tiling assembly growth to ensure the robustness of the assembly process. Our system consists of two tiles that can form a linear co-polymer. These tiles, which are initially protected such that they do not react with each other, can be activated to form linear co-polymers via the use of a strand displacing enzyme.

  14. DNA triangles and self-assembled hexagonal tilings.

    PubMed

    Chelyapov, Nickolas; Brun, Yuriy; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj; Reishus, Dustin; Shaw, Bilal; Adleman, Leonard

    2004-11-01

    We have designed and constructed DNA complexes in the form of triangles. We have created hexagonal planar tilings from these triangles via self-assembly. Unlike previously reported structures self-assembled from DNA, our structures appear to involve bending of double helices. Bending helices may be a useful design option in the creation of self-assembled DNA structures. It has been suggested that DNA self-assembly may lead to novel materials and efficient computational devices. PMID:15506744

  15. Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Eisenstein, Samuel; Rosen, Benjamin; Lau, Albert Y.; C. Walter, Johannes; LaBaer, Joshua

    2004-07-01

    Protein microarrays provide a powerful tool for the study of protein function. However, they are not widely used, in part because of the challenges in producing proteins to spot on the arrays. We generated protein microarrays by printing complementary DNAs onto glass slides and then translating target proteins with mammalian reticulocyte lysate. Epitope tags fused to the proteins allowed them to be immobilized in situ. This obviated the need to purify proteins, avoided protein stability problems during storage, and captured sufficient protein for functional studies. We used the technology to map pairwise interactions among 29 human DNA replication initiation proteins, recapitulate the regulation of Cdt1 binding to select replication proteins, and map its geminin-binding domain.

  16. Ultrasmall Peptides Self-Assemble into Diverse Nanostructures: Morphological Evaluation and Potential Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Anupama; Hauser, Charlotte A.E.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we perform a morphological evaluation of the diverse nanostructures formed by varying concentration and amino acid sequence of a unique class of ultrasmall self-assembling peptides. We modified these peptides by replacing the aliphatic amino acid at the C-aliphatic terminus with different aromatic amino acids. We tracked the effect of introducing aromatic residues on self-assembly and morphology of resulting nanostructures. Whereas aliphatic peptides formed long, helical fibers that entangle into meshes and entrap >99.9% water, the modified peptides contrastingly formed short, straight fibers with a flat morphology. No helical fibers were observed for the modified peptides. For the aliphatic peptides at low concentrations, different supramolecular assemblies such as hollow nanospheres and membrane blebs were found. Since the ultrasmall peptides are made of simple, aliphatic amino acids, considered to have existed in the primordial soup, study of these supramolecular assemblies could be relevant to understanding chemical evolution leading to the origin of life on Earth. In particular, we propose a variety of potential applications in bioengineering and nanotechnology for the diverse self-assembled nanostructures. PMID:22016623

  17. Virus-Templated Plasmonic Nanoclusters with Icosahedral Symmetry via Directed Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Jake; Dressick, Walter J; Phelps, Jamie; Johnson, John E; Rendell, Ronald W; Sampson, Travian; Ratna, Banahalli R; Soto, Carissa M

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles with precise spatial and orientational order may lead to structures with new electromagnetic properties at optical frequencies. The directed self-assembly method presented controls the interparticle-spacing and symmetry of the resulting nanometer-sized elements in solution. The self-assembly of three-dimensional (3D), icosahedral plasmonic nanosclusters (NCs) with resonances at visible wavelengths is demonstrated experimentally. The ideal NCs consist of twelve gold (Au) nanospheres (NSs) attached to thiol groups at predefined locations on the surface of a genetically engineered cowpea mosaic virus with icosahedral symmetry. In situ dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements confirm the NSs assembly on the virus. Transmission electron micrographs (TEM) demonstrate the ability of the self-assembly method to control the nanoscopic symmetry of the bound NSs, which reflects the icosahedral symmetry of the virus. Both, TEM and DLS show that the NCs comprise of a distribution of capsids mostly covered (i.e., 6–12 NS/capsid) with NSs. 3D finite-element simulations of aqueous suspensions of NCs reproduce the experimental bulk absorbance measurements and major features of the spectra. Simulations results show that the fully assembled NCs give rise to a 10-fold surface-averaged enhancement of the local electromagnetic field. PMID:24733721

  18. Ultrasmall peptides self-assemble into diverse nanostructures: morphological evaluation and potential implications.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Anupama; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we perform a morphological evaluation of the diverse nanostructures formed by varying concentration and amino acid sequence of a unique class of ultrasmall self-assembling peptides. We modified these peptides by replacing the aliphatic amino acid at the C-aliphatic terminus with different aromatic amino acids. We tracked the effect of introducing aromatic residues on self-assembly and morphology of resulting nanostructures. Whereas aliphatic peptides formed long, helical fibers that entangle into meshes and entrap >99.9% water, the modified peptides contrastingly formed short, straight fibers with a flat morphology. No helical fibers were observed for the modified peptides. For the aliphatic peptides at low concentrations, different supramolecular assemblies such as hollow nanospheres and membrane blebs were found. Since the ultrasmall peptides are made of simple, aliphatic amino acids, considered to have existed in the primordial soup, study of these supramolecular assemblies could be relevant to understanding chemical evolution leading to the origin of life on Earth. In particular, we propose a variety of potential applications in bioengineering and nanotechnology for the diverse self-assembled nanostructures. PMID:22016623

  19. Self-assembling membranes and related methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Capito, Ramille M; Azevedo, Helena S; Stupp, Samuel L

    2013-08-20

    The present invention relates to self-assembling membranes. In particular, the present invention provides self-assembling membranes configured for securing and/or delivering bioactive agents. In some embodiments, the self-assembling membranes are used in the treatment of diseases, and related methods (e.g., diagnostic methods, research methods, drug screening).

  20. Integrating nanosphere lithography in device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurvick, Tod V.; Coutu, Ronald A.; Lake, Robert A.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the integration of nanosphere lithography (NSL) with other fabrication techniques, allowing for nano-scaled features to be realized within larger microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based devices. Nanosphere self-patterning methods have been researched for over three decades, but typically not for use as a lithography process. Only recently has progress been made towards integrating many of the best practices from these publications and determining a process that yields large areas of coverage, with repeatability and enabled a process for precise placement of nanospheres relative to other features. Discussed are two of the more common self-patterning methods used in NSL (i.e. spin-coating and dip coating) as well as a more recently conceived variation of dip coating. Recent work has suggested the repeatability of any method depends on a number of variables, so to better understand how these variables affect the process a series of test vessels were developed and fabricated. Commercially available 3-D printing technology was used to incrementally alter the test vessels allowing for each variable to be investigated individually. With these deposition vessels, NSL can now be used in conjunction with other fabrication steps to integrate features otherwise unattainable through current methods, within the overall fabrication process of larger MEMS devices. Patterned regions in 1800 series photoresist with a thickness of ~700nm are used to capture regions of self-assembled nanospheres. These regions are roughly 2-5 microns in width, and are able to control the placement of 500nm polystyrene spheres by controlling where monolayer self-assembly occurs. The resulting combination of photoresist and nanospheres can then be used with traditional deposition or etch methods to utilize these fine scale features in the overall design.

  1. Dissipative self-assembly of vesicular nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Subhabrata; Fortunati, Ilaria; Ferrante, Camilla; Scrimin, Paolo; Prins, Leonard J

    2016-07-01

    Dissipative self-assembly is exploited by nature to control important biological functions, such as cell division, motility and signal transduction. The ability to construct synthetic supramolecular assemblies that require the continuous consumption of energy to remain in the functional state is an essential premise for the design of synthetic systems with lifelike properties. Here, we show a new strategy for the dissipative self-assembly of functional supramolecular structures with high structural complexity. It relies on the transient stabilization of vesicles through noncovalent interactions between the surfactants and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which acts as the chemical fuel. It is shown that the lifetime of the vesicles can be regulated by controlling the hydrolysis rate of ATP. The vesicles sustain a chemical reaction but only as long as chemical fuel is present to keep the system in the out-of-equilibrium state. The lifetime of the vesicles determines the amount of reaction product produced by the system. PMID:27325101

  2. Controlling and imaging biomimetic self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliprandi, Alessandro; Mauro, Matteo; de Cola, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of chemical entities represents a very attractive way to create a large variety of ordered functional structures and complex matter. Although much effort has been devoted to the preparation of supramolecular nanostructures based on different chemical building blocks, an understanding of the mechanisms at play and the ability to monitor assembly processes and, in turn, control them are often elusive, which precludes a deep and comprehensive control of the final structures. Here the complex supramolecular landscape of a platinum(II) compound is characterized fully and controlled successfully through a combination of supramolecular and photochemical approaches. The supramolecular assemblies comprise two kinetic assemblies and their thermodynamic counterpart. The monitoring of the different emission properties of the aggregates, used as a fingerprint for each species, allows the real-time visualization of the evolving self-assemblies. The control of multiple supramolecular pathways will help the design of complex systems in and out of their thermodynamic equilibrium.

  3. Self-assembled Oniontype Multiferroic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shenqiang; Briber, Robert M.; Wuttig, Manfred

    2009-03-01

    Spontaneously self-assembled oniontype multiferroic nanostructures based on block copolymers as templating materials are reported. Diblock copolymer containing two different magnetoelectric precursors separately segregated to the two microdomains have been shown to form well-ordered templated lamellar structures. Onion-type multilamellar ordered multiferroic (PZT/CoFe2O4) nanostructures have been induced by room temperature solvent annealing in a magnetic field oriented perpendicular to the plane of the film. The evolution of the onion-like microstructure has been characterized by AFM, MFM, and TEM. The structure retains lamellar periodicity observed at zero field. The onion structure is superparamagnetic above and antiferromagnetic below the blocking temperature. This templating process opens a route for nanometer-scale patterning of magnetic toroids by means of self-assembly on length scales that are difficult to obtain by standard lithography techniques.

  4. Self Assembly of Complex Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucke, David; Crespi, Vincent

    2004-03-01

    A genetic search algorithm for optimizing the packing density of self-assembled multicomponent crystals of nanoparticles applied to complex colloidal building blocks will be presented. The algorithm searches the complex multi-dimensional space to find preferred crystal structures where standard methods fail. Mixtures of colloidal molecules and the structures found to be preferred to phase separation for different species of coloidal molecule mixtures will be shown.

  5. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Zhigang

    2013-04-29

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  6. Single photon ionisation of self assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B. V.; Savina, M. R.; Tripa, C. E.; Calaway, W. F.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Moore, J. F.; Pellin, M. J.

    2002-05-01

    Self assembled monolayers formed from benzenethiol, diphenylsulphide and diphenyldisulphide have been analysed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), sputter neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and laser desorption photoionisation mass spectrometry (LDPI). The peak corresponding to the parent ion was much stronger in LDPI than with SIMS or SNMS analysis and fragmentation was lower. A useful yield of order 0.5% was obtained for LDPI from diphenyldisulphide.

  7. The dynamics of nacre self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Julyan H.E; Checa, Antonio G

    2006-01-01

    We show how nacre and pearl construction in bivalve and gastropod molluscs can be understood in terms of successive processes of controlled self-assembly from the molecular- to the macro-scale. This dynamics involves the physics of the formation of both solid and liquid crystals and of membranes and fluids to produce a nanostructured hierarchically constructed biological composite of polysaccharides, proteins and mineral, whose mechanical properties far surpass those of its component parts. PMID:17251136

  8. Interparticle Forces Underlying Nanoparticle Self-Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Yan, Cong; Wang, Tie

    2015-12-01

    Studies on the self-assembly of nanoparticles have been a hot topic in nanotechnology for decades and still remain relevant for the present and future due to their tunable collective properties as well as their remarkable applications to a wide range of fields. The novel properties of nanoparticle assemblies arise from their internal interactions and assemblies with the desired architecture key to constructing novel nanodevices. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the interparticle forces of nanoparticle self-assemblies is a pre-requisite to the design and control of the assembly processes, so as to fabricate the ideal nanomaterial and nanoproducts. Here, different categories of interparticle forces are classified and discussed according to their origins, behaviors and functions during the assembly processes, and the induced collective properties of the corresponding nanoparticle assemblies. Common interparticle forces, such as van der Waals forces, electrostatic interactions, electromagnetic dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, solvophonic interactions, and depletion interactions are discussed in detail. In addition, new categories of assembly principles are summarized and introduced. These are termed template-mediated interactions and shape-complementary interactions. A deep understanding of the interactions inside self-assembled nanoparticles, and a broader perspective for the future synthesis and fabrication of these promising nanomaterials is provided. PMID:26436692

  9. Meniscus height controlled convective self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Satyan; Crosby, Alfred

    Convective self-assembly techniques based on the 'coffee-ring effect' allow for the fabrication of materials with structural hierarchy and multi-functionality across a wide range of length scales. The coffee-ring effect describes deposition of non-volatiles at the edge of droplet due to capillary flow and pattern formations due to pinning and de-pinning of meniscus with the solvent evaporation. We demonstrate a novel convective self-assembly method which uses a piezo-actuated bending motion for driving the de-pinning step. In this method, a dilute solution of nanoparticles or polymers is trapped by capillary forces between a blade and substrate. As the blade oscillates with a fixed frequency and amplitude and the substrate translates at a fixed velocity, the height of the capillary meniscus oscillates. The meniscus height controls the contact angle of three phase contact line and at a critical angle de-pinning occurs. The combination of convective flux and continuously changing contact angle drives the assembly of the solute and subsequent de-pinning step, providing a direct means for producing linear assemblies. We demonstrate a new method for convective self-assembly at an accelerated rate when compared to other techniques, with control over deposit dimensions. Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0185).

  10. Directed Self-assembly for Lithography Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joy

    2010-03-01

    Economics dictated that semiconductor devices need to be scaled approximately to 70 percent linearly in order to follow the pace of Moore's law and maintain cost effectiveness. Optical lithography has been the driving force for scaling; however, it approaches its physical limit to print patterns beyond 22nm node. Directed self-assembly (DSA), which combines ``bottom-up'' self-assembled polymers and ``top-down'' lithographically defined substrates, has been considered as a potential candidate to extend optical lithography. Benefit from nanometer-scale self-assembly features and the registration precision of advanced lithography, DSA provides precise and programmable nanopatterns beyond the resolution limit of conventional lithography. We have demonstrated DSA concepts including frequency multiplication and pattern rectification using guiding prepattern with proper chemical and topographical information generated by e-beam lithography. In addition, we seek to integrate DSA with 193 nm optical lithography in a straightforward manner in order to move DSA from the research stage to a viable manufacturing technology. Recently, we implemented various integration strategies using photolithography to produce guiding patterns for DSA. This new ability enables DSA to be applied to large areas with state-of-the-art lithography facilities.

  11. Symmetry, Equivalence and Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Jack

    2006-03-01

    Molecular self-assembly at equilibrium is central to the formation of many biological structures and the emulation of this process through the creation of synthetic counterparts offers great promise for nanofabrication. The central problems in this field are an understanding of how the symmetry of the interacting particles encodes the geometrical structure of the organized structure and the nature of the thermodynamic transitions involved. Our approach is inspired by the self-assembly of actin, tubulin and icosahedral structures of plant and animal viruses. We observe chain, membrane,`nanotube' and hollow icosahedron structures using `equivalent' particles exhibiting an interplay between directional (dipolar and multi-polar) interactions and short-range (van der Waals) interactions. Specifically, a dipolar potential (continuous rotational symmetry) gives rise to chain formation, while potentials having discrete rotational symmetries (e.g., square quadrupole or triangular ring of dipoles) led to the self-organization of nanotube and icosahedral structures with some resemblance to tubulin and icosahedral viruses. The simulations are compared to theoretical models of molecular self-assembly, especially in the case of dipolar fluids where the corresponding analytic theory of equilibrium polymerization is well developed. These computations give insights into the design elements required for the development of synthetic systems exhibiting this type of organization.

  12. Self-Assembly of Nanoparticle Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Michael T.

    Self-assembly utilizes non-covalent forces to organize smaller building blocks into larger, organized structures. Nanoparticles are one type of building block and have gained interest recently due to their unique optical and electrical properties which have proved useful in fields such as energy, catalysis, and advanced materials. There are several techniques currently used to self-assemble nanoparticles, each with its own set of benefits and drawbacks. Here, we address the limited number of techniques in non-polar solvents by introducing a method utilizing amphiphilic gold nanoparticles. Grafted polymer chains provide steric stabilization while small hydrophilic molecules induce assembly through short range attractive forces. The properties of these self-assembled structures are found to be dependent on the polymer and small molecules surface concentrations and chemistries. These particles act as nanoparticle surfactants and can effectively stabilize oil-water interfaces, such as in an emulsion. In addition to the work in organic solvent, similar amphiphilic particles in aqueous media are shown to effectively stabilize oil-in-water emulsions that show promise as photoacoustic/ultrasound theranostic agents.

  13. Self-assembled plasmonic nanohole arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Hoon; Bantz, Kyle C; Lindquist, Nathan C; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Haynes, Christy L

    2009-12-01

    We present a simple and massively parallel nanofabrication technique to produce self-assembled periodic nanohole arrays over a millimeter-sized area of metallic film, with a tunable hole shape, diameter, and periodicity. Using this method, 30 x 30 microm(2) defect-free areas of 300 nm diameter or smaller holes were obtained in silver; this area threshold is critical because it is larger than the visible wavelength propagation length of surface plasmon waves ( approximately 27 microm) in the silver film. Measured optical transmission spectra show highly homogeneous characteristics across the millimeter-size patterned area, and they are in good agreement with FDTD simulations. The simulations also reveal intense electric fields concentrated near the air/silver interface, which was used for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Enhancement factors (EFs) measured with different hole shape and excitation wavelengths on the self-assembled nanohole arrays were 10(4)-10(6). With an additional Ag electroless plating step, the EF was further increased up to 3 x 10(6). The periodic nanohole arrays produced using this tunable self-assembly method show great promise as inexpensive SERS substrates as well as surface plasmon resonance biosensing platforms. PMID:19831350

  14. Engineered Self-Assembly of Plasmonic Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    A critical need in nanotechnology is the development of new tools and methods to organize, connect, and integrate solid-state nanocomponents. Self-assembly - where components spontaneously organize themselves - can be carried out on a massively parallel scale to construct large-scale architectures using solid-state nanocrystal building blocks. I will present our recent work on the synthesis and self-assembly of nanocrystals for plasmonics, where light is propagated, manipulated, and confined by solid-state components that are smaller than the wavelength of light itself. We show the organization of polymer-grafted metal nanocrystals into hierarchical nanojunction arrays that possess intense ``hot spots'' due to electromagnetic field localization. We also show that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can serve as a new class of plasmonic building blocks, where shape and carrier density can be actively tuned to engineer plasmon resonances. These examples demonstrate that nanocrystals possess unique electromagnetic properties that rival top-down structures, and the potential of self-assembly for fabricating designer plasmonic materials.

  15. Self-assembled biomimetic nanoreactors I: Polymeric template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTaggart, Matt; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile; Jugroot, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The variety of nanoarchitectures made feasible by the self-assembly of alternating copolymers opens new avenues for biomimicry. Indeed, self-assembled structures allow the development of nanoreactors which combine the efficiency of high surface area metal active centres to the effect of confinement due to the very small cavities generated by the self-assembly process. A novel self-assembly of high molecular weight alternating copolymers is characterized in the present study. The self-assembly is shown to organize into nanosheets, providing a 2 nm hydrophobic cavity with a 1D confinement.

  16. Bacterial expression of self-assembling peptide hydrogelators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonmez, Cem

    For tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications, various architectures are explored to serve as biomaterial tools. Via de novo design, functional peptide hydrogel materials have been developed as scaffolds for biomedical applications. The objective of this study is to investigate bacterial expression as an alternative method to chemical synthesis for the recombinant production of self-assembling peptides that can form rigid hydrogels under physiological conditions. The Schneider and Pochan Labs have designed and characterized a 20 amino acid beta-hairpin forming amphiphilic peptide containing a D-residue in its turn region (MAX1). As a result, this peptide must be prepared chemically. Peptide engineering, using the sequence of MAX1 as a template, afforded a small family of peptides for expression (EX peptides) that have different turn sequences consisting of natural amino acids and amenable to bacterial expression. Each sequence was initially chemically synthesized to quickly assess the material properties of its corresponding gel. One model peptide EX1, was chosen to start the bacterial expression studies. DNA constructs facilitating the expression of EX1 were designed in such that the peptide could be expressed with different fusion partners and subsequently cleaved by enzymatic or chemical means to afford the free peptide. Optimization studies were performed to increase the yield of pure peptide that ultimately allowed 50 mg of pure peptide to be harvested from one liter of culture, providing an alternate means to produce this hydrogel-forming peptide. Recombinant production of other self-assembling hairpins with different turn sequences was also successful using this optimized protocol. The studies demonstrate that new beta-hairpin self-assembling peptides that are amenable to bacterial production and form rigid hydrogels at physiological conditions can be designed and produced by fermentation in good yield at significantly reduced cost when compared to

  17. Molecular Self-Assembly of Short Aromatic Peptides: From Biology to Nanotechnology and Material Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Ehud

    2013-03-01

    The formation of ordered amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several diseases of unrelated origin. In spite of grave clinical consequence, the mechanism of amyloid formation is not fully understood. We have suggested, based on experimental and bioinformatic analysis, that aromatic interactions may provide energetic contribution as well as order and directionality in the molecular-recognition and self-association processes that lead to the formation of these assemblies. This is in line with the well-known central role of aromatic-stacking interactions in self-assembly processes. Our works on the mechanism of aromatic peptide self-assembly, lead to the discovery that the diphenylalanine recognition motif self-assembles into peptide nanotubes with a remarkable persistence length. Other aromatic homodipeptides could self-assemble in nano-spheres, nano-plates, nano-fibrils and hydrogels with nano-scale order. We demonstrated that the peptide nanostructures have unique chemical, physical and mechanical properties including ultra-rigidity as aramides, semi-conductive, piezoelectric and non-linear optic properties. We also demonstrated the ability to use these peptide nanostructures as casting mold for the fabrication of metallic nano-wires and coaxial nano-cables. The application of the nanostructures was demonstrated in various fields including electrochemical biosensors, tissue engineering, and molecular imaging. Finally, we had developed ways for depositing of the peptide nanostructures and their organization. We had use inkjet technology as well as vapour deposition methods to coat surface and from the peptide ``nano-forests''. We recently demonstrated that even a single phenylalanine amino-acid can form well-ordered fibrilar assemblies.

  18. Self-assembly of intramolecular charge-transfer compounds into functional molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjun; Liu, Taifeng; Liu, Huibiao; Tian, Mao-Zhong; Li, Yuliang

    2014-04-15

    Highly polarized compounds exhibiting intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) are used widely as nonlinear optical (NLO) materials and red emitters and in organic light emitting diodes. Low-molecular-weight donor/acceptor (D/A)-substituted ICT compounds are ideal candidates for use as the building blocks of hierarchically structured, multifunctional self-assembled supramolecular systems. This Account describes our recent studies into the development of functional molecular systems with well-defined self-assembled structures based on charge-transfer (CT) interactions. From solution (sensors) to the solid state (assembled structures), we have fully utilized intrinsic and stimulus-induced CT interactions to construct these functional molecular systems. We have designed some organic molecules capable of ICT, with diversity and tailorability, that can be used to develop novel self-assembled materials. These ICT organic molecules are based on a variety of simple structures such as perylene bisimide, benzothiadiazole, tetracyanobutadiene, fluorenone, isoxazolone, BODIPY, and their derivatives. The degree of ICT is influenced by the nature of both the bridge and the substituents. We have developed new methods to synthesize ICT compounds through the introduction of heterocycles or heteroatoms to the π-conjugated systems or through extending the conjugation of diverse aromatic systems via another aromatic ring. Combining these ICT compounds featuring different D/A units and different degrees of conjugation with phase transfer methodologies and solvent-vapor techniques, we have self-assembled various organic nanostructures, including hollow nanospheres, wires, tubes, and ribbonlike architectures, with controllable morphologies and sizes. For example, we obtained a noncentrosymmetric microfiber structure that possessed a permanent dipole along its fibers' long axis and a transition dipole perpendicular to it; the independent NLO responses of this material can be separated and

  19. Self-assembly processes in the prebiotic environment

    PubMed Central

    Deamer, David; Singaram, Sara; Rajamani, Sudha; Kompanichenko, Vladimir; Guggenheim, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    An important question guiding research on the origin of life concerns the environmental conditions where molecular systems with the properties of life first appeared on the early Earth. An appropriate site would require liquid water, a source of organic compounds, a source of energy to drive polymerization reactions and a process by which the compounds were sufficiently concentrated to undergo physical and chemical interactions. One such site is a geothermal setting, in which organic compounds interact with mineral surfaces to promote self-assembly and polymerization reactions. Here, we report an initial study of two geothermal sites where mixtures of representative organic solutes (amino acids, nucleobases, a fatty acid and glycerol) and phosphate were mixed with high-temperature water in clay-lined pools. Most of the added organics and phosphate were removed from solution with half-times measured in minutes to a few hours. Analysis of the clay, primarily smectite and kaolin, showed that the organics were adsorbed to the mineral surfaces at the acidic pH of the pools, but could subsequently be released in basic solutions. These results help to constrain the range of possible environments for the origin of life. A site conducive to self-assembly of organic solutes would be an aqueous environment relatively low in ionic solutes, at an intermediate temperature range and neutral pH ranges, in which cyclic concentration of the solutes can occur by transient dry intervals. PMID:17008220

  20. Self-assembly of FKE8 peptides using CHARMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazzani, Abdelillah; Kara, Abdelkader; Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the molecular self-assembly of FKE8 peptides (with a sequence FKFEFKFE) using CHARMM. Previous studies^1,2 of the FKE8 peptides have shown helical ribbon structures during the formation of β-sheets. In order to understand this supra-molecular structure,first we investigate the stable configuration of two FKE8 molecules as a function of the orientation of the long axis of the molecules. We find that stable configuration of these two molecules (based on energy minimization) occurs when the long axes of the two molecules are orientated at an angle ˜51.5^0 with respect to each other. This angle may be relevant to understand the pitch of the helical structure. Next we study the self-assembly of several FKE8 molecules starting with an initial configuration where two successive FKE8 molecules are oriented at an angle ˜51.5^0 with respect to each other. ^1 W. Hwang, D. Marini, R. D. Kamm, and S. Zhang, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 389 (2003).^2 S. Vauthey, S. Santoso, H. Gong, N. Watson, and S. Zhang, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 5355 (2002).

  1. Self-assembled lipid bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Waggoner, Tina A.; Last, Julie A.

    2005-11-08

    The present invention is a self-assembling material comprised of stacks of lipid bilayers formed in a columnar structure, where the assembly process is mediated and regulated by chemical recognition events. The material, through the chemical recognition interactions, has a self-regulating system that corrects the radial size of the assembly creating a uniform diameter throughout most of the structure. The materials form and are stable in aqueous solution. These materials are useful as structural elements for the architecture of materials and components in nanotechnology, efficient light harvesting systems for optical sensing, chemical processing centers, and drug delivery vehicles.

  2. Ionically self-assembled monolayers (ISAMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, John

    2001-04-01

    Ionically self-assembled monolayers (ISAMs), fabricated by alternate adsorption of cationic and anionic components, yield exceptionally homogeneous thin films with sub-nanometer control of the thickness and relative special location of the component materials. Using organic electrochromic materials such as polyaniline, we report studies of electrochromic responses in ISAM films. Reversible changes in the absorption spectrum are observed with the application of voltages on the order of 1.0 V. Measurements are made using both liquid electrolytes and in all-solid state devices incorporating solid polyelectrolytes such as poly(2-acylamido 2-methyl propane sulfonic acid) (PAMPS).

  3. Conceptual, self-assembling graphene nanocontainers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothroyd, Simon; Anwar, Jamshed

    2015-07-01

    We show that graphene nano-sheets, when appropriately functionalised, can form self-assembling nanocontainers which may be opened or closed using a chemical trigger such as pH or polarity of solvent. Conceptual design rules are presented for different container structures, whose ability to form and encapsulate guest molecules is verified by molecular dynamics simulations. The structural simplicity of the graphene nanocontainers offers considerable scope for scaling the capacity, modulating the nature of the internal environment, and defining the trigger for encapsulation or release of the guest molecule(s). This design study will serve to provide additional impetus to developing synthetic approaches for selective functionalisation of graphene.

  4. Self-assembly of Random Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longyu; Raghupathi, Kishore; Song, Cunfeng; Prasad, Priyaa; Thayumanavan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of random copolymers has attracted considerable attention recently. In this feature article, we highlight the use of random copolymers to prepare nanostructures with different morphologies and to prepare nanomaterials that are responsive to single or multiple stimuli. The synthesis of single-chain nanoparticles and their potential applications from random copolymers are also discussed in some detail. We aim to draw more attention to these easily accessible copolymers, which are likely to play an important role in translational polymer research. PMID:25036552

  5. Self-assembly of colloidal surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegel, Willem

    2012-02-01

    We developed colloidal dumbbells with a rough and a smooth part, based on a method reported in Ref. [1]. Specific attraction between the smooth parts occurs upon addition of non-adsorbing polymers of appropriate size. We present the first results in terms of the assemblies that emerge in these systems. [4pt] [1] D.J. Kraft, W.S. Vlug, C.M. van Kats, A. van Blaaderen, A. Imhof and W.K. Kegel, Self-assembly of colloids with liquid protrusions, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 1182, (2009)

  6. Self-assembly of magnetic biofunctional nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xiangcheng; Thode, C.J.; Mabry, J.K.; Harrell, J.W.; Nikles, D.E.; Sun, K.; Wang, L.M.

    2005-05-15

    Spherical, ferromagnetic FePt nanoparticles with a particle size of 3 nm were prepared by the simultaneous polyol reduction of Fe(acac){sub 3} and Pt(acac){sub 2} in phenyl ether in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine. The oleic acid ligands can be replaced with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid, giving particles that can be dispersed in water. Both x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy indicated that FePt particles were not affected by ligands replacement. Dispersions of the FePt particles with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid ligands and ammonium counter ions gave self-assembled films consisting of highly ordered hexagonal arrays of particles.

  7. Self-assembly of information in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosvall, M.; Sneppen, K.

    2006-06-01

    We model self-assembly of information in networks to investigate necessary conditions for building a global perception of a system by local communication. Our approach is to let agents chat in a model system to self-organize distant communication pathways. We demonstrate that simple local rules allow agents to build a perception of the system, that is robust to dynamical changes and mistakes. We find that messages are most effectively forwarded in the presence of hubs, while transmission in hub-free networks is more robust against misinformation and failures.

  8. Coarse-grained simulation reveals key features of HIV-1 capsid self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, John M. A.; Dama, James F.; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Woodward, Cora L.; Jensen, Grant J.; Yeager, Mark; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-05-01

    The maturation of HIV-1 viral particles is essential for viral infectivity. During maturation, many copies of the capsid protein (CA) self-assemble into a capsid shell to enclose the viral RNA. The mechanistic details of the initiation and early stages of capsid assembly remain to be delineated. We present coarse-grained simulations of capsid assembly under various conditions, considering not only capsid lattice self-assembly but also the potential disassembly of capsid upon delivery to the cytoplasm of a target cell. The effects of CA concentration, molecular crowding, and the conformational variability of CA are described, with results indicating that capsid nucleation and growth is a multi-stage process requiring well-defined metastable intermediates. Generation of the mature capsid lattice is sensitive to local conditions, with relatively subtle changes in CA concentration and molecular crowding influencing self-assembly and the ensemble of structural morphologies.

  9. Terminal groups control self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers in solution.

    PubMed

    Grzelakowski, M; Kita-Tokarczyk, K

    2016-03-28

    The terminal groups of amphiphilic block copolymers are shown to control macromolecular self-assembly in aqueous solutions, in the micellar/lamellar region of the phase diagram. At the same concentration and using the same self-assembly conditions, dramatic differences are observed in polymer hydration and the resulting nano-/microstructure for two series of polymers with identical block chemistry and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). This suggests a strong contribution from end groups to the hydration as the initial step of the self-assembly process, and could be conveniently used to guide the particle morphology and size. Additionally, for polymers with those head groups which drive vesicular structures, differences in membrane organization affect their physical properties, such as permeability. PMID:26948963

  10. Coarse-grained simulation reveals key features of HIV-1 capsid self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Grime, John M A; Dama, James F; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Woodward, Cora L; Jensen, Grant J; Yeager, Mark; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    The maturation of HIV-1 viral particles is essential for viral infectivity. During maturation, many copies of the capsid protein (CA) self-assemble into a capsid shell to enclose the viral RNA. The mechanistic details of the initiation and early stages of capsid assembly remain to be delineated. We present coarse-grained simulations of capsid assembly under various conditions, considering not only capsid lattice self-assembly but also the potential disassembly of capsid upon delivery to the cytoplasm of a target cell. The effects of CA concentration, molecular crowding, and the conformational variability of CA are described, with results indicating that capsid nucleation and growth is a multi-stage process requiring well-defined metastable intermediates. Generation of the mature capsid lattice is sensitive to local conditions, with relatively subtle changes in CA concentration and molecular crowding influencing self-assembly and the ensemble of structural morphologies. PMID:27174390

  11. Coarse-grained simulation reveals key features of HIV-1 capsid self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Grime, John M. A.; Dama, James F.; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Woodward, Cora L.; Jensen, Grant J.; Yeager, Mark; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    The maturation of HIV-1 viral particles is essential for viral infectivity. During maturation, many copies of the capsid protein (CA) self-assemble into a capsid shell to enclose the viral RNA. The mechanistic details of the initiation and early stages of capsid assembly remain to be delineated. We present coarse-grained simulations of capsid assembly under various conditions, considering not only capsid lattice self-assembly but also the potential disassembly of capsid upon delivery to the cytoplasm of a target cell. The effects of CA concentration, molecular crowding, and the conformational variability of CA are described, with results indicating that capsid nucleation and growth is a multi-stage process requiring well-defined metastable intermediates. Generation of the mature capsid lattice is sensitive to local conditions, with relatively subtle changes in CA concentration and molecular crowding influencing self-assembly and the ensemble of structural morphologies. PMID:27174390

  12. Monte Carlo simulation study of self-assembly of nanoparticles on Cayley trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Conan; Schwen, Eric; Seredinski, Andrew; Kim, Vincent; Simpson, Brian; Banks, William; Cook, Jonathan; Mazilu, Dan; Mazilu, Irina

    2014-03-01

    We present analytical and computational results for a cooperative sequential model with evaporation on general Cayley trees. In particular, we focus on the time dependence of the particle density for a wide range of parameters, such as attachment and detachment rates, tree coordination number, initial and boundary conditions. The model proposed can be used for the modeling of drug encapsulation of nanoparticles using synthetic polymers known as dendrimers, and well as ionic self-assembly of nanoparticles to create optical coatings. Computational results for silica optical coatings using the Ionic Self-Assembled Monolayer (ISAM) technique were compared with experimental results.

  13. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ye, L; Pearson, T; Cordeau, Y; Mefford, O T; Crawford, T M

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufacturing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles. PMID:26975332

  14. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.; Crawford, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufac-turing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles.

  15. Self-Assembly of Gemini Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yethiraj, Arun; Mondal, Jagannath; Mahanthappa, Mahesh

    2013-03-01

    The self-assembly behavior of Gemini (dimeric or twin-tail) dicarboxylate disodium surfactants is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. This gemini architecture, in which two single tailed surfactants are joined through a flexible hydrophobic linker, has been shown to exhibit concentration-dependent aqueous self-assembly into lyotropic phases including hexagonal, gyroid, and lamellar morphologies. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally observed phases at similar amphiphile concentrations in water, including the unusual ability of these surfactants to form gyroid phases over unprecedentedly large amphiphile concentration windows. We demonstrate quanitative agreement between the predicted and experimentally observed domain spacings of these nanostructured materials. Through careful conformation analyses of the surfactant molecules, we show that the gyroid phase is electrostatically stabilized related to the lamellar phase. By starting with a lamellar phase, we show that decreasing the charge on the surfactant headgroups by carboxylate protonation or use of a bulkier tetramethyl ammonium counterion in place of sodium drives the formation of a gyroid phase.

  16. Self-assembled Nanofibrils for Immunomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan

    This thesis has been mainly focused on applying self-assembled nanofibrils as unique depots for controlled release to modulate immune system, with two major chapters on modulation of innate immunity in chapter 2 and adaptive immunity in chapter 3, respectively. There are 5 chapters in the thesis. Chapter 1 gives a detailed review on the discovery, synthesis and application of self-assembled nanofibrils of therapeutic agents (termed as "self-delivery drugs"), including bioactive molecules; Chapter 2 demonstrates the supramolecular hydrogel of chemotactic peptides as a prolonged inflammation model through proper molecular engineering; Chapter 3 reports a suppressive antibody response achieved by encapsulation of antigens by supramolecular hydrogel of glycopeptide; Chapter 4 illustrates an example of supramolecular hydrogel formation of molecules with extremely low solubility, based on the fact that many small organic drugs have poor solubility. Chapter 5 used beta-galatosidase as a model to study glycosidase-instructed supramolecular hydrogel formation, with potential to target cancer cells due to their distinct metabolic profile.

  17. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.; Crawford, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufac-turing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles. PMID:26975332

  18. Chiral self-assembly of helical particles.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Hima Bindu; Cinacchi, Giorgio; Ferrarini, Alberta; Giacometti, Achille

    2016-04-12

    The shape of the building blocks plays a crucial role in directing self-assembly towards desired architectures. Out of the many different shapes, the helix has a unique position. Helical structures are ubiquitous in nature and a helical shape is exhibited by the most important biopolymers like polynucleotides, polypeptides and polysaccharides as well as by cellular organelles like flagella. Helical particles can self-assemble into chiral superstructures, which may have a variety of applications, e.g. as photonic (meta)materials. However, a clear and definite understanding of these structures has not been entirely achieved yet. We have recently undertaken an extensive investigation on the phase behaviour of hard helical particles, using numerical simulations and classical density functional theory. Here we present a detailed study of the phase diagram of hard helices as a function of their morphology. This includes a variety of liquid-crystal phases, with different degrees of orientational and positional ordering. We show how, by tuning the helix parameters, it is possible to control the organization of the system. Starting from slender helices, whose phase behaviour is similar to that of rodlike particles, an increase in curliness leads to the onset of azimuthal correlations between the particles and the formation of phases specific to helices. These phases feature a new kind of screw order, of which there is experimental evidence in colloidal suspensions of helical flagella. PMID:26767786

  19. Transmetalation of self-assembled, supramolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Matthew E; Collins, Mary S; Johnson, Darren W

    2014-03-21

    Substituting one metal for another in inorganic and organometallic systems is a proven strategy for synthesizing complex molecules, and in some cases, provides the only route to a particular system. The multivalent nature of the coordination in metal-ligand assemblies lends itself more readily to some types of transmetalation. For instance, a binding site can open up for exchange without greatly effecting the many other interactions holding the structure together. In addition to exchanging the metal and altering the local binding environment, transmetalation in supramolecular systems can also lead to substantial changes in the nature of the secondary and tertiary structure of a larger assembly. In this tutorial review we will cover discrete supramolecular assemblies in which metals are exchanged. First we will address fully formed structures where direct substitution replaces one type of metal for another without changing the overall supramolecular assembly. We will then address systems where the disruptive exchange of one metal for another leads to a larger change in the supramolecular assembly. When possible we have tried to highlight systems that use supramolecular self-assembly in tandem with transmetalation to synthesize new structures not accessible through a more direct approach. At the end of this review, we highlight the use of transmetalation in self-assembled aqueous inorganic clusters and discuss the consequences for material science applications. PMID:24346298

  20. Self-assembled virus-membrane complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lihua; Liang, Hongjun; Angelini, Thomas; Butler, John; Coridan, Robert; Tang, Jay; Wong, Gerard

    2010-11-16

    Anionic polyelectrolytes and cationic lipid membranes can self-assemble into lamellar structures ranging from alternating layers of membranes and polyelectrolytes to 'missing layer' superlattice structures. We show that these structural differences can be understood in terms of the surface-charge-density mismatch between the polyelectrolyte and membrane components by examining complexes between cationic membranes and highly charged M13 viruses, a system that allowed us to vary the polyelectrolyte diameter independently of the charge density. Such virus-membrane complexes have pore sizes that are about ten times larger in area than DNA-membrane complexes, and can be used to package and organize large functional molecules; correlated arrays of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} macroionic dyes have been directly observed within the virus-membrane complexes using an electron-density reconstruction. These observations elucidate fundamental design rules for rational control of self-assembled polyelectrolyte-membrane structures, which have applications ranging from non-viral gene therapy to biomolecular templates for nanofabrication.

  1. Quantifying quality in DNA self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Wachauf, Christian H.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2014-04-01

    Molecular self-assembly with DNA is an attractive route for building nanoscale devices. The development of sophisticated and precise objects with this technique requires detailed experimental feedback on the structure and composition of assembled objects. Here we report a sensitive assay for the quality of assembly. The method relies on measuring the content of unpaired DNA bases in self-assembled DNA objects using a fluorescent de-Bruijn probe for three-base ‘codons’, which enables a comparison with the designed content of unpaired DNA. We use the assay to measure the quality of assembly of several multilayer DNA origami objects and illustrate the use of the assay for the rational refinement of assembly protocols. Our data suggests that large and complex objects like multilayer DNA origami can be made with high strand integration quality up to 99%. Beyond DNA nanotechnology, we speculate that the ability to discriminate unpaired from paired nucleic acids in the same macromolecule may also be useful for analysing cellular nucleic acids.

  2. Directed Self-Assembly: Expectations and Achievements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been a revolutionary thrust in recent years of development of science and technology for its broad appeal for employing a novel idea for relevant technological applications in particular and for mass-scale production and marketing as common man commodity in general. An interesting aspect of this emergent technology is that it involves scientific research community and relevant industries alike. Top–down and bottom–up approaches are two broad division of production of nanoscale materials in general. However, both the approaches have their own limits as far as large-scale production and cost involved are concerned. Therefore, novel new techniques are desired to be developed to optimize production and cost. Directed self-assembly seems to be a promising technique in this regard; which can work as a bridge between the top–down and bottom–up approaches. This article reviews how directed self-assembly as a technique has grown up and outlines its future prospects. PMID:20730077

  3. Self-Assemblies of novel molecules, VECAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bijay; Kim, Hye-Young; Lee, Soojin; Novak, Brian; Moldovan, Dorel

    2015-03-01

    VECAR is a newly synthesized molecule, which is an amphiphilic antioxidant molecule that consists of two molecular groups, vitamin-E and Carnosine, linked by a hydrocarbon chain. The hydrocarbon chain is hydrophobic and both vitamin-E and Carnosine ends are hydrophilic. In the synthesis process, the length of the hydrophobic chain of VECAR molecules can vary from the shortest (n =0) to the longest (n =18), where n indicates the number of carbon atoms in the chain. We conducted MD simulation studies of self-assembly of VECAR molecules in water using GROMACS on LONI HPC resources. Our study shows that there is a strong correlation between the shape and atomistic structure of the self-assembled nano-structures (SANs) and the chain-length (n) of VECAR molecules. We will report the results of data analyses including the atomistic structure of each SANs and the dynamic and energetic mechanisms of their formation as function of time. In summary, both VECAR molecules of chain-length n =18 and 9 form worm-like micelles, which may be used as a drug delivery system. This research is supported by the Louisiana Board of Regents-RCS Grant (LEQSF(2012-15)-RD-A-19).

  4. Terminal groups control self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzelakowski, M.; Kita-Tokarczyk, K.

    2016-03-01

    The terminal groups of amphiphilic block copolymers are shown to control macromolecular self-assembly in aqueous solutions, in the micellar/lamellar region of the phase diagram. At the same concentration and using the same self-assembly conditions, dramatic differences are observed in polymer hydration and the resulting nano-/microstructure for two series of polymers with identical block chemistry and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). This suggests a strong contribution from end groups to the hydration as the initial step of the self-assembly process, and could be conveniently used to guide the particle morphology and size. Additionally, for polymers with those head groups which drive vesicular structures, differences in membrane organization affect their physical properties, such as permeability.The terminal groups of amphiphilic block copolymers are shown to control macromolecular self-assembly in aqueous solutions, in the micellar/lamellar region of the phase diagram. At the same concentration and using the same self-assembly conditions, dramatic differences are observed in polymer hydration and the resulting nano-/microstructure for two series of polymers with identical block chemistry and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). This suggests a strong contribution from end groups to the hydration as the initial step of the self-assembly process, and could be conveniently used to guide the particle morphology and size. Additionally, for polymers with those head groups which drive vesicular structures, differences in membrane organization affect their physical properties, such as permeability. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1: Particle diameters for hydrated NH2-ABA-NH2 polymers with different degrees of functionalization; Fig. S2: TEM characterization of compound micelles from BA-OH polymer after extrusion; Fig. S3: Cryo-TEM and stopped flow characterization of lipid vesicles; Fig. S4 and S5: NMR spectra for ABA and BA polymers

  5. Self-assembled software and method of overriding software execution

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    2013-01-08

    A computer-implemented software self-assembled system and method for providing an external override and monitoring capability to dynamically self-assembling software containing machines that self-assemble execution sequences and data structures. The method provides an external override machine that can be introduced into a system of self-assembling machines while the machines are executing such that the functionality of the executing software can be changed or paused without stopping the code execution and modifying the existing code. Additionally, a monitoring machine can be introduced without stopping code execution that can monitor specified code execution functions by designated machines and communicate the status to an output device.

  6. Ionic self-assembly for functional hierarchical nanostructured materials.

    PubMed

    Faul, Charl F J

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: The challenge of constructing soft functional materials over multiple length scales can be addressed by a number of different routes based on the principles of self-assembly, with the judicious use of various noncovalent interactions providing the tools to control such self-assembly processes. It is within the context of this challenge that we have extensively explored the use of an important approach for materials construction over the past decade: exploiting electrostatic interactions in our ionic self-assembly (ISA) method. In this approach, cooperative assembly of carefully chosen charged surfactants and oppositely charged building blocks (or tectons) provides a facile noncovalent route for the rational design and production of functional nanostructured materials. Generally, our research efforts have developed with an initial focus on establishing rules for the construction of novel noncovalent liquid-crystalline (LC) materials. We found that the use of double-tailed surfactant species (especially branched double-tailed surfactants) led to the facile formation of thermotropic (and, in certain cases, lyotropic) phases, as demonstrated by extensive temperature-dependent X-ray and light microscopy investigations. From this core area of activity, research expanded to cover issues beyond simple construction of anisotropic materials, turning to the challenge of inclusion and exploitation of switchable functionality. The use of photoactive azobenzene-containing ISA materials afforded opportunities to exploit both photo-orientation and surface relief grating formation. The preparation of these anisotropic LC materials was of interest, as the aim was the facile production of disposable and low-cost optical components for display applications and data storage. However, the prohibitive cost of the photo-orientation processes hampered further exploitation of these materials. We also expanded our activities to explore ISA of biologically relevant tectons

  7. Anisotropic nanocolloids: self-assembly, interfacial adsorption, and electrostatic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, J.

    2012-06-01

    we obtained a fascinating richness in crystal structures. For the octahedron we determined the equation of state and we obtained a liquid, a (metastable) body-centred-cubic rotator phase, and a crystal phase. (3.) - Octapod hierarchical self-assembly. We analysed the recently observed hierarchical self-assembly of octapod-shaped nanocrystals (octapods) into three-dimensional (3D) superstructures. We constructed an empirical simulation model capable of reproducing the initial chain-formation step of the self-assembly. The van-der-Waals (vdW) interactions between octapods suspended in an (a)polar medium were obtained by means of a Hamaker-de-Boer-type integration and the nature of these interactions allowed us to justify elements of our empirical model. We used the theoretical vdW calculation, together with the experimental and simulation results, to formulate a mechanism which explained the observed self-assembly in terms of the solvent-dependence and directionality of the octapod-octapod interactions. (4.) - Ionic screening of charged Janus particles. We studied the screening of charged Janus particles in an electrolyte by primitive-model Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a wide variety of parameters. We also introduced a method to compare these results to the predictions of nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. The comparison of MC and PB results allowed us to probe the range of validity of the PB approximation. This range of validity corresponds well to the range that was predicted by field-theoretical studies of homogeneously charged flat surfaces.

  8. Magnetic self-assembly of small parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetye, Sheetal B.

    Modern society's propensity for miniaturized end-user products is compelling electronic manufacturers to assemble and package different micro-scale, multi-technology components in more efficient and cost-effective manners. As the size of the components gets smaller, issues such as part sticking and alignment precision create challenges that slow the throughput of conventional robotic pick-n-place systems. As an alternative, various self-assembly approaches have been proposed to manipulate micro to millimeter scale components in a parallel fashion without human or robotic intervention. In this dissertation, magnetic self-assembly (MSA) is demonstrated as a highly efficient, completely parallel process for assembly of millimeter scale components. MSA is achieved by integrating permanent micromagnets onto component bonding surfaces using wafer-level microfabrication processes. Embedded bonded powder methods are used for fabrication of the magnets. The magnets are then magnetized using pulse magnetization methods, and the wafers are then singulated to form individual components. When the components are randomly mixed together, self-assembly occurs when the intermagnetic forces overcome the mixing forces. Analytical and finite element methods (FEM) are used to study the force interactions between the micromagnets. The multifunctional aspects of MSA are presented through demonstration of part-to-part and part-to-substrate assembly of 1 mm x 1mm x 0.5 mm silicon components. Part-to-part assembly is demonstrated by batch assembly of free-floating parts in a liquid environment with the assembly yield of different magnetic patterns varying from 88% to 90% in 20 s. Part-to-substrate assembly is demonstrated by assembling an ordered array onto a fixed substrate in a dry environment with the assembly yield varying from 86% to 99%. In both cases, diverse magnetic shapes/patterns are used to control the alignment and angular orientation of the components. A mathematical model is

  9. Influence of self-assembly regenerated silk fibroin nanofibers on the properties of electrospun materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huijing; Ren, Xia; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, self-assembly regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) nanofibers were prepared and observed by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Then RSF films containing nanospheres and nanofibers were prepared and dissolved with poly (L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) with a blending ratio of 30/70 in hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP). In order to determine whether different nanostructures in the solution influence the morphological, structural, and mechanical properties of the final electrospun materials, flat membranes were prepared and characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), and mechanical testing. The secondary structure of as-spun materials with RSF nanofibers were not changed, however, the diameter of electrospun fibers decreased and tensile strength and elongation at breaks increased. Electrospun materials with RSF nanofibers have the potential to be used for skin, cartilage, and blood vessels because of their biocompatibility and improved mechanical properties. PMID:26406088

  10. Plasmonically Enhanced Second-Harmonic Generation from Metallic/Organic Hybrid Self-Assembled Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Durak, Cemil; Heflin, Randy; Robinson, Hans

    2007-03-01

    We have fabricated a new class of second order nonlinear optical materials by combining ionic self-assembled multilayer (ISAM) films with silver nanoparticle arrays in a non-centrosymmetric geometry. These hybrid films exhibit second-harmonic generation (SHG) efficiencies as much as 1600 times larger than unmodified, conventional ISAM films, which makes a three bilayer hybrid film perform at the same level as a micron thick, 700-1000 bilayer film. This was accomplished by using nanosphere lithography to deposit silver nanoparticles on the ISAM film, tuning the geometry of the particles to make their plasmonic resonances overlap the frequency of optical excitation. Even though the enhancement is already large, we suggest that further refinements of the techniques are expected to lead to additional enhancements of similar or larger magnitude.

  11. Plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation from ionic self-assembled multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Durak, Cemil; Heflin, J R; Robinson, Hans D

    2007-02-01

    We have demonstrated large enhancements of the effective second-order nonlinear susceptibility (chi(2)) of ionic self-assembled multilayer (ISAM) films, causing a film with just 3 bilayers to be optically equivalent to a 700-1000 bilayer film. This was accomplished by using nanosphere lithography to deposit silver nanoparticles on the ISAM film, tuning the geometry of the particles to make their plasmonic resonances overlap the frequency of optical excitation. An enhancement in the efficiency of second harmonic generation (SHG) by as much as 1600 times was observed. Even though this is already a large value, we suggest that further refinements of the techniques are expected to lead to additional enhancements of similar or larger magnitude. PMID:17297986

  12. An insight into polymerization-induced self-assembly by dissipative particle dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Lv, Yisheng; Wang, Liquan; Xu, Pengxiang; Lin, Jiaping; Lin, Shaoliang

    2016-08-14

    Polymerization-induced self-assembly is a one-pot route to produce concentrated dispersions of block copolymer nano-objects. Herein, dissipative particle dynamics simulations with a reaction model were employed to investigate the behaviors of polymerization-induced self-assembly. The polymerization kinetics in the polymerization-induced self-assembly were analyzed by comparing with solution polymerization. It was found that the polymerization rate enhances in the initial stage and decreases in the later stage. In addition, the effects of polymerization rate, length of macromolecular initiators, and concentration on the aggregate morphologies and formation pathway were studied. The polymerization rate and the length of the macromolecular initiators are found to have a marked influence on the pathway of the aggregate formations and the final structures. Morphology diagrams were mapped correspondingly. A comparison between simulation results and experimental findings is also made and an agreement is shown. This work can enrich our knowledge about polymerization-induced self-assembly. PMID:27414465

  13. Self-assembled polyoxometalates nanoparticles as pickering emulsion stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Loïc; Mouret, Adrien; Renaudineau, Séverine; Schmitt, Véronique; Proust, Anna; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique

    2015-05-21

    We easily produced a series of polyoxometalate (POM) nanoparticles by taking benefit from electrostatic attractions between various POMs and alkylammonium cations. These self-assembled supramolecular nanoparticles are fully characterized in terms of shape, nanostructure, and physicochemical properties. The nanoparticle differences are discussed on the basis of the chemical composition of the initial POM. Moreover, such particles have the ability to stabilize water-in-oil Pickering emulsions. Using a gel-trapping technique coupled to atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations, we determined their affinity toward oil by the contact angle of adsorbed nanoparticles. We show that the emulsion droplet size and stability can be directly linked to the nanoparticle hydrophobicity, which is tuned by the charge localization and molecular packing of POMs with the ammonium cations. Such particles are of special interest as they open large possibilities for Pickering interfacial catalysis. PMID:25937090

  14. Self-assembled magnetic surface swimmers.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.; Belkin, M.; Aranson, I. S.; Kwok, W.-K.; Materials Science Division; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2009-03-20

    We report studies of novel self-assembled magnetic surface swimmers (magnetic snakes) formed from a dispersion of magnetic microparticles at a liquid-air interface and energized by an alternating magnetic field. We show that under certain conditions the snakes spontaneously break the symmetry of surface flows and turn into self-propelled objects. Parameters of the driving magnetic field tune the propulsion velocity of these snakelike swimmers. We find that the symmetry of the surface flows can also be broken in a controlled fashion by attaching a large bead to a magnetic snake (bead-snake hybrid), transforming it into a self-locomoting entity. The observed phenomena have been successfully described by a phenomenological model based on the amplitude equation for surface waves coupled to a large-scale hydrodynamic mean flow equation.

  15. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, Donald J.; Rusckowski, Mary

    1996-01-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  16. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, Donald J.; Rusckowski, Mary

    1999-10-12

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  17. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, C.R.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, D.J.; Rusckowski, M.

    1996-10-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products. 5 figs.

  18. Capillary self-assembly of floating bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghwan; Thompson, Paul; Bush, John

    2007-11-01

    We study the self-assembly of bodies supported on the water surface by surface tension. Attractive and repulsive capillary forces exist between menisci of, respectively, the same and opposite signs. In nature, floating objects (e.g. mosquito larvae) thus interact through capillary forces to form coherent packings on the water surface. We here present the results of an experimental investigation of such capillary pattern formation. Thin elliptical metal sheets were designed to have variable shape, flexibility and mass distribution. On the water surface, mono-, bi-, or tri-polar menisci could thus be achieved. The influence of the form of the menisci on the packings arising from the interaction of multiple floaters is explored. Biological applications are discussed.

  19. Self-assembled magnetic surface swimmers.

    PubMed

    Snezhko, A; Belkin, M; Aranson, I S; Kwok, W-K

    2009-03-20

    We report studies of novel self-assembled magnetic surface swimmers (magnetic snakes) formed from a dispersion of magnetic microparticles at a liquid-air interface and energized by an alternating magnetic field. We show that under certain conditions the snakes spontaneously break the symmetry of surface flows and turn into self-propelled objects. Parameters of the driving magnetic field tune the propulsion velocity of these snakelike swimmers. We find that the symmetry of the surface flows can also be broken in a controlled fashion by attaching a large bead to a magnetic snake (bead-snake hybrid), transforming it into a self-locomoting entity. The observed phenomena have been successfully described by a phenomenological model based on the amplitude equation for surface waves coupled to a large-scale hydrodynamic mean flow equation. PMID:19392241

  20. Pseudotannins self-assembled into antioxidant complexes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H A; Drinnan, C T; Pleshko, N; Fisher, O Z

    2015-10-21

    Natural tannins are attractive as building blocks for biomaterials due to their antioxidant properties and ability to form interpolymer complexes (IPCs) with other macromolecules. One of the major challenges to tannin usage in biomedical applications is their instability at physiological conditions and a lack of control over the purity and reactivity. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of tannin-like polymers with controlled architecture, reactivity, and size. These pseudotannins were synthesized by substituting linear dextran chains with gallic, resorcylic, and protocatechuic pendant groups to mimic the structure of natural hydrolysable tannins. We demonstrate that these novel materials can self-assemble to form reductive and colloidally stable nanoscale and microscale particles. Specifically, the synthesis, turbidity, particle size, antioxidant power, and cell uptake of IPCs derived from pseudotannins and poly(ethylene glycol) was evaluated. PMID:26313262

  1. Self assembly properties of primitive organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    A central event in the origin of life was the self-assembly of amphiphilic, lipid-like compounds into closed microenvironments. If a primitive macromolecular replicating system could be encapsulated within a vesicular membrane, the components of the system would share the same microenvironment, and the result would be a step toward true cellular function. The goal of our research has been to determine what amphiphilic molecules might plausibly have been available on the early Earth to participate in the formation of such boundary structures. To this end, we have investigated primitive organic mixtures present in carbonaceous meteorites such as the Murchison meteorite, which contains 1-2 percent of its mass in the form of organic carbon compounds. It is likely that such compounds contributed to the inventory of organic carbon on the prebiotic earth, and were available to participate in chemical evolution leading to the emergence of the first cellular life forms. We found that Murchison components extracted into non-polar solvent systems are surface active, a clear indication of amphiphilic character. One acidic fraction self-assembles into vesicular membranes that provide permeability barriers to polar solutes. Other evidence indicates that the membranes are bimolecular layers similar to those formed by contemporary membrane lipids. We conclude that bilayer membrane formation by primitive amphiphiles on the early Earth is feasible. However, only a minor fraction of acidic amphiphiles assembles into bilayers, and the resulting membranes require narrowly defined conditions of pH and ionic composition to be stable. It seems unlikely, therefore, that meteoritic infall was a direct source of membrane amphiphiles. Instead, the hydrocarbon components and their derivatives more probably would provide an organic stock available for chemical evolution. Our current research is directed at possible reactions which would generate substantial quantities of membranogenic

  2. Switching modes in easy and hard axis magnetic reversal in a self-assembled antidot array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haering, Felix; Wiedwald, Ulf; Nothelfer, Steffen; Koslowski, Berndt; Ziemann, Paul; Lechner, Lorenz; Wallucks, Andreas; Lebecki, Kristof; Nowak, Ulrich; Gräfe, Joachim; Goering, Eberhard; Schütz, Gisela

    2013-11-01

    We study the reversal mechanisms in a self-assembled, hexagonally ordered Fe antidot array with a period of 200 nm and an antidot diameter of 100 nm which was prepared by polystyrene nanosphere lithography. Direction-dependent information in such a self-assembled sample is obtained by measuring the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) through constrictions processed by focused ion beam milling in nearest neighbor and next nearest neighbor directions. We show that such an originally integral method can be used to investigate the strong in-plane anisotropy introduced by the antidot lattice. The easy and hard axis reversal mechanisms and corresponding AMR signals are modeled by micromagnetic simulations. Additional in-field magnetic force microscopy studies allow the correlation of microscopic switching to features in the integral AMR. We find that the easy axis of magnetization is connected to a distinct periodic magnetic domain pattern, which can be observed during the whole magnetization reversal. While this process is driven by nucleation and propagation of reversed domains, the hard axis reversal is characterized by a (stepwise) rotation of the magnetization via the antidot lattice’ easy axes.

  3. Microwave assisted synthesis of amorphous magnesium phosphate nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium phosphate (MgP) materials have been investigated in recent years for tissue engineering applications, attributed to their biocompatibility and biodegradability. This paper describes a novel microwave assisted approach to produce amorphous magnesium phosphate (AMP) in a nanospherical form from an aqueous solution containing Mg(2+) and HPO(4) (2-)/PO(4) (3-). Some synthesis parameters such as pH, Mg/P ratio, solution composition were studied and the mechanism of AMP precursors was also demonstrated. The as-produced AMP nanospheres were characterized and tested in vitro. The results proved these AMP nanospheres can self-assemble into mature MgP materials and support cell proliferation. It is expected such AMP has potential in biomedical applications. PMID:22890518

  4. Self-assembled levan nanoparticles for targeted breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Jung; Bae, Pan Kee; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    We report on the targeted imaging of breast cancer using self-assembled levan nanoparticles. Indocyanine green (ICG) was encapsulated in levan nanoparticles via self-assembly. Levan-ICG nanoparticles were found to be successfully accumulated in breast cancer via specific interaction between fructose moieties in levan and overexpressed glucose transporter 5 in breast cancer cells. PMID:25383444

  5. Preparation and characterization of self-assembled monolayers and mesoscale protein patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noomuna, Panae

    Bottom-up approach was used to develop self-assembled monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and undecenyltrichlorosilane(UTS) on Si(100) wafer. Undecenyltrichlorosilane monolayer was oxidized at the vinyl terminal to generate a carboxylic acid group. Lysozyme protein was immobilized on the polar carboxylic acid group. The developed protein patterns were investigated using fluorescence microscopy. Lysozyme has an isoelectronic point of 11.35. At a pH below this value the protein is positively charged making it a good candidate for electrostatic adsorption on the negatively charge -COO- group. Fluorescence images confirm formation of lysozyme across the silicon wafer. The patterned Si(100) wafer can be used as a biosensor against lysozyme antibodies. Another approach to develop varied surface properties was used to grow OTS on oxidized UTSox via chemical phase deposition (CVD). In this case we used polystyrene and silicon nanospheres as masking agents on the already developed and oxidized UTS. Fluorescence images revealed that OTS layers were formed on the interstitial spaces of the nanosphere masks. Varied protein can be immobilized on this surface due to different terminal groups on the surface.

  6. Designed self-assembly of molecular necklaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Min; Kim, Soo-Young; Heo, Jungseok; Whang, Dongmok; Sakamoto, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Kim, Kimoon

    2002-03-13

    This paper reports an efficient strategy to synthesize molecular necklaces, in which a number of small rings are threaded onto a large ring, utilizing the principles of self-assembly and coordination chemistry. Our strategy involves (1) threading a molecular "bead" with a short "string" to make a pseudorotaxane and then (2) linking the pseudorotaxanes with a metal complex with two cis labile ligands acting as an "angle connector" to form a cyclic product (molecular necklace). A 4- or 3-pyridylmethyl group is attached to each end of 1,4-diaminobutane or 1,5-diaminopentane to produce the short "strings" (C4N4(2+), C4N3(2+), C5N4(2+), and C5N3(2+)), which then react with a cucurbituril (CB) "bead" to form stable pseudorotaxanes (PR44(2+), PR43(2+), PR54(2+), and PR53(2+), respectively). The reaction of the pseudorotaxanes with Pt(en)(NO(3))(2) (en = ethylenediamine) produces a molecular necklace [4]MN, in which three molecular "beads" are threaded on a triangular framework, and/or a molecular necklace [5]MN, in which four molecular "beads" are threaded on a square framework. Under refluxing conditions, the reaction with PR44(2+) or PR54(2+) yields exclusively [4]MN (MN44T or MN54T, respectively), whereas that with PR43(2+) or PR53(2+) produces exclusively [5]MN (MN43S or MN53S, respectively). The products have been characterized by various methods including X-ray crystallography. At lower temperatures, on the other hand, the reaction with PR44(2+) or PR54(2+) affords both [4]MN and [5]MN. The supermolecules reported here are the first series of molecular necklaces obtained as thermodynamic products. The overall structures of the molecular necklaces are strongly influenced by the structures of pseudorotaxane building blocks, which is discussed in detail on the basis of the X-ray crystal structures. The temperature dependence of the product distribution observed in this self-assembly process is also discussed. PMID:11878967

  7. Solvent mediated self-assembly of solids

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, J.; Wilson, W.D.; Palmore, T.

    1997-12-12

    Solvent-mediated crystallization represents a robust approach to self-assembly of nanostructures and microstructures. In organic systems, the relative ease with which the structure of hydrogen- bonded molecules can be manipulated allows for generation of a wide variety of nanoscale crystal structures. In living organisms, control over the micron-to-millimeter form of inorganic crystals is achieved through introduction of bio-organic molecules. The purpose of this proposal is to understand the interplay between solution chemistry, molecular structure, surface chemistry, and the processes of nucleation and crystal growth in solvent-mediated systems, with the goal of developing the atomic and molecular basis of a solvent-mediated self-assembly technology. We will achieve this purpose by: (1) utilizing an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach that provides in situ, real time imaging during growth from solutions, (2) by modifying kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) models to include solution-surface kinetics, (3) by introducing quantum chemistry (QC) calculations of the potentials of the relevant chemical species and the near-surface structure of the solution, and (4) by utilizing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to identify the minimum energy pathways to the solid state. Our work will focus on two systems chosen to address both the manometer and micron-to-millimeter length scales of assembly, the family of 2,5- diketopiperazines (X-DKPs) and the system of CaCO{sub 3} with amino acids. Using AFM, we will record the evolution of surface morphology, critical lengths, step speeds, and step-step interactions as a function of supersaturation and temperature. In the case of the X-DKPs, these measurements will be repeated as the molecular structure of the growth unit is varied. In the case of CaCO{sub 3}, they will be performed as a function of solution chemistry including pH, ionic strength, and amino acid content. In addition, we will measure nucleation rates and orientations of

  8. Processing-Dependent Self-Assembly of Protein-Polymer Diblock Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. S.; Xu, L.; Olsen, B. D.

    2012-02-01

    Self-assembly of globular protein-polymer diblock copolymers is a novel method for nanopatterning protein-based materials which maintains a high fraction of protein activity as well as the folded protein structure. By subjecting these copolymers to different processing conditions, long range ordering and the fraction of active protein can be controlled. Here, self-assembly of model mCherry-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM) block copolymers is induced by water evaporation from dilute aqueous solutions of conjugate material, and followed by solvent annealing of the resulting nanostructures. Different pathways towards self-assembly are accessed by orthogonally manipulating the solvent quality for each block of the copolymer using temperature and pH. Small-angle scattering and transmission electron microscopy show nanostructure depends heavily on PNIPAM coil fraction and solvent annealing condition, with solution self-assembly reflected in the solid state structure under certain conditions. Protein structure is unaffected by the processing pathway, while protein activity levels in the nanodomains depend strongly on processing conditions and can retain up to 80% of the initial activity.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of self-assembling water-soluble polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Hogen-Esch, T.E.; Amis, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The synthesis is proposed of water-soluble vinyl and other polymers capable of self-assembly through hydrophobic bonding of pendent fluorocarbon and other hydrophobic groups. The self-assembly process will be studied by viscometry and dynamic viscoelasticity, and by static and dynamic light scattering. These investigations are aimed at identifying the structural features of polymers that are important in enhancing the viscosity of aqueous polymer solutions at very low polymer concentrations (< 1,000 ppm). The authors also initiate small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements aimed at the determination of the size of the fluorocarbon-containing hydrophobic aggregates. They will be interested in the degree of self assembly as a function of the type and length of the hydrophobic groups and of the type and length of the flexible spacer group linking the hydrophobic to the polymer backbone. The nature of the hydrophilic chain will also be of interest. Thus, they investigate a number of hydrophilic comonomers such as acrylamide, N-vinylpyrrolidone and anionic or cationic vinyl monomers. Surface interactions of these interesting copolymers will be studied by adsorption onto appropriate modified latex spheres. Finally, they propose to explore the synthesis of water-soluble polymers capable of self assembly through interactions of pendent polyanions and polycations.

  10. Strip-Pattern-Spheres Self-Assembled from Polypeptide-Based Polymer Mixtures: Structure and Defect Features

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xingyu; Guan, Zhou; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    We found that poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PBLG-b-PEG) rod-coil block copolymers and polystyrene (PS) homopolymers can cooperatively self-assemble into nano-spheres with striped patterns on their surfaces (strip-pattern-spheres) in aqueous solution. With assistance of dissipative particle dynamics simulation, it is discovered that the PS homopolymers form a spherical template core and the PBLG-b-PEG block copolymers assemble into striped patterns on the spherical surface. The hydrophobic PBLG rods are packed orderly in the strips, while the hydrophilic PEG blocks stabilize the strip-pattern-spheres in solution. Defects such as dislocations and disclinations can be observed in the striped patterns. Self-assembling temperature and sphere radius are found to affect defect densities in the striped patterns. A possible mechanism is proposed to illustrate how PBLG-b-PEG and PS cooperatively self-assemble into hierarchical spheres with striped patterns on surfaces. PMID:27418116

  11. Strip-Pattern-Spheres Self-Assembled from Polypeptide-Based Polymer Mixtures: Structure and Defect Features.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingyu; Guan, Zhou; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    We found that poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PBLG-b-PEG) rod-coil block copolymers and polystyrene (PS) homopolymers can cooperatively self-assemble into nano-spheres with striped patterns on their surfaces (strip-pattern-spheres) in aqueous solution. With assistance of dissipative particle dynamics simulation, it is discovered that the PS homopolymers form a spherical template core and the PBLG-b-PEG block copolymers assemble into striped patterns on the spherical surface. The hydrophobic PBLG rods are packed orderly in the strips, while the hydrophilic PEG blocks stabilize the strip-pattern-spheres in solution. Defects such as dislocations and disclinations can be observed in the striped patterns. Self-assembling temperature and sphere radius are found to affect defect densities in the striped patterns. A possible mechanism is proposed to illustrate how PBLG-b-PEG and PS cooperatively self-assemble into hierarchical spheres with striped patterns on surfaces. PMID:27418116

  12. Self-assembled single-crystal silicon circuits on plastic

    PubMed Central

    Stauth, Sean A.; Parviz, Babak A.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of self-assembly for the integration of freestanding micrometer-scale components, including single-crystal, silicon field-effect transistors (FETs) and diffusion resistors, onto flexible plastic substrates. Preferential self-assembly of multiple microcomponent types onto a common platform is achieved through complementary shape recognition and aided by capillary, fluidic, and gravitational forces. We outline a microfabrication process that yields single-crystal, silicon FETs in a freestanding, powder-like collection for use with self-assembly. Demonstrations of self-assembled FETs on plastic include logic inverters and measured electron mobility of 592 cm2/V-s. Finally, we extend the self-assembly process to substrates each containing 10,000 binding sites and realize 97% self-assembly yield within 25 min for 100-μm-sized elements. High-yield self-assembly of micrometer-scale functional devices as outlined here provides a powerful approach for production of macroelectronic systems. PMID:16968780

  13. Functional Self-Assembled Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, A.; Wendorff, J. H.

    Electrospinning constitutes a unique technique for the production of nanofibers with diameters down to the range of a few nanometers. In strong contrast to conventional fiber producing techniques, it relies on self-assembly processes driven by the Coulomb interactions between charged elements of the fluids to be spun to nanofibers. The transition from a macroscopic fluid object such as a droplet emerging from a die to solid nanofibers is controlled by a set of complex physical instability processes. They give rise to extremely high extensional deformations and strain rates during fiber formation causing among others a high orientational order in the nanofibers as well as enhanced mechanical properties. Electrospinning is predominantly applied to polymer based materials including natural and synthetic polymers, but, more recently, its use has been extended towards the production of metal, ceramic and glass nanofibers exploiting precursor routes. The nanofibers can be functionalized during electrospinning by introducing pores, fractal surfaces, by incorporating functional elements such as catalysts, quantum dots, drugs, enzymes or even bacteria. The production of individual fibers, random nonwovens, or orientationally highly ordered nonwovens is achieved by an appropriate selection of electrode configurations. Broad areas of application exist in Material and Life Sciences for such nanofibers, including not only optoelectronics, sensorics, catalysis, textiles, high efficiency filters, fiber reinforcement but also tissue engineering, drug delivery, and wound healing. The basic electrospinning process has more recently been extended towards compound co-electrospinning and precision deposition electrospinning to further broaden accessible fiber architectures and potential areas of application.

  14. Self-assembled biomimetic superhydrophobic hierarchical arrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongta; Dou, Xuan; Fang, Yin; Jiang, Peng

    2013-09-01

    Here, we report a simple and inexpensive bottom-up technology for fabricating superhydrophobic coatings with hierarchical micro-/nano-structures, which are inspired by the binary periodic structure found on the superhydrophobic compound eyes of some insects (e.g., mosquitoes and moths). Binary colloidal arrays consisting of exemplary large (4 and 30 μm) and small (300 nm) silica spheres are first assembled by a scalable Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technology in a layer-by-layer manner. After surface modification with fluorosilanes, the self-assembled hierarchical particle arrays become superhydrophobic with an apparent water contact angle (CA) larger than 150°. The throughput of the resulting superhydrophobic coatings with hierarchical structures can be significantly improved by templating the binary periodic structures of the LB-assembled colloidal arrays into UV-curable fluoropolymers by a soft lithography approach. Superhydrophobic perfluoroether acrylate hierarchical arrays with large CAs and small CA hysteresis can be faithfully replicated onto various substrates. Both experiments and theoretical calculations based on the Cassie's dewetting model demonstrate the importance of the hierarchical structure in achieving the final superhydrophobic surface states. PMID:23786830

  15. Dissipative adaptation in driven self-assembly.

    PubMed

    England, Jeremy L

    2015-11-01

    In a collection of assembling particles that is allowed to reach thermal equilibrium, the energy of a given microscopic arrangement and the probability of observing the system in that arrangement obey a simple exponential relationship known as the Boltzmann distribution. Once the same thermally fluctuating particles are driven away from equilibrium by forces that do work on the system over time, however, it becomes significantly more challenging to relate the likelihood of a given outcome to familiar thermodynamic quantities. Nonetheless, it has long been appreciated that developing a sound and general understanding of the thermodynamics of such non-equilibrium scenarios could ultimately enable us to control and imitate the marvellous successes that living things achieve in driven self-assembly. Here, I suggest that such a theoretical understanding may at last be emerging, and trace its development from historic first steps to more recent discoveries. Focusing on these newer results, I propose that they imply a general thermodynamic mechanism for self-organization via dissipation of absorbed work that may be applicable in a broad class of driven many-body systems. PMID:26530021

  16. Polymer blends for directed self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namie, Yuuji; Anno, Yusuke; Naruoka, Takehiko; Minegishi, Shinya; Nagai, Tomoki; Hishiro, Yoshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshikazu

    2013-03-01

    The advantage of blend DSA (Directed Self Assembly) is milder anneal condition than PS-b-PMMA BCP DSA materials and availability of conventional instruments. In this paper, blend type DSA was applied for hole patterning. Target patterns were contact hole and oval hole. Polymer phase separation behavior has been studied from the point of χN. In the case of polymer blend, χN needs to be more than 2 to give phase separation. At first the effect of polymer size was studied. When the polymer weight was low, the shrunk hole was not clean because of low χN. Furthermore, the correlation of shrink amount and χN was studied. Higher χN polymer blend system gave higher shrink amount. High χN polymer systems give clear interface, then the intermixing area would be reduced, then the attached polymer blend part became larger. The polymer blend ratio effect was also investigated. The blend ratio was varied for polymer A/ polymer B=70/30-50/50. The shrink amount of oval hole was reduced with increasing the ratio of polymer B. However, the shrink amount ratio of CDY/CDX was almost constant (~3).

  17. Surfactant mediated polyelectrolyte self-assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Monojoy; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Pincus, Phillip A.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2015-11-25

    Self-assembly and dynamics of polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant complex (PES) is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The complexation is systematically studied for five different PE backbone charge densities. At a fixed surfactant concentration the PES complexation exhibits pearl-necklace to agglomerated double spherical structures with a PE chain decorating the surfactant micelles. The counterions do not condense on the complex, but are released in the medium with a random distribution. The relaxation dynamics for three different length scales, polymer chain, segmental and monomer, show distinct features of the charge and neutral species; the counterions are fastest followed by the PE chain and surfactants. The surfactant heads and tails have the slowest relaxation due to their restricted movement inside the agglomerated structure. At the shortest length scale, all the charge and neutral species show similar relaxation dynamics confirming Rouse behavior at monomer length scales. Overall, the present study highlights the structure-property relationship for polymer-surfactant complexation. These results will help improve the understanding of PES complex and should aid in the design of better materials for future applications.

  18. Surfactant mediated polyelectrolyte self-assembly

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Goswami, Monojoy; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Pincus, Phillip A.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2015-11-25

    Self-assembly and dynamics of polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant complex (PES) is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The complexation is systematically studied for five different PE backbone charge densities. At a fixed surfactant concentration the PES complexation exhibits pearl-necklace to agglomerated double spherical structures with a PE chain decorating the surfactant micelles. The counterions do not condense on the complex, but are released in the medium with a random distribution. The relaxation dynamics for three different length scales, polymer chain, segmental and monomer, show distinct features of the charge and neutral species; the counterions are fastest followed by the PE chain andmore » surfactants. The surfactant heads and tails have the slowest relaxation due to their restricted movement inside the agglomerated structure. At the shortest length scale, all the charge and neutral species show similar relaxation dynamics confirming Rouse behavior at monomer length scales. Overall, the present study highlights the structure-property relationship for polymer-surfactant complexation. These results will help improve the understanding of PES complex and should aid in the design of better materials for future applications.« less

  19. Self-Assembled Epitaxical Nanostructure Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhukar, Anupam

    2003-03-01

    The past decade has witnessed major strides in the realization of nanostructures with 3-dimensionally confined electronic states, dubbed quantum dots (QDs). Most notable classes are the solution grown colloidal nanocrystals, also called nanoparticles (NPs) and the strain-driven semiconductor epitaxical islands formed spontaneously beyond a critical deposition amount during growth of a film with a high lattice mismatch with the substrate. The latter, though spatially randomly positioned, by virtue of their epitaxical nature, are readily integrable in a variety of test and device structures. Consequently these have led the way in providing platforms for examining QD physics and QD based devices such as lasers, detectors, amplifiers, and transistors. The colloidal nanocrystals are in desperate need of being epitaxically integrated onto appropriate substrates and thus providing the platform for realizing more flexible and varied classes of quantum nanostructures for even wider range of applications. Epitaxy and spatially-selective self-assembly are thus two key features of wide classes of nanostructures essential for future advanced information sensing, processing, communication and computing technologies within the largely current paradigms of chip and system architectures. In this talk I will focus on some fundamental issues of epitaxical growth and ordering, structural and chemical template engineering approaches, and their implementation for realization of epitaxical QDs in regular 2D and 3D ultra-dense arrays.

  20. Self-assembly of smallest magnetic particles

    PubMed Central

    Mehdizadeh Taheri, Sara; Michaelis, Maria; Friedrich, Thomas; Förster, Beate; Drechsler, Markus; Römer, Florian M.; Bösecke, Peter; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Weber, Birgit; Rehberg, Ingo; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Förster, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of tiny magnetic particles in external magnetic fields is important for many applications ranging from data storage to medical technologies. The development of ever smaller magnetic structures is restricted by a size limit, where the particles are just barely magnetic. For such particles we report the discovery of a kind of solution assembly hitherto unobserved, to our knowledge. The fact that the assembly occurs in solution is very relevant for applications, where magnetic nanoparticles are either solution-processed or are used in liquid biological environments. Induced by an external magnetic field, nanocubes spontaneously assemble into 1D chains, 2D monolayer sheets, and large 3D cuboids with almost perfect internal ordering. The self-assembly of the nanocubes can be elucidated considering the dipole–dipole interaction of small superparamagnetic particles. Complex 3D geometrical arrangements of the nanodipoles are obtained under the assumption that the orientation of magnetization is freely adjustable within the superlattice and tends to minimize the binding energy. On that basis the magnetic moment of the cuboids can be explained. PMID:26554000

  1. Self-Assembly of Tetraphenylalanine Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mayans, Enric; Ballano, Gema; Casanovas, Jordi; Díaz, Angélica; Pérez-Madrigal, Maria M; Estrany, Francesc; Puiggalí, Jordi; Cativiela, Carlos; Alemán, Carlos

    2015-11-16

    Three different tetraphenylalanine (FFFF) based peptides that differ at the N- and C-termini have been synthesized by using standard procedures to study their ability to form different nanoassemblies under a variety of conditions. The FFFF peptide assembles into nanotubes that show more structural imperfections at the surface than those formed by the diphenylalanine (FF) peptide under the same conditions. Periodic DFT calculations (M06L functional) were used to propose a model that consists of three FFFF molecules defining a ring through head-to-tail NH3(+)⋅⋅⋅(-)OOC interactions, which in turn stack to produce deformed channels with internal diameters between 12 and 16 Å. Depending on the experimental conditions used for the peptide incubation, N-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) protected FFFF self-assembles into a variety of polymorphs: ultra-thin nanoplates, fibrils, and star-like submicrometric aggregates. DFT calculations indicate that Fmoc-FFFF prefers a parallel rather than an antiparallel β-sheet assembly. Finally, coexisting multiple assemblies (up to three) were observed for Fmoc-FFFF-OBzl (OBzl = benzyl ester), which incorporates aromatic protecting groups at the two peptide terminals. This unusual and noticeable feature is attributed to the fact that the assemblies obtained by combining the Fmoc and OBzl groups contained in the peptide are isoenergetic. PMID:26419936

  2. Dissipative adaptation in driven self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Jeremy L.

    2015-11-01

    In a collection of assembling particles that is allowed to reach thermal equilibrium, the energy of a given microscopic arrangement and the probability of observing the system in that arrangement obey a simple exponential relationship known as the Boltzmann distribution. Once the same thermally fluctuating particles are driven away from equilibrium by forces that do work on the system over time, however, it becomes significantly more challenging to relate the likelihood of a given outcome to familiar thermodynamic quantities. Nonetheless, it has long been appreciated that developing a sound and general understanding of the thermodynamics of such non-equilibrium scenarios could ultimately enable us to control and imitate the marvellous successes that living things achieve in driven self-assembly. Here, I suggest that such a theoretical understanding may at last be emerging, and trace its development from historic first steps to more recent discoveries. Focusing on these newer results, I propose that they imply a general thermodynamic mechanism for self-organization via dissipation of absorbed work that may be applicable in a broad class of driven many-body systems.

  3. Colloidosome like structures: self-assembly of silica microrods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Datskos, P.; Polizos, G.; Bhandari, M.; Cullen, D. A.; Sharma, J.

    2016-03-07

    Self-assembly of one-dimensional structures is attracting a great deal of interest because assembled structures can provide better properties compared to individual building blocks. We demonstrate silica microrod self-assembly by exploiting Pickering emulsion based strategy. Micron-sized silica rods were synthesized employing previously reported methods based on polyvinylpyrrolidone/ pentanol emulsion droplets. Moreover, rods self-assembled to make structures in the range of z10 40 mm. Smooth rods assembled better than segmented rods. Finally, the assembled structures were bonded by weak van der Waals forces.

  4. Examples of Molecular Self-Assembly at Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Whitelam, Stephen

    2015-10-14

    The self-assembly of molecules at surfaces can be caused by a range of physical mechanisms. Assembly can be driven by intermolecular forces, or molecule-surface forces, or both; it can result in structures that are in equilibrium or that are kinetically trapped. Here we review examples of self-assembly at surfaces focusing on a physical understanding of what causes patterns seen in experiment. Some apparently disparate systems can be described in similar physical terms, indicating that simple factors - such as the geometry and energy scale of intermolecular binding - are key to understanding the self-assembly of those systems. PMID:25873520

  5. Peptide-directed self-assembly of hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kopeček, Jindřich; Yang, Jiyuan

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the self-assembly of macromolecules mediated by the biorecognition of peptide/protein domains. Structures forming α-helices and β-sheets have been used to mediate self-assembly into hydrogels of peptides, reactive copolymers and peptide motifs, block copolymers, and graft copolymers. Structural factors governing the self-assembly of these molecules into precisely defined three-dimensional structures (hydrogels) are reviewed. The incorporation of peptide motifs into hybrid systems, composed of synthetic and natural macromolecules, enhances design opportunities for new biomaterials when compared to individual components. PMID:18952513

  6. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S.

    2011-09-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots.

  7. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.

    2011-09-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots

  8. Bio-inspired supramolecular self-assembly towards soft nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Yiyang; MAO, Chuanbin

    2011-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly has proven to be a reliable approach towards versatile nanomaterials based on multiple weak intermolecular forces. In this review, the development of bio-inspired supramolecular self-assembly into soft materials and their applications are summarized. Molecular systems used in bio-inspired “bottom-up self-assembly” involve small organic molecules, peptides or proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses. Self-assembled soft nanomaterials have been exploited in various applications such as inorganic nanomaterial synthesis, drug or gene delivery, tissue engineering, and so on. PMID:21980594

  9. Electron-driven self-assembly of salt nanocrystals in liquid helium.

    PubMed

    Daxner, Matthias; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M

    2014-12-01

    The self-assembly of salt nanocrystals from chemical reactions inside liquid helium is reported for the first time. Reaction is initiated by an electron impacting a helium nanodroplet containing sodium atoms and SF6 molecules, leading to preferential production of energetically favorable structures based on the unit cell of crystalline NaF. These favorable structures are observed as magic number ions (anomalously intense peaks) in mass spectra and are seen in both cationic and anionic channels in mass spectra, for example, (NaF)n Na(+) and (NaF)n F(-) . In the case of anions the self-assembly is not directly initiated by electrons: the dominant process involves resonant electron-induced production of metastable electronically excited He(-) anions, which then initiate anionic chemistry by electron transfer. PMID:25378098

  10. Shuttle-like supramolecular nanostructures formed by self-assembly of a porphyrin via an oil/water system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, in terms of the concentration of an aqueous solution of a surfactant, we investigate the self-assembly behavior of a porphyrin, 5, 10, 15, 20-tetra(4-pyridyl)-21H, 23H-porphine [H2TPyP], by using an oil/water system as the medium. We find that when a chloroform solution of H2TPyP is dropwise added into an aqueous solution of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide [CTAB] with a lower concentration, a large amount of irregular nanoarchitectures, together with a small amount of well-defined shuttle-like nanostructures, hollow nanospheres, and nanotubes, could be produced. While a moderate amount of shuttle-like nanostructures accompanied by a few irregular nanoarchitectures, solid nanospheres, and nanorods are produced when a CTAB aqueous solution in moderate concentration is employed, in contrast, a great quantity of shuttle-like nanostructures together with a negligible amount of solid nanospheres, nanofibers, and irregular nanostructures are manufactured when a high-concentration CTAB aqueous solution is involved. An explanation on the basis of the molecular geometry of H2TPyP and in terms of the intermolecular π-π interactions between H2TPyP units, and hydrophobic interactions between CTAB and H2TPyP has been proposed. The investigation gives deep insights into the self-assembly behavior of porphyrins in an oil/water system and provides important clues concerning the design of appropriate porphyrins when related subjects are addressed. Our investigation suggests that an oil/aqueous system might be an efficient medium for producing unique organic-based nanostructures. PMID:21943330

  11. Self assembly: An approach to terascale integration

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.

    1993-09-01

    Surely one of the most remarkable accomplishments of modern times has been the miniaturization of electronic components, starting with discrete transistors and leading to Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) Circuits which will soon contain almost 100 million components in a few square centimeters. It led to an information processing industry that fuels almost every aspect of industrial societies and that has brought manifold benefits to their citizens. Although continuation of the miniaturization process is likely to produce even greater benefits, many experts are concerned that extrapolation of traditional silicon VLSI techniques will meet with increasingly severe difficulties. Some of these are fundamental in nature, e. g., granularity and fluctuations in semiconductors and interconnects and proximity effects such as tunneling. The first major difficulty to be encountered will be a rising cost of products due to increased complexity and difficulty of manufacturing and assembly. Such difficulties are likely to be seen in about 10 years when minimum component sizes are expected to decrease below 0.15--0.2 {mu}m. If alternatives to present VLSI techniques are to be available when needed, work on them must start now. At Los Alamos, we are exploring the feasibility of ultrasmall wires and switches that self-assemble themselves into computing elements and circuits. Their operation is based on the quantum properties of nanometer scale molecular clusters. This paper will describe our efforts in the development of these components and will summarize our work in four areas: (1) the development of conducting molecular wires, (2) conducting nanoparticle wires and switches based on the Coulomb Blockade principle, (3) the development of advanced architectures that benefit from the use of such components and that significantly advance the art of high performance computing, and (4) the development of novel methods for attaining sub-Angstrom 3-D non-destructive imaging.

  12. Differentially photo-crosslinked polymers enable self-assembling microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Mustapha; Zarafshar, Aasiyeh M.; Gracias, David H.

    2012-01-01

    An important feature of naturally self-assembled systems such as leaves and tissues is that they are curved and have embedded fluidic channels that enable the transport of nutrients to, or removal of waste from, specific three-dimensional (3D) regions. Here, we report the self-assembly of photopatterned polymers, and consequently microfluidic devices, into curved geometries. We discovered that differentially photo-crosslinked SU-8 films spontaneously and reversibly curved upon film de-solvation and re-solvation. Photolithographic patterning of the SU-8 films enabled the self-assembly of cylinders, cubes, and bidirectionally folded sheets. We integrated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels with these SU-8 films to self-assemble curved microfluidic networks. PMID:22068594

  13. Activity-assisted self-assembly of colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Mallory, S A; Cacciuto, A

    2016-08-01

    We outline a basic strategy of how self-propulsion can be used to improve the yield of a typical colloidal self-assembly process. The success of this approach is predicated on the thoughtful design of the colloidal building block as well as how self-propulsion is endowed to the particle. As long as a set of criteria are satisfied, it is possible to significantly increase the rate of self-assembly, and greatly expand the window in parameter space where self-assembly can occur. In addition, we show that by tuning the relative on-off time of the self-propelling force it is possible to modulate the effective speed of the colloids allowing for further optimization of the self-assembly process. PMID:27627360

  14. Directed self-assembly of proteins into discrete radial patterns

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Garima; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Unlike physical patterning of materials at nanometer scale, manipulating soft matter such as biomolecules into patterns is still in its infancy. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with surface density gradient has the capability to drive biomolecules in specific directions to create hierarchical and discrete structures. Here, we report on a two-step process of self-assembly of the human serum albumin (HSA) protein into discrete ring structures based on density gradient of SAM. The methodology involves first creating a 2-dimensional (2D) polyethylene glycol (PEG) islands with responsive carboxyl functionalities. Incubation of proteins on such pre-patterned surfaces results in direct self-assembly of protein molecules around PEG islands. Immobilization and adsorption of protein on such structures over time evolve into the self-assembled patterns. PMID:23719678

  15. Urethane tetrathiafulvalene derivatives: synthesis, self-assembly and electrochemical properities

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiang; Lai, Guoqiao; Li, Zhifang; Ma, Yuwen; Yuan, Xiao; Shen, Yongjia

    2015-01-01

    Summary This paper reports the self-assembly of two new tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) derivatives that contain one or two urethane groups. The formation of nanoribbons was evidenced by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), which showed that the self-assembly ability of T 1 was better than that of T 2. The results revealed that more urethane groups in a molecule did not necessarily instigate self-assembly. UV–vis and FTIR spectra were measured to explore noncovalent interactions. The driving forces for self-assembly of TTF derivatives were mainly hydrogen bond interactions and π–π stacking interactions. The electronic conductivity of the T 1 and T 2 films was tested by a four-probe method. PMID:26734083

  16. Supramolecular chirality in self-assembled peptide amphiphile nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Garifullin, Ruslan; Guler, Mustafa O

    2015-08-11

    Induced supramolecular chirality was investigated in the self-assembled peptide amphiphile (PA) nanosystems. Having shown that peptide chirality can be transferred to the covalently-attached achiral pyrene moiety upon PA self-assembly, the chiral information is transferred to molecular pyrene via weak noncovalent interactions. In the first design of a supramolecular chiral system, the chromophore was covalently attached to a peptide sequence (VVAGH) via an ε-aminohexanoic acid spacer. Covalent attachment yielded a PA molecule self-assembling into nanofibers. In the second design, the chromophore was encapsulated within the hydrophobic core of self-assembled nanofibers of another PA consisting of the same peptide sequence attached to lauric acid. We observed that supramolecular chirality was induced in the chromophore by PA assembly into chiral nanostructures, whether it was covalently attached, or noncovalently bound. PMID:26146021

  17. Modeling the Kinetics of Open Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Timothée; Foret, Lionel; Castelnovo, Martin

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we explore theoretically the kinetics of molecular self-assembly in the presence of constant monomer flux as an input, and a maximal size. The proposed model is supposed to reproduce the dynamics of viral self-assembly for enveloped virus. It turns out that the kinetics of open self-assembly is rather quantitatively different from the kinetics of similar closed assembly. In particular, our results show that the convergence toward the stationary state is reached through assembly waves. Interestingly, we show that the production of complete clusters is much more efficient in the presence of a constant input flux, rather than providing all monomers at the beginning of the self-assembly. PMID:27295398

  18. Vortical superlattices in a gold nanorods' self-assembled monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yong; Liang, Yujia; Chen, Dongxue; Wu, Xiaochun; Dai, Luru; Liu, Qian

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the novel vortical self-assembly of CTAB-capped gold nanorods. Representative left-hand, radial, and right-hand vortices are shown. Micelles formed by CTAB molecules enhance the organized self-assembly process. The drag force of solvent flow and dynamic vortex flow in the thin solvent layer are thought to be responsible for the final vortical superlattices. FDTD simulation suggests these structures have potential applications in nanofocusing and polarized light response.

  19. Dynamic shear-influenced collagen self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Nima; Sander, Edward A; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2009-12-01

    The ability to influence the direction of polymerization of a self-assembling biomolecular system has the potential to generate materials with extremely high anisotropy. In biological systems where highly-oriented cellular populations give rise to aligned and often load-bearing tissue such organized molecular scaffolds could aid in the contact guidance of cells for engineered tissue constructs (e.g. cornea and tendon). In this investigation we examine the detailed dynamics of pepsin-extracted type I bovine collagen assembly on a glass surface under the influence of flow between two plates. Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) imaging (60x-1.4NA) with focal plane stabilization was used to resolve and track the growth of collagen aggregates on borosilicate glass for 4 different shear rates (500, 80, 20, and 9s(-1)). The detailed morphology of the collagen fibrils/aggregates was examined using Quick Freeze Deep Etch (QFDE) electron microscopy. Nucleation of fibrils on the glass was observed to occur rapidly (approximately 2 min) followed by continued growth of the fibrils. The growth rates were dependent on flow in a complex manner with the highest rate of axial growth (0.1 micro/s) occurring at a shear rate of 9s(-1). The lowest growth rate occurred at the highest shear. Fibrils were observed to both branch and join during the experiments. The best alignment of fibrils was observed at intermediate shear rates of 20 and 80s(-1). However, the investigation revealed that fibril directional growth was not stable. At high shear rates, fibrils would often turn downstream forming what we term "hooks" which are likely the combined result of monomer interaction with the initial collagen layer or "mat" and the high shear rate. Further, QFDE examination of fibril morphology demonstrated that the assembled fibrillar structure did not possess native D-periodicity. Instead, fibrils comprised a collection of generally aligned, monomers which were self-assembled to form a fibril

  20. Durability of self-assembled monolayers on aluminum oxide surface for determining surface wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaejun; Bong, Jihye; Ha, Young-Geun; Park, Sangyoon; Ju, Sanghyun

    2015-03-01

    The durable non-wettability of functionalized aluminum oxide (Al2O3) thin films coated with two different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), phosphonic acid (HDF-PA) and trichlorosilane (HDF-S), was investigated by a water flow test method. After exposing the surface to 5 L of water droplets, the contact angle of HDF-S coated Al2O3 thin films remained at the initial value of ∼102.7°, while the contact angle of HDF-PA coated Al2O3 thin films decreased from an initial value of ∼99.9° to a value of ∼69.3°. Thermal annealing effect at various temperature post formation of the self-assembled HDF-PA on the Al2O3 were investigated and shown to enhance the durability of SAMs with a constant contact angle (∼100°) annealed at 100-150 °C.

  1. Design strategies for self-assembly of discrete targets

    SciTech Connect

    Madge, Jim; Miller, Mark A.

    2015-07-28

    Both biological and artificial self-assembly processes can take place by a range of different schemes, from the successive addition of identical building blocks to hierarchical sequences of intermediates, all the way to the fully addressable limit in which each component is unique. In this paper, we introduce an idealized model of cubic particles with patterned faces that allows self-assembly strategies to be compared and tested. We consider a simple octameric target, starting with the minimal requirements for successful self-assembly and comparing the benefits and limitations of more sophisticated hierarchical and addressable schemes. Simulations are performed using a hybrid dynamical Monte Carlo protocol that allows self-assembling clusters to rearrange internally while still providing Stokes-Einstein-like diffusion of aggregates of different sizes. Our simulations explicitly capture the thermodynamic, dynamic, and steric challenges typically faced by self-assembly processes, including competition between multiple partially completed structures. Self-assembly pathways are extracted from the simulation trajectories by a fully extendable scheme for identifying structural fragments, which are then assembled into history diagrams for successfully completed target structures. For the simple target, a one-component assembly scheme is most efficient and robust overall, but hierarchical and addressable strategies can have an advantage under some conditions if high yield is a priority.

  2. Synthetic Self-Assembled Materials in Biological Environments.

    PubMed

    Versluis, Frank; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic self-assembly has long been recognized as an excellent approach for the formation of ordered structures on the nanoscale. Although the development of synthetic self-assembling materials has often been inspired by principles observed in nature (e.g., the assembly of lipids, DNA, proteins), until recently the self-assembly of synthetic molecules has mainly been investigated ex vivo. The past few years however, have witnessed the emergence of a research field in which synthetic, self-assembling systems are used that are capable of operating as bioactive materials in biological environments. Here, this up-and-coming field, which has the potential of becoming a key area in chemical biology and medicine, is reviewed. Two main categories of applications of self-assembly in biological environments are identified and discussed, namely therapeutic and imaging agents. Within these categories key concepts, such as triggers and molecular constraints for in vitro/in vivo self-assembly and the mode of interaction between the assemblies and the biological materials will be discussed. PMID:27042774

  3. Electric Field Controlled Self-Assembly of Hierarchically Ordered Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Velichko, Yuri S.; Mantei, Jason R.; Bitton, Ronit; Carvajal, Daniel; Shull, Kenneth R.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembly in the presence of external forces is an adaptive, directed organization of molecular components under nonequilibrium conditions. While forces may be generated as a result of spontaneous interactions among components of a system, intervention with external forces can significantly alter the final outcome of self-assembly. Superimposing these intrinsic and extrinsic forces provides greater degrees of freedom to control the structure and function of self-assembling materials. In this work we investigate the role of electric fields during the dynamic self-assembly of a negatively charged polyelectrolyte and a positively charged peptide amphiphile in water leading to the formation of an ordered membrane. In the absence of electric fields, contact between the two solutions of oppositely charged molecules triggers the growth of closed membranes with vertically oriented fibrils that encapsulate the polyelectrolyte solution. This process of self-assembly is intrinsically driven by excess osmotic pressure of counterions, and the electric field is found to modify the kinetics of membrane formation, and also its morphology and properties. Depending on the strength and orientation of the field we observe a significant increase or decrease of up to nearly 100% in membrane thickness, as well as the controlled rotation of nanofiber growth direction by 90 degrees, resulting in a significant increase in mechanical stiffness. These results suggest the possibility of using electric fields to control structure in self-assembly processes involving diffusion of oppositely charged molecules. PMID:23166533

  4. Electric Field Controlled Self-Assembly of Hierarchically Ordered Membranes.

    PubMed

    Velichko, Yuri S; Mantei, Jason R; Bitton, Ronit; Carvajal, Daniel; Shull, Kenneth R; Stupp, Samuel I

    2012-01-25

    Self-assembly in the presence of external forces is an adaptive, directed organization of molecular components under nonequilibrium conditions. While forces may be generated as a result of spontaneous interactions among components of a system, intervention with external forces can significantly alter the final outcome of self-assembly. Superimposing these intrinsic and extrinsic forces provides greater degrees of freedom to control the structure and function of self-assembling materials. In this work we investigate the role of electric fields during the dynamic self-assembly of a negatively charged polyelectrolyte and a positively charged peptide amphiphile in water leading to the formation of an ordered membrane. In the absence of electric fields, contact between the two solutions of oppositely charged molecules triggers the growth of closed membranes with vertically oriented fibrils that encapsulate the polyelectrolyte solution. This process of self-assembly is intrinsically driven by excess osmotic pressure of counterions, and the electric field is found to modify the kinetics of membrane formation, and also its morphology and properties. Depending on the strength and orientation of the field we observe a significant increase or decrease of up to nearly 100% in membrane thickness, as well as the controlled rotation of nanofiber growth direction by 90 degrees, resulting in a significant increase in mechanical stiffness. These results suggest the possibility of using electric fields to control structure in self-assembly processes involving diffusion of oppositely charged molecules. PMID:23166533

  5. Design strategies for self-assembly of discrete targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madge, Jim; Miller, Mark A.

    2015-07-01

    Both biological and artificial self-assembly processes can take place by a range of different schemes, from the successive addition of identical building blocks to hierarchical sequences of intermediates, all the way to the fully addressable limit in which each component is unique. In this paper, we introduce an idealized model of cubic particles with patterned faces that allows self-assembly strategies to be compared and tested. We consider a simple octameric target, starting with the minimal requirements for successful self-assembly and comparing the benefits and limitations of more sophisticated hierarchical and addressable schemes. Simulations are performed using a hybrid dynamical Monte Carlo protocol that allows self-assembling clusters to rearrange internally while still providing Stokes-Einstein-like diffusion of aggregates of different sizes. Our simulations explicitly capture the thermodynamic, dynamic, and steric challenges typically faced by self-assembly processes, including competition between multiple partially completed structures. Self-assembly pathways are extracted from the simulation trajectories by a fully extendable scheme for identifying structural fragments, which are then assembled into history diagrams for successfully completed target structures. For the simple target, a one-component assembly scheme is most efficient and robust overall, but hierarchical and addressable strategies can have an advantage under some conditions if high yield is a priority.

  6. Effect of polymerization on hierarchical self-assembly into nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Taichi

    2015-01-20

    The oligomers consisting of phenyl-capped bithiophene and tetra(ethylene glycol)s linked by azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition were synthesized. The relationship between the degree of polymerization and self-assembling ability was investigated in o-dichlorobenzene and dimethyl sulfoxide. From the absorption spectrum, it was confirmed that the critical degree of polymerization (CDP) for thiophene unit aggregation was 4. The morphology of the aggregated product was observed by atomic force microscopy. The oligomers 4mer and 5mer could not self-assemble into well-defined structures due to the weak driving force for the self-assembly. In the cases of 6mer and 7mer, aggregates with nonwell-defined and nanosheet structures coexisted. In the cases of 8mer and 9mer, the nanosheet was the main product. The critical point between 7mer and 8mer could be confirmed by different aggregation behaviors in the cooling process of the solution (nonsigmoidal and sigmoidal). In the cases of 8mer and 9mer, polymer folding prior to intermolecular self-assembly, which was supported by sigmoidal aggregation behavior, leads to the nanosheet formation. On the contrary, shorter oligomers than 8mer experience intermolecular aggregation prior to intramolecular polymer folding, which was supported by the nonsigmoidal aggregation behavior. This is the first report to prove the existence of CDP for folded polymer nanosheet formation which requires hierarchical self-assembly, i.e., polymer folding followed by intermolecular self-assembly. PMID:25526560

  7. Synthesis of nanocrystals and nanocrystal self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuoying

    Chapter 1. A general introduction is presented on nanomaterials and nanoscience. Nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their structure and properties. Ferroelectric materials and nanoparticles in particular are highlighted, especially in the case of the barium titanate, and their potential applications are discussed. Different nanocrystal synthetic techniques are discussed. Nanoparticle superlattices, the novel "meta-materials" built from self-assembly at the nanoscale, are introduced. The formation of nanoparticle superlattices and the importance and interest of synthesizing these nanostructures is discussed. Chapter 2. Advanced applications for high k dielectric and ferroelectric materials in the electronics industry continues to demand an understanding of the underlying physics in decreasing dimensions into the nanoscale. The first part of this chapter presents the synthesis, processing, and electrical characterization of nanostructured thin films (thickness ˜100 nm) of barium titanate BaTiO3 built from uniform nanoparticles (<20 nm in diameter) in diameter. Essential to our approach is an understanding of the nanoparticle as a building block, combined with an ability to integrate them into thin films that have uniform and characteristic electrical properties. We observe the BaTiO3 nanocrystals crystallize with evidence of tetragonality. Electric field dependent polarization measurements show spontaneous polarization and hysteresis, indicating ferroelectric behavior for the BaTiO 3 nanocrystalline films with grain sizes in the range of 10--30 nm. Dielectric measurements of the films show dielectic constants in the range of 85--90 over the 1 kHz--100 kHz, with low loss. We present nanocrystals as initial building blocks for the preparation of thin films which exhibit uniform nanostructured morphologies and grain sizes. In the second part of this chapter, a nonhydrolytic alcoholysis route to study the preparation of well-crystallized size-tunable BaTiO3

  8. Structures Self-Assembled Through Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    dry plasma etch. The wet chemical etches the silicon away, exposing the TiSi2 rods, whereas plasma etching preferentially etches the Si-TiSi2 interface to form a crater. The porous architectures are applicable to fabricating microdevices or creating templates for part fabrication. The porous rod structure can serve as a platform for fabricating microplasma devices for propulsion or microheat exchangers and for fabricating microfilters for miniatured chemical reactors. Although more work is required, self-assembly from DSE can have a role in microdevice fabrication.

  9. A path to designing self-assembling surface patterns on particles for self-assembly of the particles themselves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Oskar; Edlund, Erik; Nilsson Jacobi, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Patchy colloids are promising candidates for self-assembly of metamaterials since directional attraction and high specificity reduces the ambiguity of the low energy state, this simplifies the design of self-assembling building blocks. However, the large scale fabrication of colloids with specific patterns becomes more difficult as the complexity of the surface pattern increases. Self-organiziation of the surface patterns themselves have been suggested as a promising fabrication method due to the new types of patterns it makes accessible. We present a method for designing self-assembling patterns in multiple components system on particle surfaces. The method is based on an analytical treatment of an effective interaction representation of real systems. As an example, we use a simplified model of Alkalethoils-on-gold to show how a limited amount of system parameters can be tuned in order to cause self-assembly of desired surface patterns. We perform in silico self-assembly of surface patterns on spherical colloids, the patterns then causes the colloids themselves to self-assemble into various geometric target structures like strings, membranes, cubic aggregates and lattices. OL and MNJ acknowledge support from the SuMo Biomaterials center of excellence.

  10. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty

  11. Directed self-assembly cut mask assignment for unidirectional design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jiaojiao; Yu, Bei; Gao, Jhih-Rong; Pan, David Z.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, directed self-assembly (DSA) has emerged as a promising lithography solution for cut manufacturing. We perform a comprehensive study on the DSA aware mask optimization problem to provide a DSA friendly design on cut layers. We first formulate the problem as an integer linear programming (ILP) to assign cuts to different guiding templates, targeting both conflict minimization and line-end extension minimization. As ILP may not be scalable for very large size problems, we then propose two speed-up strategies. The first one is to decompose the initial problem into smaller ones and solve them separately, followed by solution merging without much loss of quality. The second one is using the set cover algorithm to decide the DSA guiding pattern assignment, and then legalize the template placement. Our approaches can be naturally extended to handle arbitrary DSA guiding template patterns with complicated shapes. Experimental results show that our methodologies can significantly improve the DSA friendly, i.e., both the unresolved pattern number and the line-end extensions can be reduced.

  12. Self-replication and self-assembly for manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Ewaschuk, Robert; Turney, Peter D

    2006-01-01

    It has been argued that a central objective of nanotechnology is to make products inexpensively, and that self-replication is an effective approach to very low-cost manufacturing. The research presented here is intended to be a step towards this vision. We describe a computational simulation of nanoscale machines floating in a virtual liquid. The machines can bond together to form strands (chains) that self-replicate and self-assemble into user-specified meshes. There are four types of machines, and the sequence of machine types in a strand determines the shape of the mesh they will build. A strand may be in an unfolded state, in which the bonds are straight, or in a folded state, in which the bond angles depend on the types of machines. By choosing the sequence of machine types in a strand, the user can specify a variety of polygonal shapes. A simulation typically begins with an initial unfolded seed strand in a soup of unbonded machines. The seed strand replicates by bonding with free machines in the soup. The child strands fold into the encoded polygonal shape, and then the polygons drift together and bond to form a mesh. We demonstrate that a variety of polygonal meshes can be manufactured in the simulation, by simply changing the sequence of machine types in the seed. PMID:16859447

  13. Cationic polymers and their self-assembly for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Deka, Smriti Rekha; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Pradee

    2015-01-01

    The present article focuses on the amphiphilic cationic polymers as antibacterial agents. These polymers undergo self-assembly in aqueous conditions and impart biological activity by efficiently interacting with the bacterial cell wall, hence, used in preparing chemical disinfectants and biocides. Both cationic charge as well as hydrophobic segments facilitate interactions with the bacterial cell surface and initiate its disruption. The perturbation in transmembrane potential causes leakage of cytosolic contents followed by cell death. Out of two categories of macromolecules, peptide oligomers and cationic polymers, which have extensively been used as antibacterials, we have elaborated on the current advances made in the area of cationic polymer-based (naturally occurring and commonly employed synthetic polymers and their modified analogs) antibacterial agents. The development of polymer-based antibacterials has helped in addressing challenges posed by the drug-resistant bacterial infections. These polymers provide a new platform to combat such infections in the most efficient manner. This review presents concise discussion on the amphiphilic cationic polymers and their modified analogs having low hemolytic activity and excellent antibacterial activity against array of fungi, bacteria and other microorganisms. PMID:25858132

  14. Electric Field Driven Self-Assembly of Colloidal Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Jaime; Chaudhary, Kundan; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve; Lewis, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    The ability to assemble anisotropic colloidal building blocks into ordered configurations is of both scientific and technological importance. We are studying how electric field-induced interactions guide the self-assembly of these blocks into well aligned microstructures. Specifically, we present observations of the assembly of colloidal silica rods (L/D ˜ 4) within planar electrode cells as a function of different electric field parameters. Results from video microscopy and image analysis demonstrate that aligned microstructures form due to the competition between equilibrium interactions of induced dipoles and non-equilibrium processes (i.e., electro-osmosis). Under the appropriate electric field conditions (˜ kHZ AC fields), aligned colloidal rod fluids form over large areas on the electrode surface. The superposition of a DC electric field to this aligned colloidal rod fluid initiates their condensation into a vertically oriented crystalline phase. Ongoing work is now focused on exploring how temporal changes to electric fields influence colloidal rod dynamics and, hence, the assembly kinetics of aligned colloidal monolayers.

  15. Kinetics of self-assembled monolayer formation on individual nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremy G; Jain, Prashant K

    2016-08-24

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formation of alkanethiols on nanoparticle surfaces is an extensively studied surface reaction. But the nanoscale aspects of the rich microscopic kinetics of this reaction may remain hidden due to ensemble-averaging in colloidal samples, which is why we investigated in real-time how alkanethiol SAMs form on a single Ag nanoparticle. From single-nanoparticle trajectories obtained using in situ optical spectroscopy, the kinetics of SAM formation appears to be limited by the growth of the layer across the nanoparticle surface. A significant spread in the growth kinetics is seen between nanoparticles. The single-nanoparticle rate distributions suggest two distinct modes for SAM growth: spillover of adsorbed thiols from the initial binding sites on the nanoparticle and direct adsorption of thiol from solution. At low concentrations, wherein direct adsorption from solution is not prevalent and growth takes place primarily by adsorbate migration, the SAM formation rate was less variable from one nanoparticle to another. On the other hand, at higher thiol concentrations, when both modes of growth were operative, the population of nanoparticles with inherent variations in surface conditions and/or morphology exhibited a heterogeneous distribution of rates. These new insights into the complex dynamics of SAM formation may inform synthetic strategies for ligand passivation and functionalization of nanoparticles and models of reactive adsorption and catalysis on nanoparticles. PMID:27523488

  16. Dynamic, Directed Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles via Toggled Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Zachary M; Swan, James W

    2016-05-24

    Crystals self-assembled from nanoparticles have useful properties such as optical activity and sensing capability. During fabrication, however, gelation and glassification often leave these materials arrested in defective or disordered metastable states. This is a key difficulty preventing adoption of self-assembled nanoparticle materials at scale. Processes which suppress kinetic arrest and defect formation while accelerating growth of ordered materials are essential for bottom-up approaches to creating nanomaterials. Dynamic, directed self-assembly processes in which the interactions between self-assembling components are actuated temporally offer one promising methodology for accelerating and controlling bottom-up growth of nanostructures. In this article, we show through simulation and theory how time-dependent, periodically toggled interparticle attractions can avoid kinetic barriers and yield well-ordered crystalline domains for a dispersion of nanoparticles interacting via a short-ranged, isotropic potential. The growth mechanism and terminal structure of the dispersion are controlled by parameters of the toggling protocol. This control allows for selection of processes that yield rapid self-assembled, low defect crystals. Although self-assembly via periodically toggled attractions is inherently unsteady and out-of-equilibrium, its outcome is predicted by a first-principles theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The theory necessitates equality of the time average of pressure and chemical potential in coexisting phases of the dispersion. These quantities are evaluated using well known equations of state. The phase behavior predicted by this theory agrees well with measurements made in Brownian dynamics simulations of sedimentation equilibrium and homogeneous nucleation. The theory can easily be extended to model dynamic self-assembly directed by other toggled conservative force fields. PMID:27096705

  17. Self-assembled magnetic nanospheres with three-dimensional magnetic vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Kwan; Dhak, Prasanta; Lee, Ha-Youn; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Kim, Sang-Koog; Jin, Kyoungsuk; Chu, Arim; Nam, Ki Tae; Kim, Miyoung; Park, Hyun Soon; Aizawa, Shinji; Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Shindo, Daisuke

    2014-12-08

    We report the electron holography images of spin configurations in peculiar assemblies of soft magnetic nanoparticles in single-, double-, triple-, or quadruple-sphere geometrical arrangements, in which each particle has a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic-vortex structure. Micromagnetic numerical calculations reveal that the uniqueness of the nanoparticles' 3D vortex structure plays a crucial role in their assembly, especially in terms of the contrasting contributions of the exchange and dipolar interactions to their binding energies. The results represent physical insights into the assembly of 3D-vortex-structure magnetic nanoparticles in different geometrical configurations and offer a practical means of controlling those assemblies.

  18. Tunable two dimensional protein patterns through self-assembly nanosphere template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhishi; Ruan, Weidong; Shen, Shanshan; Wang, Haiyang; Guo, Zhinan; Xue, Xiangxin; Mao, Zhu; Ji, Wei; Wang, Xu; Song, Wei; Zhao, Bing

    2012-10-01

    By the aim of constructing surfaces for multi-component and multifunctional bioassay, a microsphere lithography technique was employed to control the surface morphology. Two kinds of protein molecules (antibodies) were used as building blocks. As a result, dual-component biocompatible surfaces with alternate immunoglobulin micropatterns were fabricated. The employed antibodies included human Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and rabbit IgG, which composed nanometer scale surface arrays on the surfaces. The antibodies were identified specially by immunoreactions with labeled antigens of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-antihuman IgG and tetramethylrhodamine-5-(and 6)-isothiocyanate (TRITC)-antirabbit IgG. The immune responses were confirmed by confocal fluorescence (FL) microscopy. A study on the sensitivity and quantification was done by using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectroscopy. The obtained SERRS spectra showed satisfactory resolution in the multi-component detection objects. No interference was observed from inner- or interactions of detecting molecules. The detection limits for both of the antigens reached to as low as 1 ng/mL, which was comparable to FL method. Meanwhile, a good linear relationship between SERRS peak intensity and the logarithm of antigens' concentrations (from 1 ng/mL to 1 mg/mL) were observed. The results demonstrated that SERRS is a very promising detection technique for multi-component immunoassay, and has great potential applications in biotechnology and biochemistry.

  19. DC electric field induced phase array self-assembly of Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yadavali, S; Sachan, R; Dyck, O; Kalyanaraman, R

    2014-11-21

    In this work we report the discovery of phase array self-assembly, a new way to spontaneously make periodic arrangements of metal nanoparticles. An initially random arrangement of gold (Au) or silver (Ag) nanoparticles on SiO2/Si substrates was irradiated with linearly polarized (P) laser light in the presence of a dc electric (E) field applied to the insulating substrate. For E fields parallel to the laser polarization (E||P), the resulting periodic ordering was single-crystal like with extremely low defect density and covered large macroscopic areas. The E field appears to be modifying the phase between radiation scattered by the individual nanoparticles thus leading to enhanced interference effects. While phase array behavior is widely known in antenna technology, this is the first evidence that it can also aid in nanoscale self-assembly. These results provide a simple way to produce periodic metal nanoparticles over large areas. PMID:25355725

  20. Light-controlled morphologies of self-assembled triarylamine-fullerene conjugates.

    PubMed

    Busseron, Eric; Cid, Juan-José; Wolf, Adrian; Du, Guangyan; Moulin, Emilie; Fuks, Gad; Maaloum, Mounir; Polavarapu, Prasad; Ruff, Adrian; Saur, Ann-Kathrin; Ludwigs, Sabine; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2015-03-24

    A family of triarylamine-fullerene conjugates has been synthesized and shown to self-assemble upon light stimulation in chlorinated solvents. This light-induced process primarily involves excitation of triarylamine derivatives, which then oxidize and stack with their neutral counterparts to form charge transfer complexes in the form of p-conducting channels, while fullerenes are consequently enforced in coaxial n-conducting columnar arrangements. These supramolecular heterojunctions can be organized over very long distances in micrometric fibers when a controlled amount of photons is provided from a white light source to initiate the process. Surprisingly, when sunlight or UV light is used instead, the nanostructuration leads to monodisperse spherical objects due to the nature of the nucleation-growth process involved in the stacks formation. This control over the supramolecular morphology of organic self-assemblies using the nature of light is of general interest for the design of functional responsive materials. PMID:25734231

  1. Morphology evolution of MoS2: From monodisperse nanoparticles to self-assembled nanobelts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ting; Luo, Xingfang; Han, Shuming; Cao, Yingjie; Yuan, Cailei; Yang, Yong; Li, Qinliang

    2016-02-01

    The MoS2 nanobelts were successfully synthesized on SiO2/Si substrates using a vapor phase sulfurization process. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques are employed to comprehensively study the morphology evolution of MoS2 from monodisperse nanoparticles to self-assembled nanobelts on the SiO2/Si substrates. A possible three-step morphology evolution process, which includes initial nucleation process, self-assembly process, and subsequent crystal growth process (Ostwald ripening), is proposed to explain the formation of MoS2. Moreover, MoS2 nanobelts are characterized by Raman spectroscopy and photo-luminescence (PL). These results provide the possibility to develop an easier-to-cooperate and morphology-controllable approach to fabricate novel architectures.

  2. AFM characterization of spin coated carboxylated polystyrene nanospheres/xyloglucan layers on mica and silicon.

    PubMed

    Lubambo, Adriana F; Lucyszyn, Neoli; Petzhold, Cesar L; Sierakowski, Maria-R; Schreiner, Wido H; Saul, Cyro K

    2013-03-01

    Self-assembled nano-arrays have a potential application as solid-phase diagnostics in many biomedical devices. The easiness of its production is directly connected to manufacture cost reduction. In this work, we present self-assembled structures starting from spin coated thin films of carboxylated polystyrene (PSC) and xyloglucan (XG) mixtures on both mica and silicon substrates. AFM images showed PSC nanospheres on top of a homogeneous layer of XG, for both substrates. The average nanosphere diameter fluctuated for a constant speed and it was likely to be independent of the component proportions on the mixture within a range of 30-50% (v/v) PSC. It was also observed that the largest diameters were found at the center of the sample and the smallest at the border. The detected nanospheres were also more numerous at the border. This behavior presents a similarity to spin coated colloidal dispersions. We observed that the average nanosphere diameter on mica substrates was bigger than the nanosphere diameters obtained on top of silicon substrates, under the same conditions. This result seems to be possibly connected to different mixture-surface interactions. PMID:23465925

  3. One-step electrodeposition of self-assembled colloidal particles: a novel strategy for biomedical coating.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiadi; Liu, Xiaoya; Meng, Long; Wei, Wei; Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-09-23

    A novel biomedical coating was prepared from self-assembled colloidal particles through direct electrodeposition. The particles, which are photo-cross-linkable and nanoscaled with a high specific surface area, were obtained via self-assembly of amphiphilic poly(γ-glutamic acid)-g-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (γ-PGA-g-AMC). The size, morphology, and surface charge of the resulting colloidal particles and their dependence on pH, initial concentrations, and UV irradiation were successfully studied. A nanostructured coating was formed in situ on the surface of magnesium alloys by electrodeposition of colloidal particles. The composition, morphology, and phase of the coating were monitored using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The corrosion test showed that the formation of the nanostructured coating on magnesium alloys effectively improved their initial anticorrosion properties. More importantly, the corrosion resistance was further enhanced by chemical photo-cross-linking. In addition, the low cytotoxicity of the coated samples was confirmed by MTT assay against NIH-3T3 normal cells. The contribution of our work lies in the creation of a novel strategy to fabricate a biomedical coating in view of the versatility of self-assembled colloidal particles and the controllability of the electrodeposition process. It is believed that our work provides new ideas and reliable data to design novel functional biomedical coatings. PMID:25162374

  4. Hydrogels constructed via self-assembly of beta-hairpin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbas, Bulent

    There is a recent and growing interest in hydrogel materials that are formed via peptide self-assembly for tissue engineering applications. Peptide based materials are excellent candidates for diverse applications in biomedical field due to their responsive behavior and complex self-assembled structures. However, there is very limited information on the self-assembly and resultant network and mechanical properties of these types of hydrogels. The main goal of this dissertation is to investigate the self-assembly mechanism and viscoelastic properties of hydrogels that can be altered by changing solution conditions as well as the primary structure of the peptide. These hydrogels are formed via intramolecular folding and consequent self-assembly of 20 amino acid long beta-hairpin peptide molecules (Max1). The peptide molecules are locally amphiphilic with two linear strands of alternating hydrophobic valine and hydrophilic lysine amino acids connected with a Dproline-LProline turn sequence. Circular dichroism and FTIR spectroscopy show that at physiological conditions peptides are unfolded in the absence of salt. By raising the ionic strength of the solution electrostatic interactions between charged lysines are screened and the peptide arms are forced into a beta-sheet secondary structure stabilized by the turn sequence. These folded molecules intermolecularly assemble via hydrophobic collapse and hydrogen bonding into a three dimensional network. Folding and self-assembly of these molecules can also be triggered by increasing temperature and/or pH of the peptide solution. In addition, the random-coil to beta-sheet transition of the beta-hairpin peptides is pH and, with proper changes in the peptide sequence, thermally reversible. Rheological measurements demonstrate that the resultant supramolecular structure forms an elastic material, whose structure, and thus modulus, can be tuned by magnitude of the stimulus. Hydrogels recover their initial viscoelastic

  5. Effect of polymer brushes on the Self Assembly of 3D Poly(Styrene-Methylmethacrylate) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lwoya, Baraka; Albert, Julie

    2015-03-01

    It would be instrumental to understand the self-assembly capabilities of polymers especially given their industrial capabilities of templating and membrane application .The ability of block copolymers to self assemble into different morphologies is determined by several factor including type of polymer blocks, volume fraction, substrate preference to a polymer and chain architecture . In this paper Poly(Styrene-Methylmethacrylate) (PS-PMMA) was chosen was chosen to further understand the effect polymer brushes on the substrate had on the self assembly of 3D structured PS-PMMA spin coated thin films (30-150 nm). The polymer brushes were grown using surface initiated atomic transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) with the optimal chain length being confirmed by gel permeation chromatography. By using ellipsometer and contact angle measurement the uniformity of the polymer brushes are characterized, while the morphology of the spin coated thin films after thermal annealing would be characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  6. Well-Defined Protein/Peptide-Polymer Conjugates by Aqueous Cu-LRP: Synthesis and Controlled Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Muxiu; Zhu, Chongyu; Nurumbetov, Gabit; Li, Zaidong; Wilson, Paul; Kempe, Kristian; Haddleton, David M

    2015-07-29

    The synthesis of well-defined protein/peptide-polymer conjugates with interesting self-assembly behavior via single electron transfer living radical polymerization in water is described. A range of protein/peptides with different physical and chemical properties have been modified to macroinitiators and optimized polymerization conditions ensure successful polymerization from soluble, insoluble, and dispersed protein/peptide molecules or protein aggregates. This powerful strategy tolerates a range of functional monomers and mediates efficient homo or block copolymerization to generate hydrophilic polymers with controlled molecular weight (MW) and narrow MW distribution. The polymerizations from bovine insulin macroinitiators follow surface-initiated "grafting from" polymerization mechanism and may involve a series of self-assembly and disassembly processes. Synthesized insulin-polymer conjugates form spheres in water, and the self-assembly behavior could be controlled via thermal control, carbohydrate-protein interaction, and protein denaturation. PMID:26149497

  7. Sequential programmable self-assembly: Role of cooperative interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Jonathan D.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a general strategy of "sequential programmable self-assembly" that enables a bottom-up design of arbitrary multi-particle architectures on nano- and microscales. We show that a naive realization of this scheme, based on the pairwise additive interactions between particles, has fundamental limitations that lead to a relatively high error rate. This can be overcome by using cooperative interparticle binding. The cooperativity is a well known feature of many biochemical processes, responsible, e.g., for signaling and regulations in living systems. Here we propose to utilize a similar strategy for high precision self-assembly, and show that DNA-mediated interactions provide a convenient platform for its implementation. In particular, we outline a specific design of a DNA-based complex which we call "DNA spider," that acts as a smart interparticle linker and provides a built-in cooperativity of binding. We demonstrate versatility of the sequential self-assembly based on spider-functionalized particles by designing several mesostructures of increasing complexity and simulating their assembly process. This includes a number of finite and repeating structures, in particular, the so-called tetrahelix and its several derivatives. Due to its generality, this approach allows one to design and successfully self-assemble virtually any structure made of a "GEOMAG" magnetic construction toy, out of nanoparticles. According to our results, once the binding cooperativity is strong enough, the sequential self-assembly becomes essentially error-free.

  8. Self-Assembly for the Synthesis of Functional Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Ortony, Julia H.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-01-01

    The use of self-assembly for the construction of functional biomaterials is a highly promising and exciting area of research, with great potential for the treatment of injury or disease. By using multiple noncovalent interactions, coded into the molecular design of the constituent components, self-assembly allows for the construction of complex, adaptable, and highly tunable materials with potent biological effects. This review describes some of the seminal advances in the use of self-assembly to make novel systems for regenerative medicine and biology. Materials based on peptides, proteins, DNA, or hybrids thereof have found application in the treatment of a wide range of injuries and diseases, and this review outlines the design principles and practical applications of these systems. Most of the examples covered focus on the synthesis of hydrogels for the scaffolding or transplantation of cells, with an emphasis on the biological, mechanical, and structural properties of the resulting materials. In addition, we will discuss the distinct advantages conferred by self-assembly (compared with traditional covalent materials), and present some of the challenges and opportunities for the next generation of self-assembled biomaterials. PMID:23457423

  9. Harnessing Surface Dislocation Networks for Molecular Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Karsten

    2009-03-01

    The controlled fabrication of functional wafer-based nano-arrays is one of the ultimate quests in current nanotechnologies. Well-ordered misfit dislocation networks of ultrathin metal films are viable candidates for the growth of two- dimensional ordered cluster arrays in the nanometer regime. Such bottom-up processes can be very complex, involving collective effects from a large number of atoms. Unraveling the fundamental forces that drive these self-assembly processes requires detailed experimental information at the atomic level of large ensembles of hundreds to thousands of atoms. The combination of variable temperature measurements from our home-built STM correlated with 2D Frenkel-Kontorova models based on first-principle interaction parameters is used to explain how uniform arrays can form with the strain in the thin film as the driving force responsible for the surface self-assembly process. This process is generally applicable to assemble many molecular species thus opening avenues towards complex self-assembled structures based on a lock-and-key type approach. Moreover, when increasing the molecular coverage and/or decreasing the strain in the thin film the intermolecular interactions will eventually dominate the elastic effects and dictate the self-assembly process via molecular structure and functionality. We will show that controlling this delicate balance leads to a richness of structures, ranging from disperse ordered arrays of molecular clusters to patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of functionalized fullerenes and methanethiol.

  10. Semiconducting nanowires from hairpin-shaped self-assembling sexithiophenes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Wen; Tevis, Ian D; Tayi, Alok S; Cui, Honggang; Stupp, Samuel I

    2010-11-18

    Conjugated organic molecules can be designed to self-assemble from solution into nanostructures for functions such as charge transport, light emission, or light harvesting. We report here the design and synthesis of a novel hairpin-shaped self-assembling molecule containing electronically active sexithiophene moieties. In several nonpolar organic solvents, such as toluene or chlorocyclohexane, this compound was found to form organogels composed of nanofibers with uniform diameters of 3.0 (±0.3) nm. NMR analysis and spectroscopic measurements revealed that the self-assembly is driven by π-π interactions of the sexithiophene moieties and hydrogen bonding among the amide groups at the head of the hairpin. Field effect transistors built with this molecule revealed p-type semiconducting behavior and higher hole mobilities when films were cast from solvents that promote self-assembly. We propose that hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking act synergistically to create ordered stacking of sexithiophene moieties, thus providing an efficient pathway for charge carriers within the nanowires. The nanostructures formed exhibit unusually broad absorbance in their UV-vis spectrum, which we attribute to the coexistence of both H and J aggregates from face-to-face π-π stacking of sexithiophene moieties and hierarchical bundling of the nanowires. The large absorption range associated with self-assembly of the hairpin molecules makes them potentially useful in light harvesting for energy applications. PMID:20698523

  11. Core-shell self-assembly triggered via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction for reduced glutathione detection and single cells monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel core-shell DNA self-assembly catalyzed by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions was proposed, which could realize GSH-initiated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification and molecules gathering. Significantly, these self-assembled products via electrostatic interaction could accumulate into prominent and clustered fluorescence-bright spots in single cancer cells for reduced glutathione monitoring, which will effectively drive cell monitoring into a new era. PMID:27412605

  12. Core-shell self-assembly triggered via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction for reduced glutathione detection and single cells monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel core-shell DNA self-assembly catalyzed by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions was proposed, which could realize GSH-initiated hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification and molecules gathering. Significantly, these self-assembled products via electrostatic interaction could accumulate into prominent and clustered fluorescence-bright spots in single cancer cells for reduced glutathione monitoring, which will effectively drive cell monitoring into a new era. PMID:27412605

  13. Functional self-assembled lipidic systems derived from renewable resources

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Julian R.; Samateh, Malick; John, George

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled lipidic amphiphile systems can create a variety of multi-functional soft materials with value-added properties. When employing natural reagents and following biocatalytic syntheses, self-assembling monomers may be inherently designed for degradation, making them potential alternatives to conventional and persistent polymers. By using non-covalent forces, self-assembled amphiphiles can form nanotubes, fibers, and other stimuli responsive architectures prime for further applied research and incorporation into commercial products. By viewing these lipid derivatives under a lens of green principles, there is the hope that in developing a structure–function relationship and functional smart materials that research may remain safe, economic, and efficient. PMID:26766923

  14. Cell Environment-Differentiated Self-Assembly of Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Chen, Peiyao; Xie, Maolin; Wu, Chengfan; Luo, Yufeng; Wang, Wentao; Jiang, Jun; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-09-01

    Employing cellular environment for the self-assembly of supramolecular nanofibers for biological applications has been widely explored. But using one precursor to differentiate the extra- and intracellular environments to self-assemble into two different nanofibers remains challenging. With the knowledge that the extracellualr environment of some cancer cells contains large amounts of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) while their intracellular environment is glutathione (GSH)-abundant in mind, we rationally designed a precursor Cys(SEt)-Glu-Tyr(H2PO3)-Phe-Phe-Gly-CBT (1) that can efficiently yield amphiphilic 2 and 2-D to self-assemble into two different nanofibers in hydrogels under the sequential treatment of ALP and GSH. We envision that, by employing a click condensation reaction, this work offers a platform for facilely postmodulation of supramolecular nanofibers, and the versatile precursor 1 could be used to kill two birds with one stone. PMID:27532322

  15. Self-assembly of tunable protein suprastructures from recombinant oleosin

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, Kevin B.; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Using recombinant amphiphilic proteins to self-assemble suprastructures would allow precise control over surfactant chemistry and the facile incorporation of biological functionality. We used cryo-TEM to confirm self-assembled structures from recombinantly produced mutants of the naturally occurring sunflower protein, oleosin. We studied the phase behavior of protein self-assembly as a function of solution ionic strength and protein hydrophilic fraction, observing nanometric fibers, sheets, and vesicles. Vesicle membrane thickness correlated with increasing hydrophilic fraction for a fixed hydrophobic domain length. The existence of a bilayer membrane was corroborated in giant vesicles through the localized encapsulation of hydrophobic Nile red and hydrophilic calcein. Circular dichroism revealed that changes in nanostructural morphology in this family of mutants was unrelated to changes in secondary structure. Ultimately, we envision the use of recombinant techniques to introduce novel functionality into these materials for biological applications. PMID:22753512

  16. Actinide sequestration using self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, Glen E; Lin, Yuehe; Fiskum, Sandy; Birnbaum, Jerome C; Wu, Hong; Kemner, Ken; Kelly, Shelley

    2005-03-01

    Surfactant templated synthesis of mesoporous ceramics provides a versatile foundation upon which to create high efficiency environmental sorbents. These nanoporous ceramic oxides condense a huge amount of surface area into a very small volume. The ceramic oxide interface is receptive to surface functionalization through molecular self-assembly. The marriage of mesoporous ceramics with self-assembled monolayer chemistry creates a powerful new class of environmental sorbent materials called self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS). These SAMMS materials are highly efficient sorbents whose interfacial chemistry can be fine-tuned to selectively sequester a specific target species, such as heavy metals, tetrahedral oxometalate anions, and radionuclides. Details addressing the design, synthesis, and characterization of SAMMS materials specifically designed to sequester actinides, of central importance to the environmental cleanup necessary after 40 years of weapons-grade plutonium production, as well as evaluation of their binding affinities and kinetics are presented. PMID:15787373

  17. Self-assembling peptides and their potential applications in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Rymer, Sarah-Jane; Tendler, Saul J B; Bosquillon, Cynthia; Washington, Clive; Roberts, Clive J

    2011-08-01

    For many years, peptides have been known to self-assemble to form nano- and micro-scale structures. Their nature of assembly and assembled morphology has since been investigated as this area of research has important implications for the development of both drug delivery and tissue regeneration. In this article, we explore the process of peptide self-assembly in vivo, and experiments that exploit the structures formed. Particular focus is directed towards diphenylalanine, the simplest self-assembling peptide, which generally forms tube-like structures on assembly. In addition, different peptides that may assemble into a range of other morphologies are highlighted and potential applications in regenerative medicine and drug delivery discussed. PMID:22826867

  18. Self-assembly and application of diphenylalanine-based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuehai; Zhu, Pengli; Li, Junbai

    2010-06-01

    Micro- and nanostructures fabricated from biological building blocks have attracted tremendous attention owing to their potential for application in biology and in nanotechnology. Many biomolecules, including peptides and proteins, can interact and self-assemble into highly ordered supramolecular architectures with functionality. By imitating the processes where biological peptides or proteins are assembled in nature, one can delicately design and synthesize various peptide building blocks composed of several to dozens of amino acids for the creation of biomimetic or bioinspired nanostructured materials. This tutorial review aims to introduce a new kind of peptide building block, the diphenylalanine motif, extracted with inspiration of a pathogenic process towards molecular self-assembly. We highlight recent and current advances in fabrication and application of diphenylalanine-based peptide nanomaterials. We also highlight the preparation of such peptide-based nanostructures as nanotubes, spherical vesicles, nanofibrils, nanowires and hybrids through self-assembly, the improvement of their properties and the extension of their applications. PMID:20502791

  19. Self-Assembly of DNA-coated colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pine, David

    DNA-coated particles have emerged as a powerful tool for programming the self-assembly of colloids and nanoparticles. The power of this approach lies in the highly specific molecular recognition properties of DNA and in the thermal reversibility of the interactions between DNA strands attached to different particles. These two properties taken together can, in principle, direct the bottom-up self-assembly of different materials into almost any desired structure. Here we discuss the self-assembly of single and multi-component crystals of DNA-coated colloids. This work is supported by the Army Research Office under MURI Grant Award Number W911NF-10-1-0518 and the MRSEC Program of the NSF under Award Number DMR-1420073.

  20. Self-assembled liposomal nanoparticles in photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivam, Magesh; Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Lakshmanan, Shanmugamurthy; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Huang, Ying-Ying; Kumar, Raj; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs the combination of non-toxic photosensitizers (PS) together with harmless visible light of the appropriate wavelength to produce reactive oxygen species that kill unwanted cells. Because many PS are hydrophobic molecules prone to aggregation, numerous drug delivery vehicles have been tested to solubilize these molecules, render them biocompatible and enhance the ease of administration after intravenous injection. The recent rise in nanotechnology has markedly expanded the range of these nanoparticulate delivery vehicles beyond the well-established liposomes and micelles. Self-assembled nanoparticles are formed by judicious choice of monomer building blocks that spontaneously form a well-oriented 3-dimensional structure that incorporates the PS when subjected to the appropriate conditions. This self-assembly process is governed by a subtle interplay of forces on the molecular level. This review will cover the state of the art in the preparation and use of self-assembled liposomal nanoparticles within the context of PDT. PMID:24348377

  1. Multivalent Protein Assembly Using Monovalent Self-Assembling Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Petkau-Milroy, Katja; Sonntag, Michael H.; Colditz, Alexander; Brunsveld, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Discotic molecules, which self-assemble in water into columnar supramolecular polymers, emerged as an alternative platform for the organization of proteins. Here, a monovalent discotic decorated with one single biotin was synthesized to study the self-assembling multivalency of this system in regard to streptavidin. Next to tetravalent streptavidin, monovalent streptavidin was used to study the protein assembly along the supramolecular polymer in detail without the interference of cross-linking. Upon self-assembly of the monovalent biotinylated discotics, multivalent proteins can be assembled along the supramolecular polymer. The concentration of discotics, which influences the length of the final polymers at the same time dictates the amount of assembled proteins. PMID:24152447

  2. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C. H.; Gungordu, H. I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents.

  3. Equation of State for Phospholipid Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipid self-assembly is the basis of biomembrane stability. The entropy of transfer from water to self-assembled micelles of lysophosphatidylcholines and diacyl phosphatidylcholines with different chain lengths converges to a common value at a temperature of 44°C. The corresponding enthalpies of transfer converge at ∼-18°C. An equation of state for the free energy of self-assembly formulated from this thermodynamic data depends on the heat capacity of transfer as the sole parameter needed to specify a particular lipid. For lipids lacking calorimetric data, measurement of the critical micelle concentration at a single temperature suffices to define an effective heat capacity according to the model. Agreement with the experimental temperature dependence of the critical micelle concentration is then good. The predictive powers should extend also to amphiphile partitioning and the kinetics of lipid-monomer transfer. PMID:26745421

  4. Investigating collagen self-assembly with optical tweezers microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy; Shayegan, Marjan; Altindal, Tuba

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Assembled from individual triple-helical proteins to make strong fibres, collagen is a beautiful example of a hierarchical self-assembling system. Using optical tweezers to perform microrheology measurements, we explore the dynamics of interactions between collagens responsible for their self-assembly and examine the development of heterogeneous mechanics during assembly into fibrillar gels. Telopeptides, short non-helical regions that flank the triple helix, have long been known to facilitate fibril self-assembly. We find that their removal not only slows down fibril nucleation but also results in a significant frequency-dependent reduction in the elastic modulus of collagens in solution. We interpret these results in terms of a model in which telopeptides facilitate transient intermolecular interactions, which enhance network connectivity in solution and lead to more rapid assembly in fibril-forming conditions. Current address: Department of Physics, McGill University.

  5. Bioprinting synthetic self-assembling peptide hydrogels for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Loo, Yihua; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a disruptive technology for creating organotypic constructs for high-throughput screening and regenerative medicine. One major challenge is the lack of suitable bioinks. Short synthetic self-assembling peptides are ideal candidates. Several classes of peptides self-assemble into nanofibrous hydrogels resembling the native extracellular matrix. This is a conducive microenvironment for maintaining cell survival and physiological function. Many peptides also demonstrate stimuli-responsive gelation and tuneable mechanical properties, which facilitates extrusion before dispensing and maintains the shape fidelity of the printed construct in aqueous media. The inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability bodes well for in vivo applications as implantable tissues and drug delivery matrices, while their short length and ease of functionalization facilitates synthesis and customization. By applying self-assembling peptide inks to bioprinting, the dynamic complexity of biological tissue can be recreated, thereby advancing current biomedical applications of peptide hydrogel scaffolds. PMID:26694103

  6. Coarse-grained simulation of amphiphilic self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, David J.; Cleaver, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present a computer simulation study of amphiphilic self-assembly performed using a computationally efficient single-site model based on Gay-Berne [J. Chem. Phys. 74, 3316 (1981)] and Lennard-Jones particles. Molecular dynamics simulations of these systems show that free self-assembly of micellar, bilayer, and inverse micelle arrangements can be readily achieved for a single model parametrization. This self-assembly is predominantly driven by the anisotropy of the amphiphile-solvent interaction, amphiphile-amphiphile dispersive interactions being found to be of secondary importance. While amphiphile concentration is the main determinant of phase stability, molecular parameters such as head group size and interaction strength also have measurable affects on system properties.

  7. Coarse-grained simulation of amphiphilic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Michel, David J; Cleaver, Douglas J

    2007-01-21

    The authors present a computer simulation study of amphiphilic self-assembly performed using a computationally efficient single-site model based on Gay-Berne [J. Chem. Phys. 74, 3316 (1981)] and Lennard-Jones particles. Molecular dynamics simulations of these systems show that free self-assembly of micellar, bilayer, and inverse micelle arrangements can be readily achieved for a single model parametrization. This self-assembly is predominantly driven by the anisotropy of the amphiphile-solvent interaction, amphiphile-amphiphile dispersive interactions being found to be of secondary importance. While amphiphile concentration is the main determinant of phase stability, molecular parameters such as head group size and interaction strength also have measurable affects on system properties. PMID:17249883

  8. Hierarchical self-assembly of chiral fibres from achiral particles

    PubMed Central

    Prybytak, P.; Frith, W. J.; Cleaver, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate, by molecular dynamics simulation, the behaviour of discotic particles in a solvent of Lennard-Jones spheres. When chromonic disc–sphere interactions are imposed on these systems, three regimes of self-assembly are observed. At moderate temperatures, numerous short threads of discs develop, but these threads remain isolated from one another. Quenching to low temperatures, alternatively, causes all of the discs to floc into a single extended aggregate which typically comprises several distinct sections and contains numerous packing defects. For a narrow temperature range between these regimes, however, defect-free chiral fibres are found to freely self-assemble. The spontaneous chirality of these fibres results from frustration between the hexagonal packing and interdigitation of neighbouring threads, the pitch being set by the particle shape. This demonstration of aggregate-wide chirality emerging owing to packing alone is pertinent to many biological and synthetic hierarchically self-assembling systems. PMID:24098850

  9. Bacteria Repellent Properties of Trichlorosilane Self-Assembled Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Jihye; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Hyunsook; Lee, Sang-Seob; Ju, Sanghyun

    2013-12-01

    The bacteria repellent property and thermal stability of pristine graphene and graphene chemically modified with a trichlorosilane (HDF-S) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) were investigated. The contact angles of HDF-S self-assembled graphene (105.8±0.5°) improved by ˜30% compared with those of pristine graphene (79.4±0.9°). In a bacterial atmosphere, while the bacteria were able to migrate to the pristine graphene surface, they were not able to migrate to the surface of the HDF-S self-assembled graphene. Moreover, the HDF-S SAM on graphene showed stable hydrophobic properties from -40 to 500 °C.

  10. Guided and magnetic self-assembly of tunable magnetoceptive gels

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, S.; Yu, C.H.; Gungordu, H.I.; Guven, S.; Vural, T.; Demirci, U.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of components into complex functional patterns at microscale is common in nature, and used increasingly in numerous disciplines such as optoelectronics, microfabrication, sensors, tissue engineering and computation. Here, we describe the use of stable radicals to guide the self-assembly of magnetically tunable gels, which we call ‘magnetoceptive’ materials at the scale of hundreds of microns to a millimeter, each can be programmed by shape and composition, into heterogeneous complex structures. Using paramagnetism of free radicals as a driving mechanism, complex heterogeneous structures are built in the magnetic field generated by permanent magnets. The overall magnetic signature of final structure is erased via an antioxidant vitamin E, subsequent to guided self-assembly. We demonstrate unique capabilities of radicals and antioxidants in fabrication of soft systems with heterogeneity in material properties, such as porosity, elastic modulus and mass density; then in bottom-up tissue engineering and finally, levitational and selective assembly of microcomponents. PMID:25175148

  11. Actinide Sequestration Using Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Lin, Yuehe; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Wu, Hong; Kemner, K. M.; Kelly, Shelley

    2005-03-01

    Surfactant templated synthesis of mesoporous ceramics provides a versatile foundation upon which to create high efficiency environmental sorbents. These nanoporous ceramic oxides condense a huge amount of surface area into a very small volume. The ceramic oxide interface is receptive to surface functionalization through molecular self-assembly. The marriage of mesoporous ceramics with self-assembled monolayer chemistry creates a powerful new class of environmental sorbent materials called self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS). These SAMMS materials are highly efficient sorbents, whose interfacial chemistry can be fine-tuned to selectively sequester a specific target species, such as heavy metals, tetrahedral oxometallate anions and radionuclides. Details addressing the design, synthesis and characterization of SAMMS materials specifically designed to sequester actinides, of central importance to the environmental clean-up necessary after 40 years of weapons grade plutonium production, as well as evaluation of their binding affinities and kinetics are presented.

  12. Self-assembly of copper nanoparticles (cubes, rods and spherical nanostructures): Significant role of morphology on hydrogen and oxygen evolution efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Jahangeer; Trinh, Phong; Mugweru, Amos M.; Ganguli, Ashok K.

    2011-05-01

    Nanocrystalline copper nanoparticles with varying morphology, nanocubes (˜50 nm), nanorods (diameter of ˜3 nm and length of ˜50 nm) and nanospheres (5 nm) have been synthesized using the microemulsion method and subsequent treatment at 400 °C in hydrogen atmosphere. The role of concentration in the self-assembly of nanoparticles in varying dimensionality has been brought out in this study. Copper nanoparticles are known to be efficient electro-catalysts for a variety of reactions. In addition, the ability of copper catalyst to generate hydrogen and oxygen in electrochemical reactions provided the impetus to understand size and shape dependence of such electro-catalytic reactions of copper in nanocrystalline form. Cube-shaped nanoparticles show significantly high hydrogen and oxygen evolution efficiencies compared to the nanorods and spherical nanoparticles. The nanospheres show higher hydrogen and oxygen evolution efficiencies than the nanorods.

  13. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of mixed self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raigoza, Annette Fernandez

    This thesis examines the formation of multicomponent self-assembled mono-layers (SAMs) on the Au(111) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. Two methods, sequential adsorption and coadsorption, are used to create these mixed SAMs. In the sequential adsorption experiments, a clean Au(111)-on-mica sub-strate is exposed to the first molecular species and then this adsorbate-covered sample is exposed to the second molecular species. Alternately, in the coadsorption experiments, a gold surface is exposed to both adsorbates simultaneously. Exposing a coronene- or dithiocarbamate-covered surface to excess thiol in the vapor phase results in a drastic restructuring of the initial surface. This is primarily driven by the kinetics of the octanethiol monolayer formation process, but the extent to which this happens is dependent on the molecule-molecule and molecule-surface interactions of the adsorbate due to the initial coverage and order of the monolayer. An octanethiolate monolayer is also substantially modified when immersed in a solution containing dithiocarbamate (DTC). Defects in the octanethiol monolayer are prime sites for molecular exchange. A surplus of DTC in the solution drives substitution that can lead to the complete removal of thiol from the surface. When a Au(111) surface is exposed to solutions containing both octanethiol and dithiocarbamate (DTC), both molecular species compete for available ad- sorption sites. At equal octanethiol-to-DTC ratios, molecular exchange hinders octanethiol monolayer formation. Higher octanethiol concentration in solution results in the incorporation of thiol into the resulting monolayer, with a strong dependence on the chain length of the DTC molecules.

  14. Self-assembly of bis(phthalocyaninato)terbium on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhitao; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Stepanow, Sebastian; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Kern, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Single-molecule magnets represent the smallest stable magnetic entities available to technology, with promising applications in data storage and quantum computation in sight. Therefore, an interface between devices and single-molecule magnets must be developed, for which the self-assembly behavior at surfaces is highly relevant. The molecular magnet bis(phthalocyaninato)terbium (TbPc2) represents a molecular system with interesting magnetic properties. In order to fabricate low dimensional nanostructures based on TbPc2, the self-assembly behavior on Cu(100), Cu(111) and Au(111) substrates is studied in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). On Cu(100), TbPc2 does not aggregate even at high coverage, which yields a good zero-dimensional system. On Cu(111), the TbPc2 molecules self-assemble into ribbon-like islands with a high aspect ratio, or an isotropically growing phase, depending on the coverage. On Au(111), TbPc2 molecules form two-dimensional domains from the initial growth stage and extend to highly ordered films, which cover entire terraces at high coverage. The molecular ordering of TbPc2 can be understood based on the behavior of single Pc adlayers, taking into account the molecular double-decker structure. The freedom in the dihedral angle between top and bottom Pc ligands allows one to optimize the molecular ordering through a flexible conformation.

  15. Composition and method for self-assembly and mineralization of peptide amphiphiles

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Beniash, Elia; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2009-06-30

    The present invention is directed to a composition useful for making homogeneously mineralized self assembled peptide-amphiphile nanofibers and nanofiber gels. The composition is generally a solution comprised of a positively or negatively charged peptide-amphiphile and a like signed ion from the mineral. Mixing this solution with a second solution containing a dissolved counter-ion of the mineral and/or a second oppositely charged peptide amphiphile, results in the rapid self assembly of the peptide-amphiphiles into a nanofiber gel and templated mineralization of the ions. Templated mineralization of the initially dissolved mineral cations and anions in the mixture occurs with preferential orientation of the mineral crystals along the fiber surfaces within the nanofiber gel. One advantage of the present invention is that it results in homogenous growth of the mineral throughout the nanofiber gel. Another advantage of the present invention is that the nanofiber gel formation and mineralization reactions occur in a single mixing step and under substantially neutral or physiological pH conditions. These homogeneous nanostructured composite materials are useful for medical applications especially the regeneration of damaged bone in mammals. This invention is directed to the synthesis of peptide-amphiphiles with more than one amphiphilic moment and to supramolecular compositions comprised of such multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles. Supramolecular compositions can be formed by self assembly of multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles by mixing them with a solution comprising a monovalent cation.

  16. Composition and method for self-assembly and mineralization of peptide-amphiphiles

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Beniash, Elia; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2012-02-28

    The present invention is directed to a composition useful for making homogeneously mineralized self assembled peptide-amphiphile nanofibers and nanofiber gels. The composition is generally a solution comprised of a positively or negatively charged peptide-amphiphile and a like signed ion from the mineral. Mixing this solution with a second solution containing a dissolved counter-ion of the mineral and/or a second oppositely charged peptide amphiphile, results in the rapid self assembly of the peptide-amphiphiles into a nanofiber gel and templated mineralization of the ions. Templated mineralization of the initially dissolved mineral cations and anions in the mixture occurs with preferential orientation of the mineral crystals along the fiber surfaces within the nanofiber gel. One advantage of the present invention is that it results in homogenous growth of the mineral throughout the nanofiber gel. Another advantage of the present invention is that the nanofiber gel formation and mineralization reactions occur in a single mixing step and under substantially neutral or physiological pH conditions. These homogeneous nanostructured composite materials are useful for medical applications especially the regeneration of damaged bone in mammals. This invention is directed to the synthesis of peptide-amphiphiles with more than one amphiphilic moment and to supramolecular compositions comprised of such multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles. Supramolecular compositions can be formed by self assembly of multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles by mixing them with a solution comprising a monovalent cation.

  17. Comparison of self-assembled and micelle encapsulated QD chemosensor constructs for biological sensing.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Christopher M; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    Whereas a variety of covalent conjugation strategies have been utilized to prepare quantum dot (QD)-based nanosensors, supramolecular approaches of self-assembly have been underexplored. A major advantage of self-assembly is the ability to circumvent laborious synthetic efforts attendant to covalent conjugation of a chemosensor to functionalized QDs. Here, we combine a CdSe/ZnS core-shell QD with gold(III) corroles using both self-assembly and micelle encapsulation to form QD nanosensors. Appreciable spectral overlap between QD emission and corrole absorption results in efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), which may be initiated by one- or two-photon excitation. The triplet state of the gold(III) corroles is quenched by molecular oxygen, enabling these constructs to function as optical O2 sensors, which is useful for the metabolic profiling of tumours. The photophysical properties, including QD and corrole lifetimes, FRET efficiency, and O2 sensitivity, have been determined for each construct. The relative merits of each conjugation strategy are assessed with regard to their implementation as sensors. PMID:26399200

  18. Integrating DNA-strand-displacement circuitry with self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dongbao; Song, Tingjie; Sun, Xianbao; Xiao, Shiyan; Huang, Fujian; Liang, Haojun

    2015-11-11

    Programmable and algorithmic behaviors of DNA molecules allow one to control the structures of DNA-assembled materials with nanometer precision and to construct complex networks with digital and analog behaviors. Here we developed a way of integrating a DNA-strand-displacement circuit with self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids, wherein a single DNA strand was used to initiate and catalyze the operation of upstream circuits to release a single strand that subsequently triggers self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids in downstream circuits, realizing a programmable kinetic control of self-assembly of spherical nucleic acids. Through utilizing this method, single-nucleotide polymorphisms or indels occurring at different positions of a sequence of oligonucleotide were unambiguously discriminated. We provide here a sophisticated way of combining the DNA-strand-displacement-based characteristic of DNA with the distinct assembly properties of inorganic nanoparticles, which may find broad potential applications in the fabrication of a wide range of complex multicomponent devices and architectures. PMID:26485090

  19. Surface Effects Mediate Self-Assembly of Amyloid-β Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a label-free method for studying the mechanism of surface effects on amyloid aggregation. In this method, spin-coating is used to rapidly dry samples, in a homogeneous manner, after various incubation times. This technique allows the control of important parameters for self-assembly, such as the surface concentration. Atomic force microscopy is then used to obtain high-resolution images of the morphology. While imaging under dry conditions, we show that the morphologies of self-assembled aggregates of a model amyloid-β peptide, Aβ12–28, are strongly influenced by the local surface concentration. On mica surfaces, where the peptides can freely diffuse, homogeneous, self-assembled protofibrils formed spontaneously and grew longer with longer subsequent incubation. The surface fibrillization rate was much faster than the rates of fibril formation observed in solution, with initiation occurring at much lower concentrations. These data suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation on surfaces where the nucleation stage is either bypassed entirely or too fast to measure. This simple preparation procedure for high-resolution atomic force microscopy imaging of amyloid oligomers and protofibrils should be applicable to any amyloidogenic protein species. PMID:25229233

  20. Nanoscale self-assembly of starch: Phase relations, formation, and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creek, John A.

    This project has been undertaken to develop a fundamental understanding of the spherulitic self-assembly of starch polymers from aqueous solution, both as a model for starch granule initiation in vivo and as a biologically-inspired material with applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Botanical starches were observed to form semi-crystalline spherulites from aqueous solution when cooled after a high temperature treatment, and the processes resulting in spherulite formation were investigated. Based on the influence of cooling rate on spherulite formation from a botanical starch, liquid-liquid demixing in competition with crystallization was proposed as the mechanism leading to spherulite formation (summarized in a hypothetical phase diagram). Study of amylose and amylopectin self-assembly demonstrated that the linear polymer plays the primary role in forming spherulites. As a result, the roles of degree of polymerization, concentration, and thermal processing conditions on amylose self-assembly were explored. Thermal properties, final system morphology, and crystalline allomorph were characterized. In all cases the experimental findings supported the proposed phase diagram. Finally, the crystalline nanostructure of the spherulites was probed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), revealing a seemingly universal level of structure in crystalline starch materials. This was compared to an existing model of crystallization for synthetic polymers involving a transitional liquid crystalline-like ordering---a comparison that makes sense in light of the known helical structure of starch.

  1. Self-Assembled DNA Templated Nano-wires and Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Erez

    2000-03-01

    The realization that conventional microelectronics is approaching its miniaturization limits has motivated the search for an alternative route based on self-assembled nanometer-scale electronics. We have recently proposed a new approach based on the hybridization of biological and electronic materials (Braun E., Eichen Y., Sivan U. and Ben-Yoseph G., Nature 391, 775 (1998)). The concept relies on a two-step self-assembly process. The inherent molecular recognition capabilities of DNA molecules are first utilized to construct a network that serves as a template for the subsequent assembly of electronic materials into a circuit. The utilization of DNA and its associated enzymatic machinery enables: (a) self-assembly of complex substrates, (b) specific molecular addresses for the localization of electronic materials (e.g., gold colloids) by standard molecular biology techniques, (c) interdevice wiring and (d) bridging the microscopic structures to the macroscopic world. The self-assembly of nanometer scale electronics relies on two complementary developments. First, the ability to convert DNA molecules into thin conductive wires and second, the self-assembly of complex extended DNA templates. Our progress in these two directions will be presented. Regarding the first issue, a physical process resulting in condensation of gold colloids onto DNA molecules enables the assembly of thin gold wires (around 100-200 A wide) having, in principle, unlimited extensions. The second issue is developed in the context of recombinant DNA which allows the self-assembly of precise molecular junctions and networks. Specifically, we use RecA protein, which is the main protein responsible for genetic recombination in E. Coli bacteria, to construct DNA junctions at pre-designed addresses (sequences) on the molecules. The integration of these processes allows advancing nanometer-scale electronics. A realistic fabrication scheme for a room-temperature single-electron transistor

  2. Probing peptide amphiphile self-assembly in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arijit; Buettner, Christian J; Manos, Aaron A; Wallace, Ashley J; Tweedle, Michael F; Goldberger, Joshua E

    2014-12-01

    There has been recent interest in designing smart diagnostic or therapeutic self-assembling peptide or polymeric materials that can selectively undergo morphological transitions to accumulate at a disease site in response to specific stimuli. Developing approaches to probe these self-assembly transitions in environments that accurately amalgamate the diverse plethora of proteins, biomolecules, and salts of blood is essential for creating systems that function in vivo. Here, we have developed a fluorescence anisotropy approach to probe the pH-dependent self-assembly transition of peptide amphiphile (PA) molecules that transform from spherical micelles at pH 7.4 to nanofibers under more acidic pH's in blood serum. By mixing small concentrations of a Ru(bipy)3(2+)-tagged PA with a Gd(DO3A)-tagged PA having the same lipid-peptide sequence, we showed that the pH dependence of self-assembly is minimally affected and can be monitored in mouse blood serum. These PA vehicles can be designed to transition from spherical micelles to nanofibers in the pH range 7.0-7.4 in pure serum. In contrast to the typical notion of serum albumin absorbing isolated surfactant molecules and disrupting self-assembly, our experiments showed that albumin does not bind these anionic PAs and instead promotes nanofibers due to a molecular crowding effect. Finally, we created a medium that replicates the transition pH in serum to within 0.08 pH units and allows probing self-assembly behavior using conventional spectroscopic techniques without conflicting protein signals, thus simplifying the development pathway from test tube to in vivo experimentation for stimuli-responsive materials. PMID:25347387

  3. Interfacial and mechanical properties of self-assembling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Daniel

    Self-assembly is a fascinating phenomena where interactions between small subunits allow them to aggregate and form complex structures that can span many length scales. These self-assembled structures are especially important in biology where they are necessary for life as we know it. This dissertation is a study of three very different self-assembling systems, all of which have important connections to biology and biological systems. Drop shape analysis was used to study the interfacial assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers at the oil/water interface. When biologically functionalyzed copolymers are used, this system can serve as a model for receptor-ligand interactions that are used by cells to perform many activities, such as interact with their surroundings. The physical properties of a self-assembling membrane system were quantified using membrane inflation and swelling experiments. These types of membranes may have important applications in medicine such as drug eluting (growth factor eluting) scaffolds to aid in wound healing. The factors affecting the properties of bis(leucine) oxalamide gels were also explored. We believe that this particular system will serve as an appropriate model for biological gels that are made up of fiber-like and/or rod-like structures. During the course of the research presented in this dissertation, many new techniques were developed specifically to allow/aid the study of these distinct self-assembling systems. For example, numerical methods were used to predict drop stability for drop shape analysis experiments and the methods used to create reproducibly create self-assembling membranes were developed specifically for this purpose. The development of these new techniques is an integral part of the thesis and should aid future students who work on these projects. A number ongoing projects and interesting research directions for each one of the projects is also presented.

  4. High stability of self-assembled peptide nanowires against thermal, chemical, and proteolytic attacks.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jungki; Park, Chan Beum

    2010-02-01

    Understanding the self-assembly of peptides into ordered nanostructures is recently getting much attention since it can provide an alternative route for fabricating novel bio-inspired materials. In order to realize the potential of the peptide-based nanofabrication technology, however, more information is needed regarding the integrity or stability of peptide nanostructures under the process conditions encountered in their applications. In this study, we investigated the stability of self-assembled peptide nanowires (PNWs) and nanotubes (PNTs) against thermal, chemical, proteolytic attacks, and their conformational changes upon heat treatment. PNWs and PNTs were grown by the self-assembly of diphenylalanine (Phe-Phe), a peptide building block, on solid substrates at different chemical atmospheres and temperatures. The incubation of diphenylalanine under aniline vapor at 150 degrees C led to the formation of PNWs, while its incubation with water vapor at 25 degrees C produced PNTs. We analyzed the stability of peptide nanostructures using multiple tools, such as electron microscopy, thermal analysis tools, circular dichroism, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Our results show that PNWs are highly stable up to 200 degrees C and remain unchanged when incubated in aqueous solutions (from pH 1 to 14) or in various chemical solvents (from polar to non-polar). In contrast, PNTs started to disintegrate even at 100 degrees C and underwent a conformational change at an elevated temperature. When we further studied their resistance to a proteolytic environment, we discovered that PNWs kept their initial structure while PNTs fully disintegrated. We found that the high stability of PNWs originates from their predominant beta-sheet conformation and the conformational change of diphenylalanine nanostructures. Our study suggests that self-assembled PNWs are suitable for future nano-scale applications requiring harsh processing conditions. PMID:19777585

  5. Design of self-assembling peptide hydrogelators amenable to bacterial expression.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Cem; Nagy, Katelyn J; Schneider, Joel P

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels formed from self-assembling peptides are finding use in tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Given the notorious difficulties associated with producing self-assembling peptides by recombinant expression, most are typically prepared by chemical synthesis. Herein, we report the design of a family of self-assembling β-hairpin peptides amenable to efficient production using an optimized bacterial expression system. Expressing peptides, EX1, EX2 and EX3 contain identical eight-residue amphiphilic β-strands connected by varying turn sequences that are responsible for ensuring chain reversal and the proper intramolecular folding and consequent self-assembly of the peptide into a hydrogel network under physiological conditions. EX1 was initially used to establish and optimize the bacterial expression system by which all the peptides could be eventually individually expressed. Expression clones were designed to allow exploration of possible fusion partners and investigate both enzymatic and chemical cleavage as means to liberate the target peptide. A systematic analysis of possible expression systems followed by fermentation optimization lead to a system in which all three peptides could be expressed as fusions with BAD-BH3, the BH3 domain of the proapoptotic BAD (Bcl-2 Associated Death) Protein. CNBr cleavage followed by purification afforded 50, 31, and 15 mg/L yields of pure EX1, EX2 and EX3, respectively. CD spectroscopy, TEM, and rheological analysis indicate that these peptides fold and assembled into well-defined fibrils that constitute hydrogels having shear-thin/recovery properties. PMID:25453938

  6. Design of Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogelators Amenable to Bacterial Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sonmez, Cem; Nagy, Katelyn J.; Schneider, Joel P.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels formed from self-assembling peptides are finding use in tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Given the notorious difficulties associated with producing self-assembling peptides by recombinant expression, most are typically prepared by chemical synthesis. Herein, we report the design of a family of self-assembling β-hairpin peptides amenable to efficient production using an optimized bacterial expression system. Expressing peptides, EX1, EX2 and EX3 contain identical eight-residue amphiphilic β-strands connected by varying turn sequences that are responsible for ensuring chain reversal and the proper intramolecular folding and consequent self-assembly of the peptide into a hydrogel network under physiological conditions. EX1 was initially used to establish and optimize the bacterial expression system by which all the peptides could be eventually individually expressed. Expression clones were designed to allow exploration of possible fusion partners and investigate both enzymatic and chemical cleavage as means to liberate the target peptide. A systematic analysis of possible expression systems followed by fermentation optimization lead to a system in which all three peptides could be expressed as fusions with BAD-BH3, the BH3 domain of the proapoptotic BAD (Bcl-2 Associated Death) Protein. CNBr cleavage followed by purification afforded 50, 31, and 15 mg/L yields of pure EX1, EX2 and EX3, respectively. CD spectroscopy, TEM, and rheological analysis indicate that these peptides fold and assembled into well-defined fibrils that constitute hydrogels having shear-thin/recovery properties. PMID:25453938

  7. Nanotechnology and Quasicrystals: From Self-Assembly to Photonic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifshitz, R.

    After providing a concise overview on quasicrystals and their discovery more than a quarter of a century ago, I consider the unexpected interplay between nano-technology and quasiperiodic crystals. Of particular relevance are efforts to fabricate artificial functional micro- or nanostructures, as well as efforts to control the self-assembly of nanostructures, where current knowledge about the possibility of having long-range order without periodicity can provide significant advantages. I discuss examples of systems ranging from artificial metamaterials for photonic applications, through self-assembled soft matter, to surface waves and optically-induced nonlinear photonic quasicrystals.

  8. Controlled self-assembly of biomolecular rods on structured substrates.

    PubMed

    Moghimian, Pouya; Harnau, Ludger; Srot, Vesna; de la Peña, Francisco; Farahmand Bafi, Nima; Facey, Sandra J; van Aken, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    We report on the evaporative self-assembly and orientational ordering of semi-flexible spherocylindrical M13 phages on asymmetric stranded webs of thin amorphous carbon films. Although the phages were dispersed with a low concentration in the isotropic phase, the substrate edges induced nematic ordering and bending of the phages. As revealed by transmission electron microscopy, phages were aligned parallel to the curved substrate edges. This two-dimensional self-assembly on structured substrates opens a new route to the design of structures of orientationally ordered semi-flexible biomacromolecules. PMID:26917247

  9. Backfilled, self-assembled monolayers and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Addleman, R. Shane; Aardahl, Christopher L.; Zheng, Feng; Busche, Brad; Egorov, Oleg B.

    2009-06-30

    Backfilled, self-assembled monolayers and methods of making the same are disclosed. The self-assembled monolayer comprises at least one functional organosilane species and a substantially random dispersion of at least one backfilling organosilane species among the functional organosilane species, wherein the functional and backfilling organosilane species have been sequentially deposited on a substrate. The method comprises depositing sequentially a first organosilane species followed by a backfilling organosilane species, and employing a relaxation agent before or during deposition of the backfilling organosilane species, wherein the first and backfilling organosilane species are substantially randomly dispersed on a substrate.

  10. Nano-engineering by optically directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Furst, Eric; Dunn, Elissa; Park, Jin-Gyu; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sainis, Sunil; Merrill, Jason; Dufresne, Eric; Reichert, Matthew D.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Molecke, Ryan A.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Grillet, Anne Mary; Gorby, Allen D.; Singh, John; Lele, Pushkar; Mittal, Manish

    2009-09-01

    Lack of robust manufacturing capabilities have limited our ability to make tailored materials with useful optical and thermal properties. For example, traditional methods such as spontaneous self-assembly of spheres cannot generate the complex structures required to produce a full bandgap photonic crystals. The goal of this work was to develop and demonstrate novel methods of directed self-assembly of nanomaterials using optical and electric fields. To achieve this aim, our work employed laser tweezers, a technology that enables non-invasive optical manipulation of particles, from glass microspheres to gold nanoparticles. Laser tweezers were used to create ordered materials with either complex crystal structures or using aspherical building blocks.

  11. Self-assembly of flagellin on Au(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    González Orive, Alejandro; Pissinis, Diego E; Diaz, Carolina; Miñán, Alejandro; Benítez, Guillermo A; Rubert, Aldo; Daza Millone, Antonieta; Rumbo, Martin; Hernández Creus, Alberto; Salvarezza, Roberto C; Schilardi, Patricia L

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption of flagellin monomers from Pseudomonas fluorescens on Au(111) has been studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), and electrochemical techniques. Results show that flagellin monomers spontaneously self-assemble forming a monolayer thick protein film bounded to the Au surface by the more hydrophobic subunit and exposed to the environment the hydrophilic subunit. The films are conductive and allow allocation of electrochemically active cytochrome C. The self-assembled films could be used as biological platforms to build 3D complex molecular structures on planar metal surfaces and to functionalize metal nanoparticles. PMID:25112916

  12. Morphological Control of Anisotropic Self-Assemblies from Alternating Poly(p-dioxanone)-poly(ethylene glycol) Multiblock Copolymer Depending on the Combination Effect of Crystallization and Micellization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Jia; Wang, Hao; Chen, Si-Chong; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Ya

    2015-06-30

    A novel and facile method was developed for morphological controlling of self-assemblies prepared by crystallization induced self-assembly of crystalline-coil copolymer depending on the combination effect of crystallization and micellization. The morphological evolution of the self-assemblies of alternating poly(p-dioxanone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PPDO-PEG) multiblock copolymer prepared by different solvent mixing methods in aqueous solution were investigated. "Chrysanthemum"-like and "star anise"-like self-assemblies were obtained at different rates of solvent mixing. The results suggested gradually change in solvent quality (slowly dropping water into DMF solution) leaded to a hierarchical micellization-crystallization process of core-forming PPDO blocks, and flake-like particles were formed at the initial stage of crystallization. Meanwhile, crystallization induced micellization process occurred when solvent quality changed drastically. Shuttle-like particles, which have much smaller size than those of flake-like particles, were formed at the initial stage of crystallization when quickly injecting water into DMF solution of the copolymer. Therefore, owing to the different changing rate of solvent quality, which may result in different combination effect of crystallization and micellization during self-assembly of the copolymer, PPDO-PEG self-assemblies with different hierarchical morphology in nano scale could be obtained. PMID:26061590

  13. pH-Dependent Self-Assembly of Polyalanine Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Kalyan; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.; Basak, Soumen

    2007-01-01

    Polyalanine expansions in the nuclear RNA-binding protein PABP2 induce misfolding and aggregation of the protein into insoluble inclusions in muscle tissues and cell nuclei, leading to the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). We have explored the effect of solvent conditions and alanine repeat number on the propensity of fibril formation in this protein deposition disease. Three peptides mimicking the N-terminal polyalanine segment of PABP2, having the generic sequence Ac-Lys-Met-(Ala)n-Gly-Tyr with n = 7, 11, and 17 (referred to as 7-ala, 11-ala, and 17-ala, respectively), were synthesized and their conformational properties studied as a function of pH. In strongly alkaline medium (pH >10), the two longer peptides (11-ala and 17-ala, but not 7-ala) showed remarkable enhancement of β-sheet content and formed fibrils after incubation for 1–2 weeks at room temperature. Fluorescence studies suggested that tyrosyl radicals produced at high pH cross-linked to form dityrosine, which provided added stabilization for fibril growth. The kinetic progress curves for fibril formation, obtained by ThT fluorescence assay, showed exponential increase with time after an initial quiescent period (lag time) and an eventual saturation phase, all of which are indicative of a nucleation-controlled polymerization mechanism for fibrillation. Hierarchical self-assembly of the peptides led to the formation of striking fractal-shaped growth patterns on substrates, raising the possibility of designing novel materials using these peptides. PMID:17040985

  14. Self-Assembly Fabrication of Graphene-Based Materials with Optical-Electronic Transient Optical and Electrochemical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiayi; He, Junhui

    2012-01-01

    Directed self-assembly of nano or microsized materials as building blocks is a very exciting research topic to construct large-scale but still uniform 2D or 3D architectures. Graphene shows great potential as an advanced building block for fabricating varied graphene-based functional films or architectures together with other metal, metal oxide and semiconductor nanomaterials. In our work, we demonstrated an approach to fabrication of flexible, transparent conductive thin films via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of oppositely charged reduced graphene oxides (RGOs). The graphene thin films showed remarkable optical-electronic properties. Inspired by this, we further fabricated transparent conductive hybrid thin film via LbL assembly of oppositely charged RGO nanosheets and Pt nanoparticles. The graphene-Pt hybrid thin film showed transient optical property as well as appropriate conductive and wetting properties. Moreover, we demonstrated graphene wrapped-MnO2 (GW-MnO2) nanocomposites by self-assembly of honeycomb MnO2 nanospheres and graphene sheets via an electrostatic co-precipitation method. The hybrid materials had a good electrochemical performance.

  15. A switchable self-assembling and disassembling chiral system based on a porphyrin-substituted phenylalanine-phenylalanine motif.

    PubMed

    Charalambidis, Georgios; Georgilis, Evangelos; Panda, Manas K; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K; Doyle, Stephen; Moss, David; Jochum, Tobias; Horton, Peter N; Coles, Simon J; Linares, Mathieu; Beljonne, David; Naubron, Jean-Valère; Conradt, Jonas; Kalt, Heinz; Mitraki, Anna; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2016-01-01

    Artificial light-harvesting systems have until now not been able to self-assemble into structures with a large photon capture cross-section that upon a stimulus reversibly can switch into an inactive state. Here we describe a simple and robust FLFL-dipeptide construct to which a meso-tetraphenylporphyrin has been appended and which self-assembles to fibrils, platelets or nanospheres depending on the solvent composition. The fibrils, functioning as quenched antennas, give intense excitonic couplets in the electronic circular dichroism spectra which are mirror imaged if the unnatural FDFD-analogue is used. By slightly increasing the solvent polarity, these light-harvesting fibres disassemble to spherical structures with silent electronic circular dichroism spectra but which fluoresce. Upon further dilution with the nonpolar solvent, the intense Cotton effects are recovered, thus proving a reversible switching. A single crystal X-ray structure shows a head-to-head arrangement of porphyrins that explains both their excitonic coupling and quenched fluorescence. PMID:27582363

  16. Protein nanoarray made by size-dependent self-assembly for detection of mouse immunoglobulin G and octamer-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Phat L.; Tchao, Yee; You, David J.; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2009-05-01

    An alternative approach for fabricating a protein array at nanoscale (<100 nm) is suggested with a capability of characterization and/or localization of multiple components on a nanoarray. Basically, fluorescent micro- and nanospheres each conjugated with different proteins are size-dependently self-assembled (SDSA) onto these nanometer wells that were created on the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) substrate by electron beam lithography (EBL). Particles of different diameters are added serially, and electrostatically attached to the corresponding wells through electrostatic attraction between the carboxylic groups of the spheres and p-doped silicon substrate underneath the PMMA layer. This SDSA was enhanced by wire-guide manipulation of droplets on the surface containing nanometer wells. Target detection utilizes fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from fluorescent beads to target (mouse immunoglobulin G = mIgG or Octamer-4 = Oct4) and its antibody bound on the beads. The 180 nm blue beads are conjugated with mIgG to capture anti-mIgG-FITC. The 50 nm green and 100 nm yellow-green beads are conjugated with anti-Oct4 to capture Oct4 peptides; where the secondary anti-Oct4 tagged with phycoerythrin via F(ab)2 fragment is then added to function as an indicator of Oct4 detection. These protein-conjugated particles are added serially from the largest to the smallest and the particles are successfully self-assembled to the respective nanometer wells to achieve sizedependent self-assembly. FRET signals are detected through fluorescence and confocal microscopes, and further confirmed by Fluorolog3 spectrofluorometer. Therefore, SDSA is a valuable approach for the fabrication of multiple components array; and FRET is a useful biorecognition technique for the detection of mIgG, Oct4 or other targets of interest.

  17. Self Assembly of Short Aromatic Peptides into Amyloid Fibrils and Related Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The formation of amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of more than twenty human disorders of unrelated etiology. In all these cases, ordered fibrillar protein assemblies with a diameter of 7–10 nm are being observed. In spite of the great clinical important of amyloidassociated diseases, the molecular recognition and self-assembly processes that lead to the formation of the fibrils are not fully understood. One direction to decipher the mechanism of amyloid formation is the use of short peptides fragments as model systems. Short peptide fragments, as short as pentapeptides, were shown to form typical amyloid assemblies in vitro that have ultrastructural, biophysical, and cytotoxic properties, as those of assemblies that are being formed by full length polypeptides. When we analyzed such short fragments, we identified the central role of aromatic moieties in the ability to aggregate into ordered nano-fibrillar structures. This notion allowed us to discover additional very short amyloidogenic peptides as well as other aromatic peptide motifs, which can form various assemblies at the nano-scale (including nanotubes, nanospheres, and macroscopic hydrogels with nano-scale order). Other practical utilization of this concept, together with novel β breakage methods, is their use for the development of novel classes of amyloid formation inhibitors. PMID:19164892

  18. Fluorescent polystyrene photonic crystals self-assembled with water-soluble conjugated polyrotaxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stasio, Francesco; Berti, Luca; McDonnell, Shane O.; Robbiano, Valentina; Anderson, Harry L.; Comoretto, Davide; Cacialli, Franco

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate control of the photoluminescence spectra and decay rates of water-soluble green-emitting conjugated polyrotaxanes by incorporating them in polystyrene opals with a stop-band spectrally tuned on the rotaxane emission (405-650 nm). We observe a suppression of the luminescence within the photonic stop-band and a corresponding enhancement of the high-energy edge (405-447 nm). Time-resolved measurements reveal a wavelength-dependent modification of the emission lifetime, which is shortened at the high-energy edge (by ˜11%, in the range 405-447 nm), but elongated within the stop-band (by ˜13%, in the range 448-482 nm). We assign both effects to the modification of the density of photonic states induced by the photonic crystal band structure. We propose the growth of fluorescent composite photonic crystals from blends of "solvent-compatible" non-covalently bonded nanosphere-polymer systems as a general method for achieving a uniform distribution of polymeric dopants in three-dimensional self-assembling photonic structures.

  19. Strain mediated self-assembly of ceramic nano islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Michael

    This dissertation presents the first observations of self-assembled arrays of epitaxial nano islands in ceramic systems, based on RF sputtering and thermal processing of Gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) thin films on an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal substrate. In contrast to the conventional semiconductor nano island self-assembly systems, the island arrays in the GDC-YSZ system provide materials with categorically different physical properties and functionalities, and they exhibit a stronger ordering at a larger characteristic length scale. The initial focus of this study was on the processing and characterization of thin GDC layers on YSZ, which are used in SOFCs as barriers to prevent the reaction of some cathode materials with the YSZ electrolyte. Chapter 3 of this document describes studies on relatively thin (<200 nm) GDC deposits which remained adherent to their substrates during post-deposition processing. The GDC films were amorphous or ultra-fine grained as deposited, with a mixed GDC-YSZ layer at the interface. After annealing at 1150°C, the GDC films were epitaxially oriented on the YSZ substrates, with isolated porosity in their interior. Some of the thick RF-sputtered GDC layers (>300 nm) were found to fail by spalling from the YSZ substrate, leaving behind patches of unspalled film and exposing a sputter-mixed GDC-YSZ surface. Upon annealing, the modified surface spontaneously broke up into two-dimensional arrays of epitaxial islands with sub-micron dimensions, exhibiting order in spacing and alignment. In addition to the classical local effects that drive dewetting processes, the self-assembly of the epitaxial GDC-bearing islands is driven by elastic interactions between them, and these interactions are mediated by the elastically anisotropic underlying YSZ substrate. The stresses in the initial mixed surface layers are modified by two factors: The thermal-expansion mismatch leads to stresses, depending on temperature and heating rates

  20. Self-assembly from milli- to nanoscales: methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangeli, M; Abbasi, S; Varel, C; Van Hoof, C; Celis, J-P; Böhringer, K F

    2009-01-01

    The design and fabrication techniques for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanodevices are progressing rapidly. However, due to material and process flow incompatibilities in the fabrication of sensors, actuators and electronic circuitry, a final packaging step is often necessary to integrate all components of a heterogeneous microsystem on a common substrate. Robotic pick-and-place, although accurate and reliable at larger scales, is a serial process that downscales unfavorably due to stiction problems, fragility and sheer number of components. Self-assembly, on the other hand, is parallel and can be used for device sizes ranging from millimeters to nanometers. In this review, the state-of-the-art in methods and applications for self-assembly is reviewed. Methods for assembling three-dimensional (3D) MEMS structures out of two-dimensional (2D) ones are described. The use of capillary forces for folding 2D plates into 3D structures, as well as assembling parts onto a common substrate or aggregating parts to each other into 2D or 3D structures, is discussed. Shape matching and guided assembly by magnetic forces and electric fields are also reviewed. Finally, colloidal self-assembly and DNA-based self-assembly, mainly used at the nanoscale, are surveyed, and aspects of theoretical modeling of stochastic assembly processes are discussed. PMID:20209016

  1. Multistep hierarchical self-assembly of chiral nanopore arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanim; Lee, Sunhee; Shin, Tae Joo; Korblova, Eva; Walba, David M.; Clark, Noel A.; Lee, Sang Bok; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2014-01-01

    A series of simple hierarchical self-assembly steps achieve self-organization from the centimeter to the subnanometer-length scales in the form of square-centimeter arrays of linear nanopores, each one having a single chiral helical nanofilament of large internal surface area and interfacial interactions based on chiral crystalline molecular arrangements. PMID:25246585

  2. Self-assembly of highly luminescent heteronuclear coordination cages.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andrea; Hollering, Manuela; Han, Jiaying; Casini, Angela; Kühn, Fritz E

    2016-08-01

    Exo-functionalized Pd2L4 cage compounds with attached Ru(ii) pyridine complexes were prepared via coordination-driven self-assembly. Unlike most of the previously reported palladium(ii) cages, one of these metallocages exhibits an exceptionally high quantum yield of 66%. The presented approach is promising to obtain luminescent coordination complexes for various applications. PMID:27436541

  3. Soft self-assembled nanoparticles with temperature-dependent properties.

    PubMed

    Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Capone, Barbara; Likos, Christos N

    2016-02-14

    The fabrication of versatile building blocks that reliably self-assemble into desired ordered and disordered phases is amongst the hottest topics in contemporary materials science. To this end, microscopic units of varying complexity, aimed at assembling the target phases, have been thought, designed, investigated and built. Such a path usually requires laborious fabrication techniques, especially when specific functionalisation of the building blocks is required. Telechelic star polymers, i.e., star polymers made of a number of f di-block copolymers consisting of solvophobic and solvophilic monomers grafted on a central anchoring point, spontaneously self-assemble into soft patchy particles featuring attractive spots (patches) on the surface. Here we show that the tunability of such a system can be widely extended by controlling the physical and chemical parameters of the solution. Indeed, under fixed external conditions the self-assembly behaviour depends only on the number of arms and on the ratio of solvophobic to solvophilic monomers. However, changes in temperature and/or solvent quality make it possible to reliably change the number and size of the attractive patches. This allows the steering of the mesoscopic self-assembly behaviour without modifying the microscopic constituents. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that diverse combinations of the parameters can generate stars with the same number of patches but different radial and angular stiffness. This mechanism could provide a neat way of further fine-tuning the elastic properties of the supramolecular network without changing its topology. PMID:26467391

  4. pH-directed self-assembling helical peptide conformation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beta-sheet and alpha-helix peptide conformation are two of the most fundamentally ordered secondary structures found in proteins and peptides. They also give rise to self-assembling motifs that form macromolecular channels and nanostructures. Through design these conformations can yield enhance...

  5. Surface dispersion and hardening of self-assembled diacetylene nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Beom; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J

    2005-11-01

    We describe here the first method for dispersion of individual self-assembled diacetylene nanotubes on surfaces. Complete polymerization by UV exposure was achieved as demonstrated by nanotubes that were resistant to aggressive organic solvents and temperatures well above the melting point of the monomer. The polymerized tubes displayed reversible thermochromic and mechanochromic properties. PMID:16277453

  6. An exactly solvable model of hierarchical self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Douglas, Jack F.; Freed, Karl F.

    2009-06-01

    Many living and nonliving structures in the natural world form by hierarchical organization, but physical theories that describe this type of organization are scarce. To address this problem, a model of equilibrium self-assembly is formulated in which dynamically associating species organize into hierarchical structures that preserve their shape at each stage of assembly. In particular, we consider symmetric m-gons that associate at their vertices into Sierpinski gasket structures involving the hierarchical association of triangles, squares, hexagons, etc., at their corner vertices, thereby leading to fractal structures after many generations of assembly. This rather idealized model of hierarchical assembly yields an infinite sequence of self-assembly transitions as the morphology progressively organizes to higher levels of the hierarchy, and these structures coexists at dynamic equilibrium, as found in real hierarchically self-assembling systems such as amyloid fiber forming proteins. Moreover, the transition sharpness progressively grows with increasing m, corresponding to larger and larger loops in the assembled structures. Calculations are provided for several basic thermodynamic properties (including the order parameters for assembly for each stage of the hierarchy, average mass of clusters, specific heat, transition sharpness, etc.) that are required for characterizing the interaction parameters governing this type of self-assembly and for elucidating other basic qualitative aspects of these systems. Our idealized model of hierarchical assembly gives many insights into this ubiquitous type of self-organization process.

  7. Nano-imaging enabled via self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Imaging object details with length scales below approximately 200 nm has been historically difficult for conventional microscope objective lenses because of their inability to resolve features smaller than one-half the optical wavelength. Here we review some of the recent approaches to surpass this limit by harnessing self-assembly as a fabrication mechanism. Self-assembly can be used to form individual nano- and micro-lenses, as well as to form extended arrays of such lenses. These lenses have been shown to enable imaging with resolutions as small as 50 nm half-pitch using visible light, which is well below the Abbe diffraction limit. Furthermore, self-assembled nano-lenses can be used to boost contrast and signal levels from small nano-particles, enabling them to be detected relative to background noise. Finally, alternative nano-imaging applications of self-assembly are discussed, including three-dimensional imaging, enhanced coupling from light-emitting diodes, and the fabrication of contrast agents such as quantum dots and nanoparticles. PMID:25506387

  8. Self-Assembly of Globular Protein-Polymer Diblock Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. S.; Olsen, B. D.

    2011-03-01

    The self-assembly of globular protein-polymer diblock copolymers into nanostructured phases is demonstrated as an elegant and simple method for structural control in biocatalysis or bioelectronics. In order to fundamentally investigate self-assembly in these complex block copolymer systems, a red fluorescent protein was expressed in E. coli and site-specifically conjugated to a low polydispersity poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM) block using thiol-maleimide coupling to form a well-defined model globular protein-polymer diblock. Functional protein materials are obtained by solvent evaporation and solvent annealing above and below the lower critical solution temperature of PNIPAM in order to access different pathways toward self-assembly. Small angle x-ray scattering and microscopy are used to show that the diblock forms lamellar nanostructures and to explore dependence of nanostructure formation on processing conditions. Circular dichroism and UV-vis show that a large fraction of the protein remains in its folded state after conjugation, and wide angle x-ray scattering demonstrates that diblock copolymer self-assembly changes the protein packing symmetry.

  9. Soft self-assembled nanoparticles with temperature-dependent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Capone, Barbara; Likos, Christos N.

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of versatile building blocks that reliably self-assemble into desired ordered and disordered phases is amongst the hottest topics in contemporary materials science. To this end, microscopic units of varying complexity, aimed at assembling the target phases, have been thought, designed, investigated and built. Such a path usually requires laborious fabrication techniques, especially when specific functionalisation of the building blocks is required. Telechelic star polymers, i.e., star polymers made of a number of f di-block copolymers consisting of solvophobic and solvophilic monomers grafted on a central anchoring point, spontaneously self-assemble into soft patchy particles featuring attractive spots (patches) on the surface. Here we show that the tunability of such a system can be widely extended by controlling the physical and chemical parameters of the solution. Indeed, under fixed external conditions the self-assembly behaviour depends only on the number of arms and on the ratio of solvophobic to solvophilic monomers. However, changes in temperature and/or solvent quality make it possible to reliably change the number and size of the attractive patches. This allows the steering of the mesoscopic self-assembly behaviour without modifying the microscopic constituents. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that diverse combinations of the parameters can generate stars with the same number of patches but different radial and angular stiffness. This mechanism could provide a neat way of further fine-tuning the elastic properties of the supramolecular network without changing its topology.

  10. Self-assembly of supramolecular chiral insulated molecular wire.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Numata, Munenori; Bae, Ah-Hyun; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    2005-04-01

    Supramolecular chiral insulated molecular wire was constructed by self-assembly of a neutral one-dimensional schizophyllan host and a water-soluble polythiophene guest. The work presented here will not only open a door to a new application of polysaccharides but also provide an important clue to prepare stable supramolecular insulated molecular wires with one-handed helical structure. PMID:15796500

  11. Self-assembling biomolecular catalysts for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Paul C.; Patterson, Dustin P.; Saboda, Kendall N.; Edwards, Ethan J.; Miettinen, Heini M.; Basu, Gautam; Thielges, Megan C.; Douglas, Trevor

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry of highly evolved protein-based compartments has inspired the design of new catalytically active materials that self-assemble from biological components. A frontier of this biodesign is the potential to contribute new catalytic systems for the production of sustainable fuels, such as hydrogen. Here, we show the encapsulation and protection of an active hydrogen-producing and oxygen-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase, sequestered within the capsid of the bacteriophage P22 through directed self-assembly. We co-opted Escherichia coli for biomolecular synthesis and assembly of this nanomaterial by expressing and maturing the EcHyd-1 hydrogenase prior to expression of the P22 coat protein, which subsequently self assembles. By probing the infrared spectroscopic signatures and catalytic activity of the engineered material, we demonstrate that the capsid provides stability and protection to the hydrogenase cargo. These results illustrate how combining biological function with directed supramolecular self-assembly can be used to create new materials for sustainable catalysis.

  12. Hierarchical self-assembly of complex polyhedral microcontainers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipiak, David J.; Azam, Anum; Leong, Timothy G.; Gracias, David H.

    2009-07-01

    The concept of self-assembly of a two-dimensional (2D) template to a three-dimensional (3D) structure has been suggested as a strategy to enable highly parallel fabrication of complex, patterned microstructures. We have previously studied the surface-tension-based self-assembly of patterned, microscale polyhedral containers (cubes, square pyramids and tetrahedral frusta). In this paper, we describe the observed hierarchical self-assembly of more complex, patterned polyhedral containers in the form of regular dodecahedra and octahedra. The hierarchical design methodology, combined with the use of self-correction mechanisms, was found to greatly reduce the propagation of self-assembly error that occurs in these more complex systems. It is a highly effective way to mass-produce patterned, complex 3D structures on the microscale and could also facilitate encapsulation of cargo in a parallel and cost-effective manner. Furthermore, the behavior that we have observed may be useful in the assembly of complex systems with large numbers of components.

  13. Chemical reaction mediated self-assembly of PTCDA into nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Sayyad, Arshad S; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2011-09-01

    Uniform and crystalline nanofibers of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), an insoluble organic semiconducting molecule, have been achieved by self-assembling the molecules using chemical reaction mediated conversion of an appropriately designed soluble precursor, perylene tetracarboxylic acid (PTCA) using carbodiimide chemistry. PMID:21814688

  14. Molecular gated transistors: Role of self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaya, O.; Halpern, E.; Khamaisi, B.; Shaked, M.; Usherenko, Y.; Shalev, G.; Doron, A.; Levy, I.; Rosenwaks, Y.

    2010-07-01

    In order to understand the biosensing mechanism of field-effect based biosensors and optimize their performance, the effect of each of its molecular building block must be understood. In this work the gating effect of self-assembled linker molecules on field-effect transistor was studied in detail. We have combined Kelvin probe force microscopy, current-voltage measurements, capacitance-voltage measurements, equivalent circuit modeling and device simulations in order to trace the mechanism of silicon-on-insulator biological field-effect transistors. The measurements were conducted on the widely used linker molecules (3-aminopropyl)-trimethoxysilane (APTMS) and 11-aminoundecyl-triethoxysilane (AUTES), which were self-assembled on ozone activated silicon oxide surface covering the transistor channel. In a dry environment, the work function of the modified silicon oxide decreased by more than 1.5 eV, and the transistor threshold voltage increased by about 30 V following the self-assembly. A detailed analysis indicates that these changes are due to negative induced charges on the top dielectric layer, and an effective dipole due to the polar monolayer. However, the self-assembly did not change the silicon flat-band voltage when in contact with an electrolyte. This is attributed to electrostatic screening by the electrolyte.

  15. Amphiphilic self-assembly of alkanols in protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihui Joy; FitzGerald, Paul A; Dolan, Andrew; Atkin, Rob; Warr, Gregory G

    2014-08-21

    Strong cohesive forces in protic ionic liquids (PILs) can induce a liquid nanostructure consisting of segregated polar and apolar domains. Small-angle X-ray scattering has shown that these forces can also induce medium chain length n-alkanols to self-assemble into micelle- and microemulsion-like structures in ethylammonium (EA(+)) and propylammonium (PA(+)) PILs, in contrast to their immiscibility with both water and ethanolammonium (EtA(+)) PILs. These binary mixtures are structured on two distinct length scales: one associated with the self-assembled n-alkanol aggregates and the other with the underlying liquid nanostructure. This suggests that EA(+) and PA(+) enable n-alkanol aggregation by acting as cosurfactants, which EtA(+) cannot do because its terminating hydroxyl renders the cation nonamphiphilic. The primary determining factor for miscibility and self-assembly is the ratio of alkyl chain lengths of the alkanol and PIL cation, modulated by the anion type. These results show how ILs can support the self-assembly of nontraditional amphiphiles and enable the creation of new forms of soft matter. PMID:25068766

  16. Cooperative Self-Assembly of Peptide Gelators and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly provides a versatile route for the production of nanoscale materials for medical and technological applications. Herein, we demonstrate that the cooperative self-assembly of amphiphilic small molecules and proteins can have drastic effects on supramolecular nanostructuring of resulting materials. We report that mesoscale, fractal-like clusters of proteins form at concentrations that are orders of magnitude lower compared to those usually associated with molecular crowding at room temperature. These protein clusters have pronounced effects on the molecular self-assembly of aromatic peptide amphiphiles (fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl- dipeptides), resulting in a reversal of chiral organization and enhanced order through templating and binding. Moreover, the morphological and mechanical properties of the resultant nanostructured gels can be controlled by the cooperative self-assembly of peptides and protein fractal clusters, having implications for biomedical applications where proteins and peptides are both present. In addition, fundamental insights into cooperative interplay of molecular interactions and confinement by clusters of chiral macromolecules is relevant to gaining understanding of the molecular mechanisms of relevance to the origin of life and development of synthetic mimics of living systems. PMID:24256076

  17. Real-time tracking of superparamagnetic nanoparticle self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Siffalovic, P; Majkova, E; Chitu, L; Jergel, M; Luby, S; Capek, I; Satka, A; Timmann, A; Roth, S V

    2008-12-01

    The spontaneous self-assembly process of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in a fast-drying colloidal drop is observed in real time. The grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) technique is employed for an in situ tracking of the reciprocal space, with a 3 ms delay time between subsequent frames delivered by a new generation of X-ray cameras. A focused synchrotron beam and sophisticated sample oscillations make it possible to relate the dynamic reciprocal to direct space features and to localize the self-assembly. In particular, no nanoparticle ordering is found inside the evaporating drop and near-surface region down to a drop thickness of 90 microm. Scanning through the shrinking drop-contact line indicates the start of self-assembly near the drop three-phase interface, in accord with theoretical predictions. The results obtained have direct implications for establishing the self-assembly process as a routine technological step in the preparation of new nanostructures. PMID:19003821

  18. Directed intermixing in multi-component self-assembling biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Gasiorowski, Joshua Z.; Collier, Joel H.

    2011-01-01

    The non-covalent co-assembly of multiple different peptides can be a useful route for producing multifunctional biomaterials. However, to date such materials have almost exclusively been investigated as homogeneous self-assemblies, having functional components uniformly distributed throughout their supramolecular structures. Here we illustrate control over the intermixing of multiple different self-assembling peptides, in turn providing a simple but powerful means for modulating these materials’ mechanical and biological properties. In beta-sheet fibrillizing hydrogels, significant increases in stiffening could be achieved using heterobifunctional cross-linkers by sequestering peptides bearing different reactive groups into distinct populations of fibrils, thus favoring inter-fibril cross-linking. Further, by specifying the intermixing of RGD-bearing peptides in 2-D and 3-D self-assemblies, the growth of HUVECs and NIH 3T3 cells could be significantly modulated. This approach may be immediately applicable towards a wide variety of self-assembling systems that form stable supramolecular structures. PMID:21863894

  19. Self-assembly of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles with Permanent Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Suvojit; Puri, Ishwar

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) exhibit superparamagnetism when thermal fluctuations overcome the potential barrier for spin reversal set by magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The magnetic moment in such a material oscillates between the easy axes leading to zero net magnetization. Stable colloidal dispersions of MNPs exploit this state to prevent agglomeration. Self-assembly of MNPs presents an excellent bottom up nanofabrication technique due to the wide range of structures that can be formed. A stable dispersion of MNPs is an essential starting point for good control of the process. In this study we explore the theoretical basis for a self-assembled MNP structure with permanent magnetization starting from a dispersion of superparamangetic MNPs. Magnetostatic coupling of dipole moments enhance the potential barrier for magnetization reversals. We use X-Ray microCT and TEM to visualize the self-assembled structures. We use a stochastic form of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation to simulate the magnetization dynamics in each MNP. Permanent magnetization in self-assembled structures generated in situ promise several significant applications such as targeted drug delivery, tissue engineering and novel soft composites.

  20. Self-assembled peptide nanostructures for functional materials.

    PubMed

    Ekiz, Melis Sardan; Cinar, Goksu; Khalily, Mohammad Aref; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-10-01

    Nature is an important inspirational source for scientists, and presents complex and elegant examples of adaptive and intelligent systems created by self-assembly. Significant effort has been devoted to understanding these sophisticated systems. The self-assembly process enables us to create supramolecular nanostructures with high order and complexity, and peptide-based self-assembling building blocks can serve as suitable platforms to construct nanostructures showing diverse features and applications. In this review, peptide-based supramolecular assemblies will be discussed in terms of their synthesis, design, characterization and application. Peptide nanostructures are categorized based on their chemical and physical properties and will be examined by rationalizing the influence of peptide design on the resulting morphology and the methods employed to characterize these high order complex systems. Moreover, the application of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials as functional materials in information technologies and environmental sciences will be reviewed by providing examples from recently published high-impact studies. PMID:27578525

  1. Towards lysozyme nanotube and 3D hybrid self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Cecile; Handschin, Stephan; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-07-01

    We report lysozyme self-assembly into nanotubes, under the effect of hydrolysis at pH 2 and 90 °C. We resolve the final steps of the fibrillation pathway, entailing the closure of multi-stranded helical ribbons into nanotubes, and we provide evidence of β-sheet arrangement within the nanotubes, demonstrating amyloid-like aggregation. Addition of chloroauric acid to the self-assembled structures can lead to generation of either gold single crystal nanoplatelets or gold nanoparticles (when a reducing agent is added) decorating the nanotube and ribbon surfaces. The crystal-based organic-inorganic hybrids further assemble into 3D ``sandwiched'' structures.We report lysozyme self-assembly into nanotubes, under the effect of hydrolysis at pH 2 and 90 °C. We resolve the final steps of the fibrillation pathway, entailing the closure of multi-stranded helical ribbons into nanotubes, and we provide evidence of β-sheet arrangement within the nanotubes, demonstrating amyloid-like aggregation. Addition of chloroauric acid to the self-assembled structures can lead to generation of either gold single crystal nanoplatelets or gold nanoparticles (when a reducing agent is added) decorating the nanotube and ribbon surfaces. The crystal-based organic-inorganic hybrids further assemble into 3D ``sandwiched'' structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods, further images and FTIR data. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02194g

  2. Direct Synthesis of Controlled-Size Nanospheres inside Nanocavities of Self-Organized Photopolymerizing Soft Oxometalates [PW12 O40 ]n (n=1100-7500).

    PubMed

    Das, Kousik; Roy, Soumyajit

    2015-09-01

    The unusual self-assembly of {(BMIm)2 (DMIm)[PW12 O40 ]}n (n=1100-7500) (BMIm=1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium, DMIm=3,3'-dimethyl-1,1'-diimidazolium) soft oxometalates (SOMs) with controlled size and a hollow nanocavity was exploited for the photochemical synthesis of polymeric nanospheres within the nanocavity of the SOM. The SOM vesicle has been characterized by using several techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS), static light scattering (SLS), attenuated total reflection (ATR) IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, microscopy, and zeta-potential analysis. The self-assembly and stabilization of this soft-oxometalate vesicle has been shown by means of counter-ion condensation. The immediate implication of such stabilization-the variation of the dielectric constant with the hydrodynamic radius of the vesicle-has been used to synthesize vesicles of controlled size. Such vesicles of varying size have been used as templates for polymerization reactions that produce polymeric spheres of controlled size. Direct evidence shows that the SOM behaves as a model heterogeneous catalytic system. Such surfactant- and initiator-free photochemical synthetic routes for obtaining uniform latex spheres could be used in the making of optical bandgap materials, inverse opals, and paints. PMID:26185037

  3. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tyler G.; Garzon, Max H.; Deaton, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are “strong” assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly

  4. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tyler G; Garzon, Max H; Deaton, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are "strong" assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly systems

  5. The impact of substrate interaction in directed self-assembly of symmetric diblock copolymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Robert

    ) and size of process window. It also introduces an analysis technique for evaluating assembly kinetics with an emphasis on defect annihilation. The fifth chapter seeks to identify more thoroughly the root causes of LER in BCP line/space DSA by investigating a number of factors. The sixth and final full chapter describes initial success in the effort to extend the concepts of BCP DSA on patterned planar substrates to flexible or three-dimensional substrates (for roll-to-roll applications) by using functional layer-by-layer deposited films. Our final conclusion touches on the ideas of nucleation of self-assembled BCP structures and how they relate to kinetic pathways and timescales of assembly.

  6. Hierarchical self-assembly: Self-organized nanostructures in a nematically ordered matrix of self-assembled polymeric chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubeena, Shaikh; Chatterji, Apratim

    2015-03-01

    We report many different nanostructures which are formed when model nanoparticles of different sizes (diameter σn) are allowed to aggregate in a background matrix of semiflexible self-assembled polymeric wormlike micellar chains. The different nanostructures are formed by the dynamical arrest of phase-separating mixtures of micellar monomers and nanoparticles. The different morphologies obtained are the result of an interplay of the available free volume, the elastic energy of deformation of polymers, the density (chemical potential) of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix, and, of course, the ratio of the size of self-assembling nanoparticles and self-avoidance diameter of polymeric chains. We have used a hybrid semi-grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation scheme to obtain the (nonequilibrium) phase diagram of the self-assembled nanostructures. We observe rodlike structures of nanoparticles which get self-assembled in the gaps between the nematically ordered chains, as well as percolating gel-like network of conjoined nanotubes. We also find a totally unexpected interlocked crystalline phase of nanoparticles and monomers, in which each crystal plane of nanoparticles is separated by planes of perfectly organized polymer chains. We identified the condition which leads to such interlocked crystal structure. We suggest experimental possibilities of how the results presented in this paper could be used to obtain different nanostructures in the laboratory.

  7. A Case Study of the Likes and Dislikes of DNA and RNA in Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hua; Wu, Siyu; Li, Mo; Li, Yulin; Jiang, Wen; Mao, Chengde

    2015-12-01

    Programmed self-assembly of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) is an active research area as it promises a general approach for nanoconstruction. Whereas DNA self-assembly has been extensively studied, RNA self-assembly lags much behind. One strategy to boost RNA self-assembly is to adapt the methods of DNA self-assembly for RNA self-assembly because of the chemical and structural similarities of DNA and RNA. However, these two types of molecules are still significantly different. To enable the rational design of RNA self-assembly, a thorough examination of their likes and dislikes in programmed self-assembly is needed. The current work begins to address this task. It was found that similar, two-stranded motifs of RNA and DNA lead to similar, but clearly different nanostructures. PMID:26457993

  8. Synthetic Molecular Machines for Active Self-Assembly: Prototype Algorithms, Designs, and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabby, Nadine L.

    behaviors. This class of behaviors includes any behavior where a passive physical system simply does not have enough physical energy to perform the specified tasks in the requisite amount of time. As we will demonstrate and prove, a sufficiently expressive implementation of an "active" molecular self-assembly approach can achieve these behaviors. Using an external source of fuel solves part of the problem, so the system is not "energetically incomplete." But the programmable system also needs to have sufficient expressive power to achieve the specified behaviors. Perhaps surprisingly, some of these systems do not even require Turing completeness to be sufficiently expressive. Building on a large variety of work by other scientists in the fields of DNA nanotechnology, chemistry and reconfigurable robotics, this thesis introduces several research contributions in the context of active self-assembly. We show that simple primitives such as insertion and deletion are able to generate complex and interesting results such as the growth of a linear polymer in logarithmic time and the ability of a linear polymer to treadmill. To this end we developed a formal model for active-self assembly that is directly implementable with DNA molecules. We show that this model is computationally equivalent to a machine capable of producing strings that are stronger than regular languages and, at most, as strong as context-free grammars. This is a great advance in the theory of active self-assembly as prior models were either entirely theoretical or only implementable in the context of macro-scale robotics. We developed a chain reaction method for the autonomous exponential growth of a linear DNA polymer. Our method is based on the insertion of molecules into the assembly, which generates two new insertion sites for every initial one employed. The building of a line in logarithmic time is a first step toward building a shape in logarithmic time. We demonstrate the first construction of a synthetic

  9. Anion-dipole interactions make the homopolymers self-assemble into multiple nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long-Hai; Zhang, Zi-Dan; Hong, Chun-Yan; He, Xue-Hao; You, Wei; You, Ye-Zi

    2015-05-27

    Anion-dipole interactions can make homopolymers self-assemble like an amphiphilic block copolymer. Generally, common homopolymers cannot self-assemble into multiple nanostructures. Here, it is reported that anion-dipole interactions can enable a number of homopolymers to achieve a variety of self-assembly behaviors in aqueous solution. Such interactions and self-assembly features have been exclusively reserved for amphiphilic (block) polymers until now. PMID:25873566

  10. Attachment of Algal Cells to Zwitterionic Self-Assembled Monolayers Comprised of Different Anionic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bauer, S; Finlay, J A; Thomé, I; Nolte, K; Franco, S C; Ralston, E; Swain, G E; Clare, A S; Rosenhahn, A

    2016-06-01

    The influence of zwitterionic self-assembled monolayers on settlement and removal of algae was studied. The monolayers were constructed either from zwitterionic thiols or from solutions of positively and negatively charged thiols. The cationic component was composed of quaternary ammonium terminated thiols and the anionic component contained sulfate or carboxylate termination. During assembly, all surfaces showed a strong tendency for equilibration of the surface charge. Settlement and adhesion assays with zoospores of Ulva linza and the diatom Navicula incerta, and field tests of the initial surface colonization revealed the relevance of charge equilibration for the biological inertness of the prepared surfaces. PMID:27182766

  11. Self-assembly of hybrid structures on nano templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruomiao

    This dissertation describes the investigation on the synthesis of hybrid structures on nano-templates. Fabrication of molecular nano-patterns of organic amphiphiles (e.g. fatty acids) by self-assembly has been discussed here, and their application as templates for two-dimensional in situ synthesis of metal soap molecular pattern has been demonstrated. The synthesis of nanoparticle---nanorod hybrid structure represents another effort to achieve hybrid materials. Therefore, methods to create complex inorganic---organic nano---hybrid are provided by this work. AFM disclosed the pattern structures of the self-assembled monolayers as designed nanoscaled patterns. It is observed two pattern periodicities reflecting the head-to-head and head-to-tail molecular assembly tendencies of the fatty acids and their dependence on the molecular structure and chain length, which exhibits a linear increase in the periodicity with an increasing molecular chain length. The investigation on molecular patterns of self-assembled monolayers of metal arachidates on graphite by AFM and FTIR is described. Metal arachidate self-assemblies show similar stripe pattern and periodicities as those of arachidic acid. The monolayer structure is mainly dictated by graphite, while the type of metal ions mainly affects the domain size, shape and regularity. The results of AFM and FTIR are correlated to the Irving-Williams Series, which predicts bond strength of the metal ions to ligands. The spin coated films from binary solutions of nanoparticles and fatty acids with different chain lengths (Even number of carbon, C18--C26), have been used to study the effect of nanoparticles on self-assemble pattern of fatty acids. C18--C22 acids formed uniform nanorods attached and induced by nanoparticles, while the self-assembled stripe patterns of C24 and C26 were unaffected by the presence of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were aligned on C26 monolayer. The seeded nucleation mechanism has been studied by AFM

  12. Multidimensional hierarchical self-assembly of amphiphilic cylindrical block comicelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Huibin; Hudson, Zachary M.; Winnik, Mitchell A.; Manners, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Self-assembly of molecular and block copolymer amphiphiles represents a well-established route to micelles with a wide variety of shapes and gel-like phases. We demonstrate an analogous process, but on a longer length scale, in which amphiphilic P-H-P and H-P-H cylindrical triblock comicelles with hydrophobic (H) or polar (P) segments that are monodisperse in length are able to self-assemble side by side or end to end in nonsolvents for the central or terminal segments, respectively. This allows the formation of cylindrical supermicelles and one-dimensional (1D) or 3D superstructures that persist in both solution and the solid state. These assemblies possess multiple levels of structural hierarchy in combination with existence on a multimicrometer-length scale, features that are generally only found in natural materials.

  13. Artificial Photosynthesis at Dynamic Self-Assembled Interfaces in Water.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Malte; Troppmann, Stefan; König, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Artificial photosynthesis is one of the big scientific challenges of today. Self-assembled dynamic interfaces, such as vesicles or micelles, have been used as microreactors to mimic biological photosynthesis. These aggregates can help to overcome typical problems of homogeneous photocatalytic water splitting. Microheterogeneous environments organize catalyst-photosensitizer assemblies at the interface in close proximity and thus enhance intermolecular interactions. Thereby vesicles and micelles may promote photoinitiated charge separation and suppress back electron transfer. The dynamic self-assembled interfaces solubilize non-polar compounds and protect sensitive catalytic units and intermediates against degradation. In addition, vesicles provide compartmentation that was used to separate different redox environments needed for an overall water splitting system. This Minireview provides an overview of the applications of micellar and vesicular microheterogeneous systems for solar energy conversion by photosensitized water oxidation and hydrogen generation. PMID:26552728

  14. Self-Assembly of Graphene on Carbon Nanotube Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kaiyuan; Eres, Gyula; Howe, Jane; Chuang, Yen-Jun; Li, Xufan; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhang, Litong; Xie, Sishen; Pan, Zhengwei

    2013-01-01

    The rolling up of a graphene sheet into a tube is a standard visualization tool for illustrating carbon nanotube (CNT) formation. However, the actual processes of rolling up graphene sheets into CNTs in laboratory syntheses have never been demonstrated. Here we report conformal growth of graphene by carbon self-assembly on single-wall and multi-wall CNTs using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane without the presence of metal catalysts. The new graphene layers roll up into seamless coaxial cylinders encapsulating the existing CNTs, but their adhesion to the primary CNTs is weak due to the existence of lattice misorientation. Our study shows that graphene nucleation and growth by self-assembly of carbon on the inactive carbon basal plane of CNTs occurs by a new mechanism that is markedly different from epitaxial growth on metal surfaces, opening up the possibility of graphene growth on many other non-metal substrates by simple methane CVD. PMID:23912638

  15. Electrostatically Directed Self-Assembly of Ultrathin Supramolecular Polymer Microcapsules

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Richard M; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Yu; Coulston, Roger J; Smith, Clive A; Salmon, Andrew R; Yu, Ziyi; Scherman, Oren A; Abell, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly offers routes to challenging architectures on the molecular and macroscopic scale. Coupled with microfluidics it has been used to make microcapsules—where a 2D sheet is shaped in 3D, encapsulating the volume within. In this paper, a versatile methodology to direct the accumulation of capsule-forming components to the droplet interface using electrostatic interactions is described. In this approach, charged copolymers are selectively partitioned to the microdroplet interface by a complementary charged surfactant for subsequent supramolecular cross-linking via cucurbit[8]uril. This dynamic assembly process is employed to selectively form both hollow, ultrathin microcapsules and solid microparticles from a single solution. The ability to dictate the distribution of a mixture of charged copolymers within the microdroplet, as demonstrated by the single-step fabrication of distinct core–shell microcapsules, gives access to a new generation of innovative self-assembled constructs. PMID:26213532

  16. DNA Self-assembly and Computer System Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Chris

    2006-11-01

    The migration of circuit fabrication technology from the microscale to the nanoscale has generated a great deal of interest in how the fundamental physical limitations of materials will change the way computer systems are engineered. The changing relationships between performance, defects, and cost have motivated research into so-called disruptive or exotic technologies and draws inspiration from systems found in biology. Advances in DNA self-assembly have demonstrated versatile and programmable methods for the synthesis of complex nanostructures suitable for logic circuitry. Several recent advances in programmable DNA self-assembly and the theory and design of DNA nanostructures for computing will be presented. The advantages of this technology go beyond the simple scaling of device feature sizes (sub-20nm) to enable new modes of computation that are otherwise impractical with conventional technologies. A brief survey of several computer architectures that take advantage of this new technology will also be presented.

  17. Biomolecular decision-making process for self assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2005-01-01

    The brain is often identified with decision-making processes in the biological world. In fact, single cells, single macromolecules (proteins) and populations of molecules also make simple decisions. These decision processes are essential to survival and to the biological self-assembly and self-repair processes that we seek to emulate. How do these tiny systems make effective decisions? How do they make decisions in concert with a cooperative network of other molecules or cells? How can we emulate the decision-making behaviors of small-scale biological systems to program and self-assemble microsystems? This LDRD supported research to answer these questions. Our work included modeling and simulation of protein populations to help us understand, mimic, and categorize molecular decision-making mechanisms that nonequilibrium systems can exhibit. This work is an early step towards mimicking such nanoscale and microscale biomolecular decision-making processes in inorganic systems.

  18. Protein-directed self-assembly of a fullerene crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kook-Han; Ko, Dong-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Nam Hyeong; Paul, Jaydeep; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Murray, Christopher B.; Acharya, Rudresh; Degrado, William F.; Kim, Yong Ho; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-04-01

    Learning to engineer self-assembly would enable the precise organization of molecules by design to create matter with tailored properties. Here we demonstrate that proteins can direct the self-assembly of buckminsterfullerene (C60) into ordered superstructures. A previously engineered tetrameric helical bundle binds C60 in solution, rendering it water soluble. Two tetramers associate with one C60, promoting further organization revealed in a 1.67-Å crystal structure. Fullerene groups occupy periodic lattice sites, sandwiched between two Tyr residues from adjacent tetramers. Strikingly, the assembly exhibits high charge conductance, whereas both the protein-alone crystal and amorphous C60 are electrically insulating. The affinity of C60 for its crystal-binding site is estimated to be in the nanomolar range, with lattices of known protein crystals geometrically compatible with incorporating the motif. Taken together, these findings suggest a new means of organizing fullerene molecules into a rich variety of lattices to generate new properties by design.

  19. Prospects for using self-assembled nucleic acid structures.

    PubMed

    Rudchenko, M N; Zamyatnin, A A

    2015-04-01

    According to the central dogma in molecular biology, nucleic acids are assigned with key functions on storing and executing genetic information in any living cell. However, features of nucleic acids are not limited only with properties providing template-dependent biosynthetic processes. Studies of DNA and RNA unveiled unique features of these polymers able to make various self-assembled three-dimensional structures that, among other things, use the complementarity principle. Here, we review various self-assembled nucleic acid structures as well as application of DNA and RNA to develop nanomaterials, molecular automata, and nanodevices. It can be expected that in the near future results of these developments will allow designing novel next-generation diagnostic systems and medicinal drugs. PMID:25869355

  20. Dynamic self-assembly of microscale rotors and swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies Wykes, Megan S.; Palacci, Jérémie; Adachi, Takuji; Ristroph, Leif; Zhong, Xiao; Ward, Michael D.; Zhang, Jun; Shelley, Michael J.

    Biological systems often involve the self-assembly of basic components into complex and function- ing structures. Artificial systems that mimic such processes can provide a well-controlled setting to explore the principles involved and also synthesize useful micromachines. Our experiments show that immotile, but active, components self-assemble into two types of structure that exhibit the fundamental forms of motility: translation and rotation. Specifically, micron-scale metallic rods are designed to induce extensile surface flows in the presence of a chemical fuel; these rods interact with each other and pair up to form either a swimmer or a rotor. Such pairs can transition reversibly be- tween these two configurations, leading to kinetics reminiscent of bacterial run-and-tumble motion.

  1. Linker-Mediated Self-Assembly Dynamics of Charged Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guanhua; Chee, See Wee; Raj, Sanoj; Král, Petr; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2016-08-23

    Using in situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we visualized a stepwise self-assembly of surfactant-coated and hydrated gold nanoparticles (NPs) into linear chains or branched networks. The NP binding is facilitated by linker molecules, ethylenediammonium, which form hydrogen bonds with surfactant molecules of neighboring NPs. The observed spacing between bound neighboring NPs, ∼15 Å, matches the combined length of two surfactants and one linker molecule. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that for lower concentrations of linkers, NPs with charged surfactants cannot be fully neutralized by strongly binding divalent linkers, so that NPs carry higher effective charges and tend to form chains, due to poor screening. The highly polar NP surfaces polarize and partly immobilize nearby water molecules, which promotes NPs binding. The presented experimental and theoretical approach allows for detail observation and explanation of self-assembly processes in colloidal nanosystems. PMID:27494560

  2. Self-Assembly of Graphene on Carbon Nanotube Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kaiyuan; Eres, Gyula; Howe, Jane; Chuang, Yen-Jun; Li, Xufan; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhang, Litong; Xie, Sishen; Pan, Zhengwei

    2013-08-01

    The rolling up of a graphene sheet into a tube is a standard visualization tool for illustrating carbon nanotube (CNT) formation. However, the actual processes of rolling up graphene sheets into CNTs in laboratory syntheses have never been demonstrated. Here we report conformal growth of graphene by carbon self-assembly on single-wall and multi-wall CNTs using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane without the presence of metal catalysts. The new graphene layers roll up into seamless coaxial cylinders encapsulating the existing CNTs, but their adhesion to the primary CNTs is weak due to the existence of lattice misorientation. Our study shows that graphene nucleation and growth by self-assembly of carbon on the inactive carbon basal plane of CNTs occurs by a new mechanism that is markedly different from epitaxial growth on metal surfaces, opening up the possibility of graphene growth on many other non-metal substrates by simple methane CVD.

  3. Stable doping of carbon nanotubes via molecular self assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.; Chen, Y.; Podzorov, V.; Cook, A.; Zakhidov, A.

    2014-10-14

    We report a novel method for stable doping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) based on methods of molecular self assembly. A conformal growth of a self-assembled monolayer of fluoroalkyl trichloro-silane (FTS) at CNT surfaces results in a strong increase of the sheet conductivity of CNT electrodes by 60–300%, depending on the CNT chirality and composition. The charge carrier mobility of undoped partially aligned CNT films was independently estimated in a field-effect transistor geometry (~100 cm²V⁻¹s⁻¹). The hole density induced by the FTS monolayer in CNT sheets is estimated to be ~1.8 ×10¹⁴cm⁻². We also show that FTS doping of CNT anodes greatly improves the performance of organic solar cells. This large and stable doping effect, easily achieved in large-area samples, makes this approach very attractive for applications of CNTs in transparent and flexible electronics.

  4. Calixarene-encapsulated nanoparticles: self-assembly into functional nanomaterials†

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Calixarenes are excellent surfactants for enhancing the dispersion and self-assembly of metal nanoparticles into well-defined structures, particularly those with unit length scales in the 10–100 nm size range. Particles within these ensembles are strongly coupled, giving rise to unique collective optical or magnetic properties. The self-assembled nanostructures described in this feature article include 2D arrays of colloidal Au nanoparticles with size-dependent plasmonic responses, and sub-100 nm Co nanoparticle rings with chiral magnetic states. These nanoparticle assemblies may be further developed for applications in chemical sensing based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and as binary elements for nonvolatile memory, respectively. PMID:16582988

  5. Self Assembled Structures by Directional Solidification of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Interest in ordered porous structures has grown because of there unique properties such as photonic bandgaps, high backing packing density and high surface to volume ratio. Inspired by nature, biometric strategies using self assembled organic molecules dominate the development of hierarchical inorganic structures. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) also exhibit self assembly characteristics to form hierarchical metallic and inorganic structures. Crystallization of diphasic materials by DSE can produce two dimensional ordered structures consisting of rods or lamella. By selective removal of phases, DSE is capable to fabricate ordered pore arrays or ordered pin arrays. Criteria and limitations to fabricate hierarchical structures will be presented. Porous structures in silicon base alloys and ceramic systems will be reported.

  6. Dynamic self-assembly of microscale rotors and swimmers.

    PubMed

    Davies Wykes, Megan S; Palacci, Jérémie; Adachi, Takuji; Ristroph, Leif; Zhong, Xiao; Ward, Michael D; Zhang, Jun; Shelley, Michael J

    2016-05-18

    Biological systems often involve the self-assembly of basic components into complex and functioning structures. Artificial systems that mimic such processes can provide a well-controlled setting to explore the principles involved and also synthesize useful micromachines. Our experiments show that immotile, but active, components self-assemble into two types of structure that exhibit the fundamental forms of motility: translation and rotation. Specifically, micron-scale metallic rods are designed to induce extensile surface flows in the presence of a chemical fuel; these rods interact with each other and pair up to form either a swimmer or a rotor. Such pairs can transition reversibly between these two configurations, leading to kinetics reminiscent of bacterial run-and-tumble motion. PMID:27121100

  7. Self-assembly of nanomaterials at fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Toor, Anju; Feng, Tao; Russell, Thomas P

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in the field of the self-assembly of nanoscale materials such as nanoparticles, nanorods and nanosheets at liquid/liquid interfaces are reviewed. Self-assembly behavior of both biological and synthetic particles is discussed. For biological nanoparticles, the nanoparticle assembly at fluid interfaces provides a simple route for directing nanoparticles into 2D or 3D constructs with hierarchical ordering. The interfacial assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at liquid interfaces would play a key role in applications such as nanotube fractionation, flexible electronic thin-film fabrication and synthesis of porous SWCNT/polymer composites foams. Liquids can be structured by the jamming of nanoparticle surfactants at fluid interfaces. By controlling the interfacial packing of nanoparticle surfactants using external triggers, a new class of materials can be generated that combines the desirable characteristics of fluids such as rapid transport of energy carriers with the structural stability of a solid. PMID:27233643

  8. Self-assembly of graphene on carbon nanotube surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaiyuan; Eres, Gyula; Howe, Jane; Chuang, Yen-Jun; Li, Xufan; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhang, Litong; Xie, Sishen; Pan, Zhengwei

    2013-01-01

    The rolling up of a graphene sheet into a tube is a standard visualization tool for illustrating carbon nanotube (CNT) formation. However, the actual processes of rolling up graphene sheets into CNTs in laboratory syntheses have never been demonstrated. Here we report conformal growth of graphene by carbon self-assembly on single-wall and multi-wall CNTs using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane without the presence of metal catalysts. The new graphene layers roll up into seamless coaxial cylinders encapsulating the existing CNTs, but their adhesion to the primary CNTs is weak due to the existence of lattice misorientation. Our study shows that graphene nucleation and growth by self-assembly of carbon on the inactive carbon basal plane of CNTs occurs by a new mechanism that is markedly different from epitaxial growth on metal surfaces, opening up the possibility of graphene growth on many other non-metal substrates by simple methane CVD. PMID:23912638

  9. Self-assembly of phenylalanine-based molecules.

    PubMed

    German, Helen W; Uyaver, Sahin; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2015-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics, we study the self-assembly of phenylalanine with charged end-groups at various temperatures and concentrations. As in the case of diphenylalanine, we observe the formation of nanotubes; however, phenylalanine aggregates in layers of four, not six, molecules. The observed aggregates are consistent with recent experimental measurements of fibrils obtained from mice with phenylketonuria. We investigate the stability and the mechanism by which these tubular structures form and discuss potential toxicity mechanisms. PMID:25347763

  10. Propagating Waves of Self-assembly in Organosilane Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas,J.; Efimenko, K.; Fischer, D.; Phelan, F.; Genzer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Wavefronts associated with reaction-diffusion and self-assembly processes are ubiquitous in the natural world. For example, propagating fronts arise in crystallization and diverse other thermodynamic ordering processes, in polymerization fronts involved in cell movement and division, as well as in the competitive social interactions and population dynamics of animals at much larger scales. Although it is often claimed that self-sustaining or autocatalytic front propagation is well described by mean-field 'reaction-diffusion' or 'phase field' ordering models, it has recently become appreciated from simulations and theoretical arguments that fluctuation effects in lower spatial dimensions can lead to appreciable deviations from the classical mean-field theory (MFT) of this type of front propagation. The present work explores these fluctuation effects in a real physical system. In particular, we consider a high-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) study of the spontaneous frontal self-assembly of organosilane (OS) molecules into self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface-energy gradients on oxidized silicon wafers. We find that these layers organize from the wafer edge as propagating wavefronts having well defined velocities. In accordance with two-dimensional simulations of this type of front propagation that take fluctuation effects into account, we find that the interfacial widths w(t) of these SAM self-assembly fronts exhibit a power-law broadening in time, w(t) {approx} t{sup {beta}}, rather than the constant width predicted by MFT. Moreover, the observed exponent values accord rather well with previous simulation and theoretical estimates. These observations have significant implications for diverse types of ordering fronts that occur under confinement conditions in biological or materials-processing contexts.

  11. Self-Assembly Protein Nanogels for Safer Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Purwada, Alberto; Tian, Ye F; Huang, Weishan; Rohrbach, Kathleen M; Deol, Simrita; August, Avery; Singh, Ankur

    2016-06-01

    Soluble antigen-based cancer vaccines have poor retention in tissues along with suboptimal antigen processing by dendritic cells. Multiple booster doses are often needed, leading to dose-limiting systemic toxicity. A versatile, immunomodulatory, self-assembly protein nanogel vaccine is reported that induces robust immune cell response at lower antigen doses than soluble antigens, an important step towards biomaterials-based safer immunotherapy approaches. PMID:27100566

  12. Self-assembled containers based on extended tetrathiafulvalene.

    PubMed

    Bivaud, Sébastien; Goeb, Sébastien; Croué, Vincent; Dron, Paul I; Allain, Magali; Sallé, Marc

    2013-07-10

    Two original self-assembled containers constituted each by six electroactive subunits are described. They are synthesized from a concave tetratopic π-extended tetrathiafulvalene ligand bearing four pyridyl units and cis-M(dppf)(OTf)2 (M = Pd or Pt; dppf = 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene; OTf = trifluoromethane-sulfonate) complexes. Both fully characterized assemblies present an oblate spheroidal cavity that can incorporate one perylene molecule. PMID:23795694

  13. The self-assembly of a camptothecin-lysine nanotube.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan; Shieh, Aileen; Kim, Se Hye; King, Samantha; Kim, Anne; Sun, Hui-Lung; Croce, Carlo M; Parquette, Jon R

    2016-06-15

    A simple, low molecular weight camptothecin-lysine conjugate is reported to self-assemble into nanotubes with diameters of 70-100nm and a drug loading level of 60.5%. The nanotubes exhibited promising in vitro cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines A549, NCI-H460 and NCI-H23. The release of active camptothecin was highly dependent on conjugate concentration, temperature and pH of the solution. PMID:27156772

  14. Self-assembly of a 5-fluorouracil-dipeptide hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan; Kaplan, Jonah A; Shieh, Aileen; Sun, Hui-Lung; Croce, Carlo M; Grinstaff, Mark W; Parquette, Jon R

    2016-04-18

    The self-assembly of 5-fluorouracil dilysine conjugates into self-supporting hydrogels, comprised of entangled nanofibers or rigid nanotubes with diameters of 10 and 16 nm, respectively, is reported. The rate of release of 5-Fu from the conjugates was highly dependent on concentration in solution, whereas, release from the fully formed hydrogels was significantly slower. The 5-Fu conjugate also exhibited promising in vitro cytotoxicity against human tumor cell lines A549, H460 and H23. PMID:26996124

  15. Lighting up cells with lanthanide self-assembled helicates

    PubMed Central

    Bünzli, Jean-Claude G.

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanide bioprobes and bioconjugates are ideal luminescent stains in view of their low propensity to photobleaching, sharp emission lines and long excited state lifetimes permitting time-resolved detection for enhanced sensitivity. We show here how the interplay between physical, chemical and biochemical properties allied to microfluidics engineering leads to self-assembled dinuclear lanthanide luminescent probes illuminating live cells and selectively detecting biomarkers expressed by cancerous human breast cells. PMID:24511387

  16. Next generation high density self assembling functional protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Raphael, Jacob V.; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Demirkan, Gokhan; Fuentes, Manuel G.; Rolfs, Andreas; Hu, Yanhui; LaBaer, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    We report a high-density self assembling protein microarray that displays thousands of proteins, produced and captured in situ from immobilized cDNA templates. Over 1500 unique cDNAs were tested with > 90% success with nearly all proteins displaying yields within 2 fold of the mean, minimal sample variation and good day to day reproducibility. The displayed proteins revealed selective protein interactions. This method will enable various experimental approaches to study protein function in high throughput. PMID:18469824

  17. Sequential programmable self-assembly: Role of cooperative interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jonathan D. Halverson; Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2016-03-04

    Here, we propose a general strategy of “sequential programmable self-assembly” that enables a bottom-up design of arbitrary multi-particle architectures on nano- and microscales. We show that a naive realization of this scheme, based on the pairwise additive interactions between particles, has fundamental limitations that lead to a relatively high error rate. This can be overcome by using cooperative interparticle binding. The cooperativity is a well known feature of many biochemical processes, responsible, e.g., for signaling and regulations in living systems. Here we propose to utilize a similar strategy for high precision self-assembly, and show that DNA-mediated interactions provide a convenientmore » platform for its implementation. In particular, we outline a specific design of a DNA-based complex which we call “DNA spider,” that acts as a smart interparticle linker and provides a built-in cooperativity of binding. We demonstrate versatility of the sequential self-assembly based on spider-functionalized particles by designing several mesostructures of increasing complexity and simulating their assembly process. This includes a number of finite and repeating structures, in particular, the so-called tetrahelix and its several derivatives. Due to its generality, this approach allows one to design and successfully self-assemble virtually any structure made of a “GEOMAG” magnetic construction toy, out of nanoparticles. According to our results, once the binding cooperativity is strong enough, the sequential self-assembly becomes essentially error-free.« less

  18. The position of hydrophobic residues tunes peptide self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, Christian; Liu, Lei; Gronewold, Thomas M A; Wang, Chen; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2014-08-21

    The final structure and properties of synthetic peptides mainly depend on their sequence composition and experimental conditions. This work demonstrates that a variation in the positions of hydrophobic residues within a peptide sequence can tune the self-assembly. Techniques employed are atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and an innovative method based on surface acoustic waves. In addition, a systematic investigation on pH dependence was carried out by utilizing constant experimental parameters. PMID:24995505

  19. Self-assembled magnetic filter for highly efficient immunomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Issadore, David; Shao, Huilin; Chung, Jaehoon; Newton, Andita; Pittet, Mikael; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a compact and inexpensive microfluidic chip, the self-assembled magnetic filter, to efficiently remove magnetically tagged cells from suspension. The self-assembled magnetic filter consists of a microfluidic channel built directly above a self-assembled NdFeB magnet. Micrometre-sized grains of NdFeB assemble to form alternating magnetic dipoles, creating a magnetic field with a very strong magnitude B (from the material) and field gradient ▽B (from the configuration) in the microfluidic channel. The magnetic force imparted on magnetic beads is measured to be comparable to state-of-the-art microfabricated magnets, allowing for efficient separations to be performed in a compact, simple device. The efficiency of the magnetic filter is characterized by sorting non-magnetic (polystyrene) beads from magnetic beads (iron oxide). The filter enriches the population of non-magnetic beads to magnetic beads by a factor of >10(5) with a recovery rate of 90% at 1 mL h(-1). The utility of the magnetic filter is demonstrated with a microfluidic device that sorts tumor cells from leukocytes using negative immunomagnetic selection, and concentrates the tumor cells on an integrated membrane filter for optical detection. PMID:20949198

  20. Self-assembled amyloid fibrils with controllable conformational heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Chang Young; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and exhibit a conformational diversity that governs their pathological functions. Despite recent findings concerning the pathological role of their conformational diversity, the way in which the heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils can be formed has remained elusive. Here, we show that microwave-assisted chemistry affects the self-assembly process of amyloid fibril formation, which results in their conformational heterogeneity. In particular, microwave-assisted chemistry allows for delicate control of the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process, which enabled us to tune the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils. The heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils, which can be tuned with microwave-assisted chemistry, are attributed to the microwave-driven thermal energy affecting the electrostatic interaction during the self-assembly process. Our study demonstrates how microwave-assisted chemistry can be used to gain insight into the origin of conformational heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils as well as the design principles showing how the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils can be controlled. PMID:26592772

  1. Modeling the self-assembly of nanoparticle and nanorod superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Alexey; Kral, Petr

    2008-03-01

    Coloidal semiconductor PbSe/CdSE nanoparticles (NP) of the sizes of 3-10 nm can self-assemble in fcc, hcp and single-hexagonal (sh) superlattices [1]. We model the Coulombic, van der Waals and steric interactions between these NPs to understand the exact conditions under which they can self-assemble in these lattice structures. Our simulations show that non-local dipoles of the NPs and their screening by the conducting substrate are both crucial for the sh lattice formation. We model analogously the self-assembly of semiconducting CdSe nanorods (NRs), realized also in the presence of electric fields [2], and the binary semiconducting-metallic nanoparticle superlattices [3]. [1] D. Talapin, E. Shevchenko, C. B. Murray, A. Titov and P. Kr'al, Nano Letters 7, 1213 (2007). [2] A. Titov and P. Kr'al, submitted. [3] E. V. Shevchenko, D. V. Talapin, N. A. Kotov, S. O'Brien, C. B. Murray, Nature 439, 55-59 (2006).

  2. Multilayer block copolymer meshes by orthogonal self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli K. G., Amir; Nicaise, Samuel M.; Gadelrab, Karim R.; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Ross, Caroline A.; Berggren, Karl K.

    2016-01-01

    Continued scaling-down of lithographic-pattern feature sizes has brought templated self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) into the forefront of nanofabrication research. Technologies now exist that facilitate significant control over otherwise unorganized assembly of BCP microdomains to form both long-range and locally complex monolayer patterns. In contrast, the extension of this control into multilayers or 3D structures of BCP microdomains remains limited, despite the possible technological applications in next-generation devices. Here, we develop and analyse an orthogonal self-assembly method in which multiple layers of distinct-molecular-weight BCPs naturally produce nanomesh structures of cylindrical microdomains without requiring layer-by-layer alignment or high-resolution lithographic templating. The mechanisms for orthogonal self-assembly are investigated with both experiment and simulation, and we determine that the control over height and chemical preference of templates are critical process parameters. The method is employed to produce nanomeshes with the shapes of circles and Y-intersections, and is extended to produce three layers of orthogonally oriented cylinders. PMID:26796218

  3. Self-assembled amyloid fibrils with controllable conformational heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Chang Young; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2015-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and exhibit a conformational diversity that governs their pathological functions. Despite recent findings concerning the pathological role of their conformational diversity, the way in which the heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils can be formed has remained elusive. Here, we show that microwave-assisted chemistry affects the self-assembly process of amyloid fibril formation, which results in their conformational heterogeneity. In particular, microwave-assisted chemistry allows for delicate control of the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process, which enabled us to tune the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils. The heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils, which can be tuned with microwave-assisted chemistry, are attributed to the microwave-driven thermal energy affecting the electrostatic interaction during the self-assembly process. Our study demonstrates how microwave-assisted chemistry can be used to gain insight into the origin of conformational heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils as well as the design principles showing how the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils can be controlled.

  4. Dynamic self-assembly and control of microfluidic particle crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhee; Amini, Hamed; Stone, Howard A.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2010-01-01

    Engineered two-phase microfluidic systems have recently shown promise for computation, encryption, and biological processing. For many of these systems, complex control of dispersed-phase frequency and switching is enabled by nonlinearities associated with interfacial stresses. Introducing nonlinearity associated with fluid inertia has recently been identified as an easy to implement strategy to control two-phase (solid-liquid) microscale flows. By taking advantage of inertial effects we demonstrate controllable self-assembling particle systems, uncover dynamics suggesting a unique mechanism of dynamic self-assembly, and establish a framework for engineering microfluidic structures with the possibility of spatial frequency filtering. Focusing on the dynamics of the particle–particle interactions reveals a mechanism for the dynamic self-assembly process; inertial lift forces and a parabolic flow field act together to stabilize interparticle spacings that otherwise would diverge to infinity due to viscous disturbance flows. The interplay of the repulsive viscous interaction and inertial lift also allow us to design and implement microfluidic structures that irreversibly change interparticle spacing, similar to a low-pass filter. Although often not considered at the microscale, nonlinearity due to inertia can provide a platform for high-throughput passive control of particle positions in all directions, which will be useful for applications in flow cytometry, tissue engineering, and metamaterial synthesis. PMID:21149674

  5. Fractal intermediates in the self-assembly of silicatein filaments

    PubMed Central

    Murr, Meredith M.; Morse, Daniel E.

    2005-01-01

    Silicateins are proteins with catalytic, structure-directing activity that are responsible for silica biosynthesis in certain sponges; they are the constituents of macroscopic protein filaments that are found occluded within the silica needles made by Tethya aurantia. Self-assembly of the silicatein monomers and oligomers is shown to form fibrous structures by a mechanism that is fundamentally different from any previously described filament-assembly process. This assembly proceeds through the formation of diffusion-limited, fractally patterned aggregates on the path to filament formation. The driving force for this self-assembly is suggested to be entropic, mediated by the interaction of hydrophobic patches on the surfaces of the silicatein subunits that are not found on highly homologous congeners that do not form filaments. Our results are consistent with a model in which silicatein monomers associate into oligomers that are stabilized by intermolecular disulfide bonds. These oligomeric units assemble into a fractal network that subsequently condenses and organizes into a filamentous structure. These results represent a potentially general mechanism for protein fiber self-assembly. PMID:16091468

  6. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A; Li, Weihua; Müller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm(2). In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free energy barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers and how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to overcome them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities, and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales-a handful of nanometers-and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail. PMID:26515095

  7. Evolutionary dynamics in a simple model of self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Iain G.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the evolutionary dynamics of an idealized model for the robust self-assembly of two-dimensional structures called polyominoes. The model includes rules that encode interactions between sets of square tiles that drive the self-assembly process. The relationship between the model’s rule set and its resulting self-assembled structure can be viewed as a genotype-phenotype map and incorporated into a genetic algorithm. The rule sets evolve under selection for specified target structures. The corresponding complex fitness landscape generates rich evolutionary dynamics as a function of parameters such as the population size, search space size, mutation rate, and method of recombination. Furthermore, these systems are simple enough that in some cases the associated model genome space can be completely characterized, shedding light on how the evolutionary dynamics depends on the detailed structure of the fitness landscape. Finally, we apply the model to study the emergence of the preference for dihedral over cyclic symmetry observed for homomeric protein tetramers.

  8. Simulation Methods for Self-Assembled Polymers and Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindt, James T.

    2003-11-01

    New off-lattice grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation methods have been developed and used to model the equilibrium structure and phase diagrams of equilibrium polymers and rings. A scheme called Polydisperse Insertion, Removal, and Resizing (PDIRR) is used to accelerate the equilibration of the size distribution of self-assembled aggregates. This method allows the insertion or removal of aggregates (e.g., chains) containing an arbitrary number of monomers in a single Monte Carlo move, or the re-sizing of an existing aggregate. For the equilibrium polymer model under semi-dilute conditions, a several-fold increase in equilibration rate compared with single-monomer moves is observed, facilitating the study of the isotropic-nematic transition of semiflexible, self-assembled chains. Combined with the pivot-coupled GCMC method for ring simulation, the PDIRR approach also allows the phenomenological simulation of a polydisperse equilibrium phase of rings, 2-dimensional fluid domains, or flat self-assembled disks in three dimensions.

  9. Self-assembled amyloid fibrils with controllable conformational heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Chang Young; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and exhibit a conformational diversity that governs their pathological functions. Despite recent findings concerning the pathological role of their conformational diversity, the way in which the heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils can be formed has remained elusive. Here, we show that microwave-assisted chemistry affects the self-assembly process of amyloid fibril formation, which results in their conformational heterogeneity. In particular, microwave-assisted chemistry allows for delicate control of the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process, which enabled us to tune the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils. The heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils, which can be tuned with microwave-assisted chemistry, are attributed to the microwave-driven thermal energy affecting the electrostatic interaction during the self-assembly process. Our study demonstrates how microwave-assisted chemistry can be used to gain insight into the origin of conformational heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils as well as the design principles showing how the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils can be controlled. PMID:26592772

  10. Multilayer block copolymer meshes by orthogonal self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakkoli K. G., Amir; Nicaise, Samuel M.; Gadelrab, Karim R.; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Ross, Caroline A.; Berggren, Karl K.

    2016-01-01

    Continued scaling-down of lithographic-pattern feature sizes has brought templated self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) into the forefront of nanofabrication research. Technologies now exist that facilitate significant control over otherwise unorganized assembly of BCP microdomains to form both long-range and locally complex monolayer patterns. In contrast, the extension of this control into multilayers or 3D structures of BCP microdomains remains limited, despite the possible technological applications in next-generation devices. Here, we develop and analyse an orthogonal self-assembly method in which multiple layers of distinct-molecular-weight BCPs naturally produce nanomesh structures of cylindrical microdomains without requiring layer-by-layer alignment or high-resolution lithographic templating. The mechanisms for orthogonal self-assembly are investigated with both experiment and simulation, and we determine that the control over height and chemical preference of templates are critical process parameters. The method is employed to produce nanomeshes with the shapes of circles and Y-intersections, and is extended to produce three layers of orthogonally oriented cylinders.

  11. Materials self-assembly and fabrication in confined spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Ji, Dr. Qingmin; Hill, Dr. Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Molecular assemblies have been mainly researched in open spaces for long time. However, recent researches have revealed that there are many interesting aspects remained in self-assemblies in confined spaces. Molecular association within nanospaces such as mesoporous materials provide unusual phenomena based on highly restricted molecular motions. Current research endeavors in materials science and technology are focused on developing either new class of materials or materials with novel/multiple functionalities which is often achived via molecular assembly in confined spaces. Template synthesis and guided assemblies are distinguishable examples for molecular assembly in confined spaces. So far, different aspects of molecular confinements are discussed separately. In this review, the focus is specifically to bring some potential developments in various aspects of confined spaces for molecular self-assembly under one roof. We arrange the sections in this review based on the nature of the confinements; accordingly the topological/geometrical confinements, chemical and biological confinements, and confinements within thin film, respectively. Following these sections, molecular confinements for practical applications are shortly described in order to show connections of these scientific aspects with possible practical uses. One of the most important facts is that the self-assembly in confined spaces stands at meeting points of top-down and bottom-up fabrications, which would be an ultimate key to push the limits of nanotechnology and nanoscience.

  12. Chiral Perylene Materials by Ionic Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Echue, Geraldine; Hamley, Ian; Lloyd Jones, Guy C; Faul, Charl F J

    2016-09-01

    Two chiral complexes (1-SDS and 1-SDBS) were prepared via the ionic self-assembly of a chiral perylene diimide tecton with oppositely charged surfactants. The effect of surfactant tail architecture on the self-assembly properties and supramolecular structure was investigated in detail using UV-vis, IR, circular dichroism, light microscopy, X-ray diffraction studies, and electron microscopy. The results obtained revealed the molecular chirality of the parent perylene tecton could be translated into supramolecular helical chirality of the resulting complexes via primary ionic interactions through careful choice of solvent and concentration. Differing solvent-dependent aggregation behavior was observed for these complexes as a result of the different possible noncovalent interactions via the surfactant alkyl tails. The results presented in this study demonstrate that ionic self-assembly (ISA) is a facile strategy for the production of chiral supramolecular materials based on perylene diimides. The structure-function relationship is easily explored here due to the wide selection and easy availability of common surfactants. PMID:27486788

  13. Quantitative Characterization of Surface Self-Assembly Imaging Using Shapelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin; Suderman, Robert; Lizotte, Daniel J.

    Microscopy and imaging of surface self-assembly phenomena have advanced significantly over the past decade. In order to determine structure/property relationships robust automated analysis of the resulting images is required, but has not advanced at an equally rapid pace. Recently, quantitative characterization techniques have been developed and applied, such as using bond-orientational order (BOO) theory. BOO-based methods have significant limitations in that they do not provide pixel-level resolution and are not robust in the presence of measurement noise. In this work, a fundamentally different method for automated quantitative characterization of surface self-assembly imaging is presented which uses a family of localized functions called ``shapelets''. The method is presented and applied to quantitative characterization of stripe and hexagonal patterns which are frequently observed in surface self-assembly. The shapelet-based method is shown to be general, highly accurate, and robust in the presence of measurement noise. It is able to efficiently determine local pattern characteristics such as pattern strength and orientation for the determination of structure/property relationships. This work was made possible by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and Compute Ontario.

  14. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Li, Weihua; Müller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm2. In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free energy barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers and how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to overcome them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities, and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales—a handful of nanometers—and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail. PMID:26515095

  15. Polymer adsorption-driven self-assembly of nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, A K; Golumbfskie, A J

    2001-01-01

    Driven by prospective applications, there is much interest in developing materials that can perform specific functions in response to external conditions. One way to design such materials is to create systems which, in response to external inputs, can self-assemble to form structures that are functionally useful. This review focuses on the principles that can be employed to design macromolecules that when presented with an appropriate two-dimensional surface, will self-assemble to form nanostructures that may be functionally useful. We discuss three specific examples: (a) biomimetic recognition between polymers and patterned surfaces. (b) control and manipulation of nanomechanical motion generated by biopolymer adsorption and binding, and (c) creation of patterned nanostructuctures by exposing molten diblock copolymers to patterned surfaces. The discussion serves to illustrate how polymer sequence can be manipulated to affect self-assembly characteristics near adsorbing surfaces. The focus of this review is on theoretical and computational work aimed toward elucidating the principles underlying the phenomena pertinent to the three topics noted above. However, synergistic experiments are also described in the appropriate context. PMID:11326074

  16. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman S.; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Li, Weihua; Muller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm2. In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free-energymore » barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers, how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to over-come them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially-relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales - a handful of nanometers -, and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail.« less

  17. Engineering hierarchical nanostructures by elastocapillary self-assembly.

    PubMed

    De Volder, Michaël; Hart, A John

    2013-02-25

    Surfaces coated with nanoscale filaments such as silicon nanowires and carbon nanotubes are potentially compelling for high-performance battery and capacitor electrodes, photovoltaics, electrical interconnects, substrates for engineered cell growth, dry adhesives, and other smart materials. However, many of these applications require a wet environment or involve wet processing during their synthesis. The capillary forces introduced by these wet environments can lead to undesirable aggregation of nanoscale filaments, but control of capillary forces can enable manipulation of the filaments into discrete aggregates and novel hierarchical structures. Recent studies suggest that the elastocapillary self-assembly of nanofilaments can be a versatile and scalable means to build complex and robust surface architectures. To enable a wider understanding and use of elastocapillary self-assembly as a fabrication technology, we give an overview of the underlying fundamentals and classify typical implementations and surface designs for nanowires, nanotubes, and nanopillars made from a wide variety of materials. Finally, we discuss exemplary applications and future opportunities to realize new engineered surfaces by the elastocapillary self-assembly of nanofilaments. PMID:23339106

  18. Equilibrium self-assembly of small RNA viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, R. F.; Comas-Garcia, M.; Garmann, R. F.; Grosberg, A. Y.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a description for the quasiequilibrium self-assembly of small, single-stranded (ss) RNA viruses whose capsid proteins (CPs) have flexible, positively charged, disordered tails that associate with the negatively charged RNA genome molecules. We describe the assembly of such viruses as the interplay between two coupled phase-transition-like events: the formation of the protein shell (the capsid) by CPs and the condensation of a large ss viral RNA molecule. Electrostatic repulsion between the CPs competes with attractive hydrophobic interactions and attractive interaction between neutralized RNA segments mediated by the tail groups. An assembly diagram is derived in terms of the strength of attractive interactions between CPs and between CPs and the RNA molecules. It is compared with the results of recent studies of viral assembly. We demonstrate that the conventional theory of self-assembly, which does describe the assembly of empty capsids, is in general not applicable to the self-assembly of RNA-encapsidating virions.

  19. Self-assembled elastin-like polypeptide particles.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Jill L; Farmer, Robin; Woodhouse, Kimberly A

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the self-assembly of a recombinant elastin-based block copolymer containing both hydrophobic and cross-linking domains from the human elastin protein was investigated. The particle formation and dynamic behavior were characterized using inverted microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The morphology and stability were evaluated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Above a critical temperature the molecules self-assembled into a bimodal distribution of nano- and micron-sized particles. The larger particles increased in size through coalescence. Micron-sized particle formation appeared largely reversible, although a self-assembly/disassembly hysteresis was observed. At high polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentrations particle coalescence and settling were reduced, particle stability seemed enhanced and PEG coated the particles. Particle stabilization was also achieved through covalent cross-linking using glutaraldehyde. This study laid the foundation for optimization of particle size and stability through modification of the solvent system and has shown that this family of elastin-based polypeptides holds potential for use as particulate drug carriers. PMID:17881311

  20. Molecular Motions in Functional Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Dhotel, Alexandre; Chen, Ziguang; Delbreilh, Laurent; Youssef, Boulos; Saiter, Jean-Marc; Tan, Li

    2013-01-01

    The construction of “smart” materials able to perform specific functions at the molecular scale through the application of various stimuli is highly attractive but still challenging. The most recent applications indicate that the outstanding flexibility of self-assembled architectures can be employed as a powerful tool for the development of innovative molecular devices, functional surfaces and smart nanomaterials. Structural flexibility of these materials is known to be conferred by weak intermolecular forces involved in self-assembly strategies. However, some fundamental mechanisms responsible for conformational lability remain unexplored. Furthermore, the role played by stronger bonds, such as coordination, ionic and covalent bonding, is sometimes neglected while they can be employed readily to produce mechanically robust but also chemically reversible structures. In this review, recent applications of structural flexibility and molecular motions in self-assembled nanostructures are discussed. Special focus is given to advanced materials exhibiting significant performance changes after an external stimulus is applied, such as light exposure, pH variation, heat treatment or electromagnetic field. The crucial role played by strong intra- and weak intermolecular interactions on structural lability and responsiveness is highlighted. PMID:23348927

  1. Nanostructured films from hierarchical self-assembly of amyloidogenic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Oppenheim, Tomas W.; Buell, Alexander K.; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Welland, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    In nature, sophisticated functional materials are created through hierarchical self-assembly of simple nanoscale motifs1–4. In the laboratory, much progress has been made in the controlled assembly of molecules into one-5–7, two-6,8,9 and three-dimensional10 artificial nanostructures, but bridging from the nanoscale to the macroscale to create useful macroscopic materials remains a challenge. Here we show a scalable self-assembly approach to making free-standing films from amyloid protein fibrils. The films were well ordered and highly rigid, with a Young’s modulus of up to 5–7 GPa, which is comparable to the highest values for proteinaceous materials found in nature. We show that the self-organizing protein scaffolds can align otherwise unstructured components (such as fluorophores) within the macroscopic films. Multiscale self-assembly that relies on highly specific biomolecular interactions is an attractive path for realizing new multifunctional materials built from the bottom up. PMID:20190750

  2. Algorithmic Self-Assembly of DNA Sierpinski Triangles

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Algorithms and information, fundamental to technological and biological organization, are also an essential aspect of many elementary physical phenomena, such as molecular self-assembly. Here we report the molecular realization, using two-dimensional self-assembly of DNA tiles, of a cellular automaton whose update rule computes the binary function XOR and thus fabricates a fractal pattern—a Sierpinski triangle—as it grows. To achieve this, abstract tiles were translated into DNA tiles based on double-crossover motifs. Serving as input for the computation, long single-stranded DNA molecules were used to nucleate growth of tiles into algorithmic crystals. For both of two independent molecular realizations, atomic force microscopy revealed recognizable Sierpinski triangles containing 100–200 correct tiles. Error rates during assembly appear to range from 1% to 10%. Although imperfect, the growth of Sierpinski triangles demonstrates all the necessary mechanisms for the molecular implementation of arbitrary cellular automata. This shows that engineered DNA self-assembly can be treated as a Turing-universal biomolecular system, capable of implementing any desired algorithm for computation or construction tasks. PMID:15583715

  3. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman S.; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Li, Weihua; Muller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm2. In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free-energy barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers, how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to over-come them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially-relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales - a handful of nanometers -, and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail.

  4. Three dimensional self-assembly at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracias, D. H.

    2013-05-01

    At the nanoscale, three dimensional manipulation and assembly becomes extremely challenging and also cost prohibitive. Self-assembly provides an attractive and possibly the only highly parallel methodology to structure truly three dimensional patterned materials and devices at this size scale for applications in electronics, optics, robotics and medicine. This is a concise review along with a perspective of an important and exciting field in nanotechnology and is related to a Nanoengineering Pioneer Award that I received at this SPIE symposium for my contributions to the 3D selfassembly of nanostructures. I detail a historical account of 3D self-assembly and outline important developments in this area which is put into context with the larger research areas of 3D nanofabrication, assembly and nanomanufacturing. A focus in this review is on our work as it relates to the self-assembly with lithographically patterned units; this approach provides a means for heterogeneous integration of periodic, curved and angled nanostructures with precisely defined three dimensional patterns.

  5. Large-scale dissipative particle dynamics simulations of self-assembly amphiphilic systems†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejin; Tang, Yu-Hang

    2014-01-01

    We present large-scale simulation results on the self-assembly of amphiphilic systems in bulk solution and under soft confinement. Self-assembled unilamellar and multilamellar vesicles are formed from amphiphilic molecules in bulk solution. The system is simulated by placing amphiphilic molecules inside large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and the dynamic soft confinement-induced self-assembled vesicles are investigated. Moreover, the self-assembly of sickle hemoglobin (HbS) is simulated in a crowded and fluctuating intracellular space and our results demonstrate that the HbS self-assemble into polymer fibers causing the LUV shape to be distorted. PMID:24938634

  6. Molecular Self-Assembly into One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    PALMER, LIAM C.; STUPP, SAMUEL I.

    2008-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Self-assembly of small molecules into one-dimensional nanostructures offers many potential applications in electronically and biologically active materials. The recent advances discussed in this Account demonstrate how researchers can use the fundamental principles of supramolecular chemistry to craft the size, shape, and internal structure of nanoscale objects. In each system described here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the assembly morphology. Circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and optical spectroscopy provided additional information about the self-assembly behavior in solution at the molecular level. Dendron rod–coil molecules self-assemble into flat or helical ribbons. They can incorporate electronically conductive groups and can be mineralized with inorganic semiconductors. To understand the relative importance of each segment in forming the supramolecular structure, we synthetically modified the dendron, rod, and coil portions. The self-assembly depended on the generation number of the dendron, the number of hydrogen-bonding functions, and the length of the rod and coil segments. We formed chiral helices using a dendron–rod–coil molecule prepared from an enantiomerically enriched coil. Because helical nanostructures are important targets for use in biomaterials, nonlinear optics, and stereoselective catalysis, researchers would like to precisely control their shape and size. Tripeptide-containing peptide lipid molecules assemble into straight or twisted nanofibers in organic solvents. As seen by AFM, the sterics of bulky end groups can tune the helical pitch of these peptide lipid nanofibers in organic solvents. Furthermore, we demonstrated the potential for pitch control using trans-to-cis photoisomerization of a terminal azobenzene group. Other molecules called peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are known to assemble in water into cylindrical nanostructures that

  7. Nanoscale templating and self-assembly of organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulvat, James Francis

    Improvements in organic electronic materials could lead to novel device applications, ranging from large-area, flexible displays to light weight, plastic electronics. Progress on these applications would benefit from development of low-cost, aqueous, solution-based fabrication techniques for organic semiconductors. Supramolecular self-assembly enables molecules to organize in complex structures through non-covalent interactions. The nanoscale structure and aggregation of organic semiconductors influence conductivity, charge mobility and luminescence. We developed three approaches to enhance the performance of organic semiconductors through molecular self-assembly. The first uses a liquid crystalline (LC) template to mediate electrochemical polymerization of poly(3,4-ethyldioxythiophene) (PEDOT), a conducting polymer used for hole injection in organic light emitting diodes (OLED). Monomers were polymerized in the cylindrical, hydrophobic cores of a hexagonal, lyotropic LC formed by a non-ionic amphiphile in water, The templated, conducting polymer films exhibited anisotropic optical properties and increased conductivity as a direct result of the nanoscale, self-organized structure of the template. Another approach was used to control molecular order by preparing organic semiconductors that are themselves liquid crystalline. We developed a novel series of triblock oligo(phenylene vinylene) (OPV) amphiphiles that form thermotropic and lyotropic LC mesophases. The self-organized, layered structure of these mesophases influences aggregation of OPV, enhancing fluorescence in the liquid crystalline state compared with disordered films. These OPV-amphiphiles are the first example of a water-soluble oligo(phenylene vinylene) that can self-organize into aligned, well-ordered, highly fluorescent films. In a third system, a triblock, dendron rod-coil (DRC) molecule containing a quaterthiophene segment was prepared and its self-assembly and electronic properties investigated

  8. Simulation of macromolecule self-assembly in solution: A multiscale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavino, Alessio D.; di Pasquale, Nicodemo; Carbone, Paola; Barresi, Antonello A.; Marchisio, Daniele L.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most common processes to produce polymer nanoparticles is to induce self-assembly by using the solvent-displacement method, in which the polymer is dissolved in a "good" solvent and the solution is then mixed with an "anti-solvent". The polymer ability to self-assemble in solution is therefore determined by its structural and transport properties in solutions of the pure solvents and at the intermediate compositions. In this work, we focus on poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) which is a biocompatible polymer that finds widespread application in the pharmaceutical and biomedical fields, performing simulation at three different scales using three different computational tools: full atomistic molecular dynamics (MD), population balance modeling (PBM) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Simulations consider PCL chains of different molecular weight in solution of pure acetone (good solvent), of pure water (anti-solvent) and their mixtures, and mixing at different rates and initial concentrations in a confined impinging jets mixer (CIJM). Our MD simulations reveal that the nano-structuring of one of the solvents in the mixture leads to an unexpected identical polymer structure irrespectively of the concentration of the two solvents. In particular, although in pure solvents the behavior of the polymer is, as expected, very different, at intermediate compositions, the PCL chain shows properties very similar to those found in pure acetone as a result of the clustering of the acetone molecules in the vicinity of the polymer chain. We derive an analytical expression to predict the polymer structural properties in solution at different solvent compositions and use it to formulate an aggregation kernel to describe the self-assembly in the CIJM via PBM and CFD. Simulations are eventually validated against experiments.

  9. Simulation of macromolecule self-assembly in solution: A multiscale approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lavino, Alessio D. Barresi, Antonello A. Marchisio, Daniele L.; Pasquale, Nicodemo di; Carbone, Paola

    2015-12-17

    One of the most common processes to produce polymer nanoparticles is to induce self-assembly by using the solvent-displacement method, in which the polymer is dissolved in a “good” solvent and the solution is then mixed with an “anti-solvent”. The polymer ability to self-assemble in solution is therefore determined by its structural and transport properties in solutions of the pure solvents and at the intermediate compositions. In this work, we focus on poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) which is a biocompatible polymer that finds widespread application in the pharmaceutical and biomedical fields, performing simulation at three different scales using three different computational tools: full atomistic molecular dynamics (MD), population balance modeling (PBM) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Simulations consider PCL chains of different molecular weight in solution of pure acetone (good solvent), of pure water (anti-solvent) and their mixtures, and mixing at different rates and initial concentrations in a confined impinging jets mixer (CIJM). Our MD simulations reveal that the nano-structuring of one of the solvents in the mixture leads to an unexpected identical polymer structure irrespectively of the concentration of the two solvents. In particular, although in pure solvents the behavior of the polymer is, as expected, very different, at intermediate compositions, the PCL chain shows properties very similar to those found in pure acetone as a result of the clustering of the acetone molecules in the vicinity of the polymer chain. We derive an analytical expression to predict the polymer structural properties in solution at different solvent compositions and use it to formulate an aggregation kernel to describe the self-assembly in the CIJM via PBM and CFD. Simulations are eventually validated against experiments.

  10. Aerosolized droplet mediated self-assembly of photosynthetic pigment analogues and deposition onto substrates.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vivek B; Biswas, Pratim

    2014-02-25

    Self-assembled photosynthetic molecules have a high extinction coefficient and a broad absorption in the infrared region, and these properties can be used to improve the efficiency of solar cells. We have developed a single-step method for the self-assembly of synthetic chlorin molecules (analogues of native bacteriochlorophylls) in aerosolized droplets, containing a single solvent and two solvents, to synthesize biomimetic light-harvesting structures. In the single-solvent approach, assembly is promoted by a concentration-driven process due to evaporation of the solvent. The peak absorbance of Zn(II) 3-(1-hydroxyethyl)-10-phenyl-13(1)-oxophorbine (1) in methanol shifted from 646 nm to 725 nm (∼ 80 nm shift) after assembly, which is comparable to the shift observed in the naturally occurring assembly of bacteriochlorophyll c. Although assembly is thermodynamically favorable, the kinetics of self-assembly play an important role, and this was demonstrated by varying the initial concentration of the pigment monomer. To overcome kinetic limitations, a two-solvent approach using a volatile solvent (tetrahydrofuran) in which the dye is soluble and a less volatile solvent (ethanol) in which the dye is sparingly soluble was demonstrated to be effective. The effect of molecular structure is demonstrated by spraying the sterically hindered Zn(II) 3-(1-hydroxyethyl)-10-mesityl-13(1)-oxophorbine (2), which is an analogue of 1, under similar conditions. The results illustrate a valuable and facile aerosol-based method for the formation of films of supramolecular assemblies. PMID:24422474

  11. Logical computation using algorithmic self-assembly of DNA triple-crossover molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Chengde; LaBean, Thomas H.; Reif, John H.; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2000-09-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the self-assembly of designed periodic two-dimensional arrays composed of DNA tiles, in which the intermolecular contacts are directed by `sticky' ends. In a mathematical context, aperiodic mosaics may be formed by the self-assembly of `Wang' tiles, a process that emulates the operation of a Turing machine. Macroscopic self-assembly has been used to perform computations; there is also a logical equivalence between DNA sticky ends and Wang tile edges. This suggests that the self-assembly of DNA-based tiles could be used to perform DNA-based computation. Algorithmic aperiodic self-assembly requires greater fidelity than periodic self-assembly, because correct tiles must compete with partially correct tiles. Here we report a one-dimensional algorithmic self-assembly of DNA triple-crossover molecules that can be used to execute four steps of a logical (cumulative XOR) operation on a string of binary bits.

  12. Self-assembly triggered by self-assembly: optically active, paramagnetic micelles encapsulated in protein cage nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Millán, Jealemy Galindo; Brasch, Melanie; Anaya-Plaza, Eduardo; de la Escosura, Andrés; Velders, Aldrik H; Reinhoudt, David N; Torres, Tomás; Koay, Melissa S T; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution, optically active and paramagnetic micelles of the ligand 1,4,7,10-tetraaza-1-(1-carboxymethylundecane)-4,7,10-triacetic acid cyclododecane (DOTAC10) have been incorporated inside capsids of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) protein through a hierarchical process of self-assembly triggered by self-assembly. The DOTAC10 ligand was used to complex Gd(III), in order to form paramagnetic micelles, as well as to encapsulate an amphiphilic Zn(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc) dye that optically confirmed the encapsulation of the micelles. The incorporation of ZnPc molecules in the paramagnetic micelles led to high capsid loading of both Gd(III) and ZnPc, as the micelles were stabilized by the amphiphilic dye encapsulation. The resulting protein cage nanoparticles (PCNs) show an improved r1 relaxivity, suggesting the possible use of these nanostructures as contrast agents (CAs) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Since the encapsulated ZnPc dye also has a potential therapeutic value, the present results represent a first step towards the consecution of fully self-assembled PCNs for multimodal imaging and therapy. PMID:24513535

  13. Critical seeding density improves the properties and translatability of self-assembling anatomically shaped knee menisci.

    PubMed

    Hadidi, Pasha; Yeh, Timothy C; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-01-01

    A recent development in the field of tissue engineering is the rise of all-biologic, scaffold-free engineered tissues. Since these biomaterials rely primarily upon cells, investigation of initial seeding densities constitutes a particularly relevant aim for tissue engineers. In this study, a scaffold-free method was used to create fibrocartilage in the shape of the rabbit knee meniscus. The objectives of this study were to: (i) determine the minimum seeding density, normalized by an area of 44 mm(2), necessary for the self-assembling process of fibrocartilage to occur; (ii) examine relevant biomechanical properties of engineered fibrocartilage, such as tensile and compressive stiffness and strength, and their relationship to seeding density; and (iii) identify a reduced, or optimal, number of cells needed to produce this biomaterial. It was found that a decreased initial seeding density, normalized by the area of the construct, produced superior mechanical and biochemical properties. Collagen per wet weight, glycosaminoglycans per wet weight, tensile properties and compressive properties were all significantly greater in the 5 million cells per construct group as compared to the historical 20 million cells per construct group. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that a lower seeding density results in a denser tissue. Additionally, the translational potential of the self-assembling process for tissue engineering was improved though this investigation, as fewer cells may be used in the future. The results of this study underscore the potential for critical seeding densities to be investigated when researching scaffold-free engineered tissues. PMID:25234157

  14. Self assembly and shear induced morphologies of asymmetric block copolymers with spherical domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandare, Prashant N.

    2007-12-01

    Microphase separated block copolymers have been subject of investigation for past two decades. While most of the work is focused on classical phases of lamellae or cylinders, spherical phases have received less attention. The present study deals with the self-assembly in spherical phases of block copolymers that results into formation of a three-dimensional cubic lattice. A model triblock copolymer with several transition temperatures is chosen. Solidification in this model system results from either the arrangement of nanospheres of minor block on a BCC lattice or by formation of physical network where the nanospheres act as crosslinks. The solid-like behavior is characterized by extremely slow relaxation modes. Long time stress relaxation of the model material was examined to distinguish between the solid and liquid behavior. Stress relaxation data from a conventional rheometer was extended to very long times by using a newly built instrument, Relaxometer. The BCC lattice structure of the material behaves as liquid over long time except at low temperatures where an equilibrium modulus is observed. This long time behavior was extended to low shear rate behavior using steady shear rheology. The zero shear viscosity observed at extremely low shear rates has a very high value that is close to the viscosity calculated from stress relaxation experiments. The steady shear viscosity decreases by several orders of magnitude over a small range of shear rates. SAXS experiments on samples sheared even at very low rates indicated loss of the BCC order that was present in the annealed samples before shearing. In the second part, response of the BCC microstructure to large stress was explored. Shearing at constant rate and with LAOS at low frequencies lead to destruction of BCC lattice. The structure recovers upon cessation of the shear with kinetics similar to the one following thermal quench. Under certain conditions, LAOS leads to formation of monodomain textures. At low

  15. Recent Advances on Carbon Nanospheres. Synthetic Routes and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Zhenan; Dai, Sheng

    2015-04-02

    Carbon-based materials are the most popular material types in both fundamental research and industrial applications, partly because of their well-controlled nano-morphologies. In the past two decades, we have witnessed a number of breakthroughs in carbon research: fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and more recently graphene. Nowadays, carbon nanospheres are attracting more and more attention worldwide due to their excellent performance in various fields: drug delivery, heterogeneous catalysis, encapsulation of support and electrode materials. Actually, spherical carbon is an old material, whereas controlling carbon spheres in the nanometer range is a recent story. In the past 5 years, it has become possible to precisely control the particle size, surface area, pore size, chemical composition, and dispersity of carbon nanospheres. Toward this end, a number of synthetic strategies are emerging, such as hydrothermal carbonization of biomass-based resources, extended Stöber synthesis, and organic–organic self-assembly via different binding methods. In this feature article, we summarize recent routes for carbon nanospheres and briefly touch on their applications to shed light on the potential of this field. Throughout this article, a special emphasis is placed on the possible modulation of spherical structures at the nanoscale, and we wish to inspire many more designs and applications of carbon nanostructures in the near future.

  16. Recent Advances on Carbon Nanospheres. Synthetic Routes and Applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Zhenan; Dai, Sheng

    2015-04-02

    Carbon-based materials are the most popular material types in both fundamental research and industrial applications, partly because of their well-controlled nano-morphologies. In the past two decades, we have witnessed a number of breakthroughs in carbon research: fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and more recently graphene. Nowadays, carbon nanospheres are attracting more and more attention worldwide due to their excellent performance in various fields: drug delivery, heterogeneous catalysis, encapsulation of support and electrode materials. Actually, spherical carbon is an old material, whereas controlling carbon spheres in the nanometer range is a recent story. In the past 5 years, it has become possible tomore » precisely control the particle size, surface area, pore size, chemical composition, and dispersity of carbon nanospheres. Toward this end, a number of synthetic strategies are emerging, such as hydrothermal carbonization of biomass-based resources, extended Stöber synthesis, and organic–organic self-assembly via different binding methods. In this feature article, we summarize recent routes for carbon nanospheres and briefly touch on their applications to shed light on the potential of this field. Throughout this article, a special emphasis is placed on the possible modulation of spherical structures at the nanoscale, and we wish to inspire many more designs and applications of carbon nanostructures in the near future.« less

  17. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  18. Combustion and self-assembly of nanoenergetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malchi, Jonathan Yaniv

    The recent worldwide interest in nanotechnology spans a wide variety of scientific fields such as electronics, biology, materials science and medicine. Because of their extremely small dimensions, nanoparticles demonstrate properties different from matter at larger scales. Understanding these unusual properties and utilizing them for macroscale devices is an overall goal for nanotechnology. Moreover, manipulating these small particles into organized structures is crucial for taking full advantage of what nanotechnology has to offer, however it has proven to be a difficult task. Recent work utilizing electrostatic forces shows great potential for the self-assembly of nanoparticles into organized two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. Overall, this work examines how nanotechnology and self-assembly can benefit the field of energetic materials. Because of aluminum's high energy density and low cost, it has been used in the field of energetic materials for several decades. In order to achieve sufficient energy release rates, aluminum is typically manufactured as a powder having spherical particles with diameters on the micron scale. It is well-known that decreasing the original particle diameter of a fuel particle will increase the burning time and, thus, energy release rate. Therefore, aluminum particles have recently been made to have diameters on the nanoscale, and shown to be advantageous for several applications. The combustion of nanoaluminum (nAl) in various systems is the primary focus of this study. A progression of experiments is used to analyze the combustion of nAl: (1) a fully heterogeneous flame spread system, (2) a semi-homogeneous sonicated thermite system and (3) a quasi-homogeneous self-assembled thermite system. The flame spread experiment physically separates the nAl from the gaseous oxidizer allowing for a well-understood convective, diffusive, reactive system to be analyzed. Because of the simplicity of the experimental setup, variables

  19. Self-assembly based nanometer-scale patterning for nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramohan, Abhishek; Sibirev, Nikolai; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Mendis, Budhika; Petty, Mike C.; Gallant, Andrew J.; Zeze, Dagou A.

    2015-08-01

    Periodic nanostructure arrays have been ubiquitously exploited lately due to their properties and prospective applications in production of templates for self-induced and gold (Au)-catalysed nanowires (NWs), because this approach is relatively cheap, time-efficient and do not require electron beam lithography. The technique consists creating nanoholes in SiO2 to expose the silicon Si (111) beneath where self-induced NWs can nucleate, while nanodots deposited onto the Si (111) surface serve as catalyst seeds. For Au-catalysed NWs, a monolayer of self-assembled polystyrene nanospheres (PNS 300nm) was created on a 2 inch Si wafer by spin coating and later etched for a short time before a very thin Au-catalyst layer was deposited. In turn, for self-induced, PNS monolayer was created onto a SiO2-Si substrate. A longer etch was required to reduce PNS diameter significantly to leave relatively larger spacing where chromium is blanket deposited. PNS were lifted off by sonicating the samples in toluene produce the periodic arrays of nanodots and nanoholes, respectively. The underlying SiO2 was etched further through the nanoholes to uncover the Si below. 200 nm holes and 30-70 nm dots were demonstrated through the bespoke methods. The patterned substrates served as master templates, subsequently copied using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to produce a flexible stamp for nanoimprint lithography. A bilayer resist lift off process was developed to print the replicated nanodots or nanoholes on large-area substrates onto which III-V NWs can be grown.

  20. Self-assembly of amorphous biophotonic nanostructures by phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, Eric R.; Noh, Heeso; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Cao, Hui; Prum, Richard O.

    2009-04-23

    Some of the most vivid colors in the animal kingdom are created not by pigments, but by wavelength-selective scattering of light from nanostructures. Here we investigate quasi-ordered nanostructures of avian feather barbs which produce vivid non-iridescent colors. These {beta}-keratin and air nanostructures are found in two basic morphologies: tortuous channels and amorphous packings of spheres. Each class of nanostructure is isotropic and has a pronounced characteristic length scale of variation in composition. These local structural correlations lead to strong backscattering over a narrow range of optical frequencies and little variation with angle of incidence. Such optical properties play important roles in social and sexual communication. To be effective, birds need to precisely control the development of these nanoscale structures, yet little is known about how they grow. We hypothesize that multiple lineages of birds have convergently evolved to exploit phase separation and kinetic arrest to self-assemble spongy color-producing nanostructures in feather barbs. Observed avian nanostructures are strikingly similar to those self-assembled during the phase separation of fluid mixtures; the channel and sphere morphologies are characteristic of phase separation by spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth, respectively. These unstable structures are locked-in by the kinetic arrest of the {beta}-keratin matrix, likely through the entanglement or cross-linking of supermolecular {beta}-keratin fibers. Using the power of self-assembly, birds can robustly realize a diverse range of nanoscopic morphologies with relatively small physical and chemical changes during feather development.

  1. Self-assembly of cyclo-diphenylalanine peptides in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Joohyun; Shell, M Scott

    2014-06-19

    The diphenylalanine (FF) peptide self-assembles into a variety of nanostructures, including hollow nanotubes that form in aqueous solution with an unusually high degree of hydrophilic surface area. In contrast, diphenylalanine can also be vapor-deposited in vacuum to produce rodlike assemblies that are extremely hydrophobic; in this process FF has been found to dehydrate and cyclize to cyclo-diphenylalanine (cyclo-FF). An earlier study used all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the early stages of the self-assembly of linear-FF peptides in solution. Here, we examine the self-assembly of cyclo-FF peptides in vacuum and compare it to these previous results to understand the differences underlying the two cases. Using all-atom replica exchange MD simulations, we consider systems of 50 cyclo-FF peptides and examine free energies along various structural association coordinates. We find that cyclo-FF peptides form ladder-like structures connected by double hydrogen bonds, and that multiple such ladders linearly align in a cooperative manner to form larger-scale, elongated assemblies. Unlike linear-FFs which mainly assemble through the interplay between hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, the assembly of cyclo-FFs in vacuum is primarily driven by electrostatic interactions along the backbone that induce alignment at long-range, followed by van der Waals interactions between side chains that become important for close-range packing. While both solution and vacuum phase driving forces result in ladder-like structures, the clustering of ladders is opposite: linear-FF peptide ladders form assemblies with side-chains buried inward, while cyclo-FF ladders point outward. PMID:24877752

  2. Bottlebrush Polymers: Synthesis, Rheology, and Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalsin, Samuel J.

    Bottlebrush polymers are comb-like molecules with a high density of side chains grafted along a central backbone. Due to their unique conformational properties, bottlebrush polymers have become attractive candidates for developing new photonic bandgap materials, nanotubes and nanowires, or drug delivery vehicles, to name a few. This dissertation primarily investigates the rheological properties and self-assembly behavior of bottlebrush polymer molecules made using a variety of different polymerization routes. A considerable portion of the work is directed towards the linear rheology of model, polyolefin-based bottlebrush polymers with independently varied branch and backbone lengths. These studies demonstrate how the tight spacing between branch points effectively precludes backbone entanglement in the polymer melts, but it does not inhibit the formation of entanglements among the branched side chains. Furthermore, the relaxation profiles reveal transient scaling behavior in which the dynamics transition from Zimm-like to Rouse-like at increasing relaxation times. These results highlight the distinct conformational character of bottlebrushes at different length scales. The latter parts of this work report on the self-assembly behavior of bottlebrush diblock polymers composed of atactic polypropylene and polystyrene side chains. The diblock samples are analyzed using small-angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy. Nearly all of the samples display strong segregation between the two blocks, owing to the large molar mass of typical bottlebrush polymers. Consequently, only one experimental sample displays an accessible order-disorder transition temperature. The strong segregation is also shown to affect the ability of large bottlebrush diblocks to readily achieve well-ordered nanostructures by self-assembly. Finally, results of the most symmetric (by volume fraction) diblock samples are compared with predictions of a newly developed self-consistent field

  3. Chemical solution route to self-assembled epitaxial oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Obradors, X; Puig, T; Gibert, M; Queraltó, A; Zabaleta, J; Mestres, N

    2014-04-01

    Self-assembly of oxides as a bottom-up approach to functional nanostructures goes beyond the conventional nanostructure formation based on lithographic techniques. Particularly, chemical solution deposition (CSD) is an ex situ growth approach very promising for high throughput nanofabrication at low cost. Whereas strain engineering as a strategy to define nanostructures with tight control of size, shape and orientation has been widely used in metals and semiconductors, it has been rarely explored in the emergent field of functional complex oxides. Here we will show that thermodynamic modeling can be very useful to understand the principles controlling the growth of oxide nanostructures by CSD, and some attractive kinetic features will also be presented. The methodology of strain engineering is applied in a high degree of detail to form different sorts of nanostructures (nanodots, nanowires) of the oxide CeO2 with fluorite structure which then is used as a model system to identify the principles controlling self-assembly and self-organization in CSD grown oxides. We also present, more briefly, the application of these ideas to other oxides such as manganites or BaZrO3. We will show that the nucleation and growth steps are essentially understood and manipulated while the kinetic phenomena underlying the evolution of the self-organized networks are still less widely explored, even if very appealing effects have been already observed. Overall, our investigation based on a CSD approach has opened a new strategy towards a general use of self-assembly and self-organization which can now be widely spread to many functional oxide materials. PMID:24418962

  4. A Programmable Transducer Self-Assembled from DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Banani; Jonoska, Natasha; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2012-01-01

    A transducer consists of an input/output alphabet, a finite set of states, and a transition function. From an input symbol applied to a given state, the transition function determines the next state, and an output symbol. Using DNA, we have constructed a transducer that divides a number by 3. The input consists of a series of individually addressable 2-state DNA nanomechanical devices that control the orientations of a group of flat 6-helix DNA motifs; these motifs have edge domains tailed in sticky ends corresponding to the numbers 0 and 1. Three-domain DNA molecules (TX tiles) act as computational tiles that correspond to the transitions that the transducer can undergo. The output domain of these TX tiles contains sticky ends that also correspond to 0 or 1. Two different DNA tiles can chelate these output domains: A 5 nm gold nanoparticle is attached to the chelating tile that binds to 0-domains and a 10 nm gold nanoparticle is attached to the chelating tile that binds to 1-domains. The answer to the division is represented by the series of gold nanoparticles, which can be interpreted as a binary number. The answers of the computation are read out by examination of the transducer complexes under a transmission electron microscope. The start or end points of the output sequence can be indicated by the presence of a 15 nm gold nanoparticle. This work demonstrates two previously unreported features integrated in a single framework: [1] a system that combines DNA algorithmic self-assembly with DNA nanomechanical devices that control that input, and [2] the arrangement of non-DNA species, here metallic nanoparticles, through DNA algorithmic self-assembly. The nanomechanical devices are controlled by single-stranded DNA strands, allowing multiple input sequences to be applied to the rest of the system, thus guiding the algorithmic self-assembly to a variety of outputs. PMID:23139854

  5. Platelets self-assemble into porous nacre during freeze casting.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2013-03-01

    Nacre possesses a remarkable combination of mechanical properties. Its high stiffness, strength and toughness are attributed to a highly aligned structure of aragonite platelets "glued" together by a small fraction (∼5vol%) of polymer; theoretically it can be described by a shear-lag model of staggered tensile elements between which loads are transferred via shear. Despite extensive research, it has not been possible yet to manufacture this aligned structure as a bulk material of considerable volume with a fast and easy production process. Particularly porous materials would benefit from enhanced wall material properties to compensate for performance loss due to their high porosity. An important application for such porous materials are tissue scaffolds for bone substitution. Bone, like nacre, exhibits excellent mechanical properties, particularly an exceptionally high toughness, because of its composite structure of hydroxyapatite platelets aligned in a ∼35vol% polymer matrix. Through the freeze casting process, which results in a fast and straightforward self-assembly of platelet-shaped particles during directional solidification, highly porous bulk materials with nacre-like cell walls can now be created. This porous nacre outperforms by a factor of 1.5-4 in terms of stiffness, strength and toughness materials that have the same amount of porosity but do not exhibit the nacre-like microarchitecture. The self-assembly process presented in this study thus has tremendous potential for the creation of highly porous, yet mechanically strong tissue scaffolds for low or medium load bearing bone substitute materials. Due to the versatility of the freeze casting process, materials with a self-assembled cell wall structure can be created from high-aspect ratio particles of all material classes. This enables material optimization for a great variety of applications such as impact protection, filtration, catalysis, energy generation and storage, in addition to those with

  6. Reprint of: self-assembly of nanoparticles employing polymerization-induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roberto J J; Hoppe, Cristina E; Zucchi, Ileana A; Romeo, Hernán E; dell'Erba, Ignacio E; Gómez, María L; Puig, Julieta; Leonardi, Agustina B

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) may be homogeneously dispersed in the precursors of a polymer (reactive solvent) by an adequate selection of their stabilizing ligands. However, the dispersion can become metastable or unstable in the course of polymerization. If this happens, NP-rich domains can be segregated by a process called polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS). This occurs mainly due to the decrease in the entropic contribution of the reactive solvent to the free energy of mixing (increase in its average size) and, for a reactive solvent generating a cross-linked polymer, the additional contribution of the elastic energy in the post-gel stage. The extent of PIPS will depend on the competition between phase separation and polymerization rates. It can be completely avoided, limited to a local scale or conveyed to generate different types of NPs' aggregates such as crystalline platelets, self-assembled structures with a hierarchical order and partitioning at the interface, and bidimensional patterns of NPs at the film surface. The use of a third component in the initial formulation such as a linear polymer or a block copolymer, provides the possibility of generating an internal template for the preferential location and self-assembly of phase-separated NPs. Some illustrative examples of morphologies generated by PIPS in solutions of NPs in reactive solvents, are analyzed in this feature article. PMID:25736431

  7. Self-assembly of nanoparticles employing polymerization-induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roberto J J; Hoppe, Cristina E; Zucchi, Ileana A; Romeo, Hernán E; dell'Erba, Ignacio E; Gómez, María L; Puig, Julieta; Leonardi, Agustina B

    2014-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) may be homogeneously dispersed in the precursors of a polymer (reactive solvent) by an adequate selection of their stabilizing ligands. However, the dispersion can become metastable or unstable in the course of polymerization. If this happens, NP-rich domains can be segregated by a process called polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS). This occurs mainly due to the decrease in the entropic contribution of the reactive solvent to the free energy of mixing (increase in its average size) and, for a reactive solvent generating a cross-linked polymer, the additional contribution of the elastic energy in the post-gel stage. The extent of PIPS will depend on the competition between phase separation and polymerization rates. It can be completely avoided, limited to a local scale or conveyed to generate different types of NPs' aggregates such as crystalline platelets, self-assembled structures with a hierarchical order and partitioning at the interface, and bidimensional patterns of NPs at the film surface. The use of a third component in the initial formulation such as a linear polymer or a block copolymer, provides the possibility of generating an internal template for the preferential location and self-assembly of phase-separated NPs. Some illustrative examples of morphologies generated by PIPS in solutions of NPs in reactive solvents, are analyzed in this feature article. PMID:25014172

  8. Localized dealloying corrosion mediated by self-assembled monolayers used as an inhibitor system.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B R; Bashir, A; Ankah, G N; Valtiner, M; Renner, F U

    2015-01-01

    The structure and chemistry of thiol or selenol self-assembled organic monolayers have been frequently addressed due to the unique opportunities in functionalization of materials. Such organic films can also act as effective inhibition layers to mitigate oxidation or corrosion. Cu-Au alloy substrates covered by self-assembled monolayers show a different dealloying mechanism compared to bare surfaces. The organic surface layer inhibits dealloying of noble metal alloys by a suppression of surface diffusion at lower potentials but at higher applied potentials dealloying proceeds in localized regions due to passivity breakdown. We present an in situ atomic force microscopy study of a patterned thiol layer applied on Cu-Au alloy surfaces and further explore approaches to change the local composition of the surface layers by exchange of molecules. The pattern for the in situ experiment has been applied by micro-contact printing. This allows the study of corrosion protection with its dependence on different molecule densities at different sites. Low-density thiol areas surrounding the high-density patterns are completely protected and initiation of dealloying proceeds only along the areas with the lowest inhibitor concentration. Dealloying patterns are highly influenced and controlled by molecular thiol to selenol exchange and are also affected by introducing structural defects such as scratches or polishing defects. PMID:25920488

  9. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Peptide Amphiphile Self-Assembly into Cylindrical Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, One-Sun; Stupp, Samuel I.; Schatz, George C.

    2011-01-01

    Relaxation of a self-assembled structure of 144 peptide amphiphile (PA) molecules into cylindrical nanofibers is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations including explicit water with physiological ion concentration. The PA for these studies includes a hydrophobic alkyl chain that is attached to the N-terminus of the sequence SLSLAAAEIKVAV. The self-assembly is initiated with PA molecules in a roughly cylindrical configuration, as suggested from previous experimental and theoretical investigations, and the cylindrical configuration that results is found to be stable during 40 ns simulations. In the converged structure of the resulting nanofiber, the cylinder radius is ~44 Å, a result that is consistent with experimental results. Water and sodium ions can penetrate into the peptide portion of the fiber but not between the alkyl chains. Even though each PA has an identical sequence, a broad distribution of secondary structure is found in the converged structure of the nanofiber. The β-sheet population for the SLSL and IKV segments of the peptide is ~25%, which is consistent with previous circular dichroism results. We also found that the epitope sequence IKVAV is located on the surface of the nanofiber, as designed for the promotion of the neurite growth. Our findings will be useful for designing new PA fibers that have improved bioactive properties.

  10. Evolving self-assembly in autonomous homogeneous robots: experiments with two physical robots.

    PubMed

    Ampatzis, Christos; Tuci, Elio; Trianni, Vito; Christensen, Anders Lyhne; Dorigo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    This research work illustrates an approach to the design of controllers for self-assembling robots in which the self-assembly is initiated and regulated by perceptual cues that are brought forth by the physical robots through their dynamical interactions. More specifically, we present a homogeneous control system that can achieve assembly between two modules (two fully autonomous robots) of a mobile self-reconfigurable system without a priori introduced behavioral or morphological heterogeneities. The controllers are dynamic neural networks evolved in simulation that directly control all the actuators of the two robots. The neurocontrollers cause the dynamic specialization of the robots by allocating roles between them based solely on their interaction. We show that the best evolved controller proves to be successful when tested on a real hardware platform, the swarm-bot. The performance achieved is similar to the one achieved by existing modular or behavior-based approaches, also due to the effect of an emergent recovery mechanism that was neither explicitly rewarded by the fitness function, nor observed during the evolutionary simulation. Our results suggest that direct access to the orientations or intentions of the other agents is not a necessary condition for robot coordination: Our robots coordinate without direct or explicit communication, contrary to what is assumed by most research works in collective robotics. This work also contributes to strengthening the evidence that evolutionary robotics is a design methodology that can tackle real-world tasks demanding fine sensory-motor coordination. PMID:19463056

  11. Control over nanostructures and associated mesomorphic properties of doped self-assembled triarylamine liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Domoto, Yuya; Busseron, Eric; Maaloum, Mounir; Moulin, Emilie; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2015-01-26

    We have synthesized a series of triarylamine-cored molecules equipped with an adjacent amide moiety and dendritic peripheral tails in a variety of modes. We show by (1) H NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy that their supramolecular self-assembly can be promoted in solution upon light stimulation and radical initiation. In addition, we have probed their molecular arrangements and mesomorphic properties in the bulk by integrated studies on their film state by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), variable-temperature polarizing optical microscopy (VT-POM), variable-temperature X-ray diffraction (VT-XRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Differences in the number and the disposition of the peripheral tails significantly affect their mesomorphic properties associated with their lamellar- or columnar-packed nanostructures, which are based on segregated stacks of the triphenylamine cores and the lipophilic/lipophobic periphery. Such structural tuning is of interest for implementation of these soft self-assemblies as electroactive materials from solution to mesophases. PMID:25483214

  12. Induction of protein-like molecular architecture by self-assembly processes.

    PubMed

    Fields, G B

    1999-01-01

    One of the most intriguing self-assembly processes is the folding of peptide chains into native protein structures. We have developed a method for building protein-like structural motifs that incorporate sequences of biological interest. A lipophilic moiety is attached onto an N(alpha)-amino group of a peptide chain, resulting in a 'peptide-amphiphile'. The alignment of amphiphilic compounds at the lipid solvent interface is used to facilitate peptide alignment and structure initiation and propagation. Peptide-amphiphiles containing potentially triple-helical structural motifs have been synthesized. The resultant head group structures have been characterized by circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopies. Evidence for a self-assembly process of peptide-amphiphiles has been obtained from: (a) circular dichroism spectra and melting curves characteristic of triple-helices, (b) one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra indicative of stable triple-helical structure at low temperatures and melted triple-helices at high temperatures, and (c) pulsed-field gradient NMR experiments demonstrating different self-diffusion coefficients between proposed triple-helical and non-triple-helical species. The peptide-amphiphiles described here provide a simple approach for building stable protein structural motifs using peptide head groups. PMID:10199658

  13. Hematite nanoparticle monolayers on mica preparation by controlled self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Oćwieja, Magdalena; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Morga, Maria; Bielańska, Elżbieta; Węgrzynowicz, Adam

    2012-11-15

    A stable suspension of α-Fe(2)O(3) (hematite) was synthesized according to the method of Matijevic and Scheiner by an acidic hydrolysis of ferric chloride. The average size of the particles was determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and was 22 nm. The electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential of particles were determined as a function of ionic strength and pH. The zeta potential of the hematite particles was positive for pH<8.9 (isoelectric point) and negative otherwise. Using the suspension, systematic studies of particle deposition kinetics on mica were carried out. The coverage of self-assembled particle monolayers was determined by AFM and SEM imaging. Particle deposition was diffusion controlled, with the initial rate proportional to the bulk concentration of particles. On the other hand, for long times, the saturation coverage was attained, increasing systematically with ionic strength. The deposition kinetic runs were adequately reflected by the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. Additionally, particle desorption kinetics, from previously formed monolayers, were studied using the AFM and SEM methods. It was confirmed that hematite particle desorption was practically negligible within the time period of 60 h. Our experimental data proved, therefore, that it is feasible to produce uniform and stable hematite particle monolayers of desired coverage in self-assembly processes controlled by the bulk suspension concentration and the ionic strength. PMID:22909964

  14. Kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocrystal superlattices measured by real-time in situ X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Weidman, Mark C; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Tisdale, William A

    2016-07-01

    On solvent evaporation, non-interacting monodisperse colloidal particles self-assemble into a close-packed superlattice. Although the initial and final states can be readily characterized, little is known about the dynamic transformation from colloid to superlattice. Here, by using in situ grazing-incidence X-ray scattering, we tracked the self-assembly of lead sulfide nanocrystals in real time. Following the first appearance of an ordered arrangement, the superlattice underwent uniaxial contraction and collective rotation as it approached its final body-centred cubic structure. The nanocrystals became crystallographically aligned early in the overall self-assembly process, showing that nanocrystal ordering occurs on a faster timescale than superlattice densification. Our findings demonstrate that synchrotron X-ray scattering is a viable method for studying self-assembly in its native environment, with ample time resolution to extract kinetic rates and observe intermediate configurations. The method could be used for real-time direction of self-assembly processes and to better understand the forces governing self-organization of soft materials. PMID:26998914

  15. Buckling instability of self-assembled colloidal columns.

    PubMed

    Swan, James W; Vasquez, Paula A; Furst, Eric M

    2014-09-26

    Suspended, slender self-assembled domains of magnetically responsive colloids are observed to buckle in microgravity. Upon cessation of the magnetic field that drives their assembly, these columns expand axially and buckle laterally. This phenomenon resembles the buckling of long beams due to thermal expansion; however, linear stability analysis predicts that the colloidal columns are inherently susceptible to buckling because they are freely suspended in a Newtonian fluid. The dominant buckling wavelength increases linearly with column thickness and is quantitatively described using an elastohydrodynamic model and the suspension thermodynamic equation of state. PMID:25302919

  16. Buckling Instability of Self-Assembled Colloidal Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James W.; Vasquez, Paula A.; Furst, Eric M.

    2014-09-01

    Suspended, slender self-assembled domains of magnetically responsive colloids are observed to buckle in microgravity. Upon cessation of the magnetic field that drives their assembly, these columns expand axially and buckle laterally. This phenomenon resembles the buckling of long beams due to thermal expansion; however, linear stability analysis predicts that the colloidal columns are inherently susceptible to buckling because they are freely suspended in a Newtonian fluid. The dominant buckling wavelength increases linearly with column thickness and is quantitatively described using an elastohydrodynamic model and the suspension thermodynamic equation of state.

  17. Energy levels in self-assembled quantum arbitrarily shaped dots.

    PubMed

    Tablero, C

    2005-02-01

    A model to determine the electronic structure of self-assembled quantum arbitrarily shaped dots is applied. This model is based principally on constant effective mass and constant potentials of the barrier and quantum dot material. An analysis of the different parameters of this model is done and compared with those which take into account the variation of confining potentials, bands, and effective masses due to strain. The results are compared with several spectra reported in literature. By considering the symmetry, the computational cost is reduced with respect to other methods in literature. In addition, this model is not limited by the geometry of the quantum dot. PMID:15740390

  18. Self-assembling peptide amphiphile nanostructures for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukasene, Stephen

    The application of nanotechnology to cancer therapy shows great promise for reducing the burden of the disease. By virtue of their size, nanoscale objects preferentially accumulate in tumor tissue through an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, to fully overcome the issues that limit current cancer treatments, viable nanostructures must also impart multifunctionality and be fully compatible with their biological surrounds. The self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) materials studied extensively in the Stupp Research Group form very biocompatible high aspect ratio nanostructures that meet these criteria. This thesis investigates the development of PA nanostructures designed to treat cancer. We first look to use the PA as a drug delivery vehicle by entrapping a small hydrophobic anti-cancer drug, camptothecin, in the core of the nanostructures. Using a solvent evaporation technique to load the drug into the PA nanofibers, we are able to improve the aqueous solubility of the molecule by nearly 30-fold. TEM and AFM studies show that entrapment of drug molecules does not disrupt the self-assembled morphology of the nanofiber. In vitro and in vivo studies are also conducted to demonstrate the bioactivity of the drug after its entrapment. As a potential platform for novel therapeutics, we next develop techniques for using light irradiation to trigger self-assembly inside the confined space of liposomes. We encapsulate PA monomers that assemble under acidic conditions along with a photoacid generator inside liposomes. Upon exposure to 254 nm light, the PA monomers self assemble inside the liposome to form nanostructures, which we observe through a quick freeze/deep etch technique that allows us to look inside the liposomes by SEM and TEM. Last of all, the development and discovery of epitopes for targeting PA nanostructures to tumors are explored. Using phage display technology we generate two groups of peptide sequences, one of which can potentially

  19. Model for dynamic self-assembled magnetic surface structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Belkin, M.; Glatz, A.; Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-07-07

    We propose a first-principles model for the dynamic self-assembly of magnetic structures at a water-air interface reported in earlier experiments. The model is based on the Navier-Stokes equation for liquids in shallow water approximation coupled to Newton equations for interacting magnetic particles suspended at a water-air interface. The model reproduces most of the observed phenomenology, including spontaneous formation of magnetic snakelike structures, generation of large-scale vortex flows, complex ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic ordering of the snake, and self-propulsion of bead-snake hybrids.

  20. Guided Self-Assembly of Nano-Precipitates into Mesocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, Z.; Zhu, Y. M.; Wang, Y.; Nie, J. F.

    2015-11-01

    We show by a combination of computer simulation and experimental characterization guided self-assembly of coherent nano-precipitates into a mesocrystal having a honeycomb structure in bulk materials. The structure consists of different orientation variants of a product phase precipitated out of the parent phase by heterogeneous nucleation on a hexagonal dislocation network. The predicted honeycomb mesocrystal has been confirmed by experimental observations in an Mg-Y-Nd alloy. The structure and lattice parameters of the mesocrystal and the size of the nano-precipitates are readily tuneable, offering ample opportunities to tailor its properties for a wide range of technological applications.

  1. Casting metal nanowires within discrete self-assembled peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Reches, Meital; Gazit, Ehud

    2003-04-25

    Tubular nanostructures are suggested to have a wide range of applications in nanotechnology. We report our observation of the self-assembly of a very short peptide, the Alzheimer's beta-amyloid diphenylalanine structural motif, into discrete and stiff nanotubes. Reduction of ionic silver within the nanotubes, followed by enzymatic degradation of the peptide backbone, resulted in the production of discrete nanowires with a long persistence length. The same dipeptide building block, made of D-phenylalanine, resulted in the production of enzymatically stable nanotubes. PMID:12714741

  2. Casting Metal Nanowires Within Discrete Self-Assembled Peptide Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Meital; Gazit, Ehud

    2003-04-01

    Tubular nanostructures are suggested to have a wide range of applications in nanotechnology. We report our observation of the self-assembly of a very short peptide, the Alzheimer's β-amyloid diphenylalanine structural motif, into discrete and stiff nanotubes. Reduction of ionic silver within the nanotubes, followed by enzymatic degradation of the peptide backbone, resulted in the production of discrete nanowires with a long persistence length. The same dipeptide building block, made of D-phenylalanine, resulted in the production of enzymatically stable nanotubes.

  3. Manipulation of self-assembly amyloid peptide nanotubes by dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jaime; Tanzi, Simone; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie

    2008-12-01

    Self-assembled amyloid peptide nanotubes (SAPNT) were manipulated and immobilized using dielectrophoresis. Micro-patterned electrodes of Au were fabricated by photolithography and lifted off on a silicon dioxide layer. SAPNT were manipulated by adjusting the amplitude and frequency of the applied voltage. The immobilized SAPNT were evaluated by SEM and atomic force microscopy. The conductivity of the immobilized SAPNT was studied by I-V characterization, for both single SAPNT and bundles. This work illustrates a way to manipulate and integrate biological nanostructures into novel bio-nanoassemblies with concrete applications, such as field-effect transistors, microprobes, microarrays, and biosensing devices. PMID:19130587

  4. Self-assembly of Epitaxial Monolayers for Vacuum Wafer Bonding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altfeder, Igor; Huang, Biqin; Appelbaum, Ian; Walker, Barry

    2007-03-01

    Self-assembled epitaxial metal monolayers can be used for hetero-integration of mismatched semiconductors, leading to simultaneously low interfacial resistance and high optical transparency. Lattice-mismatched wafers of Si(100) and Si(111) were bonded at room temperature in situ after vacuum deposition of a single atomic layer of Ag on them. The interfacial resistance was measured to be 3.9x 10-4 ohm. cm^ 2 and the optical transmission of the interface at 2500 nm is approximately 98%. We discuss the important role of electron confinement in ultrathin Ag layers as a possible contributor to the bonding energy.

  5. Self-assembly of epitaxial monolayers for vacuum wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altfeder, Igor; Huang, Biqin; Appelbaum, Ian; Walker, B. C.

    2006-11-01

    Self-assembled epitaxial metal monolayers can be used for heterointegration of mismatched semiconductors, leading to simultaneously low interfacial resistance and high optical transparency. Lattice-mismatched wafers of Si(100) and Si(111) were bonded at room temperature in situ after vacuum deposition of a single atomic layer of Ag. The interfacial resistance was measured to be 3.9×10-4Ωcm2 and the optical transmission of the interface at 2500nm is approximately 98%. Electron confinement in ultrathin Ag layers as a possible contributor to the bonding energy.

  6. Self-assembly of silk fibroin under osmotic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Sungkyun

    The supramolecular self-assembly behavior of silk fibroin was investigated using osmotic stress technique. In Chapter 2, a ternary phase diagram of water-silk-LiBr was constructed based on X-ray results on the osmotically stressed regenerated silk fibroin of Bombyx mori silkworm. Microscopic data indicated that silk I is a hydrated structure and a rough estimate of the number of water molecules lost by the structure upon converting from silk I to silk II has been made, and found to be about 2.2 per [GAGAGS] hexapeptide. In Chapter 3, wet-spinning of osmotically stressed, regenerated silk fibroin was performed, based on the prediction that the enhanced control over structure and phase behavior using osmotic stress method helps improve the physical properties of wet-spun regenerated silk fibroin fibers. The osmotic stress was applied in order to pre-structure the regenerated silk fibroin molecule from its original random coil state to more oriented state, manipulating the phase of the silk solution in the phase diagram before the start of spinning. Monofilament fiber with a diameter of 20 microm was produced. In Chapter 4, we investigated if there is a noticeable synergistic osmotic pressure increase between co-existing polymeric osmolyte and salt when extremely highly concentrated salt molecules are present both at sample subphase and stressing subphase, as is the case of silk fibroin self-assembly. The equilibration method that measures osmotic pressure relative to a reference with known osmotic pressure was introduced. Osmotic pressure of aqueous LiBr solution up to 2.75M was measured and it was found that the synergistic effect was insignificant up to this salt concentration. Solution parameters of stressing solutions and Arrhenius kinetics based on time-temperature relationship for the equilibration process were derived as well. In Chapter 5, self-assembly behavior of natural silk fibroin within the gland of Bombyx mori silkworm was investigated using osmotic

  7. Water in nanoconfinement between hydrophilic self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Lane, J Matthew D; Chandross, Michael; Stevens, Mark J; Grest, Gary S

    2008-05-20

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of water confined to subnanometer thicknesses between carboxyl-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold were performed to address conflicts in the literature on the structure and response of water in confinement. The amount of water was varied to yield submonolayer to bilayer structures. The orientation of the water is affected by the confinement, especially in the submonolayer case. We find that the diffusion coefficient decreases as the film becomes thinner and at higher pressures. However, in all cases studied, liquid diffusion is always found. At maximal suppression, the diffusion constant is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the bulk value. PMID:18412381

  8. Electrochromic Behavior of Ionically Self-Assembled Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, J. A.; Heflin, J. R.; Marciu, D.; Miller, M. B.; Davis, R. M.

    2001-03-01

    Ionically self-assembled monolayers (ISAMs), fabricated by alternate adsorption of cationic and anionic components, yield exceptionally homogeneous thin films with sub-nanometer control of the thickness and relative special location of the component materials. Using organic electrochromic materials such as polyaniline, we report studies of electrochromic responses in ISAM films. Reversible changes in the absorption spectrum are observed with the application of voltages on the order of 1.0 V. Measurements are made using both liquid electrolytes and in all-solid state devices incorporating solid polyelectrolytes such as poly(2-acylamido 2-methyl propane sulfonic acid) (PAMPS).

  9. The art and science of self-assembling molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-López, Marcos; Preece, Jon A.; Fraser Stoddart, J.

    1996-09-01

    In this review, we show how noncovalent bonding interactions between 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich aromatic ring systems (e.g. hydroquinone) and the 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient tetracationic cyclophane, cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) can be used to self-assemble novel molecular architectures which are not only interesting to us, because of their fascinating topologies, but also because they have the potential to be developed into molecular structures with switchable properties on the nanometre scale. The high efficiency observed in the self-assembly of a [2]catenane, and its dynamic properties in solution, represent the first step in the design and self-assembly of other molecular assemblies better suited for the study of molecular switching processes. Therefore, a series of [2]rotaxanes, mechanically-interlocked molecular compounds, consisting of a linear 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich dumbbell-shaped component and the 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient tetracationic cyclophane as the cyclic component, have been self-assembled and evaluated. All of the so-called molecular shuttles show translational isomerism and one of them, comprising benzidine and biphenol recognition sites as the non-degenerate 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich sites, shows molecular switching properties when it is perturbed by external stimuli, such as electrons and protons. The versatility of our approach to nanoscale molecular switches is proven by the description of a series of molecular assemblies and supramolecular arrays, consisting of 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron rich and 0957-4484/7/3/004/img1-electron deficient components, which display molecular switching properties when they are influenced by external stimuli that are photochemical, electrochemical and/or chemical in nature. However, the molecular switching phenomena take place in the solution state. Therefore, finally we describe how simple molecular structures can be ordered on to a solid

  10. Programmed self-assembly of complex DNA nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Cheng

    DNA has served as an excellent building block to self-assemble into a wide range of one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structures with the bottom-up method. Due to the specificity of base pairing, the DNA assembly system is predictable and robust. These DNA structures with higher diversity and complexity have potential applications as templates to organize guest molecules or nanoparticles for the nanofabrication, as biosensors for the genetic diagnosis and environmental detection, and as nanocarriers to deliver and release drugs for the therapy. My major researches focus on designing a novel building block and assembly strategies to self-assemble DNA into complex nanostructures to increase the diversity and complexity. A novel building block was first constructed, which is a parallel, left-handed DNA helix containing multiple domains of half-turn-long standard B-DNA. Such a structure can be used to introduce left-handed crossings in order to increase the diversity and complexity of DNA nanostructures, and can be taken into consideration when predicting the secondary structure of DNA/RNA molecules in cells. In addition, a tile-based directed self-assembly strategy was developed to construct DNA nanocages. In this strategy, directing building blocks were employed to control the self-assembly process of assembly building blocks. This strategy greatly expands the scope of accessible DNA nanostructures and would facilitate technological applications such as nano-guest encapsulation, drug delivery, and nanoparticle organization. As the complexity of DNA nanostructures increases, more errors might be involved in the assembly process. Therefore, a simplified design system based on T-junction was designed to build DNA arrays and minimize the assembly errors. In such system, due to the sequence symmetry, only one DNA single strand is employed and assembled into predesigned 1D and 2D arrays. This design system can be applied to assemble a

  11. Preface: Special Topic on Supramolecular Self-Assembly at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, Ludwig; Ernst, Karl-Heinz; Gao, Hong-Jun; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2015-03-14

    Supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces is one of the most exciting and active fields in Surface Science today. Applications can take advantage of two key properties: (i) versatile pattern formation over a broad length scale and (ii) tunability of electronic structure and transport properties, as well as frontier orbital alignment. It provides a new frontier for Chemical Physics as it uniquely combines the versatility of Organic Synthesis and the Physics of Interfaces. The Journal of Chemical Physics is pleased to publish this Special Topic Issue, showcasing recent advances and new directions.

  12. Directed self-assembly defectivity assessment. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencher, Chris; Yi, He; Zhou, Jessica; Cai, Manping; Smith, Jeffrey; Miao, Liyan; Montal, Ofir; Blitshtein, Shiran; Lavi, Alon; Dotan, Kfir; Dai, Huixiong; Cheng, Joy Y.; Sanders, Daniel P.; Tjio, Melia; Holmes, Steven

    2012-03-01

    The main concern for the commercialization of directed self-assembly (DSA) for semiconductor manufacturing continues to be the uncertainty in capability and control of defect density. Our research investigates the defect densities of various DSA process applications in the context of a 300mm wafer fab cleanroom environment; this paper expands substantially on the previously published DSA defectivity study by reporting a defect density process window relative to chemical epitaxial pre-pattern registration lines; as well as investigated DSA based contact hole shrinking and report critical dimension statistics for the phase separated polymers before and after etch, along with positional accuracy measurements and missing via defect density.

  13. Passivation effects in B doped self-assembled Si nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Puthen Veettil, B. Wu, Lingfeng; Jia, Xuguang; Lin, Ziyun; Zhang, Tian; Yang, Terry; Johnson, Craig; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Würfl, Ivan; McCamey, Dane

    2014-12-01

    Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals has enabled their widespread technological application in optoelectronics and micro/nano-electronics. In this work, boron-doped self-assembled silicon nanocrystal samples have been grown and characterised using Electron Spin Resonance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The passivation effects of boron on the interface dangling bonds have been investigated. Addition of boron dopants is found to compensate the active dangling bonds at the interface, and this is confirmed by an increase in photoluminescence intensity. Further addition of dopants is found to reduce the photoluminescence intensity by decreasing the minority carrier lifetime as a result of the increased number of non-radiative processes.

  14. Dithienophosphole-Based Phosphinamides with Intriguing Self-Assembly Behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zisu; Gelfand, Benjamin S; Baumgartner, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    A new, highly adaptable type of phosphinamide-based hydrogen bonding is representatively demonstrated in π-conjugated phosphole materials. The rotational flexibility of these intermolecular P=O-H-N hydrogen bonds is demonstrated by X-ray crystallography and variable-concentration NMR spectroscopy. In addition to crystalline compounds, phosphinamide hydrogen bonding was successfully introduced into the self-assembly of soft crystals, liquid crystals, and organogels, thus highlighting the high general value of this type of interaction for the formation of organic soft materials. PMID:26833592

  15. Rapid self-assembly of block copolymers to photonic crystals

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Yan; Sveinbjornsson, Benjamin R; Grubbs, Robert H; Weitekamp, Raymond; Miyake, Garret M; Atwater, Harry A; Piunova, Victoria; Daeffler, Christopher Scot; Hong, Sung Woo; Gu, Weiyin; Russell, Thomas P.

    2016-07-05

    The invention provides a class of copolymers having useful properties, including brush block copolymers, wedge-type block copolymers and hybrid wedge and polymer block copolymers. In an embodiment, for example, block copolymers of the invention incorporate chemically different blocks comprising polymer size chain groups and/or wedge groups that significantly inhibit chain entanglement, thereby enhancing molecular self-assembly processes for generating a range of supramolecular structures, such as periodic nanostructures and microstructures. The present invention also provides useful methods of making and using copolymers, including block copolymers.

  16. Development of self-assembling nanowires containing electronically active oligothiophenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wei-Wen

    This dissertation discusses the development of conductive one-dimensional nanowires from self-assembling oligothiophene molecules. Self-assembly has been demonstrated to be a promising alternative approach towards high performance, solution processable, and low-cost organic electronics. One of the many challenges in this field is the control of supramolecular morphologies of ordered structures containing pi-conjugated moieties. This research demonstrated several successful strategies to achieve self assembly of conductive nanowires using synergistic interactions combining pi stacking and hydrogen bonding. The first approach used was to develop a hairpin-shaped sexithiophene molecule, which features two arms of the conjugated structure. The diamidocyclohexyl headgroup of this molecule successfully directs the self-assembly from hydrogen bonding among the amides, forming high-aspect-ratio one-dimensional nanowires with well-defined diameters of 3.0 +/- 0.3 nm. The molecular orientation in the nanostructures promotes formation of sexithiophene H and J aggregates that facilitate efficient charge transport. Organic field-effect transistors were fabricated to reveal improved intrinsic hole mobility from films of the nanostructures, 3.46 x 10-6 cm2V-1s-1, which is one order of magnitude higher than films cast from unassembled molecules. Bulk heterojunction solar cells were developed from this molecule and fullerenes utilizing solution-phase fabrication methods. Intimate mix of the molecule and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester creates structured interfaces for efficient exciton splitting. The charge carrier mobilities of each material are improved by self-assembly in solution and thermal-energy assisted phase separation.The photovoltaic devices achieved the highest open-circuit voltage of 0.62 V, short-circuit current of 1.79 mA/cm2, fill factor of 35%, and power conversion efficiency of 0.48%. Another strategy to one-dimensional nanowires studied here involved the

  17. Purification of ethanol for highly sensitive self-assembly experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Kathrin; Kind, Martin; Pfeiffer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ethanol is the preferred solvent for the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiolates on gold. By applying a thin film sensor system, we could demonstrate that even the best commercial qualities of ethanol contain surface-active contaminants, which can compete with the desired thiolates for surface sites. Here we present that gold nanoparticles deposited onto zeolite X can be used to remove these contaminants by chemisorption. This nanoparticle-impregnated zeolite does not only show high capacities for surface-active contaminants, such as thiols, but can be fully regenerated via a simple pyrolysis protocol. PMID:25161861

  18. Formation and Characterization of Silicon Self-assembled Nanodots

    SciTech Connect

    Idrees, Fatima Aldaw; Sakrani, Samsudi; Othaman, Zulkafli

    2011-05-25

    Silicon self-assembled quantum dots have been successfully prepared on corning glass (7059) substrate. The samples were fabricated using the common technique RF magnetron sputtering system depend on plasma excitation at varying growth parameters and high temperature of more than 500 deg. C. The measurements of average dots size estimated to be 36 nm is confirmed by using AFM. The PL peak located at 570 nm, informed band gap energy = 2.10 eV larger than bulk material band gap, that confirmed the miniaturized of the dots. To measure the Silicon atomic% deposit on corning glass (7059) substrate EDX has been used.

  19. Electronic instabilities in self-assembled atom wires

    SciTech Connect

    Snijders, Paul C; Weitering, Harm H

    2010-01-01

    Low dimensional systems have fascinated physicists for a long time due to their unusual properties such as charge fractionalization, semionic statistics, and Luttinger liquid behavior among others. In nature, however, low dimensional systems often suffer from thermal fluctuations that can make these systems structurally unstable. Human beings, however, can trick nature by producing artificial structures which are not naturally produced. This Colloquium reviews the problem of self-assembled atomic wires on solid surfaces from an experimental and theoretical point of view. These materials represent a class of one-dimensional systems with very unusual properties that can open doors to the study of exotic physics that cannot be studied otherwise.

  20. Exploiting non-equilibrium phase separation for self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, Michael; Tricard, Simon; Whitesides, George M; Geissler, Phillip L

    2016-02-01

    Demixing can occur in systems of two or more particle species that experience different driving forces, e.g., mixtures of self-propelled active particles or of oppositely charged colloids subject to an electric field. Here we show with macroscopic experiments and computer simulations that the forces underlying such non-equilibrium segregation can be used to control the self-assembly of particles that lack attractive interactions. We demonstrate that, depending on the direction, amplitude and frequency of a periodic external force acting on one particle species, the structures formed by a second, undriven species can range from compact clusters to elongated, string-like patterns. PMID:26658789

  1. Rapid Self-Assembly of Uranyl Polyhedra into Crown Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.

    2011-06-22

    Clusters built from 32 uranyl peroxide polyhedra self-assemble and crystallize within 15 min after combining uranyl nitrate, ammonium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. These novel crown-shaped clusters are remarkable in that they form so quickly, have extraordinarily low aqueous solubility, form with at least two distinct peroxide to hydroxyl ratios, and form in very high yield. The clusters, which have outer diameters of 23 Å, topologically consist of eight pentagons and four hexagons. Their rapid formation and low solubility in aqueous systems may be useful properties at various stages in an advanced nuclear energy system.

  2. Metal nanowires from self-assembled protein fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Lin, Xiao-Min; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Sawicki, George; Scheibel, Thomas; Lindquist, Susan L.

    2002-03-01

    We present gold and silver nanowires formed by metallization of self-assembled yeast prion proteins. The proteins form 10nm wide, microns long fibers, which we metallize by growth of gold or silver crystals from specific nucleation sites on the genetically engineered fiber surface. This site-specific metal decoration is the first step toward more elaborate functionalization of these biological nanostructures. Deposition of fibers onto substrates with in-plane electrodes will allow electronic transport measurements, correlated with images (TEM and AFM) of the nanowire structure.

  3. Spin State As a Probe of Vesicle Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghoon; Bellouard, Christine; Eastoe, Julian; Canilho, Nadia; Rogers, Sarah E; Ihiawakrim, Dris; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pasc, Andreea

    2016-03-01

    A novel system of paramagnetic vesicles was designed using ion pairs of iron-containing surfactants. Unilamellar vesicles (diameter ≈ 200 nm) formed spontaneously and were characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and light and small-angle neutron scattering. Moreover, for the first time, it is shown that magnetization measurements can be used to investigate self-assembly of such functionalized systems, giving information on the vesicle compositions and distribution of surfactants between the bilayers and the aqueous bulk. PMID:26859700

  4. Selective electroless copper deposition on self-assembled dithiol monolayers.

    PubMed

    Aldakov, Dmitry; Bonnassieux, Yvan; Geffroy, Bernard; Palacin, Serge

    2009-03-01

    The paper reports the use of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of dithiols to induce electroless copper deposition on a gold substrate. The metallization catalyst, palladium nanoparticles, is bound on the dithiol SAM. The assembly process is followed by IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies to confirm the formation of a monolayer with bound catalyst. Electroless metallization is then carried out with a steady deposition rate of 130 nm/min. Additionally, microcontact printing of the catalyst on the SAM by poly(dimethylsiloxane) stamps is used to localize copper deposits. Resulting metallization is selective and allows for a high resolution. PMID:20355979

  5. Guided Self-Assembly of Nano-Precipitates into Mesocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, Z.; Zhu, Y.M.; Wang, Y.; Nie, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    We show by a combination of computer simulation and experimental characterization guided self-assembly of coherent nano-precipitates into a mesocrystal having a honeycomb structure in bulk materials. The structure consists of different orientation variants of a product phase precipitated out of the parent phase by heterogeneous nucleation on a hexagonal dislocation network. The predicted honeycomb mesocrystal has been confirmed by experimental observations in an Mg-Y-Nd alloy. The structure and lattice parameters of the mesocrystal and the size of the nano-precipitates are readily tuneable, offering ample opportunities to tailor its properties for a wide range of technological applications. PMID:26559002

  6. A self-assembling fluorescent dipeptide conjugate for cell labelling.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Steven; Hamley, Ian W; Smith, Andrew M; Gouveia, Ricardo M; Connon, Che J; Reza, Mehedi; Ruokolainen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Derivatives of fluorophore FITC (fluorescein isothiocyanate) are widely used in bioassays to label proteins and cells. An N-terminal leucine dipeptide is attached to FITC, and we show that this simple conjugate molecule is cytocompatible and is uptaken by cells (human dermal and corneal fibroblasts) in contrast to FITC itself. Co-localisation shows that FITC-LL segregates in peri-nuclear and intracellular vesicle regions. Above a critical aggregation concentration, the conjugate is shown to self-assemble into beta-sheet nanostructures comprising molecular bilayers. PMID:25990811

  7. Unifying Interfacial Self-Assembly and Surface Freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Ocko, B.M.; Hlaing, H.; Jepsen, P.N.; Kewalramani, S.; Tkachenko, A.; Pontoni, D.; Reichert, H.; Deutsch, M.

    2011-03-30

    X-ray investigations reveal that the monolayers formed at the bulk alkanol-sapphire interface are densely packed with the surface-normal molecules hydrogen bound to the sapphire. About 30-35 C above the bulk, these monolayers both melt reversibly and partially desorb. This system exhibits balanced intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions which are intermediate between self-assembled and surface-frozen monolayers, each dominated by one interaction. The phase behavior is rationalized within a thermodynamic model comprising interfacial interactions, elasticity, and entropic effects. Separating the substrate from the melt leaves the monolayer structurally intact.

  8. Unifying Interfacial Self-Assembly and Surface Freezing

    SciTech Connect

    B Ocko; H Hlaing; P Jepsen; S Kewalramani; A Tkachenko; D Pontoni; H Reichert; M Deutsch

    2011-12-31

    X-ray investigations reveal that the monolayers formed at the bulk alkanol-sapphire interface are densely packed with the surface-normal molecules hydrogen bound to the sapphire. About 30-35 C above the bulk, these monolayers both melt reversibly and partially desorb. This system exhibits balanced intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions which are intermediate between self-assembled and surface-frozen monolayers, each dominated by one interaction. The phase behavior is rationalized within a thermodynamic model comprising interfacial interactions, elasticity, and entropic effects. Separating the substrate from the melt leaves the monolayer structurally intact.

  9. How chain plasmons govern the optical response in strongly interacting self-assembled metallic clusters of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Ruben; Taylor, Richard W; Baumberg, Jeremy J; Aizpurua, Javier

    2012-06-19

    Self-assembled clusters of metallic nanoparticles separated by nanometric gaps generate strong plasmonic modes that support both intense and localized near fields. These find use in many ultrasensitive chemical and biological sensing applications through surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The inability to control at the nanoscale the structure of the clusters on which the optical response crucially depends, has led to the development of general descriptions to model the various morphologies fabricated. Here, we use rigorous electrodynamic calculations to study clusters formed by a hundred nanospheres that are separated by ∼1 nm distance, set by the dimensions of the macrocyclic molecular linker employed experimentally. Three-dimensional (3D) cluster structures of moderate compactness are of special interest since they resemble self-assembled clusters grown under typical diffusion-limited aggregation conditions. We find very good agreement between the simulated and measured far-field extinction spectra, supporting the equivalence of the assumed and experimental morphologies. From these results we argue that the main features of the optical response of two- and three-dimensional clusters can be understood in terms of the excitation of simple units composed of different length resonant chains. Notably, we observe a qualitative difference between short- and long-chain modes in both spectral response and spatial distribution: dimer and short-chain modes are observed in the periphery of the cluster at higher energies, whereas inside the structure longer chain excitation occurs at lower energies. We study in detail different configurations of isolated one-dimensional chains as prototypical building blocks for large clusters, showing that the optical response of the chains is robust to disorder. This study provides an intuitive understanding of the behavior of very complex aggregates and may be generalized to other types of aggregates and systems formed by large

  10. Molecular self-assembly: Design, synthesis, and characterization of peptidic materials for bio- and nano-technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamm, Matthew S.

    The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the design, synthesis, and characterization of amphiphilic peptides capable of self-assembling into beta-sheet fibrils under specific aqueous solution conditions. The peptide design consists of two beta-sheet forming strands of alternating valine and lysine residues, flanking a central tetrapeptide sequence that contains a diproline. Depending on the chirality of the prolines the peptide can assume either an intramolecularly folded or an extended conformation in the self-assembled state. For the peptide where intramolecular folding is designed against, the self-assembled nanostructure was found to exhibit a unique, nontwisted laminated morphology. Experimental techniques including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the self-assembled structure and kinetics. With the understanding of the self-assembly process gained from these first peptides, other peptide sequences were rationally designed to assemble with a desired nanostructure. For example, the effect of peptide strand length in conserving the laminated morphology and controlling the fibril height was investigated. In addition, other peptides were designed so as to affect the self-assembled nanostructure by enforcing a parallel versus anti-parallel beta-sheet or by disrupting the registry of laminating beta-sheet filaments. In some cases, the peptides assembled into structures predicted by the initial design while other peptides assembled into unexpected fibril morphologies. The major conclusions from the research on these peptides is that the diproline sequence plays an important role in disrupting the beta-strand twist thereby resulting in a nontwisted laminated morphology. However, when the flanking beta-strands become long enough, the effect of the diproline sequence becomes diminished and the fibrils do

  11. RecA-mediated sequence homology recognition as an example of how searching speed in self-assembly systems can be optimized by balancing entropic and enthalpic barriers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lili; Prentiss, Mara

    2016-01-01

    Ideally, self-assembly should rapidly and efficiently produce stable correctly assembled structures. We study the tradeoff between enthalpic and entropic cost in self-assembling systems using RecA-mediated homology search as an example. Earlier work suggested that RecA searches could produce stable final structures with high stringency using a slow testing process that follows an initial rapid search of ~9–15 bases. In this work, we will show that as a result of entropic and enthalpic barriers, simultaneously testing all ~9–15 bases as separate individual units results in a longer overall searching time than testing them in groups and stages. PMID:25215755

  12. Morphology and Pattern Control of Diphenylalanine Self-Assembly via Evaporative Dewetting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiarui; Qin, Shuyu; Wu, Xinglong; Chu, And Paul K

    2016-01-26

    Self-assembled peptide nanostructures have unique physical and biological properties and promising applications in electrical devices and functional molecular recognition. Although solution-based peptide molecules can self-assemble into different morphologies, it is challenging to control the self-assembly process. Herein, controllable self-assembly of diphenylalanine (FF) in an evaporative dewetting solution is reported. The fluid mechanical dimensionless numbers, namely Rayleigh, Marangoni, and capillary numbers, are introduced to control the interaction between the solution and FF molecules in the self-assembly process. The difference in the film thickness reflects the effects of Rayleigh and Marangoni convection, and the water vapor flow rate reveals the role of viscous fingering in the emergence of aligned FF flakes. By employing dewetting, various FF self-assembled patterns, like concentric and spokelike, and morphologies, like strips and hexagonal tubes/rods, can be produced, and there are no significant lattice structural changes in the FF nanostructures. PMID:26654935

  13. Self-Assembly of Channel Type β-CD Dimers Induced by Dodecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengcheng; Cheng, Xinhao; Zhao, Qiang; Yan, Yun; Wang, Jide; Huang, Jianbin

    2014-12-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) can hardly self-assemble into well-defined structures. Here we report if they preassemble into channel type dimers assisted by dodecane, well-defined vesicles and bricks can be formed. Unlike the traditional self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules driven by hydrophobic effect, the self-assembly of the channel type dodecane@2β-CD supramolecular building block is predoninantly driven by hydrogen-bonds. More water molecules are found in the lyophilized vesicles than in the bricks, suggesting water molecules play an important role in the self-assembly of the channel-type dimers of β-CD. The amount of structural water in the self-assembly is closely related to the curvature of the final self-assembled structures. Our work reveals that the channel-type dimer of β-CD may represent a new sort of building block for advanced structures.

  14. Self-assembly of channel type β-CD dimers induced by dodecane.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chengcheng; Cheng, Xinhao; Zhao, Qiang; Yan, Yun; Wang, Jide; Huang, Jianbin

    2014-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) can hardly self-assemble into well-defined structures. Here we report if they preassemble into channel type dimers assisted by dodecane, well-defined vesicles and bricks can be formed. Unlike the traditional self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules driven by hydrophobic effect, the self-assembly of the channel type dodecane@2β-CD supramolecular building block is predoninantly driven by hydrogen-bonds. More water molecules are found in the lyophilized vesicles than in the bricks, suggesting water molecules play an important role in the self-assembly of the channel-type dimers of β-CD. The amount of structural water in the self-assembly is closely related to the curvature of the final self-assembled structures. Our work reveals that the channel-type dimer of β-CD may represent a new sort of building block for advanced structures. PMID:25532046

  15. Molecular self-assembly routes to optically functional thin films: Electroluminescent multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Malinsky, J.E.; Chou, H.

    1998-07-01

    This contribution describes the use of layer-by-layer self-limiting siloxane chemisorption processes to self-assemble structurally regular multilayer organic LED (OLED) devices. Topics discussed include: (1) the synthesis of silyl-functionalized precursor molecules for hole transport layer (HTL), emissive layer (EML), and electron transport layer (ETL) self-assembly, (2) the use of layer-by-layer self-assembly for ITO electrode modification/passivation/hole-electron balancing in a vapor-deposited device, (3) the microstructure/chemical characterization of HTL self-assembly using a prototype triarylamine precursor, (4) fabrication and properties of a hybrid self-assembled + vapor deposited two-layer LED, and (5) fabrication and properties of a fully self-assembled two-layer OLED.

  16. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    Catalytically active colloids maintain non-equilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals at their surface. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1/r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a non-equilibrium analogue of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. In dilute conditions these active colloids join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds. Colloids are found to join up to form self-assembled molecules that could be inert or have spontaneous activity in the form of net translational velocity and spin depending on their symmetry properties and their constituents. As the interactions do not satisfy detailed-balance, it is possible to achieve structures with time dependent functionality. We study a molecule that adopts spontaneous oscillations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that posses dynamical functionalities.

  17. Precise hierarchical self-assembly of multicompartment micelles

    PubMed Central

    Gröschel, André H.; Schacher, Felix H.; Schmalz, Holger; Borisov, Oleg V.; Zhulina, Ekaterina B.; Walther, Andreas; Müller, Axel H.E.

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchical self-assembly offers elegant and energy-efficient bottom-up strategies for the structuring of complex materials. For block copolymers, the last decade witnessed great progress in diversifying the structural complexity of solution-based assemblies into multicompartment micelles. However, a general understanding of what governs multicompartment micelle morphologies and polydispersity, and how to manipulate their hierarchical superstructures using straightforward concepts and readily accessible polymers remains unreached. Here we demonstrate how to create homogeneous multicompartment micelles with unprecedented structural control via the intermediate pre-assembly of subunits. This directed self-assembly leads to a step-wise reduction of the degree of conformational freedom and dynamics and avoids undesirable kinetic obstacles during the structure build-up. It yields a general concept for homogeneous populations of well-defined multicompartment micelles with precisely tunable patchiness, while using simple linear ABC triblock terpolymers. We further demonstrate control over the hierarchical step-growth polymerization of multicompartment micelles into micron-scale segmented supracolloidal polymers as an example of programmable mesoscale colloidal hierarchies via well-defined patchy nanoobjects. PMID:22426231

  18. Stochastic lag time in nucleated linear self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Nitin S; van der Schoot, Paul

    2016-06-21

    Protein aggregation is of great importance in biology, e.g., in amyloid fibrillation. The aggregation processes that occur at the cellular scale must be highly stochastic in nature because of the statistical number fluctuations that arise on account of the small system size at the cellular scale. We study the nucleated reversible self-assembly of monomeric building blocks into polymer-like aggregates using the method of kinetic Monte Carlo. Kinetic Monte Carlo, being inherently stochastic, allows us to study the impact of fluctuations on the polymerization reactions. One of the most important characteristic features in this kind of problem is the existence of a lag phase before self-assembly takes off, which is what we focus attention on. We study the associated lag time as a function of system size and kinetic pathway. We find that the leading order stochastic contribution to the lag time before polymerization commences is inversely proportional to the system volume for large-enough system size for all nine reaction pathways tested. Finite-size corrections to this do depend on the kinetic pathway. PMID:27334194

  19. Aqueous Two Phase System Assisted Self-Assembled PLGA Microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeredla, Nitish; Kojima, Taisuke; Yang, Yi; Takayama, Shuichi; Kanapathipillai, Mathumai

    2016-06-01

    Here, we produce poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) based microparticles with varying morphologies, and temperature responsive properties utilizing a Pluronic F127/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) assisted self-assembly. The PLGA polymer, when emulsified in Pluronic F127/dextran ATPS, forms unique microparticle structures due to ATPS guided-self assembly. Depending on the PLGA concentration, the particles either formed a core-shell or a composite microparticle structure. The microparticles facilitate the simultaneous incorporation of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules, due to their amphiphilic macromolecule composition. Further, due to the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) properties of Pluronic F127, the particles exhibit temperature responsiveness. The ATPS based microparticle formation demonstrated in this study, serves as a novel platform for PLGA/polymer based tunable micro/nano particle and polymersome development. The unique properties may be useful in applications such as theranostics, synthesis of complex structure particles, bioreaction/mineralization at the two-phase interface, and bioseparations.

  20. Structure of self - assembled two-dimensional spherical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bausch, Andreas R.

    2004-03-01

    Dense spherical particles on a flat surface usually pack into a simple triangular lattice, similar to billiard balls at the start of a game. The minimum energy configuration for interacting particles on the curved surface of a sphere, however, presents special difficulties, as recognized already by J.J. Thomson. We describe experimental investigations of the structure of two-dimensional spherical crystals. The crystals, formed by beads self-assembled on water droplets in oil, serve as model systems for exploring very general theories about the minimum energy configurations of particles with arbitrary repulsive interactions on curved surfaces. Above a critical system size we find that crystals develop distinctive high-angle grain boundaries or "scars" not found in planar crystals. The number of excess defects in a scar is shown to grow linearly with the dimensionless system size. First experiments where the melting of the crystal structure was observable will be discussed. Dynamic triangulation methods allow the analysis of the dynamics of the defects. Possible modifications towards mechanically stabilized self assembly structures result in so called Colloidosomes, which are promising for many different encapsulation purposes.

  1. Control of crystal nucleation by patterned self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizenberg, Joanna; Black, Andrew J.; Whitesides, George M.

    1999-04-01

    An important requirement in the fabrication of advanced inorganic materials, such as ceramics and semiconductors, is control over crystallization. In principle, the synthetic growth of crystals can be guided by molecular recognition at interfaces. But it remains a practical challenge to control simultaneously the density and pattern of nucleation events, and the sizes and orientations of the growing crystals. Here we report a route to crystal formation, using micropatterned self-assembled monolayers,, which affords control over all these parameters. We begin with a metal substrate patterned with a self-assembled monolayer having areas of different nucleating activity-in this case, an array of acid-terminated regions separated by methyl-terminated regions. By immersing the patterned substrates in a calcium chloride solution and exposing them to carbon dioxide, we achieve ordered crystallization of calcite in the polar regions, where the rate of nucleation is fastest; crystallization can be completely suppressed elsewhere by a suitable choice of array spacing, which ensures that the solution is undersaturated in the methyl-terminated regions. The nucleation density (the number of crystals formed per active site) may be controlled by varying the area and distribution of the polar regions, and we can manipulate the crystallographic orientation by using different functional groups and substrates.

  2. Free surface BCP self-assembly process characterization with CDSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Shimon; Weinberg, Yakov; Adan, Ofer; Klinov, Michael; Argoud, Maxime; Claveau, Guillaume; Tiron, Raluca

    2016-03-01

    A simple and common practice to evaluate Block copolymers (BCP) self-assembly performances, is on a free surface wafer. With no guiding pattern the BCP designed to form line space pattern for example, spontaneously rearranges to form a random fingerprint type of a pattern. The nature of the rearrangement is dictated by the physical properties of the BCP moieties, wafer surface treatment and the self-assembly process parameters. Traditional CDSEM metrology algorithms are designed to measure pattern with predefined structure, like linespace or oval via holes. Measurement of pattern with expected geometry can reduce measurement uncertainty. Fingerprint type of structure explored in this dissertation, poses a challenge for CD-SEM measurement uncertainty and offers an opportunity to explore 2D metrology capabilities. To measure this fingerprints we developed a new metrology approach that combines image segmentation and edge detection to measure 2D pattern with arbitrary rearrangement. The segmentation approach enabled to quantify the quality of the BCP material and process, detecting 2D attributes such as: CD and CDU at one axis, and number of intersections, length and number of PS fragments, etched PMMA spaces and donut shapes numbers on the second axis. In this paper we propose a 2D metrology to measure arbitrary BCP pattern on a free surface wafer. We demonstrate experimental results demonstrating precision data, and characterization of PS-b-PMMA BCP, intrinsic period L0 = 38nm (Arkema), processed at different bake time and temperatures.

  3. Simulation of self-assembly of polyzwitterions into vesicles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mahalik, Jyoti P.; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-08-19

    Using the Langevin dynamics method and a coarse-grained model, we have researched the formation of vesicles by hydrophobic polymers consisting of periodically placed zwitterion side groups in dilute salt-free aqueous solutions. The zwitterions, being permanent charge dipoles, provide long-range electrostatic correlations which are interfered by the conformational entropy of the polymer. Our simulations are geared towards gaining conceptual understanding in these correlated dipolar systems, where theoretical calculations are at present formidable. A competition between hydrophobic interactions and dipole-dipole interactions leads to a series of self-assembled structures. As the spacing d between the successive zwitterion side groups decreases, single chains undergomore » globule → disk → worm-like structures. We have calculated the Flory-Huggins χ parameter for these systems in terms of d and monitored the radius of gyration, hydrodynamic radius, spatial correlations among hydrophobic and dipole monomers, and dipole-dipole orientational correlation functions. During the subsequent stages of self-assembly, these structures lead to larger globules and vesicles as d is decreased up to a threshold value, below which no large scale morphology forms. Finally the vesicles form via a polynucleation mechanism whereby disk-like structures form first, followed by their subsequent merger.« less

  4. Molecular mobility in self-assembled dendritic chromophore glasses.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Daniel B; Zhou, Xing-Hua; Shi, Zhengwei; Luo, Jingdong; Jang, Sei-Hum; Jen, Alex K-Y; Overney, René M

    2009-10-29

    Increasing complexity in bottom-up molecular designs of amorphous structures with multiple relaxation modes demands an integrated and cognitive design approach, where chemical synthesis is guided by both analytical tools and theoretical simulations. In particular, this is apparent for novel organic second-order nonlinear optical materials of self-assembling molecular glasses involving dendritic arene stabilization moieties (phenyl, naphthyl, and anthryl) with electro-optical activities above 300 pm/V. In this study, nanoscale thermo-mechanical analyses yield direct insight into the molecular enthalpic and entropic relaxation modes. Arene-perfluoroarene interactions for coarse self-assembly are found to impose three phase relaxation regimes, with intermediate regimes of 8-15 degrees C in width and apparent activation energies between 40 and 60 kcal/mol to be the most effective for poling. Energetic analyses based on intrinsic friction microscopy (IFA) identify increasing temporal stability with increasing arene size for the low-temperature regime. Electric field poling efficiency is found to be inversely proportional to entropic cooperative contributions that can make up 80% of the overall apparent relaxation energy for the high-temperature regime. The origin for the activation energies below the incipient glass transition temperature, based on complementary molecular dynamic simulations, is tied primarily to noncovalent interactions between chromophore (dipole), dendritic (quadrupole) moieties, and combinations thereof. PMID:19780549

  5. Self-Assembly into Strands in Amphiphilic Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Larin, Daniil E; Lazutin, Alexei A; Govorun, Elena N; Vasilevskaya, Valentina V

    2016-07-12

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic macromolecules end-grafted to a plane surface is studied using mean-field theory and computer simulations. Chain backbones are built from hydrophobic groups, whereas side groups are hydrophilic. The brush is immersed in a solvent, which can be good or poor, but on average is not far from θ conditions. It is demonstrated that the strong amphiphilicity of macromolecules at a monomer unit level leads to their self-assembly into a system of strands with a 2D hexagonal order in a cross-section parallel to the grafting plane. The structure period is determined by the length of side groups. In theory, this effect is explained by the orientation of strongly amphiphilic monomer units at a strand/solvent boundary that leads to an effective negative contribution to the surface tension. Computer simulations with molecular dynamics (MD) are used for a detailed study of the local brush structure. The aggregation number of strands grows with the increase of the grafting density and side group length. PMID:27267357

  6. A coarse-grained model of microtubule self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Chola; Cheng, Shengfeng

    Microtubules play critical roles in cell structures and functions. They also serve as a model system to stimulate the next-generation smart, dynamic materials. A deep understanding of their self-assembly process and biomechanical properties will not only help elucidate how microtubules perform biological functions, but also lead to exciting insight on how microtubule dynamics can be altered or even controlled for specific purposes such as suppressing the division of cancer cells. Combining all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the essential dynamics coarse-graining method, we construct a coarse-grained (CG) model of the tubulin protein, which is the building block of microtubules. In the CG model a tubulin dimer is represented as an elastic network of CG sites, the locations of which are determined by examining the protein dynamics of the tubulin and identifying the essential dynamic domains. Atomistic MD modeling is employed to directly compute the tubulin bond energies in the surface lattice of a microtubule, which are used to parameterize the interactions between CG building blocks. The CG model is then used to study the self-assembly pathways, kinetics, dynamics, and nanomechanics of microtubules.

  7. Molecular Self-Assembly Driven by London Dispersion Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guo; Cooper, Valentino R; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2011-01-01

    The nature and strength of intermolecular interactions are crucial to a variety of kinetic and dynamic processes at surfaces. Whereas strong chemisorption bonds are known to facilitate molecular binding, the importance of the weaker yet ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions remains elusive in most cases. Here we use first-principles calculations combined with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to unambiguously demonstrate the vital role that vdW interactions play in molecular self-assembly, using styrene nanowire growth on silicon as a prototypical example. We find that, only when the London dispersion forces are included, accounting for the attractive parts of vdW interactions, can the effective intermolecular interaction be reversed from being repulsive to attractive. Such attractive interactions, in turn, ensure the preferred growth of long wires under physically realistic conditions as observed experimentally. We further propose a cooperative scheme, invoking the application of an electric field and the selective creation of Si dangling bonds, to drastically improve the ordered arrangement of the molecular structures. The present study represents a significant step forward in the fundamental understanding and precise control of molecular self-assembly guided by London dispersion forces.

  8. Self assembled monolayers on silicon for molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    Aswal, D K; Lenfant, S; Guerin, D; Yakhmi, J V; Vuillaume, D

    2006-05-24

    We present an overview of various aspects of the self-assembly of organic monolayers on silicon substrates for molecular electronics applications. Different chemical strategies employed for grafting the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanes having different chain lengths on native oxide of Si or on bare Si have been reviewed. The utility of different characterization techniques in determination of the thickness, molecular ordering and orientation, surface coverage, growth kinetics and chemical composition of the SAMs has been discussed by choosing appropriate examples. The metal counterelectrodes are an integral part of SAMs for measuring their electrical properties as well as using them for molecular electronic devices. A brief discussion on the variety of options available for the deposition of metal counterelectrodes, that is, soft metal contacts, vapor deposition and soft lithography, has been presented. Various theoretical models, namely, tunneling (direct and Fowler-Nordheim), thermionic emission, Poole-Frenkel emission and hopping conduction, used for explaining the electronic transport in dielectric SAMs have been outlined and, some experimental data on alkane SAMs have been analyzed using these models. It has been found that short alkyl chains show excellent agreement with tunneling models; while more experimental data on long alkyl chains are required to understand their transport mechanism(s). Finally, the concepts and realization of various molecular electronic components, that is, diodes, resonant tunnel diodes, memories and transistors, based on appropriate architecture of SAMs comprising of alkyl chains (sigma- molecule) and conjugated molecules (pi-molecule) have been presented. PMID:17761249

  9. Compositional Inheritance: Comparison of Self-assembly and Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng; Higgs, Paul G.

    2008-10-01

    Genetic inheritance in modern cells is due to template-directed replication of nucleic acids. However, the difficulty of prebiotic synthesis of long information-carrying polymers like RNA raises the question of whether some other form of heredity is possible without polymers. As an alternative, the lipid world theory has been proposed, which considers non-covalent assemblies of lipids, such as micelles and vesicles. Assemblies store information in the form of a non-random molecular composition, and this information is passed on when the assemblies divide, i.e . the assemblies show compositional inheritance. Here, we vary several important assumptions of previous lipid world models and show that compositional inheritance is relevant more generally than the context in which it was originally proposed. Our models assume that interaction occurs between nearest neighbour molecules only, and account for spatial segregation of molecules of different types within the assembly. We also draw a distinction between a self-assembly model, in which the composition is determined by mutually favourable interaction energies between the molecules, and a catalytic model, in which the composition is determined by mutually favourable catalysis. We show that compositional inheritance occurs in both models, although the self-assembly case seems more relevant if the molecules are simple lipids. In the case where the assemblies are composed of just two types of molecules, there is a strong analogy with the classic two-allele Moran model from population genetics. This highlights the parallel between compositional inheritance and genetic inheritance.

  10. Protein-directed self-assembly of a fullerene crystal

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kook-Han; Ko, Dong-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Nam Hyeong; Paul, Jaydeep; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Murray, Christopher B.; Acharya, Rudresh; DeGrado, William F.; Kim, Yong Ho; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-01-01

    Learning to engineer self-assembly would enable the precise organization of molecules by design to create matter with tailored properties. Here we demonstrate that proteins can direct the self-assembly of buckminsterfullerene (C60) into ordered superstructures. A previously engineered tetrameric helical bundle binds C60 in solution, rendering it water soluble. Two tetramers associate with one C60, promoting further organization revealed in a 1.67-Å crystal structure. Fullerene groups occupy periodic lattice sites, sandwiched between two Tyr residues from adjacent tetramers. Strikingly, the assembly exhibits high charge conductance, whereas both the protein-alone crystal and amorphous C60 are electrically insulating. The affinity of C60 for its crystal-binding site is estimated to be in the nanomolar range, with lattices of known protein crystals geometrically compatible with incorporating the motif. Taken together, these findings suggest a new means of organizing fullerene molecules into a rich variety of lattices to generate new properties by design. PMID:27113637

  11. Designing self-assembling 3D structures of microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Like; Shum, Henry; Shklyaev, Oleg; Yashin, Victor; Balazs, Anna

    Self-assembly of complex, three-dimensional structures is commonly achieved by biological cells but difficult to realize in synthetic systems with micron-scale or larger components. Some previous modeling studies have considered only the planar self-assembly of microcapsules on a substrate. In this work, nanoparticles released from the capsules bind to the substrate and to the shells of nearby capsules. The non-uniform nanoparticle deposition on a capsule's surface leads to adhesion gradients, which drive the capsules to effectively ``climb'' on top of one another and self-organize in the vertical direction. We determine conditions that favor this structural organization. In particular, we study how the vertical structuring depends on the background fluid flow, the topography of the microcapsules and the underlying surface, the capsule-capsule interaction and that between the capsules and the substrate. The findings can provide design rules for the autonomous creation of novel nanocomposites, where the layers are formed from nanoparticle-containing and nanoparticle-decorated microcapsules.

  12. Aqueous Two Phase System Assisted Self-Assembled PLGA Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Yeredla, Nitish; Kojima, Taisuke; Yang, Yi; Takayama, Shuichi; Kanapathipillai, Mathumai

    2016-01-01

    Here, we produce poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) based microparticles with varying morphologies, and temperature responsive properties utilizing a Pluronic F127/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) assisted self-assembly. The PLGA polymer, when emulsified in Pluronic F127/dextran ATPS, forms unique microparticle structures due to ATPS guided-self assembly. Depending on the PLGA concentration, the particles either formed a core-shell or a composite microparticle structure. The microparticles facilitate the simultaneous incorporation of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules, due to their amphiphilic macromolecule composition. Further, due to the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) properties of Pluronic F127, the particles exhibit temperature responsiveness. The ATPS based microparticle formation demonstrated in this study, serves as a novel platform for PLGA/polymer based tunable micro/nano particle and polymersome development. The unique properties may be useful in applications such as theranostics, synthesis of complex structure particles, bioreaction/mineralization at the two-phase interface, and bioseparations. PMID:27279329

  13. Aerosol-Assisted Self-Assembly of Mesostructured Spherical Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C.J.; Fan,; H.; Lu, Y.; Rieker, T.; Stump, A.; Ward, T.L.

    1999-03-23

    Nanostructured particles exhibiting well-defined pore sizes and pore connectivities (1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional) are of interest for catalysis, chromatography, controlled release, low dielectric constant fillers, and custom-designed pigments and optical hosts. During the last several years considerable progress has been made on controlling the macroscopic forms of mesoporous silicas prepared by surfactant and block copolymer liquid crystalline templating procedures. Typically interfacial phenomena are used to control the macroscopic form (particles, fibers, or films), while self-assembly of amphiphilic surfactants or polymers is used to control the mesostructure. To date, although a variety of spherical or nearly-spherical particles have been prepared, their extent of order is limited as is the range of attainable mesostructures. They report a rapid, aerosol process that results in solid, completely ordered spherical particles with stable hexagonal, cubic, or vesicular mesostructures. The process relies on evaporation-induced interfacial self-assembly (EISA) confined to a spherical aerosol droplet. The process is simple and generalizable to a variety of materials combinations. Additionally, it can be modified to provide the first aerosol route to the formation of ordered mesostructured films.

  14. Stochastic lag time in nucleated linear self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Nitin S.; van der Schoot, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Protein aggregation is of great importance in biology, e.g., in amyloid fibrillation. The aggregation processes that occur at the cellular scale must be highly stochastic in nature because of the statistical number fluctuations that arise on account of the small system size at the cellular scale. We study the nucleated reversible self-assembly of monomeric building blocks into polymer-like aggregates using the method of kinetic Monte Carlo. Kinetic Monte Carlo, being inherently stochastic, allows us to study the impact of fluctuations on the polymerization reactions. One of the most important characteristic features in this kind of problem is the existence of a lag phase before self-assembly takes off, which is what we focus attention on. We study the associated lag time as a function of system size and kinetic pathway. We find that the leading order stochastic contribution to the lag time before polymerization commences is inversely proportional to the system volume for large-enough system size for all nine reaction pathways tested. Finite-size corrections to this do depend on the kinetic pathway.

  15. Self-assembled mannan nanogel: cytocompatibility and cell localization.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sílvia A; Carvalho, Vera; Costa, Carla; Teixeira, João Paulo; Vilanova, Manuel; Gama, Francisco M

    2012-06-01

    Amphiphilic mannan, produced by the Michael addition of hydrophobic 1-hexadecanethiol to vinyl methacrylated mannan, self-assembles in aqueous medium through hydrophobic interactions among alkyl chains. Resultant nanogel is stable, spherical, polydisperse, with 50-140 nm mean hydrodynamic diameter depending on the polymer degree of substitution, and nearly neutral negative surface charge. No cytotoxicity of mannan nanogel is detected up to about 0.4 mg/mL in mouse embryo fibroblast cell line 3T3 and mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) using cell proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase and Live/Dead assays. Comet assay, under the tested conditions, reveals no DNA damage in fibroblasts but possible in BMDM. BMDM internalize the mannan nanogel, which is observed in vesicles in the cytoplasm by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Confocal colocalization image analysis denotes that the entrance and exit of nanogel and FM 4-64 might occur by the same processes--endocytosis and exocytosis--in BMDM. Physicochemical characteristics, in vitro cytocompatibility and uptake of self-assembled mannan nanogel by mouse BMDM are great signals of the potential applicability of this nanosystem for macrophages targeted delivery of vaccines or drugs, acting as potential nanomedicines, always with the key goal of preventing and/or treating diseases. PMID:22764417

  16. Self assembly of highly-ordered nanoparticle monolayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Bigioni, T. P.; Lin, X.-M.; Nguyen, T. T.; Corwin, E. I.; Witten, T. A.; Jaeger, H. M.; Univ. of Chicago

    2006-01-01

    When a drop of a colloidal solution of nanoparticles dries on a surface, it leaves behind coffee-stain-like rings of material with lace-like patterns or clumps of particles in the interior. These non-uniform mass distributions are manifestations of far-from-equilibrium effects, such as fluid flows and solvent fluctuations during late-stage drying. However, recently a strikingly different drying regime promising highly uniform, long-range-ordered nanocrystal monolayers has been found. Here we make direct, real-time and real-space observations of nanocrystal self-assembly to reveal the mechanism. We show how the morphology of drop-deposited nanoparticle films is controlled by evaporation kinetics and particle interactions with the liquid-air interface. In the presence of an attractive particle-interface interaction, rapid early-stage evaporation dynamically produces a two-dimensional solution of nanoparticles at the liquid-air interface, from which nanoparticle islands nucleate and grow. This self-assembly mechanism produces monolayers with exceptional long-range ordering that are compact over macroscopic areas, despite the far-from-equilibrium evaporation process. This new drop-drying regime is simple, robust and scalable, is insensitive to the substrate material and topography, and has a strong preference for forming monolayer films. As such, it stands out as an excellent candidate for the fabrication of technologically important ultra thin film materials for sensors, optical devices and magnetic storage media.

  17. Simulation of self-assembly of polyzwitterions into vesicles.

    PubMed

    Mahalik, J P; Muthukumar, M

    2016-08-21

    Using the Langevin dynamics method and a coarse-grained model, we have studied the formation of vesicles by hydrophobic polymers consisting of periodically placed zwitterion side groups in dilute salt-free aqueous solutions. The zwitterions, being permanent charge dipoles, provide long-range electrostatic correlations which are interfered by the conformational entropy of the polymer. Our simulations are geared towards gaining conceptual understanding in these correlated dipolar systems, where theoretical calculations are at present formidable. A competition between hydrophobic interactions and dipole-dipole interactions leads to a series of self-assembled structures. As the spacing d between the successive zwitterion side groups decreases, single chains undergo globule → disk → worm-like structures. We have calculated the Flory-Huggins χ parameter for these systems in terms of d and monitored the radius of gyration, hydrodynamic radius, spatial correlations among hydrophobic and dipole monomers, and dipole-dipole orientational correlation functions. During the subsequent stages of self-assembly, these structures lead to larger globules and vesicles as d is decreased up to a threshold value, below which no large scale morphology forms. The vesicles form via a polynucleation mechanism whereby disk-like structures form first, followed by their subsequent merger. PMID:27544126

  18. Self-Assembly of Porphyrin J-Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snitka, Valentinas; Rackaitis, Mindaugas; Navickaite, Gintare

    2006-03-01

    The porphyrin nanotubes were built by ionic self-assembly of two oppositely charged porphyrins in aqueous solution. The porphyrins in the acid aqueous solution self-assemble into J-aggregates, wheels or other structures. The electrostatic forces between these porphyrin blocks contribute to the formation of porphyrin aggregates in the form of nanotubes, enhance the structural stability of these nanostructures. The nanotubes were composed mixing aqueous solutions of the two porphyrins - anionic Meso-tetra(4- sulfonatophrnyl)porhine dihydrochloride (TPPS4) and cationic Meso-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphine (T4MPyP). The porphyrin nanotubes obtained are hollow structures with the length of 300 nm and diameter 50 nm. Photocatalytic porphyrins are used to reduce metal complexes from aqueous solution and to control the deposition of Au from AuHCl4 and Au nanoparticles colloid solutions onto porphyrin nanotubes. Porphyrin nanotubes are shown to reduce metal complexes and deposit the metal selectively onto the inner or outer surface of the tubes, leading to nanotube-metal composite structures.

  19. Self-assembly mechanism in colloids: perspectives from statistical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacometti, Achille

    2012-06-01

    Motivated by recent experimental findings in chemical synthesis of colloidal particles, we draw an analogy between self-assembly processes occurring in biological systems (e.g. protein folding) and a new exciting possibility in the field of material science. We consider a self-assembly process whose elementary building blocks are decorated patchy colloids of various types, that spontaneously drive the system toward a unique and predetermined targeted macroscopic structure. To this aim, we discuss a simple theoretical model — the Kern-Frenkel model — describing a fluid of colloidal spherical particles with a pre-defined number and distribution of solvophobic and solvophilic regions on their surface. The solvophobic and solvophilic regions are described via a short-range square-well and a hard-sphere potentials, respectively. Integral equation and perturbation theories are presented to discuss structural and thermodynamical properties, with particular emphasis on the computation of the fluid-fluid (or gas-liquid) transition in the temperaturedensity plane. The model allows the description of both one and two attractive caps, as a function of the fraction of covered attractive surface, thus interpolating between a square-well and a hard-sphere fluid, upon changing the coverage. By comparison with Monte Carlo simulations, we assess the pros and the cons of both integral equation and perturbation theories in the present context of patchy colloids, where the computational effort for numerical simulations is rather demanding.

  20. Transport and photodetection in self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Razeghi, M; Lim, H; Tsao, S; Szafraniec, J; Zhang, W; Mi, K; Movaghar, B

    2005-02-01

    A great step forward in science and technology was made when it was discovered that lattice mismatch can be used to grow highly ordered, artificial atom-like structures called self-assembled quantum dots. Several groups have in the meantime successfully demonstrated useful infrared photodetection devices which are based on this technology. The new physics is fascinating, and there is no doubt that many new applications will be found when we have developed a better understanding of the underlying physical processes, and in particular when we have learned how to integrate the exciting new developments made in nanoscopic addressing and molecular self-assembly methods with semiconducting dots. In this paper we examine the scientific and technical questions encountered in current state of the art infrared detector technology and suggest ways of overcoming these difficulties. Promoting simple physical pictures, we focus in particular on the problem of high temperature detector operation and discuss the origin of dark current, noise, and photoresponse. PMID:21727426