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Sample records for nanotube field emitters

  1. Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bronkowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have shown that with suitable choices of critical dimensions, planar arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes (see figure) can serve as high-current-density field emitter (cold-cathode) electron sources. Whereas some hot-cathode electron sources must be operated at supply potentials of thousands of volts, these cold-cathode sources generate comparable current densities when operated at tens of volts. Consequently, arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes might prove useful as cold-cathode sources in miniature, lightweight electron-beam devices (e.g., nanoklystrons) soon to be developed. Prior to the experiments, all reported efforts to develop carbon-nanotube-based field-emission sources had yielded low current densities from a few hundred microamperes to a few hundred milliamperes per square centimeter. An electrostatic screening effect, in which taller nanotubes screen the shorter ones from participating in field emission, was conjectured to be what restricts the emission of electrons to such low levels. It was further conjectured that the screening effect could be reduced and thus emission levels increased by increasing the spacing between nanotubes to at least by a factor of one to two times the height of the nanotubes. While this change might increase the emission from individual nanotubes, it would decrease the number of nanotubes per unit area and thereby reduce the total possible emission current. Therefore, to maximize the area-averaged current density, it would be necessary to find an optimum combination of nanotube spacing and nanotube height. The present concept of using an array of bundles of nanotubes arises partly from the concept of optimizing the spacing and height of field emitters. It also arises partly from the idea that single nanotubes may have short lifetimes as field emitters, whereas bundles of nanotubes could afford redundancy so that the loss of a single nanotube would not significantly reduce the overall field emission.

  2. Excellent oxidation endurance of boron nitride nanotube field electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yenan; Song, Yoon-Ho; Milne, William I.; Jin Lee, Cheol

    2014-04-21

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are considered as a promising cold electron emission material owing to their negative electron affinity. BNNT field emitters show excellent oxidation endurance after high temperature thermal annealing of 600 °C in air ambient. There is no damage to the BNNTs after thermal annealing at a temperature of 600 °C and also no degradation of field emission properties. The thermally annealed BNNTs exhibit a high maximum emission current density of 8.39 mA/cm{sup 2} and show very robust emission stability. The BNNTs can be a promising emitter material for field emission devices under harsh oxygen environments.

  3. Gas ionization sensors with carbon nanotube/nickel field emitters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Lin, Tzu-Ching; Yang, Ying-Kan; Tzeng, Shien-Der

    2011-12-01

    Gas ionization sensors based on the field emission properties of the carbon nanotube/nickel (CNT/Ni) field emitters were first developed in this work. It is found that the breakdown electric field (E(b)) slightly decreases from 2.2 V/microm to 1.9 V/microm as the pressure of H2 gas increases from 0.5 Torr to 100 Torr. On the contrary, E(b) obviously increases from 2.9 V/microm to 6.5 V/microm as O2 gas pressure increases from 0.5 Torr to 100 Torr. This may be explained by the depression of the electron emission that caused by the adsorption of the O2 gas on the CNT emitters. The Raman spectra of the CNT/Ni emitters also show that more defects were generated on the CNTs after O2 gas sensing. The Joule heating effect under high current density as performing H2 sensing was also observed. These effects may contribute the pressure dependence on the breakdown electric field of the CNT/Ni gas ionization sensors. PMID:22409010

  4. Field emission properties from flexible field emitters using carbon nanotube film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Jung, Seung Il; Yun, Ki Nam; Chen, Guohai; Song, Yoon-Ho; Saito, Yahachi; Milne, William I.; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2014-07-01

    Flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters are fabricated using CNT films on polyethylene terephthalate films. The flexible CNT emitters, which are made using double-walled CNTs, show high emission performance and also indicate stable field emission properties under several bending conditions. The flexible CNT emitters have a low turn-on field of about 0.82 V/μm and a high emission current density of about 2.0 mA/cm2 at an electric field of 1.6 V/μm. During stability tests, the flexible CNT emitters initially degrade over the first 4 h but exhibit no further significant degradation over the next 16 h testing while being continually bent. A flexible lamp made using the flexible CNT emitter displays uniform and bright emission patterns in a convex mode.

  5. Systems and Methods for Implementing Robust Carbon Nanotube-Based Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Kristof, Valerie (Inventor); Toda, Risaku (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement carbon nanotube-based field emitters. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating a carbon nanotube field emitter includes: patterning a substrate with a catalyst, where the substrate has thereon disposed a diffusion barrier layer; growing a plurality of carbon nanotubes on at least a portion of the patterned catalyst; and heating the substrate to an extent where it begins to soften such that at least a portion of at least one carbon nanotube becomes enveloped by the softened substrate.

  6. Effective hybrid graphene/carbon nanotubes field emitters by electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Angel T. T.; Chen, Ting; Pan, Likun; Sun, Zhuo; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2013-05-01

    Hybrid graphene and carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters were fabricated with electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The combination of both materials was used to improve the turn-on field for pure carbon nanotubes emitters and the reliability of pure graphene emitters deposited by the same method. The CNT was envisioned to hold down the graphene flakes, like a safety belt or Velcro, at high voltages to prevent an early short circuit at relatively low voltages. These hybrid emitters were studied for their field emission performance in relation to the EPD deposition duration. It was observed that the emitters performed better when the EPD duration was increased due to the increase in the amount and density of graphene flakes. Possible reasons for the improvement of field emission performance were suggested. The roles of graphene and CNT in these hybrid emitters were also discussed.

  7. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube field emitters after high temperature thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Hwang, Yeon Mo; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2014-07-15

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters have been fabricated by attaching a CNT film on a graphite rod using graphite adhesive material. The CNT field emitters showed much improved field emission properties due to increasing crystallinity and decreasing defects in CNTs after the high temperature thermal annealing at 900 °C in vacuum ambient. The CNT field emitters showed the low turn-on electric field of 1.15 V/μm, the low threshold electric field of 1.62 V/μm, and the high emission current of 5.9 mA which corresponds to a current density of 8.5 A/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the CNT field emitters indicated the enhanced field emission properties due to the multi-stage effect when the length of the graphite rod increases. The CNT field emitter showed good field emission stability after the high temperature thermal annealing. The CNT field emitter revealed a focused electron beam spot without any focusing electrodes and also showed good field emission repeatability.

  8. Field emission from optimized structure of carbon nanotube field emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, V.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S.

    2016-04-01

    The authors report a detail study on the emission properties of field emitter array (FEA) of micro-circular emitters of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The FEAs were fabricated on patterned substrates prepared with an array of circular titanium (Ti) islands on titanium nitride coated tantalum substrates. CNTs were rooted into these Ti islands to prepare an array of circular emitters. The circular emitters were prepared in different diameters and pitches in order to optimize their structure for acquiring a high emission current. The pitch was varied from 0 to 600 μm, while a diameter of circular emitters was kept constant to be 50 μm in order to optimize a pitch. For diameter optimization, a diameter was changed from 50 to 200 μm while keeping a constant edge-to-edge distance of 150 μm between the circular emitters. The FEA with a diameter of 50 μm and a pitch of 120 μm was found to be the best to achieve an emission current of 47 mA corresponding to an effective current density of 30.5 A/cm2 at 7 V/μm. The excellent emission current was attributed to good quality of CNT rooting into the substrate and optimized FEA structure, which provided a high electric field on a whole circular emitter of 50 μm and the best combination of the strong edge effect and CNT coverage. The experimental results were confirmed with computer simulation.

  9. Ultralow biased field emitter using single-wall carbon nanotube directly grown onto silicon tip by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Kinosita, Seizo; Gotoh, Yoshitaka; Uchiyama, Tetsuo; Manalis, Scott; Quate, Calvin

    2001-01-01

    A carbon-nanotube field emitter which has single-wall carbon nanotubes with a diameter of 1-2 nm grown directly onto the Si tips by thermal chemical vapor deposition was developed. Owing to the 10-20 times smaller diameter of the nanotube than the conventional silicon (Si) tip, the fabricated carbon-nanotube field emitter showed an ultralow threshold voltage of 10 V for the field emission of electrons, which is more than ten times smaller value than the conventional Si emitter.

  10. Fabrication and field emission properties of triode-type carbon nanotube emitter arrays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianfeng; Wyse, Madeline; McClain, Devon; Thomas, Nicole; Jiao, Jun

    2009-02-01

    We report here an effective method for the fabrication of a large number of triode-type microgated carbon nanotube field emitter arrays. Our technique combines dual-beam focused ion beam technology and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, avoiding the tedious lithography and wet chemistry procedures conventionally used to fabricate such structures. Field emission testing revealed that increasing gate voltage by as little as 0.3 V had significant impact on the local electric fields, lowering the turn on and threshold fields by 3.6 and 3.0 V/microm, respectively. The field enhancement factor of the emitter arrays was also increased from 149 to 222. A quantum mechanical model for such triode-type field emission indicates that the local electric field generated by a negatively or positively biased gate directly impacts the tunneling barrier thickness and thus the achievable emitter current. PMID:19161333

  11. Characterization of X-ray charge neutralizer using carbon-nanotube field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawaki, Shuhei; Abo, Satoshi; Wakaya, Fujio; Yamashita, Hayato; Abe, Masayuki; Takai, Mikio

    2016-06-01

    An X-ray charge neutralizer using a screen-printed carbon-nanotube field emitter is demonstrated to show the possibility of a large-area flat-panel charge neutralizer, although the device dimensions in the present work are not very large. The X-ray yields and spectra are characterized to estimate the ion generation rate as one of the figures of merit of neutralizers. Charge neutralization characteristics are measured and show good performance.

  12. Fabrication of Gate-Electrode Integrated Carbon-Nanotube Bundle Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Bronikowski, Michael; Luong, Edward; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    A continuing effort to develop carbon-nanotube-based field emitters (cold cathodes) as high-current-density electron sources has yielded an optimized device design and a fabrication scheme to implement the design. One major element of the device design is to use a planar array of bundles of carbon nanotubes as the field-emission tips and to optimize the critical dimensions of the array (principally, heights of bundles and distances between them) to obtain high area-averaged current density and high reliability over a long operational lifetime a concept that was discussed in more detail in Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters (NPO-40817), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 2 (February 2007), page 58. Another major element of the design is to configure the gate electrodes (anodes used to extract, accelerate, and/or focus electrons) as a ring that overhangs a recess wherein the bundles of nanotubes are located, such that by virtue of the proximity between the ring and the bundles, a relatively low applied potential suffices to generate the large electric field needed for emission of electrons.

  13. In-plane carbon nanotube field emitters for high temperature integrated electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monica, Andrew Hayes

    Lateral carbon nanotube (CNT)-based field emission devices have been developed for the purpose of fabricating diodes, triodes, and ultimately integrated circuits. The goal of this research is to create CNT-based field emission devices that offer high performance operation in harsh environments, particularly high temperature. Silicon based technologies suffer from an inherent inability to operate at temperatures above ˜300°C; however, a need still exists for such electronics. The devices developed by this research seek to address the need for robust microelectronics capable of wide temperature range operation without the need for elaborate cooling systems. The field emitter structures consist of carbon nanotubes that are created using one of two distinct techniques: dielectrophoretic assembly or thermal chemical vapor deposition synthesis. I will discuss how such techniques can be used to create lateral CNT structures suitable for planar field emission while also enabling complete compatibility with modern semiconductor processing techniques. The electrical and thermal performance results of planar CNT field emitters operating in diode and triode configurations are also reported. Carbon nanotube based field emission devices, such as those I have developed, have characteristics that could result in benefits to an exceedingly wide range of applications beyond operation in harsh environments. High-frequency analog applications are particularly of interest because of the very low capacitances and the high current/unit area capability of typical CNT field emitters, which is in the Amps/cm2 range. Also, since field emitted current is a very strong function of the applied electric field, these devices will undoubtedly find potential use in applications requiring large gain.

  14. Stable electron field emission from carbon nanotubes emitter transferred on graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ning; Chen, Jing; Qu, Ke; Khan, Qasim; Lei, Wei; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2015-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arrays grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method was transferred onto the substrate covered with graphene layer obtained by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology. The graphene buffer layer provides good electrical and thermal contact to the CNTs. The field emission characteristics of this hybrid structure were investigated in this study. Compared with the CNTs arrays directly grown on the silicon substrate, the hybrid emitter shows better field emission performance, such as high emission current and long-term emission stability. The presence of this graphene layer was shown to improve the field emission behavior of CNTs. This work provides an effective way to realize stable field emission from CNTs emitter and similar hybrid structures.

  15. Stationary scanning x-ray source based on carbon nanotube field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, Jian; Cheng, Yuan; Gao, Bo; Qiu, Qi; Lee, Yueh; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotube is an ideal field emitter thanks to its large aspect ratio and small diameter. Based on its field emission property, we have developed a stationary scanning x-ray source, which can generate a scanning x-ray beam to image an object from multiple projection angles without mechanical motion. The key component of the device is a gated carbon nanotube field emission cathode with an array of electron emitting pixels that are individually addressable via a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor-based electronic circuit. The characteristics of this x-ray source are measured and its imaging capability is demonstrated. The device can potentially lead to a fast data acquisition rate for laminography and tomosynthesis.

  16. Fabrication of carbon nanotube emitters on the graphite rod and their high field emission performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Hoon Shin, Dong; Nam Yun, Ki; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Jin Lee, Cheol

    2014-01-27

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters with small emission area were fabricated on graphite rods using CNT films. By introducing the edge polishing process, the field emission performance of the CNT emitter was much improved, which showed a very high emission current of 6.34 mA (1.6 A/cm{sup 2}) under an applied electric field of 5.3 V/μm. It also indicates good long-term emission stability, which reveals no degradation in the emission current for 20 h. The emission patterns demonstrate uniform and well-focused electron beam spots. The enhanced field emission performance is mainly attributed to the suppressed edge emission after the edge polishing process.

  17. Carbon Nanotubes as Thermionic Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutfy, R. O.; Samandi, M.; Moravsky, A.; Strange, S.

    2004-02-01

    Thermionic converters are an interesting option for lightweight and long-life power generators due to a number of compelling advantages, including all solid construction, no moving parts, and waste heat rejection at high temperature. An experimental set up has been built that allows the screening of thermionic coatings and new nanomaterials from room temperature to 2000 K in high vacuum and at gap sizes as small as 1 μm. A new class of very high temperature compatible materials, carbon nanotubes, has been investigated for their performance as cathodes. Seven different types of carbon nanotubes have been screened as thermionic emitter cathodes and compared to tungsten and nitrogen doped diamond. It has been found that some carbon nanotubes combine excellent temperature stability with good thermal emission performance. Yet, other carbon nanotubes exhibited exceptional combined thermal and field enhanced emission performance.

  18. Enhanced Field-Emission Performance from Carbon Nanotube Emitters on Nickel Foam Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Meng; Xu, Peng; Han, Lijing; Yi, Lan; Wang, Xu; Li, Zhenhua; Shang, Xuefu; Wang, Xiumin; Wu, Huizhen; Zhao, Pei; Song, Yenan; Wang, Miao

    2016-04-01

    We present a three-dimensionally configured cathode with enhanced field-emission performance formed by combining carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters with a nickel foam (NiF) substrate via a conventional screen-printing technique. The CNT/NiF cathode has low turn-on electric field of 0.53 V μm-1 (with current density of 10 μA cm-2) and threshold electric field of 0.87 V μm-1 (with current density of 0.1 mA cm-2), and a very high field enhancement factor of 1.4 × 104. The porous structure of the NiF substrate can greatly improve the field-emission properties due to its large specific surface area that can accommodate more CNTs and increase the emitter density, as well as its high electrical and thermal conductivities that facilitate current transition and heat dissipation in the cathode. Most importantly, the local electric field was also enhanced by the multistage effect resulting from the rough metal surface, which furthermore leads to a high field enhancement factor. We believe that this improved field-emission performance makes such cathodes promising candidates for use in various field-emission applications.

  19. Highly reliable field electron emitters produced from reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2014-02-14

    Highly reliable field electron emitters were developed using a formulation for reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube (CNT) composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers and a ball-milling method. We carefully controlled the ball-milling sequence and time to avoid any damage to the CNTs, which incorporated fillers that were fully dispersed as paste constituents. The field electron emitters fabricated by printing the CNT pastes were found to exhibit almost perfect adhesion of the CNT emitters to the cathode, along with good uniformity and reproducibility. A high field enhancement factor of around 10,000 was achieved from the CNT field emitters developed. By selecting nano-sized metal alloys and oxides and using the same formulation sequence, we also developed reliable field emitters that could survive high-temperature post processing. These field emitters had high durability to post vacuum annealing at 950 °C, guaranteeing survival of the brazing process used in the sealing of field emission x-ray tubes. We evaluated the field emitters in a triode configuration in the harsh environment of a tiny vacuum-sealed vessel and observed very reliable operation for 30 h at a high current density of 350 mA cm(-2). The CNT pastes and related field emitters that were developed could be usefully applied in reliable field emission devices. PMID:24434798

  20. Carbon and metal nanotube hybrid structures on graphene as efficient electron field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Kwang; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Hyungwoo; Cho, Dong-guk; Arif, Muhammad; Kim, Kyu Young; Choi, Young Jin; Hong, Seunghun

    2016-07-01

    We report a facile and efficient method for the fabrication of highly-flexible field emission devices by forming tubular hybrid structures based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nickel nanotubes (Ni NTs) on graphene-based flexible substrates. By employing an infiltration process in anodic alumina oxide (AAO) templates followed by Ni electrodeposition, we could fabricate CNT-wrapped Ni NT/graphene hybrid structures. During the electrodeposition process, the CNTs served as Ni nucleation sites, resulting in a large-area array of high aspect-ratio field emitters composed of CNT-wrapped Ni NT hybrid structures. As a proof of concepts, we demonstrate that high-quality flexible field emission devices can be simply fabricated using our method. Remarkably, our proto-type field emission devices exhibited a current density higher by two orders of magnitude compared to other devices fabricated by previous methods, while maintaining its structural integrity in various bending deformations. This novel fabrication strategy can be utilized in various applications such as optoelectronic devices, sensors and energy storage devices.

  1. Carbon and metal nanotube hybrid structures on graphene as efficient electron field emitters.

    PubMed

    Heo, Kwang; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Hyungwoo; Cho, Dong-Guk; Arif, Muhammad; Kim, Kyu Young; Choi, Young Jin; Hong, Seunghun

    2016-07-01

    We report a facile and efficient method for the fabrication of highly-flexible field emission devices by forming tubular hybrid structures based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nickel nanotubes (Ni NTs) on graphene-based flexible substrates. By employing an infiltration process in anodic alumina oxide (AAO) templates followed by Ni electrodeposition, we could fabricate CNT-wrapped Ni NT/graphene hybrid structures. During the electrodeposition process, the CNTs served as Ni nucleation sites, resulting in a large-area array of high aspect-ratio field emitters composed of CNT-wrapped Ni NT hybrid structures. As a proof of concepts, we demonstrate that high-quality flexible field emission devices can be simply fabricated using our method. Remarkably, our proto-type field emission devices exhibited a current density higher by two orders of magnitude compared to other devices fabricated by previous methods, while maintaining its structural integrity in various bending deformations. This novel fabrication strategy can be utilized in various applications such as optoelectronic devices, sensors and energy storage devices. PMID:27233004

  2. A digital miniature x-ray tube with a high-density triode carbon nanotube field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Kim, Jae-Woo; Song, Yoon-Ho; Ahn, Seungjoon

    2013-01-14

    We have fabricated a digital miniature x-ray tube (6 mm in diameter and 32 mm in length) with a high-density triode carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter for special x-ray applications. The triode CNT emitter was densely formed within a diameter of below 4 mm with the focusing-functional gate. The brazing process enables us to obtain and maintain a desired vacuum level for the reliable electron emission from the CNT emitters after the vacuum packaging. The miniature x-ray tube exhibited a stable and reliable operation over 250 h in a pulse mode at an anode voltage of above 25 kV.

  3. Plannar light source using a phosphor screen with single-walled carbon nanotubes as field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahena-Garrido, Sharon; Shimoi, Norihiro; Abe, Daisuke; Hojo, Toshimasa; Tanaka, Yasumitsu; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2014-10-01

    We developed and successfully fabricated a plannar light source device using a phosphor screen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as field emitters in a simple diode structure composed of the cathode containing the highly purified and crystalline SWCNTs dispersed into an organic In2O3-SnO2 precursor solution and a non-ionic surfactant. The cathode was activated by scratching process with sandpaper to obtain a large field emission current with low power consumption. The nicks by scratching were treated with Fourier analysis to determine the periodicity of the surface morphology and designed with controlling the count number of sandpapers. The anode, on the other hand, was made with phosphor deliberately optimized by coverage of ITO nanoparticles and assembled together with the cathode by the new stable assembling process resulting to stand-alone flat plane-emission panel. The device in a diode structure has a low driving voltage and good brightness homogeneity in that plane. Furthermore, field emission current fluctuation, which is an important factor in comparing luminance devices too, has a good stability in a simple diode panel. The flat plane-emission device employing the highly purified and crystalline SWCNTs has the potential to provide a new approach to lighting in our life style.

  4. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  5. High Stability Electron Field Emitters Synthesized via the Combination of Carbon Nanotubes and N₂-Plasma Grown Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Films.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Hsun; Hsieh, Ping-Yen; Kunuku, Srinivasu; Lou, Shiu-Cheng; Manoharan, Divinah; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan; Tai, Nyan-Hwa

    2015-12-16

    An electron field emitter with superior electron field emission (EFE) properties and improved lifetime stability is being demonstrated via the combination of carbon nanotubes and the CH4/N2 plasma grown ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) films. The resistance of the carbon nanotubes to plasma ion bombardment is improved by the formation of carbon nanocones on the side walls of the carbon nanotubes, thus forming strengthened carbon nanotubes (s-CNTs). The N-UNCD films can thus be grown on s-CNTs, forming N-UNCD/s-CNTs carbon nanocomposite materials. The N-UNCD/s-CNTs films possess good conductivity of σ = 237 S/cm and marvelous EFE properties, such as low turn-on field of (E0) = 3.58 V/μm with large EFE current density of (J(e)) = 1.86 mA/cm(2) at an applied field of 6.0 V/μm. Moreover, the EFE emitters can be operated under 0.19 mA/cm(2) for more than 350 min without showing any sign of degradation. Such a superior EFE property along with high robustness characteristic of these combination of materials are not attainable with neither N-UNCD films nor s-CNTs films alone. Transmission electron microscopic investigations indicated that the N-UNCD films contain needle-like diamond grains encased in a few layers of nanographitic phase, which enhanced markedly the transport of electrons in the N-UNCD films. Moreover, the needle-like diamond grains were nucleated from the s-CNTs without the necessity of forming the interlayer that facilitate the transport of electrons crossing the diamond-to-Si interface. Both these factors contributed to the enhanced EFE behavior of the N-UNCD/s-CNTs films. PMID:26600097

  6. Stationary scanning x-ray source based on carbon nanotube field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yang, G.; Cheng, Y.; Gao, B.; Qiu, Q.; Lee, Y. Z.; Lu, J. P.; Zhou, O.

    2005-05-01

    We report a field emission x-ray source that can generate a scanning x-ray beam to image an object from multiple projection angles without mechanical motion. The key component of the device is a gated carbon nanotube field emission cathode with an array of electron emitting pixels that are individually addressable via a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor-based electronic circuit. The characteristics of this x-ray source are measured and its imaging capability is demonstrated. The device can potentially lead to a fast data acquisition rate for laminography and tomosynthesis with a simplified experimental setup.

  7. Stationary scanning x-ray source based on carbon nanotube field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Yang, G.; Cheng, Y.; Gao, B.; Qiu, Q.; Lee, Y.Z.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2005-05-02

    We report a field emission x-ray source that can generate a scanning x-ray beam to image an object from multiple projection angles without mechanical motion. The key component of the device is a gated carbon nanotube field emission cathode with an array of electron emitting pixels that are individually addressable via a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor-based electronic circuit. The characteristics of this x-ray source are measured and its imaging capability is demonstrated. The device can potentially lead to a fast data acquisition rate for laminography and tomosynthesis with a simplified experimental setup.

  8. Effect of increased crystallinity of single-walled carbon nanotubes used as field emitters on their electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoi, Norihiro

    2015-12-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) synthesized by arc discharge are expected to exhibit good field emission (FE) properties at a low driving voltage. We used a coating containing homogeneously dispersed highly crystalline SWCNTs produced by a high-temperature annealing process to fabricate an FE device by a wet-coating process at a low cost. Using the coating, we succeeded in reducing the power consumption of field emitters for planar lighting devices. SWCNTs synthesized by arc discharge have crystal defects in the carbon network, which are considered to induce inelastic electron tunneling that deteriorates the electrical conductivity of the SWCNTs. In this study, the blocking of the transport of electrons in SWCNTs with crystal defects is simulated using an inelastic electron tunneling model. We succeeded in clarifying the mechanism underlying the electrical conductivity of SWCNTs by controlling their crystallinity. In addition, it was confirmed that field emitters using highly crystalline SWCNTs can lead to new applications operating with low power consumption and new devices that may change our daily lives in the future.

  9. A vacuum-sealed miniature X-ray tube based on carbon nanotube field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyun Jin; Ha, Jun Mok; Cho, Sung Oh

    2012-05-01

    A vacuum-sealed miniature X-ray tube based on a carbon nanotube field-emission electron source has been demonstrated. The diameter of the X-ray tube is 10 mm; the total length of the tube is 50 mm, and no external vacuum pump is required for the operation. The maximum tube voltage reaches up to 70 kV, and the X-ray tube generates intense X-rays with the air kerma strength of 108 Gy·cm2 min-1. In addition, X-rays produced from the miniature X-ray tube have a comparatively uniform spatial dose distribution.

  10. A vacuum-sealed miniature X-ray tube based on carbon nanotube field emitters

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A vacuum-sealed miniature X-ray tube based on a carbon nanotube field-emission electron source has been demonstrated. The diameter of the X-ray tube is 10 mm; the total length of the tube is 50 mm, and no external vacuum pump is required for the operation. The maximum tube voltage reaches up to 70 kV, and the X-ray tube generates intense X-rays with the air kerma strength of 108 Gy·cm2 min−1. In addition, X-rays produced from the miniature X-ray tube have a comparatively uniform spatial dose distribution. PMID:22594627

  11. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  12. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  13. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  14. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for x-ray imaging of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-20

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary DBT (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission x-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for x-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 s was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent. PMID:24869902

  15. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for x-ray imaging of human breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-01

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary DBT (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission x-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for x-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 s was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent.

  16. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for X-ray imaging of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-01-01

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to 2D mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission X-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for X-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 seconds, was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent. PMID:24869902

  17. Effect of purity, edge length, and growth area on field emission of multi-walled carbon nanotube emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Monika; Gautam, S.; Shah, P. V.; Jha, P.; Kumar, P.; Rawat, J. S.; Chaudhury, P. K.; HASH0x9890f80, Harsh; Tandon, R. P.

    2013-05-01

    Present report aims to study the effect of purity, edge length, and growth area on field emission of patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) emitter arrays. For development of four CNT emitter arrays (CEAs), low resistively silicon substrates were coated with thin film of iron catalyst using photolithography, sputtering, and lift off process. Four CEAs were synthesized on these substrates using thermal chemical vapor deposition with minor changes in pretreatment duration. Out of these, two CEAs have 10 μm × 10 μm and 40 μm × 40 μm solid square dots of CNTs with constant 20 μm inter-dot separation. Other two CEAs have ring square bundles of CNTs and these CEAs are envisioned as 10 μm × 10 μm square dots with 4 μm × 4 μm scooped out area and 15 μm × 15 μm square dots with 5 μm × 5 μm lift out area with constant 20 μm inter-dot spacing. Solid square dot structures have exactly constant edge length per unit area with more than four-fold difference in CNT growth area however ring square dot patterns have minor difference in edge length per unit area with approximately two times difference in CNT growth area. Quality and morphology of synthesized CEAs were assessed by scanning electron microscope and Raman characterization which confirm major differences. Field emission of all CEAs was carried out under same vacuum condition and constant inter-electrode separation. Field emission of solid square dot CEAs show approximately identical current density-electric field curves and Fowler-Nordheim plots with little difference in emission current density at same electric field. Similar results were observed for ring square structure CEAs when compared separately. Maximum emission current density observed from these four CEAs reduces from 14.53, 12.23, 11.01, to 8.66 mA/cm2 at a constant electric field of 5 V/μm, according to edge length of 1361.7, 1221.08, 872.20, to 872.16 mm rather than growth area and purity. Although, the 40 μm × 40 μm CEAs possessed highest

  18. Effect of purity, edge length, and growth area on field emission of multi-walled carbon nanotube emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Shahi, Monika; Gautam, S.; Shah, P. V.; Jha, P.; Kumar, P.; Rawat, J. S.; Chaudhury, P. K.; Harsh; Tandon, R. P.

    2013-05-28

    Present report aims to study the effect of purity, edge length, and growth area on field emission of patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) emitter arrays. For development of four CNT emitter arrays (CEAs), low resistively silicon substrates were coated with thin film of iron catalyst using photolithography, sputtering, and lift off process. Four CEAs were synthesized on these substrates using thermal chemical vapor deposition with minor changes in pretreatment duration. Out of these, two CEAs have 10 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m and 40 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 40 {mu}m solid square dots of CNTs with constant 20 {mu}m inter-dot separation. Other two CEAs have ring square bundles of CNTs and these CEAs are envisioned as 10 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m square dots with 4 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 4 {mu}m scooped out area and 15 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 15 {mu}m square dots with 5 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 5 {mu}m lift out area with constant 20 {mu}m inter-dot spacing. Solid square dot structures have exactly constant edge length per unit area with more than four-fold difference in CNT growth area however ring square dot patterns have minor difference in edge length per unit area with approximately two times difference in CNT growth area. Quality and morphology of synthesized CEAs were assessed by scanning electron microscope and Raman characterization which confirm major differences. Field emission of all CEAs was carried out under same vacuum condition and constant inter-electrode separation. Field emission of solid square dot CEAs show approximately identical current density-electric field curves and Fowler-Nordheim plots with little difference in emission current density at same electric field. Similar results were observed for ring square structure CEAs when compared separately. Maximum emission current density observed from these four CEAs reduces from 14.53, 12.23, 11.01, to 8.66 mA/cm{sup 2} at a constant electric field of 5 V/{mu}m, according to edge

  19. Emission stability enhancement of a tip-type carbon-nanotube-based field emitter via hafnium interlayer deposition and thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Pil; Chang, Han-Beet; Kim, Bu-Jong; Park, Jin-Seok

    2012-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited on a tip-type tungsten substrate via electrophoretic deposition, in which a hafnium thin film was used as an interlayer. The long-term (up to 24 h) emission stability of the CNT-based field emitter was remarkably enhanced when the hafnium interlayer was coated and thermally treated. This is attributed to the enhanced adhesion between the substrate and the CNTs. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study and nano-scratch measurement provided a convincing evidence of the increase in the adhesive force.

  20. A glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube emitter for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Seung Jun; Jeong, Jaeik; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Park, Hunkuk; Kwak, Junghwan; Noh, Eunkyong; Paik, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Ryu, Jehwang

    2016-04-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a carbon nanotube based a glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube without vacuum pump. The x-ray tube consists of four electrodes with anode, focuser, gate, and cathode electrode. The shape of cathode is rectangular for isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The obtained x-ray images show clearly micrometer scale.

  1. Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, S.K.; Jha, A.; Chattopadhyay, K.K.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). • Improved dispersion enhanced thermal conductivity of engine oil. • Again f-a-CNTs showed enhanced field emission property compared to pure a-CNTs. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were synthesized at low temperature in open atmosphere and further functionalized by treating them in thionyl chloride added stearic acid-dichloro methane solution. The as prepared functionalized a-CNTs (f-a-CNTs) were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The nanofluid was prepared by dispersing f-a-CNTs in engine oil using ultrasonic treatment. The effective thermal conductivity of as prepared nanofluid was investigated at different loading (volume fraction of f-a-CNTs). Obtained experimental data of thermal conductivity were compared with the predicted values, calculated using existing theoretical models. Stability of the nanofluid was tested by means of zeta potential measurement to optimize the loading. The as prepared f-a-CNTs sample also showed improved field emission result as compared to pristine a-CNTs. Dependence of field emission behavior on inter electrode distance was investigated too.

  2. Improved Photoresist Coating for Making CNT Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Manohara, Harish

    2009-01-01

    An improved photoresist-coating technique has been developed for use in the fabrication of carbon-nanotube- (CNT) based field emitters is described. The improved photoresist coating technique overcomes what, heretofore, has been a major difficulty in the fabrication process.

  3. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.; Petillo, J. J.

    2015-05-01

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 102-104 are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  4. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.; Petillo, J. J.

    2015-05-18

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  5. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  6. Directional couplers with integrated carbon nanotube incandescent light emitters.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Randy G; Pyatkov, Felix; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Flavel, Benjamin S; Krupke, Ralph; Pernice, Wolfram H P

    2016-01-25

    We combine on-chip single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) emitters with directional coupling devices as fundamental building blocks for carbon photonic systems. These devices are essential for studying the emission properties of SWNTs in the few photon regime for future applications in on-chip quantum photonics. The combination of SWNTs with on-chip beam splitters herein provides the basis for correlation measurements as necessary for nanoscale source characterization. The employed fabrication methods are fully scalable and thus allow for implementing a multitude of functional and active circuits in a single fabrication run. Our metallic SWNT emitters are broadband and cover both visible and near-infrared wavelengths, thus holding promise for emerging hybrid optoelectronic devices with fast reconfiguration times. PMID:26832479

  7. Numerical and experimental studies of enhanced electron emission from functionalized carbon nanotube emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Feng; Little, Scott; Alzubi, Feras

    2007-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The CNTs were further functionalized by coating their surface with a thin layer of low work function oxide emissive materials. The electron emission capability of the coated CNT emitters was greatly improved with the low work function emissive layer, particularly at high temperature. Thermionic emission current three orders magnitude higher was observed. The emission properties of the oxide coated CNTs were measured and characterized over a wide temperature and field ranges. It was found that neither the Fowler-Nordheim theory for field emission nor the Richardson theory for thermionic emission were adequate to describe the electron emission characteristics of these emitters in certain range of temperature and field. However, by adopting a general electron emission formulism developed by Murphy and Good, we were able to simulate the electron emission from the coated CNTs over the whole temperature and field range and fit the experimental data.

  8. Technology for producing carbon field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Khatapova, R.M.; Demskaya, L.L.; Romanova, V.K.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes methods for producing field emitters from carbon filaments. Coating of Ni and two-layer coatings of Ni-Mo with a thickness of 10-40 um are applied to the carbon filaments by electrochemical deposition so that they can be spot welded to a metal holder. A technology for attaching carbon filaments with a refractory adhesive composition is also described. Field emitters with point radius of curvature of 0.2-0.4 um are made from three types of carbon filament.

  9. Modeling of carbon nanotube-based devices: from nanoFETs to THz emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Carlo, Aldo; Pecchia, Alessandro; Petrolati, Eleonora; Paoloni, Claudio

    2006-08-01

    In the first part of the present contribution, we will report on transport calculations of nanoscaled devices based on Carbon Nanotubes obtained via self-consistent density-functional method coupled with non-equilibrium Green's function approaches. In particular, density functional tight-binding techniques are very promising due to their intrinsic efficiency. This scheme allows treatment of systems comprising a large number of atoms and enables the computation of the current flowing between two or more contacts in a fully self-consistent manner with the open boundary conditions that naturally arise in transport problems. We will give a description of this methodology and application to field effect transistor based on Carbon nanotubes. The advances in manufacturing technology are allowing new opportunities even for vacuum electron devices producing radio-frequency radiation. Modern micro and nano-technologies can overcome the typical severe limitations of vacuum tube devices. As an example, Carbon Nanotubes used as cold emitters in micron-scaled triodes allow for frequency generation up to THz region. The purpose of the second part of this contribution will be a description of the modelling of Carbon Nanotube based vacuum devices such as triodes. We will present the calculation of important figures of merit and possible realizations.

  10. Field emission from multi-walled carbon nanotubes and its application to electron tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Hamaguchi, K.; Uemura, S.; Uchida, K.; Tasaka, Y.; Ikazaki, F.; Yumura, M.; Kasuya, A.; Nishina, Y.

    Field emission from closed and open-ended multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) was studied by field-emission microscopy. As an application of nanotube field emitters, we manufactured lighting elements with the structure of a triode-type vacuum tube by replacing the conventional thermionic cathodes with the MWNT field emitters. Stable electron emission, adequate luminance and long life of the tubes have been demonstrated.

  11. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  12. Innovative Field Emitters for High-Voltage Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sominski, G. G.; Sezonov, V. E.; Taradaev, E. P.; Tumareva, T. A.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Kornishin, S. Yu.; Stepanova, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    We describe multitip field emitters with protective coatings, which were developed in Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University. The coatings ensure long-term operation of the emitters under high currents and technical vacuum. Innovative multi-layer emitters composed of contacting nanolayers of materials with different work functions are presented as well. The possibility by using the developed emitters in high-voltage electronic devices is demonstrated.

  13. Ultralow mode-volume photonic crystal nanobeam cavities for high-efficiency coupling to individual carbon nanotube emitters

    PubMed Central

    Miura, R.; Imamura, S.; Ohta, R.; Ishii, A.; Liu, X.; Shimada, T.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.; Kato, Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    The unique emission properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes are attractive for achieving increased functionality in integrated photonics. In addition to being room-temperature telecom-band emitters that can be directly grown on silicon, they are ideal for coupling to nanoscale photonic structures. Here we report on high-efficiency coupling of individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes to silicon photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. Photoluminescence images of dielectric- and air-mode cavities reflect their distinctly different mode profiles and show that fields in the air are important for coupling. We find that the air-mode cavities couple more efficiently, and estimated spontaneous emission coupling factors reach a value as high as 0.85. Our results demonstrate advantages of ultralow mode-volumes in air-mode cavities for coupling to low-dimensional nanoscale emitters. PMID:25420679

  14. Ultralow mode-volume photonic crystal nanobeam cavities for high-efficiency coupling to individual carbon nanotube emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, R.; Imamura, S.; Ohta, R.; Ishii, A.; Liu, X.; Shimada, T.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.; Kato, Y. K.

    2014-11-01

    The unique emission properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes are attractive for achieving increased functionality in integrated photonics. In addition to being room-temperature telecom-band emitters that can be directly grown on silicon, they are ideal for coupling to nanoscale photonic structures. Here we report on high-efficiency coupling of individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes to silicon photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. Photoluminescence images of dielectric- and air-mode cavities reflect their distinctly different mode profiles and show that fields in the air are important for coupling. We find that the air-mode cavities couple more efficiently, and estimated spontaneous emission coupling factors reach a value as high as 0.85. Our results demonstrate advantages of ultralow mode-volumes in air-mode cavities for coupling to low-dimensional nanoscale emitters.

  15. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitter on metal foil for medical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Je Hwang; Kim, Wan Sun; Lee, Seung Ho; Eom, Young Ju; Park, Hun Kuk; Park, Kyu Chang

    2013-10-01

    A simple method is proposed for growing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal foil using the triode direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The carbon nanotube (CNT) electron emitter was fabricated using fewer process steps with an acid treated metal substrate. The CNT emitter was used for X-ray generation, and the X-ray image of mouse's joint was obtained with an anode current of 0.5 mA at an anode bias of 60 kV. The simple fabrication of a well-aligned CNT with a protection layer on metal foil, and its X-ray application, were studied. PMID:24245201

  16. Carbon nanotube as a Cherenkov-type light emitter and free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Batrakov, K. G.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Thomsen, C.

    2009-03-15

    A mechanism of stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation by an electron beam in carbon nanotubes is theoretically considered. Three basic properties of carbon nanotubes: a strong slowing down of surface electromagnetic waves, ballisticity of the electron motion over typical nanotube length, and extremely high electron current density reachable in nanotubes, allow proposition of them as candidates for the development of nanoscale Cherenkov-type emitters, analogous to traveling-wave tube and free electron laser. Dispersion equations of the electron-beam instability and the threshold conditions of the stimulated emission have been derived and analyzed, demonstrating realizability of the nanotube-based nano-free electron lasers at realistic parameters of nanotubes and electronic beams.

  17. Photolithographic fabrication of gated self-aligned parallel electron beam emitters with a single-stranded carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Justin; Ono, Takahito; Tsai, Ching-Hsiang; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we report on the development of a photolithographic process to fabricate a gated-emitter array with single-stranded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) self-aligned to the center of the emitter gate using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Si tips are formed on a silicon wafer by anisotropic etching of Si using SiO2 as a mask. Deposition of a SiO2 insulating layer and Cr-W electrode layers creates protrusions above the Si tips. This wafer is polished, and the Cr-W on the tips is removed. Etching of the SiO2 using hydrofluoric acid is performed to expose the gated Si tip. Incorporation of a novel diffusion process produces single-stranded CNTs by depositing a thin Ni layer on the Si tips and thermally diffusing the Ni layer to yield a catalyst particle for single-stranded CNT growth. The large surface to volume ratio at the apex of the Si tip allows a Ni particle to remain to act as a catalyst to grow a single-stranded CNT for fabricating the CNT based emitter structure. Diffusion of the Ni is carried out in situ during the heating phase of the PECVD CNT growth process at 600 °C. The diameters of the observed CNTs are on the order of 20 nm. The field emission characteristics of the gated field emitters are evaluated. The measured turn-on voltage of the gated emitter is 5 V.

  18. Surface treatment and surface coating of silicon field emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajra, Mahua Sudhakrishna

    The objectives of this research were to fabricate ungated Si field emitter arrays (FEA's), and then to identify ways to improve the performance of the emitters. In the first and second chapters, the basis of the research, including background, theory, and the goals of the research is presented. The third chapter discusses the fabrication methods used to form the ungated Si FEA's. The fourth chapter gives the details about surface treatment procedures used to improve initial operation. The fifth and the sixth chapter discuss the different surface coating materials used to study the emission properties of the Si field emitters. The seventh chapter summarizes the work and suggests possible follow up research. The four surface treatments discussed in chapter four employ, respectively, residual gas ions, low-energy electron-stimulated desorption, a hydrogen-enhanced residual gas atmosphere, and a plasma of a Ar (96%) and H2 (4%) gas mixture. The method, using the hydrogen-enriched residual gas atmosphere is very unique in that it uses getters to produce the hydrogen rich atmosphere. The method, using a plasma of Ar (96%) and H2 (4%) gas mixture, is an effective in-situ cleaning procedure, which can be performed prior to packaging the devices. In chapters five and six is a comparison of the field-emission properties of the Si FEA coated with various materials, including (1) nanoparticle clusters of diamond and gallium nitride (GaN), (2) a thin film of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), (3) a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) coating, and (4) carbon nanotubes. Among the above coatings, the conformal coating of UNCD produced electron emission at an extremely low threshold field of between 2 to 5 V/mum. A further study of the behavior of electron emission from UNCD-coated Si FEA during in-situ exposure to H2, N2, and Ar respectively showed that when the emitting surface is exposed to H 2, at 10-5 Torr and 10-4 Torr, the initial emission current (2 muA) increases by a factor

  19. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  20. Diamond-Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Field Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Stevan; Withers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Field-emission cathodes containing arrays of carbon nanotubes coated with diamond or diamondlike carbon (DLC) are undergoing development. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been shown to perform well as electron field emitters. The idea underlying the present development is that by coating carbon nanotubes with wideband- gap materials like diamond or DLC, one could reduce effective work functions, thereby reducing threshold electric-field levels for field emission of electrons and, hence, improving cathode performance. To demonstrate feasibility, experimental cathodes were fabricated by (1) covering metal bases with carbon nanotubes bound to the bases by an electrically conductive binder and (2) coating the nanotubes, variously, with diamond or DLC by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In tests, the threshold electric-field levels for emission of electrons were reduced by as much as 40 percent, relative to those of uncoated- nanotube cathodes. Coating with diamond or DLC could also make field emission-cathodes operate more stably by helping to prevent evaporation of carbon from nanotubes in the event of overheating of the cathodes. Cathodes of this type are expected to be useful principally as electron sources for cathode-ray tubes and flat-panel displays.

  1. Nanostructure TEM analysis of diamond cold cathode field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Travis S.; Ghosh, Nikkon; Wittig, James Edward; Kang, Weng; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Unocic, Kinga A; Davidson, James; Tolk, Norman H.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond cold cathode devices have demonstrated significant potential as electron field emitters. Ultra-sharp diamond pyramidal tips (~5nm tip radius) have been fabricated and show improvement in emission when compared to conventional field emitters. However, the emission mechanisms in these complex diamond nanostructures are not well understood. Transmission electron microscopy performed in this study provides new insight into tip structure and composition with implications for field emission and diamond growth.

  2. Physical electrostatics of small field emitter arrays/clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Richard G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to improve qualitative understanding of electrostatic influences on apex field enhancement factors (AFEFs) for small field emitter arrays/clusters. Using the "floating sphere at emitter-plate potential" (FSEPP) model, it re-examines the electrostatics and mathematics of three simple systems of identical post-like emitters. For the isolated emitter, various approaches are noted. An adequate approximation is to consider only the effects of sphere charges and (for significantly separated emitters) image charges. For the 2-emitter system, formulas are found for charge-transfer ("charge-blunting") effects and neighbor-field effects, for widely spaced and for "sufficiently closely spaced" emitters. Mutual charge-blunting is always the dominant effect, with a related (negative) fractional AFEF-change δtwo. For sufficiently small emitter spacing c, |δtwo| varies approximately as 1/c; for large spacing, |δtwo| decreases as 1/c3. In a 3-emitter equispaced linear array, differential charge-blunting and differential neighbor-field effects occur, but differential charge-blunting effects are dominant, and cause the "exposed" outer emitters to have higher AFEF (γ0) than the central emitter (γ1). Formulas are found for the exposure ratio Ξ = γ0/γ1, for large and for sufficiently small separations. The FSEPP model for an isolated emitter has accuracy around 30%. Line-charge models (LCMs) are an alternative, but an apparent difficulty with recent LCM implementations is identified. Better descriptions of array electrostatics may involve developing good fitting equations for AFEFs derived from accurate numerical solution of Laplace's equation, perhaps with equation form(s) guided qualitatively by FSEPP-model results. In existing fitting formulas, the AFEF-reduction decreases exponentially as c increases, which is different from the FSEPP-model formulas. This discrepancy needs to be investigated, using systematic Laplace-based simulations and appropriate results

  3. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports a novel implanting micromachining technology. By using this method, for the first time, we could implant nano-scale materials into milli-scale metal substrates at room temperature. Ni-based flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters were fabricated by the novel micromachining method. By embedding CNT roots into Ni foil using polymer matrix as transfer media, effective direct contact between Ni and CNTs was achieved. As a result, our novel emitter shows relatively good field emission properties such as low turn-on field and good stability. Moreover, the emitter was highly flexible with preservation of the field emission properties. The excellent field emission characteristics attributed to the direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate. To check the practical application of the novel emitter, a simple X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a traditional tube. The gray shadow that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the successful generation of X-ray.

  4. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports a novel implanting micromachining technology. By using this method, for the first time, we could implant nano-scale materials into milli-scale metal substrates at room temperature. Ni-based flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters were fabricated by the novel micromachining method. By embedding CNT roots into Ni foil using polymer matrix as transfer media, effective direct contact between Ni and CNTs was achieved. As a result, our novel emitter shows relatively good field emission properties such as low turn-on field and good stability. Moreover, the emitter was highly flexible with preservation of the field emission properties. The excellent field emission characteristics attributed to the direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate. To check the practical application of the novel emitter, a simple X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a traditional tube. The gray shadow that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the successful generation of X-ray. PMID:27401089

  5. Field emitter based extractor gauges and residual gas analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Changkun Dong; G. Rao Myneni

    1999-04-01

    Attempts at using the Spindt-type molybdenum field emitter arrays in the extractor gauges and a residual gas analyzer are presented in this article. The sensitivity of the fuel emitter gauge is as high as 11 Torr{sup -1}. The departure from linearity of the pressure versus ion current measurements did not exceed 10% over the pressure range of 10{sup -10} - 10{sup -6} Torr. Stable sensitivities for nitrogen, helium, and hydrogen were achieved below 10{sup -7} Torr with the field emitter residual gas analyzer. The slightly reduced emission current and sensitivity, after long-term operation, are of concern and need to be addressed. Residual gas spectra indicate that when using field emitters, the electron stimulated desorption ions (O{sup +}, F{sup +}, and Cl{sup +}) are reduced as compared to those made using a hot filament source.

  6. Field energy and RMS emittance in intense particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.; Mills, R.S.; Reiser, M.

    1986-04-25

    An equation is presented for continuous beam with azimuthal symmetry and continuous linear focusing; the equation expresses a relationship between the rate of change for squared rms emittance and the rate of change for a quantity we call the nonlinear field energy. The nonlinear field energy depends on the shape of the charge distribution and corresponds to the residual field energy possessed by beams with nonuniform charge distributions. The equation can be integrated for the case of an rms matched beam to yield a formula for space-charge-induced emittance growth that we have tested numerically for a variety of initial distributions. The results provide a framework for discussing the scaling of rms emittance growth and an explanation for the well-established lower limit on output emittance.

  7. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kwan, Simon W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10.sup.-4 Torr and about 10.sup.-7 Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10.sup.-8 Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters.

  8. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1999-03-30

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and about 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10{sup {minus}8} Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters. 2 figs.

  9. Photolithographic fabrication of gated self-aligned parallel electron beam emitters with a single-stranded carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Ho, Justin; Ono, Takahito; Tsai, Ching-Hsiang; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2008-09-10

    In this paper we report on the development of a photolithographic process to fabricate a gated-emitter array with single-stranded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) self-aligned to the center of the emitter gate using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Si tips are formed on a silicon wafer by anisotropic etching of Si using SiO(2) as a mask. Deposition of a SiO(2) insulating layer and Cr-W electrode layers creates protrusions above the Si tips. This wafer is polished, and the Cr-W on the tips is removed. Etching of the SiO(2) using hydrofluoric acid is performed to expose the gated Si tip. Incorporation of a novel diffusion process produces single-stranded CNTs by depositing a thin Ni layer on the Si tips and thermally diffusing the Ni layer to yield a catalyst particle for single-stranded CNT growth. The large surface to volume ratio at the apex of the Si tip allows a Ni particle to remain to act as a catalyst to grow a single-stranded CNT for fabricating the CNT based emitter structure. Diffusion of the Ni is carried out in situ during the heating phase of the PECVD CNT growth process at 600 °C. The diameters of the observed CNTs are on the order of 20 nm. The field emission characteristics of the gated field emitters are evaluated. The measured turn-on voltage of the gated emitter is 5 V. PMID:21828872

  10. Field Emitter Magnetic Sensor with Steered Focused Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaescu, Dan; Filip, Valeriu; Itoh, Junji

    2001-04-01

    A novel field emission magnetic sensor is proposed and its operation is theoretically analyzed. The sensor comprises a dual-gate wedge field emitter with a split gate having the double role of focusing and steering the electron beam. The electron beam deflection due to the Lorentz force is compensated by appropriate potentials applied to this electrode. The modeling results have been obtained using the Simion 3D 7.0 software package. The device has high sensitivity and its operation is not influenced by fluctuations in the emission current. Arrangements of mutually normal wedge emitters can be used for two-dimensional magnetic field sensing.

  11. Wide-range Vacuum Measurements from MWNT Field Emitters Grown Directly on Stainless Steel Substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Detian; Zhao, Yangyang; Cheng, Yongjun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-12-01

    The field emission properties and the vacuum measurement application are investigated from the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grown directly on catalytic stainless steel substrates. The MWNT emitters present excellent emission properties after the acid treatment of the substrate. The MWNT gauge is able to work down to the extreme-high vacuum (XHV) range with linear measurement performance in wide range from 10(-11) to 10(-6) Torr. A modulating grid is attempted with improved gauge sensitivity. The extension of the lower pressure limit is attributed largely to low outgassing effect due to direct growth of MWNTs and justified design of the electron source. PMID:26738501

  12. Wide-range Vacuum Measurements from MWNT Field Emitters Grown Directly on Stainless Steel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Detian; Zhao, Yangyang; Cheng, Yongjun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-01-01

    The field emission properties and the vacuum measurement application are investigated from the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grown directly on catalytic stainless steel substrates. The MWNT emitters present excellent emission properties after the acid treatment of the substrate. The MWNT gauge is able to work down to the extreme-high vacuum (XHV) range with linear measurement performance in wide range from 10-11 to 10-6 Torr. A modulating grid is attempted with improved gauge sensitivity. The extension of the lower pressure limit is attributed largely to low outgassing effect due to direct growth of MWNTs and justified design of the electron source.

  13. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices. PMID:27607498

  14. An electrically driven, ultrahigh-speed, on-chip light emitter based on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tatsuya; Yamauchi, Yohei; Honda, Satoshi; Maki, Hideyuki

    2014-06-11

    The integration of high-speed light emitters on silicon chips is an important issue that must be resolved in order to realize on-chip or interchip optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate the first electrically driven ultrafast carbon nanotube (CNT) light emitter based on blackbody radiation with a response speed (1-10 Gbps) that is more than 10(6) times higher than that of conventional incandescent emitters and is either higher than or comparable to that of light-emitting diodes or laser diodes. This high-speed response is explained by the extremely fast temperature response of the CNT film, which is dominated by the small heat capacity of the CNT film and its high heat dissipation to the substrate. Moreover, we experimentally demonstrate 140 ps width pulsed light generation and real-time optical communication. This CNT-based emitter with the advantages of ultrafast response speeds, a small footprint, and integration on silicon can enable novel architectures for optical interconnects, photonic, and optoelectronic integrated circuits. PMID:24796644

  15. Ultraefficient Coupling of a Quantum Emitter to the Tunable Guided Plasmons of a Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Moreno, Luis; de Abajo, F. Javier García; García-Vidal, Francisco J.

    2015-10-01

    We show that a single quantum emitter can efficiently couple to the tunable plasmons of a highly doped single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Plasmons in these quasi-one-dimensional carbon structures exhibit deep subwavelength confinement that pushes the coupling efficiency close to 100% over a very broad spectral range. This phenomenon takes place for distances and tube diameters comprising the nanometer and micrometer scales. In particular, we find a β factor ≈1 for QEs placed 1-100 nm away from SWCNTs that are just a few nanometers in diameter, while the corresponding Purcell factor exceeds 106.

  16. On-chip polarized light emitters based on (6,5) chirality-sorted carbon nanotube aligned arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ze; Liang, Shuang; Liu, Yang; Wang, Fanglin; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-02-01

    Electrically driven light-emitters based on carbon nanotubes are highly promising candidates for on-chip optical interconnection and nanophotonics. Here, we fabricated on-chip polarized light-emitters based on (6,5) chirality-sorted carbon nanotube aligned arrays obtained via an evaporation-induced self-assembly method. Electroluminescence results shows an impact excitation dominant mechanism originated from (6,5) defect-brightened dark exciton emission and trion emission. The degree of polarization of the carbon nanotube aligned arrays is characterized quantitatively and the average value is ˜76.8%. The importance of parallelism and orientation of nanotubes when integrated with on-chip waveguides is also discussed.

  17. High performance bulk metallic glass/carbon nanotube composite cathodes for electron field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman; Gibson, Mark A.; East, Daniel; Simon, George P.

    2011-11-07

    We report the preparation of new nanocomposites based on a combination of bulk metallic glass and carbon nanotubes for electron field emission applications. The use of bulk metallic glass as the matrix ensures high electrical and thermal conductivity, high thermal stability, and ease of processing, whilst the well dispersed carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient electron emitters. These advantages, alongside excellent electron emission properties, make these composites one of the best reported options for electron emission applications to date.

  18. Photosensitivity of p-type black Si field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingels, S.; Porshyn, V.; Prommesberger, C.; Langer, C.; Schreiner, R.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G.

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the properties of black Si field emitter arrays under strong electric fields and laser illumination. A low onset field of 1.8 MV/m for an emission current of 1 nA was obtained. A pronounced saturation region of the dark and photo-enhanced current was observed, which provided a short-term stability of 0.1% at 0.4 μA and 0.7% at 1.0 μA, respectively. As maximum value for the photosensitivity, an on-off current switching ratio of 43 reaching about 13 μA was achieved at a laser power of 15 mW. Electron spectra in the dark and under laser illumination are presented, showing a current and light-sensitive voltage drop across the emitters as well as hints for hot electron emission.

  19. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  20. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  1. Field emission and growth of fullerene nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rinzler, A.G.; Hafner, J.H.; Nilolaev, P.; Colbert, D.T.; Smalley, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    Efforts to control the growth of individual carbon nanotubes from nanotube seed crystals have led to a characterization of their field-induced electron emission behavior. The application of a bias voltage in the growth apparatus was motivated by the prolific formation of nanotubes in the carbon are growth method, in which the electric field appears to play a central role. The authors report here the ability to achieve various tube tip configurations by the controlled application of voltage, heat and chemicals to an individual nanotube, and that these states are well characterized by the emission currents they induce.

  2. Spacecraft charging control by thermal, field emission with lanthanum-hexaboride emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal, field emitters of lanthanum (or perhaps cerium) hexaboride (LaB6) with temperature variability up to about 1500K are suggested for spacecraft charging control. Such emitters operate at much lower voltages with considerably more control and add plasma-diagnostic versatility. These gains should outweigh the additional complexity of providing heat for the LaB6 thermal, field emitter.

  3. A novel inexpensive device for the electrochemical generation of metallic emitters for field desorption.

    PubMed

    Rechsteiner, C E; Mathis, D E; Bursey, M M; Buck, R P

    1977-02-01

    Details for the construction of a novel, inexpensive device for the electrochemical generation of metallic emitters for field desorption mass spectrometry are described. Use of the device for the generation of cobalt and nickel emitters is demonstrated. PMID:836944

  4. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R.; Pease, R.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Kosier, S.L.

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

  5. Origin of enhanced field emission characteristics postplasma treatment of multiwalled carbon nanotube array

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyu; Lim, Seong Chu; Lee, Young Hee; Choi, Young Chul

    2008-08-11

    Field emission properties of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with plasma treatment have been investigated. Origin of the enhanced field emission current was interpreted in terms of surface morphology of MWCNTs, work function, field enhancement factor, and emission area. Contrary to the general belief, the change in the work function increased slightly with the plasma treatment time, whereas the field enhancement factor decreased. We found that the number of emittable MWCNTs played a dominant role in the current enhancement.

  6. Discrete space charge affected field emission: Flat and hemisphere emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Shiffler, Donald A.; Tang, Wilkin; Rittersdorf, Ian M.; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Harris, John R.; Lau, Y. Y.; Petillo, John J.; Luginsland, John W.

    2015-05-21

    Models of space-charge affected thermal-field emission from protrusions, able to incorporate the effects of both surface roughness and elongated field emitter structures in beam optics codes, are desirable but difficult. The models proposed here treat the meso-scale diode region separate from the micro-scale regions characteristic of the emission sites. The consequences of discrete emission events are given for both one-dimensional (sheets of charge) and three dimensional (rings of charge) models: in the former, results converge to steady state conditions found by theory (e.g., Rokhlenko et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 107, 014904 (2010)]) but show oscillatory structure as they do. Surface roughness or geometric features are handled using a ring of charge model, from which the image charges are found and used to modify the apex field and emitted current. The roughness model is shown to have additional constraints related to the discrete nature of electron charge. The ability of a unit cell model to treat field emitter structures and incorporate surface roughness effects inside a beam optics code is assessed.

  7. Silicon solar cells with polysilicon emitters and back surface fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiang; Berndt, Lyall P.; Tarr, N. Garry

    2010-06-01

    The first solar cells using in-situ doped polysilicon contacts to form both emitter and back surface field (BSF) regions are reported. The use of polysilicon contacts permits extremely low thermal budget processing (maximum 850°C 5 sec for dopant activation), preserving substrate properties. The effectiveness of the BSF is best seen with backside illumination, where the photocurrent under natural sunlight is found to be over 30% of that obtained with frontside illumination, even though the substrate thickness is comparable to the minority carrier diffusion length. The applicability of the structure to bifacial operation is considered.

  8. Field Emission Characteristics of the Structure of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Bundles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao-Hung; Sie, Cong-Lin; Chen, Ching-An; Chang, Hsuan-Chen; Shih, Yi-Ting; Chang, Hsin-Yueh; Su, Wei-Jhih; Lee, Kuei-Yi

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we performed thermal chemical vapor deposition for growing vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) bundles for a field emitter and applied photolithography for defining the arrangement pattern to simultaneously compare square and hexagonal arrangements by using two ratios of the interbundle distance to the bundle height (R) of field emitters. The hexagon arrangement with R = 2 had the lowest turn-on electric field (E to) and highest enhancement factor, whereas the square arrangement with R = 3 had the most stable field emission (FE) characteristic. The number density can reveal the correlation to the lowest E to and highest enhancement factor more effectively than can the R or L. The fluorescent images of the synthesized VACNT bundles manifested the uniformity of FE currents. The results of our study indicate the feasibility of applying the VACNT field emitter arrangement to achieve optimal FE performance. PMID:26183388

  9. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    SciTech Connect

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-04

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system’s quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  10. High-density Au nanorod optical field-emitter arrays.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, R G; Yang, Y; Keathley, P D; Swanwick, M E; Velásquez-Garcíia, L F; Kärtner, F X; Graves, W S; Berggren, K K

    2014-11-21

    We demonstrate the design, fabrication, characterization, and operation of high-density arrays of Au nanorod electron emitters, fabricated by high-resolution electron beam lithography, and excited by ultrafast femtosecond near-infrared radiation. Electron emission characteristic of multiphoton absorption has been observed at low laser fluence, as indicated by the power-law scaling of emission current with applied optical power. The onset of space-charge-limited current and strong optical field emission has been investigated so as to determine the mechanism of electron emission at high incident laser fluence. Laser-induced structural damage has been observed at applied optical fields above 5 GV m(-1), and energy spectra of emitted electrons have been measured using an electron time-of-flight spectrometer. PMID:25354583

  11. High-density Au nanorod optical field-emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, R. G.; Yang, Y.; Keathley, P. D.; Swanwick, M. E.; Velásquez-García, L. F.; Kärtner, F. X.; Graves, W. S.; Berggren, K. K.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate the design, fabrication, characterization, and operation of high-density arrays of Au nanorod electron emitters, fabricated by high-resolution electron beam lithography, and excited by ultrafast femtosecond near-infrared radiation. Electron emission characteristic of multiphoton absorption has been observed at low laser fluence, as indicated by the power-law scaling of emission current with applied optical power. The onset of space-charge-limited current and strong optical field emission has been investigated so as to determine the mechanism of electron emission at high incident laser fluence. Laser-induced structural damage has been observed at applied optical fields above 5 GV m-1, and energy spectra of emitted electrons have been measured using an electron time-of-flight spectrometer.

  12. Study of the Electric Field Screening Effect on Low Number of Carbon Fiber Field Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wilkin; Shiffler, Don; Lacour, Matthew; Golby, Ken; Knowles, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Field emitter arrays have the potential to provide high current density, low voltage operation, and high pulse repetition for radar and communication. It is well known that packing density of the field emitter arrays significantly affects the emission current.1 Previously we conducted experiments using two- and four-cathode configurations. Here we extend our previous work and present experimental results for nine cathodes in a square and cylindrical configuration. The experiments used nine cathodes with variable spacing to investigate the effect of electric field screening on current emission. Emission characteristic is compared for the case of two, four and nine field emitters with different spacing. Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to compare with the experiments. Work supported by an LRIR from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  13. Field Emitter Arrays and Displays Produced by Ion Tracking Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Felter, T E; Musket, R G; Bernhardt, A F

    2004-12-28

    When ions of sufficient electronic energy loss traverse a dielectric film or foil, they alter the chemical bonding along their nominally straight path within the material. A suitable etchant can quickly dissolve these so-called latent tracks leaving holes of small diameter ({approx}10nm) but long length - several microns. Continuing the etching process gradually increases the diameter reproducibly and uniformly. The trackable medium can be applied as a uniform film onto large substrates. The small, monodisperse holes produced by this track etching can be used in conjunction with additional thin film processing to create functional structures attached to the substrate. For example, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Candescent Technologies Corporation (CTC) co-developed a process to make arrays of gated field emitters ({approx}100nm diameter electron guns) for CTC's ThinCRT{trademark} displays, which have been fabricated to diagonal dimensions > 13. Additional technological applications of ion tracking lithography will be briefly covered.

  14. Spin-polarized electron emitter: Mn-doped GaN nanotubes and their arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shaogang; Zhou, Gang; Wu, Jian; Duan, Wenhui; Gu, Bing-Lin

    2004-03-01

    The influences from the doping magnetic atom, Mn, on the geometry, electronic properties, and spin-polarization characteristics are demonstrated for open armchair gallium nitrogen (GaN) nanotubes and arrays by use of the first-principles calculations. The interaction between dangling bonds of Ga (Mn) and N atoms at the open-end promotes the self-close of the tube mouth and formation of a more stable open semicone top. Primarily owing to hybridization of Mn 3d and N 2p orbitals, one Mn atom introduces several impurity energy levels into the original energy gap, and the calculated magnetic moment is 4μB. The electron spin polarizations in the field emission are theoretically evaluated. We suggest that armchair open GaN nanotube arrays doped with a finite number of magnetic atoms may have application potential as the electron source of spintronic devices in the future.

  15. Electric Field Screening by the Proximity of Two Knife-Edge Field Emitters of Finite Width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, P.; Tang, W.; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, B.

    2015-11-01

    Field emitter arrays have the potential to provide high current density, low voltage operation, and high pulse repetition for radar and communication. It is well known that packing density of the field emitter arrays significantly affect the emission current. Previously we calculated analytically the electric field profile of two-dimensional knife-edge cathodes with arbitrary separation by using a Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. Here we extend this previous work to include the finite width of two identical emitters. From the electric field profile, the field enhancement factor, thereby the severity of the electric field screening, are determined. It is found that for two identical emitters with finite width, the magnitude of the electric field on the knife-edge cathodes depends strongly on the ratio h / a and h / r , where h is the height of the knife-edge cathode, 2a is the distance between the cathodes, and 2 r represents their width. Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to compare with the analytical results on the emission current distribution. P. Y. Wong was supported by a Directed Energy Summer Scholar internship at Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, and by AFRL Award No. FA9451-14-1-0374.

  16. Nanostructured ultrafast silicon-tip optical field-emitter arrays.

    PubMed

    Swanwick, Michael E; Keathley, Phillip D; Fallahi, Arya; Krogen, Peter R; Laurent, Guillaume; Moses, Jeffrey; Kärtner, Franz X; Velásquez-García, Luis F

    2014-09-10

    Femtosecond ultrabright electron sources with spatially structured emission are an enabling technology for free-electron lasers, compact coherent X-ray sources, electron diffractive imaging, and attosecond science. In this work, we report the design, modeling, fabrication, and experimental characterization of a novel ultrafast optical field emission cathode comprised of a large (>100,000 tips), dense (4.6 million tips·cm(-2)), and highly uniform (<1 nm tip radius deviation) array of nanosharp high-aspect-ratio silicon columns. Such field emitters offer an attractive alternative to UV photocathodes while providing a direct means of structuring the emitted electron beam. Detailed measurements and simulations show pC electron bunches can be generated in the multiphoton and tunneling regime within a single optical cycle, enabling significant advances in electron diffractive imaging and coherent X-ray sources on a subfemtosecond time scale, not possible before. At high charge emission yields, a slow rollover in charge is explained as a combination of the onset of tunneling emission and the formation of a virtual cathode. PMID:25075552

  17. Field emission property of N-doped aligned carbon nanotubes grown by pyrolysis of monoethanolamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pradip; Tanemura, M.; Soga, T.; Zamri, M.; Jimbo, T.

    2008-07-01

    Densely distributed bamboo-shaped nitrogen-doped aligned carbon nanotubes, grown on silicon substrate by thermal decomposition of monoethanolamine/ferrocene mixtures at 900 ∘C, were investigated for field electron emission. The morphology and crystallinity of the as-grown carbon nanotubes were characterized by SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the nitrogen concentration on carbon nanotubes and it was observed that nitrogen concentration on nanotubes was 6.6 at.%. Field emission study of as-grown nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes suggests that they are good emitters with a turn-on and threshold field of 1.8 V/μm and 2.53 V/μm, respectively. The maximum current density was observed to be 6 mA/cm 2 at 3 V/μm. It is considered that the nice field emission performance of CN x nanotube is due to the presence of lone pairs of electrons on nitrogen atom that supplies more electrons to the conduction band.

  18. Elementary framework for cold field emission from quantum-confined, non-planar emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, A. A.; Akinwande, A. I.

    2015-05-01

    For suitably small field emitters, the effects of quantum confinement at the emitter tip may have a significant impact on the emitter performance and total emitted current density (ECD). Since the geometry of a quantum system uniquely determines the magnitude and distribution of its energy levels, a framework for deriving ECD equations from cold field electron emitters of arbitrary geometry and dimensionality is developed. In the interest of obtaining semi-analytical ECD equations, the framework is recast in terms of plane wave solutions to the Schrödinger equation via the use of the Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. To demonstrate the framework's consistency with our previous work and its capabilities in treating emitters with non-planar geometries, ECD equations were derived for the normally unconfined cylindrical nanowire (CNW) and normally confined (NC) CNW emitter geometries. As a function of the emitter radius, the NC CNW emitter ECD profile displayed a strong dependence on the Fermi energy and had an average ECD that exceeded the Fowler-Nordheim equation for typical values of the Fermi energy due to closely spaced, singly degenerate energy levels (excluding electron spin), comparatively large electron supply values, and the lack of a transverse, zero-point energy. Such characteristics suggest that emitters with non-planar geometries may be ideal for emission from both an electron supply and electrostatics perspective.

  19. Elementary framework for cold field emission from quantum-confined, non-planar emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, A. A. Akinwande, A. I.

    2015-05-07

    For suitably small field emitters, the effects of quantum confinement at the emitter tip may have a significant impact on the emitter performance and total emitted current density (ECD). Since the geometry of a quantum system uniquely determines the magnitude and distribution of its energy levels, a framework for deriving ECD equations from cold field electron emitters of arbitrary geometry and dimensionality is developed. In the interest of obtaining semi-analytical ECD equations, the framework is recast in terms of plane wave solutions to the Schrödinger equation via the use of the Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. To demonstrate the framework's consistency with our previous work and its capabilities in treating emitters with non-planar geometries, ECD equations were derived for the normally unconfined cylindrical nanowire (CNW) and normally confined (NC) CNW emitter geometries. As a function of the emitter radius, the NC CNW emitter ECD profile displayed a strong dependence on the Fermi energy and had an average ECD that exceeded the Fowler-Nordheim equation for typical values of the Fermi energy due to closely spaced, singly degenerate energy levels (excluding electron spin), comparatively large electron supply values, and the lack of a transverse, zero-point energy. Such characteristics suggest that emitters with non-planar geometries may be ideal for emission from both an electron supply and electrostatics perspective.

  20. Field electron emission enhancement of graphenated MWCNTs emitters following their decoration with Au nanoparticles by a pulsed laser ablation process.

    PubMed

    Gautier, L-A; Le Borgne, V; Delegan, N; Pandiyan, R; El Khakani, M A

    2015-01-30

    A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was adapted to alter the growth of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) so that graphene sheets grow out of their tips. Gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) decoration of graphenated MWCNTs (g-MWCNTs) was obtained by subsequent decoration by a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process. By varying the number of laser ablation pulses (N(Lp)) in the PLD process, we were able to control the size of the gold nanoparticles and the surface coverage of the decorated g-MWCNTs. The presence of Au-NPs, preferentially located at the tip of the g-MWCNTs emitters, is shown to significantly improve the field electron emission (FEE) properties of the global g-MWCNT/Au-NP nanohybrid films. Indeed, the electric field needed to extract a current density of 0.1 μA cm(-)(2) from the g-MWCNT/Au-NP films was decreased from 2.68 V μm(-1) to a value as low as 0.96 V μm(-1). On the other hand, UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) characterization revealed a decrease in the global work function of the Au-decorated g-MWCNT nanohybrids compared to that of bare g-MWCNT emitters. Surprisingly, the work function of g-MWCNT was found to decrease from 4.9 to 4.7 eV with the addition of Au-NPs-a value lower than the work function of both materials worth 5.2 and 4.9 eV for gold and g-MWCNT, respectively. Our results show that the N(Lp) dependence of the FEE characteristics of the g-MWCNT/Au-NP emitters correlates well with their work function changes. Fowler-Nordheim-theory-based calculations suggest that the significant FEE enhancement of the emitters is also caused by the Au-NPs acting as nanoscale electric field enhancers. PMID:25567743

  1. Field electron emission enhancement of graphenated MWCNTs emitters following their decoration with Au nanoparticles by a pulsed laser ablation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, L.-A.; Le Borgne, V.; Delegan, N.; Pandiyan, R.; El Khakani, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was adapted to alter the growth of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) so that graphene sheets grow out of their tips. Gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) decoration of graphenated MWCNTs (g-MWCNTs) was obtained by subsequent decoration by a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process. By varying the number of laser ablation pulses (NLp) in the PLD process, we were able to control the size of the gold nanoparticles and the surface coverage of the decorated g-MWCNTs. The presence of Au-NPs, preferentially located at the tip of the g-MWCNTs emitters, is shown to significantly improve the field electron emission (FEE) properties of the global g-MWCNT/Au-NP nanohybrid films. Indeed, the electric field needed to extract a current density of 0.1 μA cm-2 from the g-MWCNT/Au-NP films was decreased from 2.68 V μm-1 to a value as low as 0.96 V μm-1. On the other hand, UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) characterization revealed a decrease in the global work function of the Au-decorated g-MWCNT nanohybrids compared to that of bare g-MWCNT emitters. Surprisingly, the work function of g-MWCNT was found to decrease from 4.9 to 4.7 eV with the addition of Au-NPs—a value lower than the work function of both materials worth 5.2 and 4.9 eV for gold and g-MWCNT, respectively. Our results show that the NLp dependence of the FEE characteristics of the g-MWCNT/Au-NP emitters correlates well with their work function changes. Fowler-Nordheim-theory-based calculations suggest that the significant FEE enhancement of the emitters is also caused by the Au-NPs acting as nanoscale electric field enhancers.

  2. Field Emission Characteristics of Carbon Nanotubes and Their Applications in Sensors and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2003-03-01

    FIELD EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF CARBON NANOTUBES AND THEIR APPLICATIONS IN SENSORS AND DEVICES A. Vaseashta, C. Shaffer, M. Collins, A. Mwuara Dept of Physics, Marshall University, Huntington, WV V. Pokropivny Institute for Materials Sciences of NASU, Kiev, Ukraine. D. Dimova-Malinovska Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria. The dimensionality of a system has profound influence on its physical behavior. With advances in technology over the past few decades, it has become possible to fabricate and study reduced-dimensional systems, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Carbon nanotubes are especially promising candidate for cold cathode field emitter because of their electrical properties, high aspect ratio, and small radius of curvature at the tips. Electron emission from the carbon nanotubes was investigated. Based upon the field emission investigation of carbon nanotubes, several prototype devices have been suggested that operate with low swing voltages with sufficient high current densities. Characteristics that allow improved current stability and long lifetime operation for electrical and opto-electronics devices are presented. The aim of this brief overview is to illustrate the useful characteristics of carbon nanotubes and its possible application.

  3. Thermal instability of field emission from carbon nanotubes studied using multi-physics simulation by considering space charge effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A. E.; Fairchild, S. B.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-01

    Thermal instability is an important concern for practical use of high-current field emitters in display, X-ray generation, Hall thruster, and microplasma generation. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their bundles have high thermal conductivity and offers great promise in this aspect. A wide-range of experiments has recently been performed with CNT-based emitters containing single or a bundle of nanotubes. Analysis of these experiments is executed using the classical Fowler-Nordheim (FN) equation and the heat equation with no self-consistency. The space-charge effect - one of the most important aspect of high-current field emission - is often ignored in these theoretical analyses. In this work, we use a numerical framework to study thermal instability in the CNT-based emitters by solving electrostatics, space-charge effect, quantum-mechanical tunneling (with FN equation as the limiting case), thermionic emission and heat flow in a self-consistent manner. Simulation compares well with the experimental results and allows study of temperature rise - the root cause of thermal instability - for the emitter in a wide range of conditions. Our analysis suggests that higher thermal conductivity and/or electrical conductivity and their reduced temperature dependence are beneficial for the field emitters, as these improve the thermal stability of the emitter by reducing temperature rise.

  4. The Reliability Improvements of Carbon Nanotubes Emitters by Utilizing an Fe-Ti Codeposited Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Rui-Ling; Shiu, Jiun-Kai; Chang, Yao-Ren; Lin, Kao-Chao; Chang, Pei-Chi; Juan, Chuan-Pin; Lee, Chien-Yin; Chen, Shia-Wei; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2007-08-01

    In this report, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) partially immersed into the codeposited metal layer have been synthesized by utilizing an Fe-Ti codeposited catalyst in a thermal-chemical vapor deposition system. This structure could enlarge the contact area between CNTs and substrates to provide better adhesion properties than that in the case of CNTs synthesized from a pure Fe film. Therefore, an abrupt decrease in emission current due to mechanical destruction at a high electric field and a gradual degradation in emission current due to Joule heating were remarkably suppressed. A stable emission current of about 30 mA/cm2 at 7.7 V/μm for 2,500 s was obtained without obvious degradation.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and low field emission of CN x nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Pei; Liang, Erjun; Chao, Mingju; Guo, Xinyong; Zhang, Jingwei

    2005-01-01

    Aligned CNx nanotubes were fabricated by pyrolyzing ethylenediamine on p-type Si(1 1 1) substrates using iron as the catalyst. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the CNx nanotubes. The CNx nanotubes with the average length of 20 μm and diameters in the range of 50-100 nm have the "bamboo-like" structure and worse crystalline order. The low-field emission measurements of the CNx nanotubes indicated that 20 μA/cm2 current densities were observed at an electric field of 1.4 V/μm and 1.280 mA/cm2 were obtained at 2.54 V/μm. The CNx nanotubes exhibit better field emission properties than the carbon nanotubes and the BCN nanotubes. The emission mechanism of CNx nanotubes is also discussed.

  6. Space charge effects on the current-voltage characteristics of gated field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K. L.; Kodis, M. A.; Murphy, R. A.; Zaidman, E. G.

    1997-07-01

    Microfabricated field emitter arrays (FEAs) can provide the very high electron current densities required for rf amplifier applications, typically on the order of 100 A/cm2. Determining the dependence of emission current on gate voltage is important for the prediction of emitter performance for device applications. Field emitters use high applied fields to extract current, and therefore, unlike thermionic emitters, the current densities can exceed 103A/cm2 when averaged over an array. At such high current densities, space charge effects (i.e., the influence of charge between cathode and collector on emission) affect the emission process or initiate conditions which can lead to failure mechanisms for field emitters. A simple model of a field emitter will be used to calculate the one-dimensional space charge effects on the emission characteristics by examining two components: charge between the gate and anode, which leads to Child's law, and charge within the FEA unit cell, which gives rise to a field suppression effect which can exist for a single field emitter. The predictions of the analytical model are compared with recent experimental measurements designed to assess space charge effects and predict the onset of gate current. It is shown that negative convexity on a Fowler-Nordheim plot of Ianode(Vgate) data can be explained in terms of field depression at the emitter tip in addition to reflection of electrons by a virtual cathode created when the anode field is insufficient to extract all of the current; in particular, the effects present within the unit cell constitute a newly described effect.

  7. Carbon nanotube based field emission X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan

    This dissertation describes the development of field emission (FE) x-ray sources with a carbon-nanotube (CNT) cathode. Field emission x-rays have advantages over conventional x-rays by replacing the thermionic cathode with a cold cathode so that electrons are emitted at room temperature and emission is voltage controllable. CNTs are found to be excellent electron emitters with low threshold fields and high current density which makes them ideal for generate field emission x-rays. Macroscopic CNT cold cathodes are prepared and the parameters to tune their field emission properties are studied: structure and morphology of CNT cathodes, temperature as well as electronic work function of CNT. Macroscopic CNT cathodes with optimized performance are chosen to build a high-resolution x-ray imaging system. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution up to nanoseconds and spatial resolution down to 10 micron. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging and micro-computed tomography are also demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for non-destructive testing and for non-invasive small-animal imaging for biomedical research.

  8. Chemically doped three-dimensional porous graphene monoliths for high-performance flexible field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Young; Jeong, Sooyeon; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Han, Joong Tark; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Geon-Woong; Jeong, Hee Jin

    2015-03-01

    Despite the recent progress in the fabrication of field emitters based on graphene nanosheets, their morphological and electrical properties, which affect their degree of field enhancement as well as the electron tunnelling barrier height, should be controlled to allow for better field-emission properties. Here we report a method that allows the synthesis of graphene-based emitters with a high field-enhancement factor and a low work function. The method involves forming monolithic three-dimensional (3D) graphene structures by freeze-drying of a highly concentrated graphene paste and subsequent work-function engineering by chemical doping. Graphene structures with vertically aligned edges were successfully fabricated by the freeze-drying process. Furthermore, their number density could be controlled by varying the composition of the graphene paste. Al- and Au-doped 3D graphene emitters were fabricated by introducing the corresponding dopant solutions into the graphene sheets. The resulting field-emission characteristics of the resulting emitters are discussed. The synthesized 3D graphene emitters were highly flexible, maintaining their field-emission properties even when bent at large angles. This is attributed to the high crystallinity and emitter density and good chemical stability of the 3D graphene emitters, as well as to the strong interactions between the 3D graphene emitters and the substrate.Despite the recent progress in the fabrication of field emitters based on graphene nanosheets, their morphological and electrical properties, which affect their degree of field enhancement as well as the electron tunnelling barrier height, should be controlled to allow for better field-emission properties. Here we report a method that allows the synthesis of graphene-based emitters with a high field-enhancement factor and a low work function. The method involves forming monolithic three-dimensional (3D) graphene structures by freeze-drying of a highly concentrated

  9. Relation between field energy and RMS emittance in intense particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.; Mills, R.S.; Reiser, M.

    1985-10-01

    An equation is presented for continuous beams with azimuthal symmetry and continuous linear focusing, which expresses a relationship between the rate of change for squared rms emittance and the rate of change for a quantity we call the nonlinear field energy. The nonlinear field energy depends on the shape of the charge distribution and corresponds to the residual field energy possessed by beams with nonuniform charge distributions. The equation can be integrated for the case of an rms matched beam to yield a formula for space-charge-induced emittance growth that we have tested numerically for a variety of initial distributions. The results provide a framework for discussing the scaling of rms emittance growth and an explanation for the well-established lower limit on output emittance.

  10. Relation between field energy and RMS emittance in intense particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.; Mills, R.S.; Reiser, M.

    1985-01-01

    An equation is presented for continuous beams with azimuthal symmetry and continuous linear focusing, which expresses a relationship between the rate of change for squared rms emittance and the rate of change for a quantity we call the nonlinear field energy. The nonlinear field energy depends on the shape of the charge distribution and corresponds to the residual field energy possessed by beams with nonuniform charge distributions. The equation can be integrated for the case of an rms matched beam to yield a formula for space-charge-induced emittance growth that we have tested numerically for a variety of initial distributions. The results provide a framework for discussing the scaling of rms emittance growth and an explanation for the well-established lower limit on output emittance. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  11. On the Importance of Symmetrizing RF Coupler Fields for Low Emittance Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai; Zhou, Feng; Vlieks, Arnold; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    The input power of accelerator structure is normally fed through a coupling slot(s) on the outer wall of the accelerator structure via magnetic coupling. While providing perfect matching, the coupling slots may produce non-axial-symmetric fields in the coupler cell that can induce emittance growth as the beam is accelerated in such a field. This effect is especially important for low emittance beams at low energies such as in the injector accelerators for light sources. In this paper, we present studies of multipole fields of different rf coupler designs and their effect on beam emittance for an X-band photocathode gun being jointly designed with LLNL, and X-band accelerator structures. We will present symmetrized rf coupler designs for these components to preserve the beam emittance.

  12. High brightness field emission from printed carbon nanotubes in an S-band microwave gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qilong; Li, Xiangkun; Di, Yusong; Yu, Cairu; Zhang, Xiaobing; Li, Ming; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were applied as cold cathode and placed into an S-band microwave gun operating at 2856 MHz with the pulse duration of 2.8 μs. High brightness field emission was demonstrated and the current density achieves the value more than 4.2 A/cm2. The emittance of field emission beam is calculated to be nearly 21 μm based on the beam profile of emission electrons monitored via yttrium aluminum garnet screen. The infrared image of printed CNTs confirms that the emitters in the center contributed more electrons and the heat generated during the large current density field emission. The results in the paper imply that randomly distributed printed CNTs have the potential to be applied as the high brightness electron sources for free electron lasers.

  13. Possible emittance growth induced by nonlinear space charge fields for arbitrary particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A procedure to obtain a ratio of beam radii at final and initial states in arbitrary particle distributions is proposed, and is applied to the estimation of possible emittance growth for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions. The ratios are estimated for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions as a function of tune depression. The possible emittance growth as a function of tune depression and nonlinear field energy factor is also estimated with and without a constant radius ratio approximation. It is confirmed that the possible emittance growths are almost the same in comparison to the cases with and without the constant radius ratio approximation at each distribution.

  14. Experimental investigation of relationship between nonlinear field energy and emittance growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D.; McCready, S. S.; McHarg, M. G.; Brasure, L. D.

    1989-11-01

    Understanding the phenomena of emittance growth in space-charge-dominated particle beams is important to any application that requires a small final emittance. Many researchers have looked at the process of emittance growth under these conditions. Wangler, et al., uses the idea of nonlinear field energy to describe emittance growth. In brief, a beam with a nonuniform radial intensity distribution has a potential energy associated with this distribution. As the beam propagates through a solenoidal magnetic field, this potential energy is turned into transverse kinetic energy and manifests itself as emittance growth. The experimental results shows that there is a relationship between the initial intensity profile and the tune ratio to the emittance of charged particle beams in solenoidal focusing fields. The results also agree with the predicted beam intensity profile changes under focusing for peaked and flat beams. This experiment shows that an experiment to verify this theory by using two different beam intensity profiles is feasible. More experimentation in this area is recommended.

  15. Field emitters with nanoscale tips based on Mo oxide fabricated by electrochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Takeo; Sato, Takahiro; Kitamura, Shin; Kitao, Akiko; Kubota, Oichi; Ozaki, Eiji; Motoi, Taiko

    2016-04-01

    Field emitters with nanoscale tips and a fabrication technique using a nanoscale gap are described. Each fabrication technique makes it possible to form emitters on a meter-scale glass substrate. The emitter has a configuration with one side gate to reduce the electron scattering losses at the counter electrode to improve the emission efficiency. All thin film layers constituting the emitter are fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and sputtering deposition. Nanoscale tips are formed between a shallow gap less than 7 nm deep by the joule heating of a Mo complex oxide, which is produced by the electro chemical etching of a deposited Mo layer. To our knowledge, this is the first work that shows a uniform efficiency of 5% or more achieved at an anode voltage of 10 kV and an operation voltage of 23 V.

  16. Portable Infrared Reflectometer Designed and Manufactured for Evaluating Emittance in the Laboratory or in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    The optical properties of materials play a key role in spacecraft thermal control. In space, radiant heat transfer is the only mode of heat transfer that can reject heat from a spacecraft. One of the key properties for defining radiant heat transfer is emittance, a measure of how efficiently a surface can reject heat in comparison to a perfect black body emitter. Heat rejection occurs in the infrared region of the spectrum, nominally in the range of 2 to 25 mm. To calculate emittance, one obtains the reflectance over this spectral range, calculates spectral absorptance by difference, and then uses Kirchhoff s Law and the Stefan-Boltzmann equation to calculate emittance. A new portable infrared reflectometer, the SOC 400t, was designed and manufactured to evaluate the emittance of surfaces and coatings in the laboratory or in the field. It was developed by Surface Optics Corporation under a contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to replace the Center s aging Gier-Dunkle DB-100 infrared reflectometer. The specifications for the new instrument include a wavelength range of 2 to 25 mm; reflectance repeatability of +/-1 percent; self-calibrating, near-normal spectral reflectance measurements; a full scan measurement time of 3.5 min, a sample size of 1.27 cm (0.5 in.); a spectral resolution selectable from 4, 8, 16, or 32/cm; and optical property characterization utilizing an automatic integration to calculate total emittance in a selectable temperature range.

  17. Microelectrode for energy and current control of nanotip field electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Lüneburg, S.; Müller, M. Paarmann, A. Ernstorfer, R.

    2013-11-18

    Emerging experiments and applications in electron microscopy, holography, and diffraction benefit from miniaturized electron guns for compact experimental setups. We present a highly compact microelectrode integrated field emitter that consists of a tungsten nanotip coated with a few micrometers thick polyimide film followed by a several nanometers thick gold film, both positioned behind the exposed emitter apex by approximately 10–30 μm. The control of the electric field strength at the nanometer scale tip apex allows suppression, extraction, and energy tuning of field-emitted electrons. The performance of the microelectrode is demonstrated experimentally and supported by numerical simulations.

  18. Electron gun using carbon-nanofiber field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Y.; Haga, A.; Sugita, S.; Kita, S.; Tanaka, S.-I.; Okuyama, F.; Kobayashi, N.

    2007-01-01

    An electron gun constructed using carbon-nanofiber (CNF) emitters and an electrostatic Einzel lens system has been characterized for the development of a high-resolution x-ray source. The CNFs used were grown on tungsten and palladium tips by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Electron beams with the energies of 10

  19. Electron gun using carbon-nanofiber field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Y.; Haga, A.; Sugita, S.; Kita, S.; Tanaka, S.-I.; Okuyama, F.; Kobayashi, N.

    2007-01-15

    An electron gun constructed using carbon-nanofiber (CNF) emitters and an electrostatic Einzel lens system has been characterized for the development of a high-resolution x-ray source. The CNFs used were grown on tungsten and palladium tips by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Electron beams with the energies of 10

  20. Planar Field Emitters and High Efficiency Photocathodes Based on Ultrananocrystalline Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumant, Anirudha V. (Inventor); Baryshev, Sergey V. (Inventor); Antipov, Sergey P. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method of forming a field emitter comprises disposing a first layer on a substrate. The first layer is seeded with nanodiamond particles. The substrate with the first layer disposed thereon is maintained at a first temperature and a first pressure in a mixture of gases which includes nitrogen. The first layer is exposed to a microwave plasma to form a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on the first layer, which has a percentage of nitrogen in the range of about 0.05 atom % to about 0.5 atom %. The field emitter has about 10.sup.12 to about 10.sup.14 emitting sites per cm.sup.2. A photocathode can also be formed similarly by forming a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on a substrate similar to the field emitter, and then hydrogen terminating the film. The photocathode is responsive to near ultraviolet light as well as to visible light.

  1. A fine-focusing x-ray source using carbon-nanofiber field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, W.; Sugita, S.; Sakai, Y.; Goto, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohga, Y.; Kita, S.; Ohara, T.

    2010-08-15

    A fine-focusing x-ray source has been constructed employing a field electron emitter prepared by growing carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) on a metal tip. The x-ray source is composed of a CNF field electron emitter, an electrostatic lens, two magnetic lenses, and a W-target for generating x-rays by electron impact. The CNFs provided field electrons with a current density of J{approx}5x10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2}, which was evaluated with the aid of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron beam extracted from the CNF emitter was accelerated to the energies of E=10-25 keV, and then focused by the lenses. By recording the x-ray images of test charts, the optimum resolution of the x-ray source was estimated to be approximately D{sub x}=0.5 {mu}m.

  2. Planar field emitters and high efficiency photocathodes based on ultrananocrystalline diamond

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Antipov, Sergey P.

    2016-08-16

    A method of forming a field emitter comprises disposing a first layer on a substrate. The first layer is seeded with nanodiamond particles. The substrate with the first layer disposed thereon is maintained at a first temperature and a first pressure in a mixture of gases which includes nitrogen. The first layer is exposed to a microwave plasma to form a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on the first layer, which has a percentage of nitrogen in the range of about 0.05 atom % to about 0.5 atom %. The field emitter has about 10.sup.12 to about 10.sup.14 emitting sites per cm.sup.2. A photocathode can also be formed similarly by forming a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on a substrate similar to the field emitter, and then hydrogen terminating the film. The photocathode is responsive to near ultraviolet light as well as to visible light.

  3. Carbon nanotube bundles under electric field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammes, I.; Latgé, A.

    2012-03-01

    Here we address the important role played by electric fields applied in carbon nanotube bundles in providing convenient scenarios for their use in electronic devices. We show that a gap modulation may be derived depending on the bundle configuration and the details of the applied field configuration. The system is described by a tight binding Hamiltonian and the Green function formalism is used to calculate the local density of states. Small bundles were used to validate our model on the basis of ab initio calculations. Further analysis shows that the number of tubes, geometrical configuration details and field intensities may be controlled to tune the electronic structure close to the Fermi energy, envisaging atomic-scale devices.

  4. Field Emission Study of Carbon Nanotubes: High Current Density from Nanotube Bundle Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Micheal J.; Manohara, Harish M.; Siegel, Peter H.; Hunt, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the field emission behavior of lithographically patterned bundles of multiwalled carbon nanotubes arranged in a variety of array geometries. Such arrays of nanotube bundles are found to perform significantly better in field emission than arrays of isolated nanotubes or dense, continuous mats of nanotubes, with the field emission performance depending on the bundle diameter and inter-bundle spacing. Arrays of 2-micrometers diameter nanotube bundles spaced 5 micrometers apart (edge-to-edge spacing) produced the largest emission densities, routinely giving 1.5 to 1.8 A/cm(sup 2) at approximately 4 V/micrometer electric field, and greater than 6 A/cm(sup 2) at 20 V/micrometers.

  5. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors Using Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Grown Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, Hirofumi; Kojima, Yoshihiro; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Ohno, Yutaka; Mizutani, Takashi

    2006-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes are grown using grid-inserted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The field effect transistor operation was confirmed using the PECVD grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The preferential growth of the semiconducting nanotubes was confirmed in the grid-inserted PECVD by measuring current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the devices. Based on the measurement of the electrical breakdown of the metallic CNTs, the probability of growing the semiconducting nanotubes has been estimated to be more than 90%.

  6. Estimation of Metal-Deposited Field Emitters for the Micro Vacuum Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Junzo; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Inoue, Kazunori; Nagao, Masayoshi; Sasaki, Takahiro; Kaneko, Takashi; Gotoh, Yasuhito

    1993-03-01

    The material dependence on the emission characterisitics of metal-deposited field emitters has been investigated in order to determine the cathode material suitable for vacuum microelectronics devices. It is shown that the relationships between the intercepts and the slopes of the experimental F-N plots give the apparent differences of the materials even though the radii of the apices are not equal among the emitters. We derive the modified F-N equation from the experimental values and the semi-empirical assumption as a linear variation of the work function with electrical field due to an adsorption effect. From this equation we calculate the emitting area, the radius of the emitter apex and the work function.

  7. Densification effects of the carbon nanotube pillar array on field-emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuang-Yu; Chou, Chia-Hsin; Liao, Chan-Yu; Li, Yu-Ren; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a simple densification method for carbon nanotube (CNT) pillars is proposed to achieve high-performance field emission characteristics and stable emission. Through capillary force during solution evaporation, the CNT density in each pillar can be increased by about six times without causing damage to the crystallinity of CNTs. The densified CNT pillars exhibit lower series resistance, sharper pillars, better contacts, higher thermal conductivity, and better mechanical stiffness than as-grown ones. Therefore, the threshold field of the field emitter with such CNT pillars of 50 µm height can be reduced to 1.98 V/µm, as compared with 2.2 V/µm for the undensified ones. Moreover, the fluctuation of field-emission current decreases from 15.5 to 9.4% after the stress tests at a field of 2 V/µm for 1800 s. These findings imply that the densified CNT pillars are promising for the field-emission applications.

  8. Electrochemical Charging of Carbon Nanotubes for Tunable Electron Field Emission Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Alexander; Barisci, Norman; Zakhidov, Anvar; Zakhidov, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have very promising applications as electron field emitters. Work function of CNTs greatly affects the performance of such cold electron emitters. It is possible to change emission currents by several orders of magnitude by electrochemical charging. Electrochemical charging changes work function of CNTs by creating so called double layer. It was recently demonstrated that double layer structure remains for several hours after removing the CNTs from an electrolyte [1]. The extensive study of charging single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) paper in different electrolytes has been performed at different charging potentials Vch. Field emission currents and threshold fields dependence on the charging potential and polarity is studied for various ions, with different valency and size: Na, Mg, Cs. Clear dependence of work function on Vch is demonstrated. AFM micro-imaging with a Kelvin probe allowed to study the micropatterns of work function modulation. Also dissipation of positive charge in air was investigated and its stability was significantly increased. 1. Suh Dong-Seok, Baughman Ray, Zakhidov Anvar, US Patent 20070170071 (2007)

  9. Flexible electron field emitters fabricated using conducting ultrananocrystalline diamond pyramidal microtips on polynorbornene films

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H.; Lin, I. N.

    2014-01-20

    High performance flexible field emitters made of aligned pyramidal shaped conducting ultrananocrystalline diamond (C-UNCD) microtips on polynorbornene substrates is demonstrated. Flexible C-UNCD pyramidal microtips show a low turn-on field of 1.80 V/μm with a field enhancement factor of 4580 and a high emission current density of 5.8 mA/cm{sup 2} (at an applied field of 4.20 V/μm) with life-time stability of 210 min. Such an enhancement in the field emission is due to the presence of sp{sup 2}-graphitic sheath with a nanowire-like diamond core. This high performance flexible C-UNCD field emitter is potentially useful for the fabrication of diverse, flexible electronic devices.

  10. Characterization of NiSi nanowires as field emitters and limitations of Fowler-Nordheim model at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkadi, Amina B.; Gale, E.; Isakovic, A. F.

    2015-03-01

    Nanoscale field emitters are of technological interest because of the anticipated faster turn-on time, better sustainability and compactness. This report focuses on NiSi nanowires as field emitters for two reasons: (a) possible enhancement of field emission in nanoscale field emitters over bulk, and (b) achieving the same field emission properties as in bulk, but at a lower energy cost. To this end, we have grown, fabricated and characterized NiSi nanowires as field emitters. Depending on the geometry of the NiSi nanowires (aspect ratio, shape etc.), the relevant major field emission parameters, such as (1) the turn-on field, (2) the work function, and (3) the field enhancement factor, can be comparable or even superior to other recently explored nanoscale field emitters, such as CdS and ZnO. We also report on a comparative performance of various nanoscale field emitters and on the difficulties in the performance comparison in the light of relatively poor applicability of the standard Folwer-Nordheim model for field emission analysis for the case of the nanoscale field emitters. Proposed modifications are discussed. This work is supported through SRC-ATIC Grant 2011-KJ-2190. We also acknoweldge BNL-CFN and Cornell CNF facilities and staff.

  11. Field emission properties of hybrid few-layer graphene-carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei Qi, Jun; Zhang, Fu; Xia Zhang, Li; Cao, Jian; Cai Feng, Ji

    2014-04-01

    Few-layer graphene (FLG) and carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid is prepared by in situ growth of FLG on the walls of CNTs, using PECVD, without catalyst. The amount and size of FLG can be controlled by total gas pressure and growth time. The field emission (FE) characteristics of CNTs coated with different-density FLG were studied, and an FE phenomenon schematic and electrostatic field equipotential model of these FLG-CNTs were proposed. These results show that the geometrical morphology of FLG plays an important role in the FE property of hybrid FLG-CNTs. The medium-density FLG on the CNTs exhibits excellent FE properties, with a low turn-on electric field and threshold field, as well as large field enhancement factor, which are much better than those of the as-grown CNTs. The excellent FE properties of the FLG-CNT hybrids make them promising candidates for high-performance FE emitters.

  12. Self-organized growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotube arrays for field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padya, Balaji; Kalita, Dipankar; Jain, P. K.; Padmanabham, G.; Ravi, M.; Bhat, K. S.

    2012-09-01

    Well-aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube (N-CNTs) film was fabricated on silicon substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition process with varying the growth temperature. The effect of growth temperature on morphology, microstructure and crystallinity for the growth of N-CNTs was studied. At all growth temperatures, the bamboo-like morphology of graphene layers with compartments in CNTs were observed in transmission electron microscope micrographs. The doping level and the type of nitrogen-related moieties were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The compartment distance decreases with increase in nitrogen doping level in hexagonal graphite network. The increase in nitrogen doping level in N-CNTs will lead to decrease in crystallinity and in-plane crystallite size. Field emission study of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes grown at optimum parameters showed that they are good emitters with a turn-on and threshold field of 0.3 and 1.6 V/μm, respectively. The maximum current density was observed to be 18.8 mA/cm2 at the electric field of 2.1 V/μm. It is considered that the enhanced field emission performance of doped nanotube is due to the presence of lone pairs of electrons on nitrogen atom that supplies more electrons to the conduction band.

  13. Fowler-Nordheim plot characteristics for ZnO virtual field emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Tabbakh, Ahmed A.

    2015-09-01

    Linear and nonlinear Fowler-Nordheim (FN) plots from semiconductors emitters arrays were equally reported by researchers with occasionally inexplicit justification of either behaviour. Interpretation of experimental field emission data depends on explaining the FN plot behaviour from these arrays. The FN plot behaviour was investigated for virtual arrays of ZnO emitters with defined geometries based on fundamental electron tunnelling from semiconductors. The effects of emitters' size distribution, saturation of conduction band (CB) current and contribution of valence band (VB) current on FN plot behaviour were investigated and discussed in detail. Comparison with some experimental results was introduced in support of the discussion. Results showed that saturation of CB current and contribution of VB electrons may not always be manifested as a well-observed deviation from linear characteristic of the FN plot. In addition, the dependence of the CB current on the emitters' geometries was found to affect the FN plot behaviour. The present investigation is thought to be of great importance to field emission community and help for better interpretation of experimental field emission data.

  14. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    DOEpatents

    Korsah, Kofi [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  15. Argon inclusion in sputtered films and the effect of the gas on molybdenum field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalamala, Babu R.; Reuss, Robert H.

    2001-04-01

    Residual gas analysis of a number of field emission displays showed that argon desorbed from molybdenum metal lines was the dominant gas in sealed vacuum packages. We present experimental results on the emission characteristics of molybdenum field emitter arrays in argon ambient. In argon, the emission current dropped rapidly similar to that in oxygenic gas ambients. Existing degradation models do not provide an adequate explanation for this behavior. Rather, we suggest a model based on shallow implantation of argon into the field emitter tips that increases the effective width of the tunneling barrier. Experimental support for this model comes from the following observations: emission current degraded only when the device was turned on; after gas exposure, significant current recovery which followed diffusion type behavior was noted; degradation and recovery rates were functions of partial pressure; and no detectable effects associated with sputtering were observed. This mechanism is also consistent with ion pumping known to occur in field emission displays.

  16. Enhanced field emission of vertically aligned core-shelled carbon nanotubes with molybdenum oxide encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Chua, Daniel H. C.; Sow, C. H.; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2009-06-01

    The field emission characteristics of the core-shelled nanostructures obtained by directly coating molybdenum oxide onto vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was investigated. A metal-organic chemical vapor deposition technique was used with Mo(CO){sub 6} as the precursor and films deposited at process temperatures of 200, 400, and 700 deg. C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction were used to study and understand the material properties of the deposited coatings. Enhanced field emission performance was observed for molybdenum oxide coated MWNT samples at 400 deg. C with a turn-on field of 1.33 V mum{sup -1} and a field enhancement factor beta estimated to be approx7000. The enhanced performance may be due to both the shape of the coated emitters and a decrease in the effective barrier height.

  17. X-ray tube with a graphite field emitter inflamed at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Yusuke; Koike, Takayoshi; Hayama, Youhei; Jouzuka, Atsuo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Onizuka, Yoshihiro; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Mimura, Hidenori

    2013-01-01

    The authors developed a class of novel graphite-based field emitters, known as graphite field emitters inflamed at high temperature (GFEIHTs), which includes numerous edges and juts. The GFEIHT field emission characteristics are investigated in a vacuum tube (10−7 Pa), and an anode current exceeding 2 mA is obtained. The authors also fabricated tipped-off x-ray tubes using GFEIHTs. No degradation in the anode current is observed under the operating conditions of 16.6 kV anode voltage and 160 μA anode current. The current dispersion, defined as the standard deviation (σ)/mean over 24 h, is 2.8%. The authors successfully demonstrated radiography and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry using an x-ray tube with GFEIHT. PMID:23847750

  18. Spectrum of classes of point emitters: new tool for nonparaxial optical field modeling.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Román; Muñoz, Hernán

    2016-08-01

    Numerical modeling of optical fields provides valuable support to both theoretical research and technological development in many optics fields. Fourier methods have been the most widely used tools of numerical modeling. However, important limitations have restricted their application in contemporary research that involve high numerical apertures, short propagation distances, and spatially partially coherent states of light, for instance. The spectrum of classes of point emitters is introduced as a numerical tool that overcomes such limitations for the design, analysis, and synthesis of nonparaxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this context, optical processing is realized as the filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence that could be implemented dynamically by using programmable devices. PMID:27505639

  19. Study on beam emittance evolution in a nonlinear plasma wake field accelerator with mobile plasma ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Weiming; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren; Lu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    We study the electron beam evolution in a nonlinear blowout PWFA when the accelerated beam has a very small matched spot size that can cause the plasma ions collapsing towards the beam. Contrary to the common belief, very small emittance growth of the accelerated electron beam is found when the plasma ion collapsing destroys the perfect linear focusing force in the plasma wake field. The improved quasi-static PIC code QuickPIC also allows us to use very high resolution and to model asymmetric spot sizes. Simulation results show that the accelerated beam will reach a steady state after several cm propagation in the plasma (which is why we can do simulations and not let the drive beam evolve). We find that for round beams the ion density (which is Li+) enhancement is indeed by factors of 100, but that the emittance only grows by around 20 percent. For asymmetric spot sizes, the ion collapse is less and emittance growth is zero in the plane with the largest emittance and about 20 percent in the other plane.

  20. Behavior of molecules and molecular ions near a field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gault, Baptiste; Saxey, David W.; Ashton, Michael W.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Moody, Michael P.; Schreiber, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    The cold emission of particles from surfaces under intense electric fields is a process which underpins a variety of applications including atom probe tomography (APT), an analytical microscopy technique with near-atomic spatial resolution. Increasingly relying on fast laser pulsing to trigger the emission, APT experiments often incorporate the detection of molecular ions emitted from the specimen, in particular from covalently or ionically bonded materials. Notably, it has been proposed that neutral molecules can also be emitted during this process. However, this remains a contentious issue. To investigate the validity of this hypothesis, a careful review of the literature is combined with the development of new methods to treat experimental APT data, the modeling of ion trajectories, and the application of density-functional theory simulations to derive molecular ion energetics. It is shown that the direct thermal emission of neutral molecules is extremely unlikely. However, neutrals can still be formed in the course of an APT experiment by dissociation of metastable molecular ions. This work is a partial contribution of the US Government and therefore is not subject to copyright in the United States.

  1. 128x96 pixel field emitter-array image sensor with HARP target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Toshio; Nanba, Masakazu; Osada, Katsunori; Takiguchi, Yoshiro; Okazaki, Saburo; Egami, Norifumi; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Itoh, Shigeo

    2002-04-01

    In pursuit of developing a next-generation pick-up device having high definition and ultrahigh sensitivity features, research continues on a new type of image sensor that combines a HARP target and a field emitter array. A new field emitter array on a small-sized substrate is designed and a unique packaging technique is proposed. The prototype device is sealed in a vacuum package with a thickness of only about 10 mm and has 128 horizontal and 96 vertical pixels. Experimental results show that images could be successfully reproduced for the first time ever in a device of this type. Highly sensitive characteristics and propr resolution were also obtained with the device. The prototype image sensor can operate stably for more than 250 hours, demonstrating its feasibility and potential as a next- generation image pickup device.

  2. Effect of insulating layer on the Field Electron Emission Performance of Nano-Apex Metallic Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Qudah, Ala'a. A.; Mousa, Marwan S.; Fischer, A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with the process of electron emission from the surface of metals (before and after coating with controlled layers of dielectric materials) into the vacuum due to an intense applied external electric field. This process is usually called cold field electron emission (CFE). The research work reported here includes the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics presented as Fowler-Nordheim (FN) plots and scanning electron micrographs in addition to the spatial emission current distributions (electron emission images). The process of coating the clean tungsten (W) emitters by layers of dielectric epoxylite resin was easy, and the measurements were performed under UHV ∼ 10-8 mbar. From comparing the results obtained in this work, significant improvement in properties of the emitters after coating are observed.

  3. Integrated atom detector based on field ionization near carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gruener, B.; Jag, M.; Stibor, A.; Visanescu, G.; Haeffner, M.; Kern, D.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.

    2009-12-15

    We demonstrate an atom detector based on field ionization and subsequent ion counting. We make use of field enhancement near tips of carbon nanotubes to reach extreme electrostatic field values of up to 9x10{sup 9} V/m, which ionize ground-state rubidium atoms. The detector is based on a carpet of multiwall carbon nanotubes grown on a substrate and used for field ionization, and a channel electron multiplier used for ion counting. We measure the field enhancement at the tips of carbon nanotubes by field emission of electrons. We demonstrate the operation of the field ionization detector by counting atoms from a thermal beam of a rubidium dispenser source. By measuring the ionization rate of rubidium as a function of the applied detector voltage we identify the field ionization distance, which is below a few tens of nanometers in front of nanotube tips. We deduce from the experimental data that field ionization of rubidium near nanotube tips takes place on a time scale faster than 10{sup -10} s. This property is particularly interesting for the development of fast atom detectors suitable for measuring correlations in ultracold quantum gases. We also describe an application of the detector as partial pressure gauge.

  4. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube yarn for micro-resolution X-ray tube cathode.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Won; Mo, Chan Bin; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Seongwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has excellent electrical and thermal conductivity and high aspect ratio for X-ray tube cathode. However, CNT field emission cathode has been shown unstable field emission and short life time due to field evaporation by high current density and detachment by electrostatic force. An alternative approach in this direction is the introduction of CNT yarn, which is a one dimensional assembly of individual carbon nanotubes bonded by the Van der Waals force. Because CNT yarn is composed with many CNTs, CNT yarns are expected to increase current density and life time for X-ray tube applications. In this research, CNT yarn was fabricated by spinning of a super-aligned CNT forest and was characterized for application to an X-ray tube cathode. CNT yarn showed a high field emission current density and a long lifetime of over 450 hours. Applying the CNT yarn field emitter to the X-ray tube cathode, it was possible to obtain micro-scale resolution images. The relationship between the field emission properties and the microstructure evolution was investigated and the unraveling effect of the CNT yarn was discussed. PMID:24245260

  5. Field and laboratory evaluation of a diffusive emitter for semipassive release of PCE to an aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Arildskov, N.P.; Devlin, J.F.

    2000-02-01

    In controlled field experiments or model aquifers, it is sometimes desirable to introduce solutes below the water table without perturbing the flow system. Diffusive emitters offer a means of achieving that goal. In this study, two laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate nylon tubing as a diffusive emitter for tetrachloroethene (PCE). The initial approach was to pump a saturated aqueous PCE solution through a piece of nylon tubing immersed in a flow-through contractor vessel. Millipore water was pumped through the contractor vessel at a constant rate. Due to PCE diffusion through the nylon, a steady-state concentration in the contractor vessel eventually developed. The process was well described by a computer model that accounted for retarded diffusion through the nylon. In a second experiment, pieces of nylon tubing were exposed to a relatively low concentration of PCE in water for 10 days in gently rotated hypovials. With the aid of a second diffusion model, the bulk diffusion coefficient was obtained from the concentration history of the solution. With the different experimental conditions taken into account, there was reasonably good agreement between the bulk diffusion coefficients in the two experiments. The results were used in the field design of a semipassive release system. Evaluation of this system showed a lower than expected steady-state concentration of PCE inside the releasing wells. The difference is likely due to lower temperature, variable PCE concentrations in the nylon tubing, and nonideal mixing in the wells. The work has shown that laboratory derived diffusion coefficients for polymeric materials are likely to be larger than, but within an order of magnitude of, the effective diffusion coefficients exhibited by emitters in the field. Nevertheless, with temperature corrections taken into account and proper well development, these values could be used to design emitters that would suit most practical applications.

  6. Effect of synthesis parameters on morphology of polyaniline (PANI) and field emission investigation of PANI nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bankar, Prashant K.; More, Mahendra A.; Patil, Sandip S.

    2015-06-24

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures have been synthesized by simple chemical oxidation route at different monomer concentration along with variation in synthesis temperature. The effect of variation of synthesis parameters has been revealed using different characterization techniques. The structural and morphological characterization of the synthesized PANI nanostructures was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), whereas Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been used to reveal the chemical properties. With the variation in the synthesis temperature and monomer concentration, various morphologies characterized by formation of PANI nanoparticles, nanofibres, nanotubes and nanospheres, are revealed from the SEM analysis. The FTIR analysis reveals the formation of conducting state of PANI under prevailing experimental conditions. The field emission investigation of the conducting PANI nanotubes was performed in all metal UHV system at base pressure of 1x10{sup −8} mbar. The turn on field required to draw emission of 1 nA current was observed to be ∼ 2.2 V/μm and threshold field (corresponding to emission current density of 1 µA/cm2) was found to be 3.2 V/μm. The emission current was observed to be stable for more than three hours at a preset value 1 µA. The simple synthesis route and good field emission characteristics indicate potential of PANI nanofibres as a promising emitter for field emission based micro/nano devices.

  7. Application of Anisotropic Conductive Film to Fabrication of Molybdenum Field Emitter Arrays Using Transfer Mold Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eou Sik; Ahn, Min Hyung; Kwon, Sang Jik

    2008-08-01

    In the fabrication of molybdenum field emitter arrays (Mo FEA) by the transfer mold technique, anisotropic conductive film (ACF) was applied to the bond between the inverted mold structure and the transferred glass substrate. Without any electrical treatment of electrostatic bonding, the inverted mold was successfully bonded to an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate under optimized thermal and pressure conditions. No additional conductive layers were used in the bonding process, and the bonded ACF was not chemically affected in the wet-etch process of the silicon inverted mold structure. The fabricated Mo FEA was structurally and electrically investigated and an anode current of 10 nA per emitter was obtained at a gate bias of 94 V. The results demonstrate the possibility of selective conduction in the fabrication of transfer mold FEA using ACF bonding.

  8. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhou, Otto Z.

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists worldwide. The small dimensions, strength and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a very unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review we describe some of the important materials science applications of carbon nanotubes. Specifically we discuss the electronic and electrochemical applications of nanotubes, nanotubes as mechanical reinforcements in high performance composites, nanotube-based field emitters, and their use as nanoprobes in metrology and biological and chemical investigations, and as templates for the creation of other nanostructures. Electronic properties and device applications of nanotubes are treated elsewhere in the book. The challenges that ensue in realizing some of these applications are also discussed from the point of view of manufacturing, processing, and cost considerations.

  9. Ampère-Class Pulsed Field Emission from Carbon-Nanotube Cathodes in a Radiofrequency Resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, D.; Faillace, L.; Hartzell, J.; Panuganti, H.; Boucher, S. M.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Thangaraj, J. C.T.

    2014-12-01

    Pulsed field emission from cold carbon-nanotube cathodes placed in a radiofrequency resonant cavity was observed. The cathodes were located on the backplate of a conventional $1+\\frac{1}{2}$-cell resonant cavity operating at 1.3-GHz and resulted in the production of bunch train with maximum average current close to 0.7 Amp\\`ere. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristic, transverse emittance, and pulse duration are presented and, when possible, compared to numerical simulations. The implications of our results to high-average-current electron sources are briefly discussed.

  10. Reliability tests of gated silicon field emitters for use in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Collingwood, C. M.; Kent, B. J.

    2004-07-01

    Neutralizers are required to prevent spacecraft charging from satellite ion propulsion. This paper discusses the development of a gated silicon tip field emitter (FE) neutralizer, specified to deliver 6 mA, with each tip emitting a mean current of 7 nA. It is important to investigate factors affecting the lifetime of field emitter arrays for a space application, as longevity and reliability are both critical requirements. Semi-automated procedures to prepare 400 arrays, each consisting of 765 FEs, for life tests are described with failure conditions strictly defined by mission constraints. Results of 25 life tests on 72 arrays driven to failure at constant emission current are summarized, and a case study of one test is presented. Two of the three failure mechanisms identified are consistent with thermal failure and damage by ion bombardment. Reduced field enhancement from tip erosion caused by ion bombardment is a common explanation for FE failure. However, scanning electron microscope examination of tip apex diameters showed no significant relationship between array failure and apex geometry. The third failure mechanism was associated with short-lived arrays and may be caused by manufacturing defects. Substantial intrinsic variability was observed in the arrays tested, even with the rigorous production standards required for space applications. Arrays without manufacturing defects had lifetimes of thousands of hours.

  11. Magnetic field control of near-field radiative heat transfer and the realization of highly tunable hyperbolic thermal emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncada-Villa, E.; Fernández-Hurtado, V.; García-Vidal, F. J.; García-Martín, A.; Cuevas, J. C.

    2015-09-01

    We present a comprehensive theoretical study of the magnetic field dependence of the near-field radiative heat transfer (NFRHT) between two parallel plates. We show that when the plates are made of doped semiconductors, the near-field thermal radiation can be severely affected by the application of a static magnetic field. We find that irrespective of its direction, the presence of a magnetic field reduces the radiative heat conductance, and dramatic reductions up to 700% can be found with fields of about 6 T at room temperature. We show that this striking behavior is due to the fact that the magnetic field radically changes the nature of the NFRHT. The field not only affects the electromagnetic surface waves (both plasmons and phonon polaritons) that normally dominate the near-field radiation in doped semiconductors, but it also induces hyperbolic modes that progressively dominate the heat transfer as the field increases. In particular, we show that when the field is perpendicular to the plates, the semiconductors become ideal hyperbolic near-field emitters. More importantly, by changing the magnetic field, the system can be continuously tuned from a situation where the surface waves dominate the heat transfer to a situation where hyperbolic modes completely govern the near-field thermal radiation. We show that this high tunability can be achieved with accessible magnetic fields and very common materials like n -doped InSb or Si. Our study paves the way for an active control of NFRHT and it opens the possibility to study unique hyperbolic thermal emitters without the need to resort to complicated metamaterials.

  12. Field Enhanced Thermionic Electron Emission from Oxide Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Christopher; Jin, Feng; Liu, Yan; Little, Scott

    2006-03-01

    We have created a novel nanostructure by coating carbon nanotubes with a thin functional oxide layer. The structure was fabricated by sputter deposition of a thin film of oxide materials on aligned carbon nanotubes, which were grown on a tungsten substrate with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. This structure combines the low work function of the oxide coating with a high field enhancement factor introduced by carbon nanotubes and we have demonstrated that it can be used as a highly efficient electron source. A field enhancement factor as high as 2000 was observed and thermionic electron emission current at least an order of magnitude higher than the emission from a conventional oxide cathode was obtained.

  13. MoS{sub 2} nanotube field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Strojnik, M. E-mail: dragan.mihailovic@ijs.si; Mrzel, A.; Buh, J.; Strle, J.; Kovic, A.; Mihailovic, D. E-mail: dragan.mihailovic@ijs.si

    2014-09-15

    We report on electric field effects on electron transport in multi-walled MoS{sub 2} nanotubes (NTs), fabricated using a two-step synthesis method from Mo{sub 6}S{sub x}I{sub 9-x} nanowire bundle precursors. Transport properties were measured on 20 single nanotube field effect transistor (FET) devices, and compared with MoS{sub 2} layered crystal devices prepared using identical fabrication techniques. The NTs exhibited mobilities of up to 0.014 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1} and an on/off ratio of up to 60. As such they are comparable with previously reported WS{sub 2} nanotube FETs, but materials defects and imperfections apparently limit their performance compared with multilayer MoS{sub 2} FETs with similar number of layers.

  14. Advances In Vertical Solid-State Current Limiters For Individual Field Emitter Regulation In High-Density Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Frances A.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-12-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of improved solid-state elements intended for individual regulation of field emitters part of high-density arrays. We demonstrate a high-yield, CMOS compatible fabrication process of single-crystal, vertical, ungated, n-type silicon field-effect transistors (FETs); each device behaves as a current source when is biased at a voltage larger than its drain-source saturation voltage. An ungated FET in saturation connected in series to a field emitter can compensate for the wide variation in current-voltage characteristics of the field emitters due to the tip radii spread present in any field emitter array, which should result in emitter burn-out protection, larger array utilization, and smaller array emission non-uniformity. Using 1-2 Ωcm single-crystal n-Si wafers, we fabricated arrays of 25 μm tall vertical ungated FETs with 0.5 μm diameter that span two orders of magnitude of array size. Experimental characterization of the arrays demonstrates that the current is limited with > 3.5 V bias voltage to the same ∼6 μA (6 A.cm-2) per-FET value. Finite element simulations of the device predict a saturation voltage close to the experimental value and a saturation current within a factor of two of the experimental value.

  15. Enhancement of field emission properties of cyanoacrylate carbon nanotube arrays by laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuming; Fan, Shou Shan

    2004-08-01

    Cyanoacrylate-carbon nanotube arrays are prepared by embedding carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays grown on silicon substrate in cyanoacrylate adhesive. Upon laser treatment, enhanced field emission properties are obtained. Moreover, the binding force between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate is strengthened by the cyanoacrylate adhesive. When the field emission current is large enough at high electric field, the carbon nanotubes cannot be pulled out of the substrate by electric field force. A large field emission current can be obtained from cyanoacrylate-carbon nanotube arrays at relatively low voltage just by decreasing the distance between the anode and the cathode.

  16. Investigation of Field Emitter Array Vacuum Microtriodes for Space Electronics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Mark A.; Kapoor, Vik J.

    1997-01-01

    Research into processing techniques for fabrication of vacuum microelectronic devices has been carried out, with special emphasis being given to the growth of silicon dioxide thin films. Oxide films ranging from 30 nm to approximately 2 micrometers have been grown on single crystal silicon wafers. Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor test structures have been made from some of these oxide films, and current-versus-voltage plots for these structures have been measured. It has been observed that the rate of applied voltage across the oxide films produces marked differences in measured leakage current. Breakdown fields across two of the thinnest oxide films have been measured and are comparable with highest values reported in literature. Several silicon wafers were processed to make field- emitter array diodes, and were delivered to collaborators at NASA-Lewis Research Center for final fabrication steps and testing.

  17. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  18. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18-20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  19. Neutralization of Space Charge Effects for Low Energy Ion Beams Using Field Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolaescu, D.; Sakai, S.; Matsuda, K.; Gotoh, Y.; Ishikawa, J.

    2008-11-03

    The paper presents models and computations for neutralization of space charge effects using electrons provided by field emitter arrays. Different ion species ({sup 11}B{sup +},{sup 31}P{sup +},{sup 75}As{sup +}) with energy in the range E{sub ion} = 200 eV-1 keV have been considered. The ion beam divergence is studied as a function of electron beam geometry and physical parameters (electron and ion energy, electron/ion current ratio I{sub el}/I{sub ion}). The electron beam geometry takes into account electron source positions and initial launching angles. It is shown that optimal ion beam neutralization occurs for low energy electrons emitted parallel to the ion beam.

  20. Self-oscillations in an electromechanical system with a field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshch, V. I.; Obraztsov, A. N.; Obraztsova, E. D.

    2009-11-01

    Electromechanical oscillations have been detected in a system consisting of a vacuum diode with a field cathode made of single-walled carbon nanotubes. As a dc voltage between such a cathode and an anode is applied, stable mechanical oscillations are observed along with oscillations of the self-sustained emission current. An empirical model of this phenomenon is proposed. It is described with a system of one-dimensional equations of mechanical motion and electrical processes in the system. An analysis of these equations is performed and a qualitative consistency of theoretical and experimental results is demonstrated. It is proved that the observed phenomenon is common for all systems with field nanoemitters. The suggested mechanism of the excitation of the self-sustained oscillations can be used to explain the experimentally observed features of such nanoemitters.

  1. Characterisation of carbon nanotube pastes for field emission using their sheet resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floweri, Octia; Kim, Jihan; Seo, Yongho; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Naesung

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) pastes for field emitters were fabricated by varying the milling speed, CNT amount and glass frit (GF) powder size. The CNTs remained agglomerated at lower milling speeds while they were damaged and shortened at higher speeds. Increasing the amount of CNTs improved the field emission properties, but excessive CNTs led to increased removal of the CNT paste with surface activation because of lower cohesion strength. Small GF particles were incorporated to provide a flat surface to the CNT paste, which improved its field emission uniformity and lifespan. The dispersion, density and milling damage characteristics of CNTs in the pastes were assessed by their sheet resistances under the assumption of equal printed thicknesses. Tape activation reduced the thickness of the CNT pastes by different amounts that depended on the cohesion strength of the paste. This reduction caused the sheet resistance to increase. For all cases in this study, the field emission properties of the CNT pastes were closely related to their sheet resistances, suggesting that sheet resistance could be used as a figure-of-merit for the evaluation of CNT pastes for field emission applications.

  2. An ordered Si nanowire with NiSi2 tip arrays as excellent field emitters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Yi; Li, Wun-Shan; Chu, Li-Wei; Lu, Ming-Yen; Tsai, Cho-Jen; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2011-02-01

    A method was developed to grow ordered silicon nanowire with NiSi(2) tip arrays by reacting nickel thin films on silica-coated ordered Si nanowire (NW) arrays. The coating of thin silica shell on Si NW arrays has the effect of limiting the diffusion of nickel during the silicidation process to achieve the single crystalline NiSi(2) NWs. In the meantime, it relieves the distortion of the NWs caused by the strain associated with formation of NiSi(2) to maintain the straightness of the nanowire and the ordering of the arrays. Other nickel silicide phases such as Ni(2)Si and NiSi were obtained if the silicidation processes were conducted on the ordered Si NWs without a thin silica shell. Excellent field emission properties were found for NiSi(2)/Si NW arrays with a turn on field of 0.82 V µm(-1) and a threshold field of 1.39 V µm(-1). The field enhancement factor was calculated to be about 2440. The stability test showed a fluctuation of about 7% with an applied field of 2.6 V µm(-1) for a period of 24 h. The excellent field emission characteristics are attributed to the well-aligned and highly ordered arrangement of the single crystalline NiSi(2)/Si heterostructure field emitters. In contrast to other growth methods, the present growth of ordered nickel silicide/Si NWs on silicon is compatible with silicon nanoelectronics device processes, and also provides a facile route to grow other well-aligned metal silicide NW arrays. The advantages will facilitate its applications as field emission devices. PMID:21178255

  3. Hysteresis modeling in ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yian; Moura, Mateus S; Costa, Ademir J; de Almeida, Luiz Alberto L; Paranjape, Makarand; Fontana, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models are adapted to describe the hysteresis effects seen in the electrical characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The ballistic transport model describes the contributions of conduction energy sub-bands over carbon nanotube field-effect transistor drain current as a function of drain-source and gate-source voltages as well as other physical parameters of the device. The limiting-loop proximity model, originally developed to understand magnetic hysteresis, is also utilized in this work. The curves obtained from our developed model corroborate well with the experimentally derived hysteretic behavior of the transistors. Modeling the hysteresis behavior will enable designers to reliably use these effects in both analog and memory applications. PMID:25187698

  4. Hysteresis modeling in ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yian; Moura, Mateus S; Costa, Ademir J; de Almeida, Luiz Alberto L; Paranjape, Makarand; Fontana, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models are adapted to describe the hysteresis effects seen in the electrical characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The ballistic transport model describes the contributions of conduction energy sub-bands over carbon nanotube field-effect transistor drain current as a function of drain-source and gate-source voltages as well as other physical parameters of the device. The limiting-loop proximity model, originally developed to understand magnetic hysteresis, is also utilized in this work. The curves obtained from our developed model corroborate well with the experimentally derived hysteretic behavior of the transistors. Modeling the hysteresis behavior will enable designers to reliably use these effects in both analog and memory applications. PMID:25187698

  5. Morphology dependent field emission of acid-spun carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, S. B.; Boeckl, J.; Back, T. C.; Ferguson, J. B.; Koerner, H.; Murray, P. T.; Maruyama, B.; Lange, M. A.; Cahay, M. M.; Behabtu, N.; Young, C. C.; Pasquali, M.; Lockwood, N. P.; Averett, K. L.; Gruen, G.; Tsentalovich, D. E.

    2015-03-01

    Acid spun carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers were investigated for their field emission properties and performance was determined to be dependent on fiber morphology. The fibers were fabricated by wet-spinning of pre-made CNTs. Fiber morphology was controlled by a fabrication method and processing conditions, as well as purity, size, and type of the CNT starting material. The internal fiber structure consisted of CNT fibrils held together by van der Waals forces. Alignment and packing density of the CNTs affects the fiber’s electrical and thermal conductivity. Fibers with similar diameters and differing morphology were compared, and those composed of the most densely packed and well aligned CNTs were the best field emitters as exhibited by a lower turn-on voltage and a larger field enhancement factor. Fibers with higher electrical and thermal conductivity demonstrated higher maximum current before failure and longer lifetimes. A stable emission current at 3 mA was obtained for 10 h at a field strength of <1 V μm-1. This stable high current operation makes these CNT fibers excellent candidates for use as low voltage electron sources for vacuum electronic devices.

  6. Morphology dependent field emission of acid-spun carbon nanotube fibers.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, S B; Boeckl, J; Back, T C; Ferguson, J B; Koerner, H; Murray, P T; Maruyama, B; Lange, M A; Cahay, M M; Behabtu, N; Young, C C; Pasquali, M; Lockwood, N P; Averett, K L; Gruen, G; Tsentalovich, D E

    2015-03-13

    Acid spun carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers were investigated for their field emission properties and performance was determined to be dependent on fiber morphology. The fibers were fabricated by wet-spinning of pre-made CNTs. Fiber morphology was controlled by a fabrication method and processing conditions, as well as purity, size, and type of the CNT starting material. The internal fiber structure consisted of CNT fibrils held together by van der Waals forces. Alignment and packing density of the CNTs affects the fiber's electrical and thermal conductivity. Fibers with similar diameters and differing morphology were compared, and those composed of the most densely packed and well aligned CNTs were the best field emitters as exhibited by a lower turn-on voltage and a larger field enhancement factor. Fibers with higher electrical and thermal conductivity demonstrated higher maximum current before failure and longer lifetimes. A stable emission current at 3 mA was obtained for 10 h at a field strength of <1 V μm(-1). This stable high current operation makes these CNT fibers excellent candidates for use as low voltage electron sources for vacuum electronic devices. PMID:25694166

  7. Experimental and theoretical study on field emission properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Zhou, Wei-Man; Liu, Wei-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Li

    2015-05-01

    Field emission properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated experimentally and theoretically. CNTs are in situ decorated with ZnO NPs during the growth process by chemical vapor deposition using a carbon source from the iron phthalocyanine pyrolysis. The experimental field emission test shows that the ZnO NP decoration significantly improves the emission current from 50 μA to 275 μA at 550 V and the reduced threshold voltage from 450 V to 350 V. The field emission mechanism of ZnO NPs on CNTs is theoretically studied by the density functional theory (DFT) combined with the Penn-Plummer method. The ZnO NPs reconstruct the ZnO-CNT structure and pull down the surface barrier of the entire emitter system to 0.49 eV so as to reduce the threshold electric field. The simulation results suggest that the presence of ZnO NPs would increase the LDOS near the Fermi level and increase the emission current. The calculation results are consistent with the experiment results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91123018, 61172040, and 61172041) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM7277).

  8. Near-Field Radiation Between Graphene-Covered Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Richard; Liu, Xianglei; Zhang, Zhuomin; Nanoscale Thermal Radiation Laboratory Team

    2015-03-01

    It has been shown that at nanometer gap distances, or the near-field, thermal radiation is enhanced over blackbody between hyperbolic metamaterials. It was shown that vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays in the near-field demonstrate exceptional enhancement. In this study, graphene is covered on the surfaces of two semi-infinite VACNT arrays separated by a sub-micron vacuum gap. Doped graphene (μ >= 0.3 eV) is found to improve photon tunneling in a broad hyperbolic frequency range, due to the interaction with graphene-graphene surface plasmons. Increasing doping that shifts the peak spectral heat flux toward higher frequencies attests to the tunable bandgap of graphene. Although graphene covering of VACNT does not offer many magnitudes of near-field heat flux enhancement over uncovered VACNT, this study identifies conditions (i.e. gap distance and doping) that best augments heat transfer to that of VACNT arrays. In addition, this study demonstrates the near-field Poynting vector to determine the energy absorption due to graphene. It is found that graphene, in low frequencies and high chemical potentials, attenuates large penetration depths of hyperbolic modes, thereby increasing the contribution of graphene-graphene surface plasmons. This study has an impact toward designing carbon-based emitters and thermal junctions.

  9. The effect of Ar neutral beam treatment of screen-printed carbon nanotubes for enhanced field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kyung, Se Jin; Park, Jae Beom; Park, Byung Jae; Min, Kyung Seok; Lee, June Hee; Yeom, Geun Young; Shin, Yong Sook; Park, Chong Yun

    2007-04-15

    This study examined the effectiveness of an Ar neutral beam as a surface treatment for improving the field emission properties of screen-printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A short period of the neutral beam treatment on tape-activated CNTs enhanced the emission properties of the CNTs, showing a decrease in the turn-on field and an increase in the number of emission sites. The neutral beam treatment appeared to render the CNT surfaces more actively by exposing more CNTs from the CNT paste without cutting or kinking the already exposed long CNT emitters. The treated CNTs emitted more electrons than the CNTs treated using other methods. When the field emission properties were measured after the neutral beam treatment, the turn-on field decreased from 1.65 to 0.60 V/{mu}m and the emission field at 1 mA/cm{sup 2} decreased from 3.10 to 2.41 V/{mu}m. After the neutral beam treatment for 10 s, there was an improvement in the stability of the emission current at a constant electric field. It is expected that the neutral beam treatment introduced in this study will provide an easy way of improving the emission intensity and stability of screen-printed CNT emitters.

  10. Simulation of the enhancement factor from an individual 3D hemisphere-on-post field emitter by using finite elements method.

    PubMed

    Roveri, D S; Sant'Anna, G M; Bertan, H H; Mologni, J F; Alves, M A R; Braga, E S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D computational framework for evaluating electrostatic properties of a single field emitter characterized by the hemisphere-on-post geometry. Numerical simulations employed the finite elements method by using Ansys-Maxwell software. Extensive parametric simulations were focused on the threshold distance from which the emitter field enhancement factor (γ) becomes independent from the anode-substrate gap (G). This investigation allowed demonstrating that the ratio between G and the emitter height (h) is a reliable reference for a broad range of emitter dimensions; furthermore, results permitted establishing G/h ≥ 2.2 as the threshold condition for setting the anode without affecting γ. PMID:26555324

  11. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices for Advanced Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich Justin

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for electron field emission (FE) cathodes in integrated FE devices. These nanostructured carbon materials possess exceptional properties and their synthesis can be thoroughly controlled. Their integration into advanced electronic devices, including not only FE cathodes, but sensors, energy storage devices, and circuit components, has seen rapid growth in recent years. The results of the studies presented here demonstrate that the CNT field emitter is an excellent candidate for next generation vacuum microelectronics and related electron emission devices in several advanced applications. The work presented in this study addresses determining factors that currently confine the performance and application of CNT-FE devices. Characterization studies and improvements to the FE properties of CNTs, along with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) design and fabrication, were utilized in achieving these goals. Important performance limiting parameters, including emitter lifetime and failure from poor substrate adhesion, are examined. The compatibility and integration of CNT emitters with the governing MEMS substrate (i.e., polycrystalline silicon), and its impact on these performance limiting parameters, are reported. CNT growth mechanisms and kinetics were investigated and compared to silicon (100) to improve the design of CNT emitter integrated MEMS based electronic devices, specifically in vacuum microelectronic device (VMD) applications. Improved growth allowed for design and development of novel cold-cathode FE devices utilizing CNT field emitters. A chemical ionization (CI) source based on a CNT-FE electron source was developed and evaluated in a commercial desktop mass spectrometer for explosives trace detection. This work demonstrated the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. The CNT-FE source demonstrated low power requirements, pulsing

  12. Electric fields can control the transport of water in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ritos, Konstantinos; Borg, Matthew K.; Mottram, Nigel J.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of water confined inside nanotubes are of considerable scientific and technological interest. We use molecular dynamics to investigate the structure and average orientation of water flowing within a carbon nanotube. We find that water exhibits biaxial paranematic liquid crystal ordering both within the nanotube and close to its ends. This preferred molecular ordering is enhanced when an axial electric field is applied, affecting the water flow rate through the nanotube. A spatially patterned electric field can minimize nanotube entrance effects and significantly increase the flow rate. PMID:26712640

  13. Remarkably improved field emission of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays by annealing atmosphere engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Ai-Zhen; Wang, Cheng-Wei Chen, Jian-Biao; Zhang, Xu-Qiang; Li, Yan; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • TNAs were prepared by anodization and annealed in different atmospheres. • The crystal structure and electronic properties of the prepared TNAs were investigated. • The field emission of TNAs was highly dependent on annealing atmosphere. • A low turn-on of 2.44 V/μm was obtained for TNAs annealed in H{sub 2} atmosphere. - Abstract: Highly ordered TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (TNAs) were prepared by anodization, and followed by annealing in the atmospheres of Air, Vacuum, Ar, and H{sub 2}. The effect of annealing atmosphere on the crystal structure, composition, and electronic properties of TNAs were systematically investigated. Raman and EDS results indicated that the TNAs annealed in anaerobic atmospheres contained more oxygen vacancies, which result in the substantially improved electron transport properties and reduced work function. Moreover, it was found that the FE properties of TNAs were highly dependent on the annealing atmosphere. By engineering the annealing atmosphere, the turn-on field as low as 2.44 V/μm can be obtained from TNAs annealed in H{sub 2}, which was much lower than the value of 18.23 V/μm from the TNAs annealed in the commonly used atmosphere of Air. Our work suggests an instructive and attractive way to fabricate high performance TNAs field emitters.

  14. Statistical model for field emitter activation on metallic surfaces used in high-gradient accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagotzky, S.; Müller, G.

    2016-01-01

    Both super- and normal-conducting high-gradient linear accelerators are limited by enhanced field emission (EFE) in the accelerating structures, e.g. due to power loss or ignition of discharges. We discuss the dependence of the number density of typical emitters, i.e. particulates and surface defects, on the electric field level at which they are activated for naturally oxidized metallic surfaces. This activation is explained by the transition of a metal-insulator interface into geometric features that enhance the EFE process. A statistical model is successfully compared to systematic studies of niobium and copper relevant for recent and future linear accelerators. Our results show that the achievable surface quality of Nb might be sufficient for the suppression of EFE in the superconducting accelerating structures for the actual European XFEL but not for the planned International Linear Collider. Moreover, some effort will be required to reduce EFE and thus the breakdown rate of the normal conducting Cu structures for the Compact Linear Collider.

  15. Breakdown voltage reliability improvement in gas-discharge tube surge protectors employing graphite field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žumer, Marko; Zajec, Bojan; Rozman, Robert; Nemanič, Vincenc

    2012-04-01

    Gas-discharge tube (GDT) surge protectors are known for many decades as passive units used in low-voltage telecom networks for protection of electrical components from transient over-voltages (discharging) such as lightning. Unreliability of the mean turn-on DC breakdown voltage and the run-to-run variability has been overcome successfully in the past by adding, for example, a radioactive source inside the tube. Radioisotopes provide a constant low level of free electrons, which trigger the breakdown. In the last decades, any concept using environmentally harmful compounds is not acceptable anymore and new solutions were searched. In our application, a cold field electron emitter source is used as the trigger for the gas discharge but with no activating compound on the two main electrodes. The patent literature describes in details the implementation of the so-called trigger wires (auxiliary electrodes) made of graphite, placed in between the two main electrodes, but no physical explanation has been given yet. We present experimental results, which show that stable cold field electron emission current in the high vacuum range originating from the nano-structured edge of the graphite layer is well correlated to the stable breakdown voltage of the GDT surge protector filled with a mixture of clean gases.

  16. Water-methanol separation with carbon nanotubes and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarto, Affa; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    Methanol is used in various applications, such as fuel for transportation vehicles, fuel cells, and in chemical industrial processes. Conventionally, separation of methanol from aqueous solution is by distillation. However, this method consumes a large amount of energy; hence development of a new method is needed. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effect of an electric field on water-methanol separation by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with diameters of 0.81 to 4.07 nm. Without an electric field, methanol molecules fill the CNTs in preference to water molecules. The preference of methanol to occupy the CNTs over water results in a separation effect. This separation effect is strong for small CNT diameters and significantly decreases with increasing diameter. In contrast, under an electric field, water molecules strongly prefer to occupy the CNTs over methanol molecules, resulting in a separation effect for water. More interestingly, the separation effect for water does not decrease with increasing CNT diameter. Formation of water structures in CNTs induced by an electric field has an important role in the separation of water from methanol.Methanol is used in various applications, such as fuel for transportation vehicles, fuel cells, and in chemical industrial processes. Conventionally, separation of methanol from aqueous solution is by distillation. However, this method consumes a large amount of energy; hence development of a new method is needed. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effect of an electric field on water-methanol separation by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with diameters of 0.81 to 4.07 nm. Without an electric field, methanol molecules fill the CNTs in preference to water molecules. The preference of methanol to occupy the CNTs over water results in a separation effect. This separation effect is strong for small CNT diameters and significantly decreases with increasing

  17. Application of the general thermal field model to simulate the behaviour of nanoscale Cu field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Eimre, Kristjan; Aabloo, Alvo; Parviainen, Stefan Djurabekova, Flyura; Zadin, Vahur

    2015-07-21

    Strong field electron emission from a nanoscale tip can cause a temperature rise at the tip apex due to Joule heating. This becomes particularly important when the current value grows rapidly, as in the pre-breakdown (the electrostatic discharge) condition, which may occur near metal surfaces operating under high electric fields. The high temperatures introduce uncertainties in calculations of the current values when using the Fowler–Nordheim equation, since the thermionic component in such conditions cannot be neglected. In this paper, we analyze the field electron emission currents as the function of the applied electric field, given by both the conventional Fowler–Nordheim field emission and the recently developed generalized thermal field emission formalisms. We also compare the results in two limits: discrete (atomistic simulations) and continuum (finite element calculations). The discrepancies of both implementations and their effect on final results are discussed. In both approaches, the electric field, electron emission currents, and Joule heating processes are simulated concurrently and self-consistently. We show that the conventional Fowler–Nordheim equation results in significant underestimation of electron emission currents. We also show that Fowler–Nordheim plots used to estimate the field enhancement factor may lead to significant overestimation of this parameter especially in the range of relatively low electric fields.

  18. A multi-wavelength study of z = 3.15 Lyman-α emitters in the GOODS South Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, K. K.; Møller, P.; Möller, O.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Michałowski, M. J.; Watson, D.; Ledoux, C.; Rosati, P.; Pedersen, K.; Grove, L. F.

    2007-08-01

    Context: Lyα-emitters have proven to be excellent probes of faint, star-forming galaxies in the high redshift universe. However, although the sample of known emitters is increasingly growing, their nature (e.g. stellar masses, ages, metallicities, star-formation rates) is still poorly constrained. Aims: We aim to study the nature of Lyα-emitters, to find the properties of a typical Lyα-emitting galaxy and to compare these properties with the properties of other galaxies at similar redshift, in particular Lyman-break galaxies. Methods: We have performed narrow-band imaging at the VLT, focused on Lyα at redshift z ≈ 3.15, in the GOODS-S field. We have identified a sample of Lyα-emitting candidates, and we have studied their Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). Results: We find that the emitters are best fit by an SED with low metallicity (Z/Z⊙ = 0.005), low dust extinction (AV ≈ 0.26) and medium stellar masses of approximately 109 M⊙. The age is not very well constrained. One object out of 24 appears to be a high redshift Lyα-emitting dusty starburst galaxy. We find filamentary structure as traced by the Lyα-emitters at the 4σ level. The rest-frame UV SED of these galaxies is very similar to that of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) and comply with the selection criteria for U-band drop-outs, except they are intrinsically fainter than the current limit for LBGs. Conclusions: Lyα-emitters are excellent probes of galaxies in the distant universe, and represent a class of star-forming, dust and AGN free, medium mass objects. Based on observations carried out at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) under prog. ID No. 70.A-0447, 274.A-5029 and LP168.A-0485.

  19. Effect of the morphology of CNT arrays on the current density of field-emitter matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Galperin, V. A. Zhukov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. A.; Skorik, S. N.; Shaman, Yu. P.; Shamanaev, A. A.

    2014-12-15

    Structured carbon-nanotube arrays synthesized in topological regions formed by electron-beam lithography are studied. The effect of the morphology and topology of the carbon-nanotube arrays on the emission characteristics of the structures being formed are considered.

  20. Directed Assembly of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Erika; Palma, Matteo; Chenet, Daniel A; Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming; Hone, James C; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-02-23

    The outstanding electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have made them prime candidates for future nanoelectronics technologies. One of the main obstacles to the implementation of advanced SWCNT electronics to date is the inability to arrange them in a manner suitable for complex circuits. Directed assembly of SWCNT segments onto lithographically patterned and chemically functionalized substrates is a promising way to organize SWCNTs in topologies that are amenable to integration for advanced applications, but the placement and orientational control required have not yet been demonstrated. We have developed a technique for assembling length sorted and chirality monodisperse DNA-wrapped SWCNT segments on hydrophilic lines patterned on a passivated oxidized silicon substrate. Placement of individual SWCNT segments at predetermined locations was achieved with nanometer accuracy. Three terminal electronic devices, consisting of a single SWCNT segment placed either beneath or on top of metallic source/drain electrodes were fabricated. Devices made with semiconducting nanotubes behaved as typical p-type field effect transistors (FETs), whereas devices made with metallic nanotubes had a finite resistance with little or no gate modulation. This scalable, high resolution approach represents an important step forward toward the potential implementation of complex SWCNT devices and circuits. PMID:26807948

  1. Strong-Field Emission From High Aspect Ratio Si Emitter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keathley, Phillip; Swanwick, Michael; Sell, Alexander; Putnam, William; Guerrera, Stephen; Velásquez-García, Luis; Kärtner, Franz

    2013-03-01

    We discuss photoelectron emission from an arrays of high aspect ratio, sharp Si emitters both experimentally and theoretically. The structures are prepared from highly doped single-crystal silicon having a pencil-like shape with end radii of curvature of around 10 nm. The tips were illuminated at a grazing incidence of roughly 84deg.with a laser pulse having a center wavelength of 800 nm, and a pulse duration of 35 fs from a regenerative amplifier system. Native oxide coated Si tips were characterized using a time of flight (TOF) electron energy spectrometer. An annealing process was observed, resulting in a red shift of the energy spectra along with an increased electron yield. Total current yield from samples having the oxide stripped were also studied. Apeak total emission of 0.68 pC/bunch, corresponding to around 1.5x103 electrons/tip/pulse was observed at a DC bias of 70 V. Both spectral and current characterization results are consistent with a stong-field photoemission process at the surface of the tip apex. This work was funded by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)/Microsystems Technology Office and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR) under contract N66001-11-1-4192.

  2. Planar ultrananocrystalline diamond field emitter in accelerator radio frequency electron injector: Performance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Sergey V. Antipov, Sergey; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shao, Jiahang; Liu, Wanming; Gai, Wei; Pérez Quintero, Kenneth J.; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Kanareykin, Alexei D.

    2014-11-17

    A case performance study of a planar field emission cathode (FEC) based on nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond, (N)UNCD, was carried out in an RF 1.3 GHz electron gun. The FEC was a 100 nm (N)UNCD film grown on a 20 mm diameter stainless steel disk with a Mo buffer layer. At surface gradients 45–65 MV/m, peak currents of 1–80 mA (equivalent to 0.3–25 mA/cm{sup 2}) were achieved. Imaging with two YAG screens confirmed emission from the (N)UNCD surface with (1) the beam emittance of 1.5 mm × mrad/mm-rms and (2) longitudinal FWHM and rms widths of non-Gaussian energy spread of 0.7% and 11% at an electron energy of 2 MeV. Current stability was tested over the course of 36 × 10{sup 3} RF pulses (equivalent to 288 × 10{sup 6 }GHz oscillations)

  3. Protein deposition on field-emitter tips and its removal by UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, J. A.; Giaever, I.

    1980-07-01

    Protein deposition on field-emitter tips has been examined using Transmission Electron Microscopy to view the protein coated tip profile. A single layer of adsorbed protein is barely if at all detectable, but double and triple layers produced by the immunologic reaction can be directly observed. As a result, the thickness and morphology of antigen-antibody layers has been directly observed for the first time. Tips exposed first to Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and then to anti-BSA rabbit serum are covered with a reasonably uniform, double protein layer ≈130 Å thick. This layer can be built-up to a triple layer ≈275 Å thick by additional exposure to anti-rabbit IgG goat serum. Surface tension forces during the drying process which follows protein deposition appear to affect the thickness and morphology of the protein layers. The oxidation and subsequent change in the morphology of a protein layer exposed to ultraviolet radiation has also been observed using TEM. The destruction of a triple protein layer at a rate of ≈0.5 Å/s is observed for tungsten tips exposed to ≈6 W of UV radiation from a high-pressure mercury arc in laboratory ambient. These results are compared to those obtained from a simple, visual test for protein layer adsorption in which submonolayer coverages of protein can be detected with the unaided eye.

  4. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-06-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm2) is in the range of 2.04% - 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10952 cd/cm2 and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%.

  5. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters.

    PubMed

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-01-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm(2)) is in the range of 2.04% - 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10,952 cd/cm(2) and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%. PMID:26042359

  6. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-01-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm2) is in the range of 2.04% – 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10952 cd/cm2 and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%. PMID:26042359

  7. Ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction with laser-driven field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropers, Claus

    2015-03-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in solids and nanostructures can be investigated by an increasing number of sophisticated electron and x-ray diffraction techniques. Electrons are particularly suited for this purpose, exhibiting high scattering cross-sections and allowing for beam control by versatile electrostatic or magnetic lens systems. The capabilities of time-resolved electron imaging techniques critically depend on the employed source of laser-driven ultrashort electron pulses. Nanoscopic sources offer exceptional possibilities for the generation of electron probe pulses with very short durations and high spatial beam coherence. In this talk, I will discuss recent progress in the development of ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction based on nanoscopic photocathodes. In particular, we implemented ultrafast low-energy electron diffraction (ULEED) and ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM) driven by nonlinear photoemission from field emission tips. ULEED enables the study of structural changes with high temporal resolution and ultimate surface sensitivity, at sub-keV electron energies. As a first application of this technique, we studied the structural phase transition in a stripe-like polymer superstructure on freestanding monolayer graphene. An advanced UTEM instrument was realized by custom modifications of a standard transmission electron microscope, leading to electron focal spot sizes in the microscope's sample plane of about 10 nm and electron pulse durations of less than 700 fs. Utilizing these features, we investigate the quantum-coherent interaction between the ultrashort electron pulse and the optical near-field of an illuminated nanostructure. Finally, further applications and prospects of ultrafast electron imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy using nanoscale field emitters will be discussed.

  8. Nanofabrication of arrays of silicon field emitters with vertical silicon nanowire current limiters and self-aligned gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrera, S. A.; Akinwande, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We developed a fabrication process for embedding a dense array (108 cm‑2) of high-aspect-ratio silicon nanowires (200 nm diameter and 10 μm tall) in a dielectric matrix and then structured/exposed the tips of the nanowires to form self-aligned gate field emitter arrays using chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Using this structure, we demonstrated a high current density (100 A cm‑2), uniform, and long lifetime (>100 h) silicon field emitter array architecture in which the current emitted by each tip is regulated by the silicon nanowire current limiter connected in series with the tip. Using the current voltage characteristics and with the aid of numerical device models, we estimated the tip radius of our field emission arrays to be ≈4.8 nm, as consistent with the tip radius measured using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  9. Nanofabrication of arrays of silicon field emitters with vertical silicon nanowire current limiters and self-aligned gates.

    PubMed

    Guerrera, S A; Akinwande, A I

    2016-07-22

    We developed a fabrication process for embedding a dense array (10(8) cm(-2)) of high-aspect-ratio silicon nanowires (200 nm diameter and 10 μm tall) in a dielectric matrix and then structured/exposed the tips of the nanowires to form self-aligned gate field emitter arrays using chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Using this structure, we demonstrated a high current density (100 A cm(-2)), uniform, and long lifetime (>100 h) silicon field emitter array architecture in which the current emitted by each tip is regulated by the silicon nanowire current limiter connected in series with the tip. Using the current voltage characteristics and with the aid of numerical device models, we estimated the tip radius of our field emission arrays to be ≈4.8 nm, as consistent with the tip radius measured using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). PMID:27292120

  10. Field Emission Lamps Prepared with Dip-Coated and Nickel Electroless Plated Carbon Nanotube Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Pu, N W; Youh, M J; Chung, K J; Liu, Y M; Ger, M D

    2015-07-01

    Fabrication and efficiency enhancement of tubal field emission lamps (FELs) using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as the cathode field emitters were studied. The cathode filaments were prepared by eletrolessly plating a nickel (Ni) film on the cathode made of a 304 stainless steel wire dip-coated with MWNTs. The 304 wire was dip-coated with MWNTs and nano-sized Pd catalyst in a solution, and then eletrolessly plated with Ni to form an MWNT-embedded composite film. The MWNTs embedded in Ni not only had better adhesion but also exhibited a higher FE threshold voltage, which is beneficial to our FEL system and can increase the luminous efficiency of the anode phosphor. Our results show that the FE cathode prepared by dipping three times in a solution containing 400 ppm Pd nano-catalysts and 0.2 wt.% MWNTs and then eletrolessly plating a Ni film at a deposition temperature of 60 °C, pH value of 5, and deposition time of 7 min has the best FE uniformity and efficiency. Its emission current can stay as low as 2.5 mA at a high applied voltage of 7 kV, which conforms to the high-voltage-and-low-current requirement of the P22 phosphor and can therefore maximize the luminous efficiency of our FEL. We found that the MWNT cathodes prepared by this approach are suitable for making high-efficiency FELs. PMID:26373085

  11. A study of junction effect transistors and their roles in carbon nanotube field emission cathodes in compact pulsed power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Qiong

    This thesis is focusing on a study of junction effect transistors (JFETs) in compact pulsed power applications. Pulsed power usually requires switches with high hold-off voltage, high current, low forward voltage drop, and fast switching speed. 4H-SiC, with a bandgap of 3.26 eV (The bandgap of Si is 1.12eV) and other physical and electrical superior properties, has gained much attention in high power, high temperature and high frequency applications. One topic of this thesis is to evaluate if 4H-SiC JFETs have a potential to replace gas phase switches to make pulsed power system compact and portable. Some other pulsed power applications require cathodes of providing stable, uniform, high electron-beam current. So the other topic of this research is to evaluate if Si JFET-controlled carbon nanotube field emitter cold cathode will provide the necessary e-beam source. In the topic of "4H-SiC JFETs", it focuses on the design and simulation of a novel 4H-SiC normally-off VJFET with high breakdown voltage using the 2-D simulator ATLAS. To ensure realistic simulations, we utilized reasonable physical models and the established parameters as the input into these models. The influence of key design parameters were investigated which would extend pulsed power limitations. After optimizing the key design parameters, with a 50-mum drift region, the predicted breakdown voltage for the VJFET is above 8kV at a leakage current of 1x10-5A/cm2 . The specific on-state resistance is 35 mO·cm 2 at VGS = 2.7 V, and the switching speed is several ns. The simulation results suggest that the 4H-SiC VJFET is a potential candidate for improving switching performance in repetitive pulsed power applications. To evaluate the 4H-SiC VJFETs in pulsed power circuits, we extracted some circuit model parameters from the simulated I-V curves. Those parameters are necessary for circuit simulation program such as SPICE. This method could be used as a test bench without fabricating the devices to

  12. Field emission from carbon nanotubes produced using microwave plasma assisted CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Yoon, S.F.; Ahn, J.; Gan, B.; Rusli; Yu, M.B.; Cheah, L.K.; Shi, X.

    2000-01-30

    Electron field emission from carbon nanotubes prepared using microwave plasma assisted CVD has been investigated. The nanotubes, ranging from 50 to 120 nm in diameter and a few tens of microns in length, were formed under methane and hydrogen plasma at 720 C with the aid of iron-oxide particles. The morphology and growth direction of the nanotubes are found to be strongly influenced by the flow ratio of methane to hydrogen. However, the electron field emission from these massive nanotubes show similar characteristics, i.e., high emission current at low electric fields.

  13. Lipid nanotube formation using space-regulated electric field above interdigitated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongmei; Fu, Dingguo; Wang, Lei; Han, Xiaojun

    2014-04-22

    Lipid nanotubes have great potential in biology and nanotechnology. Here we demonstrate a method to form lipid nanotubes using space-regulated AC electric fields above coplanar interdigitated electrodes. The AC electric field distribution can be regulated by solution height above the electrodes. The ratio of field component in x axis (Ex) to field component in z axis (Ez) increases dramatically at solution height below 50 μm; therefore, at lower solution height, the force from Ex predominantly drives lipids to form lipid nanotubes along with the electric field direction. The forces exerted on the lipid nanotube during its formation were analyzed in detail, and an equation was obtained to describe the relationship among nanotube length and field frequency, amplitude, and time. We believe that the presented approach opens a way to design and prepare nanoscale materials with unique structural and functional properties using space-regulated electric fields. PMID:24669822

  14. Effect of a concave grid mesh in a carbon nanotube-based field emission X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Lee, Choong Hun

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Successful design using a concave grid mesh for the focusing electron. • Much better X-ray image due to the concave grid mesh. • Higher anode current efficiency using the concave grid mesh versus a flat grid mesh. - Abstract: This study introduces a simple approach to improve the X-ray image quality produced by the carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter X-ray source by altering the geometrical shape of the grid mesh from the conventional flat shape to a concave one in a typical triode structure. The concave shape of the grid electrode increases the effective number of the grid cells in the mesh, which exerted an electric field in the direction of the emitted electrons, thereby increasing the emission current reaching the anode. Furthermore, the curved mesh (concave grid mesh), which was responsible for the extraction of electrons from the field emitter, exhibited a focusing effect on the electron beam trajectory thereby, reducing the focal spot size impinging on the anode and resulted in a better spatial resolution of the X-ray images produced.

  15. A Two-Dimensional Extremely Short Optical Pulse in a System of Carbon Nanotubes in a Direct Current Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belonenko, M. B.; Galkina, E. N.; Filimonova, Z. A.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of an external dc electric field on the two-dimensional extremely short optical pulse propagating in a zigzag carbon nanotube array was investigated. The electromagnetic field evolution in the investigated nanotube system is described by the Maxwell equations. Using numerical simulation, the interaction between the pulse electromagnetic field and the external electric field applied to the carbon nanotube array is analyzed.

  16. Enhanced shot noise in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, A.; Fiori, G.; Iannaccone, G.

    2009-12-21

    We predict shot noise enhancement in defect-free carbon nanotube field-effect transistors through a numerical investigation based on the self-consistent solution of the Poisson and Schroedinger equations within the nonequilibrium Green's functions formalism, and on a Monte Carlo approach to reproduce injection statistics. Noise enhancement is due to the correlation between trapping of holes from the drain into quasibound states in the channel and thermionic injection of electrons from the source, and can lead to an appreciable Fano factor of 1.22 at room temperature.

  17. Single walled carbon nanotube-borosilicate glass composite as broadband near infrared emitter for multifunctional photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arnab; Ghosh, Sujan; Das, Sukhen; Das, Probal K.; Banerjee, Rajat

    2013-05-01

    Near infrared fluorescence was observed from single walled carbon nanotube-borosilicate glass composite around 0.84-2.03 μm with 325 nm laser excitation. Band gap fluorescence of SWCNT bundles along with defect related fluorescence from SiO2 structure were the source of the NIR emissions of the composite. The emission spectra was 1185 nm wide that contains three main transmission windows for fiber optic telecommunications. The results strongly indicate high potentiality of this material in broadband fiber optic telecommunications and fabrication of NIR tunable lasers.

  18. Structures of water molecules in carbon nanotubes under electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Winarto,; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-03-28

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising for water transport through membranes and for use as nano-pumps. The development of CNT-based nanofluidic devices, however, requires a better understanding of the properties of water molecules in CNTs because they can be very different from those in the bulk. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the structure of water molecules in CNTs having diameters ranging from (7,7) to (10,10). The water dipole moments were aligned parallel to the electric field, which increases the density of water inside the CNTs and forms ordered ice-like structures. The electric field induces the transition from liquid to ice nanotubes in a wide range of CNT diameters. Moreover, we found an increase in the lifetime of hydrogen bonds for water structures in the CNTs. Fast librational motion breaks some hydrogen bonds, but the molecular pairs do not separate and the hydrogen bonds reform. Thus, hydrogen bonds maintain the water structure in the CNTs, and the water molecules move collectively, decreasing the axial diffusion coefficient and permeation rate.

  19. Structures of water molecules in carbon nanotubes under electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarto, Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising for water transport through membranes and for use as nano-pumps. The development of CNT-based nanofluidic devices, however, requires a better understanding of the properties of water molecules in CNTs because they can be very different from those in the bulk. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the structure of water molecules in CNTs having diameters ranging from (7,7) to (10,10). The water dipole moments were aligned parallel to the electric field, which increases the density of water inside the CNTs and forms ordered ice-like structures. The electric field induces the transition from liquid to ice nanotubes in a wide range of CNT diameters. Moreover, we found an increase in the lifetime of hydrogen bonds for water structures in the CNTs. Fast librational motion breaks some hydrogen bonds, but the molecular pairs do not separate and the hydrogen bonds reform. Thus, hydrogen bonds maintain the water structure in the CNTs, and the water molecules move collectively, decreasing the axial diffusion coefficient and permeation rate.

  20. Limit of validity of the thermionic-field-emission treatment of electron injection across emitter-base junctions in abrupt heterojunction bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, T.; Cahay, M.; Shi, S.; Roenker, K.; Stanchina, W. E.

    1995-06-01

    A hybrid model is developed to simulate electron transport through the emitter-base heterojunction and the base region of abrupt heterojunction bipolar transistors. The energy distribution of the injected electron flux through the emitter-base junction is calculated using a rigorous quantum-mechanical treatment of electron tunneling and thermionic emission across the spike at the emitter-base junction. The results are compared with those predicted by the conventional thermionic-field-emission model. For both models, the electron fluxes injected across the emitter-base junction are used as initial energy distributions in a regional Monte Carlo calculation to model electron transport through the base. The average base transit times are calculated using the impulse response technique as a function of the emitter-base voltage. The differences between the thermionic-field-emission model and the rigorous quantum-mechanical approaches to model electron transport through abrupt heterojunction bipolar transistors are pointed out.

  1. Fabrication, characterization and integration of carbon nanotube cathodes for field emission X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon-Colon, Xiomara

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters are now being evaluated for a wide range of vacuum electronic applications. Our laboratory pioneer in the development of CNT based field emission X-ray source technology, which has the potential to fundamentally change how X-ray radiation is generated and utilized. Applications of the CNT field emission X-ray source technology in a wide range of applications including biomedical imaging, radiation therapy, and homeland security are being actively pursued. However, problems with the performance of the CNT cathodes for X-ray generation including short lifetime at high current density, instability under high voltage, poor emission uniformity, and cathode-to-cathode inconsistency are still major obstacles for device applications. The goal of this thesis work is the development and optimization of an electrophoretic process to fabricate composite CNT films with controlled nanotube orientation and surface density, and enhanced adhesion. The CNT cathode fabrication process consist in a combination of photolithography and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method where parameters such as SU-8 photoresist thickness, deposition time, and deposition voltage were varied to fabricate CNT cathodes with the required properties for X-ray generation. Also the development of CNT alcohol-based suspensions in context of the EPD method requirements with excellent long term stability has been accomplished. The CNT cathodes fabricated by EPD have significantly enhanced macroscopic field emission current density and long-term stability under high operating voltages. Also these CNT cathodes compared to others reported previously show significant improved field emission properties with small cathode-to-cathode variation. The integration, characterization, and evaluation of these CNT cathodes into a micro focus field emission X-ray source has been achieved with excellent X-ray source characteristics and performance including X-ray flux and stability at the

  2. Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Fibers and Sheets for a High Current Electron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Larry

    Field emission (FE) properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers from Rice University and the University of Cambridge have been studied for use within a high current electron source for a directed energy weapon. Upon reviewing the performance of these two prevalent CNT fibers, cathodes were designed with CNT fibers from the University of Cincinnati Nanoworld Laboratory. Cathodes composed of a single CNT fiber, an array of three CNT fibers, and a nonwoven CNT sheet were investigated for FE properties; the goal was to design a cathode with emission current in excess of 10 mA. Once the design phase was complete, the cathode samples were fabricated, characterized, and then analyzed to determine FE properties. Electrical conductivity of the CNT fibers was characterized with a 4-probe technique. FE characteristics were measured in an ultra-high vacuum chamber at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The arrayed CNT fiber and the enhanced nonwoven CNT sheet emitter design demonstrated the most promising FE properties. Future work will include further analysis and cathode design using this nonwoven CNT sheet material to increase peak current performance during electron emission.

  3. Planar-defect-rich zinc oxide nanoparticles assembled on carbon nanotube films as ultraviolet emitters and photocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunqing; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Ru; Li, Qingwen

    2014-01-01

    Structural defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are complex and hard to be controlled during the synthesis, however, diversifying the chemical and physical performances. Here we report a rapid and low-temperature deposition method to fabricate planar-defect-rich ZnO nanoparticles on freestanding and aligned carbon nanotube films, different from common treatments which remove structural defects as many as possible. The defect energy states are very close to the valence band of ZnO and serve as recombination centers for a nearly monochromatic ultraviolet luminescence within a wavelength range of 373–376 nm. The absence of point defects, especially of oxygen vacancies whose energy level is <1 eV below the conduction band, allows photoinduced electrons and holes to take parts in possible photocatalytic reactions rather than to recombine at the shallow energy levels of planar defects. PMID:24740315

  4. Planar-defect-rich zinc oxide nanoparticles assembled on carbon nanotube films as ultraviolet emitters and photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yunqing; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Ru; Li, Qingwen

    2014-01-01

    Structural defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are complex and hard to be controlled during the synthesis, however, diversifying the chemical and physical performances. Here we report a rapid and low-temperature deposition method to fabricate planar-defect-rich ZnO nanoparticles on freestanding and aligned carbon nanotube films, different from common treatments which remove structural defects as many as possible. The defect energy states are very close to the valence band of ZnO and serve as recombination centers for a nearly monochromatic ultraviolet luminescence within a wavelength range of 373-376 nm. The absence of point defects, especially of oxygen vacancies whose energy level is <1 eV below the conduction band, allows photoinduced electrons and holes to take parts in possible photocatalytic reactions rather than to recombine at the shallow energy levels of planar defects. PMID:24740315

  5. Hydrogen sensing characteristics from carbon nanotube field emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Changkun; Luo, Haijun; Cai, Jianqiu; Wang, Fuquan; Zhao, Yangyang; Li, Detian

    2016-03-01

    An innovative hydrogen sensing concept is demonstrated based on the field emission from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, where the low emission currents rise in proportion to hydrogen partial pressures above 10-9 Torr. Experimental and first principles studies reveal that the sensing mechanism is attributed to the effective work function reduction from dissociative hydrogen chemisorption. The embedded Ni catalyst would assist both the hydrogen dissociation and work function reduction. This technique is promising to build miniature low cost hydrogen sensors for multiple applications. This work is valuable for studies of nanocarbon-gas reaction mechanisms and the work function properties in adsorption related applications, including field emission, hydrogen storage, energy cells, and gas sensing.

  6. Hydrogen sensing characteristics from carbon nanotube field emissions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Changkun; Luo, Haijun; Cai, Jianqiu; Wang, Fuquan; Zhao, Yangyang; Li, Detian

    2016-03-14

    An innovative hydrogen sensing concept is demonstrated based on the field emission from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, where the low emission currents rise in proportion to hydrogen partial pressures above 10(-9) Torr. Experimental and first principles studies reveal that the sensing mechanism is attributed to the effective work function reduction from dissociative hydrogen chemisorption. The embedded Ni catalyst would assist both the hydrogen dissociation and work function reduction. This technique is promising to build miniature low cost hydrogen sensors for multiple applications. This work is valuable for studies of nanocarbon-gas reaction mechanisms and the work function properties in adsorption related applications, including field emission, hydrogen storage, energy cells, and gas sensing. PMID:26890686

  7. SEARCHING FOR z {approx} 7.7 Ly{alpha} EMITTERS IN THE COSMOS FIELD WITH NEWFIRM

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Hannah B.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Tilvi, Vithal; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Hibon, Pascale; Swaters, Rob

    2012-02-01

    The study of Ly{alpha} emission in the high-redshift universe is a useful probe of the epoch of reionization, as the Ly{alpha} line should be attenuated by the intergalactic medium (IGM) at low to moderate neutral hydrogen fractions. Here we present the results of a deep and wide imaging search for Ly{alpha} emitters in the Cosmological Evolution Survey field. We have used two ultra-narrowband filters (filter width of {approx}8-9 A) on the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Mosaic camera, installed on the Mayall 4 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, in order to isolate Ly{alpha} emitters at z = 7.7; such ultra-narrowband imaging searches have proved to be excellent at detecting Ly{alpha} emitters. We found 5{sigma} detections of four candidate Ly{alpha} emitters in a survey volume of 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} Mpc{sup 3} (total survey area {approx}760 arcmin{sup 2}). Each candidate has a line flux greater than 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. Using these results to construct a luminosity function and comparing to previously established Ly{alpha} luminosity functions at z = 5.7 and z = 6.5, we find no conclusive evidence for evolution of the luminosity function between z = 5.7 and z = 7.7. Statistical Monte Carlo simulations suggest that half of these candidates are real z = 7.7 targets, and spectroscopic follow-up will be required to verify the redshift of these candidates. However, our results are consistent with no strong evolution in the neutral hydrogen fraction of the IGM between z = 5.7 and z = 7.7, even if only one or two of the z = 7.7 candidates are spectroscopically confirmed.

  8. Pumping of water through carbon nanotubes by rotating electric field and rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Peng; Kong, Gao-Pan; Zhang, Xing; He, Guo-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate pumping of water through a carbon nanotube by applying the combination of a rotating electric field and a rotating magnetic field. The driving force is a Lorentz force generated from the motion of charges in the magnetic field, and the motion is caused by the rotation of the electric field. We find that there exits a linear relationship between the average pumping velocity v and magnetic field strength B, which can be used to control the flux of the continuous unidirectional water flow. This approach is expected to be used in liquid circulation without a pressure gradient.

  9. Transparent conducting oxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alivov, Yahya; Singh, Vivek; Ding, Yuchen; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-09-01

    Thin film or porous membranes made of hollow, transparent, conducting oxide (TCO) nanotubes, with high chemical stability, functionalized surfaces and large surface areas, can provide an excellent platform for a wide variety of nanostructured photovoltaic, photodetector, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic devices. While large-bandgap oxide semiconductors offer transparency for incident light (below their nominal bandgap), their low carrier concentration and poor conductivity makes them unsuitable for charge conduction. Moreover, materials with high conductivity have nominally low bandgaps and hence poor light transmittance. Here, we demonstrate thin films and membranes made from TiO2 nanotubes heavily-doped with shallow Niobium (Nb) donors (up to 10%, without phase segregation), using a modified electrochemical anodization process, to fabricate transparent conducting hollow nanotubes. Temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics revealed that TiO2 TCO nanotubes, doped with 10% Nb, show metal-like behavior with resistivity decreasing from 6.5 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 300 K (compared to 6.5 × 10-1 Ωcm for nominally undoped nanotubes) to 2.2 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 20 K. Optical properties, studied by reflectance measurements, showed light transmittance up to 90%, within wavelength range 400 nm-1000 nm. Nb doping also improves the field emission properties of TCO nanotubes demonstrating an order of magnitude increase in field-emitter current, compared to undoped samples.

  10. Transparent conducting oxide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alivov, Yahya; Singh, Vivek; Ding, Yuchen; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-09-26

    Thin film or porous membranes made of hollow, transparent, conducting oxide (TCO) nanotubes, with high chemical stability, functionalized surfaces and large surface areas, can provide an excellent platform for a wide variety of nanostructured photovoltaic, photodetector, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic devices. While large-bandgap oxide semiconductors offer transparency for incident light (below their nominal bandgap), their low carrier concentration and poor conductivity makes them unsuitable for charge conduction. Moreover, materials with high conductivity have nominally low bandgaps and hence poor light transmittance. Here, we demonstrate thin films and membranes made from TiO2 nanotubes heavily-doped with shallow Niobium (Nb) donors (up to 10%, without phase segregation), using a modified electrochemical anodization process, to fabricate transparent conducting hollow nanotubes. Temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics revealed that TiO2 TCO nanotubes, doped with 10% Nb, show metal-like behavior with resistivity decreasing from 6.5 × 10(-4) Ωcm at T = 300 K (compared to 6.5 × 10(-1) Ωcm for nominally undoped nanotubes) to 2.2 × 10(-4) Ωcm at T = 20 K. Optical properties, studied by reflectance measurements, showed light transmittance up to 90%, within wavelength range 400 nm-1000 nm. Nb doping also improves the field emission properties of TCO nanotubes demonstrating an order of magnitude increase in field-emitter current, compared to undoped samples. PMID:25180635

  11. Nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond based field emitter array for a flat-panel x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, Chrystian M.; Grant, Edwin J.; Divan, Ralu; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Stan, Liliana; Lee, Hyoung K.; Castaño, Carlos H.

    2014-04-01

    A field emission based flat-panel transmission x-ray source is being developed as an alternative for medical and industrial imaging. A field emitter array (FEA) prototype based on nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond film has been fabricated to be used as the electron source of this flat panel x-ray source. The FEA prototype was developed using conventional microfabrication techniques. The field emission characteristics of the FEA prototype were evaluated. Results indicated that emission current densities of the order of 6 mA/cm2 could be obtained at electric fields as low as 10 V/μm to 20 V/μm. During the prototype microfabrication process, issues such as delamination of the extraction gate and poor etching of the SiO2 insulating layer located between the emitters and the extraction layer were encountered. Consequently, alternative FEA designs were investigated. Experimental and simulation data from the first FEA prototype were compared and the results were used to evaluate the performance of alternative single and double gate designs that would yield better field emission characteristics compared to the first FEA prototype. The best simulation results are obtained for the double gate FEA design, when the diameter of the collimator gate is around 2.6 times the diameter of the extraction gate.

  12. Analysis of long-channel nanotube field-effect-transistors (NT FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an analysis of long-channel nanotube (NT) field effect transistors (FET) from NASA's Ames Research Center. The structure of such a transistor including the electrode contact, 1D junction, and the planar junction is outlined. Also mentioned are various characteristics of a nanotube tip-equipped scanning tunnel microscope (STM).

  13. Electrostatic waves in carbon nanotubes with an axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdikian, Alireza; Bagheri, Mehran

    2013-10-01

    Based on a linearized hydrodynamic model and within the quasi-static approximation, the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating through single-walled carbon nanotubes subject to an axial magnetic field is theoretically explored. In the classical limit, we obtain two main possible waves which in turn are divided into two branches, a low-frequency acoustical and a high-frequency optical plasmon branch. In the quantum case, we have found that the dispersion relation is substantially modified when the electron wavelength becomes large enough compared to the propagation wavelength of the electrostatic waves in the quantum plasma. We also show that the axial magnetic field manifest itself on the perturbed electron density through the quantum term and gives rise to the propagation of the electrostatic waves within the quantum plasma. As a result, the effect of the magnetic field is pronounced in the plasma dispersion relations in such a way that their curves approach to zero when the magnetic field is weak; and for the strong magnetic field, they asymptotically meet the constant lines.

  14. Electrostatic waves in carbon nanotubes with an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikian, Alireza; Bagheri, Mehran

    2013-10-15

    Based on a linearized hydrodynamic model and within the quasi-static approximation, the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating through single-walled carbon nanotubes subject to an axial magnetic field is theoretically explored. In the classical limit, we obtain two main possible waves which in turn are divided into two branches, a low-frequency acoustical and a high-frequency optical plasmon branch. In the quantum case, we have found that the dispersion relation is substantially modified when the electron wavelength becomes large enough compared to the propagation wavelength of the electrostatic waves in the quantum plasma. We also show that the axial magnetic field manifest itself on the perturbed electron density through the quantum term and gives rise to the propagation of the electrostatic waves within the quantum plasma. As a result, the effect of the magnetic field is pronounced in the plasma dispersion relations in such a way that their curves approach to zero when the magnetic field is weak; and for the strong magnetic field, they asymptotically meet the constant lines.

  15. Nanotube

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-09-13

    This is a source code to calculate the current-voltage characteristics, the charge distribution and the electrostatic potential in carbon nanotube devices. The code utilizes the non-equilibrium Green's function method, implemented in a tight-binding scheme, to calculate the charge distribution and the energy-dependent transmission function, from which the current or the conductance are obtained. The electrostatic potential is obtained by solving Poisson's equation on a grid with boundary conditions on the electrodes, and at other interfaces.more » Self-consistency between the charge and the electrostatic potential is achieved using a linear mixing method. Different versions of the code allow the modeling of different types of nanotube devices: Version 1.0: Modeling of carbon nanotube electronic devices with cylindrical symmetry Version 1.1: Modeling of planar carbon nanotube electronic devices Version 1.2: Modeling of photocurrent in carbon nanotube devices« less

  16. Plasma-assembled carbon nanotubes: electric field-related effects.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, I; Ostrikov, K; Keidar, M

    2008-11-01

    The paper presents results of comparative investigation of carbon nanotubes growth processes in dense low-temperature plasma and on substrate surface. Hybrid/Monte-Carlo numerical simulations were used to demonstrate the differences in the ion fluxes, growth rates and kinetics of adsorbed atoms re-distribution on substrate and nanotubes surfaces. We show that the plasma parameters significantly affect the nanotubes growth kinetics. We demonstrate that the growth rates of the nanotubes in plasma and on surface can differ by three orders, and the specific fluxes to the nanotube in the plasma can exceed the flux to surface-grown nanotube by six orders. We also show that the metal catalyst used for the nanotubes production on surface and in arc is a subject to very different conditions and this may be a key factor for the nanotube growth mode. The obtained dependencies for the ion fluxes to the nanotubes and nanotubes growth rates on the plasma parameters may be useful for selection of the production methods. PMID:19198353

  17. Frequency characteristics of field electron emission from long carbon nanofilaments/nanotubes in a weak AC electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izrael'yants, K. R.; Orlov, A. P.; Musatov, A. L.; Blagov, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    Frequency characteristics of field electron emission from long carbon nanofilaments/nanotubes in strong dc and weak ac electric fields have been investigated. A series of narrow peaks with a quality factor of up to 1100 has been discovered in the frequency range of hundreds of kilohertz. The analysis has shown that these peaks are probably associated with mechanical oscillations of the carbon nanofilaments/nanotubes driven by the ac electric field.

  18. Optical near-field investigations of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartschuh, Achim

    2009-03-01

    Optical excitation of semiconducting nanotubes creates excitons that determine nearly all light-based applications. Near-field photoluminescence (PL) and Raman imaging with a spatial resolution better than 15 nm was used to probe the spectroscopic properties of excitonic states along single nanotubes on substrates [1,2]. The PL intensity was found to decrease towards the nanotube ends on a length scale of few 10 nm probably caused by exciton transport to localized end states followed by efficient non-radiative recombination. DNA-wrapping of nanotubes results in pronounced emission energy variations on a length scale of few 10 nm indicating the potential of the material for nanoscale sensing applications [3]. Inter-nanotube energy transfer was studied for different pairs of semiconducting nanotubes forming bundles and crossings [4]. Efficient transfer is found to be limited to a few nanometres because of competing fast non-radiative relaxation and can be explained in terms of electromagnetic near-field coupling. We also report on our recent experimental results on time-resolved near-field PL measurements, electrically gated nanotubes and the PL of nanotubes on metal surfaces. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] A. Hartschuh, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 47, 8178 (2008). [0pt] [2] I. O. Maciel et. al, Nature Mat. 7, 878 (2008). [0pt] [3] H. Qian et. al, Nano Lett. 8, 2706 (2008). [0pt] [4] H. Qian et. al, Nano Lett. 8, 1363 (2008).

  19. Water–methanol separation with carbon nanotubes and electric fields.

    PubMed

    Winarto; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-08-01

    Methanol is used in various applications, such as fuel for transportation vehicles, fuel cells, and in chemical industrial processes. Conventionally, separation of methanol from aqueous solution is by distillation. However, this method consumes a large amount of energy; hence development of a new method is needed. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effect of an electric field on water–methanol separation by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with diameters of 0.81 to 4.07 nm. Without an electric field, methanol molecules fill the CNTs in preference to water molecules. The preference of methanol to occupy the CNTs over water results in a separation effect. This separation effect is strong for small CNT diameters and significantly decreases with increasing diameter. In contrast, under an electric field, water molecules strongly prefer to occupy the CNTs over methanol molecules, resulting in a separation effect for water. More interestingly, the separation effect for water does not decrease with increasing CNT diameter. Formation of water structures in CNTs induced by an electric field has an important role in the separation of water from methanol. PMID:26397004

  20. Electrostatic Simulation of Charge Trapping in Carbon Nanotube Vertical Organic Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Jennifer; Rinzler, Andrew; Hershfield, Selman

    The carbon nanotube vertical organic field effect transistor is a vertical sequence consisting of a gate electrode, gate dielectric, thin nanotube network source electrode, organic semiconducting channel and finally the drain electrode. The drain current is modulated by the gate voltage which varies a Schottky barrier between source and channel layers. Hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristic has been observed when a electret charge trapping layer is placed between the nanotube source and the gate dielectric. We provide a model for charge injection into a trapping layer placed in contact with the carbon nanotube film and solve self-consistently for the electrostatics and the occupancy of the traps. For a range of applied gate voltages the simulations demonstrate hysteresis of the carbon nanotubes' charge as a result of the electric field produced by the trapped charge. This affects the current by modulating the Schottky barrier. This work was supported by the NSF Grant DMR-1461019.

  1. PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 4.86 IN THE COSMOS 2 SQUARE DEGREE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Shioya, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Nagao, T.; Saito, T.; Trump, J.; Sasaki, S. S.; Ideue, Y.; Nakajima, A.; Matsuoka, K.; Murayama, T.; Scoville, N. Z.; Capak, P.; Ellis, R. S.; Sanders, D. B.; Kartaltepe, J.; Mobasher, B.; Aussel, H.; Koekemoer, A.; Carilli, C.; Garilli, B.

    2009-05-01

    We present results of a survey for Ly{alpha} emitters at z {approx} 4.86 based on optical narrowband ({lambda} {sub c} = 7126 A, {delta}{lambda} = 73 A) and broadband (B, V, r', i', and z') observations of the Cosmic Evolution Survey field using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. We find 79 Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE) candidates at z {approx} 4.86 over a contiguous survey area of 1.83 deg{sup 2}, down to the Ly{alpha} line flux of 1.47 x 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. We obtain the Ly{alpha} luminosity function with a best-fit Schechter parameters of log L* = 42.9{sup +0.5} {sub -0.3} erg s{sup -1} and {phi}* = 1.2{sup +8.0} {sub -1.1} x 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3} for {alpha} = -1.5 (fixed). The two-point correlation function for our LAE sample is {xi}(r) = (r/4.4{sup +5.7} {sub -2.9} Mpc){sup -1.90{+-}}{sup 0.22}. In order to investigate the field-to-field variations of the properties of Ly{alpha} emitters, we divide the survey area into nine tiles of 0.{sup 0}5 x 0.{sup 0}5 each. We find that the number density varies with a factor of {approx_equal}2 from field to field with high statistical significance. However, we find no significant field-to-field variance when we divide the field into four tiles with 0.{sup 0}7 x 0.{sup 0}7 each. We conclude that at least 0.5 deg{sup 2} survey area is required to derive averaged properties of LAEs at z {approx} 5, and our survey field is wide enough to overcome the cosmic variance.

  2. Effect of a focusing electric field on the formation of arc generated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Soumen; Nagar, Harshada; Pasricha, R.; Seth, T.; Sathe, V. G.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Das, A. K.

    2006-12-01

    The effect of a focusing electric field on the formation of carbon nanotubes in a direct current arc-plasma is investigated. The hard deposits on the surface of the cathode are the main products, rich in multi-walled carbon nanotubes. It is seen that the focusing electric field has a distinct influence on the yield, purity and morphology of the nanotubes. The yield of the carbon nanotubes under the 'focused field condition' has been found to be higher than that derived from the normal electrode configuration. It has been observed that the deposition of carbonaceous soot on the reactor wall is considerably reduced on application of the focusing electric field. Transmission electron microscopy has been used to determine the morphology of the nanotubes. In addition, Raman spectroscopy has helped in distinguishing the graphene-like structures from the disordered carbon networks and helped in analysing the morphology of the tubes. Thermal analysis gave a qualitative estimation of the relative yield of carbon nanotubes within the cathode deposits and their thermal stabilities. The crystalline nature of the samples has been confirmed by x-ray diffraction analysis. The results clearly indicate that the focusing electric field confines the positively charged carbon precursors within the cathode-anode space causing high relative yield and purity and has a distinct effect on controlling the inner diameter of the as-synthesized carbon nanotubes.

  3. A comparative study of nitrogen plasma effect on field emission characteristics of single wall carbon nanotubes synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-12-01

    Vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with large scale control of diameter, length and alignment have successfully been grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The nickel (Ni) as catalyst deposited on silicon (Si) substrate was used to grow the SWCNTs. Field emission (FE) characteristics of the as grown SWCNTs were measured using indigenously designed setup in which a diode is configured in such a way that by applying negative voltage on the copper plate (cathode) with respect to stainless steel anode plate, current density can be recorded. To measure the FE characteristics, SWCNTs film pasted on the copper plate with silver epoxy was used as electron emitter source. The effective area of anode was ∼78.5 mm2 for field emission measurements. The emission measurements were carried out under high vacuum pressure of the order of 10-6 Torr to minimize the electron scattering and degradation of the emitters. The distance between anode and cathode was kept 500 μm (constant) during entire field emission studies. The grown SWCNTs are excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 25 mA/cm2 at turn-on field 1.3 V/μm. In order to enhance the field emission characteristics, the as grown SWCNTs have been treated under nitrogen (N2) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics have been measured. The N2 plasma treated SWCNTs show a good enhancement in the field emission properties with emission current density 81.5 mA/cm2 at turn on field 1.2 V/μm. The as-grown and N2 plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), Raman spectrometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  4. Role of the resistivity of insulating field emitters on the energy of field-ionised and field-evaporated atoms.

    PubMed

    Arnoldi, L; Silaeva, E P; Vurpillot, F; Deconihout, B; Cadel, E; Blum, I; Vella, A

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of laser atom probe analyses, it is important to understand all the physical processes induced by the combination of the high electrical field and the femtosecond laser beam during field evaporation. New information can be accessed from the energy of evaporated surface atoms or field-ionised atoms of an imaging gas. In order to study the ions energy, we combine La-APT and FIM analyses in a new experimental setup equipped with electrostatic lenses. We report measurements for semiconductors and oxides and we study the influence of the illumination conditions (laser power and wavelength), the evaporation rate, the sample geometry and the tip preparation processes. The results are discussed taking into account the resistive properties of non-metallic samples and the photo-stimulated conductivity. This work clarifies the role of the laser and DC field in the energy deficit of field evaporated ions. PMID:25484362

  5. Method of synthesizing small-diameter carbon nanotubes with electron field emission properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jie (Inventor); Du, Chunsheng (Inventor); Qian, Cheng (Inventor); Gao, Bo (Inventor); Qiu, Qi (Inventor); Zhou, Otto Z. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube material having an outer diameter less than 10 nm and a number of walls less than ten are disclosed. Also disclosed are an electron field emission device including a substrate, an optionally layer of adhesion-promoting layer, and a layer of electron field emission material. The electron field emission material includes a carbon nanotube having a number of concentric graphene shells per tube of from two to ten, an outer diameter from 2 to 8 nm, and a nanotube length greater than 0.1 microns. One method to fabricate carbon nanotubes includes the steps of (a) producing a catalyst containing Fe and Mo supported on MgO powder, (b) using a mixture of hydrogen and carbon containing gas as precursors, and (c) heating the catalyst to a temperature above 950.degree. C. to produce a carbon nanotube. Another method of fabricating an electron field emission cathode includes the steps of (a) synthesizing electron field emission materials containing carbon nanotubes with a number of concentric graphene shells per tube from two to ten, an outer diameter of from 2 to 8 nm, and a length greater than 0.1 microns, (b) dispersing the electron field emission material in a suitable solvent, (c) depositing the electron field emission materials onto a substrate, and (d) annealing the substrate.

  6. Self aligned hysteresis free carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlafman, M.; Tabachnik, T.; Shtempluk, O.; Razin, A.; Kochetkov, V.; Yaish, Y. E.

    2016-04-01

    Hysteresis phenomenon in the transfer characteristics of carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNT FET) is being considered as the main obstacle for successful realization of electronic devices based on CNTs. In this study, we prepare four kinds of CNTFETs and explore their hysteretic behavior. Two kinds of devices comprise on-surface CNTs (type I) and suspended CNTs (type II) with thin insulating layer underneath and a single global gate which modulates the CNT conductance. The third and fourth types (types III and IV) consist of suspended CNT over a metallic local gate underneath, where for type IV the local gate was patterned self aligned with the source and drain electrodes. The first two types of devices, i.e., type I and II, exhibit substantial hysteresis which increases with scanning range and sweeping time. Under high vacuum conditions and moderate electric fields ( |E |>4 ×106 V /cm ), the hysteresis for on-surface devices cannot be eliminated, as opposed to suspended devices. Interestingly, type IV devices exhibit no hysteresis at all at ambient conditions, and from the different roles which the global and local gates play for the four types of devices, we could learn about the hysteresis mechanism of this system. We believe that these self aligned hysteresis free FETs will enable the realization of different electronic devices and sensors based on CNTs.

  7. High field breakdown characteristics of carbon nanotube thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Man Prakash; Behnam, Ashkan; Lian, Feifei; Estrada, David; Pop, Eric; Kumar, Satish

    2013-10-11

    The high field properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) network thin film transistors (CN-TFTs) are important for their practical operation, and for understanding their reliability. Using a combination of experimental and computational techniques we show how the channel geometry (length L(C) and width W(C)) and network morphology (average CNT length L(t) and alignment angle distribution θ) affect heat dissipation and high field breakdown in such devices. The results suggest that when WC ≥ L(t), the breakdown voltage remains independent of W(C) but varies linearly with L(C). The breakdown power varies almost linearly with both W(C) and L(C) when WC > L(t). We also find that the breakdown power is more susceptible to the variability in the network morphology compared to the breakdown voltage. The analysis offers new insight into the tunable heat dissipation and thermal reliability of CN-TFTs, which can be significantly improved through optimization of the network morphology and device geometry. PMID:24029606

  8. Control of Carbon Nanotube Morphology by Change of Applied Bias Field During Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L H.; AuBuchon, J F.; Gapin, A; Daraio, C; Bandaru, P; Jin, Sungho; Kim, D. W.; Yoo, I K.; Wang, Chong M.

    2004-10-21

    Carbon nanotube morphology has been engineered via simple control of applied voltage during dc plasma chemical vapor deposition growth. Below a critical applied voltage, a nanotube configuration of vertically aligned tubes with a constant diameter is obtained. Above the critical voltage, a nanocone-type configuration is obtained. The strongly field-dependent transition in morphology is attributed primarily to the plasma etching and decrease in the size of nanotube-nucleating catalyst particles. A two-step control of applied voltage allows a creation of dual-structured nanotube morphology consisting of a broad base nanocone ({approx}200 nm dia.) with a small diameter nanotube ({approx}7 nm) vertically emanating from the apex of the nanocone, which may be useful for atomic force microscopy.

  9. Block Copolymers as Templates for Arrays of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Michael; Hunt, Brian

    2003-01-01

    A method of manufacturing regular arrays of precisely sized, shaped, positioned, and oriented carbon nanotubes has been proposed. Arrays of carbon nanotubes could prove useful in such diverse applications as communications (especially for filtering of signals), biotechnology (for sequencing of DNA and separation of chemicals), and micro- and nanoelectronics (as field emitters and as signal transducers and processors). The method is expected to be suitable for implementation in standard semiconductor-device fabrication facilities.

  10. Plasma-induced field emission study of carbon nanotube cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Xia, Liansheng; Zhang, Huang; Liu, Xingguang; Yang, Anmin; Shi, Jinshui; Zhang, Linwen; Liao, Qingliang; Zhang, Yue

    2011-10-01

    An investigation on the plasma-induced field emission (PFE) properties of a large area carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode on a 2 MeV linear induction accelerator injector is presented. Experimental results show that the cathode is able to emit intense electron beams. Intense electron beams of 14.9-127.8A/cm2 are obtained from the cathode. The CNT cathode desorbs gases from the CNTs during the PFE process. The fast cathode plasma expansion affects the diode perveance. The amount of outgassing is estimated to be 0.06-0.49Pa·L, and the ratio of outgassing and electron are roughly calculated to be within the range of 170-350 atoms per electron. The effect of the outgassing is analyzed, and the outgassing mass spectrum of the CNT cathode has been studied during the PFE. There is a significant desorption of CO2, N2(CO), and H2 gases, which plays an important role during the PFE process. All the experiments demonstrate that the outgassing plays an important role in the formation of the cathode plasma. Moreover, the characteristic turn-on time of the CNT cathode was measured to be 39 ns.

  11. Electric field effect on (6,0) zigzag single-walled aluminum nitride nanotube.

    PubMed

    Baei, Mohammad T; Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi; Moghimi, Masoumeh

    2012-09-01

    Structural, electronic, and electrical responses of the H-capped (6,0) zigzag single-walled aluminum nitride nanotube was studied under the parallel and transverse electric fields with strengths 0-140 × 10(-4) a.u. by using density functional calculations. Geometry optimizations were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory using a locally modified version of the GAMESS electronic structure program. The dipole moments, atomic charge variations, and total energy of the (6,0) zigzag AlNNT show increases with increase in the applied external electric field strengths. The length, tip diameters, electronic spatial extent, and molecular volume of the nanotube do not significantly change with increasing electric field strength. The energy gap of the nanotube decreases with increases of the electric field strength and its reactivity is increased. Increase of the ionization potential, electron affinity, chemical potential, electrophilicity, and HOMO and LUMO in the nanotube with increase of the applied parallel electric field strengths shows that the parallel field has a much stronger interaction with the nanotube with respect to the transverse electric field strengths. Analysis of the parameters indicates that the properties of AlNNTs can be controlled by the proper external electric field. PMID:22643968

  12. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10-6 Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system.

  13. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10(-6) Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system. PMID:23376878

  14. Effect of substrate material on the growth and field emission characteristics of large-area carbon nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummethala, Raghunandan; Wenger, Daniela; Tedde, Sandro F.; Täschner, Christine; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd; Eckert, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising replacement for tungsten filaments as electron emitters in conventional x-ray sources, owing to their higher aspect ratio, superior mechanical stability, chemical inertness, and high electrical and thermal conductivities. Conditions for realizing the best emission behavior from CNTs have been formulated over the last few years. In this paper, we report the relatively less-investigated factor, namely, the influence of the nature of substrate material on the growth as well as field emission characteristics of large-area multiwalled CNTs for their practical application in medical x-ray sources. We compare the morphology of CNTs on a variety of substrates such as stainless steel, copper, molybdenum, graphite, few-layer graphene, and carbon nanowalls grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition following a simple drop-coating of catalyst. We find that CNTs grown on stainless steel and graphite show the best combination of emission characteristics under pulsed operation mode. These studies are helpful in selecting the optimum substrate material for field emission applications. Ex situ studies on field emission degradation of CNTs are presented towards the end.

  15. The fabrication of carbon-nanotube-coated electrodes and a field-emission-based luminescent device.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sanjay; Yamini Sarada, B; Kar, Kamal K

    2010-02-10

    Tungsten substrates were coated with an Ni or Ni-Co catalyst by the electroless dip coating technique. Various carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method under different growth conditions. It was observed that Ni-and Ni-Co-coated tungsten substrates give very good growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in terms of yield, uniformity and alignment at a growth temperature of 600 degrees C. We fabricated a field-emission-based luminescent light bulb where a tungsten wire coated with carbon nanotubes served as a cathode. Results show lower threshold voltage, better emission stability and higher luminescence for CNT cathodes in comparison with uncoated tungsten cathodes. We found that aligned-coiled carbon nanotubes are superior to straight CNTs in terms of field emission characteristics and luminescence properties. PMID:20057034

  16. Electron field emission from phase pure nanotube films grown in a methane/hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küttel, Olivier M.; Groening, Oliver; Emmenegger, Christoph; Schlapbach, Louis

    1998-10-01

    Phase pure nanotube films were grown on silicon substrates by a microwave plasma under conditions which normally are used for the growth of chemical vapor deposited diamond films. However, instead of using any pretreatment leading to diamond nucleation we deposited metal clusters on the silicon substrate. The resulting films contain only nanotubes and also onion-like structures. However, no other carbon allotropes like graphite or amorphous clustered material could be found. The nanotubes adhere very well to the substrates and do not need any further purification step. Electron field emission was observed at fields above 1.5 V/μm and we observed an emission site density up to 104/cm2 at 3 V/μm. Alternatively, we have grown nanotube films by the hot filament technique, which allows to uniformly cover a two inch wafer.

  17. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  18. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  19. Development of tomographic imaging systems using carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian

    2005-11-01

    Conventional thermionic x-ray sources use hot filament cathodes to generate electrons for x-ray production. The thermionic technology has several inherent limitations such as high operating temperature, slow response time, and difficulty for miniaturization. On the other hand, field emission provides an alternative to generate electrons without all these limitations. The concept of field emission x-ray source has been proposed and tested in the early 1970s. Unfortunately all of the early field emission x-ray systems failed due primarily to the limitations on the electron field emitters. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have recently emerged as a promising class of electron emissive materials and field emission x-ray source based on CNTs are expected to have significantly improved properties. We have recently developed a CNT-based field emission micro-focus x-ray source. It shows stable tube current under high operating voltage, extraordinary dynamic imaging capability, and excellent potential for miniaturization. All of these new features make it very attractive for various potential industrial and medical applications. In order to demonstrate its applications, two sets of x-ray imaging systems using this field emission x-ray source were constructed in our lab. One is a micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging system using a single field emission x-ray source for dynamic radiographic and tomographic imaging applications. It shows great potential for the future development of dynamic micro-CT scanner. The other one is a multi-beam field emission x-ray source with multiple addressable focal spots which can provide scanning x-ray beams without mechanical movement. It can lead to fast data acquisition rates for future tomographic imaging systems with a simplified experimental set-up.

  20. Field emission from hybrid diamond-like carbon and carbon nanotube composite structures.

    PubMed

    Zanin, H; May, P W; Hamanaka, M H M O; Corat, E J

    2013-12-11

    A thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) film was deposited onto a densely packed "forest" of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VACNT). DLC deposition caused the tips of the CNTs to clump together to form a microstructured surface. Field-emission tests of this new composite material show the typical low threshold voltages for carbon nanotube structures (2 V μm(-1)) but with greatly increased emission current, better stability, and longer lifetime. PMID:24224845

  1. Electrokinetics of scalable, electric-field-assisted fabrication of vertically aligned carbon-nanotube/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Richard J.; Akin, Cevat; Giraldo, Gabriel; Kim, Sangil; Fornasiero, Francesco; Shan, Jerry W.

    2015-06-01

    Composite thin films incorporating vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) offer promise for a variety of applications where the vertical alignment of the CNTs is critical to meet performance requirements, e.g., highly permeable membranes, thermal interfaces, dry adhesives, and films with anisotropic electrical conductivity. However, current VACNT fabrication techniques are complex and difficult to scale up. Here, we describe a solution-based, electric-field-assisted approach as a cost-effective and scalable method to produce large-area VACNT composites. Multiwall-carbon nanotubes are dispersed in a polymeric matrix, aligned with an alternating-current (AC) electric field, and electrophoretically concentrated to one side of the thin film with a direct-current (DC) component to the electric field. This approach enables the fabrication of highly concentrated, individually aligned nanotube composites from suspensions of very dilute ( ϕ = 4 × 10 - 4 ) volume fraction. We experimentally investigate the basic electrokinetics of nanotube alignment under AC electric fields, and show that simple models can adequately predict the rate and degree of nanotube alignment using classical expressions for the induced dipole moment, hydrodynamic drag, and the effects of Brownian motion. The composite AC + DC field also introduces complex fluid motion associated with AC electro-osmosis and the electrochemistry of the fluid/electrode interface. We experimentally probe the electric-field parameters behind these electrokinetic phenomena, and demonstrate, with suitable choices of processing parameters, the ability to scalably produce large-area composites containing VACNTs at number densities up to 1010 nanotubes/cm2. This VACNT number density exceeds that of previous electric-field-fabricated composites by an order of magnitude, and the surface-area coverage of the 40 nm VACNTs is comparable to that of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown arrays of smaller-diameter nanotubes.

  2. Effect of the electric field of the anode sheath on the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes in a glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Pal', A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Suetin, N. V.; Timofeev, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.

    2007-01-15

    Arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes on silicon substrates were grown in the anode sheath of a dc glow discharge. In order to clarify the role of the electric field in the growth of nanotubes, numerical simulations of charged particle transport in the anode sheath were carried out in the drift-diffusion approximation. The distributions of the charged particle density and electric field are obtained. Possible mechanisms whereby the electric field influences the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes are analyzed. It is found that the nanotubes grow in the region in which the electric field is enhanced due to the depletion of positive ions in the anode sheath.

  3. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  4. Applications and production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jason Howard

    Carbon nanotubes, a recently discovered form of carbon fiber with structural perfection similar to that of a fullerene molecule, have interesting electronic, chemical and mechanical properties due to their size and structure. Nanotubes have great potential as a bulk material for strong, lightweight composite materials, and as individual nano-scale tools or devices. Initial work on applications with individual multiwalled nanotubes as field emission sources and scanning force microscopy tips is described. The nanotubes display intriguing field emission behavior interpreted as the nanotube unraveling under the influence of the electric field. The unraveling process is believed to result in facile field emission from linear atomic carbon chains at the end of the nanotube. Such atomic wires represent an excellent field emitter. The work on multiwalled nanotube SFM tips was equally encouraging. The high aspect ratio of the nanotube allows it to image deep trenches inaccessible to commercially available Si pyramidal tips, and it reduces the interaction with the ambient water layer on the sample which perturbs image quality. The most remarkable advantage of nanotube SFM tips is a result of their mechanical properties. It was found that the nanotubes will remain rigid during normal imaging, but conveniently buckle to the side if circumstances arise which create large forces known to damage the tip and sample. This feature makes the tip more durable than Si tips, and is especially important for soft biological samples. In these two applications, as well as others, and in the measurements of novel nanotube properties, high quality, small diameter (0.5 to 2 nm) diameter single-walled nanotubes are most interesting. Such material can be produced slowly and in small amounts by catalytic arc vaporization and catalytic laser vaporization of graphite. It is well known that nanotubes can be mass produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD), but the product consists only

  5. Nonaligned carbon nanotubes anchored on porous alumina: formation, process modeling, gas-phase analysis, and field-emission properties.

    PubMed

    Lysenkov, Dmitry; Engstler, Jörg; Dangwal, Arti; Popp, Alexander; Müller, Günter; Schneider, Jörg J; Janardhanan, Vinod M; Deutschmann, Olaf; Strauch, Peter; Ebert, Volker; Wolfrum, Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    We have developed a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), anchored in a comose-type structure on top of porous alumina substrates. The mass-flow conditions of precursor and carrier gases and temperature distributions in the CVD reactor were studied by transient computational fluid dynamic simulation. Molecular-beam quadrupole mass spectroscopy (MB-QMS) has been used to analyze the gas phase during ferrocene CVD under reaction conditions (1073 K) in the boundary layer near the substrate. Field-emission (FE) properties of the nonaligned CNTs were measured for various coverages and pore diameters of the alumina. Samples with more dense CNT populations provided emitter-number densities up to 48,000 cm(-2) at an electric field of 6 V microm(-1). Samples with fewer but well-anchored CNTs in 22-nm pores yielded the highest current densities. Up to 83 mA cm(-2) at 7 V microm(-1) in dc mode and more than 200 mA cm(-2) at 11 V microm(-1) in pulsed diode operation have been achieved from a cathode size of 24 mm2. PMID:17514768

  6. Silicon based light emitters utilizing radiation from dislocations; electric field induced shift of the dislocation-related luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguirov, T.; Mchedlidze, T.; Kittler, M.; Reiche, M.; Wilhelm, T.; Hoang, T.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, J.

    2009-05-01

    Dislocation rich regions can be controllably formed at a certain location inside a silicon wafer. We studied the light emission properties of such regions located in an electric field of a p-n junction under different excitation conditions. It was found that the luminescence spectra of the dislocations are significantly influenced by the presence of the junction. The dislocation-related luminescence peak position appears red-shifted due to the built-in electric field. A suppression of that field by photo-generation of carriers or by applying a forward bias voltage at the junction leads to a gradual decrease in the energy position of the peaks. The dependence of the peak position on the electric field was found to be a quadratic function, similar to that observed for semiconductor nanostructures. We show that the shift of the peak position is due to the Stark effect on dislocation-related excitonic states. The characteristic constant of the shift, obtained by fitting the data with the quadratic Stark effect equation, was 0.0186 meV/(kV/cm) 2. The observed effect opens new possibilities for integration of a silicon based light emitter, combining the radiation from dislocations with a Stark effect based modulator.

  7. Controlled synthesis of large-scale, uniform, vertically standing graphene for high-performance field emitters.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lili; Yang, Tianzhong; Liu, Fei; Dong, Jing; Yao, Zhaohui; Shen, Chengmin; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Liu, Yunqi; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2013-01-11

    Large-scale, uniform, vertically standing graphene with atomically thin edges are controllably synthesized on copper foil using a microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition system. A growth mechanism for this system is proposed. This film shows excellent field-emission properties, with low turn-on field of 1.3 V μm(-1) , low threshold field of 3.0 V μm(-1) and a large field-enhancement factor more than 10 000. PMID:23135968

  8. In situ tuning and probing the ambipolar field effect on multiwall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Li-Ying; Chang, Chia-Seng

    2014-12-15

    We report a method of fabricating ultra-clean and hysteresis-free multiwall carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) inside the ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscope equipped with a movable gold tip as a local gate. By tailoring the shell structure of the nanotube and varying the drain-source voltage (V{sub ds}), we can tune the electronic characteristic of a multiwall CNFET in situ. We have also found that the Schottky barriers of a multiwall CNFET are generated within the nanotube, but not at the nanotube/electrode contacts, and the barrier height has been derived. We have subsequently demonstrated the ambipolar characteristics of the CNFET with concurrent high-resolution imaging and local gating.

  9. Secondary nanotube growth on aligned carbon nanofibre arrays for superior field emission.

    PubMed

    Watts, Paul C P; Lyth, Stephen M; Henley, Simon J; Silva, S Ravi P

    2008-04-01

    We report substantial improvement of the field emission properties from aligned carbon nanotubes grown on aligned carbon nanofibres by a two-stage plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. The threshold field decreased from 15.0 to 3.6 V/microm after the secondary growth. The field enhancement factor increased from 240 to 1480. This technique allows for superior emission of electrons for carbon nanotube/nanofibre arrays grown directly on highly doped silicon for direct integration in large area displays. PMID:18572626

  10. The screening effects of carbon nanotube arrays and its field emission optimum density

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Dan Liu, Lie

    2013-12-15

    In order to investigate the field emission optimum density of carbon nanotube (CNT) array, the screening effects of CNT array have been studied. It has been shown that the electric field in the vicinity of an individual nanotube of array can be notable distorted due to the screening action of the surrounding neighbors. The optimum normalized spacing s/l(as referred to the length) for the maximum emission current is inversely proportional to aspect ratio l/r and electric field strength for CNT arrays with a fixed dimension.