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Sample records for nanotube formed ti-zr

  1. Various sized nanotubes on TiZr for antibacterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorescu, Sabina; Ungureanu, Camelia; Kirchgeorg, Robin; Schmuki, Patrik; Demetrescu, Ioana

    2013-04-01

    A two-step anodization of a Ti50Zr alloy results in a various sized nanotube oxide structures, which show an improved antibacterial activity. The nanotubes were formed in glycol with 15 vol.% H2O and 0.2 M NH4F by two-step anodization. The oxide layer grown during 2 h was removed by sonication in deionized water and anodized again for 1 h at the same conditions as in the first step. The removed layer acts as a nano-prepatterned surface, where higher ordered and open nanotubes can be achieved. The surface morphologies were analyzed by SEM and AFM, the surface wettability by contact angle measurements. The diameter and the length of the grown nanotubes are potential dependent between 20 and 100 nm in diameter and 2.3 and 5.7 μm in length, respectively. The antibacterial properties were evaluated in vitro on the formed nanotubes on the TiZr alloy against gram negative Escherichia coli bacteria. The E. coli (ATCC 8738) were cultured in a tube containing Luria Bertani medium at 37 °C. The optical density was determined after 18 h of incubation. In comparison, the smallest nanotubes exhibited the most efficient antibacterial behavior against E. coli bacterium. This suggests the use of small diameter nanotubes on TiZr for antimicrobial surface applications, which are susceptible for biofilms and microbial cultures.

  2. Thermal Evaporation Loss Measurements on Quasicrystal (Ti-Zr-Ni) and Glass Forming (Vit 106 and Vit 106a) Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, M. E.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Kelton, K. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal evaporation loss measurements made using the electrostatic levitation (ESL) technique for one binary Ti-Zr, two ternary Ti-Zr-Ni, and two glass-forming (Vit 106 and Vit 106a) alloy liquids are reported. The containerless environment enables measurements not only for the equilibrium liquids but also for the metastable supercooled liquids. The data follow the Langmuir equation when the activity coefficient of the solute atoms, a measure for the deviation from the ideal solution behavior, is taken into account. An estimate for the activity coefficient of Ni in the Ti-Zr liquid is made from these data, demonstrating the effectiveness of ESL for such measurements.

  3. Surface Tension and Viscosity of Quasicrystal-Forming Ti-Zr-Ni Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, R. W.; Bradshaw, R. C.; Rogers, J. R.; Rathz, T. J.; Lee, G. W.; Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    The surface tension and viscosity of quasicrystal-forming Ti-Zr-Ni alloys were measured over a range of temperature, including both stable and undercooled liquids by an Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) technique. ESL is a containerless technique which allows processing of samples without contact, greatly reducing contamination and increasing access to the metastable undercooled liquid. The measured viscosity is typical of glass-forming alloys of similar composition to the quasicrystal-forming alloys studied here, while the surface tension shows an anomaly at deep undercoolings.

  4. X-Ray and Electrostatic Levitation Undercooling Studies in Ti-Zr-Ni Quasicrystals Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. R.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Woo, G. L.; Hannet, L.; Krishnan, S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first undercooling nucleation measurements of electrostatic-levitated droplets of TiZrNi alloys that form the icosahedral quasicrystal phase (i-phase) are presented. The reduced undercooling for crystallization decreases with an increasing polytetrahedral order of the primary solidifying phase, supporting the existence of a developing icosahedral short-range order in the undercooled liquid. X-ray diffraction measurements made at the Advance Photon Source on levitated liquid droplets of these alloys at their liquidus temperatures, however, show no evidence for increased icosahedral order. This suggests that significant ordering only occurs below the melting temperature.

  5. Crystal structure and thermal expansion of the low- and high-temperature forms of BaM{sup IV}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds (M=Ti, Zr, Hf and Sn)

    SciTech Connect

    Bregiroux, D.; Popa, K.; Jardin, R.; Raison, P.E.; Wallez, G.; Quarton, M.; Brunelli, M.; Ferrero, C.; Caciuffo, R.

    2009-05-15

    The crystal structure of beta-BaZr(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, archetype of the high-temperature forms of BaM(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} phosphates (with M=Ti, Zr, Hf and Sn), has been solved ab initio by Rietveld analysis from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. The phase transition appears as a topotactic modification of the monoclinic (S.G. C2/m) lamellar alpha-structure into a trigonal one (S.G. P3-barm1) through a simple mechanism involving the unfolding of the [Zr(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sub n}{sup 2-} layers. The thermal expansion is very anisotropic (e.g., -4.1forms, as a consequence of symmetry. It stems from a complex combination of several mechanisms, involving bridging oxygen rocking in M-O-P linkages, and 'bond thermal expansion'. - Graphical abstract: The layered high-temperature form of BaM(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, only expands along the c-axis.

  6. Superelastic properties of biomedical (Ti-Zr)-Mo-Sn alloys.

    PubMed

    Ijaz, Muhammad Farzik; Kim, Hee Young; Hosoda, Hideki; Miyazaki, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    A new class of Ti-50Zr base biomedical superelastic alloys was developed in this study. The (Ti-Zr)-Mo-Sn alloys exhibited a shape memory effect and superelastic property by adjusting Mo and Sn contents. The (Ti-Zr)-1.5Mo-3Sn alloy revealed the most stable superelasticity among (Ti-Zr)-(1-2)Mo-(2-4)Sn alloys. The superelastic recovery strain showed a strong dependence on heat treatment temperature after cold working in the (Ti-Zr)-1.5Mo-3Sn alloy. The superelastic recovery strain increased as the heat treatment temperature increased although the critical stress for slip decreased. The (Ti-Zr)-1.5Mo-3Sn alloy heat treated at 1073K exhibited excellent superelastic properties with a large recovery strain as large as 7% which is due to the strong {001}β<110>β recrystallization texture. PMID:25579891

  7. Local structure of deuterated Ti-Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunaga, T.; Itoh, K.; Hashi, K.; Aoki, K.

    The Ti-Zr alloy system is isomorphous over the total concentration range. A neutron zero-scattering alloy can be obtained at the composition Ti0.676Zr0.324 because of negative and positive coherent neutron scattering amplitudes of Ti and Zr respectively. A (Ti0.676Zr0.324)D0.31 amorphous alloy was synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) under a deuterium-gas atmosphere of 0.08 MPa. In contrast, it is found that the MA of Ti and Zr powders under a deuterium-gas atmosphere of 2.0 MPa forms a nano-crystalline (Ti0.676Zr0.324)D1.54 alloy, which is composed of TiH2 and ZrH2 crystalline compounds.

  8. Oligomer functionalized nanotubes and composites formed therewith

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K; Sainsbury, Toby; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed herein is a sequential functionalization methodology for the covalent modification of nanotubes with between one and four repeat units of a polymer. Covalent attachment of oligomer units to the surface of nanotubes results in oligomer units forming an organic sheath around the nanotubes, polymer-functionalized-nanotubes (P-NTs). P-NTs possess chemical functionality identical to that of the functionalizing polymer, and thus provide nanoscale scaffolds which may be readily dispersed within a monomer solution and participate in the polymerization reaction to form a polymer-nanotube/polymer composite. Formation of polymer in the presence of P-NTs leads to a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within the polymer matrix, in contrast to aggregated masses of nanotubes in the case of pristine-NTs. The covalent attachment of oligomeric units to the surface of nanotubes represents the formation of a functional nanoscale building block which can be readily dispersed and integrated within the polymer to form a novel composite material.

  9. Ab initio Ti-Zr-Ni phase diagram predicts stability of icosahedral TiZrNi quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, R. G.; Carlsson, A. E.; Kelton, K. F.; Henley, C. L.

    2005-04-01

    The ab initio phase diagram determines the energetic stability of the icosahedral TiZrNi quasicrystal. The complete ab initio zero-temperature ternary phase diagram is constructed from the calculated energies of the elemental, binary and ternary Ti-Zr-Ni phases. For this, the icosahedral i -TiZrNi quasicrystal is approximated by periodic structures of up to 123 atoms/unit cell, based on a decorated-tiling model [R. G. Hennig, K. F. Kelton, A. E. Carlsson, and C. L. Henley, Phys. Rev. B 67, 134202 (2003)]. The approximant structures containing the 45-atom Bergman cluster are nearly degenerate in energy, and are all energetically stable against the competing phases. It is concluded that i -TiZrNi is a ground-state quasicrystal, as it is experimentally the low-temperature phase for its composition.

  10. In vitro biocompatibility response of Ti-Zr-Si thin film metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, J. L.; Huang, C. H.; Chen, Y. H.; Tsai, W. Y.; Wei, T. Y.; Huang, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the bio-electrochemical response of the Ti-Zr-Si thin film metallic glasses (TFMGs) in simulated body fluid with different contents of titanium is measured via potentiostat. According to the results of bio-corrosion potential and current, as well as the polarization resistance, it is concluded that the Ti66Zr25Si9 TFMGs possess the highest bio-electrochemical resistance. With increasing content of titanium, the corrosion resistance becomes progressively higher. The passive current results reveal that amorphous alloys can form a more protective and denser passive film on the metallic glass surface than the crystalline materials. In addition, the mechanical performance of the Ti-Zr-Si TFMGs is better than the crystalline counterparts. As a result, the Ti-based TFMGs are considered to be potential materials for bio-coating applications.

  11. Research on the secondary electron yield of TiZrV-Pd thin film coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Yong; Xu, Yanhui; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    In particle accelerators, the build-up of electron cloud may have important influence on beam quality. Especially for the positron and proton accelerators, massive electrons lead to electron cloud, which affects the stability, energy, emittance and beam life adversely. A secondary electron emission (SEE) measurement system has been designed and used to study the SEE of palladium (Pd), TiZrV and TiZrV-Pd with an independently adjustable energy from 50 eV to 5 keV. Here, we obtained the characteristics of the SEE from Pd, TiZrV and TiZrV-Pd film coatings with different thickness under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions. Moreover, the maximum secondary electron yield (SEY), {\\delta}max, of the Pd, TiZrV and TiZrV-Pd film coatings under different primary electron doses were obtained, respectively. Finally, the variation of the secondary electron yield with the incident electron energy will be discussed for Pd, TiZrV and TiZrV-Pd thin film coatings. Low SEY is a new advantage of TiZrV-Pd films, besides high H2 absorption ability and prolonging the lifetime of TiZrV film, which will be of great value in the design of beam screen for Super Proton-Proton Collider (SPPC).

  12. Study of nanostructured (Ti-Zr-Nb)N coatings’ physical- mechanical properties obtained by vacuum arc evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, S. V.; Pogrebnjak, A. D.; Yerokhina, L. N.; Yeskermessov, D. K.; erdybaeva, N. K. Y.

    2016-02-01

    The coatings were formed by vacuum arc deposition. Unit cast target (cathodes) was used on the basis of 30 atm. % Ti, 35 at. % Zr and 35 atm. % Nb as the vaporized materials. Molecular nitrogen was used as the working gas. The thickness of the coatings in the experiments was 4.0 microns. The surface morphology fractograph fracture, track friction were investigated in a scanning electron microscope JSM-6390 LV. The use of multicoatings based on carbides is very promising to ensure the high performance properties of the complex, nitrides and silicides of transition metals. Findings - nanostructured coating of (Ti-Zr-Nb) N was obtained by vacuum arc evaporation cathode-cast in a nitrogen gas reaction medium. Multicomponent films have a pronounced columnar structure. Elemental composition was obtained by the vacuum arc deposition of coatings (Ti-Zr-Nb) N, depending on the physical parameters of the deposition process, in particular the pressure of the reaction gas nitrogen.

  13. Nanostructured Ti-Zr-Pd-Si-(Nb) bulk metallic composites: Novel biocompatible materials with superior mechanical strength and elastic recovery.

    PubMed

    Hynowska, A; Blanquer, A; Pellicer, E; Fornell, J; Suriñach, S; Baró, M D; Gebert, A; Calin, M; Eckert, J; Nogués, C; Ibáñez, E; Barrios, L; Sort, J

    2015-11-01

    The microstructure, mechanical behaviour, and biocompatibility (cell culture, morphology, and cell adhesion) of nanostructured Ti45 Zr15 Pd35- x Si5 Nbx with x = 0, 5 (at. %) alloys, synthesized by arc melting and subsequent Cu mould suction casting, in the form of rods with 3 mm in diameter, are investigated. Both Ti-Zr-Pd-Si-(Nb) materials show a multi-phase (composite-like) microstructure. The main phase is cubic β-Ti phase (Im3m) but hexagonal α-Ti (P63/mmc), cubic TiPd (Pm3m), cubic PdZr (Fm3m), and hexagonal (Ti, Zr)5 Si3 (P63/mmc) phases are also present. Nanoindentation experiments show that the Ti45 Zr15 Pd30 Si5 Nb5 sample exhibits lower Young's modulus than Ti45 Zr15 Pd35 Si5 . Conversely, Ti45 Zr15 Pd35 Si5 is mechanically harder. Actually, both alloys exhibit larger values of hardness when compared with commercial Ti-40Nb, (HTi-Zr-Pd-Si ≈ 14 GPa, HTi-Zr-Pd-Si-Nb ≈ 10 GPa and HTi-40Nb ≈ 2.7 GPa). Concerning the biological behaviour, preliminary results of cell viability performed on several Ti-Zr-Pd-Si-(Nb) discs indicate that the number of live cells is superior to 94% in both cases. The studied Ti-Zr-Pd-Si-(Nb) bulk metallic system is thus interesting for biomedical applications because of the outstanding mechanical properties (relatively low Young's modulus combined with large hardness), together with the excellent biocompatibility. PMID:25533018

  14. Thermal stability of nanocrystalline (Ti,Zr)0.54Al0.46N films implanted by He+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, V. V.; Abadias, G.; Rovbut, A. Y.; Zlotski, S. V.; Saladukhin, I. A.; Skuratov, V. A.; Petrovich, S.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of irradiation with He+ ions on the thermal stability of TiZrN and (Ti,Zr)0.54Al0.46N nanocrystalline films was studied. The TiZrN and (Ti,Zr)0.54Al0.46N films were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering. XRD research showed that the TiZrN and (Ti,Zr)0.54Al0.46N films were single-phase systems (based on cubic c-(Ti,Zr)N and cubic c-(Ti,Zr,Al)N solid solutions) with nanocrystalline (grain size 30 and 21 nm, respectively) structure. The irradiation with He+ ions and thermal annealing up to 800 °C do not affect the structure and phase composition of the (Ti,Zr)0.54Al0.46N film. The prior irradiation of the (Ti,Zr)0.54Al0.46N film with He+ ions activates spinodal decomposition of the c-(Ti,Zr,Al)N solid solution after thermal annealing at 1000 °C due to redistribution of the components of the solid solution inside the grains.

  15. Deposition and characterization of TiZrV-Pd thin films by dc magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Yan-Hui; Wei, Wei; Fan, Le; Pei, Xiang-Tao; Hong, Yuan-Zhi; Wang, Yong

    2015-12-01

    TiZrV film is mainly applied in the ultra-high vacuum pipes of storage rings. Thin film coatings of palladium, which are added onto the TiZrV film to increase the service life of nonevaporable getters and enhance H2 pumping speed, were deposited on the inner face of stainless steel pipes by dc magnetron sputtering using argon gas as the sputtering gas. The TiZrV-Pd film properties were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The grain size of TiZrV and Pd films were about 0.42-1.3 nm and 8.5-18.25 nm respectively. It was found that the roughness of TiZrV films is small, about 2-4 nm, but for Pd film it is large, about 17-19 nm. The PP At. % of Pd in TiZrV/Pd films varied from 86.84 to 87.56 according to the XPS test results. Supported by National Natural Science Funds of China (11205155) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (WK2310000041)

  16. Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Growth on Functionalized Surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-Zr-Nb Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylypchuk, Ie V.; Petranovskaya, A. L.; Gorbyk, P. P.; Korduban, A. M.; Markovsky, P. E.; Ivasishin, O. M.

    2015-08-01

    A biomimetic approach for coating titanium-containing alloys with hydroxyapatite (HA) is reported in the article. Two types of Ti-containing alloys were chosen as an object for coating: Ti-6Al-4V (recommended for orthopedic application) and a novel highly biocompatible Ti-Zr-Nb alloy, with good mechanical compatibility due to a modulus that is more close to that of human bones (E ≈ 50 GPa instead of 110 GPa in Ti-6Al-4V). Coating process was carried out in a 10×-concentrated simulated body fluid (SBF)—synthetic analog of human body plasma. The effect of oxidized and carboxylated alloy surface on formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite has been studied. By XRD, we found influence of thermal conditions on HA crystal formation and size. SEM images and Fourier transform infrared confirmed that hydroxyapatite with different morphology, crystallinity, and Ca/P ratio formed on metallic surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that in the Ti-6AL-4V sample the observed Ca/P ratio reach 0.97, whereas in the Ti-Zr-Nb sample the observed Ca/P ratio reach 1.15.

  17. Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Growth on Functionalized Surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-Zr-Nb Alloys.

    PubMed

    Pylypchuk, Ie V; Petranovskaya, A L; Gorbyk, P P; Korduban, A M; Markovsky, P E; Ivasishin, O M

    2015-12-01

    A biomimetic approach for coating titanium-containing alloys with hydroxyapatite (HA) is reported in the article. Two types of Ti-containing alloys were chosen as an object for coating: Ti-6Al-4V (recommended for orthopedic application) and a novel highly biocompatible Ti-Zr-Nb alloy, with good mechanical compatibility due to a modulus that is more close to that of human bones (E ≈ 50 GPa instead of 110 GPa in Ti-6Al-4V). Coating process was carried out in a 10×-concentrated simulated body fluid (SBF)-synthetic analog of human body plasma. The effect of oxidized and carboxylated alloy surface on formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite has been studied. By XRD, we found influence of thermal conditions on HA crystal formation and size. SEM images and Fourier transform infrared confirmed that hydroxyapatite with different morphology, crystallinity, and Ca/P ratio formed on metallic surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that in the Ti-6AL-4V sample the observed Ca/P ratio reach 0.97, whereas in the Ti-Zr-Nb sample the observed Ca/P ratio reach 1.15. PMID:26297184

  18. Anion Exchange Behavior Of Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb And Ta As Homologues Of Rf And Db In Mixed HF--Acetone Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenov, N. V.; Bozhikov, G. A.; Starodub, G. Ya.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Filosofov, D. V.; Sun Jin, Jon; Radchenko, V. I.; Lebedev, N. A.; Novgorodov, A. F.

    2010-04-30

    We studied in detail the sorption behavior of Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta on AG 1 anion exchange resin in HF-acetone mixed solutions as a function of organic cosolvent and acid concentrations. Anion exchange behavior was found to be strongly acetone concentration dependent. The distribution coefficients of Ti, Zr, Hf and Nb increased and those of Ta decreased with increasing content of acetone in HF solutions. With increasing HF concentration anion exchange equilibrium analysis indicated the formation of fluoride complexes of group 4 elements with charge-3 and Ta---2. For Nb the slope of-2 increased up to-5. Optimal conditions for separation of the elements using AIX chromatography were found. Group 4 elements formed MF{sub 7}{sup 3-} (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) complexes whose sorption decreased Ti>Hf>Zr in reverse order of complex stability. This fact is of particular interest for studying ion exchange behavior of Rf compared to Ti. The advantages of studying chemical properties of Rf and Db in aqueous HF solutions mixed with organic solvents are briefly discussed.

  19. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  20. Calculation of isothermal sections of three ternary Ti-Zr-X systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Delaey, L.; Van Der Biest, O.; Wollants, P.

    1996-05-01

    The equilibrium phase diagram of the binary system Ti-Zr shows complete solubility in both allotropic forms, the high temperature {beta}-phase (bcc structure) and the low temperature {alpha}-phase (hexagonal structure). In the present paper the influence of additions of a third element (X = Hf, Nb, Ta) on the relative stability of both phases has been analyzed. Hf does also exhibit the two allotropic forms, and both show complete solubility for Zr and Ti. The other two elements crystallize as bcc. Nb is completely soluble in {beta}-Ti, but only at higher temperatures in {beta}-Zr. Its solubility in the {alpha}-Ti and {alpha}-Zr phases is very limited. Ta is also completely soluble in {beta}-Ti but shows only limited solubility in {beta}-Zr, {alpha}-Zr and {alpha}-Ti. Calculated isothermal sections of these three ternary equilibrium phase diagrams as well as considerations concerning thermodynamic parameters are presented and discussed in this work.

  1. A Liquid-Liquid Transition in an Undercooled Ti-Zr-Ni Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. W.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Kelton, K. F.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    If crystallization can be avoided, liquids enter a metastable (undercooled) state below their equilibrium liquidus temperatures, TI, finally freezing into a glass below a characteristic temperature called the glass transition temperature, T,. In rare cases, the undercooled liquid may undergo a liquid-liquid phase transition (liquid polymorphism) before entering the glassy state. This has been suggested from experimental studies of HzO and Si4. Such phase transitions have been predicted in some stable liquids, i.e. above TI at atmospheric pressure, for Si02 and BeF;, but these have not been verified experimentally. They have been observed in liquids of P7, Sis and C9, but only under high pressure. All of these transitions are driven by an anomalous density change, i.e. change in local structure, with temperature or pressure. In this letter we present the first experimental evidence for a phase transition in a low viscosity liquid that is not driven by an anomalous density change, but by an approach to a constant configuration state. A maximum in the specific heat at constant pressure, similar to what is normally observed near T,, is reported here for undercooled low viscosity liquids of quasicrystal- forming Ti-Zr-Ni alloys. that includes cooperativity, by incorporating a temperature dependent excitation energy fits the data well, signaling a phase transition.

  2. Stabilization of MIV = Ti, Zr, Hf, Ce, and Th using a selenium bis(phenolate) ligand.

    PubMed

    Behrle, Andrew C; Levin, Jessica R; Kim, Jee Eon; Drewett, Jonathan M; Barnes, Charles L; Schelter, Eric J; Walensky, Justin R

    2015-02-14

    We report M(iv) M = Ti, Zr, Hf, Ce, and Th, complexes of a selenium bis(phenolate) ligand, 2,2'-selenobis(4,6-di-tert-butylphenol), (H(2)(Ar)OSeO), 1. Reaction of Ti(NEt(2))(4) with two equivalents of affords Ti((Ar)OSeO)(2), 2. Salt metathesis of ZrCl(4) and HfCl(4) with two equivalents of Na(2)(Ar)OSeO produces Zr((Ar)OSeO)(2)(THF), 3, and Hf((Ar)OSeO)(2)(THF), 4, respectively. Protonolysis of ThCl[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) with two equivalents of yields Th((Ar)OSeO)(2)(THF)(2), 5. Salt metathesis of Ce(OTf)(3) and two equivalents of Na(2)(Ar)OSeO produces [Na(THF)(3)][Ce((Ar)OSeO)(2)], which was oxidized in situ using 0.5 equivalents of I(2) to yield the diamagnetic Ce(iv) product, Ce((Ar)OSeO)(2)(THF)(2), 6. Addition of 2,2'-bipyridyl to forms Ce((Ar)OSeO)(2)(bipy), 6a. Each diamagnetic complex was characterized using (1)H, (13)C, and (77)Se NMR and IR spectroscopy and the structures of 2-6a were established with X-ray crystallography. Electrochemical measurements using cyclic voltammetry on complexes 2, 5, and 6a re also reported. PMID:25209827

  3. Characterization of multi-principal-element (TiZrNbHfTa)N and (TiZrNbHfTa)C coatings for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Braic, V; Balaceanu, M; Braic, M; Vladescu, A; Panseri, S; Russo, A

    2012-06-01

    Multi-principal-element (TiZrNbHfTa)N and (TiZrNbHfTa)C coatings were deposited on Ti6Al4V alloy by co-sputtering of Ti, Zr, Nb, Hf and Ta metallic targets in reactive atmosphere. The coatings were analyzed for elemental and phase compositions, crystalline structure, morphology, residual stress, hardness, friction performance, wear-corrosion resistance and cell viability. For all the films, only simple fcc solid solutions with (111) preferred orientations were found, with crystallite sizes in the range 7.2-13.5 nm. The coatings were subjected to compressive stress, with values ranging from 0.8 to 1.6 GPa. The carbide coating with the highest carbon content (carbon/metal ≈1.3) exhibited the highest hardness of about 31 GPa, the best friction behavior (μ = 0.12) and the highest wear resistance (wear rate K=0.2×10(-6)mm(3)N(-1)m(-1)), when testing in simulated body fluids (SBFs). Cell viability tests proved that the osteoblast cells were adherent to the coated substrates, and a very high percentage of live cells were observed on sample surfaces, after 72 h incubation time. PMID:22520431

  4. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of nanocrystalline TiZrN films on AISI 304 stainless steel substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Huang, Jia-Hong; Yu, Ge-Ping

    2010-07-15

    This study investigated the microstructure and properties of nanocrystalline TiZrN films on AISI 304 stainless steel substrate. TiZrN films were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering based on the previous optimum coating conditions (substrate temperature, system pressure, nitrogen flow, etc.) for TiN and ZrN thin films. The composition ratio of TiZrN coatings were adjusted by changing the Zr target power, while keeping the Ti target power constant. Experiments were conduced to find the optimum composition with desired properties. The ratio of TiZrN composition was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometer. In terms of phase formation, there were two types of coatings that were considered: single-phase solid solutions of TiZrN and interlacing nuclei of TiZr in the matrix of TiZrN. The thickness of all TiZrN films as measured by the secondary ion mass spectroscopy was about 500 nm, and the composition depth profiles indicated that the compositions in the TiZrN films were uniform from the film surface to the 304 stainless steel substrate. The crystal structure of the TiZrN films was determined by x-ray diffraction using a M18XHF-SRA diffractometer with Cu K{sub {alpha}} radiation. A diffraction peak of TiZrN (002) was observed between that of TiN (002) and ZrN (002); similarly, a diffraction peak of TiZrN (111) was observed between that of TiN(111) and ZrN(111), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the TiZrN film deposited on the 304 stainless steel has been investigated by electrochemical measurement. The electrolyte, 0.5M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} containing 0.05M KSCN, was used for the potentiodynamic polarization. The potentiodynamic scan was conducted from -800 to 800 mV standard calomel electrode (SCE).

  5. [Animal experiment study of titanium with surface coatings of (Ti,Nb)ON and (Ti,Zr)O].

    PubMed

    Thull, R; Handke, K D; Karle, E J

    1995-10-01

    Titanium is considered to be biocompatible as long as the passive layer of TiO2 which is formed within the body, is not destroyed mechanically by the shearing forces acting on implants during function. Mechanically stable hard coatings on the basis of the so-called refractory metals render titanium wear-and-tear-resistant, with the added advantage for its biocompatibility of keeping its the physical and electrochemical properties constant, even in the event of relative movement against hard or soft tissue. Biological testing of coated and uncoated titanium in experimental animals shows that the deposition of new bone on (Ti,Zr)O or (Ti,Nb)ON surfaces takes place in the same way as on the surface of titanium. PMID:8527641

  6. A Novel Liquid-Liquid Transition in Undercooled Ti-Zr-Ni Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. W.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Kelton, K. F.; Bradshaw, R. C.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    If crystallization can be avoided, liquids enter a metastable (undercooled) state below their equilibrium liquidus temperatures, T(sub l), finally 'freezing' into a glass below a characteristic temperature called the glass transition temperature, T(sub g). In rare cases, the undercooled liquid may undergo a liquid-liquid phase transition (liquid polymorphism) before entering the glassy state. This has been suggested from experimental studies of H2O and Si. Such phase transitions have been predicted in some stable liquids, ie. above T(sub l) at atmospheric pressure, for SiO2 and BeF2, but these have not been verified experimentally. They have been observed in liquids of P, Si and C, but only under high pressure. In this letter we present the first experimental evidence for a phase transition in a low viscosity metallic liquid that is driven by an approach to a constant entropy configuration state and correlated with a growing icosahedral order in the liquid. A maximum in the specific heat at constant pressure, similar to what is normally observed near T(sub g), is reported for undercooled liquids of quasicrystal-forming Ti-Zr-Ni alloys. A two-state excitation model that includes cooperativity by incorporating a temperature-dependent excitation energy, fits the specific heat data well, signaling a phase transition. An inflection in the liquid density with decreasing temperature instead of a discontinuity indicates that this is not a typical first order phase transition; it could be a weakly first order or higher order transition. While showing many similarities to a glass transition, this liquid-liquid phase transition occurs in a mobile liquid, making it novel.

  7. Decomposition of a solid solution in the ω phase of the Ti-Zr system under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkin, I. O.; Shestakov, V. V.; Sakharov, M. K.; Fedotov, V. K.; Ponyatovskiĭ, E. G.

    2008-07-01

    Phase separation in the hexagonal ω modification of the Ti-Zr system was observed. The ω → ω1 + ω2 decomposition in an equiatomic TiZr alloy after prolonged thermal treatment at P = 5.5 ± 0.6 GPa and T = 440 ± 30°C was revealed using x-ray diffraction. It is found that the concentration dependence of the specific volume of the ω phase of Ti-Zr alloys deviates from the Vegard law to higher values. An isobaric section of the equilibrium P- T- x phase diagram of the Ti-Zr system is shown to have the shape of an eutectoid diagram at pressures higher than 8 GPa.

  8. Electrochemical properties of melt spun Si-Cu-Ti-Zr-Ni alloy powders for the anode of Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Seong Min; Sohn, Keun Yong; Park, Won-Wook

    2014-07-01

    The Si-Cu-Ti-Zr-Ni alloys of various compositions were prepared using arc-melting under an argon atmosphere, and the alloys were re-melted several times to ensure chemical homogeneity. The alloyed ingots were melt-spun to produce rapidly solidified ribbons under vacuum in order to prevent oxidation. Finely dispersed silicon particles 50-100 nm in diameter mainly consisting of Cu3Si, NiSi2 and TiSi2 phases were formed in the matrices. The alloy ribbons were then fragmented using ball-milling to produce powders. In order to evaluate the electrochemical properties of the alloys, anode electrodes were fabricated by mixing the active alloy materials (80 wt. %) with Ketjenblack® (2 wt. %) as a conductive material and polyamide imide (PAI, 8 wt. %) binder, and the mixtures were dissolved in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) and SFG6 (10 wt. %). The anode performances of Si-Cu-Ti-Zr-Ni alloy cells were measured in the range 0.01-1.5 V (versus Li/Li+). The results showed that the Si68(Cu47Ti34Zr11Ni8)32 alloy ribbons had the highest specific discharge capacities, and the Si68(Cu40Ti40Zr10Ni10)32 alloy ribbons had relatively stable electrochemical properties and cycle performances due to the very fine microstructure including partially distributed amorphous phase. The matrix phases of the Si-Cu-Ti-Zr-Ni alloy ribbons effectively accommodated the change in Si particle volume during cycling.

  9. Multiwalled Nanotubes Formed by Catanionic Mixtures of Drug Amphiphiles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mixing of oppositely charged amphiphilic molecules (catanionic mixing) offers an attractive strategy to produce morphologies different from those formed by individual molecules. We report here on the use of catanionic mixing of anticancer drug amphiphiles to construct multiwalled nanotubes containing a fixed and high drug loading. We found that the molecular mixing ratio, the solvent composition, the overall drug concentrations, as well as the molecular design of the studied amphiphiles are all important experimental parameters contributing to the tubular morphology. We believe these results demonstrate the remarkable potential that anticancer drugs could offer to self-assemble into discrete nanostructures and also provide important insight into the formation mechanism of nanotubes by catanionic mixtures. Our preliminary animal studies reveal that the CPT nanotubes show significantly prolonged retention time in the tumor site after intratumoral injection. PMID:25415538

  10. Thin single-wall BN-nanotubes formed inside carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Ryo; Kitaura, Ryo; Warner, Jamie H.; Yamamoto, Yuta; Arai, Shigeo; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Shinohara, Hisanori

    2013-01-01

    We report a high yield synthesis of single-wall boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) inside single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), a nano-templated reaction, using ammonia borane complexes (ABC) as a precursor. Transmission electron microscope (TEM), high angle annular dark field (HAADF)-scanning TEM (STEM), electron energy loss spectra (EELS) and high resolution EELS mapping using aberration-corrected TEM system clearly show the formation of thin SWBNNTs inside SWCNTs. We have found that the yield of the SWBNNT formation is high and that the most of ABC molecules decompose and fuse to form the thin BNNTs at a temperature of 1,673 K having a narrow diameter distribution of 0.7 ± 0.1 nm. Optical absorption measurements suggest that the band gap of the thin SWBNNTs is about 6.0 eV, which provide the ideal insulator nanotubes with very small diameters. PMID:23459405

  11. The effect of C content on the mechanical properties of Ti-Zr coatings.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, M G; Jiménez, O; Alvarado-Hernández, F; Flores, M; Andrade, E; Canto, C E; Ávila, C; Espinoza-Beltrán, F

    2015-09-01

    In this study, Ti-Zr and Ti-Zr-C coatings were deposited at room temperature via pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering. A 70Ti-30Zr at% target and a 99.99% graphite plate were used to deposit samples. In order to modify C content, coatings were deposited at different target powers such as 50, 75 and 100 W. Changes on the structure, microstructure and mechanical properties due to C addition were studied. Results indicate that the as-deposited coatings were partly crystalline and that an increment on C content stabilized α' phase and inhibited the appearance of ω precipitates. Therefore, Ti-Zr-C alloys with C>1.9 at% showed only α' phase whereas the others alloys exhibited α'+ω structures. Hardness values from 12.94 to 34.31 GPa were obtained, whereas the elastic modulus was found between 181.84 and 298 GPa. Finally, a high elastic recovery ratio (0.69-0.87) was observed as a function of composition. The overall properties of these coatings were improved due to C content increment, martensitic α' phase and nanocrystalline grain size (10-16 nm). PMID:26056996

  12. Microstructure and Characteristics of Ba(Ti,Zr)O3 Ceramics with Addition of Glass Frit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Huy

    2002-08-01

    Microstructure and characteristics of Ba(Ti,Zr)O3 ceramics are significantly influenced by the addition of 4PbO.B2O3. The melting temperature of 4PbO.B2O3 was approximately 500°C, and thus it provides a liquid phase during sintering. At low sintering temperatures, the grain growth of Ba(Ti,Zr)O3 ceramics is enhanced by capillary rearrangement and solution-reprecipitation from the liquid phase. At high sintering temperatures, exaggerated grain growth of Ba(Ti,Zr)O3 ceramics is restrained by the presence of a liquid phase. The spreading liquid can penetrate the solid-solid interfaces. Penetration leads to disintegration of the solid and the subsequent rearrangement of fragments. With increasing amounts of 4PbO.B2O3, the tetragonal c/a ratio and Curie point temperature increase, but the dielectric loss tangent is depressed. With a suitable amount of glass frit and temperature for sintering, the density is enhanced and the values of the planar coupling factor and the poled dielectric constant are improved.

  13. The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of quaternary Heusler alloy TiZrCoIn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng-Li; Zhang, Jian-Min; Xu, Ke-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Employing the first-principles calculations, we have investigated the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of quaternary Heusler alloy TiZrCoIn. The TiZrCoIn alloy with type (I) configuration is predicted to be half-metallic ferromagnet at its equilibrium lattice constant 6.525 Å with an indirect band gap of 0.930 eV in minority spin channel. The total magnetic moment is 2 μB/f.u., following the Slater-Pauling rule μt=Zt-18. Moreover, the negative formation energy indicates the thermodynamical stability of this alloy. The band gap of minority spin channel is determined by the bonding (t2g) and antibonding (t1u) states created from the hybridizations of the d states of transition metal atoms Ti, Zr and Co. In addition, the HM, character is kept as hydrostatic strain ranged from -10% to 7.6% and tetragonal strain ranged from -19% to 27%.

  14. Structural, stability and electronic properties of C15-AB2 (A = Ti, Zr; B = Cr) intermetallic compounds and their hydrides: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhaddi, Reza; Arabi, Hadi; Pourarian, Faiz

    2014-05-01

    The structural, stability and electronic properties of C15-AB2 (A = Ti, Zr; B = Cr) isomeric intermetallic compounds were systematically investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) and plane-wave pseudo-potential (PW-PP) method. The macroscopic properties including the lattice constant, bulk modulus and stability for these compounds were studied before and after hydrogenation. For parent compounds, the enthalpy of formation was evaluated with regard to their bulk modules and electronic structures. After hydrogenation of compounds at different interstitial tetrahedral sites (A2B2, A1B3, B4), a volume expansion was found for hydrides. The stability properties of hydrides characterized the A2B2 sites as the site preference of hydrogen atoms for both compounds. The Miedema's "reverse stability" rule is also satisfied in these compounds as lower the enthalpy of formation for the host compound, the more stable the hydride. Analysis of microscopic properties (electronic structures) after hydrogenation at more stable interstitial site (A2B2) shows that the H atoms interact stronger with the weaker (or non) hydride forming element B (Cr) than the hydride forming element A (Ti/Zr). A correlation was also found between the stability of the hydrides and their electronic structure: the deeper the hydrogen band, the less stable the hydride.

  15. Electrochemical formation of self-organized anodic nanotube coating on Ti-28Zr-8Nb biomedical alloy surface.

    PubMed

    Feng, X J; Macak, J M; Albu, S P; Schmuki, P

    2008-03-01

    In recent years, Ti-Zr-Nb alloys have become increasingly attractive as biomedical implant materials. In the present communication, we report the formation of self-organized nanotube oxide layers on a Ti-28Zr-8Nb biomedical alloy surface in 1M (NH4)2SO4 containing 0.25M NH4F. The morphology of the nanotube layers (the diameter and the length) is affected by the electrochemical conditions used (applied potential and time). Under specific conditions oxide layers consisting of highly ordered nanotubes with a wide range of diameters and lengths can be formed, varying, respectively, from approx. 50 to 300nm and from approx. 500nm to 22microm. The present results are highly promising for this biomedical alloy, as the large surface area and the tunable nanoscale geometry of the surface oxide provide novel pathways for the interaction of the materials with biorelevant species, such as cells and proteins. PMID:17923448

  16. Surface morphology of nanotube formed Ti alloy by electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hwan; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate the surface morphology of nanotube formed Ti alloy by electrochemical methods, the Ti-6Al-4V alloys for dental implant were used in this study. Heat treatment was carried out at 800 degrees C for 1 hour and then water quenching in argon atmosphere, that will be have a specimen name of 800 WQ. The formation of nanotube structure was conducted by electrochemical method on Ti-6Al-4V alloy in mixed electrolytes at 30 V for 1 hour. Microstructure of β phases showed dot-like structures at non-treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and needle-like in equiaxed structure from treated the alloy at 800 WQ. In non-treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy case, nanotubes only exhibited at α phase region with dissolved V-oxide area of β phase. However, in the case of 800 WQ, nanotubes of Ti-6Al-4V alloy exhibited at both α and βphase region. Electrochemical corrosion studies showed that the nanotubular alloy of 800 WQ possesses slightly higher corrosion resistance than that of non-treated nanotubular alloy. PMID:25958530

  17. Bone bonding bioactivity of Ti metal and Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys with Ca ions incorporated on their surfaces by simple chemical and heat treatments.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, A; Takemoto, M; Saito, T; Fujibayashi, S; Neo, M; Yamaguchi, S; Kizuki, T; Matsushita, T; Niinomi, M; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T

    2011-03-01

    Ti15Zr4Nb4Ta and Ti29Nb13Ta4.6Zr, which do not contain the potentially cytotoxic elements V and Al, represent a new generation of alloys with improved corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, and cytocompatibility. Recently it has become possible for the apatite forming ability of these alloys to be ascertained by treatment with alkali, CaCl2, heat, and water (ACaHW). In order to confirm the actual in vivo bioactivity of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) and these alloys after subjecting them to ACaHW treatment at different temperatures, the bone bonding strength of implants made from these materials was evaluated. The failure load between implant and bone was measured for treated and untreated plates at 4, 8, 16, and 26 weeks after implantation in rabbit tibia. The untreated implants showed almost no bonding, whereas all treated implants showed successful bonding by 4 weeks, and the failure load subsequently increased with time. This suggests that a simple and economical ACaHW treatment could successfully be used to impart bone bonding bioactivity to Ti metal and Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys in vivo. In particular, implants heat treated at 700 °C exhibited significantly greater bone bonding strength, as well as augmented in vitro apatite formation, in comparison with those treated at 600 °C. Thus, with this improved bioactive treatment process these advantageous Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys can serve as useful candidates for orthopedic devices. PMID:20883837

  18. Histomorphometric and histologic evaluation of titanium-zirconium (aTiZr) implants with anodized surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay; McQuillan, A James; Shibata, Yo; Sharma, Lavanya A; Waddell, John Neil; Duncan, Warwick John

    2016-05-01

    The choice of implant surface has a significant influence on osseointegration. Modification of TiZr surface by anodization is reported to have the potential to modulate the osteoblast cell behaviour favouring more rapid bone formation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of anodizing the surface of TiZr discs with respect to osseointegration after four weeks implantation in sheep femurs. Titanium (Ti) and TiZr discs were anodized in an electrolyte containing DL-α-glycerophosphate and calcium acetate at 300 V. The surface characteristics were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and goniometry. Forty implant discs with thickness of 1.5 and 10 mm diameter (10 of each-titanium, titanium-zirconium, anodized titanium and anodized titanium-zirconium) were placed in the femoral condyles of 10 sheep. Histomorphometric and histologic analysis were performed 4 weeks after implantation. The anodized implants displayed hydrophilic, porous, nano-to-micrometer scale roughened surfaces. Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis revealed calcium and phosphorous incorporation into the surface of both titanium and titanium-zirconium after anodization. Histologically there was new bone apposition on all implanted discs, slightly more pronounced on anodised discs. The percentage bone-to-implant contact measurements of anodized implants were higher than machined/unmodified implants but there was no significant difference between the two groups with anodized surfaces (P > 0.05, n = 10). The present histomorphometric and histological findings confirm that surface modification of titanium-zirconium by anodization is similar to anodised titanium enhances early osseointegration compared to machined implant surfaces. PMID:26970768

  19. Electron dominated thermoelectric response in MNiSn (M: Ti, Zr, Hf) half-Heusler alloys.

    PubMed

    Gandi, Appala Naidu; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-05-18

    We solve the transport equations of the electrons and phonons to understand the thermoelectric behaviour of the technologically important half-Heusler alloys MNiSn (M: Ti, Zr, Hf). Doping is simulated within the rigid band approximation. We clarify the origin of the electron dominated thermoelectric response and determine the carrier concentrations with maximal figures of merit. The phonon mean free path is studied to calculate the grain size below which grain refinement methods can enforce ballistic heat conduction to enhance the figure of merit. PMID:27156360

  20. Formation ranges of icosahedral, amorphous and crystalline phases in rapidly solidified Ti-Zr-Hf-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N. . E-mail: asyzxy@imr.edu; Louzguine, D.V.; Ranganathan, S.; Inoue, A.

    2005-02-01

    From the quaternary Ti-Zr-Hf-Ni phase diagram, the cross-section at 20 at.% Ni was selected for investigation. The icosahedral quasicrystalline, crystalline and amorphous phases were observed to form in nine kinds of rapidly solidified (Ti{sub x}Zr{sub y}Hf{sub z}){sub 80}Ni{sub 20} (x + y + z = 1) alloys at different compositions. The quasilattice constants of 0.519 and 0.531 nm were obtained for the icosahedral phase formed in the melt-spun Ti{sub 40}Zr{sub 20}Hf{sub 20}Ni{sub 20} and Ti{sub 20}Zr{sub 40}Hf{sub 20}Ni{sub 20} alloys, respectively. The icosahedral phase formed in the melt-spun Ti{sub 40}Zr{sub 20}Hf{sub 20}Ni{sub 20} alloy especially is thermodynamically stable. The supercooled liquid region of the Ti{sub 20}Zr{sub 20}Hf{sub 40}Ni{sub 20} glassy alloy reached 64 K. From these results a comparison of quasicrystal-forming and glass-forming abilities was carried out. The quasicrystal-forming ability was reduced and glass-forming ability was improved with an increase in Hf and Zr contents in the (Ti{sub x}Zr{sub y}Hf{sub z}){sub 80}Ni{sub 20} alloys. On the other hand, an increase in Ti content caused an improvement in quasicrystal-forming ability.

  1. Hydriding of TiZrNiFe nanocompounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żywczak, A.; Shinya, Daigo; Gondek, Ł.; Takasaki, Akito; Figiel, H.

    2010-01-01

    Ti-based quasicrystals belong to the second largest group of the stable quasicrystals, showing attractive properties as hydrogen storage materials. The Ti 45Zr 38Ni 17 intermetallic compound forms an icosahedral ( i-phase) structure, in which Ti and Zr atoms possess very good chemical affinity for hydrogen absorption. We modified the Ti 45Zr 38Ni 17 compounds by substituting 3d metals (iron) for Ni to obtain amorphous phase. The samples were produced by mechanical alloying. The 3d metal atoms are located in the same positions as nickel. The structural characterization was made by means of XRD measurements. Thermodynamic properties were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The obtained amorphous phases Ti 45Zr 38Ni (9,13)Fe (8,4) transform to the i-phase at the similar temperature range as Ti 45Zr 38Ni 17. The final concentration of absorbed hydrogen depends on the amount of Fe. When increasing the amount of iron, the hydrogen release temperature becomes lower. After hydriding, the samples decompose into simple metal hydrides.

  2. Analysis of Hydrogenated Ti-Zr-Ni alloys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzoub, E. H.; Viano, A. M.; Kelton, K. F.; Yelon, W. B.; Goldman, A. I.

    1996-03-01

    The polytetrahedral order in quasicrystals deserves close attention for pragmatic reasons. It is well known that hydrogen atoms prefer to sit in tetrahedral interstitial sites in transition metals and their alloys. Since the number of tetrahedral intersticies is presumed large in quasicrystals, it is interesting to see how much hydrogen can be stored in them. Additionally, hydrogen in quasicrystals can be of great help in locating tetrahedral sites, since neutron diffraction of a loaded sample will determine the position of the hydrogen atoms. We present results of elastic neutron scattering studies of deuterated tzn453817. Samples were deuterated using the gas phase method, samples were hydrogenated using both the gas phase method and by electrochemical means. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was performed on loaded samples to determine stability of phases formed and to estimate transition enthalpies. Approximate binding energies of hydrogen in the host alloy were determined using DSC enthalpies and are shown to be in the range of 1eV/H atom for tzn453817 alloys. Chemical variations in the alloy tvzn45-xx3817 are shown to affect this binding energy quite dramatically.

  3. Decomposition of the ω-phase in the equiatomic TiZr alloy under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkin, I. O.; Shestakov, V. V.; Sakharov, M. K.; Ponyatovsky, E. G.

    2008-07-01

    The phase decomposition phenomenon is found in the hexagonal ω-phase of the Ti—Zr system under high pressure. The ω → ω1 + ω2 decomposition of the equiatomic TiZr alloy occurred due to long thermobaric treatment at P = 5.5±0.6 GPa and T = 710±30 K. The chemical compositions of the ω1- and ω2-phases recovered to ambient conditions were estimated from the X-ray data to be around Ti20Zr80 and Ti83Zr17. The experimental data were used to calculate the mixing energy and the top of the decomposition curve in the isobaric T-C diagram of this system. We find that the equilibrium T-C phase diagram of the Ti-Zr system at pressures above ~8 GPa is of the eutectoid type with the high-temperature β-phase and the low-temperature ω1- and ω2-phases.

  4. Matrix Infrared Spectra and Quantum Chemical Calculations of Ti, Zr, and Hf Dihydride Phosphinidene and Arsinidene Molecules.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Lester; Cho, Han-Gook

    2016-09-01

    Laser ablated Ti, Zr, and Hf atoms react with phosphine during condensation in excess argon or neon at 4 K to form metal hydride insertion phosphides (H2P-MH) and metal dihydride phosphinidenes (HP═MH2) with metal phosphorus double bonds, which are characterized by their intense metal-hydride stretching frequencies. Both products are formed spontaneously on annealing the solid matrix samples, which suggests that both products are relaxed from the initial higher energy M-PH3 intermediate complex, which is not observed. B3LYP (DFT) calculations show that these phosphinidenes are strongly agostic with acute H-P═M angles in the 60° range, even smaller than those for the analogous methylidenes (carbenes) (CH2═MH2) and in contrast to the almost linear H-N═Ti subunit in the imines (H-N═TiH2). Comparison of calculated agostic and terminal bond lengths and covalent bond radii for HP═TiH2 with computed bond lengths for Al2H6 finds that these strong agostic Ti-H bonds are 18% longer than single covalent bonds, and the bridged bonds in dialane are 10% longer than the terminal Al-H single bonds, which show that these agostic bonds can also be considered as bridged bonds. The analogous arsinidenes (HAs═MH2) have 4° smaller agostic angles and almost the same metal-hydride stretching frequencies and double bond orders. Calculations with fixed H-P-Ti and H-As-Ti angles (170.0°) and Cs symmetry find that electronic energies increased by 36 and 44 kJ/mol, respectively, which provide estimates for the agostic/bridged bonding energies. PMID:27558006

  5. Comments on the equilibrium diagram of the Ti-Zr system

    SciTech Connect

    Ruch, M. . Depto INEND); Arias, D. . Dept Materiales)

    1993-08-15

    The Ti-Zr system is a continuous series of solid solutions in both the [alpha]- and [beta]-phases, with a congruent minimum at Ti-50at%Zr. The equilibrium diagram has been reviewed by Murray in 1981, who accepts the [alpha]/[beta] temperature for this minimum determined by Farrar and Adler by metallographic techniques. Etchessahar and Debuigne measured by dilatometry a transformation temperature of (894 [plus minus])K and (859[plus minus]2)K for [alpha]/[alpha] + [beta] and [beta]/[alpha] + [beta] respectively, and later in a high temperature Calvet microcalorimeter, 883K. Blacktop et al find that this value is consistent with their measurements of the [alpha]/[beta] transformation temperature in Ti-40%Zr and Ti-60%Zr in a high temperature calorimeter. In the present work, the [alpha]/[beta] transformation temperature was measured by several techniques. The effect of impurities is considered in both transformation temperature and microstructure of product phases.

  6. p-t-x diagram of Pb(TiZr)O/sub 3/ solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Polandov, I.N.; Alekhina, N.S.; Gulish, O.K.; Isaev, G.P.; Malyutin, B.I.

    1986-07-01

    This paper attempts to generalize work the authors performed at high pressures on the phase equilibria in the PbTiO/sub 3/-PbZrO/sub 3/ system for Ti contents up to 50 at.%, i.e., the most interesting compositions from the practical standpoint. It is established that the rhombohedral ferroelectric phase, localized near the Curie point, not only expands its region of temperature stability, but also shifts its region of temperature stability to higher pressures with rise of solid solution Ti content. The authors construct for the first time the complete p-t-x diagram of Pb(Ti, Zr)O/sub 3/ solid solutions with Ti contents up to 50 at.%.

  7. Dissolution of amorphous Ti-Zr-Si alloy during anodic oxidation with formation of barrier films

    SciTech Connect

    Isaev, N.I.; Yakovlev, V.B.; Iovdal'skii, A.A.; Gorshkov, T.P.

    1988-07-01

    Radiometric analysis of a solution has been used to study kinetic mechanisms for dissolution of amorphous alloy components in acid aqueous solutions with anodic oxidation in different regimes. In a galvanostatic regime for alloy and crystalline Ti, Zr, and Ta two sections are detected: an initial section of accelerated dissolution and a steady section. An increase in dissolution of zirconium from the alloy has been revealed compared with pure crystalline zirconium. Potentiostatic oxidation is accompanied by a slowdown in dissolution similar to a change in current. Current yield has been analyzed for dissolution of the main elements and nonrectifying impurities of the alloy (for example copper). Gamma spectroscopy using the gamma radiation from neutron-activated isotopes of the components and impurities was performed.

  8. Effect of Microstructure on Reliability of Ca(TiZr)O3-Based Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoki, Tomoo; Naito, Masahiro; Sano, Harunobu; Konoike, Takehiro; Tomono, Kunisaburo

    2000-09-01

    We examined the reliability of Ca(TiZr)O3 (CTZ)-based Ni-electrode multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCs) prepared by two different processes with particular interest in the microstructure. One process was to calcine the mixture of CaCO3 and TiO2 to prepare CaTiO3 (CT) powder and the mixture of CaCO3 and ZrO2 to prepare CaZrO3 (CZ) powder, and then mix these calcined powders and sinter them to synthesize the CTZ-based ceramics. The other was to calcine the mixture of CaCO3, TiO2 and ZrO2 powders together to prepare CTZ powder and then sinter them. These two processes of CTZ ceramic preparation resulted in a different crystallinity and distribution of the elements. We found that these factors influenced the reliability of CTZ-based MLCs.

  9. Continuous production of granular or powder Ti, Zr and Hf or their alloy products

    DOEpatents

    White, Jack C.; Oden, Laurance L.

    1993-01-01

    A continuous process for producing a granular metal selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr or Hf under conditions that provide orderly growth of the metal free of halide inclusions comprising: a) dissolving a reducing metal selected from the group consisting of Na, Mg, Li or K in their respective halide salts to produce a reducing molten salt stream; b) preparing a second molten salt stream containing the halide salt of Ti, Zr or Hf; c) mixing and reacting the two molten streams of steps a) and b) in a continuous stirred tank reactor; d) wherein steps a) through c) are conducted at a temperature range of from about 800.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. so that a weight percent of equilibrium solubility of the reducing metal in its respective halide salt varies from about 1.6 weight percent at about 900.degree. C. to about 14.4 weight percent at about 1062.degree. C.; and wherein a range of concentration of the halide salt of Ti, Zn or Hf in molten halides of Na, Mg, Li or K is from about 1 to about 5 times the concentration of Na, Mg, Li or K; e) placing the reacted molten stream from step c) in a solid-liquid separator to recover an impure granular metal product by decantation, centrifugation, or filtration; and f) removing residual halide salt impurity by vacuum evaporator or inert gas sweep at temperatures from about 850.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. or cooling the impure granular metal product to ambient temperature and water leaching off the residual metal halide salt.

  10. New insights into the initial stages of Ta oxide nanotube formation on polycrystalline Ta electrodes.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Hany A; Horwood, Corie A; Abhayawardhana, Anusha D; Birss, Viola I

    2013-02-21

    Ta oxide nanotubes (NTs) were formed by the anodization of Ta at 15 V in a solution of concentrated sulfuric acid containing 0.8-1.0 M hydrofluoric acid. To study the initial stages of NT formation, FESEM images of samples anodized for very short times were obtained. The results contradict the existing explanation of the current-time data collected during anodization, which has persisted in the literature for more than two decades. In addition to providing a first-time morphological study of Ta oxide NT formation at very early stages of anodization, we also propose a new interpretation of the i-t response, showing that pores are already present in the first few milliseconds of anodization and that NTs are formed well before present models predict. This behaviour may also extend to the anodization of other valve metals, such as Al, Ti, Zr, W, and Nb. PMID:23338813

  11. Optical and structural properties of sol gel made Ce/Ti/Zr mixed oxide thin films as transparent counter electrode for electrochromic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodsi, F. E.; Tepehan, F. Z.; Tepehan, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    Ce/Ti/Zr mixed oxide thin films were prepared using sol-gel process with mole ratios from 45/5 to 5/45 of Ti/Zr and 50 of Ce and deposited by dip coating technique. Optical, electrochromic, and structural properties of such films were investigated. The thickness, refractive index, and extinction coefficient of the films were calculated through transmission and reflection measurement by an nkd spectrophotometer. The surface morphology and structural behaviors of the films were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Cyclic voltammetry measurements also were used to study electrochromic properties of these films. The best counter electrode Ce/Ti/Zr oxide thin film is achieved for the sample with a mole ratio of 40/10 of Ti/Zr. The ratio between anodic and cathodic charge is about 0.95 for this sample with a surface roughness of 1.8 nm.

  12. Studies of thin films of Ti- Zr -V as non-evaporable getter films prepared by RF sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Nidhi; Jagannath,; Sharma, R. K.; Gadkari, S. C.; Muthe, K. P.; Mukundhan, R.; Gupta, S. K.

    2013-02-05

    Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) films of the Ti-Zr-V prepared on stainless steel substrates by Radio Frequency sputtering. To observe its getter behavior at the lowest activation temperature, the sample is heated continuously at different temperatures (100 Degree-Sign C, 150 Degree-Sign C, 200 Degree-Sign C and 250 Degree-Sign C) for 2 hours. The changes of the surface chemical composition at different temperaturesare analyzed by using XPS and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) techniques. The volume elemental composition of the film has been measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The in-situ XPS measurements of the activated getter films show the disappearance of the superficial oxide layer through the variation in the oxygen stoichiometry during thermal activation. Results of these studies show that the deposited films of Ti-Zr-V could be used as NEG to produce extreme high vacuum.

  13. Deposition And Characterization of (Ti,Zr)N Thin Films Grown Through PAPVD By The Pulsed Arc Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Marulanda, D. M.; Trujillo, O.; Devia, A.

    2006-12-04

    The Plasma Assisted Physic Vapor Deposition (PAPVD) by the pulsed arc technique has been used for deposition of Titanium Zirconium Nitride (Ti,Zr)N coatings, using a segmented target of TiZr. The deposition was performed in a vacuum chamber with two faced electrodes (target and substrate) using nitrogen as working gas, and a power-controlled source used to produce the arc discharges. Films were deposited on stainless steel 304, and they were characterized using the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy (EDS) and Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) techniques. The XRD patterns show different planes in which the film grows. Through SPM, using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Lateral Force Microscopy (LFM) modes, a nanotribologic study of the thin film was made, determining hardness and friction coefficient.

  14. The Aβ peptide forms non-amyloid fibrils in the presence of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jinghui; Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.; Yu, Chien-Hung; Muhammad, Kamran; Gräslund, Astrid; Pieter Abrahams, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have specific properties that make them potentially useful in biomedicine and biotechnology. However, carbon nanotubes may themselves be toxic, making it imperative to understand how carbon nanotubes interact with biomolecules such as proteins. Here, we used NMR, CD, and ThT/fluorescence spectroscopy together with AFM imaging to study pH-dependent molecular interactions between single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. The aggregation of the Aβ peptide, first into oligomers and later into amyloid fibrils, is considered to be the toxic mechanism behind Alzheimer's disease. We found that SWNTs direct the Aβ peptides to form a new class of β-sheet-rich yet non-amyloid fibrils.Carbon nanotubes have specific properties that make them potentially useful in biomedicine and biotechnology. However, carbon nanotubes may themselves be toxic, making it imperative to understand how carbon nanotubes interact with biomolecules such as proteins. Here, we used NMR, CD, and ThT/fluorescence spectroscopy together with AFM imaging to study pH-dependent molecular interactions between single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. The aggregation of the Aβ peptide, first into oligomers and later into amyloid fibrils, is considered to be the toxic mechanism behind Alzheimer's disease. We found that SWNTs direct the Aβ peptides to form a new class of β-sheet-rich yet non-amyloid fibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00291a

  15. Characteristics of Ti-Nb, Ti-Zr and Ti-Al containing hydrogenated carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaceanu, M.; Braic, V.; Braic, M.; Vladescu, A.; Zoita, C. N.; Grigorescu, C. E. A.; Grigore, E.; Ripeanu, R.

    2009-10-01

    Nanocomposite Me-C-N:H coatings (Me is TiNb, TiZr or TiAl), with relatively high non-metal/metal ratios, were prepared by cathodic arc method using TiNb, TiZr and TiAl alloy cathodes in a CH 4 + N 2 atmosphere. For comparison purposes, a-C-N:H films were also produced through evaporating a graphite cathode in a similar atmosphere. The films were characterized in terms of elemental and phase compositions, chemical bonds, texture, hardness, adhesion and friction behavior by GDOES, XPS, Raman spectroscopy and XRD techniques, surface profilometry, hardness and scratch adhesion measurements, and tribological tests. The nanocomposite films consisted of a mixture of crystalline metal carbonitride and amorphous carbon nitride. The non-metal/metal ratio in the films composition was found to range between 1.8 and 1.9. For the metal containing nanocomposites, grain size in the range 7-23 nm, depending on the metal nature, were determined. As compared with the a-C-N:H, the Me-C-N:H films exhibited a much higher hardness (up to about 39 GPa for Ti-Zr-C-N:H) and a better adhesion strength, while the coefficients of friction were somewhat higher (0.2-0.3 for Me-C-N:H and 0.1 for a-C-N:H).

  16. Mechanics of capillary forming of aligned carbon nanotube assemblies.

    PubMed

    Tawfick, Sameh; Zhao, Zhouzhou; Maschmann, Matthew; Brieland-Shoultz, Anna; De Volder, Michael; Baur, Jeffery W; Lu, Wei; Hart, A John

    2013-04-30

    Elastocapillary self-assembly is emerging as a versatile technique to manufacture three-dimensional (3D) microstructures and complex surface textures from arrangements of micro- and nanoscale filaments. Understanding the mechanics of capillary self-assembly is essential to engineering of properties such as shape-directed actuation, anisotropic wetting and adhesion, and mechanical energy transfer and dissipation. We study elastocapillary self-assembly (herein called "capillary forming") of carbon nanotube (CNT) microstructures, combining in situ optical imaging, micromechanical testing, and finite element modeling. By imaging, we identify sequential stages of liquid infiltration, evaporation, and solid shrinkage, whose kinetics relate to the size and shape of the CNT microstructure. We couple these observations with measurements of the orthotropic elastic moduli of CNT forests to understand how the dynamic of shrinkage of the vapor-liquid interface is coupled to the compression of the forest. We compare the kinetics of shrinkage to the rate of evporation from liquid droplets having the same size and geometry. Moreover, we show that the amount of shrinkage during evaporation is governed by the ability of the CNTs to slip against one another, which can be manipulated by the deposition of thin conformal coatings on the CNTs by atomic layer deposition (ALD). This insight is confirmed by finite element modeling of pairs of CNTs as corrugated beams in contact and highlights the coupled role of elasticity and friction in shrinkage and stability of nanoporous solids. Overall, this study shows that nanoscale porosity can be tailored via the filament density and adhesion at contact points, which is important to the development of lightweight multifunctional materials. PMID:23537107

  17. Superconductivity in the ternary silicide TrIrSi (Tr = Ti, Zr, and Hf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Naoki; Suzuki, Harufumi; Nakano, Tomohito; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-03-01

    We discover a new superconductor, TiIrSi at T c = 1.4 K, and reveal a superconducting state of TrIrSi (Tr = Ti, Zr, and Hf) by using dc magnetic susceptibility χ (T), electrical resistivity ρ (T), and specific heat C(T) measurements. Superconductivity of TrIrSi is confirmed in ρ (T) at T c = 1.4, 1.85, and 3.4 K, respectively. The electronic specific heat {C}{{e}}(T) of TrIrSi can be fitted with the theoretical BCS curve of the weak-coupling limit with {{Δ }}{C}{{e}}/γ {T}{{c}}= 1.43. Measurements in several magnetic fields suggest that TrIrSi is a type-II superconducting material with upper critical fields of {μ }0{H}{{c}2}(0) = 0.751, 0.618, and 2.23 T, respectively. The electron-phonon coupling constants {λ }{ep} are calculated to be 0.441, 0.464, and 0.545, which are consistent with the weak-coupling limit inferred from the specific jump. The T c of TrIrSi depends on {λ }{ep} and is inversely proportional to N({E}{{F}}).

  18. Ba(Ti, Zr)O3 Ceramics Sintered with Lead Borate Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunz-Heuy; Wu, Long

    1993-08-01

    The sintering of Ba(Ti, Zr)O3 ceramics is significantly influenced by the addition of 4PbO\\cdotB2O3. The eutectic temperature of 4PbO\\cdotB2O3 is around 500°C, so it exists as a liquid phase during the sintering process. Grain growth in Ba(TiyZr1-y)O3 exhibits a peculiar phenomenon. The liquid has high surface tension which aids solubility and penetration. As a consequence, the spreading liquid can penetrate solid-solid interfaces. Penetration leads to disintegration of the solid and subsequent rearrangement of fragments. The theory of grain growth in the presence of a liquid phase is examined in terms of the equation Rn{=}k*t. The grain growth kinetic exponent, n, has an inverse relationship with the rate of grain growth. With suitable amounts of glass frit and sintering temperature, the density of the ceramics was enhanced and the dielectric and piezoelectric properties were improved.

  19. Preparation and wear resistance of Ti-Zr-Ni quasicrystal and polyamide composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinlu; Li, Xuesong; Zhang, Zhenjiang; Zhang, Shanshan; Liu, Wanqiang; Wang, Limin

    2011-07-01

    Ti-Zr-Ni icosahedral quasicrystal powders (Ti-QC), prepared by mechanical alloying and then annealing in a vacuum furnace, were used as a novel filler material in polyamide 12 (PA12). The melt processability of the composite was studied using a Haake torque rheometer. This indicates that PA12/Ti-QC composites can be melt-processed into a wear-resistant material. Further, these composites, fabricated by compression molding, were tested in sliding wear against a polished bearing steel counterface. The results from wear testing show that the addition of Ti-QC filler to PA12 enhances wear resistance and reduces volume loss by half compared with neat PA12. Furthermore, it is found that the hardness of the composite increases with increasing content of Ti-QC filler. In addition, PA12/Ti-QC composites exhibit a slightly higher crystallization temperature and better thermal stability than PA12. These combined results demonstrate that Ti-QC filler may be a desirable alternative when attempting to increase the wear resistance of PA12.

  20. Matrix isolation spectra of metal atoms and ions: Ti, Zr, and Mo in Ar and Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrüchel, Christoph; Gruen, Dieter M.

    1981-01-01

    UV-absorption spectra are reported of neutral atoms and ions of Ti, Zr, and Mo in Ar and Kr matrices. The matrix-isolated species are produced by ion bombardment of a bulk metal target. Thermal and photoannealing experiments indicate that sputtered neutral atoms may occupy one or two distinct matrix sites, depending on the system. Sputtered ions, after being neutralized in the matrix, either go preferentially into the higher energy site, i.e., the site whose absorption bands are shifted farther to the blue, when atoms already populate two sites, or they create a new site at higher energy when there is only one site for atoms. Deconvolution of matrix isolation spectra into contributions from individual sites shows that spectra due to atoms in a particular site correspond much better to gas phase spectra than do total matrix isolation spectra. Matrix shifts of atomic absorption bands for both sites can be rationalized using a model by McCarty and Robinson if allowance is made for matrix distortion around solute atoms. The blue, or close-packed, site is found to correspond to a solute atom replacing a single matrix atom without inducing appreciable matrix distortion, whereas the red, or expanded, site requires the cage around a solute atom to be enlarged by a few percent.

  1. Ceria Nanotube Formed by Sacrificed Precursors Template through Oswald Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Laixue; Wang, Xiaoying; Tang, Xinde

    2015-01-01

    Controllable preparation of ceria nanotube was realized by hydrothermal treatment of Ce(OH)CO3 precursors. The gradually changing morphologies and microstructures of cerium oxide were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A top-down path is illuminated to have an insight to the morphological transformation from nanorod to nanotube by adjusting the reaction time. The growth process is investigated by preparing a series of intermediate morphologies during the shape evolution of CeO2nanostructure based on the scanning electron microscopy image observation. On the basis of the time-dependent experimental observation, the possible formation mechanism related to oriented attachment and Oswald ripening was proposed, which might afford some guidance for the synthesis of other inorganic nanotubes. PMID:26151866

  2. Functionalization of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes with gallium to form Ga-CN(x)-multi-wall carbon nanotube hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Trevor J; Hashim, Daniel P; Zhan, Xiaobo; Bravo-Sanchez, Mariela; Hahm, Myung Gwan; López-Luna, Edgar; Linhardt, Robert J; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Navarro-Contreras, Hugo; Vidal, Miguel A

    2012-08-17

    In an effort to combine group III-V semiconductors with carbon nanotubes, a simple solution-based technique for gallium functionalization of nitrogen-doped multi-wall carbon nanotubes has been developed. With an aqueous solution of a gallium salt (GaI(3)), it was possible to form covalent bonds between the Ga(3+) ion and the nitrogen atoms of the doped carbon nanotubes to form a gallium nitride-carbon nanotube hybrid at room temperature. This functionalization was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:22825368

  3. The first principle study of magnetic properties of Mn2WSn, Fe2YSn (Y=Ti, V), Co2YSn (Y=Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Mn) and Ni2YSn (Y=Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Mn) heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Sana; Arif, Suneela; Haneef, Muhammad; Amin, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The spin polarized electronic band structures, density of states (DOS) and magnetic properties of Mn2WSn, Fe2YSn (Y=Ti, V), Co2YSn (Y=Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Mn) and Ni2YSn (Y=Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Mn) huesler compounds are reported. The calculations are performed by using full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method (FP-LAPW) within density functional theory. The magnetic trend in these compounds is studied using values of magnetic moments, exchange interaction and calculated band gap. The results reveal that Mn2WSn and Ni2VSn show 100% spin polarization, Co2YSn (Y=Ti, Zr, Hf, Mn), Fe2YSn (Y=Ti, V), and Ni2MnSn exhibit metallic nature and Ni2YSn (Y=Ti, Zr, Hf) and Co2VSn show semi-conducting behavior.

  4. Light-Harvesting Nanotubes Formed by Supramolecular Assembly of Aromatic Oligophosphates.

    PubMed

    Bösch, Caroline D; Langenegger, Simon M; Häner, Robert

    2016-08-16

    A 2,7-disubstituted phosphodiester-linked phenanthrene trimer forms tubular structures in aqueous media. Chromophores are arranged in H-aggregates. Incorporation of small quantities of pyrene results in the development of light-harvesting nanotubes in which phenanthrenes act as antenna chromophores and pyrenes as energy acceptors. Energy collection is most efficient after excitation at the phenanthrene H-band. Fluorescence quantum yields up to 23 % are reached in pyrene doped, supramolecular nanotubes. PMID:27375116

  5. Diverse 3D microarchitectures made by capillary forming of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    De Volder, Michael; Tawfick, Sameh H; Park, Sei Jin; Copic, Davor; Zhao, Zhouzhou; Lu, Wei; Hart, A John

    2010-10-15

    A new technology called capillary forming enables transformation of vertically aligned nanoscale filaments into complex three-dimensional microarchitectures. We demonstrate capillary forming of carbon nanotubes into diverse forms having intricate bends, twists, and multidirectional textures. In addition to their novel geometries, these structures have mechanical stiffness exceeding that of microfabrication polymers, and can be used as masters for replica molding PMID:20814919

  6. The stability and electronic structure of lithium adsorbed in triplet form of (5.0) carbon nanotubes and (5.0) boron nitrogen nanotubes: Density functional theory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke Jing; Shao, Qing Yi; Zhang, Juan; Yao, Xin Hua

    2016-07-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated the stability and electronic structure of lithium (Li) adsorbed in triplet form of (5.0) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and (5.0) boron nitrogen nanotubes (BNNTs). We have mainly found that three (5.0) tubes are covalently connected. The triplet form is an energetically stable semiconductor. Li atom can be chemically adsorbed in the triplet form of nanotubes (NTs). Meanwhile, upon the adsorption of Li, the triplet form convert into metal. Hence, the triplet form can improve reactivity and sensitivity of NTs to Li significantly.

  7. Comparative characteristics of the mineralogical composition of Ti-Zr potential placer district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikova, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Russia has a great off-balance reserves of TiO2 and it is ranked fourth in the world after Ukraine, China and Australia. Inferred resources are also very significant. But today Russia produces titanium products only from imported raw materials. Exploration of Ti-raw material is carried out in Russia only as passing on comprehensive deposits. As a result of work conducted in 1959, Stavropolsky elevation was discovered Stavropolsky Ti-Zr alluvial basin. The same mineralogical composition has Ti-Zr Ergeninsky potential alluvial district, which is located north-eastern of Stavropolsky littoral basin. Administratively, Ergeninsky area, basically, covers territory of Kalmikia, and partially Rostovsky and Volgogradsky area. In terms of tectonics, it occupies an area of the junction of the East European platform and Karpinsky Ridge. Alluvial basin holds really magnificent range. There are two hypotheses as to where was the demolition of ore sand. According to the first demolition of the original ore material was from crumbling crystalline rocks southern East European platform. The second hypothesis links the formation of these placers due to the erosion of crystalline basement rocks of the Greater Caucasus, which is explained by the fact of the existence of the Sarmatian paleo sea. There are two productive horizons on the territory of Ergeninsky potential placer district. First - the lower productive horizon it has a capacity of 1.5 to 6.3 m and the total content of titanium and zirconium minerals 12 to 66 kg m³. Second - upper productive horizon. 1.5 to 4.3 m and the total content of titanium and zirconium minerals from 21 to 50 kg m³. Earlier in the study of the area, only samples from the upper productive horizon were considered. At the beginning petrophysical analysis of all available samples, was conducted. Before you choose a basic test, each of the 26 studied several petrophysical properties: 1. Magnetic susceptibility (κ, 10-5 units. C) 2. The density (d, g / cm

  8. Biocompatibility of nanotube formed Ti-30Nb-7Ta alloys.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Sil; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biocompatibility of Ti-30Nb-7Ta alloy surface decorated with TiO2 nanotubes by anodization in an electrolyte containing 1 M H3PO4 and 0.8 wt.% NaF with an applied voltage of 10 V for 2 h. The anodization was carried out using a scanning potentiostat. The microstructures of alloys and morphology of the nanotubes were investigated by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. In comparison to the Ti-30Nb-3Ta alloy, the Ti-30Nb-7Ta alloy contained a lower amount of α" phase, while the β phase was higher. In this study, we observed the formation of a spongy porous layer on the Ti-30Nb-7Ta alloy, while the Ti-30Nb and Ti-30Nb-3Ta alloys showed an absence of such a spongy layer. PMID:25958540

  9. Probing astroglia with carbon nanotubes: modulation of form and function

    PubMed Central

    Gottipati, Manoj K.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown much promise in neurobiology and biomedicine. Their structural stability and ease of chemical modification make them compatible for biological applications. In this review, we discuss the effects that chemically functionalized CNTs, applied as colloidal solutes or used as strata, have on the morpho-functional properties of astrocytes, the most abundant cells present in the brain, with an insight into the potential use of CNTs in neural prostheses. PMID:25225092

  10. Carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum nanocomposite via plasma and high velocity oxy-fuel spray forming.

    PubMed

    Laha, T; Liu, Y; Agarwal, A

    2007-02-01

    Free standing structures of hypereutectic aluminum-23 wt% silicon nanocomposite with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reinforcement have been successfully fabricated by two different thermal spraying technique viz Plasma Spray Forming (PSF) and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) Spray Forming. Comparative microstructural and mechanical property evaluation of the two thermally spray formed nanocomposites has been carried out. Presence of nanosized grains in the Al-Si alloy matrix and physically intact and undamaged carbon nanotubes were observed in both the nanocomposites. Excellent interfacial bonding between Al alloy matrix and MWCNT was observed. The elastic modulus and hardness of HVOF sprayed nanocomposite is found to be higher than PSF sprayed composites. PMID:17450788

  11. Secondary Electron Yield Measurements of TiN coating and TiZrV getter film(LCC-128)

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F

    2003-10-09

    In the beam pipe of the positron Main Damping Ring (MDR) of the Next Linear Collider (NLC), ionization of residual gases and secondary electron emission give rise to an electron cloud which can cause the loss of the circulating beam. One path to avoid the electron cloud is to ensure that the vacuum wall has low secondary emission yield and, therefore, we need to know the secondary emission yield (SEY) for candidate wall coatings. We report on SEY measurements at SLAC on titanium nitride (TiN) and titanium-zirconium-vanadium (TiZrV) thin sputter deposited films, as well as describe our experimental setup.

  12. Microstructure and properties of rapidly solidified beryllium-transition metal alloys. [With small amounts of Ti, Zr and Y (1-3 wt %)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, L.A.; Richardson, S.

    1988-01-01

    Alloys of beryllium with small amounts of Ti, Zr and Y (1-3 wt %) were rapidly solidified using an arc hammer splat technique. Each of these elements forms a dilute eutectic with beryllium, and has very low solid solubility in the alpha phase. In the case of Ti, the Be-rich compound is TiBe/sub 12/, and for Zr and Y, the compound is MBe. The objective of the work was to achieve a fine, uniform dispersion of particles of the intermetallic compound. Since these compounds have very high melting points, it was expected that rapidly solidified microstructures would be relatively stable at elevated temperatures. This microstructural stability should result in improved high temperature properties for the alloys. Microstructures have been characterized using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Microhardness measurements have been made in order to determine the effects of rapid solidification and to evaluate the effects of high temperature exposure on microstructural stability and property retention. The results will be presented in light of the potential of these alloys for intermediate temperature application. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Electron-stimulated desorption from polished and vacuum fired 316LN stainless steel coated with Ti-Zr-Hf-V

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, Oleg B. Valizadeh, Reza; Hogan, Benjamin T.; Hannah, Adrian N.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, two identical 316LN stainless steel tubular samples, which had previously been polished and vacuum-fired and then used for the electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) experiments, were coated with Ti-Zr-Hf-V with different morphologies: columnar and dense. ESD measurement results after nonevaporable getter (NEG) activation to 150, 180, 250, and 350 °C indicated that the values for the ESD yields are significantly (2–20 times) lower than the data from our previous study with similar coatings on nonvacuum-fired samples. Based on these results, the lowest pressure and best long-term performance in particle accelerators will be achieved with a vacuum-fired vacuum chamber coated with dense Ti-Zr-Hf-V coating activated at 180 °C. This is likely due to the following facts: after NEG activation, the hydrogen concentration inside the NEG was lower than in the bulk stainless steel substrate; the NEG coating created a barrier for gas diffusion from the sample bulk to vacuum; the dense NEG coating performed better as a barrier than the columnar NEG coating.

  14. Comparison of Ti-Zr-V nonevaporable getter films deposited using alloy or twisted wire sputter-targets

    SciTech Connect

    Valizadeh, R.; Malyshev, O. B.; Colligon, J. S.; Hannah, A.; Vishnyakov, V. M.

    2010-11-15

    A comparison of the performance of nonevaporable getter (NEG) films deposited using two different types of targets has been made to find the one that has the best pumping properties. For the first time, the NEG coating was deposited using a preformed Ti-Zr-V alloy target. The NEG film characterization and pumping properties have been studied in comparison with a film deposited using the commonly used three-wire twisted target. It was demonstrated that the alloy target produces a NEG coating with uniform composition both laterally and in depth. The composition of the film was found to be the same as the target. Film topography and microstructure with 5 nm grain sizes were found to be the same for both targets. The main result is that the activation temperature of the NEG coating deposited using the Ti-Zr-V alloy target is 160 deg. C, which is 20 deg. C lower than for NEG coatings deposited using three twisted wires.

  15. Characterization and Evaluation of Ti-Zr-V Non-evaporable Getter Films Used in Vacuum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, M. J.; Seraphim, R. M.; Ramirez, A. J.; Tabacniks, M. H.; Nascente, P. A. P.

    Among several methods used to obtain ultra-high vacuum (UHV) for particles accelerators chambers, it stands out the internal coating with metallic films capable of absorbing gases, called NEG (non-evaporable getter). Usually these materials are constituted by elements of great chemical reactivity and solubility (such as Ti, Zr, and V), at room temperature for oxygen and other gases typically found in UHV, such as H2, CO, and CO2. Gold and ternary Ti-Zr-V films were produced by magnetron sputtering, and their composition, structure, morphology, and aging characteristics were characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission gun sc anning electronmicroscopy (FEG-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The comparison between the produced films and commercial samples indicated that the desirable characteristics depend on the nanometric structure of the films and that this structure is sensitive to the heat treatments.

  16. Study of the surface wear resistance and biological properties of the Ti-Zr-Nb-Sn alloy for dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Chang-Yi; Deng, Jia-Yin; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Lian-Yun

    2010-10-01

    A new titanium alloy (Ti-12.5Zr-3Nb-2.5Sn) was developed to meet the needs of clinical requirements for medical titanium alloys and improve the properties of existing titanium alloys. The as-prepared alloy was solution treated at 500 °C for 3 h in vacuum followed by water quenching. Tensile, wear and hardness tests were carried out to examine the mechanical properties of the Ti-Zr-Nb-Sn alloy. Oral mucous membrane irritation test was performed to evaluate the surface biological properties of the Ti-Zr-Nb-Sn alloy. The results suggested that the surface hardness and wear-resistant properties of the Ti-12.5Zr-3Nb-2.5Sn alloy were superior to commercially pure Ti. The oral mucous irritation test showed that all samples had no mucous membrane irritation. It indicates that Ti-12.5Zr-3Nb-2.5Sn has large potential to be used as dental restoration material. PMID:20876964

  17. Carbon nanotunnels form from single-walled carbon nanotubes interacting with a diamond (100)-(2 X 1) surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, D. A.; Sternberg, M.; Zapol, P.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2011-08-01

    A quantum chemical study of the interaction of (5,5), (7,7), (9,9) and (8,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes with a clean (100)-(2 x 1) diamond surface is reported. Stable structures with covalent bonds at the interface were found for carbon nanotubes oriented parallel or perpendicular to the dimer rows on the reconstructed (100) surface. The binding energy of the most stable (5,5) nanotube-diamond structure is 1.7 eV/{angstrom}, and is attributed to strong covalent bonds formed between the carbon nanotube and the diamond surface. The structure of the nanotube is distorted by adsorption on the surface such that it adopts a tunnel-like geometry. Two other nanotunnel geometries were found for the (5,5) nanotube, with binding energies of 1.39 and 1.09 eV/{angstrom}. In the most stable (5,5) nanotube-diamond structure the interaction between the nanotube and the diamond surface produces a 0.6 eV band gap near the Fermi level, but the metallic character of the nanotube is maintained in the two other, less strongly bound nanotunnel structures. No charge transfer occurs between the diamond surface and the nanotunnels in any of the three orientations. Binding energies decrease with increases in tube diameter, to the extent that one of the three nanotunnel structures is not formed by (9,9) carbon nanotubes.

  18. Morphology of fibroblasts grown on substrates formed by dielectrophoretically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Felix L.-Y.; Zak, Gene; Waldman, Stephen D.

    2007-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube templates formed on the surfaces of planar interdigitated microelectrode arrays by means of AC electric field-guided assembly are being explored as potential substrates for tissue engineering. The objective of the present study is to examine whether surface patterns of aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes can have an effect on cell growth, morphology, and alignment. Bovine fibroblasts grown on aligned carbon nanotubes for a period of 2 weeks were found to have raised bodies and pronounced cell extensions for anchoring themselves to the substrate similar to that of the cells found in native tissues. On the other hand, cells grown on various control surfaces had a flat, circular morphology. The cell cultures were visualized by means of SEM imaging and the resulting morphologies were statistically analyzed and compared. PMID:19002836

  19. Longitudinal unzipping of carbon nanotubes to form graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Higginbotham, Amanda L; Sinitskii, Alexander; Lomeda, Jay R; Dimiev, Ayrat; Price, B Katherine; Tour, James M

    2009-04-16

    Graphene, or single-layered graphite, with its high crystallinity and interesting semimetal electronic properties, has emerged as an exciting two-dimensional material showing great promise for the fabrication of nanoscale devices. Thin, elongated strips of graphene that possess straight edges, termed graphene ribbons, gradually transform from semiconductors to semimetals as their width increases, and represent a particularly versatile variety of graphene. Several lithographic, chemical and synthetic procedures are known to produce microscopic samples of graphene nanoribbons, and one chemical vapour deposition process has successfully produced macroscopic quantities of nanoribbons at 950 degrees C. Here we describe a simple solution-based oxidative process for producing a nearly 100% yield of nanoribbon structures by lengthwise cutting and unravelling of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) side walls. Although oxidative shortening of MWCNTs has previously been achieved, lengthwise cutting is hitherto unreported. Ribbon structures with high water solubility are obtained. Subsequent chemical reduction of the nanoribbons from MWCNTs results in restoration of electrical conductivity. These early results affording nanoribbons could eventually lead to applications in fields of electronics and composite materials where bulk quantities of nanoribbons are required. PMID:19370030

  20. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2007-05-29

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  1. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2006-11-07

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  2. Guided proliferation and bone-forming functionality on highly ordered large diameter TiO2 nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruopeng; Wu, Hongliu; Ni, Jiahua; Zhao, Changli; Chen, Yifan; Zheng, Chengjunyi; Zhang, Xiaonong

    2015-08-01

    The significantly enhanced osteoblast adhesion, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were observed on TiO2 nanotube surface in recent studies in which the scale of nanotube diameter was restricted under 100 nm. In this paper, a series of highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays with larger diameters ranging from 150 nm to 470 nm were fabricated via high voltage anodization. The behaviors of MC3T3-E1 cells in response to the diameter-controlled TiO2 nanotubes were investigated. A contrast between the trend of proliferation and the trend of cell elongation was observed. The highest cell elongation (nearly 10:1) and the lowest cell number were observed on the TiO2 nanotube arrays with 150 nm diameter. While, the lowest cell elongation and highest cell number were achieved on the TiO2 nanotube arrays with 470 nm diameter. Furthermore, the ALP activity peaked on the 150 nm diameter TiO2 nanotube arrays and decreased dramatically with the increase of nanotube diameter. Thus a narrow range of diameter (100-200 nm) that could induce the greatest bone-forming activity is determined. It is expected that more delicate design of orthopedic implant with regional abduction of cell proliferation or bone forming could be achieved by controlling the diameter of TiO2 nanotubes. PMID:26042715

  3. Nanotube

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-09-13

    This is a source code to calculate the current-voltage characteristics, the charge distribution and the electrostatic potential in carbon nanotube devices. The code utilizes the non-equilibrium Green's function method, implemented in a tight-binding scheme, to calculate the charge distribution and the energy-dependent transmission function, from which the current or the conductance are obtained. The electrostatic potential is obtained by solving Poisson's equation on a grid with boundary conditions on the electrodes, and at other interfaces.more » Self-consistency between the charge and the electrostatic potential is achieved using a linear mixing method. Different versions of the code allow the modeling of different types of nanotube devices: Version 1.0: Modeling of carbon nanotube electronic devices with cylindrical symmetry Version 1.1: Modeling of planar carbon nanotube electronic devices Version 1.2: Modeling of photocurrent in carbon nanotube devices« less

  4. Simultaneously Enhancing the Ductility and Strength in a Hierarchical and Multiphase Nanolaminated TiZrAlV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yindong; Wang, Lina; Wu, Chunxia

    2015-12-01

    High strength and ductility are the prerequisite for structural materials for wide applications. Here, a simultaneous enhancement of both the ductility and strength is reported in a hierarchical and multiphase nanolaminated (HMN) TiZrAlV prepared via thermomechanical processing treatments. An excellent combination of high ultimate tensile strength of σb ~ 1550 MPa and good elongation to failure of ɛf ~ 8.0% is obtained in an appropriate HMN structure that consists of nanoscale α″ martensites, submicroscale α plates, and large microscale primary αp grains, much better than that (σb ~ 1440 MPa, ɛf ~ 3.6%) of its coarse-laminated counterpart without primary αp grains. The present study is significant for the enhancement of strength and ductility of engineering materials via the design of hierarchical-laminated structure.

  5. Systematic study on the anisotropic elastic properties of tetragonal XYSb (X = Ti, Zr, Hf; Y = Si, Ge) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozyar, U. F.; Deligoz, E.; Colakoglu, K.

    2015-02-01

    The anisotropic elastic properties of XYSb (X = Ti, Zr, Hf; Y = Si, Ge) compounds have been investigated by using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The calculated lattice parameters are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The computed elastic constants indicate that all compounds are mechanically stable according to the elastic stability criteria under pressure. We have calculated the bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, Debye temperature, and anisotropy value from the obtained elastic constants according to the Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximation. Additionally, the ductility and brittleness are characterized with the estimation from Pugh's rule (B/G) and Poisson's ratio. Furthermore, the elastic anisotropy have been visualized in detail by plotting the directional dependence of compressibility, Young's and shear moduli.

  6. Investigation of Interdiffusion in Ba(Ti,Zr)O3-Based Y5V Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors with Ni Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Wang, Xiaohui; Qiao, Bin; Li, Longtu

    2007-02-01

    The interdiffusion between the Ba(Ti,Zr)O3 (BTZ) dielectric and the internal Ni electrode layers in Y5V-type multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) with an active layer thickness of 5 μm was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis. It was found that such interdiffusion leads to the formation of some defects and the lattice distortion near the interface. The diffusion degree of Ni into BTZ was higher than that of BTZ into Ni. In the EDS analysis the chemical composition was confirmed and the different diffusion degrees were verified. The generation of the interdiffusion and the relationship between the interdiffusion and degradation of MLCCs with Ni electrodes were also studied.

  7. Self-assembly pathway of peptide nanotubes formed by a glutamatic acid-based bolaamphiphile.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Emerson Rodrigo; Alves, Wendel Andrade; Castelletto, Valeria; Reza, Mehedi; Ruokolainen, Janne; Hussain, Rohanah; Hamley, Ian William

    2015-07-25

    The self-assembly of peptide nanotubes formed by an L-glutamic acid-based bolaamphiphile is shown to proceed via a remarkable mechanism where the peptide conformation changes from β-sheet to unordered. The kinetics of this process are elucidated via X-ray scattering and UV circular dichroism methods. The reverse transition from "unordered" to β-sheet structures is triggered by UV radiation. PMID:26094619

  8. Thermal stability of titanate nanorods and titania nanowires formed from titanate nanotubes by heating

    SciTech Connect

    Brunatova, Tereza; Matej, Zdenek; Oleynikov, Peter; Vesely, Josef; Danis, Stanislav; Popelkova, Daniela; Kuzel, Radomir

    2014-12-15

    The structure of titanate nanowires was studied by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and 3D precession electron diffraction. Titania nanowires and titanate nanorods were prepared by heating of titanate nanotubes. The structure of final product depended on heating conditions. Titanium nanotubes heated in air at a temperature of 850 °C decomposed into three phases — Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} (nanorods) and two phases of TiO{sub 2} — anatase and rutile. At higher temperatures the anatase form of TiO{sub 2} transforms into rutile and the nanorods change into rutile nanoparticles. By contrast, in the vacuum only anatase phases of TiO{sub 2} were obtained by heating at 900 °C. The anatase transformation into rutile began only after a longer time of heating at 1000 °C. For the description of anisotropic XRD line broadening in the total powder pattern fitting by the program MSTRUCT a model of nanorods with elliptical base was included in the software. The model parameters — rod length, axis size of the elliptical base, the ellipse flattening parameter and twist of the base could be refined. Variation of particle shapes with temperature was found. - Highlights: • Titanate nanotubes changed to particles of TiO{sub 2} and nanorods of Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} at 850 °C. • With heating time and temperature nanorods transformed to rutile nanoparticles. • X-ray diffraction powder pattern fitting indicated an elliptical shape of nanorod base. • No transition of titanate nanotubes to Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} was found after heating in vacuum. • Heating of titanate nanotubes in vacuum leads to appearance of anatase nanowires.

  9. Can trans-polyacetylene be formed on single-walled carbon-doped boron nitride nanotubes?

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Hong-xia; Zhao, Jing-xiang; Cai, Qing-hai; Wang, Xiao-guang; Wang, Xuan-zhang

    2012-07-01

    Recently, the grafting of polymer chains onto nanotubes has attracted increasing attention as it can potentially be used to enhance the solubility of nanotubes and in the development of novel nanotube-based devices. In this article, based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we report the formation of trans-polyacetylene on single-walled carbon-doped boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) through their adsorption of a series of C(2)H(2) molecules. The results show that, rather than through [2 + 2] cycloaddition, an individualmolecule would preferentially attach to a carbon-doped BNNT via "carbon attack" (i.e., a carbon in the C(2)H(2) attacks a site on the BNNT). The adsorption energy gradually decreases with increasing tube diameter. The free radical of the carbon-doped BNNT is almost completely transferred to the carbon atom at the end of the adsorbed C(2)H(2) molecule. When another C(2)H(2) molecule approaches the carbon-doped BNNT, it is most energetically favorable for this C(2)H(2) molecule to be adsorbed at the end of the previously adsorbed C(2)H(2) molecule, and so on with extra C(2)H(2) molecules, leading to the formation of polyacetylene on the nanotube. The spin of the whole system is always localized at the tip of the polyacetylene formed, which initiates the adsorption of the incoming species. The present results imply that carbon-doped BNNT is an effective "metal-free" initiator for the formation of polyacetylene. PMID:22271098

  10. Vertical alignment of single-walled carbon nanotube films formed by electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Kyoung; Lee, Haiwon; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Weiss, Paul S

    2008-11-18

    Films of chemically shortened and functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been formed on a gold electrode by electrophoretic deposition. Applying ultrasonic energy resulted in dramatic changes of the film morphology; the deposited SWNT bundles reassembled and oriented normal to the electrode. Oriented SWNT bundles with high density (more than 250 bundles/microm (2)) not only presented narrow size distributions, but uniformly spread on the electrode. We discuss the mechanism of SWNT orientation by analyzing the variation in the film morphology with ultrasonication time. In addition, we suggest that the 3D displays of AFM images can lead to misjudgment of nanotube alignment. The method for aligning SWNTs normal to the electrode may be competitive with chemical vapor deposition or screen printing, the predominant methods by which vertically aligned SWNT films have been fabricated to date. PMID:18925761

  11. Dynamic DNA Nanotubes: Reversible Switching between Single and Double-Stranded Forms, and Effect of Base Deletions.

    PubMed

    Rahbani, Janane F; Hariri, Amani A; Cosa, Gonzalo; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2015-12-22

    DNA nanotubes hold great potential as drug delivery vehicles and as programmable templates for the organization of materials and biomolecules. Existing methods for their construction produce assemblies that are entirely double-stranded and rigid, and thus have limited intrinsic dynamic character, or they rely on chemically modified and ligated DNA structures. Here, we report a simple and efficient synthesis of DNA nanotubes from 11 short unmodified strands, and the study of their dynamic behavior by atomic force microscopy and in situ single molecule fluorescence microscopy. This method allows the programmable introduction of DNA structural changes within the repeat units of the tubes. We generate and study fully double-stranded nanotubes, and convert them to nanotubes with one, two and three single-stranded sides, using strand displacement strategies. The nanotubes can be reversibly switched between these forms without compromising their stability and micron-scale lengths. We then site-specifically introduce DNA strands that shorten two sides of the nanotubes, while keeping the length of the third side. The nanotubes undergo bending with increased length mismatch between their sides, until the distortion is significant enough to shorten them, as measured by AFM and single-molecule fluorescence photobleaching experiments. The method presented here produces dynamic and robust nanotubes that can potentially behave as actuators, and allows their site-specific addressability while using a minimal number of component strands. PMID:26556531

  12. Determination of Ti, Zr, Nb, V, W and Mo in seawater by a new online-preconcentration method and subsequent ICP-MS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poehle, Sandra; Schmidt, Katja; Koschinsky, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    We present a new method for the determination of Ti, Zr, Nb, V, W and Mo in seawater by adapting the online-preconcentration procedure with the system SeaFAST and subsequent analysis by ICP-MS to these metals. The trace elements Ti, Zr, Nb and W are present in seawater in ultratrace concentrations in the range of pmol kg-1, whereas Mo and V, which are biologically essential elements, are present in the concentration range of nmol kg-1. The online-preconcentration system we used consists of an autosampler, a sample loop, a preconcentration column and two valves controlling the sample loop and the preconcentration processes. The pre-packed preconcentration column contains a chelating resin with two functional groups, ethylenediamine triacetic acid (EDTriA) and iminodiacetic acid (IDA), immobilized on a polymer backbone. The preconcentration process was optimized for loading the sample and subsequent rinsing to remove residues of seawater matrix prior to elution with the optimized elution acid (0.5 M HNO3-0.002 M HF). We used acidified North Sea seawater (0.02 M HCl-0.002 M HF) for the method development. Samples and calibration standards were loaded onto the preconcentration column and after elution directly transferred to the quadrupole ICP-MS and measured immediately. Best results were achieved with matrix-matched calibration standards (0.6 M NaCl-0.02 M HCl-0.002 M HF) simulating acidified seawater samples. Titanium, Zr, Nb and W are measured simultaneously in one run, whereas V and Mo are determined simultaneously in a separate run. Low procedure blanks were calculated for Ti, Zr, Nb, W (635, 14.5, 1.35, 10.2 pmol kg-1) and for V and Mo, 9.79 and 5.61 nmol kg-1, respectively. Very good spike recoveries achieved with spiked North Sea water demonstrate the applicability for all six elements. Analysis of the seawater standard NASS-6 gave recoveries of 97-99% (0.9-2.2% standard deviation, SD) for Mo and V. We also provide Zr, Nb and W data for this reference standard

  13. Effects of Grain Boundary and Segregated-Phases on Reliability of Ba(Ti,Zr)O3-Based Ni Electrode MLCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamatsu, Toshihiro; Sano, Harunobu; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    The reliability in the highly accelerated life test (HALT) for multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCs) composed of the Ba(Ti,Zr)O3-Gd-Mg-Mn-Si system was markedly improved by controlling the amount of SiO2 and the ratio of Ba/(Ti+Zr). We observed the following characteristics in the microstructures when the reliability was improved. 1) The segregated-phases, which consisted of Mg oxides and Si oxides, were dispersed well in the dielectric layers and their size was considerably small. 2) The corrosion resistance of grain boundaries was improved. 3) The electric potential as a contrast in the focused ion beam scanning ion microscopy was homogeneous in both the grains and the grain boundaries. We can design these microstructures by controlling the additives to generate BaMg2Si2O7 and BaSi2O5, which have low melting points.

  14. Multifunctional nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles formed via vacuum filtration

    DOEpatents

    Hersam, Mark C; Ostojic, Gordana; Liang, Yu Teng

    2013-10-22

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a method of forming a film of nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of (a) providing a first solution that contains a plurality of CNTs, (b) providing a second solution that contains a plurality of Pt nanoparticles, (c) combining the first solution and the second solution to form a third solution, and (d) filtering the third solution through a nanoporous membrane using vacuum filtration to obtain a film of nanocomposites of CNTs and Pt nanoparticles.

  15. Gold behaves as hydrogen in the intermolecular self-interaction of metal aurides MAu4 (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf).

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Hyemi; Kim, Jong Chan; Park, Min Hee; Han, Young-Kyu

    2011-03-01

    We performed density functional calculations to examine the intermolecular self-interaction of metal tetraauride MAu(4) (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf) clusters. We found that the metal auride clusters have strong dimeric interactions (2.8-3.1 eV) and are similar to the metal hydride analogues with respect to structure and bonding nature. Similarly to (MH(4))(2), the (μ-Au)(3) C(s) structures with three three-center two-electron (3c-2e) bonds were found to be the most stable. Natural orbital analysis showed that greater than 96 % of the Au 6s orbital contributes to the 3c-2e bonds, and this predominant s orbital is responsible for the similarity between metal aurides and metal hydrides (>99 % H 1s). The favorable orbital interaction between occupied Au 6s and unoccupied metal d orbitals leads to a stronger dimeric interaction for MAu(4)-MAu(4) than the interaction for MH(4)-MH(4). There is a strong relationship between the dimeric interaction energy and the chemical hardness of its monomer for (MAu(4))(2) and (MH(4))(2). PMID:21225974

  16. Microstructures and Stability Origins of β-(Ti,Zr)-(Mo,Sn)-Nb Alloys with Low Young's Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Li, Qun; Li, Xiaona; Zhang, Ruiqian; Gao, Xiaoxia; Dong, Chuang; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-09-01

    The present work investigates the microstructural evolution and β-phase stability of a multi-component [(Mo,Sn)-(Ti,Zr)14]-Nb alloy series developed using the cluster-plus-glue-atom model. Low Young's modulus ( E) can be reached, when both low- E elements, Sn and Zr, and β-Ti stabilizers, Mo and Nb, are properly incorporated in the so-called cluster formulas. After the X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis, and in combination with the β-Ti stability measured by the Mo equivalent, the Young's modulus of β-Ti alloys is found to increase with increasing β stabilities and is closely related to both the microstructures of the β matrix and the precipitated phases. More importantly, the morphologies of the β matrix change with β stabilities apparently so that high- E ( E >70 GPa) and low- E ( E ≤70 GPa) β-Ti alloys can be distinguished with the microstructures of the β matrix. The quinary alloy, formulated as [(Mo0.5Sn0.5)-(Ti13Zr1)]Nb1, owns its lowest E of 48 GPa among the present alloy series to the mixed thin-lamellar and rod-shaped morphology of the β structure with the lowest stability for the β formation.

  17. Toward an understanding of the hydrogenation reaction of MO2 gas-phase clusters (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf).

    PubMed

    González-Navarrete, P; Calatayud, M; Andrés, J; Ruipérez, F; Roca-Sanjuán, D

    2013-06-27

    A theoretical investigation using density functional theory (DFT) has been carried out in order to understand the molecular mechanism of dihydrogen activation by means of transition metal dioxides MO2 (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf) according to the following reaction: MO2 + H2 → MO + H2O. B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2pd)/SDD methodology was employed considering two possible reaction pathways. As the first step hydrogen activation by M═O bonds yields to metal-oxo hydride intermediates O═MH(OH). This process is spontaneous for all metal dioxides, and the stability of the O═MH(OH) species depends on the transition metal center. Subsequently, the reaction mechanism splits into two paths: the first one takes place passing through the M(OH)2 intermediates yielding to products, whereas the second one corresponds to direct formation of the product complex OM(H2O). A two-state reactivity mechanism was found for the TiO2 system, whereas for ZrO2 and HfO2 no spin-crossing processes were observed. This is confirmed by CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations for ZrO2 that lead to the correct ordering of electronic states not found by DFT. The results obtained in the present paper for MO2 molecules are consistent with the observed reactivity on surfaces. PMID:23706045

  18. Carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum based nanocomposite fabricated by thermal spray forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Tapas

    The present research concentrates on the fabrication of bulk aluminum matrix nanocomposite structures with carbon nanotube reinforcement. The objective of the work was to fabricate and characterize multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced hypereutectic Al-Si (23 wt% Si, 2 wt% Ni, 1 wt% Cu, rest Al) nanocomposite bulk structure with nanocrystalline matrix through thermal spray forming techniques viz. plasma spray forming (PSF) and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray forming. This is the first research study, which has shown that thermal spray forming can be successfully used to synthesize carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites. Microstructural characterization based on quantitative microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms (i) retention and macro/sub-macro level homogenous distribution of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the Al-Si matrix and (ii) evolution of nanostructured grains in the matrix. Formation of ultrathin beta-SiC layer on MWCNT surface, due to chemical reaction of Si atoms diffusing from Al-Si alloy and C atoms from the outer walls of MWCNTs has been confirmed theoretically and experimentally. The presence of SiC layer at the interface improves the wettability and the interfacial adhesion between the MWCNT reinforcement and the Al-Si matrix. Sintering of the as-sprayed nanocomposites was carried out in an inert environment for further densification. As-sprayed PSF nanocomposite showed lower microhardness compared to HVOF, due to the higher porosity content and lower residual stress. The hardness of the nanocomposites increased with sintering time due to effective pore removal. Uniaxial tensile test on CNT-bulk nanocomposite was carried out, which is the first ever study of such nature. The tensile test results showed inconsistency in the data attributed to inhomogeneous

  19. Accessory Mineral U-Pb Ti-Zr Thermochronology of the Deep Crust of Zealandia: Rift, Breakup and Drift from 90-20 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beinlich, A.; Palin, J.; Cooper, A. F.

    2006-12-01

    Cenozoic alkaline mafic volcanics of eastern Otago were made famous in classic petrology and petrography texts coauthored by Francis Turner. Several locales have yielded mantle and crustal xenoliths including the Pigroot "mafic phonolite". Here, among abundant spinel lherzolite xenoliths, we discovered an undeformed cumulate gabbro composed of intermediate plagioclase and pargasitic amphibole with augite, ilmenite, magnetite, titanite (sphene) and accessory zircon and apatite. Major and trace elements indicate the rock crystallised from primitive alkaline magma, whereas the mineral assemblage indicates equilibration under amphibolite facies conditions at 5-9 kbar. Accessory mineral U-Pb Ti-Zr thermochronology by LA-ICP-MS on grain separates and in thin section reveals a T-t path that began with zircon crystallisation at 90±2 Ma (^{208}Pb-corrected 206Pb/238U, n=37, mswd=9.9) and 710±20°C (Ti-zircon geothermometer of Watson et al. 2006). Titanite dates (207Pb-corrected 206Pb/238U, n=49) and temperatures (Zr-titanite geothermometer of Hayden et al. 2006 at 7 kbar) form a linear array (r2=0.6) extending from 85 Ma, 830°C to 34 Ma, 760°C. The slope of this T-t array is inconsistent with diffusive loss of Pb and Zr from titanite (Cherniak, pers.comm.) and, together with REE data and reaction textures, indicates prolonged growth at the expense of plagioclase and ilmenite. Apatite U-Pb isotope data projected from the measured 207Pb/206Pb in plagioclase give a lower intercept age of 20±3 Ma (n=17, mswd=1.5) which overlaps the K-Ar age of the phonotephrite host lava (Coombs, pers.comm.). This remarkable xenolith records 1) crystallisation of alkaline mafic magma in the deep crust during early rifting of Zealandia from Gondwana around 90 Ma, 2) heating during continued lithospheric thinning 90-85 Ma, 3) slow cooling (≤2°C/my) for 50 my following continental breakup at 85 Ma, and 4) transport to the surface and thermal quenching at 20 Ma. Slow cooling of the deep

  20. Reactive magnetron cosputtering of hard and conductive ternary nitride thin films: Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N

    SciTech Connect

    Abadias, G.; Koutsokeras, L. E.; Dub, S. N.; Tolmachova, G. N.; Debelle, A.; Sauvage, T.; Villechaise, P.

    2010-07-15

    Ternary transition metal nitride thin films, with thickness up to 300 nm, were deposited by dc reactive magnetron cosputtering in Ar-N{sub 2} plasma discharges at 300 deg. C on Si substrates. Two systems were comparatively studied, Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N, as representative of isostructural and nonisostructural prototypes, with the aim of characterizing their structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. While phase-separated TiN-ZrN and TiN-TaN are the bulk equilibrium states, Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N and Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N solid solutions with the Na-Cl (B1-type) structure could be stabilized in a large compositional range (up to x=1 and y=0.75, respectively). Substituting Ti atoms by either Zr or Ta atoms led to significant changes in film texture, microstructure, grain size, and surface morphology, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, and scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. The ternary Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films exhibited superior mechanical properties to Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N films as well as binary compounds, with hardness as high as 42 GPa for y=0.69. All films were metallic, the lowest electrical resistivity {rho}{approx}65 {mu}{Omega} cm being obtained for pure ZrN, while for Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films a minimum was observed at y{approx}0.3. The evolution of the different film properties is discussed based on microstructrural investigations.

  1. Structural and electronic properties of SrZrO3 and Sr(Ti,Zr)O3 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, L.; Janotti, A.; Cui, X. Y.; Himmetoglu, B.; Stampfl, C.; Van de Walle, C. G.

    2015-08-01

    Using hybrid density functional calculations, we study the electronic and structural properties of SrZrO3 and ordered Sr (Ti ,Zr )O3 alloys. Calculations were performed for the ground-state orthorhombic (P n m a ) and high-temperature cubic (P m 3 m ) phases of SrZrO3. The variation of the lattice parameters and band gaps with Ti addition was studied using ordered SrTixZr1 -xO3 structures with x =0 , 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1. As Ti is added to SrZrO3, the lattice parameter is reduced and closely follows Vegard's law. On the other hand, the band gap shows a large bowing and is highly sensitive to the Ti distribution. For x =0.5 , we find that arranging the Ti and Zr atoms into a 1 ×1 SrZrO3/SrTiO3 superlattice along the [001] direction leads to interesting properties, including a highly dispersive single band at the conduction-band minimum (CBM), which is absent in both parent compounds, and a band gap close to that of pure SrTiO3. These features are explained by the splitting of the lowest three conduction-band states due to the reduced symmetry of the superlattice, lowering the band originating from the in-plane Ti 3 dx y orbitals. The lifting of the t2 g orbital degeneracy around the CBM suppresses scattering due to electron-phonon interactions. Our results demonstrate how short-period SrZrO3/SrTiO3 superlattices could be exploited to engineer the band structure and improve carrier mobility compared to bulk SrTiO3.

  2. Texture and microstructure in co-sputtered Mg-M-O (M = Mg, Al, Cr, Ti, Zr, and Y) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraiva, M.; Depla, D.

    2012-05-01

    Mg-M-O solid solution films (M = Mg, Al, Cr, Ti, Zr, and Y) with various M contents are grown employing reactive co-sputtering by varying the target-to-substrate distance. It is shown that all films are biaxially aligned. When the two cathodes are equipped with the same target material (Mg), the in-plane alignment is determined by the cathode closest to the substrate, i.e., by the largest material flux. In the case of nearly equal material fluxes from the two cathodes, double in-plane orientation is observed. This is also the case for the Mg-Al-O and Mg-Cr-O films, while the Mg-Ti-O, Mg-Zr-O and Mg-Y-O films exhibit single in-plane orientation. Pole figures indicate that the grains in Mg-M-O (M different than Mg) are titled; in the Mg-Al-O, Mg-Cr-O, and Mg-Ti-O films, the grains tilt towards the Al, Cr, and Ti metal flux, respectively, while the grain tilt of the Mg-Zr-O and Mg-Y-O films is found to be towards the Mg metal flux. Furthermore, SEM cross-sectional images of the Mg-M-O films reveal columnar microstructure with columns tilted to the same direction as the grains. A mechanism which is based on the cation radius change upon the incorporation of an M atom in the MgO lattice is proposed to explain the tilting.

  3. X-ray microstructural analysis of nanocrystalline TiZrN thin films by diffraction pattern modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, D.; Ospina, R.; Gómez, A.G.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Arango, P.J.

    2014-02-15

    A detailed microstructural characterization of nanocrystalline TiZrN thin films grown at different substrate temperatures (T{sub S}) was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total diffraction pattern modeling based on more meaningful microstructural parameters, such as crystallite size distribution and dislocation density, was performed to describe the microstructure of the thin films more precisely. This diffraction modeling has been implemented and used mostly to characterize powders, but the technique can be very useful to study hard thin films by taking certain considerations into account. Nanocrystalline films were grown by using the cathodic pulsed vacuum arc technique on stainless steel 316L substrates, varying the temperature from room temperature to 200 °C. Further surface morphology analysis was performed to study the dependence of grain size on substrate temperature using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The crystallite and surface grain sizes obtained and the high density of dislocations observed indicate that the films underwent nanostructured growth. Variations in these microstructural parameters as a function of T{sub S} during deposition revealed a competition between adatom mobility and desorption processes, resulting in a specific microstructure. These films also showed slight anisotropy in their microstructure, and this was incorporated into the diffraction pattern modeling. The resulting model allowed for the films' microstructure during synthesis to be better understood according to the experimental results obtained. - Highlights: • Mobility and desorption competition generates a critical temperature. • A microstructure anisotropy related to the local strain was observed in thin films. • Adatom mobility and desorption influence grain size and microstrain.

  4. Processing, structure and tribological property relations of ternary Zn-Ti-O and quaternary Zn-Ti-Zr-O nanocrystalline coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageh, Victor

    Conventional liquid lubricants are faced with limitations under extreme cyclic operating conditions, such as in applications that require lubrication when changing from atmospheric pressure to ultrahigh vacuum and ambient air to dry nitrogen (e.g., satellite components), and room to elevated (>500°C) temperatures (e.g., aerospace bearings). Alternatively, solid lubricant coatings can be used in conditions where synthetic liquid lubricants and greases are not applicable; however, individual solid lubricant phases usually perform best only for a limited range of operating conditions. Therefore, solid lubricants that can adequately perform over a wider range of environmental conditions are needed, especially during thermal cycling with temperatures exceeding 500°C. One potential material class investigated in this dissertation is lubricious oxides, because unlike other solid lubricant coatings they are typically thermodynamically stable in air and at elevated temperatures. While past studies have been focused on binary metal oxide coatings, such as ZnO, there have been very few ternary oxide and no reported quaternary oxide investigations. The premise behind the addition of the third and fourth refractory metals Ti and Zr is to increase the number of hard and wear resistant phases while maintaining solid lubrication with ZnO. Therefore, the major focus of this dissertation is to investigate the processing-structuretribological property relations of composite ZnO, TiO2 and ZrO2 phases that form ternary (ZnTi)xOy and quaternary (ZnTiZr) xOy nanocrystalline coatings. The coatings were processed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a selective variation of ALD parameters. The growth structure and chemical composition of as-deposited and ex situ annealed ternary and quaternary oxide coatings were studied by combined x-ray diffraction/focused ion beam microscopy/cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy/Auger electron

  5. A Continuing Story on the Secondary Electron Yield Measurements of TiN Coating and TiZrV Getter Film

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F.

    2004-06-07

    In the beam pipe of the positron Main Damping Ring (MDR) of the Next Linear Collider (NLC), ionization of residual gases and secondary electron emission will give rise to an electron cloud which can cause the loss of the circulating beam. One path to avoid the electron cloud is to ensure that the vacuum wall has low secondary emission yield and, therefore, we need to know the secondary emission yield (SEY) for candidate wall coatings. We report on the ongoing SEY measurements at SLAC on titanium nitride (TiN) and titanium-zirconium-vanadium (TiZrV) thin sputter-deposited films, as well as their effects on simulations.

  6. New intermetallic MIrP (M=Ti, Zr, Nb, Mo) and MgRuP compounds related with MoM'P (M'=Ni and Ru) superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kito, Hijiri; Iyo, Akira; Wada, Toshimi

    2011-01-01

    Using a cubic-anvil high-pressure apparatus, ternary iridium phosphides MIrP (M=Ti, Zr, Nb, Mo) and MgRuP have been prepared by reaction of stoichiometric amounts of each metal and phosphide powders at around 2 Gpa and above 1523 K for the first time. The structure of these compounds prepared at high-pressure has been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. Diffraction lines of these compounds are assigned by the index of the Co2Si-type structure. The electrical resistivity and the d.c magnetic susceptibility of MIrP (M=Ti, Zr, Nb, Mo) have measured at low temperatures. Unfortunately, no superconducting transition for MIrP (M=Ti, Zr, Nb, Mo) and MgRuP are observed down to 2 K.

  7. Effect of a carbon additive on the TbCu7-type melt-spun Sm(Co, M)7 (M=Ti, Zr, Hf, V and Ge) ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Chieh; Huang, Shih-Teng; Guo, Jin-Sheng; Shih, Chih-Wei; Chang, Wen-Cheng; Chang, Huang-Wei; Shaw, Chun-Chung

    2013-08-01

    The effect of a carbon additive on the microstructure and the magnetic properties of melt-spun SmCo7- x M x C y (M=Ti, Zr, Hf, V and Ge; x = 0-0.3 and y = 0-0.1) ribbons was studied. Based on the XRD and the TEM analyses, a pure 1:7 phase could be formed for the C-containing ribbons with M= Ti and Ge. However, carbide phases, i.e., Sm2C3 for M=Zr and Hf, and SmCoC2 for M=V, respectively, were found. Nevertheless, a slight C addition may effectively refine the microstructure and improve both the intrinsic coercvity and the magnetic energy product in all the studied ribbons. Among them, the SmCo6.9V0.1C0.1 ribbons with σ r = 58.7 emu/g, i H c = 13.5 kOe and ( BH) max = 9.3 MGOe, and the SmCo6.9Hf0.1C0.1 ribbons with σ r = 61.6 emu/g, i H c = 11.8 kOe and ( BH) max = 10.3 MGOe are most suitable for the bonded magnet applications.

  8. Influence of boron vacancies on phase stability, bonding and structure of MB 2 (M  =  Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W) with AlB2 type structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlqvist, Martin; Jansson, Ulf; Rosen, Johanna

    2015-11-01

    Transition metal diborides in hexagonal AlB2 type structure typically form stable MB 2 phases for group IV elements (M  =  Ti, Zr, Hf). For group V (M  =  V, Nb, Ta) and group VI (M  =  Cr, Mo, W) the stability is reduced and an alternative hexagonal rhombohedral MB 2 structure becomes more stable. In this work we investigate the effect of vacancies on the B-site in hexagonal MB 2 and its influence on the phase stability and the structure for TiB2, ZrB2, HfB2, VB2, NbB2, TaB2, CrB2, MoB2, and WB2 using first-principles calculations. Selected phases are also analyzed with respect to electronic and bonding properties. We identify trends showing that MB 2 with M from group V and IV are stabilized when introducing B-vacancies, consistent with a decrease in the number of states at the Fermi level and by strengthening of the B-M interaction. The stabilization upon vacancy formation also increases when going from M in period 4 to period 6. For TiB2, ZrB2, and HfB2, introduction of B-vacancies have a destabilizing effect due to occupation of B-B antibonding orbitals close to the Fermi level and an increase in states at the Fermi level.

  9. Novel Pb(Ti, Zr)O3(PZT) Crystallization Technique Using Flash Lamp for Ferroelectric RAM (FeRAM) Embedded LSIs and One Transistor Type FeRAM Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koji; Imai, Keitaro; Arisumi, Osamu; Arikado, Tsunetoshi; Yoshioka, Masaki; Owada, Tatsushi; Okumura, Katsuya

    2002-04-01

    A novel method of ferroelectric capacitor formation for Ferroelectrie random access memory (FeRAM) embedded LSIs and one-transistor-type FeRAMs has been developed. Amorphous Pb(Ti, Zr)O3(PZT) films were successfully transformed to the perovskite phase by a flash lamp technique with a crystallization time of 1.2 ms at a substrate temperature of 350°C. A flash lamp energy of 27 J/cm2 was sufficient to form a ferroelectric crystal structure due to rapid thermal effects with little heat diffusion in the depth direction. This technique enabled PZT film crystallization in Pt/PZT/Pt structures on multi-Al wiring layers. Granular PZT grains were observed on Pt, Ru and RuO2 electrodes, which indicates that crystal growth begins from the film surfaces. Ferroelectric property was verified by the process at 350°C maximum temperature. PZT films were also crystallized directly on SiO2. This is useful for the fabrication of embedded FeRAM devices and 1Tr-type FeRAMs. The flash lamp process was found to have great potential for application to dielectric film formation, annealing processes and so on.

  10. Influence of boron vacancies on phase stability, bonding and structure of MB₂ (M  =  Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W) with AlB₂ type structure.

    PubMed

    Dahlqvist, Martin; Jansson, Ulf; Rosen, Johanna

    2015-11-01

    Transition metal diborides in hexagonal AlB2 type structure typically form stable MB2 phases for group IV elements (M  =  Ti, Zr, Hf). For group V (M  =  V, Nb, Ta) and group VI (M  =  Cr, Mo, W) the stability is reduced and an alternative hexagonal rhombohedral MB2 structure becomes more stable. In this work we investigate the effect of vacancies on the B-site in hexagonal MB2 and its influence on the phase stability and the structure for TiB2, ZrB2, HfB2, VB2, NbB2, TaB2, CrB2, MoB2, and WB2 using first-principles calculations. Selected phases are also analyzed with respect to electronic and bonding properties. We identify trends showing that MB2 with M from group V and IV are stabilized when introducing B-vacancies, consistent with a decrease in the number of states at the Fermi level and by strengthening of the B-M interaction. The stabilization upon vacancy formation also increases when going from M in period 4 to period 6. For TiB2, ZrB2, and HfB2, introduction of B-vacancies have a destabilizing effect due to occupation of B-B antibonding orbitals close to the Fermi level and an increase in states at the Fermi level. PMID:26445165

  11. C-Cl activation by group IV metal oxides in solid argon matrixes: matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and theoretical investigations of the reactions of MOx (M = Ti, Zr; x = 1, 2) with CH3Cl.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanying

    2013-07-11

    Reactions of the ground-state titanium and zirconium monoxide and dioxide molecules with monochloromethane in excess argon matrixes have been investigated in solid argon by infrared absorption spectroscopy and density functional theoretical calculations. The results show that the ground-state MOx (M = Ti, Zr; x = 1, 2) molecules react with CH3Cl to first form the weakly bound MO(CH3Cl) and MO2(CH3Cl) complexes. The MO(CH3Cl) complexes can rearrange to the CH3M(O)Cl isomers with the Cl atom of CH3Cl coordination to the metal center of MO upon UV light irradiation (λ < 300 nm). Theoretical calculations indicate that the electronic state crossings exist from the MO + CH3Cl reaction to the more stable CH3M(O)Cl molecules via the MO(CH3Cl) complexes traversing their corresponding transition states. The MO2(CH3Cl) complexes can isomerize to the more stable CH3OM(O)Cl molecules with the addition of the C-Cl bond of CH3Cl to one of the O═M bonds of MO2 upon annealing after broad-band light irradiation. The C-Cl activation by the MOx mechanism was interpreted by the calculated potential energy profiles. PMID:23763350

  12. Dendritic carbon architectures formed by nanotube core-directed diffusion-limited aggregation of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyu; Kong, Xiaohui

    2010-08-28

    A regular array of fractal patterns with macroscopic dendritic carbon architecture was prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The dendritic carbon architectures have micrometre-sized stems and hyperbranches evolved by lateral growth, and they are formed by diffusion-limited aggregation of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticle building blocks generated from catalytic pyrolysis of toluene, which is directed by carbon nanotube cores, and followed by subsequent restructuring from surface to bulk. Incorporation of such proposed processes in Monte Carlo simulations generates dendritic architectures similar to the morphologies observed from the experiments. The findings provide direct information to the time resolved evolution of the morphology and microstructure of the dendritic carbon architecture, which mimic the nature behavior as snowflake attaching on the tree branches. Those will be important to understand the growth of vapor grown carbon fibers and carbon filamentous structures, and further possibility to control branching out of vapor grown carbon fibers. PMID:20607160

  13. Energy relaxation of nonequilibrium electrons in a nanotube formed by a rolled-up quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Seyid-Rzayeva, S. M.

    2013-06-15

    The energy relaxation processes of excess electrons on the surface of a semiconductor nanotube are studied. A general analytical expression for the relaxation time of the energy of nonequilibrium electrons is derived taking into account possible intersubband transitions at an arbitrary ratio of nanotube and polaron radii r{sub 0}/r{sub p}. Numerical calculations for GaAs semiconductor nanotube are performed.

  14. Origin of nondetectable x-ray diffraction peaks in nanocomposite CuTiZr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J. Z.; Kato, H.; Ohsuna, T.; Saida, J.; Inoue, A.; Saksl, K.; Franz, H.; Stâhl, K.

    2003-10-01

    Microscopic structures of Cu60Ti10+xZr30-x (x=0 and 10) alloys have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). In the Cu60Ti10Zr30 samples annealed at 708 K for times ranging from 0 to 130 min, where the enthalpy of the first exothermic peak decreases by 80%, the corresponding XRD patterns still look similar to that for the as-prepared sample. However, the simulated XRD patterns for the pure Cu51Zr14 phase, which is the crystalline phase formed during the first exothermic reaction, with small grain sizes and defects clearly show a broadened amorphous-like feature. This might be the reason that no diffraction peaks from the nanocrystalline component were detected in the XRD patterns recorded for the as-cast or as-spun Cu60Ti10+xZr30-x (x=0 and 10) alloys and for the alloys annealed at lower temperatures, in which the enthalpy of the first exothermic peak has a significant reduction. The second exothermic peak found in DSC curves is due to the formation of another hexagonal phase, spacing group P63/mmc (194) and lattice parameters a=5.105 Å and c=8.231 Å.

  15. A study on low-power, nanosecond operation and multilevel bipolar resistance switching in Ti/ZrO2/Pt nonvolatile memory with 1T1R architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Chi; Jang, Wen-Yueh; Lin, Chen-Hsi; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2012-06-01

    Low-power, bipolar resistive switching (RS) characteristics in the Ti/ZrO2/Pt nonvolatile memory with one transistor and one resistor (1T1R) architecture were reported. Multilevel storage behavior was observed by modulating the amplitude of the MOSFET gate voltage, in which the transistor functions as a current limiter. Furthermore, multilevel storage was also executed by controlling the reset voltage, leading the resistive random access memory (RRAM) to the multiple metastable low resistance state (LRS). The experimental results on the measured electrical properties of the various sized devices confirm that the RS mechanism of the Ti/ZrO2/Pt structure obeys the conducting filaments model. In application, the devices exhibit high-speed switching performances (250 ns) with suitable high/low resistance state ratio (HRS/LRS > 10). The LRS of the devices with 10 year retention ability at 80 °C, based on the Arrhenius equation, is also demonstrated in the thermal accelerating test. Furthermore, the ramping gate voltage method with fixed drain voltage is used to switch the 1T1R memory cells for upgrading the memory performances. Our experimental results suggest that the ZrO2-based RRAM is a prospective alternative for nonvolatile multilevel memory device applications.

  16. Fabrication of nanotube arrays on commercially pure titanium and their apatite-forming ability in a simulated body fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsueh-Chuan; Wu, Shih-Ching; Hsu, Shih-Kuang; Chang, Yu-Chen; Ho, Wen-Fu

    2015-02-15

    In this study, we investigated self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes that were grown using anodization of commercially pure titanium at 5 V or 10 V in NH{sub 4}F/NaCl electrolyte. The nanotube arrays were annealed at 450 °C for 3 h to convert the amorphous nanotubes to anatase and then they were immersed in simulated body fluid at 37 °C for 0.5, 1, and 14 days. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the apatite-formation abilities of anodized Ti nanotubes with different tube diameters and lengths. The nanotubes that formed on the surfaces of Ti were examined using a field emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. When the anodizing potential was increased from 5 V to 10 V, the pore diameter of the nanotube increased from approximately 24–30 nm to 35–53 nm, and the tube length increased from approximately 590 nm to 730 nm. In vitro testing of the heat-treated nanotube arrays indicated that Ca-P formation occurred after only 1 day of immersion in simulated body fluid. This result was particularly apparent in the samples that were anodized at 10 V. It was also found that the thickness of the Ca-P layer increases as the applied potential for anodized c.p. Ti increases. The average thickness of the Ca-P layer on Ti that was anodized at 5 V and 10 V was approximately 170 nm and 190 nm, respectively, after immersion in simulated body fluid for 14 days. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanotube on Ti surface was formed by anodic oxidation in a NaCl/NH{sub 4}F solution. • TiO{sub 2} layers show a tube length of 590 nm and 730 nm at 5 V and 10 V, respectively. • After soaking in SBF, Ca-P layer completely covered the entire nanotubular surfaces. • The Ca-P layer was thicker on the Ti surface anodized at 10 V.

  17. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp3 bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp3-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40-70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  18. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Wei Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2015-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp{sup 3} bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp{sup 3}-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40–70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  19. Cell interaction with modified nanotubes formed on titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Hynek; Vandrovcova, Marta; Chotova, Katerina; Fojt, Jaroslav; Pruchova, Eva; Joska, Ludek; Bacakova, Lucie

    2016-08-01

    Nanotubes with diameters ranging from 40 to 60nm were prepared by electrochemical oxidation of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy in electrolyte containing ammonium sulphate and ammonium fluoride. The nanotubes were further modified with calcium and phosphate ions or were heat treated. Polished Ti-6Al-4V alloy served as a reference sample. The spreading of human osteoblast-like cells was similar on all nanotube samples but lower than on polished samples. The number of initially adhered cells was higher on non-modified nanotubes, but the final cell number was the highest on Ca-enriched nanotubes and the lowest on heat-treated nanotubes. However, these differences were relatively small and less pronounced than the differences in the concentration of specific molecular markers of cell adhesion and differentiation, estimated by their intensity of immunofluorescence staining. The concentration of vinculin, i.e. a protein of focal adhesion plaques, was the lowest on nanotubes modified with calcium. Collagen I, an early marker of osteogenic cell differentiation, was also the lowest on samples modified with calcium and was highest on polished samples. Alkaline phosphatase, a middle marker of osteogenic differentiation, was observed in lowest concentration on nanotubes modified with phosphorus and the highest on heat-treated samples. Osteocalcin concentrations, a late marker of osteogenic cell differentiation, were similar on all tested samples, although they tended to be the highest on heat-treated samples. Thus, osteogenic differentiation can be modulated by various additional treatments of nanotube coatings on Ti-6Al-4V implants. PMID:27157757

  20. Endohedral confinement of a DNA dodecamer onto pristine carbon nanotubes and the stability of the canonical B form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Fernando J. A. L.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Mota, José P. B.

    2014-06-01

    Although carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for DNA encapsulation and subsequent delivery of biological payloads to living cells, the thermodynamical spontaneity of DNA encapsulation under physiological conditions is still a matter of debate. Using enhanced sampling techniques, we show for the first time that, given a sufficiently large carbon nanotube, the confinement of a double-stranded DNA segment, 5'-D(*CP*GP*CP*GP*AP*AP*TP*TP*CP*GP*CP*G)-3', is thermodynamically favourable under physiological environments (134 mM, 310 K, 1 bar), leading to DNA-nanotube hybrids with lower free energy than the unconfined biomolecule. A diameter threshold of 3 nm is established below which encapsulation is inhibited. The confined DNA segment maintains its translational mobility and exhibits the main geometrical features of the canonical B form. To accommodate itself within the nanopore, the DNA's end-to-end length increases from 3.85 nm up to approximately 4.1 nm, due to a ˜0.3 nm elastic expansion of the strand termini. The canonical Watson-Crick H-bond network is essentially conserved throughout encapsulation, showing that the contact between the DNA segment and the hydrophobic carbon walls results in minor rearrangements of the nucleotides H-bonding. The results obtained here are paramount to the usage of carbon nanotubes as encapsulation media for next generation drug delivery technologies.

  1. Investigation of Lithium-Air Battery Discharge Product Formed on Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert Revell, III

    Carbon nanotubes have been actively investigated for integration in a wide variety of applications since their discovery over 20 years ago. Their myriad desirable material properties including exceptional mechanical strength, high thermal conductivities, large surface-to-volume ratios, and considerable electrical conductivities, which are attributable to a quantum mechanical ability to conduct electrons ballistically, have continued to motivate interest in this material system. While a variety of synthesis techniques exist, carbon nanotubes and nanofibers are most often conveniently synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), which involves their catalyzed growth from transition metal nanoparticles. Vertically-aligned nanotube and nanofiber carpets produced using CVD have been utilized in a variety of applications including those related to energy storage. Li-air (Li-O2) batteries have received much interest recently because of their very high theoretical energy densities (3200 Wh/kgLi2O2 ). which make them ideal candidates for energy storage devices for future fully-electric vehicles. During operation of a Li-air battery O2 is reduced on the surface a porous air cathode, reacting with Li-ions to form lithium peroxide (Li-O2). Unlike the intercalation reactions of Li-ion batteries, discharge in a Li-air cell is analogous to an electrodeposition process involving the nucleation and growth of the depositing species on a foreign substrate. Carbon nanofiber electrodes were synthesized on porous substrates using a chemical vapor deposition process and then assembled into Li-O2 cells. The large surface to volume ratio and low density of carbon nanofiber electrodes were found to yield a very high gravimetric energy density in Li-O 2 cells, approaching 75% of the theoretical energy density for Li 2O2. Further, the carbon nanofiber electrodes were found to be excellent platforms for conducting ex situ electron microscopy investigations of the deposition Li2O2 phase

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Ti-Zr-V Non-Evaporable Getter Films to Be Used in Ultra-High Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Marcelo J.; Tallarico, Denise A.; Nascente, Pedro A. P.

    2009-01-29

    An appealing procedure to obtain operating pressures in the 10{sup -8} Pa range, which is necessary for the insertion devices elements of synchrotron sources, is to coat the inner ultra-high vacuum chamber walls with a thin film of non-evaporable getter (NEG) metals. Titanium, zirconium, vanadium, and their alloys are used as NEG materials due to their low activation temperature, high chemical activity, large solubility, and high diffusivity for gases. In this work, magnetron sputtering was employed to deposit thin films of Ti-Zr-V on a Si(111) substrate. The morphological, structural, and chemical analyses were carried out by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  3. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  4. Endohedral confinement of a DNA dodecamer onto pristine carbon nanotubes and the stability of the canonical B form

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Fernando J. A. L.; Pablo, Juan J. de; Mota, José P. B.

    2014-06-14

    Although carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for DNA encapsulation and subsequent delivery of biological payloads to living cells, the thermodynamical spontaneity of DNA encapsulation under physiological conditions is still a matter of debate. Using enhanced sampling techniques, we show for the first time that, given a sufficiently large carbon nanotube, the confinement of a double-stranded DNA segment, 5′-D({sup *}CP{sup *}GP{sup *}CP{sup *}GP{sup *}AP{sup *}AP{sup *}TP{sup *}TP{sup *}CP{sup *}GP{sup *}CP{sup *}G)-3′, is thermodynamically favourable under physiological environments (134 mM, 310 K, 1 bar), leading to DNA-nanotube hybrids with lower free energy than the unconfined biomolecule. A diameter threshold of 3 nm is established below which encapsulation is inhibited. The confined DNA segment maintains its translational mobility and exhibits the main geometrical features of the canonical B form. To accommodate itself within the nanopore, the DNA's end-to-end length increases from 3.85 nm up to approximately 4.1 nm, due to a ∼0.3 nm elastic expansion of the strand termini. The canonical Watson-Crick H-bond network is essentially conserved throughout encapsulation, showing that the contact between the DNA segment and the hydrophobic carbon walls results in minor rearrangements of the nucleotides H-bonding. The results obtained here are paramount to the usage of carbon nanotubes as encapsulation media for next generation drug delivery technologies.

  5. Analysis of the interaction products in U(Mo,X)/Al and U(Mo,X)/Al(Si) diffusion couples, with X = Cr, Ti, Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allenou, J.; Palancher, H.; Iltis, X.; Tougait, O.; El Bekkachi, H.; Bonnin, A.; Tucoulou, R.

    2014-03-01

    In the framework of the development of a low 235U enriched nuclear fuel for material testing reactors, γ-U(Mo)/Al based materials are considered as the most interesting prospect. In the process to optimize their composition, addition to both γ-U(Mo) and Al have been proposed. In this paper, the crystallographic composition of Interaction Layers (ILs) in γ-U(Mo,X)/Al and γ-U(Mo,X)/AlSi7 diffusion couples, with X = Cr, Ti, Zr, heat-treated at 600 °C for 2 h, were studied by micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD). When compared to the U(Mo)/Al and U(Mo)/Al(Si) reference systems, all investigated systems involving either Al or Al(Si) as counterparts show interaction products composed of similar phases and related sequences of phase formation. Only relative thicknesses of sub-layers and relative fractions of intermediate phases are correlated with the nature of the X element in the γ-U(Mo,X) alloy.

  6. Investigation of (Ti-Zr-Hf-V-Nb)N Multicomponent Nanostructured Coatings before and after Thermal Annealing by Nuclear Physics Methods of Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnjak, A. D.; Beresnev, V. M.; Bondar', A. V.; Kaverin, M. V.; Ponomarev, A. G.

    2013-10-01

    (Ti-Zr-Hf-V-Nb)N multicomponent nanostructured coatings with thickness of 1.0-1.4 μm synthesized by the method of cathode arc-vapor deposition at temperatures of 250-300°С are investigated by various mutually complementary methods of elemental structural analysis using slow positron beams (SPB), proton microbeam based particle-induced x-ray emission (μ-PIXE), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses based on electron micro- and nanobeams, x-ray diffraction (XRD) method of phase structural analysis, and the "a-sin2φ" method of measuring a stressed-strained state (x-ray tensometry). The elemental composition, microstructure, residual stress in nanograins, profiles of defect and atom distributions with depth and over the coating surface in 3D-representation are studied for these coatings, and their phase composition, severely strained state, and composition of coatings before and after annealing at Tann = 600°С for annealing time τ = 30 min are investigated. It is demonstrated that the oxidation resistance of the examined coatings can be significantly increased by high-temperature annealing that leads to the formation of elastic severely strained compression state of the coating. Redistribution of elements and defects, their segregation near the interface boundaries and around grains and subgrains in the process of thermostimulated diffusion, and termination of spinodal segregation without considerable change of the average nanograin size are revealed.

  7. A modular peptide-based immobilization system for ZrO2, TiZr and TiO2 surfaces.

    PubMed

    Micksch, Tina; Herrmann, Elisa; Scharnweber, Dieter; Schwenzer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes a novel versatile immobilization system for the modification of implant materials with biologically active molecules (BAMs), e.g. antibiotics or growth factors. Specific adsorbing peptides are used as anchor molecules to immobilize oligodesoxynucleotides (ODNs) on the implant surface (anchor strand, AS). The BAM is conjugated to a complementary ODN strand (CS) which is able to hybridize to the AS on the implant surface to immobilize the BAM. The ODN double strand allows for a controlled release of the BAM adjustable by the ODN sequence and length. The immobilization system was developed and proven on three typical implant materials, namely ZrO2, TiZr and Ti, respectively. The parathyroid hormone (PTH) fragment 1-34 was conjugated to the CS and immobilized on these different implant materials. To investigate the biological activity of the immobilized PTH, alkaline phosphatase was quantified after incubation of the osteoblast precursor cells C2C12 on the modified samples. The results demonstrate the successful immobilization of biologically active PTH (1-34) and the high potential of the established surfaces to achieve an increased osseointegration of variable implants, especially for patients with risk factors. PMID:25449919

  8. Stability and crystal chemistry of the ternary borides M2(Ni21-xMx)B6 (M tbnd Ti, Zr, Hf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artini, C.; Provino, A.; Valenza, F.; Pani, M.; Cacciamani, G.

    2016-01-01

    A crystallochemical study was undertaken to investigate the structural stability and the compositional extent of the ternary borides M2(Ni21-xMx)B6 (M tbnd Ti, Zr, Hf). This phase often occurs during the production of MB2 joints by means of Ni-B brazing alloys. Samples with the nominal compositions M2Ni21B6 and M3Ni20B6 were synthesized by arc melting and characterized by optical and electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Crystal structure refinements were performed by the Rietveld method. The compositional boundaries of the ternary phases were experimentally determined and found strictly related to the M/Ni size ratio. The stability of this structure is mainly determined by the capability of the structure to expand under the effect of the Ni substitution by the M atom. The CALPHAD modeling of the three M-Ni-B ternary systems in the Ni-rich corner of the phase diagram, performed on the basis of the obtained structural data, shows a good agreement with experimental results.

  9. Investigation of the peptide adsorption on ZrO2, TiZr, and TiO2 surfaces as a method for surface modification.

    PubMed

    Micksch, Tina; Liebelt, Nora; Scharnweber, Dieter; Schwenzer, Bernd

    2014-05-28

    Specific surface binding peptides offer a versatile and interesting possibility for the development of biocompatible implant materials. Therefore, eight peptide sequences were examined in regard to their adsorption on zirconium oxide (ZrO2), titanium zircon (TiZr), and titanium (c.p. Ti). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements were performed on Ti coated sensor chips to determine the kinetics of the interactions and kinetic rate constants (kon, koff, KD, and Rmax). We also investigated the interactions which are present in our system. Electrostatic and coordinative interactions were found to play a major role in the adsorption process. Four of the eight examined peptide sequences showed a significant adsorption on all investigated materials. Moreover, the two peptides with the highest adsorption could be quantified (up to 370 pmol/cm(2)). For potential biomaterials applications, we proved the stability of the adsorption of selected peptides in cell culture media, under competition with proteins and at body temperature (37 °C), and their biocompatibility via their effects on the adhesion and proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The results qualify the peptides as anchor peptides for the biofunctionalization of implants. PMID:24735333

  10. Transferable force-constant modeling of vibrational thermodynamic properties in fcc-based Al-TM ( TM=Ti , Zr, Hf) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jefferson Z.; Ghosh, G.; van de Walle, A.; Asta, M.

    2007-03-01

    The vibrational thermodynamic properties of ordered and disordered fcc-based alloys in three aluminum transition-metal (TM) systems, Al-TM ( TM=Ti , Zr, and Hf), are computed by first principles methods employing supercell calculations and the transferable-force-constant (TFC) approach. In order to obtain accurate values for the high-temperature limit of the vibrational mixing entropies in these systems, it is necessary to parametrize the dependence of the force constants on both the equilibrium bond length and the TM concentration in the TFC method. Provided this concentration dependence is accounted for, the TFC approach is shown to lead to predictions for the vibrational mixing entropy accurate to within approximately 20%. The utility of the TFC method is demonstrated by its application to the calculation of vibrational entropies of mixing for approximately 30 structures in each of the three Al-TM systems, facilitating the construction of well converged vibrational-entropy cluster expansions. The calculations yield large and negative values for the vibrational mixing entropies of both ordered and disordered alloys, with an overall magnitude of up to 1.0kB /atom, and ordering entropies (i.e., the difference between the vibrational entropy of ordered and disordered phases at the same composition) in the range of 0.2-0.3kB /atom for concentrated alloys. Calculated results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data available for the Al-Ti system.

  11. Mechanical and Electronic Properties of A1-xBxHy (A and B =Ti, Zr, Hf) Hydride Alloys: A First-principles Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Yunya; Yang, Li; Nie, JL; Fan, K. M.; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Zhou, Xiaosong; Bing, Wenzeng; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei

    2013-12-01

    Using ab initio calculations, we investigated the mechanical and electronic properties of Ti1-xHfxHy, Ti1-xZrxHy and Zr1-xHfxTHy (x=0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1; y=1.5, 1.75, 2). The calculated results in binary hydrides show that the β-phase MH1.5[100] (M=Ti, Zr, Hf) are more stable than other possible structures. At the Fermi level, the density of states for metal d state increases with increasing the H concentration in MHy (y ranged from 1.5 to 2), which leads to the instability of their fcc structures and induces the tetragonal distortion. Ti0.75Hf0.25H1.5 and Zr0.25Hf0.75H1.5 exhibit the highest mechanical stability, while Ti0.25Zr0.75H1.5 has the lowest mechanical stability among the corresponding ternary systems considered. Moreover, the systems studied in the present work are all anisotropic and show a ductile behavior. The tetragonal distortion in Ti1-xHfxH1.5, Ti1-xZrxH1.5 and Zr1-xHfxH1.5 is not observed, retaining their fcc structures. The electronic structure of A1-xBxHy (A and B =Ti, Hf, Zr) exhibits metallic character.

  12. Expansion of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury after instillation of three forms of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The exceptional physical-chemical properties of carbon nanotubes have lead to their use in diverse commercial and biomedical applications. However, their utilization has raised concerns about human exposure that may predispose individuals to adverse health risks. The present study investigated the susceptibility to cardiac ischemic injury following a single exposure to various forms of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). It was hypothesized that oropharyngeal aspiration of MWCNTs exacerbates myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury (I/R injury). Methods Oropharyngeal aspiration was performed on male C57BL/6J mice with a single amount of MWCNT (0.01 - 100 μg) suspended in 100 μL of a surfactant saline (SS) solution. Three forms of MWCNTs were used in this study: unmodified, commercial grade (C-grade), and functionalized forms that were modified either by acid treatment (carboxylated, COOH) or nitrogenation (N-doped) and a SS vehicle. The pulmonary inflammation, serum cytokine profile and cardiac ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury were assessed at 1, 7 and 28 days post-aspiration. Results Pulmonary response to MWCNT oropharyngeal aspiration assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) revealed modest increases in protein and inflammatory cell recruitment. Lung histology showed modest tissue inflammation as compared to the SS group. Serum levels of eotaxin were significantly elevated in the carboxylated MWCNT aspirated mice 1 day post exposure. Oropharyngeal aspiration of all three forms of MWCNTs resulted in a time and/or dose-dependent exacerbation of myocardial infarction. The severity of myocardial injury varied with the form of MWCNTs used. The N-doped MWCNT produced the greatest expansion of the infarct at any time point and required a log concentration lower to establish a no effect level. The expansion of the I/R injury remained significantly elevated at 28 days following aspiration of the COOH and N-doped forms, but not the C-grade as

  13. Fabrication and characterization of tunnel barriers in a multi-walled carbon nanotube formed by argon atom beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomizawa, H.; Yamaguchi, T.; Akita, S.; Ishibashi, K.

    2015-07-01

    We have evaluated tunnel barriers formed in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by an Ar atom beam irradiation method and applied the technique to fabricate coupled double quantum dots. The two-terminal resistance of the individual MWNTs was increased owing to local damage caused by the Ar beam irradiation. The temperature dependence of the current through a single barrier suggested two different contributions to its Arrhenius plot, i.e., formed by direct tunneling through the barrier and by thermal activation over the barrier. The height of the formed barriers was estimated. The fabrication technique was used to produce coupled double quantum dots with serially formed triple barriers on a MWNT. The current measured at 1.5 K as a function of two side-gate voltages resulted in a honeycomb-like charge stability diagram, which confirmed the formation of the double dots. The characteristic parameters of the double quantum dots were calculated, and the feasibility of the technique is discussed.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of tunnel barriers in a multi-walled carbon nanotube formed by argon atom beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tomizawa, H.; Yamaguchi, T.; Akita, S.; Ishibashi, K.

    2015-07-28

    We have evaluated tunnel barriers formed in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by an Ar atom beam irradiation method and applied the technique to fabricate coupled double quantum dots. The two-terminal resistance of the individual MWNTs was increased owing to local damage caused by the Ar beam irradiation. The temperature dependence of the current through a single barrier suggested two different contributions to its Arrhenius plot, i.e., formed by direct tunneling through the barrier and by thermal activation over the barrier. The height of the formed barriers was estimated. The fabrication technique was used to produce coupled double quantum dots with serially formed triple barriers on a MWNT. The current measured at 1.5 K as a function of two side-gate voltages resulted in a honeycomb-like charge stability diagram, which confirmed the formation of the double dots. The characteristic parameters of the double quantum dots were calculated, and the feasibility of the technique is discussed.

  15. Crystal chemistry of the G-phases in the {l_brace}Ti, Zr, Hf{r_brace}-Ni-Si systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grytsiv, A.; Chen Xingqiu; Rogl, P. Podloucky, R.; Schmidt, H.; Giester, G.; Pomjakushin, V.

    2007-02-15

    Ternary compounds M{sub 6}Ni{sub 16}Si{sub 7} (M=Ti, Zr, Hf) have been investigated by X-ray powder/single crystal and neutron powder diffraction. Compounds with Zr and Hf crystallize in the ordered Th{sub 6}Mn{sub 23} type (Mg{sub 6}Cu{sub 16}Si{sub 7}-type, space group Fm3-bar m), whereas Ti{sub 6}Ni{sub 16.7}Si{sub 7} contains an additional Ni atom partially occupying the 24e site (M2 site, x=0.4637,0,0; occ.=0.119) inside a Ti octahedron; Ti atoms occupy a split position. Ti{sub 6}Ni{sub 16.7}Si{sub 7} represents a new variant of the filled Th{sub 6}Mn{sub 23} type structure. Ab initio calculations confirm the structural difference: additional Ni atoms favour the 24e site for Ti{sub 6}Ni{sub 16.7}Si{sub 7}, however, for the Zr and Hf-based compounds the unoccupied site renders an energetically lower ground state. Enthalpies of formation of Ti{sub 6}Ni{sub 17}Si{sub 7}, Zr{sub 6}Ni{sub 16}Si{sub 7}, and Hf{sub 6}Ni{sub 16}Si{sub 7} were calculated to be -68.65, -74.78, and -78.59kJ/(mol of atoms), respectively.

  16. Catalytic effect of different forms of iron in purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Sakae; Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    In the arc plasma jet (APJ) method, a large amount of soot including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be produced in a short time. However, as-grown soot contains a lot of impurities, such as metallic particles used as catalyst and amorphous carbon. Hence it is necessary to purify the soot to obtain pure SWNTs. The biggest problem in purifying APJ-SWNTs is how to remove the thick amorphous carbon covering the catalyst metal particles. By refluxing APJ-SWNTs in hydrogen peroxide using iron particle as catalyst, it can be purified. The added fine particle of pure iron is found to be effective. Then, we examine whether SWNTs can be purified more effectively by adding solution containing the Fe ion instead of the iron particle. We used iron (III) nitrate nonahydrate, hydrogen peroxide decomposing agent which contains catalase and ammonium iron (II) sulfate hexahydrate. In the case of iron (III) nitrate and catalase, purification effect is not obvious. Under these conditions hydrogen peroxide was decomposed into H2O and O2, and the hydroxyl radical was not generated. On the other hand, ammonium iron (II) sulfate is effective. Because of existence of Fe2+ in solution Fenton's reaction takes place. Reaction rate is increased at high temperature. Therefore, APJ-SWNT is purified more effectively if refluxed in hydrogen peroxide using ammonium iron (II) sulfate as catalyst. PMID:20355392

  17. Microstructural Models of Alumina Nanotubes and Anodic Porous Alumina Film Formed in Sulphuric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Lin; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Tan, Chao; Yang, Zheng; Zou, Jian-Ping; Bao, Xi-Mao; Feng, Duan; Shi, Yi; Zheng, You-Dou

    2002-03-01

    Electrochemical stepwise anodization of aluminium in dilute sulphuric acid results in the formation of alumina nanotubes (ANTs) due to the hexagonal split of the anodic porous alumina (APA) film along the cell boundaries containing many voids; that is, the ANTs are the completely detached cell of the APA film. The inner diameters of the ANTs are in the range of 10-20 nm, and the aspect ratio (inner diameter/length) of the ANTs can be about 80. The relations found for pore diameter, cell diameter and barrier layer thickness are around 1, 2.7 and 0.85 nm/V, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the ANT wall has a three-shell structure: an outer shell (metal/oxide interface) consisting of pure alumina oxide, a middle shell of the hydrated oxide or/and hydroxide and an inner shell (oxide/electrolyte interface) of anion incorporated oxide with the thickness ratio of 1:1:2. The structural change of ANTs induced by e-beam irradiation in TEM indicates that the thermal instability of the hydrated oxide or/and hydroxide within the cell wall might be an alternative origin contributing to the self-organization of the cells, leading to a densely packed triangular cell lattice of the APA film.

  18. Tunneling Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Emil; Fujisawa, Sho; Barlas, Afsar; Romin, Yevgeniy; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2012-01-01

    Tunneling nanotubes are actin-based cytoplasmic extensions that function as intercellular channels in a wide variety of cell types.There is a renewed and keen interest in the examination of modes of intercellular communication in cells of all types, especially in the field of cancer biology. Tunneling nanotubes –which in the literature have also been referred to as “membrane nanotubes,” “’intercellular’ or ‘epithelial’ bridges,” or “cytoplasmic extensions” – are under active investigation for their role in facilitating direct intercellular communication. These structures have not, until recently, been scrutinized as a unique and previously unrecognized form of direct cell-to-cell transmission of cellular cargo in the context of human cancer. Our recent study of tunneling nanotubes in human malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinomas demonstrated efficient transfer of cellular contents, including proteins, Golgi vesicles, and mitochondria, between cells derived from several well-established cancer cell lines. Further, we provided effective demonstration that such nanotubes can form between primary malignant cells from human patients. For the first time, we also demonstrated the in vivo relevance of these structures in humans, having effectively imaged nanotubes in intact solid tumors from patients. Here we provide further analysis and discussion on our findings, and offer a prospective ‘road map’ for studying tunneling nanotubes in the context of human cancer. We hope that further understanding of the mechanisms, methods of transfer, and particularly the role of nanotubes in tumor-stromal cross-talk will lead to identification of new selective targets for cancer therapeutics. PMID:23060969

  19. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  20. Plumbing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chuanhong; Suenaga, Kazu; Iijima, Sumio

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, the possibility of connecting carbon nanotubes together like water pipes has been an intriguing prospect for these hollow nanostructures. The serial joining of carbon nanotubes in a controlled manner offers a promising approach for the bottom-up engineering of nanotube structures-from simply increasing their aspect ratio to making integrated carbon nanotube devices. To date, however, there have been few reports of the joining of two different carbon nanotubes. Here we demonstrate that a Joule heating process, and associated electro-migration effects, can be used to connect two carbon nanotubes that have the same (or similar) diameters. More generally, with the assistance of a tungsten metal particle, this technique can be used to seamlessly join any two carbon nanotubes-regardless of their diameters-to form new nanotube structures.

  1. Mixing thermodynamics of TM1-xGdxN (TM=Ti,Zr,Hf) from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alling, B.; Höglund, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hultman, L.

    2011-06-01

    The mixing thermodynamics of GdN with TiN, ZrN, and HfN is studied using first-principles methods. We find that while Ti1-xGdxN has a strong preference for phase separation due to the large lattice mismatch, Zr1-xGdxN and Hf1-xGdxN readily mix, possibly in the form of ordered compounds. In particular, ZrGdN2 is predicted to order in a rocksalt counterpart to the L11 structure at temperatures below 1020 K. These mixed nitrides are promising candidates as neutron absorbing, thermally and chemically stable, thin film materials.

  2. Adhesion strength and nucleation thermodynamics of four metals (Al, Cu, Ti, Zr) on AlN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuan; Ke, Genshui; Xie, Yan; Chen, Yigang; Shi, Siqi; Guo, Haibo

    2015-12-01

    Devices based on AlN generally require adherent and strong interfaces between AlN and other materials, whereas most metals are known to be nonwetting to AlN and form relatively weak interfaces with AlN. In this study, we selected four representative metals (Al, Cu, Ti, and Zr) to study the adhesion strength of the AlN/metal interfaces. Mathematical models were constructed between the adhesion strength and enthalpy of formation of Al-metal solid solutions, the surface energies of the metals, and the lattice mismatch between the metals and AlN, based on thermodynamic parameters calculated using density functional theory. It appears that the adhesion strength is mainly determined by the lattice mismatch, and is in no linear correlation with either the Al-metal solution's formation enthalpies or the metals' surface energies. We also investigated the nucleation thermodynamics of the four metals on AlN substrates. It was found that Ti forms the strongest interface with AlN, and has the largest driving force for nucleation on AlN substrates among the four metals.

  3. Morphotropy, isomorphism, and polymorphism of Ln{sub 2}M{sub 2}O{sub 7}-based (Ln = La-Lu, Y, Sc; M = Ti, Zr, Hf, Sn) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyakhtina, A. V.

    2013-07-15

    Structural studies of compounds of variable composition and measurements of their conductivity have made it possible to identify new oxygen-ion-conducting rare-earth pyrochlores, Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln = Dy-Lu) and Ln{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln = Eu, Gd), with intrinsic high-temperature oxygen ion conductivity (up to 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} S/cm at 800 Degree-Sign C). Twenty six systems have been studied, and more than 50 phases based on the Ln{sub 2}M{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln= La-Lu; M = Ti, Zr, Hf) oxides have been synthesized and shown to be potential oxygen ion conductors. The morphotropy and polymorphism of the Ln{sub 2}M{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln = La-Lu; M = Ti, Zr, Hf) rare-earth pyrochlores have been analyzed in detail for the first time. Thermodynamic and kinetic (growth-related) phase transitions have been classified with application to the pyrochlore family.

  4. An experimental study on the mixing behavior of Ti, Zr, V and Mo in the Elbe, Rhine and Weser estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Alexandre B.; Koschinsky, Andrea; Kiprotich, Joseph; Poehle, Sandra; do Nascimento, Paulo C.

    2016-03-01

    Estuaries are important interfaces between land and ocean, in which the input of trace metals into the ocean via the rivers is often significantly modified along the mixing gradient between freshwater and seawater. In the present study we have carried out mixing experiments using river water from the Rhine, the Elbe and the Weser and seawater from the North Sea with the aim of gaining more insights into the behavior of titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), vanadium (V) and molybdenum (Mo) and their distribution between dissolved and particulate forms during mixing in the estuaries. Little is known about the modification of their concentrations in estuaries and these metals increasingly enter the rivers and the ocean due to their application as so-called high-tech metals in industrial activities. Such laboratory experiments at controlled conditions allow the systematic investigation of chemical changes related to the mixing ratios, independent of further influence factors occurring in natural systems. Adsorptive stripping voltammetry was used for the analytical determination of the four metals. Although our data largely confirmed a strong particle-reactive behavior of Ti and Zr and a mostly conservative behavior of Mo, our mixing experiments revealed partial deviation from this behavior. Vanadium mostly does not follow a strict conservative mixing trend but shows both small ad- and desorption effects along the salinity transect. Also Mo shows some deviations from conservative mixing at mid-salinities. The enrichment of dissolved Ti and Zr at about 50:50 river: seawater mixtures agrees with recently published data of similar field studies and appears to be a systematic effect possibly related to charge transitions on particle surfaces or change of the dissolved metal speciation. The observed effects partly differed in experiments with filtered and non-filtered river water samples, especially for Ti and Zr, highlighting the role of riverine particulate matter for the

  5. Transport Properties of p-n Junctions Formed in Boron/Nitrogen Doped Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouri, Mahmoud; Vasiliev, Igor

    2014-03-01

    We apply ab initio computational methods based on density functional theory to study the transport properties of p-n junctions made of single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons. The p-n junctions are formed by doping the opposite ends of carbon nanostructures with boron and nitrogen atoms. Our calculations are carried out using the SIESTA electronic structure code combined with the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation functional. The transport properties are calculated using a self-consistent nonequilibrium Green's function method implemented in the TranSIESTA package. The modeled nanoscale p-n junctions exhibit linear I-V characteristics in the forward bias and nonlinear I-V characteristics with a negative differential resistance in the reverse bias. The computed transmission spectra and the I-V characteristics of the p-n junctions are compared to the results of other theoretical studies and to the available experimental data. Supported by NMSU GREG Award and by NSF CHE-1112388.

  6. Self-Assembled Microspheres Formed from α-MnO2 Nanotubes as an Anode Material for Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Jan, S Savut; Nurgul, S; Shi, Xiaoqin; Xia, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Self-assembed microspheres formed from single-crystal α-MnO2 nanotubes have been successfully synthesized by a facile hydrothermal treatment of KMnO4 in the hydrochloric acid solution. The effect of the reaction time on the microstructure and morphology of the sample is investigated systemically. Meanwhile, the forming mechanism of nano-structured α-MnO2 is carefully studied by X-ray powder diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The MnO2 nanotube microspheres exhibit large reversible capacity up to 807 mA h g(-1) as well as good cycling stability and rate capability, making them promising as anode material for lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26716307

  7. Alternating syn-anti bacteriochlorophylls form concentric helical nanotubes in chlorosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Swapna; Oostergetel, Gert T.; Wawrzyniak, Piotr K.; Reus, Michael; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Aline; Buda, Francesco; Boekema, Egbert J.; Bryant, Donald A.; Holzwarth, Alfred R.; de Groot, Huub J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorosomes are the largest and most efficient light-harvesting antennae found in nature, and they are constructed from hundreds of thousands of self-assembled bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c, d, or e pigments. Because they form very large and compositionally heterogeneous organelles, they had been the only photosynthetic antenna system for which no detailed structural information was available. In our approach, the structure of a member of the chlorosome class was determined and compared with the wild type (WT) to resolve how the biological light-harvesting function of the chlorosome is established. By constructing a triple mutant, the heterogeneous BChl c pigment composition of chlorosomes of the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobaculum tepidum was simplified to nearly homogeneous BChl d. Computational integration of two different bioimaging techniques, solid-state NMR and cryoEM, revealed an undescribed syn-anti stacking mode and showed how ligated BChl c and d self-assemble into coaxial cylinders to form tubular-shaped elements. A close packing of BChls via π–π stacking and helical H-bonding networks present in both the mutant and in the WT forms the basis for ultrafast, long-distance transmission of excitation energy. The structural framework is robust and can accommodate extensive chemical heterogeneity in the BChl side chains for adaptive optimization of the light-harvesting functionality in low-light environments. In addition, syn-anti BChl stacks form sheets that allow for strong exciton overlap in two dimensions enabling triplet exciton formation for efficient photoprotection. PMID:19435848

  8. Comparative studies of singlet oxygen generation by fullerenes and single- and multilayer carbon nanotubes in the form of solid-phase film coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, I. V.; Kiselev, V. M.; Kislyakov, I. M.; Starodubtsev, A. M.; Burchinov, A. N.

    2015-03-01

    Four types of carbon nanoparticles: C60 fullerene (crystalline and amorphized) and single- and multilayer carbon nanotubes were studied in the form of solid-phase film coatings for the purpose of obtaining singlet oxygen generation in the process of irradiation of these materials by continuous-wave broadband light-emitting diodes in the visible region spectra and by a monopulse 532-nm neodymium laser.

  9. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  10. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  11. Effects of Ti, Zr, and Hf on the Phase Stability of Mo-Mo3Si+Mo5SiB2 Alloys at 1600 C

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Bei, Hongbin; Chen, Shuanglin; George, Easo P; Tiley, Jaimie; Chang, Y. Austin

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the stability of the three-phase Mo{_}+Mo{sub 3}Si+Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} region is important for alloy design of Mo-Si-B-based refractory metal intermetallic composites. In this work, thermodynamic modeling is coupled with guided experiments to study phase stability in this three-phase region of the Mo-Si-B-X (X = Ti, Zr, Hf) system. Both the calculated and experimental results show that additions of Zr and Hf limit significantly the stability of the three-phase region because of the formation of the ternary phases MoSiZr and MoSiHf, while Ti addition leads to a much larger region of stability for the three-phase equilibrium.

  12. Comparison of the interactions of daunorubicin in a free form and attached to single-walled carbon nanotubes with model lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary In this work the interactions of an anticancer drug daunorubicin (DNR) with model thiolipid layers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothioethanol (DPPTE) were investigated using Langmuir technique. The results obtained for a free drug were compared with the results recorded for DNR attached to SWCNTs as potential drug carrier. Langmuir studies of mixed DPPTE–SWCNTs-DNR monolayers showed that even at the highest investigated content of the nanotubes in the monolayer, the changes in the properties of DPPTE model membranes were not as significant as in case of the incorporation of a free drug, which resulted in a significant increase in the area per molecule and fluidization of the thiolipid layer. The presence of SWCNTs-DNR in the DPPTE monolayer at the air–water interface did not change the organization of the lipid molecules to such extent as the free drug, which may be explained by different types of interactions playing crucial role in these two types of systems. In the case of the interactions of free DNR the electrostatic attraction between positively charged drug and negatively charged DPPTE monolayer play the most important role, while in the case of SWCNTs-DNR adducts the hydrophobic interactions between nanotubes and acyl chains of the lipid seem to be prevailing. Electrochemical studies performed for supported model membranes containing the drug delivered in the two investigated forms revealed that the surface concentration of the drug-nanotube adduct in supported monolayers is comparable to the reported surface concentration of the free DNR incorporated into DPPTE monolayers on gold electrodes. Therefore, it may be concluded that the application of carbon nanotubes as potential DNR carrier allows for the incorporation of comparable amount of the drug into model membranes with simultaneous decrease in the negative changes in the membrane structure and organization, which is an important aspect in terms of side effects of the drug

  13. Comparison of the interactions of daunorubicin in a free form and attached to single-walled carbon nanotubes with model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Matyszewska, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    In this work the interactions of an anticancer drug daunorubicin (DNR) with model thiolipid layers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothioethanol (DPPTE) were investigated using Langmuir technique. The results obtained for a free drug were compared with the results recorded for DNR attached to SWCNTs as potential drug carrier. Langmuir studies of mixed DPPTE-SWCNTs-DNR monolayers showed that even at the highest investigated content of the nanotubes in the monolayer, the changes in the properties of DPPTE model membranes were not as significant as in case of the incorporation of a free drug, which resulted in a significant increase in the area per molecule and fluidization of the thiolipid layer. The presence of SWCNTs-DNR in the DPPTE monolayer at the air-water interface did not change the organization of the lipid molecules to such extent as the free drug, which may be explained by different types of interactions playing crucial role in these two types of systems. In the case of the interactions of free DNR the electrostatic attraction between positively charged drug and negatively charged DPPTE monolayer play the most important role, while in the case of SWCNTs-DNR adducts the hydrophobic interactions between nanotubes and acyl chains of the lipid seem to be prevailing. Electrochemical studies performed for supported model membranes containing the drug delivered in the two investigated forms revealed that the surface concentration of the drug-nanotube adduct in supported monolayers is comparable to the reported surface concentration of the free DNR incorporated into DPPTE monolayers on gold electrodes. Therefore, it may be concluded that the application of carbon nanotubes as potential DNR carrier allows for the incorporation of comparable amount of the drug into model membranes with simultaneous decrease in the negative changes in the membrane structure and organization, which is an important aspect in terms of side effects of the drug. PMID

  14. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  15. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  16. Mobilities in ambipolar field effect transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotube network and formed on a gold nanoparticle template

    SciTech Connect

    Wongsaeng, Chalao; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-04-07

    Ambipolar field effect transistors based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network formed on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) template with polyvinyl alcohol as a gate insulator were studied by measuring the current–gate voltage characteristics. It was found that the mobilities of holes and electrons increased with increasing AuNP number density. The disturbances in the flow pattern of the carbon feedstock in the chemical vapor deposition growth that were produced by the AuNP geometry, resulted in the differences in the crystallinity and the diameter, as well as the changes in the degree of the semiconductor behavior of the SWNTs.

  17. Working Toward Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga; Hadjiev, Victor G.; Scott, Carl D.; Files, Bradley S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most attractive applications of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is found in the area of structural materials. Nanotubes have a unique combination of high strength, modulus, and elongation to failure, and therefore have potential to significantly enhance the mechanical properties of today's composites. This is especially attractive for the aerospace industry looking for any chance to save weight. This is why NASA has chosen to tackle this difficult application of SWNT. Nanotube properties differ significantly from that of conventional carbon fibers, and a whole new set of problems, including adhesion and dispersion in the adhesive polymer matrix, must be resolved in order to engineer superior composite materials. From recent work on a variety of applications it is obvious that the wide range of research in nanotubes will lead to advances in physics, chemistry, and engineering. However, the possibility of ultralightweight structures is what causes dreamers to really get excited. One of the important issues in composite engineering is aspect ratio of the fibers, since it affects load transfer in composites. Nanotube length was a gray area for years, since they are formed in bundles, making it impossible to monitor individual nanotube length. Even though bundles are observed to be tens and hundreds of microns long, they can be built of relatively short tubes weakly bound by Van der Waals forces. Nanotube length can be affected by subsequent purification and ultrasound processing, which has been necessary in order to disperse nanotubes and introduce them into a polymer matrix. Some calculations show that nanotubes with 10(exp 5) aspect ratio may be necessary to achieve good load transfer. We show here that nanotubes produced in our laser system are as much as tens of microns long and get cut into lengths of hundreds of nanometers during ultrasound processing. Nanotube length was measured by AFM on pristine nanotube specimens as well, as after sonication

  18. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  19. Energy efficient microwave synthesis of mesoporous Ce0.5M0.5O2 (Ti, Zr, Hf) nanoparticles for low temperature CO oxidation in an ionic liquid – a comparative study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alammar, Tarek; Chow, Ying -Kit; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2014-11-19

    Ce0.5M0.5O2 (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by microwave irradiation in the ionic liquid [C4mim][Tf2N] (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide). The morphology, crystallinity, and chemical composition of the obtained materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, and N2–adsorption measurements. XRD and Raman spectroscopy analyses confirmed the formation of solid solutions with cubic fluorite structure. The catalytic activities of the Ce0.5M0.5O2 (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) nanoparticles were investigated in the low-temperature oxidation of CO. Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 nanospheres exhibit the best performance (100% conversion at 350 °C), followed by Ce0.5Hf0.5O2more » (55% conversion at 360 °C) and Ce0.5Ti0.5O2 (11% conversion at 350 °C). Heating the as-prepared Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 to 600 °C for extended time leads to a decrease in surface area and, as expected decreased catalytic activity. Depending on the ionic liquid the obtained Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 exhibits different morphologies, varying from nano-spheres in [C4mim][Tf2N] and [P66614][Tf2N] (P66614 = trishexyltetradecylphosphonium) to sheet-like assemblies in [C3mimOH][Tf2N] (C3mimOH = 1-(3-hydroxypropyl)-3-methylimidazolium). As a result, the microwave synthesis superiority to other heating methods like sonochemical synthesis and conventional heating was proven by comparative experiments where the catalytic activity of Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 obtained by alternate methods such as conventional heating was found to be poorer than that of the microwave-synthesised material.« less

  20. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  1. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2010-01-10

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  2. Elastic properties of perovskite ATiO{sub 3} (A = Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) and PbBO{sub 3} (B = Ti, Zr, and Hf): First principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Pandech, Narasak; Limpijumnong, Sukit; Sarasamak, Kanoknan

    2015-05-07

    The mechanical properties of perovskite oxides depend on two metal oxide lattices that are intercalated. This provides an opportunity for separate tuning of hardness, Poisson's ratio (transverse expansion in response to the compression), and shear strength. The elastic constants of series of perovskite oxides were studied by first principles approach. Both A-site and B-site cations were systematically varied in order to see their effects on the elastic parameters. To study the effects of A-site cations, we studied the elastic properties of perovskite ATiO{sub 3} for A being Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, or Ba, one at a time. Similarly, for B-site cations, we studied the elastic properties of PbBO{sub 3} for B being Ti, Zr, or Hf, one at a time. The density functional first principles calculations with local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) were employed. It is found that the maximum C{sub 11} elastic constant is achieved when the atomic size of the cations at A-site and B-site are comparable. We also found that C{sub 12} elastic constant is sensitive to B-site cations while C{sub 44} elastic constant is more sensitive to A-site cations. Details and explanations for such dependencies are discussed.

  3. Study of Ni{sub 2}-Mn-Ga phase formation by magnetron sputtering film deposition at low temperature onto Si substrates and LaNiO{sub 3}/Pb(Ti,Zr)O{sub 3} buffer

    SciTech Connect

    Figueiras, F.; Rauwel, E.; Amaral, V. S.; Vyshatko, N.; Kholkin, A. L.; Soyer, C.; Remiens, D.; Shvartsman, V. V.; Borisov, P.; Kleemann, W.

    2010-01-15

    Film deposition of Ni{sub 2}MnGa phaselike alloy by radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering was performed onto bare Si(100) substrates and LaNiO{sub 3}/Pb(Ti,Zr)O{sub 3} (LNO/PZT) ferroelectric buffer layer near room temperature. The prepared samples were characterized using conventional x-ray diffraction (XRD), superconducting quantum interference device, and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy from scanning electron microscope observations. The optimized films deposited under high rf power and low argon pressure present good surface quality and highly textured phase crystallization. The positioning distance between the substrate and the target-holder axis has some limited effect on the film's composition due to the specific diffusion behavior of each element in the sputtering plasma. Extended four pole high resolution XRD analysis allowed one to discriminate the intended Ni-Mn-Ga tetragonal martensitic phase induced by the (100) LNO/PZT oriented buffer. This low temperature process appears to be very promising, allowing separate control of the functional layer's properties, while trying to achieve high electromagnetoelastic coupling.

  4. Analysis of local regions near interfaces in nanostructured multicomponent (Ti-Zr-Hf-V-Nb)N coatings produced by the cathodic-arc-vapor-deposition from an arc of an evaporating cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause-Rehberg, R.; Pogrebnyak, A. D.; Borisyuk, V. N.; Kaverin, M. V.; Ponomarev, A. G.; Bilokur, M. A.; Oyoshi, K.; Takeda, Y.; Beresnev, V. M.; Sobol', O. V.

    2013-08-01

    Multicomponent nanostructured (Ti-Zr-Hf-V-Nb)N coatings produced by the cathodic-arc-vapor-deposition method have been studied using several complementary methods of elemental and structural analysis, such as those based on the use of slow positron beam (SPB); proton microbeam (μ-PIXE); electron micro- and nanobeam (EDS and SEM analysis); and X-ray diffraction phase analysis (XRD), including the a-sin2ϕ method of measuring the stress-strain state (X-ray tensometry). The elemental composition, microstructure, residual stresses in nanograins, and in-depth and surface distributions of defects and atoms, as well as the phase composition, stress-strain state, and texture of the coatings have been studied in a 3D representation. It has been found that creating a state of elastic stress-strain compression in the coating can significantly enhance its resistance to oxidation upon annealing. A redistribution of elements and defects (their aligning and segregation) due to diffusion and termination of spinodal segregation has been revealed near interfaces, around grains and subgrains, which occurred without a significant change in the average size of nanograins.

  5. Theoretical predictions of properties and volatility of chlorides and oxychlorides of group-4 elements. I. Electronic structures and properties of MCl{sub 4} and MOCl{sub 2} (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, and Rf)

    SciTech Connect

    Pershina, V.; Borschevsky, A.; Iliaš, M.

    2014-08-14

    Relativistic, infinite order exact two-component, density functional theory electronic structure calculations were performed for MCl{sub 4} and MOCl{sub 2} of group-4 elements Ti, Zr, Hf, and element 104, Rf, with the aim to predict their behaviour in gas-phase chromatography experiments. RfCl{sub 4} and RfOCl{sub 2} were shown to be less stable than their lighter homologs in the group, tetrachlorides and oxychlorides of Zr and Hf, respectively. The oxychlorides turned out to be stable as a bent structure, though the stabilization energy with respect to the flat one (C{sub 2v}) is very small. The trend in the formation of the tetrachlorides from the oxychlorides in group 4 is shown to be Zr < Hf < Rf, while the one in the formation of the oxychlorides from the chlorides is opposite. All the calculated properties are used to estimate adsorption energy of these species on various surfaces in order to interpret results of gas-phase chromatography experiments, as is shown in Paper II.

  6. Carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2002-03-26

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  7. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.

    2000-02-08

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: (a) forming a melt comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; (b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and (c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}.

  8. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Charles H.; Branagan, Daniel J.; Hyde, Timothy A.

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: a) forming a melt comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1.

  9. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  10. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  11. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  12. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  13. Triphenylalanine peptides self-assemble into nanospheres and nanorods that are different from the nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine peptides.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cong; Luo, Yin; Zhou, Ruhong; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the nature of the self-assembly of peptide nanostructures at the molecular level is critical for rational design of functional bio-nanomaterials. Recent experimental studies have shown that triphenylalanine(FFF)-based peptides can self-assemble into solid plate-like nanostructures and nanospheres, which are different from the hollow nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine(FF)-based peptides. In spite of extensive studies, the assembly mechanism and the molecular basis for the structural differences between FFF and FF nanostructures remain poorly understood. In this work, we first investigate the assembly process and the structural features of FFF nanostructures using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, and then compare them with FF nanostructures. We find that FFF peptides spontaneously assemble into solid nanometer-sized nanospheres and nanorods with substantial β-sheet contents, consistent with the structural properties of hundred-nanometer-sized FFF nano-plates characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. Distinct from the formation mechanism of water-filled FF nanovesicles and nanotubes reported in our previous study, intermediate bilayers are not observed during the self-assembly process of FFF nanospheres and nanorods. The peptides in FFF nanostructures are predominantly anti-parallel-aligned, which can form larger sizes of β-sheet-like structures than the FF counterparts. In contrast, FF peptides exhibit lipid-like assembly behavior and assemble into bilayered nanostructures. Furthermore, although the self-assembly of FF and FFF peptides is mostly driven by side chain-side chain (SC-SC) aromatic stacking interactions, the main chain-main chain (MC-MC) interactions also play an important role in the formation of fine structures of the assemblies. The delicate interplay between MC-MC and SC-SC interactions results in the different nanostructures formed by the two peptides. These findings provide new insights into the structure

  14. High-Throughput Top-Down and Bottom-Up Processes for Forming Single-Nanotube Based Architectures for 3D Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; von Allmen, Paul; Kowalczyk, Robert; Baron, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We have developed manufacturable approaches to form single, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, where the tubes are centered precisely, and placed within a few hundred nm of 1-1.5 micron deep trenches. These wafer-scale approaches were enabled by chemically amplified resists and inductively coupled Cryo-etchers for forming the 3D nanoscale architectures. The tube growth was performed using dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the materials used for the pre-fabricated 3D architectures were chemically and structurally compatible with the high temperature (700 C) PECVD synthesis of our tubes, in an ammonia and acetylene ambient. Tube characteristics were also engineered to some extent, by adjusting growth parameters, such as Ni catalyst thickness, pressure and plasma power during growth. Such scalable, high throughput top-down fabrication techniques, combined with bottom-up tube synthesis, should accelerate the development of PECVD tubes for applications such as interconnects, nano-electromechanical (NEMS), sensors or 3D electronics in general.

  15. (29)Si, (47)Ti, (49)Ti and (195)Pt solid state MAS NMR spectroscopic investigations of ternary silicides TPtSi, germanides TPtGe (T = Ti, Zr, Hf) and stannide TiPtSn.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, Christopher; Eckert, Hellmut; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-05-10

    Eight ternary tetrelides TPtX (T = Ti, Zr, Hf; X = Si, Ge, Sn) were synthesized from the elements by arc-melting and subsequent annealing. TiPtSi, ZrPtSi, ZrPtGe, HfPtSi and HfPtGe crystallize with the orthorhombic TiNiSi type structure, in the space group Pnma. The structures of HfPtSi (a = 654.44(9), b = 387.97(6), c = 750.0(1) pm, wR2 = 0.0592, 411 F(2) values, 20 variables) and HfPtGe (a = 660.36(7), b = 395.18(4), c = 763.05(8) pm, wR2 = 0.0495, 430 F(2) values, 20 variables) were refined from single crystal X-ray diffractometer data. TiPtSn adopts the cubic MgAgAs type. TiPtGe is dimorphic with a TiNiSi type high-temperature modification which transforms to cubic LT-TiPtGe (MgAgAs type). All phases were investigated by high resolution (29)Si, (47)Ti, (49)Ti and (195)Pt solid state MAS NMR spectroscopy. In the cubic compounds, the (47/49)Ti NMR signals are easily detected owing to the absence of quadrupolar broadening effects. The (195)Pt resonances of the orthorhombic compounds are characterized by strongly negative isotropic Knight shifts and large Knight shift anisotropies, whereas positive isotropic Knight shifts and no anisotropies are observed for the cubic compounds. These results indicate that the phase transition in TiPtGe is associated with dramatic changes in the electronic properties. Within each group of isotypic compounds the isotropic (29)Si, (47/49)Ti and (195)Pt Knight shifts show systematic dependences on the transition metal or tetrel atomic number, suggesting that the numerical values are influenced by the electronegativities of the metallic (or metalloid) neighbours. PMID:27097719

  16. Assessing the performance and longevity of Nb, Pt, Ta, Ti, Zr, and ZrO₂-sputtered Havar foils for the high-power production of reactive [18F]F by proton irradiation of [18O]H2O.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, K; Wilson, J S; Sant, E; Backhouse, C J; McQuarrie, S A

    2011-10-01

    As water-soluble ionic contaminants, which arise following proton irradiation of [18O]H2O have been associated with decreased [18F]FDG yields, the minimization of these contaminants is an asset in improving the [18F]F reactivity. To this end, we have previously demonstrated that the use of Nb-sputtered Havar foils results in decreased radionuclidic and chemical impurities in proton irradiated [18O]H2O, improved [18F]FDG yields, and improved [18F]FDG yield consistency when compared with non-sputtered Havar. Resulting from the highly reactive chemical microenvironment within the target however, this niobium layer is observed to degrade over time. To find a material that displays increased longevity with regards to maintaining high [18F]F reactivity, this project extensively investigated and compared Havar foils sputtered with Nb, Pt, Ta, Ti, Zr and ZrO₂. Of the materials investigated, the results of this study suggest that Ta-sputtered Havar foil is the preferred choice. For similar integrated currents (~1,000,000 μA min), when comparing the Ta-sputtered Havar with Nb-sputtered Havar we observed: (i) greater than an order of magnitude decrease in radionuclidic impurities, (ii) a 6.4 percent increase (p=0.0025) in the average TracerLab MX [18F]FDG yield, and (iii) an overall improvement in the FDG yield consistency. Excellent performance of the Ta-sputtered foil was maintained throughout its ~1,500,000 μA min lifetime. PMID:21782460

  17. Heterometallic alumo- and gallodisilicates with M(O-Si-O)2M' and [M(O-Si-O)2]2M' cores (M = Al, Ga; M' = Ti, Zr, Hf).

    PubMed

    Huerta-Lavorie, Raúl; Solis-Ibarra, Diego; Báez-Rodríguez, Dana Victoria; Reyes-Lezama, Marisol; de las Nieves Zavala-Segovia, M; Jancik, Vojtech

    2013-06-17

    The synthesis and stabilization of alumo- and gallodisilicates [HC{C(Me)N(2,6-iPr2C6H3)}2]M[(μ-O)Si(OH)(OtBu)2]2 [M = Al (1), Ga (2)] containing two silicate subunits have been achieved through reactions between 2 equiv of the silanediol (tBuO)2Si(OH)2 and the aluminum hydride [HC{C(Me)N(2,6-iPr2C6H3)}2]AlH2 or the gallium amide [HC{C(Me)N(2,6-iPr2C6H3)}2]Ga(NHEt)2, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibit M(O-SiO2-OH)2 moiety and represent the first molecular metallosilicate-based analogues of neighboring silanol groups found in silicate surfaces. The substitution of both SiOH groups led to the formation of bimetallic compounds with 4R topologies, which are regularly found in zeolitic materials. Thus, reactions between group 4 metal amides M'(NEt2)4 (M' = Ti, Zr, Hf) and 1 and 2 resulted in the formation of nine heterometallic silicates (3-11) containing inorganic M(O-Si-O)2M' and [M(O-Si-O)2]2M' cores with 4R and spiro-4R topologies, respectively. The latter have M···M distances of 0.81 nm. NMR studies of the heterometallic derivatives showed a fluxional behavior at room temperature due to a high flexibility of the eight-membered ring. PMID:23718324

  18. Triphenylalanine peptides self-assemble into nanospheres and nanorods that are different from the nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Cong; Luo, Yin; Zhou, Ruhong; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the nature of the self-assembly of peptide nanostructures at the molecular level is critical for rational design of functional bio-nanomaterials. Recent experimental studies have shown that triphenylalanine(FFF)-based peptides can self-assemble into solid plate-like nanostructures and nanospheres, which are different from the hollow nanovesicles and nanotubes formed by diphenylalanine(FF)-based peptides. In spite of extensive studies, the assembly mechanism and the molecular basis for the structural differences between FFF and FF nanostructures remain poorly understood. In this work, we first investigate the assembly process and the structural features of FFF nanostructures using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, and then compare them with FF nanostructures. We find that FFF peptides spontaneously assemble into solid nanometer-sized nanospheres and nanorods with substantial β-sheet contents, consistent with the structural properties of hundred-nanometer-sized FFF nano-plates characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. Distinct from the formation mechanism of water-filled FF nanovesicles and nanotubes reported in our previous study, intermediate bilayers are not observed during the self-assembly process of FFF nanospheres and nanorods. The peptides in FFF nanostructures are predominantly anti-parallel-aligned, which can form larger sizes of β-sheet-like structures than the FF counterparts. In contrast, FF peptides exhibit lipid-like assembly behavior and assemble into bilayered nanostructures. Furthermore, although the self-assembly of FF and FFF peptides is mostly driven by side chain-side chain (SC-SC) aromatic stacking interactions, the main chain-main chain (MC-MC) interactions also play an important role in the formation of fine structures of the assemblies. The delicate interplay between MC-MC and SC-SC interactions results in the different nanostructures formed by the two peptides. These findings provide new insights into the structure

  19. CARBON NANOTUBES AS MULTIPOLLUTANT SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exploratory Research Program Project - Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are formed from graphite (or graphene) sheets rolled into tubes, typically with diameters of 1 - 10 nm and lengths of 200 - 500 nm. Carbon nanotubes have unique electrical properties that have led to interest in thei...

  20. Preparation of aligned nanotube membranes for water and gas separation applications

    DOEpatents

    Lulevich, Valentin; Bakajin, Olgica; Klare, Jennifer E.; Noy, Aleksandr

    2016-01-05

    Fabrication methods for selective membranes that include aligned nanotubes can advantageously include a mechanical polishing step. The nanotubes have their ends closed off during the step of infiltrating a polymer precursor around the nanotubes. This prevents polymer precursor from flowing into the nanotubes. The polishing step is performed after the polymer matrix is formed, and can open up the ends of the nanotubes.

  1. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  2. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  3. Comparison of bio-mineralization behavior of Ti-6Al-4V-1Nb and Zr-1Nb nano-tubes formed by anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong; Hong, Sun I.

    2014-12-01

    Nano-tubes of titanium and zirconium alloys like Ti-6Al-4V-1Nb and Zr-1Nb were prepared by anodization followed by coating with hydroxylapatite (HA) and their bio-mineralization behaviors were compared to develop a bio-compatible material for implants in orthopedics, dentistry and cardiology. Ti-6Al-4V-1Nb weight gain in a simulated body solution increased gradually. The bigger tube diameter was, the heavier HA was deposited. Surface roughness of both alloys increased highly with the increasing diameter of nano-tube. Their surface roughness decreased by HA deposition due to the removal of the empty space of the nano-tubes. Zr-1Nb alloy had faster growth of nano-tubes layers more than Ti-6Al-4V-1Nb alloy.

  4. Exploration of R2XM2 (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge): Structural Motifs, the novel Compound Gd2AlGe2 and Analysis of the U3Si2 and Zr3Al2 Structure Types

    SciTech Connect

    Sean William McWhorter

    2006-05-01

    In the process of exploring and understanding the influence of crystal structure on the system of compounds with the composition Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} several new compounds were synthesized with different crystal structures, but similar structural features. In Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}, the main feature of interest is the magnetocaloric effect (MCE), which allows the material to be useful in magnetic refrigeration applications. The MCE is based on the magnetic interactions of the Gd atoms in the crystal structure, which varies with x (the amount of Si in the compound). The crystal structure of Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} can be thought of as being formed from two 3{sup 2}434 nets of Gd atoms, with additional Gd atoms in the cubic voids and Si/Ge atoms in the trigonal prismatic voids. Attempts were made to substitute nonmagnetic atoms for magnetic Gd using In, Mg and Al. Gd{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}InGe{sub 2} both possess the same 3{sup 2}434 nets of Gd atoms as Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}, but these nets are connected differently, forming the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} crystal structure. A search of the literature revealed that compounds with the composition R{sub 2}XM{sub 2} (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge) crystallize in one of four crystal structures: the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2}, Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}AlB{sub 2} and W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2} crystal structures. These crystal structures are described, and the relationships between them are highlighted. Gd{sub 2}AlGe{sub 2} forms an entirely new crystal structure, and the details of its synthesis and characterization are given. Electronic structure calculations are performed to understand the nature of bonding in this compound and how electrons can be accounted for. A series of electronic structure calculations were performed on models with the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structures, using Zr and A1 as

  5. Supported Lipid Bilayer/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    We form supported lipid bilayers on single-walled carbon nanotubes and use this hybrid structure to probe the properties of lipid membranes and their functional constituents. We first demonstrate membrane continuity and lipid diffusion over the nanotube. A membrane-bound tetanus toxin protein, on the other hand, sees the nanotube as a diffusion barrier whose strength depends on the diameter of the nanotube. Finally, we present results on the electrical detection of specific binding of streptavidin to biotinylated lipids with nanotube field effect transistors. Possible techniques to extract dynamic information about the protein binding events will also be discussed.

  6. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  7. Architecture and Characteristics of Bacterial Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Gyanendra P; Malli Mohan, Ganesh Babu; Dubrovsky, Anna; Amen, Triana; Tsipshtein, Shai; Rouvinski, Alex; Rosenberg, Alex; Kaganovich, Daniel; Sherman, Eilon; Medalia, Ohad; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2016-02-22

    Bacteria display an array of contact-dependent interaction systems that have evolved to facilitate direct cell-to-cell communication. We have previously identified a mode of bacterial communication mediated by nanotubes bridging neighboring cells. Here, we elucidate nanotube architecture, dynamics, and molecular components. Utilizing Bacillus subtilis as a model organism, we found that at low cell density, nanotubes exhibit remarkable complexity, existing as both intercellular tubes and extending tubes, with the latter frequently surrounding the cells in a "root-like" fashion. Observing nanotube formation in real time showed that these structures are formed in the course of minutes, displaying rapid movements. Utilizing a combination of super-resolution, light, and electron microscopy, we revealed that nanotubes are composed of chains of membranous segments harboring a continuous lumen. Furthermore, we discovered that a conserved calcineurin-like protein, YmdB, presents in nanotubes and is required for both nanotube production and intercellular molecular trade. PMID:26906740

  8. The diameter of nanotubes formed on Ti-6Al-4V alloy controls the adhesion and differentiation of Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Filova, Elena; Fojt, Jaroslav; Kryslova, Marketa; Moravec, Hynek; Joska, Ludek; Bacakova, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Ti-6Al-4V-based nanotubes were prepared on a Ti-6Al-4V surface by anodic oxidation on 10 V, 20 V, and 30 V samples. The 10 V, 20 V, and 30 V samples and a control smooth Ti-6Al-4V sample were evaluated in terms of their chemical composition, diameter distribution, and cellular response. The surfaces of the 10 V, 20 V, and 30 V samples consisted of nanotubes of a relatively wide range of diameters that increased with the voltage. Saos-2 cells had a similar initial adhesion on all nanotube samples to the control Ti-6Al-4V sample, but it was lower than on glass. On day 3, the highest concentrations of both vinculin and talin measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and intensity of immunofluorescence staining were on 30 V nanotubes. On the other hand, the highest concentrations of ALP, type I collagen, and osteopontin were found on 10 V and 20 V samples. The final cellular densities on 10 V, 20 V, and 30 V samples were higher than on glass. Therefore, the controlled anodization of Ti-6Al-4V seems to be a useful tool for preparing nanostructured materials with desirable biological properties. PMID:26648719

  9. The diameter of nanotubes formed on Ti-6Al-4V alloy controls the adhesion and differentiation of Saos-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Filova, Elena; Fojt, Jaroslav; Kryslova, Marketa; Moravec, Hynek; Joska, Ludek; Bacakova, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Ti-6Al-4V-based nanotubes were prepared on a Ti-6Al-4V surface by anodic oxidation on 10 V, 20 V, and 30 V samples. The 10 V, 20 V, and 30 V samples and a control smooth Ti-6Al-4V sample were evaluated in terms of their chemical composition, diameter distribution, and cellular response. The surfaces of the 10 V, 20 V, and 30 V samples consisted of nanotubes of a relatively wide range of diameters that increased with the voltage. Saos-2 cells had a similar initial adhesion on all nanotube samples to the control Ti-6Al-4V sample, but it was lower than on glass. On day 3, the highest concentrations of both vinculin and talin measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and intensity of immunofluorescence staining were on 30 V nanotubes. On the other hand, the highest concentrations of ALP, type I collagen, and osteopontin were found on 10 V and 20 V samples. The final cellular densities on 10 V, 20 V, and 30 V samples were higher than on glass. Therefore, the controlled anodization of Ti-6Al-4V seems to be a useful tool for preparing nanostructured materials with desirable biological properties. PMID:26648719

  10. Electronic properties of nanotube junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambin, Ph.; Meunier, V.

    1998-08-01

    The possibility of realizing junctions between two different nanotubes has recently attracted a great interest, even though much remains to be done for putting this idea in concrete form. Pentagon-heptagon pair defects in the otherwise perfect graphitic network make such connections possible, with virtually infinite varieties. In this paper, the literature devoted to nanotube junctions is briefly reviewed. A special emphasize is put on the electronic properties of C nanotube junctions, together with an indication on how their current-voltage characteristics may look like.

  11. Formation mechanism of silicon carbide nanotubes with special morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, L. Z.; Tang, Y. H.; Zhao, X. Q.; Chen, Y. W.; Guo, C.

    2006-08-01

    SiC nanotubes have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Research results show that SiC nanotubes consist of hollow inner pore, crystalline SiC wall layers, and thin amorphous silica sheath. Besides most abundant normal nanotubes, bamboo-shaped SiC nanotubes and elliptically hollow SiC nanospheres were also observed. The different morphologies of the SiC nanotubes are closely relative to the diameter of the SiC nanotubes. The confinement effect of other SiC nanotubes may play an important effect retarding the growth of SiC nanotubes to form the hollow SiC nanospheres. Defect inducing growth is proposed to explain the formation of bamboo-shaped SiC nanotubes.

  12. Splitting and joining in carbon nanotube/nanoribbon/nanotetrahedron growth.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takayuki; Kohno, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    We report a novel phenomenon for carbon nanotube growth that results in a new carbon nanotube morphology. A carbon nanotube grown via metal nanoparticle-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition splits into two flattened nanotubes during growth and the two flattened nanotubes merge to form a ring of carbon nanotube/nanoribbon. This novel process is revealed by transmission electron microscopy observations of the carbon nanostructures. We propose that the splitting-and-joining process involves only one metal catalyst nanoparticle and a self-folding mechanism that we have named the origami mechanism to explain the process and the formation of nanoribbons and nanotetrahedra. PMID:25559588

  13. Carbon nanotube devices: Sorting, Assembling, Characterizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupke, Ralph

    2009-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been studied extensively over the last decade. Various exceptional properties have been revealed which still drive the vision about using carbon nanotube in future electronics, for instance as molecular nanoscale transistors or electromigration resistant interconnects. For many years a major obstacle was the inability to grow nanotubes with defined dimensions (length, diameter) and electronic properties (metallic,semiconducting). Recently those problems have been solved to a large extent by advanced sorting techniques. Today the challenge is to assemble nanotubes devices with defined properties to form a complex circuitry. As progress is made in making highly-integrated nanotube device arrays new characterization techniques have to be developed which allow testing large number of devices within an acceptable time. Along this line I will report on the state-of-the-art of sorting of carbon nanotube, as a base for nanotube device fabrication [1]. I will then explain our strategy to assemble high-density arrays of nanotube devices [2] and discuss a new characterization technique for nanotube devices [3]. Finally I will introduce a novel device engineering tool [4]. [4pt] [1] R. Krupke et al., ``Separation techniques for carbon nanotubes'' in Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes, p.129-139, American Scientific Publishers 2008[0pt] [2] A. Vijayaraghavan et al., ``Ultra-Large-Scale Directed Assembly of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Devices'', Nano Lett. 7 (2007) 1556-1560[0pt] [3] A. Vijayaraghavan et al., ``Imaging Electronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes by Voltage-Contrast Scanning Electron Microscopy'', Nano Resarch 1 (2008) 321-332[0pt] [4] C. W. Marquardt et al., ``Reversible metal-insulator transitions in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes'', Nano Lett. 9 (2008) 2767-2772

  14. Synthesis of yttrium hydroxide and oxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qun; Liu, Zhaoping; Li, Shu; Zhang, Shuyuan; Liu, Xianming; Qian, Yitai

    2003-11-01

    Yttrium hydroxide nanotubes were hydrothermally synthesized via a metastable precursor, PEG-Y(NO 3) 3 complex. XRD patterns showed the product was a pure hexagonal phase of Y(OH) 3. TEM images displayed that the nanotubes have outer diameters ranging from 80 to 200 nm, wall thicknesses of about 30 nm, and lengths up to several micrometers. The nanotube growth may have three stages: formation of a metastable PEG-Y(NO 3) 3 complex; nucleation and formation of Y(OH) 3 nanorods; developing Y(OH) 3 nanotubes. We proposed the Y(OH) 3 nanotubes growth mechanism to be a nucleation-diffusion growth based on the characterization results. Y 2O 3 nanotubes were formed with smaller diameters after post-treatment at 500°C for 2 h.

  15. Development of Carbon-Nanotube/Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a short discussion of one company's effort to develop composites of carbon nanotubes in epoxy and other polymer matrices. The focus of the discussion is on the desirability of chemically modifying carbon nanotubes to overcome their inherent chemical nonreactivity and thereby enable the formation of strong chemical bonds between nanotubes and epoxies (or other polymeric matrix materials or their monomeric precursors). The chemical modification is effected in a process in which discrete functional groups are covalently attached to the nanotube surfaces. The functionalization process was proposed by the company and demonstrated in practice for the first time during this development effort. The covalently attached functional groups are capable of reacting with the epoxy or other matrix resin to form covalent bonds. Furthermore, the company uses this process to chemically modify the nanotube surfaces, affording tunable adhesion to polymers and solubility in select solvents. Flat-sheet composites containing functionalized nanotubes demonstrate significantly improved mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties.

  16. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  17. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  18. Ophthalmologial Applications of Carbon Nanotube Nanotechology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David; Girten, Beverly (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development of an implantable device consisting of an array of carbon nanotubes on a silicon chip for restoration of vision in patients with macular degeneration and other retinal disorders is presented. The use of carbon nanotube bucky paper for retinal cell transplantation is proposed. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  19. A Combinatorial Approach to the Investigation of Metal Systems that Form Both Bulk Metallic Glasses and High Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welk, Brian A.; Gibson, Mark A.; Fraser, Hamish L.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, compositionally graded specimens were deposited using the laser engineered net-shaping (LENS™) additive manufacturing technique to study the glass-forming ability of two bulk metallic glass (BMG) and high entropy alloy (HEA) composite systems. The first graded specimen varied from Zr57Ti5Al10Cu20Ni8 (BMG) to CoCrFeNiCu0.5 (HEA) and the second graded specimen varied from TiZrCuNb (BMG) to (TiZrCuNb)65Ni35 (HEA). After deposition, laser surface melting experiments were performed parallel to the gradient to remelt and rapidly solidify the specimen. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were used to determine the morphology and composition variations in the as-deposited and laser surface melted phases. Selected area diffraction of the melt pool regions confirmed an almost fully amorphous region in the first gradient and an amorphous matrix/crystalline dendrite composite structure in the second gradient.

  20. Inhaled carbon nanotubes reach the subpleural tissue in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryman-Rasmussen, Jessica P.; Cesta, Mark F.; Brody, Arnold R.; Shipley-Phillips, Jeanette K.; Everitt, Jeffrey I.; Tewksbury, Earl W.; Moss, Owen R.; Wong, Brian A.; Dodd, Darol E.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Bonner, James C.

    2009-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes are shaped like fibres and can stimulate inflammation at the surface of the peritoneum when injected into the abdominal cavity of mice, raising concerns that inhaled nanotubes may cause pleural fibrosis and/or mesothelioma. Here, we show that multiwalled carbon nanotubes reach the subpleura in mice after a single inhalation exposure of 30 mg m-3 for 6 h. Nanotubes were embedded in the subpleural wall and within subpleural macrophages. Mononuclear cell aggregates on the pleural surface increased in number and size after 1 day and nanotube-containing macrophages were observed within these foci. Subpleural fibrosis unique to this form of nanotubes increased after 2 and 6 weeks following inhalation. None of these effects was seen in mice that inhaled carbon black nanoparticles or a lower dose of nanotubes (1 mg m-3). This work suggests that minimizing inhalation of nanotubes during handling is prudent until further long-term assessments are conducted.

  1. Applications and production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jason Howard

    Carbon nanotubes, a recently discovered form of carbon fiber with structural perfection similar to that of a fullerene molecule, have interesting electronic, chemical and mechanical properties due to their size and structure. Nanotubes have great potential as a bulk material for strong, lightweight composite materials, and as individual nano-scale tools or devices. Initial work on applications with individual multiwalled nanotubes as field emission sources and scanning force microscopy tips is described. The nanotubes display intriguing field emission behavior interpreted as the nanotube unraveling under the influence of the electric field. The unraveling process is believed to result in facile field emission from linear atomic carbon chains at the end of the nanotube. Such atomic wires represent an excellent field emitter. The work on multiwalled nanotube SFM tips was equally encouraging. The high aspect ratio of the nanotube allows it to image deep trenches inaccessible to commercially available Si pyramidal tips, and it reduces the interaction with the ambient water layer on the sample which perturbs image quality. The most remarkable advantage of nanotube SFM tips is a result of their mechanical properties. It was found that the nanotubes will remain rigid during normal imaging, but conveniently buckle to the side if circumstances arise which create large forces known to damage the tip and sample. This feature makes the tip more durable than Si tips, and is especially important for soft biological samples. In these two applications, as well as others, and in the measurements of novel nanotube properties, high quality, small diameter (0.5 to 2 nm) diameter single-walled nanotubes are most interesting. Such material can be produced slowly and in small amounts by catalytic arc vaporization and catalytic laser vaporization of graphite. It is well known that nanotubes can be mass produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD), but the product consists only

  2. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  3. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(- D-Ala- L-Ala)_4-] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  4. Nanotube News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Smaller, faster computers, bullet-proof t-shirts, and itty-bitty robots--such are the promises of nanotechnology and the cylinder-shaped collection of carbon molecules known as nanotubes. But for these exciting ideas to become realities, scientists must understand how these miracle molecules perform under all sorts of conditions. This brief…

  5. Directional solidification of (Ti, Zr) carbide-(Ti, Zr) diboride eutectics

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrell, C.C.; Beratan, H.R.; Bradt, R.C.; Stubican, V.C.

    1984-03-01

    The ZrC-ZrB2, ZrC-TiB2, and TiC-TiB2 metal diboride-metal carbide pseudo-binary eutectic systems have been successfully solidified directionally by means of the floating zone method. The first and third of these eutectics possess a morphology consisting of columnar grains of parallel lamellae with interlamellar spacings that adhere to the lambda-squared (R) C relationship, while the second is noted to solidify in a Chinese calligraphy-like morphology of broken and deformed lamellae. This phenomenon may be related to solid solution effects, but it did not prevent the interlamellar spacings from following the aforementioned law. The calligraphic effect's values are larger than those of the other two systems, and the constant, C, is accordingly about an order of magnitude larger. All three of these cubic-hexagonal systems exhibited identical epitaxial relationships. 24 references.

  6. Electrical properties and applications of carbon nanotube structures.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Prabhakar R

    2007-01-01

    The experimentally verified electrical properties of carbon nanotube structures and manifestations in related phenomena such as thermoelectricity, superconductivity, electroluminescence, and photoconductivity are reviewed. The possibility of using naturally formed complex nanotube morphologies, such as Y-junctions, for new device architectures are then considered. Technological applications of the electrical properties of nanotube derived structures in transistor applications, high frequency nanoelectronics, field emission, and biological sensing are then outlined. The review concludes with an outlook on the technological potential of nanotubes and the need for new device architectures for nanotube systems integration. PMID:17450889

  7. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  8. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  9. Process for derivatizing carbon nanotubes with diazonium species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Bahr, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Yang, Jiping (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention incorporates new processes for the chemical modification of carbon nanotubes. Such processes involve the derivatization of multi- and single-wall carbon nanotubes, including small diameter (ca. 0.7 nm) single-wall carbon nanotubes, with diazonium species. The method allows the chemical attachment of a variety of organic compounds to the side and ends of carbon nanotubes. These chemically modified nanotubes have applications in polymer composite materials, molecular electronic applications and sensor devices. The methods of derivatization include electrochemical induced reactions thermally induced reactions (via in-situ generation of diazonium compounds or pre-formed diazonium compounds), and photochemically induced reactions. The derivatization causes significant changes in the spectroscopic properties of the nanotubes. The estimated degree of functionality is ca. 1 out of every 20 to 30 carbons in a nanotube bearing a functionality moiety. Such electrochemical reduction processes can be adapted to apply site-selective chemical functionalization of nanotubes. Moreover, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the derivatized nanotubes are chemically compatible with a polymer matrix, allowing transfer of the properties of the nanotubes (such as, mechanical strength or electrical conductivity) to the properties of the composite material as a whole. Furthermore, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the groups can be polymerized to form a polymer that includes carbon nanotubes ##STR00001##.

  10. Energy efficient microwave synthesis of mesoporous Ce0.5M0.5O2 (Ti, Zr, Hf) nanoparticles for low temperature CO oxidation in an ionic liquid – a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Alammar, Tarek; Chow, Ying -Kit; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2014-11-19

    Ce0.5M0.5O2 (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by microwave irradiation in the ionic liquid [C4mim][Tf2N] (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide). The morphology, crystallinity, and chemical composition of the obtained materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, and N2–adsorption measurements. XRD and Raman spectroscopy analyses confirmed the formation of solid solutions with cubic fluorite structure. The catalytic activities of the Ce0.5M0.5O2 (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) nanoparticles were investigated in the low-temperature oxidation of CO. Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 nanospheres exhibit the best performance (100% conversion at 350 °C), followed by Ce0.5Hf0.5O2 (55% conversion at 360 °C) and Ce0.5Ti0.5O2 (11% conversion at 350 °C). Heating the as-prepared Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 to 600 °C for extended time leads to a decrease in surface area and, as expected decreased catalytic activity. Depending on the ionic liquid the obtained Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 exhibits different morphologies, varying from nano-spheres in [C4mim][Tf2N] and [P66614][Tf2N] (P66614 = trishexyltetradecylphosphonium) to sheet-like assemblies in [C3mimOH][Tf2N] (C3mimOH = 1-(3-hydroxypropyl)-3-methylimidazolium). As a result, the microwave synthesis superiority to other heating methods like sonochemical synthesis and conventional heating was proven by comparative experiments where the catalytic activity of Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 obtained by alternate methods such as conventional heating was found to

  11. Teslaphoresis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Castillo, Aida C; Smalley, Preston R; Kittrell, Carter; James, Dustin K; Brinson, Bruce E; Rybolt, Thomas R; Johnson, Bruce R; Cherukuri, Tonya K; Cherukuri, Paul

    2016-04-26

    This paper introduces Teslaphoresis, the directed motion and self-assembly of matter by a Tesla coil, and studies this electrokinetic phenomenon using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Conventional directed self-assembly of matter using electric fields has been restricted to small scale structures, but with Teslaphoresis, we exceed this limitation by using the Tesla coil's antenna to create a gradient high-voltage force field that projects into free space. CNTs placed within the Teslaphoretic (TEP) field polarize and self-assemble into wires that span from the nanoscale to the macroscale, the longest thus far being 15 cm. We show that the TEP field not only directs the self-assembly of long nanotube wires at remote distances (>30 cm) but can also wirelessly power nanotube-based LED circuits. Furthermore, individualized CNTs self-organize to form long parallel arrays with high fidelity alignment to the TEP field. Thus, Teslaphoresis is effective for directed self-assembly from the bottom-up to the macroscale. PMID:27074626

  12. A label-free aptasensor based on polyethyleneimine wrapped carbon nanotubes in situ formed gold nanoparticles as signal probe for highly sensitive detection of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Azadbakht, Azadeh; Roushani, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Amir Reza; Menati, Saeid; Derikvand, Zohreh

    2016-11-01

    Herein, a highly sensitive and selective aptamer biosensor for quantitative detection of a model target, dopamine (DA), was developed by using a gold (Au) electrode modified with highly dispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and acid-oxidized carbon nanotubes (CNTs-COOH) functionalized with polyethyleneimine (PEI). Amine-terminated12-mercaptureprobe (ssDNA1) as a capture probe and specific DA-aptamer (ssDNA2) as a detection probe was immobilized on the surface of a modified electrode via the formation of covalent amide bond and hybridization, respectively. Methylene blue (MB) was used as the redox probe, which was intercalated into the aptamer through the specific interaction with its guanine bases. In the presence of DA, the interaction between aptamer and DA displaced the MB from the electrode surface, rendering a lowered electrochemical signal attributed to decreased amount of adsorbed MB. The developed electrochemical DA aptasensor showed a good linear response to DA from 5 to 300nM with detection limit of 2.1nM. The biosensor also exhibited satisfactory selectivity and could be successfully used to detect DA in blood serum sample. PMID:27524058

  13. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  14. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  15. Inorganic nanotubes and electro-fluidic devices fabricated therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Fan, Rong; Karnik, Rohit

    2011-03-01

    Nanofluidic devices incorporating inorganic nanotubes fluidly coupled to channels or nanopores for supplying a fluid containing chemical or bio-chemical species are described. In one aspect, two channels are fluidly interconnected with a nanotube. Electrodes on opposing sides of the nanotube establish electrical contact with the fluid therein. A bias current is passed between the electrodes through the fluid, and current changes are detected to ascertain the passage of select molecules, such as DNA, through the nanotube. In another aspect, a gate electrode is located proximal the nanotube between the two electrodes thus forming a nanofluidic transistor. The voltage applied to the gate controls the passage of ionic species through the nanotube selected as either or both ionic polarities. In either of these aspects the nanotube can be modified, or functionalized, to control the selectivity of detection or passage.

  16. Method of making carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei; Liu, Jun

    2006-03-14

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  17. Novel nanotubes and encapsulated nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, M.; Hsu, W. K.; Schilder, A.; Terrones, H.; Grobert, N.; Hare, J. P.; Zhu, Y. Q.; Schwoerer, M.; Prassides, K.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    Carbon nanotubes, with or without encapsulated material, generated by arc discharge and electrolytic techniques have been studied. Microcrystals of refractory carbides (i.e. NbC, TaC, MoC), contained in nanotubes and polyhedral particles, produced by arcing electrodes of graphite/metal mixtures, were analysed by high hesolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray powder diffraction. Encapsulation of MoC was found to give rise to an unusual stable form, namely face-centered-cubic MoC. SQUID measurements indicate that the encapsulated carbides exhibit superconducting transitions at about 10-12 K, thus they differ from carbon nanotubes/nanoparticles which do not superconduct. Four-probe and microwave (contactless) conductivity measurements indicate that most of the analysed samples behave as semiconductors. However, metallic transport was observed in specimens containing single conglomerated carbon nanotube bundles and boron-doped carbon nanotubes. Novel metallic βSn nanowires were produced by electrolysis of graphite electrodes immersed in molten LiCl/SnCl2 mixtures. Prolonged electron irradiation of these nanowires leads to axial growth and to dynamic transformations. These observations suggest ways in which materials may be modified by microencapsulation and irradiation.

  18. Roping and wrapping carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausman, Kevin D.; O'Connell, Michael J.; Boul, Peter; Ericson, Lars M.; Casavant, Michael J.; Walters, Deron A.; Huffman, Chad; Saini, Rajesh; Wang, Yuhuang; Haroz, Erik; Billups, Edward W.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes can be dispersed into solvents by ultrasonication to the point that primarily individual tubes, cut to a few hundred nanometers in length, are present. However, when such dispersions are filtered to a thick mat, or paper, only tangles of uniform, seemingly endless ropes are observed. The factors contributing to this "roping" phenomenon, akin to aggregation or crystallization, will be discussed. We have developed methods for generating "super-ropes" more than twenty times the diameter of those formed by filtration, involving the extraction of nanotube material from an oleum dispersion. Nanotubes have been solubilized in water, largely individually, by non-covalently wrapping them with linear polymers. The general thermodynamic drive for this wrapping involves the polymer disrupting both the hydrophobic interface with water and the smooth tube-tube interaction in aggregates. The nanotubes can be recovered from their polymeric wrapping by changing their solvent system. This solubilization process opens the door to solution chemistry on pristine nanotubes, as well as their introduction into biologically relevant systems.

  19. Novel Nanotube Manufacturing Streamlines Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Nanotubes have novel qualities that make them uniquely qualified for a plethora of uses, including applications in electronics, optics, and other scientific and industrial fields. The NASA process for creating these nanostructures involves using helium arc welding to vaporize an amorphous carbon rod and then form nanotubes by depositing the vapor onto a water-cooled carbon cathode, which then yields bundles, or ropes, of single-walled nanotubes at a rate of 2 grams per hour using a single setup. This eliminates costs associated with the use of metal catalysts, including the cost of product purification, resulting in a relatively inexpensive, high-quality, very pure end product. While managing to be less expensive, safer, and simpler, the process also increases the quality of the nanotubes. Goddard's Innovative Partnerships Program (IPP) Office promoted the technology, and in 2005, Boise-based Idaho Space Materials Inc. (ISM) was formed and applied for a nonexclusive license for the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing technology. ISM commercialized its products, and the inexpensive, robust nanotubes are now in the hands of the scientists who will create the next generation of composite polymers, metals, and ceramics that will impact the way we live. In fact, researchers are examining ways for these newfound materials to be used in the manufacture of transistors and fuel cells, large screen televisions, ultra-sensitive sensors, high-resolution atomic force microscopy probes, supercapacitors, transparent conducting films, drug carriers, catalysts, and advanced composite materials, to name just a few of the myriad technologies to benefit.

  20. Hydroxyapatite electrodeposition on anodized titanium nanotubes for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcharoen, Yardnapar; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat; Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Termsuksawad, Preecha

    2014-08-01

    Nanotubes modification for orthopedic implants has shown interesting biological performances (such as improving cell adhesion, cell differentiation, and enhancing osseointegration). The purpose of this study is to investigate effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube feature on performance of hydroxyapatite-coated titanium (Ti) bone implants. TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by anodization using ammonium fluoride electrolyte (NH4F) with and without modifiers (PEG400 and Glycerol) at various potential forms, and times. After anodization, the nanotubes were subsequently annealed. TiO2 nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. The amorphous to anatase transformation due to annealing was observed. Smooth and highly organized TiO2 nanotubes were found when high viscous electrolyte, NH4F in glycerol, was used. Negative voltage (-4 V) during anodization was confirmed to increase nanotube thickness. Length of the TiO2 nanotubes was significantly increased by times. The TiO2 nanotube was electrodeposited with hydroxyapatite (HA) and its adhesion was estimated by adhesive tape test. The result showed that nanotubes with the tube length of 560 nm showed excellent adhesion. The coated HA were tested for biological test by live/dead cell straining. HA coated on TiO2 nanotubes showed higher cells density, higher live cells, and more spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells than that growing on titanium plate surface.

  1. Formation mechanism of TiO2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. D.; Chan, Y. F.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, W. F.; Yang, Z. Y.; Wang, N.

    2003-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopic observation showed that TiO2 nanotubes synthesized via a simple hydrothermal chemical process formed a crystalline structure with open-ended and multiwall morphologies. Unlike multiwalled carbon nanotubes, the TiO2 nanotube walls were not seamless. During alkali treatment, crystalline TiO2 raw material underwent delamination in the alkali solution to produce single-layer TiO2 sheets. TiO2 nanotubes were formed by rolling up the single-layer TiO2 sheets with a rolling-up vector of [001] and attracting other sheets to surround the tubes.

  2. Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Hansel; Hudson, Steve; Bhat, Biliyar; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical molecules composed of carbon atoms in a regular hexagonal arrangement. If nanotubes can be uniformly dispersed in a supporting matrix to form structural materials, the resulting structures could be significantly lighter and stronger than current aerospace materials. Work is currently being done to develop an electrolyte-based self-assembly process that produces a Carbon Nanotube/Nickel composite material with high specific strength. This process is expected to produce a lightweight metal matrix composite material, which maintains it's thermal and electrical conductivities, and is potentially suitable for applications such as advanced structures, space based optics, and cryogenic tanks.

  3. Nanorods and nanotubes: Synthesis, manipulation and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Eric Warren

    Nanorods and nanotubes represent idealized structures for investigating phenomena associated with reduced dimensionality and are potential building blocks for nanostructured materials. Understanding their synthesis as well as physical properties is crucial if they are to form the basis for future devices. The synthesis of carbide nanotubes and nanorods is described. Also presented is a general method that combines micropatterning techniques with scanning force microscopy (SFM) to probe individual quasi-one-dimensional materials. Polycrystalline TiC and NbC nanorods, with 20-30 nm diameters and lengths exceeding 1 mum, were synthesized by reacting gaseous Ti-I or Nb-I at 550-1100sp°C with carbon nanotubes which served as structural templates. Template growth from nanotubes appears general since polycrystalline BCsb{x} and amorphous Fesb3C nanorods were produced from Bsb2Osb2 and FeClsb3, respectively. However, reaction of Si-I precursors with nanotubes or graphite above 1050sp°C resulted in single crystal SiC nanorods, with 1-20 nm diameters and 1-20 mum lengths, that grew catalytically from MoSisb2 nanoparticles by a vapor-solid mechanism. Above 1200sp°C, single crystal TiC nanorods grew from nanotubes and Ti-I or TiO by an undetermined mechanism. To probe electrical transport in carbon nanotubes, a method was devised where a static gold contact was lithographically formed with one end of a nanotube while a second dynamic contact was made by a conducting SFM probe. The conducting SFM tip can simultaneously map the topography and conductance of the nanotube. The transport properties of a series of structurally distinct nanotubes were studied and shown to sensitively depend on their structure, the presence of defects causing dramatic increases in resistivity. The mechanics of SiC nanorods and carbon nanotubes were studied using an analogous technique. An SFM tip was used to measure the forces required to bend nanobeams. The SiC nanorods had elastic moduli in close

  4. Electrochemical biosensing based on polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yibing; Zhao, Ye

    2013-12-01

    The glucose oxidase (GOD) modified polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is fabricated for electrochemical biosensing application. The titania nanotube array is grown directly on a titanium substrate through an anodic oxidation process. A thin film of polypyrrole is coated onto titania nanotube array to form polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid through a normal pulse voltammetry process. GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is prepared by the covalent immobilization of GOD onto polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid via the cross-linker of glutaraldehyde. The morphology and microstructure of nanotube electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The biosensing properties of this nanotube enzyme electrode have been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid provides highly accessible nanochannels for GOD encapsulation, presenting good enzymatic affinity. As-formed GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode well conducts bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose, exhibiting a good biosensing performance with a high sensitivity, low detection limit and wide linear detection range. PMID:24094220

  5. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  6. Single-crystal gallium nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberger, Joshua; He, Rongrui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Lee, Sangkwon; Yan, Haoquan; Choi, Heon-Jin; Yang, Peidong

    2003-04-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991 (ref. 1), there have been significant research efforts to synthesize nanometre-scale tubular forms of various solids. The formation of tubular nanostructure generally requires a layered or anisotropic crystal structure. There are reports of nanotubes made from silica, alumina, silicon and metals that do not have a layered crystal structure; they are synthesized by using carbon nanotubes and porous membranes as templates, or by thin-film rolling. These nanotubes, however, are either amorphous, polycrystalline or exist only in ultrahigh vacuum. The growth of single-crystal semiconductor hollow nanotubes would be advantageous in potential nanoscale electronics, optoelectronics and biochemical-sensing applications. Here we report an `epitaxial casting' approach for the synthesis of single-crystal GaN nanotubes with inner diameters of 30-200nm and wall thicknesses of 5-50nm. Hexagonal ZnO nanowires were used as templates for the epitaxial overgrowth of thin GaN layers in a chemical vapour deposition system. The ZnO nanowire templates were subsequently removed by thermal reduction and evaporation, resulting in ordered arrays of GaN nanotubes on the substrates. This templating process should be applicable to many other semiconductor systems.

  7. Laser Spinning of Nanotubes: A path to fast-rotating microdevices*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Petr; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2002-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes [1] have unique mechanical and electronic properties with many potential applications. Nanotubes possess huge Young modulus Y> 1 TPa, and their ``molecular structures'' remain naturally stable even at large deformations. Rotationally symmetric structures based on stiff nanotubes could form ideal piston-rods for nanoscale applications. We show that circularly polarized light can spin nanotubes with GHz frequencies- for the particular example of a (10,10) armchair nanotube, the rotational frequency is 28 GHz. In this method, angular momenta of infrared photons are resonantly transferred to nanotube phonons (ir-active modes) and passed to the tube body by ``umklapp" scattering. We investigate experimental realization of this ultrafast rotation in carbon nanotubes, levitating in an optical trap and undergoing mechanical vibrations. Rotating nanotubes could form parts of nano-motors, centrifuges or stabilizers. *supported by the NSF. [1] S. Iijima, Nature 354, 56 (1991).

  8. Stability of diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Castillo-Leon, Jaime; Hedström, Martin; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2011-03-01

    Over the last couple of years, self-organizing nanotubes based on the dipeptide diphenylalanine have received much attention, mainly as possible building blocks for the next generation of biosensors and as drug delivery systems. One of the main reasons for this large interest is that these peptide nanotubes are believed to be very stable both thermally and chemically. Previously, the chemical and thermal stability of self-organizing structures has been investigated after the evaporation of the solvent. However, it was recently discovered that the stability of the structures differed significantly when the tubes were in solution. It has been shown that, in solution, the peptide nanotubes can easily be dissolved in several solvents including water. It is therefore of critical importance that the stability of the nanotubes in solution and not after solvent evaporation be investigated prior to applications in which the nanotube will be submerged in liquid. The present article reports results demonstrating the instability and suggests a possible approach to a stabilization procedure, which drastically improves the stability of the formed structures. The results presented herein provide new information regarding the stability of self-organizing diphenylalanine nanotubes in solution.Over the last couple of years, self-organizing nanotubes based on the dipeptide diphenylalanine have received much attention, mainly as possible building blocks for the next generation of biosensors and as drug delivery systems. One of the main reasons for this large interest is that these peptide nanotubes are believed to be very stable both thermally and chemically. Previously, the chemical and thermal stability of self-organizing structures has been investigated after the evaporation of the solvent. However, it was recently discovered that the stability of the structures differed significantly when the tubes were in solution. It has been shown that, in solution, the peptide nanotubes can

  9. Janus Composite Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Liu, Zhen; Qu, Xiaozhong; Liang, Fuxin; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2016-06-21

    We propose a facile method to achieve paramagnetic Janus nanotubes with two compositions compartmentalized onto the interior and exterior surfaces, respectively. A sulfonated polydivinylbenzene (PDVB) nanotube is prepared by simple sulfonation of the exterior surface of a PDVB nanotube. Silica@FeOOH dual layers are sequentially grown onto the sulfonated PDVB nanotube surface. The composite nanotubes become paramagnetic after calcination and can be broken into shorter pieces under vigorous ultrasonication. After selective modification of the interior and exterior surfaces of the paramagnetic nanotubes, the nanotube shell becomes Janus in wettability. Desired hydrophobic species can be selectively captured inside the cavity. The paramagnetic Janus composite nanotubes can align into parallel chains under a magnetic field, which is self-disassembled upon removal of the magnetic field. PMID:27124877

  10. Substantial improvement of nanotube processability by freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Maugey, M; Neri, W; Zakri, C; Derré, A; Pénicaud, A; Noé, L; Chorro, M; Launois, P; Monthioux, M; Poulin, P

    2007-08-01

    As-produced carbon nanotubes often contain a fraction of impurities such as metal catalysts, inorganic supports, and carbon by-products. These impurities can be partially removed by using acidic dissolution. The resulting nanotube materials have to be dried to form a powder. The processability of nanotubes subjected to regular (thermal vaporisation) drying is particularly difficult because capillary forces pack and stick the nanotubes irreversibly, which limits their dispersability in polymeric matrices or solvents. We show that this dramatic limitation can be circumvented by using freeze-drying instead of regular-drying during nanotube purification process. In this case, the nanotubes are trapped in frozen water which is then sublimated. As a result the final powder is significantly less compact and, more important, the nanotubes can be easily dispersed with no apparent aggregates, thereby greatly enhancing their processability, e.g., they can be used to make homogeneous composites and fibers. Results from coagulation spinning from water-based dispersions of regularly-dried and freeze-dried nanotubes are compared. We also show that freeze-dried materials, in contrast to regularly-dried materials, can be dissolved in organic polar solvents using alkali-doped nanotubes. High resolution TEM and XRD analysis demonstrate that the nanotube structure and quality are not affected at the nanoscale by freeze-drying treatments. PMID:17685277

  11. Studies of Nucleation, Growth, Specific Heat, and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrahedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Croat, T. K.; Gangopadhyay, A.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Robinson, Michael B.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    Undercooling experiments and thermal physical property measurements of metallic alloys on the International Space Station (ISS) are planned. This recently-funded research focuses on fundamental issues of the formation and structure of highly-ordered non-crystallographic phases (quasicrystals) and related crystal phases (crystal approximants), and the connections between the atomic structures of these phases and those of liquids and glasses. It extends studies made previously by us of the composition dependence of crystal nucleation processes in silicate and metallic glasses, to the case of nucleation from the liquid phase. Motivating results from rf-levitation and drop-tube measurements of the undercooling of Ti/Zr-based liquids that form quasicrystals and crystal approximants are discussed. Preliminary measurements by electrostatic levitation (ESL) are presented.

  12. Engineered Carbon Nanotube Materials for High-Q Nanomechanical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Daniel S.; Hunt, Brian; Bronikowski, Mike; Epp, Larry; Hoenk, Michael; Hoppe, Dan; Kowalczyk, Bob; Wong, Eric; Xu, Jimmy; Adam, Douglas; Young, Rob

    2003-01-01

    This document represents a presentation offered by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with assistance from researchers from Brown University and Northrop Grumman. The presentation took place in Seoul, Korea in July 2003 and attempted to demonstrate the fabrication approach regarding the development of high quality factor (high-Q) mechanical oscillators (in the forms of a tunable nanotube resonator and a nanotube array radio frequency [RF] filter) aimed at signal processing and based on carbon nanotubes. The presentation also addressed parallel efforts to develop both in-plane single nanotube resonators as well as vertical array power devices.

  13. Computational Nanotechnology of Materials, Devices, and Machines: Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Kwak, Dolhan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The mechanics and chemistry of carbon nanotubes have relevance for their numerous electronic applications. Mechanical deformations such as bending and twisting affect the nanotube's conductive properties, and at the same time they possess high strength and elasticity. Two principal techniques were utilized including the analysis of large scale classical molecular dynamics on a shared memory architecture machine and a quantum molecular dynamics methodology. In carbon based electronics, nanotubes are used as molecular wires with topological defects which are mediated through various means. Nanotubes can be connected to form junctions.

  14. Noncatalytic synthesis of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ismagilov, R. R. Shvets, P. V.; Kharin, A. Yu.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2011-03-15

    A new method is proposed to obtain uniform arrays of multiwall carbon nanotubes without catalysts. Nanotubes have been formed by carbon condensation from a hydrogen-methane gas mixture activated by a dc discharge. Structural and morphological investigations of the obtained material were performed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. It is shown that the obtained nanotubes contain no impurities that could act as catalysts. Based on these experimental data, it is concluded that the nanotube synthesis under study is noncatalytic. Possible mechanisms of this synthesis are considered.

  15. Atomic site preferences and its effect on magnetic structure in the intermetallic borides M{sub 2}Fe(Ru{sub 0.8}T{sub 0.2}){sub 5}B{sub 2} (M=Sc, Ti, Zr; T=Ru, Rh, Ir)

    SciTech Connect

    Brgoch, Jakoah; Mahmoud, Yassir A.; Miller, Gordon J.

    2012-12-15

    The site preference for a class of intermetallic borides following the general formula M{sub 2}Fe(Ru{sub 0.8}T{sub 0.2}){sub 5}B{sub 2} (M=Sc, Ti, Zr; T=Ru, Rh, Ir), has been explored using ab initio and semi-empirical electronic structure calculations. This intermetallic boride series contains two potential sites, the Wyckoff 2c and 8j sites, for Rh or Ir to replace Ru atoms. Since the 8j site is a nearest neighbor to the magnetically active Fe atom, whereas the 2c site is a next nearest neighbor, the substitution pattern should play an important role in the magnetic structure of these compounds. The substitution preference is analyzed based on the site energy and bond energy terms, both of which arise from a tight-binding evaluation of the electronic band energy, and are known to influence the locations of atoms in extended solids. According to these calculations, the valence electron-rich Rh and Ir atoms prefer to occupy the 8j site, a result also corroborated by experimental evidence. Additionally, substitution of Rh or Ir at the 8j site results in a modification of the magnetic structure that ultimately results in larger local magnetic moment on the Fe atoms. - Graphical abstract: The site preference for electron rich atoms to occupy the 8j (gray) site is identified in these intermetallic borides, while the magnetic structure is modified as a function of the substituted atoms band center. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify the energetics dictating the site preference in a series of intermetallic borides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Establish substitution rules for use in future directed synthetic preparations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identified changes in magnetic structure that accompany the site preference.

  16. Geometric and electronic structure of carbon nanotube networks: 'super'-carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coluci, V. R.; Galvão, D. S.; Jorio, A.

    2006-02-01

    Structures of the so-called super-carbon nanotubes are proposed. These structures are built from single walled carbon nanotubes connected by Y-like junctions forming a 'super'-sheet that is then rolled into a seamless cylinder. Such a procedure can be repeated several times, generating a fractal structure. This procedure is not limited to carbon nanotubes, and can be easily modified for application to other systems. Tight binding total energy and density of states calculations showed that the 'super'-sheets and tubes are stable and predicted to present metallic and semiconducting behaviour.

  17. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buranova, Yu. S. Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-15

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  18. Inorganic nanotubes and fullerene-like materials.

    PubMed

    Tenne, Reshef

    2002-12-01

    Following the discovery of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, it was shown that nanoparticles of inorganic layered compounds, like MoS2, are unstable in the planar form and they form closed cage structures with polyhedral or nanotubular shapes. Various issues on the structure, synthesis, and properties of such inorganic fullerene-like structures are reviewed, together with some possible applications. PMID:12432497

  19. Process for derivatizing carbon nanotubes with diazonium species and compositions thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Bahr, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Yang, Jiping (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods for the chemical modification of carbon nanotubes involve the derivatization of multi- and single-wall carbon nanotubes, including small diameter (ca. 0.7 nm) single-wall carbon nanotubes, with diazonium species. The method allows the chemical attachment of a variety of organic compounds to the side and ends of carbon nanotubes. These chemically modified nanotubes have applications in polymer composite materials, molecular electronic applications, and sensor devices. The methods of derivatization include electrochemical induced reactions, thermally induced reactions, and photochemically induced reactions. Moreover, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the derivatized nanotubes are chemically compatible with a polymer matrix, allowing transfer of the properties of the nanotubes (such as, mechanical strength or electrical conductivity) to the properties of the composite material as a whole. Furthermore, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the groups can be polymerized to form a polymer that includes carbon nanotubes.

  20. Preparation of array of long carbon nanotubes and fibers therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; DePaula, Ramond F.; Zhu, Yuntian T.; Usov, Igor O.

    2015-11-19

    An array of carbon nanotubes is prepared by exposing a catalyst structure to a carbon nanotube precursor. Embodiment catalyst structures include one or more trenches, channels, or a combination of trenches and channels. A system for preparing the array includes a heated surface for heating the catalyst structure and a cooling portion that cools gas above the catalyst structure. The system heats the catalyst structure so that the interaction between the precursor and the catalyst structure results in the formation of an array of carbon nanotubes on the catalyst structure, and cools the gas near the catalyst structure and also cools any carbon nanotubes that form on the catalyst structure to prevent or at least minimize the formation of amorphous carbon. Arrays thus formed may be used for spinning fibers of carbon nanotubes.

  1. Experimental studies and micromagnetic simulations of electrodeposited Co nanotube arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Sachin; Singh, Sukhvinder; Gaur, Rajmani; Sharma, Manish

    2014-08-07

    Magnetic hollow nanotubes of cobalt forming close-packed arrays are synthesized by controlling the growth during electrodeposition in AAO template. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry is used to experimentally measure the static magnetization of the array of nanotubes. Excellent qualitative agreements of SQUID and micromagnetic simulations for static measurements are observed. This motivates us to evaluate dynamic response measurements via micromagnetic simulations. The coercivity simulated along the longitudinal axis of the nanotube is found increase with the length of isolated as well as for array of nanotubes. The effect of interactions is also clearly observed both in static as well as in dynamic evaluations. The interactions cause reduction in coercivity along with the switching which depends upon the length of the nanotubes. The calculation for FMR modes also indicates that propagation of the spin waves are greatly influenced by the hollow centre of nanotube as compare to nanowire and support to maintain the stable vortex configuration. For array of nanotubes, multiple peaks are found over larger number of frequencies which is anticipated due the interactions between nanotubes. Simulation for bias field and angular dependence of spin wave modes also yields a significant influenced by the presence of neighbouring nanotubes.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  3. Carbon nanotube electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  4. Effects of Zr and Si on the Glass Forming Ability and Compressive Properties of Ti-Cu-Co-Sn Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tan; Wu, Yidong; Si, Jiajia; Hui, Xidong

    2015-06-01

    To succeed in finding novel Ti-based bulk metallic glasses, which are free from Be, Ni, and noble metallic elements, a comprehensive study was performed on the effects of Zr and Si on the microstructural evolution, glass-forming ability (GFA), and mechanical properties of Ti46Cu44- x Zr x Co7Sn3 ( x = 0, 5, 10, 12.5, and 16 at. pct) and Ti46Cu31.5Zr12.5- x Co7Sn3Si x ( x = 0.5, 1, and 1.5 at. pct) alloys. It is shown that with the increase of Zr, the sequence of phase formation is β-Ti + α-Ti + (Ti, Zr)3Cu4 ⇒ β-Ti + α-Ti + TiCu ⇒ β-Ti + Ti2Cu + glass ⇒ glass ⇒ β-Ti + Ti2Cu + TiCuSn. The quinary Ti-Zr-Cu-Co-Sn alloy with 12.5 pct Zr exhibits the best GFA. The addition of 1 pct Si results in the improvement of the critical size of glassy rods up to 3 mm in diameter. The yield stress and Young's modulus of Z-series alloys increases, and the plastic strain decreases with the addition of Zr. The yield stress and ultimate compression stress of Ti46Zr11.5Cu31.5Co7Sn3Si1 glassy alloy reach 2477.9 and 2623.3 MPa, respectively. It was found that the addition of Si promotes the generation and multiplication of shear bands, resulting in certain plasticity in these kinds of glassy alloys.

  5. Electrical device fabrication from nanotube formations

    DOEpatents

    Nicholas, Nolan Walker; Kittrell, W. Carter; Kim, Myung Jong; Schmidt, Howard K.

    2013-03-12

    A method for forming nanotube electrical devices, arrays of nanotube electrical devices, and device structures and arrays of device structures formed by the methods. Various methods of the present invention allow creation of semiconducting and/or conducting devices from readily grown SWNT carpets rather than requiring the preparation of a patterned growth channel and takes advantage of the self-controlling nature of these carpet heights to ensure a known and controlled channel length for reliable electronic properties as compared to the prior methods.

  6. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhou, Otto Z.

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists worldwide. The small dimensions, strength and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a very unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review we describe some of the important materials science applications of carbon nanotubes. Specifically we discuss the electronic and electrochemical applications of nanotubes, nanotubes as mechanical reinforcements in high performance composites, nanotube-based field emitters, and their use as nanoprobes in metrology and biological and chemical investigations, and as templates for the creation of other nanostructures. Electronic properties and device applications of nanotubes are treated elsewhere in the book. The challenges that ensue in realizing some of these applications are also discussed from the point of view of manufacturing, processing, and cost considerations.

  7. Extended Platinum Nanotubes as Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, S.; Pivovar, B. S.; Yan, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption has relied principally on fossil fuels as an energy source; fuel cells, however, can provide a clean and sustainable alternative, an answer to the depletion and climate change concerns of fossil fuels. Within proton exchange membrane fuel cells, high catalyst cost and poor durability limit the commercial viability of the device. Recently, platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) were studied as durable, active catalysts, providing a platform to meet US Department of Energy vehicular activity targets.[1] Porous PtNTs were developed to increase nanotube surface area, improving mass activity for oxygen reduction without sacrificing durability.[2] Subsurface platinum was then replaced with palladium, forming platinum-coated palladium nanotubes.[3] By forming a core shell structure, platinum utilization was increased, reducing catalyst cost. Alternative substrates have also been examined, modifying platinum surface facets and increasing oxygen reduction specific activity. Through modification of the PtNT platform, catalyst limitations can be reduced, ensuring a commercially viable device.

  8. Microfluidic sieve using intertwined, free-standing carbon nanotube mesh as active medium

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr

    2007-11-06

    A microfluidic sieve having a substrate with a microfluidic channel, and a carbon nanotube mesh. The carbon nanotube mesh is formed from a plurality of intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes which are fixedly attached within the channel for separating, concentrating, and/or filtering molecules flowed through the channel. In one embodiment, the microfluidic sieve is fabricated by providing a substrate having a microfluidic channel, and growing the intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes from within the channel to produce the carbon nanotube mesh attached within the channel.

  9. Mineral potential tracts for shoreline Ti-Zr placer deposits (phase V, deliverable 85): Chapter P in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaudoin, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Shoreline placer Ti deposits are composed of ilmenite, rutile, zircon, monazite, and magnetite in well-sorted, fine- to medium-grained sand in coastal dunes, beaches and inlets. In addition to titanium, zirconium, in particular, and rare earth elements (REE) have become a major source of value in shoreline placer deposits. Shoreline placer deposits form mostly on tropical beaches around the world (fig. 1), and consist of dark sand layers rich in heavy minerals that are resistant to mechanical abrasion and chemical weathering. According to Hamilton (1995), shoreline placer deposits supply approximately 80 percent of the world’s rutile production, 25 percent of ilmenite, 100 percent of zircon, and 50 percent of both monazite and xenotime.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis Through Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirado, Pablo; Garcia, Rafael; Montes, Jorge; Melendrez, Rodrigo; Barboza, Marcelino; Contreras, Oscar

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes show a great potential of applications since there discovery by Iijima in 1991[1] due to their numerous physical-chemical properties such as their high weight to strength relationship, which make them ideal to use in high resistance compound materials, and in many other applications[2] In this work, a novel method for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes is presented, starting from an ultra-thin sheet of graphite synthesized by the chemical vapor decomposition technique (CVD), using ultra high purity methane and hydrogen at 1200°C in a horizontal quartz reactor. For the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, the graphite sheets were exposed to different doses of radiation, with the objective of breaking the graphite bonds and form carbon nanotubes; a Gammacell equipment model 220 Excel was used for the purpose, which counts with a radiation source of cobalt 60, and a current radiation rate of 0.9 Gy/seconds. The time of exposure to radiation was varied in each sample, according to the desired dose of radiation in each case, afterwards the samples were characterized using the Raman spectroscopy and TEM microscopy techniques with the objective of observing the kind of nanotubes formed, their morphology and their number of defects. Results will be shown during the poster session.