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1

Narcissism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-nine newly recovering alcoholic outpatients drawn from a Minnesota-Model type treatment program in the United Kingdom completed the NPI narcissism scale and the “Steps Questionnaire.” Results showed the narcissistic “authority” subscale showed a very strong inverse relationship to level of personal acceptance of Steps 2 and 3 (the so called “God” steps) of the 12-Step program embodied by Alcoholics Anonymous.

Kenneth E. Hart; Cherry Huggett

2005-01-01

2

Narcissism and Rhetorical Maturity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveys relevant literature, including Kohut, Rochlin, Kernberg, and others. Offers a theoretical formulation on the rhetorical implications of unhealthy narcissism, particularly misjudgments of audience and occasion and misshaped messages. (MS)

Barrett, Harold

1986-01-01

3

Narcissism and its discontents.  

PubMed

Comments on the original article by Paris (see record 2012-18549-001) on the topic of narcissism and modernity. It is a wide-ranging, ambitious, and, at times, provocative discussion of issues related to putative cultural influences on the etiology, development, and exacerbation of narcissism. Among the most important issues raised by Paris is the need for well-conducted longitudinal research on the development of narcissism so that the etiological mechanisms underlying this oftentimes-deleterious condition might be uncovered. However, there are a number of ongoing debates in the literature that make much of his proposal premature. This commentary addresses a few of these debate issues. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24796570

Wright, Aidan G C

2014-04-01

4

Narcissism and birth order.  

PubMed

The purpose of this investigation was to clarify the relationship between birth-order position and the development of narcissism, while refining research and theory. The relationship between birth-order status and narcissism was examined with a sample of 79 undergraduate students (55 women and 24 men). These subjects were placed in one of the four following birth-order categories of firstborn, second-born, last-born, and only children. These categories were chosen given their significance in Adlerian theory. Each subject completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and a demographic inventory. Based on psychodynamic theory, it was hypothesized that firstborn children were expected to score highest, but statistical significance was not found for an association between narcissism and birth order. Further research is urged to investigate personality theory as it relates to parenting style and birth order. PMID:9148293

Eyring, W E; Sobelman, S

1996-04-01

5

Narcissism and rhetorical maturity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unhealthful narcissism leads to rhetorical maladaptation. It hinders the spirit and processes of discovery, hampers establishment and appreciation of beliefs, values, and ideals, distorts perception, and results in regressive social behavior, e.g., in relating. While a general rhetorical standard assumes an adult mentality, the solipsistic state—narcissistic and immature?forecasts missed rhetorical opportunity, misjudgments of audience and occasion, and misshaped messages.

Harold Barrett

1986-01-01

6

Narcissism and Moral Education: Extending the Debate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responds to criticisms of his article, "Unmasking the Face of Narcissism," recognizing a difference between "positive narcissism," or mastering one's own reality, and "negative narcissism." Suggests the Copernican Model, involving longer class periods and fewer major courses, as a means of incorporating analyses of narcissism into literature,…

Ryan, Francis J.

1996-01-01

7

Freud's "On Narcissism: An Introduction"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author reviews Freud's (1914) seminal paper "On narcissism: an introduction". Freud's paper is briefly set in the historical context of the evolution of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic theories, and Freud's metapsychology up to the publication of his Narcissism paper is outlined. A detailed and comprehensive description of the content of the…

Crockatt, Philip

2006-01-01

8

Narcissism, Sex Roles, and Self-Functioning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the relationship between gender, sex role, and narcissism. Data indicated that males and masculine individuals were not higher in their levels of maladaptive narcissism, that an adjusted narcissism was more obvious in males and in masculine subjects, and that femininity appeared to inhibit the display of an unhealthy exploitative…

Watson, P. J.; And Others

1987-01-01

9

Narcissism--An Adolescent Disorder?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper argues that the adolescent process needs to be accorded its own particularity of reference, especially where narcissism is concerned. The paper draws on literary and clinical examples to describe what is termed the "adolescent organisation". In many ways, this organisation reflects post-Kleinian theory of what constitutes narcissistic…

Waddell, Margot

2006-01-01

10

NEOCOLONIAL NARCISSISM AND POSTCOLONIAL PARANOIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children represents an attempt to provide a therapeutic understanding of history and its traumas in a manner that places individualized psychoanalytic constructions in juxtaposition to those of larger collectives. Following Rushdie's lead, I recuperate the problematic Freudian concepts of paranoia, narcissism and fetishism and offer them as models for the functioning of state power. I postulate interdependent

Jason Howard Mezey

2006-01-01

11

The deconstruction of primary narcissism.  

PubMed

The author examines Winnicott?'s contribution to Freud?'s concept of primary narcissism. In Mourning and melancholia, Freud laid the foundations for this contribution, but it was Winnicott who turned it into a clinically useful concept. There are three of Winnicott's ideas that can be seen as preliminary stages to his theory of transitional phenomena and illusion. They serve as an introduction to thinking about the analysis of the analysand?'s primary narcissism and the theoretical prerequisites that make the interpretation of primary narcissism possible. Through the exploration of three main points in Winnicott's writings the author shows how Winnicott's conceptualizations are both new and a continuation of Freud?'s thinking. His ideas are thus part of the overall theoretical pattern of Freud?'s metapsychology. The three main points are as follows: 1. In bringing maternal care and the presence of the psychic environment into the construction of primary narcissism, Winnicott made it possible to analyse narcissism. His ideas enable us to stand back from the characteristic solipsism of narcissism, which holds that everything comes from the self and only from the self. The latter concept tends to eliminate the role of the object and environment in the construction of the self. At the same time, by deconstructing the way in which the self is infiltrated by a certain number of narcissistic postulates, Winnicott made it possible to interpret the theory of narcissism itself. 2. Between the individual and the sense of self, Winnicott inserted the maternal object and her function as a mirror of affects who acts as a medium for the organization of self-identity. Primary identity is established through the construction and elimination of a narcissistic identification that becomes meaningful in the context of a primary homosexual relationship functioning as a 'double'. 3. A process of differentiation that governs the discovery of the object is in a dialectical relationship with narcissistic identification. That process can be understood only in terms of the responses made by the primary psychic environment to the baby's primary aggression. PMID:20840641

Roussillon, René

2010-08-01

12

Narcissism, mania and analysts' envy.  

PubMed

Character traits like narcissism, mania and grandiosity are routinely discussed in the psychoanalytic literature as aspects of psychopathology only. However, many individuals who have both achieved and contributed to society in the most profound ways often have such characteristics. Psychoanalysts, sometimes envious of patients who possess considerable wealth and/or power, may be inclined to overly pathologize such qualities, denying their own desires for the perks of power and material success. Mad Men is discussed largely in this context. PMID:22143506

Hirsch, Irwin

2011-12-01

13

Collective narcissism and its social consequences.  

PubMed

This article introduces the concept of collective narcissism--an emotional investment in an unrealistic belief about the in group's greatness--aiming to explain how feelings about an ingroup shape a tendency to aggress against outgroups. The results of 5 studies indicate that collective, but not individual, narcissism predicts intergroup aggressiveness. Collective narcissism is related to high private and low public collective self-esteem and low implicit group esteem. It predicts perceived threat from outgroups, unwillingness to forgive outgroups, preference for military aggression over and above social dominance orientation, right-wing authoritarianism, and blind patriotism. The relationship between collective narcissism and aggressiveness is mediated by perceived threat from outgroups and perceived insult to the ingroup. In sum, the results indicate that collective narcissism is a form of high but ambivalent group esteem related to sensitivity to threats to the ingroup's image and retaliatory aggression. PMID:19968420

de Zavala, Agnieszka Golec; Cichocka, Aleksandra; Eidelson, Roy; Jayawickreme, Nuwan

2009-12-01

14

Down-regulating narcissistic tendencies: communal focus reduces state narcissism.  

PubMed

Narcissism has been conceptualized as a set of coherent, mutually reinforcing attributes that orients individuals toward self-enhancement and positive self-feelings. In this view, reducing one element of narcissism--such as a greater concern for agency than communion--may situationally reduce narcissism in a state-like manner. Across five studies, we found that increasing communal focus toward others decreases state narcissism. In Study 1, participants induced to feel empathy reported less state narcissism. In Studies 2 to 4, participants primed with interdependent self-construal reported less state narcissism than control participants and those primed with independent self-construal. Furthermore, in Study 4, changes in state narcissism mediated changes in desire for fame and perceptions that others deserve help. Thus, changes in one element of narcissism may situationally reduce narcissistic tendencies. These findings suggest that narcissism is more state-like and context-dependent than previously assumed. PMID:24345714

Giacomin, Miranda; Jordan, Christian H

2014-04-01

15

Narcissism and social networking Web sites.  

PubMed

The present research examined how narcissism is manifested on a social networking Web site (i.e., Facebook.com). Narcissistic personality self-reports were collected from social networking Web page owners. Then their Web pages were coded for both objective and subjective content features. Finally, strangers viewed the Web pages and rated their impression of the owner on agentic traits, communal traits, and narcissism. Narcissism predicted (a) higher levels of social activity in the online community and (b) more self-promoting content in several aspects of the social networking Web pages. Strangers who viewed the Web pages judged more narcissistic Web page owners to be more narcissistic. Finally, mediational analyses revealed several Web page content features that were influential in raters' narcissistic impressions of the owners, including quantity of social interaction, main photo self-promotion, and main photo attractiveness. Implications of the expression of narcissism in social networking communities are discussed. PMID:18599659

Buffardi, Laura E; Campbell, W Keith

2008-10-01

16

Envy divides the two faces of narcissism.  

PubMed

In this article, we test psychodynamic assumptions about envy and narcissism by examining malicious envy in the context of narcissistic grandiosity and vulnerability. In Study 1, students (N?=?192) and community adults (N?=?161) completed trait measures of narcissism, envy, and schadenfreude. In Study 2 (N?=?121), participants relived an episode of envy, and cognitive-affective components of envy were examined in the context of both self- and informant reports of their envy and narcissism. In Study 3 (N?=?69), narcissism was linked to reports of envy covertly induced in the laboratory. Vulnerable narcissism was strongly and consistently related to dispositional envy and schadenfreude (Studies 1-2), as well as to all cognitive-affective components of envy (Study 2). Furthermore, it facilitated envy and schadenfreude toward a high-status peer (Study 3). Grandiose narcissism was slightly negatively related to dispositional envy (Studies 1-2), and it did not predict informant reports of envy or cognitive-affective components of the emotion (Study 2). Finally, it did not exacerbate envy, hostility, or resentment toward a high-status peer (Study 3). The results suggest envy is a central emotion in the lives of those with narcissistic vulnerability and imply that envy should be reconsidered as a symptom accompanying grandiose features in the diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder. PMID:22224975

Krizan, Zlatan; Johar, Omesh

2012-10-01

17

Dependent Narcissism, Organizational Learning, and Human Resource Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Narcissistic leadership can benefit organizational performance. Aberrant narcissism can destroy the psychosocial health of groups, limiting performance. This article examines Dependent Organizational Disorder, a common form of narcissism, which infects leadership, thwarts performance, and interrupts organizational learning. Dependent…

Godkin, Lynn; Allcorn, Seth

2009-01-01

18

How To Eliminate Narcissism Overnight  

PubMed Central

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition appears likely to eliminate the diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder. There are significant problems with the discriminant validity of the current narcissistic personality disorder critiera set; furthermore, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition's narrow focus on “grandiosity” probably contributes to the wide disparity between low narcissistic personality disorder prevalence rates in epidemiological studies and high rates of narcissistic personality disorder in clinical practice. Nevertheless, the best course of action may be to refine the narcissistic personality disorder criteria, followed by careful field testing and a search for biomarkers, rather than wholesale elimination of the narcissistic personality disorder category. The construct of “malignant narcissism” is also worthy of more intense empirical investigation.

2011-01-01

19

Facing towards or Turning away from Destructive Narcissism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a detailed theoretical discussion of destructive narcissism in relation to Freud and Rosenfeld and later theorists. In destructive narcissism, the destructiveness is itself idealised and overrides "the vital functions which serve the purpose of self-preservation" (Freud, S., 1914, "On narcissism" S.E. 14: 87)--a feature which…

Flynn, Denis; Skogstad, Helga

2006-01-01

20

A Python interface with Narcisse graphics  

SciTech Connect

Narcisse is a graphics package developed by our French colleagues at Centre d`Etudes de Limeil Valenton of the Commissariat d`Energie Atomique. Narcisse is quite comprehensive; it can do two-, three-, and four-dimensional plots (the latter meaning that the surface is colored according to the values of an arbitrary function). One can open and send plots to a Narcisse window on a distant machine. Narcisse has a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) which, once a graph has appeared, allows the user to change its characteristics interactively. This enables one to find the best appearance for a particular plot without having to graph it repeatedly from the user program. Previously created files in various formats can also be imported directly into the Narcisse GUI and manipulated from there. Narcisse runs independently, as a graphics server. The user program communicates with Narcisse via Unix sockets. This communication is quite low level and very complex. The appearance of a plot is controlled by nearly 150 parameters for determining such things as the color palette, type of shading, axis scales, curve and surface labels, titles, angle and distance of view (for three- and four-dimensional graphs), hidden line removal, etc. Most end users do not wish to spend time learning the tedious details of such interfaces; they would just like to specify data and ask to have it plotted. This paper describes a high level, easy to use graphics interface which hides (as much as possible) the low level details of whatever graphics system is actually being used, so that the low level can be essentially ``plug-and-play.`` Then, whenever a better system becomes available, it should only be necessary to change low level interface routines not normally accessed by ordinary users. Python, with its easy extendability, was ideally suited for this job.

Motteler, Z.C.

1996-04-15

21

The Predictive Utility of Narcissism among Children and Adolescents: Evidence for a Distinction between Adaptive and Maladaptive Narcissism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the predictive utility of narcissism among a community sample of children and adolescents (N=98) longitudinally. Analyses focused on the differential utility between maladaptive and adaptive narcissism for predicting later delinquency. Maladaptive narcissism significantly predicted self-reported delinquency at one-, two-, and…

Barry, Christopher T.; Frick, Paul J.; Adler, Kristy K.; Grafeman, Sarah J.

2007-01-01

22

Clarifying the links between grandiose narcissism and parenting.  

PubMed

This study investigated the links between parenting and grandiose narcissism in hopes of clarifying recent empirical discrepancies. One-hundred forty-five participants completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and reported about their parents' support, coldness, monitoring, psychological control, and overvaluation. Psychological control was associated positively with narcissism, whereas monitoring and coldness were associated negatively. Overvaluation and parental support showed no reliable associations with narcissism. Analysis of the components of narcissism further elucidated these links. The results are interpreted in light of previous findings and as consistent with social learning and psychodynamic theories regarding the origins of narcissism. PMID:24684075

Horton, Robert S; Tritch, Tanner

2014-01-01

23

An integrative approach to the assessment of narcissism.  

PubMed

Narcissism research is poorly calibrated across fields of study in part due to confusion over how to integrate normal and pathological descriptions of narcissism. We argue that pathological and normal narcissism can be integrated in a single model that organizes around self-regulation mechanisms. We present theoretical and empirical support for this interpretation, and demonstrate that modeling pathological and normal narcissism as 2 dimensions underlying the narcissistic character can help to resolve some of the inconsistencies in the field regarding how to best assess adaptive and maladaptive expressions of narcissism. PMID:23451709

Roche, Michael J; Pincus, Aaron L; Lukowitsky, Mark R; Ménard, Kim S; Conroy, David E

2013-01-01

24

The significance of Alfred Adler for the concept of narcissism.  

PubMed

Alfred Adler's significance for the concept of narcissism is presented with reference to four aspects: 1) Adler's theory of masculine protest was evidently a factor influencing Freud to turn toward the phenomenon of narcissism. 2) Present-day understanding of narcissism shows remarkable similarity to Adler's views on psychodynamics and neurotic egocentricity. 3) Some contemporary criticisms of Freud's theory of narcissism are very similar to Adler's criticism. 4) Adler's theory of social interest permits subsumption of narcissism under lack of social interest rather than acceptance of it as an expression of innate socially negative tendencies. PMID:3882001

Ansbacher, H L

1985-02-01

25

Sexual Narcissism and the Perpetration of Sexual Aggression  

PubMed Central

Despite indirect evidence linking narcissism to sexual aggression, studies directly examining this relationship have yielded inconsistent results. Likely contributing to such inconsistencies, prior research has used global measures of narcissism not sensitive to whether the components of narcissism are activated in sexual versus non-sexual domains. The current research avoided such problems by using a measure of sexual narcissism to predict sexual aggression. In a sample of 299 men and women, Study 1 validated the Sexual Narcissism Scale, a new sexuality research instrument with four subscales—Sexual Exploitation, Sexual Entitlement, Low Sexual Empathy, and Sexual Skill. Then, in a sample of 378 men, Study 2 demonstrated that sexual narcissism was associated with reports of the frequency of sexual aggression, three specific types of sexual aggression (unwanted sexual contact, sexual coercion, and attempted/completed rape), and the likelihood of future sexual aggression. Notably, global narcissism was unrelated to all indices of sexual aggression when sexual narcissism was controlled. That sexual narcissism outperformed global assessments of narcissism to account for variance in sexual aggression suggests that future research may benefit by examining whether sexual narcissism and other sexual-situation-specific measurements of personality can similarly provide a more valid test of the association between personality and other sexual behaviors and outcomes (e.g., contraceptive use, infidelity, sexual satisfaction).

McNulty, James K.

2014-01-01

26

Sexual narcissism and the perpetration of sexual aggression.  

PubMed

Despite indirect evidence linking narcissism to sexual aggression, studies directly examining this relationship have yielded inconsistent results. Likely contributing to such inconsistencies, prior research has used global measures of narcissism not sensitive to whether the components of narcissism are activated in sexual versus non-sexual domains. The current research avoided such problems by using a measure of sexual narcissism to predict sexual aggression. In a sample of 299 men and women, Study 1 validated the Sexual Narcissism Scale, a new sexuality research instrument with four subscales-Sexual Exploitation, Sexual Entitlement, Low Sexual Empathy, and Sexual Skill. Then, in a sample of 378 men, Study 2 demonstrated that sexual narcissism was associated with reports of the frequency of sexual aggression, three specific types of sexual aggression (unwanted sexual contact, sexual coercion, and attempted/completed rape), and the likelihood of future sexual aggression. Notably, global narcissism was unrelated to all indices of sexual aggression when sexual narcissism was controlled. That sexual narcissism outperformed global assessments of narcissism to account for variance in sexual aggression suggests that future research may benefit by examining whether sexual narcissism and other sexual-situation-specific measurements of personality can similarly provide a more valid test of the association between personality and other sexual behaviors and outcomes (e.g., contraceptive use, infidelity, sexual satisfaction). PMID:19130204

Widman, Laura; McNulty, James K

2010-08-01

27

Personal Fables, Narcissism, and Adolescent Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship among three personal fables ("omnipotence," "invulnerability," "personal uniqueness"), narcissism, and mental health variables was assessed in a large, cross-sectional sample of adolescents drawn from Grades 6 (n = 94), 8 (n = 223), 10 (n = 142), and 12 (n = 102). Participants responded to the New Personal Fable Scale, the…

Aalsma, Matthew C.; Lapsley, Daniel K.; Flannery, Daniel J.

2006-01-01

28

[Social psychological implications of the narcissism theory].  

PubMed

The author recapitulates various conceptions of narcissism that are in psychoanalytic discussion and attempts to set up a new theoretical frame for the socio-psychological topoi "authoritarian character" and "narcissistic personality" by means of Kohut's conceptions of the "grandiose self" and the "idealized parental imago". Based on M. Mahler's observations, Kernberg's critique of Kohut is rejected. PMID:1546178

Breuer, S

1992-01-01

29

Narcissism and spirituality in Flannery O'Connor's stories.  

PubMed

Virtually any short story by Flannery O'Connor could serve as a poignant case study of narcissism. While narcissism in the guises of ambition and hubris is an ancient literary theme, O'Connor's protagonists vividly exemplify a syndrome of covert and hypervigilant narcissism that has been well characterized in the literature. Her work also strongly implies that narcissism and spirituality (particularly Christianity) are antithetical, and two of her stories--"The Enduring Chill" and "The Lame Shall Enter First"--are analyzed with respect to this belief. The characters of Asbury and Sheppard exhibit classic narcissistic signs and symptoms as delineated by Kohut and Kernberg. The complex relationship of narcissism to evil, spirituality, and contemporary culture is explored, and it is argued that narcissism has a prominent spiritual dimension that raises questions about the role of values in psychotherapy. PMID:14735879

Scheurich, Neil; Mullen, Vincent

2003-01-01

30

Parenting Narcissus: What Are the Links Between Parenting and Narcissism?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous theorizing by clinical psychologists suggests that adolescent narcissism may be related to parenting practices (Kernb- erg, 1975; Kohut, 1977). Two studies investigated the relations between parenting dimensions (i.e., warmth, monitoring, and psychological con- trol) and narcissism both with and without removing from narcissism variance associated with trait self-esteem. Two hundred and twenty-two college students (Study 1) and 212 high

Robert S. Horton; Geoff Bleau; Brian Drwecki

2006-01-01

31

Rhetoric and Narcissism: A Critique of Ideological Selfism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues for a redefinition of narcissism as pathological communication, rather than egoism or individualism. Contends that such a definition has heuristic advantages. Suggests directions for further research. (MS)

Catt, Isaac E.

1986-01-01

32

The implications of sexual narcissism for sexual and marital satisfaction.  

PubMed

There is theoretical reason to believe narcissism is associated with a number of sexual behaviors and outcomes that affect both sexual and relationship satisfaction. Nevertheless, research on the association between personality and behavior demonstrates that personality traits, such as narcissism, only predict behavior in domains that activate the components of the personality system. Given that global assessments of narcissism do not capture the extent to which the components of narcissism are activated in the sexual domain, we examined the extent to which the facets of a domain-specific measure of sexual narcissism accounted for the trajectories of own and partner sexual and marital satisfaction over the first five years of 120 new marriages. Three of the four facets of sexual narcissism (sexual exploitation, sexual entitlement, and low sexual empathy) were negatively associated with both trajectories. The fourth facet (sexual skill) was positively associated with both trajectories. Notably, sexual satisfaction mediated the effect of every facet of sexual narcissism on marital satisfaction. A global assessment of narcissism was not associated with either trajectory of satisfaction. These findings highlight (1) the importance of narcissistic tendencies for sexual processes, (2) the benefits of using domain-specific measures of personality in research on sexual behavior, and (3) the importance of examining the implications of the specific facets of personality constructs. PMID:23297145

McNulty, James K; Widman, Laura

2013-08-01

33

Unmasking the Face of Narcissism: A Prerequisite for Moral Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that moral and values clarification education encourages narcissism in youths through a focus on individualism and the personal. Finds similar tendencies in adolescent literature. Describes a moral education program designed to counter narcissism through a focus on cooperative relationships. Provides instructional techniques to counter…

Ryan, Francis J.

1996-01-01

34

Rhetoric and narcissism: A critique of ideological Selfism  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a hermeneutically based philosophic reflection, an attempt is made to define narcissism as pathological communication. The concept of narcissism is distinguished from egoism or individualistic social tendencies with which it is often confused. Narrow perspectives on narcissistic experience, taken up by psychoanalysis, are shown to perpetuate a prevailing ideology of narcissistic culture. The rhetorical roots of an either\\/or mentality

Isaac E. Catt

1986-01-01

35

There Is an "I" in TEAM: Narcissism and Social Loafing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigated narcissism as a moderator of social loafing on a physical performance task. High and low narcissistic individuals twice performed a cycling task in same-sex teams of three: once when identifiability was low; and once when identifiability was high. A significant interaction between narcissism and identifiability was revealed, F(1,…

Woodman, Tim; Roberts, Ross; Hardy, Lew; Callow, Nichola; Rogers, Catherine H.

2011-01-01

36

Parenting narcissus: what are the links between parenting and narcissism?  

PubMed

Previous theorizing by clinical psychologists suggests that adolescent narcissism may be related to parenting practices (Kernberg, 1975; Kohut, 1977). Two studies investigated the relations between parenting dimensions (i.e., warmth, monitoring, and psychological control) and narcissism both with and without removing from narcissism variance associated with trait self-esteem. Two hundred and twenty-two college students (Study 1) and 212 high school students (Study 2) completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, a trait self-esteem scale, and standard measures of the three parenting dimensions. Parental warmth was associated positively and monitoring was associated negatively with both types of narcissism. Psychological control was positively associated with narcissism scores from which trait self-esteem variance had been removed. Clinical implications of the findings are discussed, limitations are addressed, and future research directions are suggested. PMID:16529580

Horton, Robert S; Bleau, Geoff; Drwecki, Brian

2006-04-01

37

Humor style mediates the association between pathological narcissism and self-esteem  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to examine whether humor styles mediated the associations between the pathological forms of narcissism (grandiose narcissism and vulnerable narcissism) and self-esteem in a sample of Israeli undergraduates (N=200). Grandiose narcissism was positively associated with the use of adaptive humor (i.e., self-enhancing humor and affiliative humor), whereas vulnerable narcissism was negatively associated with the

Virgil Zeigler-Hill; Avi Besser

2011-01-01

38

The Narcissism of Depression or the Depression of Narcissism and Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the fact that it has long been recognised that narcissism can contribute to depression, we have become accustomed to referring to depression mostly in terms of a neurotic disturbance. The author highlights the difference between the narcissistic elements in depression, which is based on guilt, and the graver narcissistic depression, which…

Anastasopoulos, Dimitris

2007-01-01

39

Narcissism at the crossroads: phenotypic description of pathological narcissism across clinical theory, social/personality psychology, and psychiatric diagnosis.  

PubMed

This review documents two themes of emphasis found in phenotypic descriptions of pathological narcissism across clinical theory, social/personality psychology, and psychiatric diagnosis. Clinical theories of narcissism spanning 35 years consistently describe variations in the expression of pathological narcissism that emphasize either grandiosity or vulnerable affects and self-states. Recent research in social/personality psychology examining the structure of narcissistic personality traits consistently finds two broad factors representing Grandiosity-Exhibitionism and Vulnerability-Sensitivity-Depletion respectively. However, the majority of psychiatric criteria for narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) emphasize expressions of grandiosity. By placing most of the diagnostic emphasis on overt grandiosity, DSM NPD has been limited by poor discriminant validity, modest levels of temporal stability, and the lowest prevalence rate on Axis II. Despite converging support for two phenotypic themes associated with pathological narcissism, psychiatric diagnosis and social/personality psychology research often focus only on grandiosity in the assessment of narcissism. In contrast, clinical theory struggles with a proliferation of labels describing these broad phenotypic variations. We conclude that the construct of pathological narcissism is at a crossroads and provide recommendations for diagnostic assessment, clinical conceptualization, and future research that could lead to a more integrated understanding of narcissistic personality and narcissistic personality pathology. PMID:18029072

Cain, Nicole M; Pincus, Aaron L; Ansell, Emily B

2008-04-01

40

Vicissitudes of narcissism in the cinematic autobiography.  

PubMed

We have discussed two contemporary cinematic autobiographies in which narcissistic struggles are presented in the protagonists. Whether Bob Fosse and Woody Allen are themselves suffering from narcissistic character pathology is unknown to us and is not the point of our thesis. Narcissistic issues are presented as predominant life difficulties for the major characters in the movies, and an examination of these narcissistic themes can enlarge our understanding of the current cultural and intrapsychic narcissistic phenomena. By examining how Joe Gideon in All That Jazz and Sandy Bates in Stardust Memories approach relationships with significant figures in their lives, how they deal with the mid-life crisis, and how they struggle with the knowledge of the inevitability of personal death provide insights about the vicissitudes of narcissism at a particular point in the male adult life-cycle. PMID:6436853

Gabbard, G O; Gabbard, K

1984-09-01

41

Examining Associations Between Narcissism, Behavior Problems, and Anxiety in Non-Referred Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined associations between narcissism (total, adaptive, and maladaptive), self-esteem, and externalizing\\u000a and internalizing problems in 157 non-referred adolescents (aged 14 to 18). Consistent with previous research, narcissism\\u000a was positively associated with self-reported delinquency, overt aggression, and relational aggression. Maladaptive narcissism\\u000a showed unique positive associations with aggression and delinquency variables, while adaptive narcissism showed unique negative\\u000a associations with

Katherine S. L. LauMonica; Monica A. Marsee; Melissa M. KunimatsuGregory; Gregory M. Fassnacht

2011-01-01

42

Locus of Control, Narcissism, and Family Life Education in Correctional Rehabilitation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined effect of narcissism and locus of control on prisoner ability to complete family life psycho-educational program. Data from 63 inmates and 2 sex offender groups indicated significant correlation between locus of control, narcissism, and final examination scores. No significant correlations were found between narcissism and locus of…

Bayse, Daniel J.; And Others

1992-01-01

43

Convergence of Narcissism Measures from the Perspective of General Personality Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The construct of narcissism has a lengthy history and has been operationalized and measured by a variety of instruments. In this study, five narcissism scales were compared in terms of alternative conceptualizations of narcissism offered by C. C. Morf and F. Rhodewalt (2001), D. L. Paulhus (2001), and S. Vazire and D. C. Funder (2006), using the…

Samuel, Douglas B.; Widiger, Thomas A.

2008-01-01

44

The Relations among Narcissism, Self-Esteem, and Delinquency in a Sample of At-Risk Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study explores the relation between narcissism and delinquency among 372 at-risk 16-18-year-olds. The study also considered the relation between narcissism and self-esteem, as well as the potential interaction between narcissism and self-esteem for predicting delinquency in this age group. Narcissism and self-esteem were positively…

Barry, Christopher T.; Grafeman, Sarah J.; Adler, Kristy K.; Pickard, Jessica D.

2007-01-01

45

Relations of proactive and reactive dimensions of aggression to overt and covert narcissism in nonclinical adolescents.  

PubMed

In recent years, there has been increasing acknowledgment of the multidimensionality of narcissism and that different types of narcissism may relate differently to other domains of functioning. Similarly, aggression-a frequently discussed correlate of narcissism-is a heterogeneous construct. In this study, the relations of proactive and reactive aggression with overt and covert manifestations of narcissism were examined in a sample of 674 Italian high school students (mean age=15.5 years, SD=2.1 years). Overt narcissism was positively related to both proactive and reactive subtypes of aggression, whereas covert narcissism related only to reactive aggression. Vanity, Authority, Exhibitionism, and Exploitativeness were the components of overt narcissism related to Proactive Aggression (all remained unique correlates when controlling for Reactive Aggression), whereas Reactive Aggression was associated with the Exhibitionism, Superiority, and Entitlement subscales (only the latter was uniquely related when controlling for Proactive Aggression). PMID:19918915

Fossati, Andrea; Borroni, Serena; Eisenberg, Nancy; Maffei, Cesare

2010-01-01

46

Relations of Proactive and Reactive Dimensions of Aggression to Overt and Covert Narcissism in Nonclinical Adolescents  

PubMed Central

In recent years, there has been increasing acknowledgement of the multidimensionality of narcissism and that different types of narcissism may relate differently to other domains of functioning. Similarly, aggression—a frequently discussed correlate of narcissism--is a heterogeneous construct. In the present study, the relations of proactive and reactive aggression with overt and covert manifestations of narcissism were examined in a sample of 674 Italian high school students (mean age = 15.5 years, SD = 2.1 years). Overt narcissism was positively related to both proactive and reactive subtypes of aggression, whereas covert narcissism related only to reactive aggression. Vanity, Authority, Exhibitionism, and Exploitativeness were the components of overt narcissism related to Proactive Aggression (all remained unique correlates when controlling for Reactive Aggression), whereas Reactive Aggression was associated with the Exhibitionism, Superiority, and Entitlement subscales (only the latter was uniquely related when controlling for Proactive Aggression).

Fossati, Andrea; Borroni, Serena; Eisenberg, Nancy; Maffei, Cesare

2009-01-01

47

Preschool Personality Antecedents of Narcissism in Adolescence and Emergent Adulthood: A 20-Year Longitudinal Study  

PubMed Central

This prospective study examined relations between preschool personality attributes and narcissism during adolescence and emerging adulthood. We created five a priori preschool scales anticipated to foretell future narcissism. Independent assessors evaluated the participants' personality at ages 14, 18, and 23. Based upon these evaluations, we generated observer-based narcissism scales for each of these three ages. All preschool scales predicted subsequent narcissism, except Interpersonal Antagonism at age 23. According to mean scale and item scores analyses, narcissism increased significantly from age 14 to 18, followed by a slight but non-significant decline from age 18 to 23. The discussion focused on a developmental view of narcissism, the need for research on automatic processing and psychological defenses, and links between narcissism and attachment.

Carlson, Kevin S.; Gjerde, Per F.

2009-01-01

48

Wealth and the inflated self: class, entitlement, and narcissism.  

PubMed

Americans may be more narcissistic now than ever, but narcissism is not evenly distributed across social strata. Five studies demonstrated that higher social class is associated with increased entitlement and narcissism. Upper-class individuals reported greater psychological entitlement (Studies 1a, 1b, and 2) and narcissistic personality tendencies (Study 2), and they were more likely to behave in a narcissistic fashion by opting to look at themselves in a mirror (Study 3). Finally, inducing egalitarian values in upper-class participants decreased their narcissism to a level on par with their lower-class peers (Study 4). These findings offer novel evidence regarding the influence of social class on the self and highlight the importance of social stratification to understanding basic psychological processes. PMID:23963971

Piff, Paul K

2014-01-01

49

Narcissism and discrepancy between self and friends' perceptions of personality.  

PubMed

Most research on narcissism and person perception has used strangers as perceivers. However, research has demonstrated that strangers' ratings are influenced by narcissists' stylish appearance (Back, Schmukle, & Egloff, 2010). In the present study, we recruited participants and their close friends, individuals whose close relationship should immunize them to participants' superficial appearance cues. We investigated the relation between narcissism and personality ratings by self and friends. Participants (N?=?66; 38 women; Mage ?=?20.83 years) completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (Raskin & Terry, 1988) and described their personality on the 100-item California Adult Q-Sort (CAQ; Block, 2008). Participants' personality was also described on the CAQ by close friends. The "optimally adjusted individual" prototype was used to summarize participant and friend personality ratings (Block, 2008). Participants with high narcissism scores were ascribed higher optimal adjustment by self than by friends. Narcissistic individuals' self-ratings were extremely positive and more favorable than friends' ratings of them. PMID:23799917

Park, Sun W; Colvin, C Randall

2014-08-01

50

Aspects of narcissism and symbiosis, or, essential neurosis of twins.  

PubMed

Following a brief introduction I address the relationships of twins from five different perspectives: the Intimate Connection, the Mirror Image and Complementarity, Object- and Self-Representation, Self and Object or Rivalry, and Intersubjective Communication. This approach attempts to understand twin relationships and the individual development of twins in terms of their intense mutual dependence, akin to infantile symbiosis, and in terms of narcissism. In their similarity to each other, twins may choose each other as love objects even as they see themselves in the other. That is, a twin may "love what he himself is" or "someone who was once part of himself." This "type of object-choice … must be termed 'narcissistic'" (Freud, 1914, pp. 90, 88). Such "cathexis of an undifferentiated self-object" is considered to be "primary narcissism" (Burstein, 1977, p. 103). Hoffer (1952) describes primary narcissism as "the lack of all qualities discriminating between self and not-self, inside and outside" (p. 33). PMID:22712590

Kahn, Charlotte

2012-06-01

51

The narcissism epidemic: Commentary on Modernity and narcissistic personality disorder.  

PubMed

Comments on the original article by Paris (see record 2012-18549-001) regarding narcissistic personality disorder. The current authors agree with Paris that modern life is making people more narcissistic. In fact, the authors demonstrate with this commentary, the case for increasing narcissism is even stronger than presented in his article. An explain that expressing individualism and lack of social support play key roles in this increase. However, the current authors question the idea that therapy is building narcissism. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24796568

Twenge, Jean M; Miller, Joshua D; Campbell, W Keith

2014-04-01

52

[Narcissism, its Disorders and the role of TFP].  

PubMed

In this paper, the authors present an overview of a range of psychoanalytic understandings of narcissistic pathology with an emphasis on the model and system of classification described by Kernberg. They discuss how the concept of a fundamental split between object relations dyads can contribute to major pathology of superego development and functioning and to the defensive establishment of the false grandiose self that are central to pathological narcissism. The authors also review therapeutic modifications that can help clinicians effectively treat patients with narcissistic pathology and describe distinctions in levels of narcissism that influence both how to approach treatment and prognosis. PMID:18795198

Diamond, Diana; Yeomans, Frank

2008-01-01

53

An examination of the perceptions of social network characteristics associated with grandiose and vulnerable narcissism.  

PubMed

Two dimensions of narcissism exist, grandiose and vulnerable, which are thought to be associated with distinctly different patterns of interpersonal behavior. Social network analysis is a way of quantifying and analyzing interpersonal interactions that may prove useful for characterizing the networks associated with these narcissism dimensions. In the current study, participants (N = 148) completed scales assessing both narcissism dimensions and a measure of the five-factor model of personality. Egocentric network information about participants' 30 closest friends and family members (i.e., "alters") was also obtained. Both narcissism dimensions were characterized by negative perceptions of the individuals who comprise one's social networks, and many of these relations were mediated by individuals' higher levels of antagonism. Grandiose narcissism also interacted with alter centrality (i.e., importance to the network) such that individuals low on grandiose narcissism were less likely to perceive central alters in a negative light and were more attuned to central alters than were individuals high on grandiose narcissism. Overall, both narcissism dimensions were associated with perceiving one's overall social environment negatively because of the high levels of antagonism that characterize both narcissism dimensions. Individuals high on grandiose narcissism, however, appear to be more insensitive to the relative importance of individuals in their social networks. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24364501

Lamkin, Joanna; Clifton, Allan; Campbell, W Keith; Miller, Joshua D

2014-04-01

54

Institutional Narcissism, Arrogant Organization Disorder and Interruptions in Organizational Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This article aims to present an alternative approach to diagnosing behavioral barriers to organizational learning. Design/methodology/approach: The paper juxtaposes interruptions in organizational learning with characteristics of narcissism and arrogant organization disorder. Psychoanalytically informed theory and DSM-IV criteria are…

Godkin, Lynn; Allcorn, Seth

2009-01-01

55

Technology, Narcissism, and the Moral Sense: Implications for Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses narcissism, child-rearing practices that lead to child-centeredness, and social insensitivity and their implications for instruction. Considers moral education and the moral sense; cultivating the moral sense through technology; and idea and product technologies. Also includes a commentary on the article by Jonathan Ross and a response…

Ryan, Francis; Bednar, Maryanne; Sweeder, John

1999-01-01

56

Narcissism in the Rorschach Revisited: Some Reflections on Empirical Data.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whether the Rorschach test was able to identify pathological expressions of narcissism was studied in 91 patients with Axis II mental disorder. Results suggest that the Rorschach can differentiate narcissistic personality disorder patients from a nonclinical sample and a sample from Cluster A ("Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental…

Hilsenroth, Mark J.; And Others

1997-01-01

57

The Two Faces of Narcissism and Adolescent Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a study that examined the relationship between two forms of adolescent narcissism and indicators of self-worth (positive adjustment and psychopathology) in a sample of 561 adolescents. School structure, academic performance, and school participation were also examined and mental health functioning was assessed by measures of…

Aalsma, Matthew C.; Varshney, Nicole M.; Arens, Daniel; Lapsley, Daniel K.

58

Nonpathological and pathological narcissism: which self-reported characteristics are most problematic in adolescents?  

PubMed

Prior research indicates that dimensions of adolescent narcissism differ in their associations with indicators of positive and negative psychological functioning (e.g., Barry, Frick, Adler, & Grafeman, 2007 ; Barry & Wallace, 2010 ). This study investigated correlates of 2 empirically derived factors of adolescent narcissism (i.e., pathological and nonpathological narcissism) from 2 measures thought to differ based on their inclusion of pathological versus nonpathological content. In a sample of 188 at-risk adolescents ages 16 to 18, pathological narcissism was associated with various indicators of maladjustment, including aggression, low self-esteem, internalizing problems, and poor perceived interpersonal relationships. On the other hand, nonpathological narcissism was positively associated with self-esteem and aggression but negatively associated with internalizing problems. The implications for the conceptualization of adolescent narcissism are discussed. PMID:24007215

Barry, Christopher T; Kauten, Rebecca L

2014-01-01

59

Are Universities Creating Millennial Narcissistic Employees? An Empirical Examination of Narcissism in Business Students and Its Implications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors investigate whether narcissism levels are significantly higher in undergraduate business students than psychology students, whether business schools are reinforcing narcissism in the classroom, and whether narcissism is influencing student salary and career expectations. Data were collected from Millennial students (n = 536) and…

Westerman, James W.; Bergman, Jacqueline Z.; Bergman, Shawn M.; Daly, Joseph P.

2012-01-01

60

A neural model of mechanisms of empathy deficits in narcissism.  

PubMed

From a multidimensional perspective, empathy is a process that includes affective sharing and imagining and understanding the emotions of others. The primary brain structures involved in mediating the components of empathy are the anterior insula (AI), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and specific regions of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). The AI and ACC are the main nodes in the salience network (SN), which selects and coordinates the information flow from the intero- and exteroreceptors. AI might play a role as a crucial hub - a dynamic switch between 2 separate networks of cognitive processing: the central executive network (CEN), which is concerned with effective task execution, and the default mode network (DMN), which is involved with self-reflective processes. Given various classifications, a deficit in empathy may be considered a central dysfunctional trait in narcissism. A recent fMRI study suggests that deficit in empathy is due to a dysfunction in the right AI. Based on the acquired data, we propose a theoretical model of imbalanced SN functioning in narcissism in which the dysfunctional AI hub is responsible for constant DMN activation, which, in turn, centers one's attention on the self. This might hinder the ability to affectively share and understand the emotions of others. This review paper on neural mechanisms of empathy deficits in narcissism aims to inspire and direct future research in this area. PMID:24189465

Jankowiak-Siuda, Kamila; Zajkowski, Wojciech

2013-01-01

61

Narcissism and consumer behaviour: a review and preliminary findings  

PubMed Central

We review the literature on the relation between narcissism and consumer behavior. Consumer behavior is sometimes guided by self-related motives (e.g., self-enhancement) rather than by rational economic considerations. Narcissism is a case in point. This personality trait reflects a self-centered, self-aggrandizing, dominant, and manipulative orientation. Narcissists are characterized by exhibitionism and vanity, and they see themselves as superior and entitled. To validate their grandiose self-image, narcissists purchase high-prestige products (i.e., luxurious, exclusive, flashy), show greater interest in the symbolic than utilitarian value of products, and distinguish themselves positively from others via their materialistic possessions. Our review lays the foundation for a novel methodological approach in which we explore how narcissism influences eye movement behavior during consumer decision-making. We conclude with a description of our experimental paradigm and report preliminary results. Our findings will provide insight into the mechanisms underlying narcissists’ conspicuous purchases. They will also likely have implications for theories of personality, consumer behavior, marketing, advertising, and visual cognition.

Cisek, Sylwia Z.; Sedikides, Constantine; Hart, Claire M.; Godwin, Hayward J.; Benson, Valerie; Liversedge, Simon P.

2014-01-01

62

Narcissism, hypochondria and the problem of alternative theories.  

PubMed

This paper is an experiment in conceptual integration and clinical theory testing. Its argument is that narcissism and sexual object love develop from a single source and continue to interact during childhood development and adult life (Freud) and that drives in their oedipal and other formations are not merely disintegration products of narcissism (Kohut). Material from two analyses, supplemented by material from two others, indicate that narcissistic injury was a significant factor in the neuroses of these patients but that aggressive and libidinal conflicts were also decisive such that their hypochondriac symptoms were compositions of their interacting causality. As a result these neuroses are negative instances of Kohut's theory of narcissism. The hypochondriac symptoms as they emerged could not have had the structure and dynamics they actually had nor could the analytic process these patients underwent have achieved the far-reaching and durable amelioration of these symptoms that occurred. On the positive side, these analyses are but two inductive instances that support Freud's theory. However, one major difficulty of the faddishness of psychoanalytic theorizing is that much of worth is lost from general theories that turn out not to be supportable. The clinical material from these two cases which disprove basic elements of self-psychology metapsychology also require adjustments to classical theory that integrate the contributions of self-psychology to psychoanalytic clinical theory. PMID:21702746

Hanly, Charles

2011-06-01

63

Narcissism and consumer behaviour: a review and preliminary findings.  

PubMed

We review the literature on the relation between narcissism and consumer behavior. Consumer behavior is sometimes guided by self-related motives (e.g., self-enhancement) rather than by rational economic considerations. Narcissism is a case in point. This personality trait reflects a self-centered, self-aggrandizing, dominant, and manipulative orientation. Narcissists are characterized by exhibitionism and vanity, and they see themselves as superior and entitled. To validate their grandiose self-image, narcissists purchase high-prestige products (i.e., luxurious, exclusive, flashy), show greater interest in the symbolic than utilitarian value of products, and distinguish themselves positively from others via their materialistic possessions. Our review lays the foundation for a novel methodological approach in which we explore how narcissism influences eye movement behavior during consumer decision-making. We conclude with a description of our experimental paradigm and report preliminary results. Our findings will provide insight into the mechanisms underlying narcissists' conspicuous purchases. They will also likely have implications for theories of personality, consumer behavior, marketing, advertising, and visual cognition. PMID:24711797

Cisek, Sylwia Z; Sedikides, Constantine; Hart, Claire M; Godwin, Hayward J; Benson, Valerie; Liversedge, Simon P

2014-01-01

64

A neural model of mechanisms of empathy deficits in narcissism  

PubMed Central

From a multidimensional perspective, empathy is a process that includes affective sharing and imagining and understanding the emotions of others. The primary brain structures involved in mediating the components of empathy are the anterior insula (AI), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and specific regions of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). The AI and ACC are the main nodes in the salience network (SN), which selects and coordinates the information flow from the intero- and exteroreceptors. AI might play a role as a crucial hub – a dynamic switch between 2 separate networks of cognitive processing: the central executive network (CEN), which is concerned with effective task execution, and the default mode network (DMN), which is involved with self-reflective processes. Given various classifications, a deficit in empathy may be considered a central dysfunctional trait in narcissism. A recent fMRI study suggests that deficit in empathy is due to a dysfunction in the right AI. Based on the acquired data, we propose a theoretical model of imbalanced SN functioning in narcissism in which the dysfunctional AI hub is responsible for constant DMN activation, which, in turn, centers one’s attention on the self. This might hinder the ability to affectively share and understand the emotions of others. This review paper on neural mechanisms of empathy deficits in narcissism aims to inspire and direct future research in this area.

Jankowiak-Siuda, Kamila; Zajkowski, Wojciech

2013-01-01

65

The Higher Order Factor Structure and Gender Invariance of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI) is a recently developed multidimensional inventory for the assessment of pathological narcissism. The authors describe and report the results of two studies that investigate the higher order factor structure and gender invariance of the PNI. The results of the first study indicate that the PNI has a…

Wright, Aidan G. C.; Lukowitsky, Mark R.; Pincus, Aaron L.; Conroy, David E.

2010-01-01

66

Narcissism, Exploitative Attitudes, and Academic Dishonesty: An Exploratory Investigation of Reality versus Myth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Renewed interest in the effects of narcissism in the media has generated a closer examination of the phenomenon. This coupled with an increase in academic misbehavior among both high school and university students has provided an opportunity to scrutinize the effects of narcissism on attitudes toward academic dishonesty. The authors investigated…

Menon, Mohan K.; Sharland, Alex

2011-01-01

67

Response to Francis Ryan's "Unmasking the Face of Narcissism: A Prerequisite to Moral Education."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Agrees that Ryan's article highlights an important problem in moral education, but describes Ryan's view of narcissism as narrow and his account of the past idealized. Argues that a school program combating narcissism is not sufficient because individualism is so deeply rooted in our culture. (10 citations) (AJL)

de Leeuw, Gary

1996-01-01

68

Measuring Narcissism within Add Health: The Development and Validation of a New Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports the development of a measure of narcissism within the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) data set. In Study 1, items were selected from Wave III to form the Add Health Narcissism Scale (AHNS). These were factor analyzed, yielding a single factor comprised of five subscales. We correlated the AHNS and…

Davis, Mark S.; Brunell, Amy B.

2012-01-01

69

Narcissism and academic dishonesty: The exhibitionism dimension and the lack of guilt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Narcissism is associated with morally questionable behavior in the workplace, but little is known about the role of specific dimensions of narcissism or the mechanism behind these effects. The current study assessed academic dishonesty among college students. One hundred and ninety-nine participants either self-reported or reported others’ cheating behavior and completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI; Raskin & Terry, 1988).

Amy B. Brunell; Sara Staats; Jamie Barden; Julie M. Hupp

2011-01-01

70

Narcissism as a moderator of the relationship between job characteristics and job reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A growing body of research has begun to examine the relationship between narcissism and human behavior in organizations. The research to date, however, has been anecdotal and impressionistic. The present research represents the first attempt to use a questionnaire methodology to examine systematically narcissism as an individual difference variable within an organizational context. Using an interactionist perspective, it is posited

Lynn S. Mullins; Richard E. Kopelman

1987-01-01

71

Intrapsychic Conflict Versus Developmental Deficit: A Causal Modeling Approach to Examining Psychoanalytic Theories of Narcissism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past 15 years, disorders of the self have occupied the attention of the psychoanalytic community. In particular, Otto Kernberg and Heinz Kohut have written extensively about narcissism, but from distinctly different theoretical vantage points. Each theorist has attracted adherents, but the debate between the conflict and deficit models of narcissism has been largely polemical, serving to further polarize

Marc B. Glassman

1988-01-01

72

Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM). METHODS: This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning

Marit F Svindseth; Jim Aage Nøttestad; Juliska Wallin; John Olav Roaldset; Alv A Dahl

2008-01-01

73

Examining Associations between Narcissism, Behavior Problems, and Anxiety in Non-Referred Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined associations between narcissism (total, adaptive, and maladaptive), self-esteem, and externalizing and internalizing problems in 157 non-referred adolescents (aged 14 to 18). Consistent with previous research, narcissism was positively associated with self-reported delinquency, overt aggression, and relational…

Lau, Katherine S. L.; Marsee, Monica A.; Kunimatsu, Melissa M.; Fassnacht, Gregory M.

2011-01-01

74

Ringleader bullying: association with psychopathic narcissism and theory of mind among child psychiatric inpatients.  

PubMed

This study examined the association of ringleader bullying with psychopathic traits and theory of mind among 100 youth aged 10-15 (62 boys and 38 girls) receiving inpatient psychiatric services at a state facility. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated a positive association between ringleader bullying and psychopathic narcissism, and a significant interaction effect between narcissism and theory of mind. More specifically, narcissism moderated the relationship between theory of mind and ringleader bullying such that theory of mind was positively associated with ringleader bullying when levels of narcissism were high, and theory of mind was negatively associated ringleader bullying when levels of narcissism were low. The discussion of these results focuses on the importance of developing effective treatment techniques for youth whose bullying behavior is associated with narcissistic features and social acuity. PMID:23271677

Stellwagen, Kurt K; Kerig, Patricia K

2013-10-01

75

Collective narcissism moderates the effect of in-group image threat on intergroup hostility.  

PubMed

Results of 4 experiments demonstrated that under in-group image threat collective narcissism predicts retaliatory intergroup hostility. Under in-group criticism (vs. praise) collective narcissists expressed intention to harm the offending out-group but not other, nonoffending out-groups. This effect was specific to collective narcissism and was replicated in studies that accounted for the overlap between collective narcissism and individual narcissism, in-group positivity (in-group identification, blind and constructive patriotism), social dominance orientation, and right wing authoritarianism. The link between collective narcissism and retaliatory intergroup hostility under in-group image threat was found in the context of national identity and international relations and in the context of a social identity defined by university affiliation. Study 4 demonstrated that the relationship between collective narcissism and intergroup hostility was mediated by the perception of in-group criticism as personally threatening. The results advance our understanding of the mechanism driving the link between collective narcissism and intergroup hostility. They indicate that threatened egotism theory can be extended into the intergroup domain. PMID:23586408

Golec de Zavala, Agnieszka; Cichocka, Aleksandra; Iskra-Golec, Irena

2013-06-01

76

Narcissism as a predictor of motivations behind Facebook profile picture selection.  

PubMed

The rising popularity of social networking sites raises the question of whether and how personality differences are manifested on them. The present study explores this topic through an analysis of the relationship between narcissism and motivations behind Facebook profile picture selection. A survey that assesses motivations emphasizing physical attractiveness, personality, and social ties was conducted with 288 undergraduate students. The study found narcissism to be a significant predictor of the motivation for selecting profile pictures that emphasize attractiveness and personality for both men and women. The findings are discussed in terms of the dynamic self-regulatory processing model of narcissism. PMID:23249240

Kapidzic, Sanja

2013-01-01

77

Revolting doubles: radical narcissism and the trope of lesbian doppelgangers.  

PubMed

This article is concerned with a repositioning of popular culture images and narratives that are, and have been, highly unpopular among queer audiences. This involves a re-engagement with the visual representation of lesbian lovers as doubles, ubiquitous in popular culture. It argues that by positioning the trope of the lesbian doppelgangers as it appears in popular culture on a continuum of visual representations of sameness and likeness that also includes feminist and queer art its qualities of radical or "absolute" narcissism are brought to the fore to be enjoyed as a subversive statement of highly self-referencing, auto-erotic, and self-sufficient economy of desire. In a reading of Black Swan (2010), a film that has attracted notable negative responses from feminist critics, it discusses how radical narcissism disturbs the heteronormative matrix through a refusal of its underpinning organization of desire and identification as exclusionary. It closes by engaging with contemporary artworks drawing on the doppelganger motif. PMID:23855946

Jenzen, Olu

2013-01-01

78

It Is Developmental Me, Not Generation Me: Developmental Changes Are More Important Than Generational Changes in Narcissism-Commentary on.  

PubMed

In this article, we make two points about the ongoing debate concerning the purported increase in narcissistic tendencies in college students over the last 30 years. First, we show that when new data on narcissism are folded into preexisting meta-analytic data, there is no increase in narcissism in college students over the last few decades. Second, we show, in contrast, that age changes in narcissism are both replicable and comparatively large in comparison to generational changes in narcissism. This leads to the conclusion that every generation is Generation Me, as every generation of younger people are more narcissistic than their elders. PMID:21243122

Roberts, Brent W; Edmonds, Grant; Grijalva, Emily

2010-01-01

79

Pathological narcissism and interpersonal behavior in daily life.  

PubMed

The cognitive-affective processing system (CAPS) has been proposed as a useful metaframework for integrating contextual differences in situations with individual differences in personality pathology. In this article, we evaluated the potential of combining the CAPS metaframework and contemporary interpersonal theory to investigate how individual differences in pathological narcissism influenced interpersonal functioning in daily life. University students (N = 184) completed event-contingent reports about interpersonal interactions across a 7-day diary study. Using multilevel regression models, we found that combinations of narcissistic expression (grandiosity, vulnerability) were associated with different interpersonal behavior patterns reflective of interpersonal dysfunction. These results are among the first to empirically demonstrate the usefulness of the CAPS model to conceptualize personality pathology through the patterning of if-then interpersonal processes. PMID:23205698

Roche, Michael J; Pincus, Aaron L; Conroy, David E; Hyde, Amanda L; Ram, Nilam

2013-10-01

80

The Associations of Self-Reported and Peer-Reported Relational Aggression with Narcissism and Self-Esteem among Adolescents in a Residential Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigated the relations of self-reported and peer-nominated relational aggression (RA) with self-esteem and narcissism among 43 at-risk 16- to 18-year-olds. Self-reported and peer-nominated RA were positively intercorrelated, and each was positively correlated with narcissism. An interaction between self-esteem and narcissism

Golmaryami, Farrah N.; Barry, Christopher T.

2010-01-01

81

Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology  

PubMed Central

Background The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM). Methods This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). The patients filled in the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-21 item version (NPI-21), The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. High and low narcissism was defined by the median of the total NPI-21 score. An age- and gender-matched control sample from the general population also scored the NPI-21 (NORM). Results Being male, involuntary admitted, having diagnosis of schizophrenia, higher self-esteem, and severe violence were significantly associated with high narcissism, and so were also low levels of suicidality, depression, anxiety and GAF scores. Severe violence and high self-esteem were significantly associated with high narcissism in multivariable analyses. The NPI-21 and its subscales showed test-retest correlations ?0.83, while the BPRS and the HADS showed lower correlations, confirming the trait character of the NPI-21. Depression and suicidality were negatively associated with the NPI-21 total score and all its subscales, while positive association was observed with grandiosity. No significant differences were observed between patients and NORM on the NPI-21 total score or any of the NPI subscales. Conclusion Narcissism in the psychiatric patients was significantly associated with violence, suicidality and other symptoms relevant for management and treatment planning. Due to its trait character, use of the NPI-21 in acute psychiatric patients can give important clinical information. The similar level of narcissism found in patients and NORM is in need of further examination.

Svindseth, Marit F; N?ttestad, Jim Aage; Wallin, Juliska; Roaldset, John Olav; Dahl, Alv A

2008-01-01

82

Agentic and Communal Goals in Early Adulthood: Associations with Narcissism, Empathy, and Perceptions of Self and Others  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined social goals of interpersonal agency (status, power) and communion (affiliation, closeness) in association with narcissism, empathy, and generalized perceptions of self and others in two studies of undergraduates. In Study 1 (N = 504) as well as Study 2 (N = 225), narcissism was positively and empathy negatively associated with agentic goals, whereas self-esteem, empathy, and generalized perception of others were

Danielle Findley; Tiina Ojanen

2012-01-01

83

Pathological Forms of Narcissism and Perceived Stress During the Transition to the University: The Mediating Role of Humor Styles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The way individuals use humor is likely to be influenced by how they feel about themselves. The goal of the present studies was to examine the association between the pathological forms of narcissism (grandiose and vulnerable narcissism) and humor styles in Jewish Israeli undergraduate samples as they made the adjustment to being university students. Study 1 (N = 187) found

Avi Besser; Virgil Zeigler-Hill

2011-01-01

84

A behavioral genetic study of intrapersonal and interpersonal dimensions of narcissism.  

PubMed

Narcissism, characterized by grandiose self-image and entitled feelings to others, has been increasingly prevalent in the past decades. This study examined genetic and environmental bases of two dimensions of narcissism: intrapersonal grandiosity and interpersonal entitlement. A total of 304 pairs of twins from Beijing, China completed the Narcissistic Grandiosity Scale and the Psychological Entitlement Scale. Both grandiosity (23%) and entitlement (35%) were found to be moderately heritable, while simultaneously showing considerable non-shared environmental influences. Moreover, the genetic and environmental influences on the two dimensions were mostly unique (92-93%), with few genetic and environmental effects in common (7-8%). The two dimensions of narcissism, intrapersonal grandiosity and interpersonal entitlement, are heritable and largely independent of each other in terms of their genetic and environmental sources. These findings extend our understanding of the heritability of narcissism on the one hand. On the other hand, the study demonstrates the rationale for distinguishing between intrapersonal and interpersonal dimensions of narcissism, and possibly personality in general as well. PMID:24695616

Luo, Yu L L; Cai, Huajian; Song, Hairong

2014-01-01

85

Narcissistic admiration and rivalry: disentangling the bright and dark sides of narcissism.  

PubMed

We present a process model that distinguishes 2 dimensions of narcissism: admiration and rivalry. We propose that narcissists' overarching goal of maintaining a grandiose self is pursued by 2 separate pathways, characterized by distinct cognitive, affective-motivational, and behavioral processes. In a set of 7 studies, we validated this 2-dimensional model using the newly developed Narcissistic Admiration and Rivalry Questionnaire (NARQ). We showed that narcissistic admiration and rivalry are positively correlated dimensions, yet they have markedly different nomological networks and distinct intra- and interpersonal consequences. The NARQ showed the hypothesized 2-dimensional multifaceted structure as well as very good internal consistencies (Study 1, N = 953), stabilities (Study 2, N = 93), and self-other agreements (Study 3, N = 96). Narcissistic admiration and rivalry showed unique relations to the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI), the Big Five, self-esteem, pathological narcissism, and other narcissism-related traits like Machiavellianism, psychopathy, self-enhancement, and impulsivity (Study 4, Ns = 510-1,814). Despite the positive relation between admiration and rivalry, the 2 differentially predicted general interpersonal orientations and reactions to transgressions in friendships and romantic relationships (Study 5, N = 1,085), interpersonal perceptions during group interactions (Study 6, N = 202), and observed behaviors in experimental observations (Study 7, N = 96). For all studies, the NARQ outperformed the standard measure of narcissism, the NPI, in predicting outcome measures. Results underscore the utility of a 2-dimensional conceptualization and measurement of narcissism. PMID:24128186

Back, Mitja D; Küfner, Albrecht C P; Dufner, Michael; Gerlach, Tanja M; Rauthmann, John F; Denissen, Jaap J A

2013-12-01

86

A Behavioral Genetic Study of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Dimensions of Narcissism  

PubMed Central

Narcissism, characterized by grandiose self-image and entitled feelings to others, has been increasingly prevalent in the past decades. This study examined genetic and environmental bases of two dimensions of narcissism: intrapersonal grandiosity and interpersonal entitlement. A total of 304 pairs of twins from Beijing, China completed the Narcissistic Grandiosity Scale and the Psychological Entitlement Scale. Both grandiosity (23%) and entitlement (35%) were found to be moderately heritable, while simultaneously showing considerable non-shared environmental influences. Moreover, the genetic and environmental influences on the two dimensions were mostly unique (92–93%), with few genetic and environmental effects in common (7–8%). The two dimensions of narcissism, intrapersonal grandiosity and interpersonal entitlement, are heritable and largely independent of each other in terms of their genetic and environmental sources. These findings extend our understanding of the heritability of narcissism on the one hand. On the other hand, the study demonstrates the rationale for distinguishing between intrapersonal and interpersonal dimensions of narcissism, and possibly personality in general as well.

Luo, Yu L. L.; Cai, Huajian; Song, Hairong

2014-01-01

87

Evidence for the criterion validity and clinical utility of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory  

PubMed Central

In this study we evaluated aspects of criterion validity and clinical utility of the grandiosity and vulnerability components of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI) using two undergraduate samples (Ns = 299, 500). Criterion validity was assessed by evaluating the correlations of narcissistic grandiosity and narcissistic vulnerability with established indices of normal personality traits, psychopathology and clinical concerns, and pathological personality traits. Overall, the pattern of correlations supported the convergent and discriminate validity of grandiose and vulnerable conceptualizations of pathological narcissism as measured by the PNI. Clinical utility was assessed by evaluating the extent to which clinicians without specific training in pathological narcissism as well as clinicians with expertise in pathological narcissism could accurately predict the correlates of PNI grandiosity and vulnerability with normal and pathological personality traits and psychopathology. The rcontrast-cv coefficient (Westen & Rosenthal, 2003) provided a global index of accuracy in clinicians’ predictions that was more fully elaborated by examining systematic discrepancies across groups. Overall, novice and expert clinicians were generally able to predict criterion correlations, with some exceptions (e.g., counter to predictions, pathological narcissism was negatively associated with treatment resistance). These results provide further evidence regarding the validity and utility of the narcissistic grandiosity and narcissistic vulnerability constructs as measured by the PNI.

Thomas, Katherine M.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Lukowitsky, Mark R.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Hopwood, Christopher J.

2012-01-01

88

The double-edged sword of grandiose narcissism: implications for successful and unsuccessful leadership among U.S. Presidents.  

PubMed

Recent research and theorizing suggest that narcissism may predict both positive and negative leadership behaviors. We tested this hypothesis with data on the 42 U.S. presidents up to and including George W. Bush, using (a) expert-derived narcissism estimates, (b) independent historical surveys of presidential performance, and (c) largely or entirely objective indicators of presidential performance. Grandiose, but not vulnerable, narcissism was associated with superior overall greatness in an aggregate poll; it was also positively associated with public persuasiveness, crisis management, agenda setting, and allied behaviors, and with several objective indicators of performance, such as winning the popular vote and initiating legislation. Nevertheless, grandiose narcissism was also associated with several negative outcomes, including congressional impeachment resolutions and unethical behaviors. We found that presidents exhibit elevated levels of grandiose narcissism compared with the general population, and that presidents' grandiose narcissism has been rising over time. Our findings suggest that grandiose narcissism may be a double-edged sword in the leadership domain. PMID:24104503

Watts, Ashley L; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Smith, Sarah Francis; Miller, Joshua D; Campbell, W Keith; Waldman, Irwin D; Rubenzer, Steven J; Faschingbauer, Thomas J

2013-12-01

89

Parent-Infant Psychotherapy, the Transition to Parenthood and Parental Narcissism: Implications for Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article the author discusses some of the indications for short- or long-term parent-infant psychotherapeutic interventions in terms of what he defines as "problems of parenthood" and "problems of parental narcissism". Brief parent-infant psychotherapeutic interventions are most frequently indicated in the case of the former: more neurotic…

Espasa, Francisco Palacio

2004-01-01

90

An Empirical Typology of Narcissism and Mental Health in Late Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A two-step cluster analytic strategy was used in two studies to identify an empirically derived typology of narcissism in late adolescence. In Study 1, late adolescents (N=204) responded to the profile of narcissistic dispositions and measures of grandiosity (''superiority'') and idealization (''goal instability'') inspired by Kohut's theory,…

Lapsley, Daniel K.; Aalsma, Matthew C.

2006-01-01

91

Trumping Shame by Blasts of Noise: Narcissism, Self-Esteem, Shame, and Aggression in Young Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This experiment tested how self-views influence shame-induced aggression. One hundred and sixty-three young adolescents (M = 12.2 years) completed measures of narcissism and self-esteem. They lost to an ostensible opponent on a competitive task. In the shame condition, they were told that their opponent was bad, and they saw their own name at the…

Thomaes, Sander; Bushman, Brad J.; Stegge, Hedy; Olthof, Tjeert

2008-01-01

92

Androgyny as synthetic narcissism: Sex role measures and Kohut's psychology of the self  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Kohut's analysis of narcissism, the self emerges as a bipolar structure characterized by grandiosity at one pole and dependency at the other. Through appropriate developmental processes, grandiosity grows into a mature ambitiousness, and early dependencies are converted into a stable system of ideals. The present investigation predicted that sex role constructs essentially measure these two aspects of the self.

P. J. Watson; Michael D. Biderman; Carolyn Boyd

1989-01-01

93

An empirical typology of narcissism and mental health in late adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

A two-step cluster analytic strategy was used in two studies to identify an empirically derived typology of narcissism in late adolescence. In Study 1, late adolescents (N ¼ 204) responded to the profile of narcissistic dispositions and measures of grandiosity (''superiority'') and idealization (''goal instability'') inspired by Kohut's theory, along with several College Adjustment Scales and a measure of pathology

Daniel K. Lapsley; Matthew C. Aalsma

2005-01-01

94

A test of the construct validity of the Five-Factor Narcissism Inventory.  

PubMed

The Five-Factor Narcissism Inventory (FFNI) is a new self-report measure that was developed to assess traits associated with grandiose and vulnerable narcissism from a Five-factor model (FFM) perspective. In a sample of undergraduates (N = 283), the relations among the FFNI scales, grandiose and vulnerable dimensions, and an array of relevant criteria were examined including self- and informant reports of the Big Five domains, measures of the Dark Triad, ratings of the interpersonal circumplex, externalizing and internalizing behaviors and symptoms, and romantic and attachment styles. The FFNI grandiose and vulnerable dimensions demonstrated good convergent and criterion validity. The FFNI grandiose and vulnerable dimensions manifested converging (e.g., disagreeableness, low love/communion, psychopathy, Machiavellianism, Ludus/Manic love styles) and diverging (e.g., neuroticism, extraversion, dominance, externalizing, internalizing, attachment anxiety) relations in a manner largely consistent with predictions. The FFNI joins the Pathological Narcissism Inventory as a measure that can simultaneously assess both grandiose and vulnerable dimensions of narcissism. PMID:23186210

Miller, Joshua D; Gentile, Brittany; Campbell, W Keith

2013-01-01

95

It Is Developmental Me, Not Generation Me: Developmental Changes Are More Important Than Generational Changes in Narcissism--Commentary on Trzesniewski & Donnellan (2010)  

PubMed Central

In this article, we make two points about the ongoing debate concerning the purported increase in narcissistic tendencies in college students over the last 30 years. First, we show that when new data on narcissism are folded into preexisting meta-analytic data, there is no increase in narcissism in college students over the last few decades. Second, we show, in contrast, that age changes in narcissism are both replicable and comparatively large in comparison to generational changes in narcissism. This leads to the conclusion that every generation is Generation Me, as every generation of younger people are more narcissistic than their elders.

Roberts, Brent W.; Edmonds, Grant; Grijalva, Emily

2011-01-01

96

Self-Serving Bias or Simply Serving the Self? Evidence for a Dimensional Approach to Narcissism.  

PubMed

Previous research has suggested that narcissism can be conceptualized as a multidimensional construct consisting of the related, but unique, dimensions of grandiosity and entitlement. The current studies examined the divergent associations of grandiosity and entitlement with respect to different types of self-serving strategies. In Study 1, we found that narcissistic grandiosity, but not entitlement, was positively associated with a self-enhancing strategy of unrealistic optimism. This association was not mediated by self-esteem. In Study 2, narcissistic entitlement, but not grandiosity, was predictive of unethical decision-making, an interpersonal self-promotional strategy that advances the self at the expense of others. Together, both studies support a model of narcissism consisting of a relatively intrapersonal dimension of grandiosity and a relatively interpersonal dimension of entitlement. PMID:22773880

Tamborski, Michael; Brown, Ryan P; Chowning, Karolyn

2012-06-01

97

Self-Serving Bias or Simply Serving the Self? Evidence for a Dimensional Approach to Narcissism  

PubMed Central

Previous research has suggested that narcissism can be conceptualized as a multidimensional construct consisting of the related, but unique, dimensions of grandiosity and entitlement. The current studies examined the divergent associations of grandiosity and entitlement with respect to different types of self-serving strategies. In Study 1, we found that narcissistic grandiosity, but not entitlement, was positively associated with a self-enhancing strategy of unrealistic optimism. This association was not mediated by self-esteem. In Study 2, narcissistic entitlement, but not grandiosity, was predictive of unethical decision-making, an interpersonal self-promotional strategy that advances the self at the expense of others. Together, both studies support a model of narcissism consisting of a relatively intrapersonal dimension of grandiosity and a relatively interpersonal dimension of entitlement.

Tamborski, Michael; Brown, Ryan P.; Chowning, Karolyn

2012-01-01

98

Narcissism, self-evaluations, and partner preferences among men who have sex with men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Larger or more prominent male body attributes—increased muscularity, penis size, height, etc.—may be associated with differences in narcissism in men who have sex with men (MSM). This may be due, in part, to physical appearance, which tends to be disproportionately revered by MSM. An Internet survey (N=649) was employed to test this and other hypotheses. Our results indicated that MSM

David Andrew Moskowitz; Gerulf Rieger; David Wyatt Seal

2009-01-01

99

Empathy and narcissism in a sample of child abuse perpetrators and a comparison sample of foster parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this research was to study the personality variables of empathy and narcissism in a sample of child abuse perpetrators and a comparison sample of foster parents, conceptualized as nonabusive parents, in order to gain further understanding of perpetrators and to provide clues for intervention.Method: The sample consisted of two groups: physically and emotionally abusive parents (n=52)

Vernon R Wiehe

2003-01-01

100

Self-Functioning and Perceived Parenting: Relations of Parental Empathy and Love Inconsistency with Narcissism, Depression, and Self-Esteem  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Heinz Kohut's (1977, 1984) theory of the psychology of the self, good parenting provides a child with optimal frustration and just the right amount of loving empathic concern. In the present study, the authors examined the relations of perceived parental empathy and love inconsistency with measures of narcissism, self-esteem, and depression. In…

Trumpeter, Nevelyn N.; Watson, P. J.; O'Leary, Brian J.; Weathington, Bart L.

2008-01-01

101

Seeing my world in a million little pieces: narcissism, self-construal, and cognitive-perceptual style.  

PubMed

In 4 studies we examine the association between narcissism, self-construal, and cognitive-perceptual style, hypothesizing that high self-focus in combination with low other-focus (i.e., social atomization) is related to an analytic cognitive-perceptual style. Participants completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, the Self-Construal Scale, and measures of cognitive-perceptual style such as the Analysis-Holism Scale, the Embedded Figures Test, a visual illusion test, and a measure of the representativeness heuristic. We found evidence for a decontextualized cognitive-perceptual style in socially atomized participants, which included those high in narcissism and also those who had a combination of high independent and low interdependent self-construal. A meta-analytic integration of our findings found that narcissism was positively related to independent and negatively related to interdependent self-construal, and mediation analyses found some evidence that the relationship between self-construal and cognitive-perceptual style is partially mediated by narcissism. PMID:19558438

Konrath, Sara; Bushman, Brad J; Grove, Tyler

2009-08-01

102

Exploring the automatic undercurrents of sexual narcissism: individual differences in the sex-aggression link.  

PubMed

Sexual narcissism (SN) has recently been proposed to be a specific risk factor for the perpetration of sexual coercion based on both self-reports of previous behavior and self-estimated likelihood of engaging in acts of sexual violence. To explore one of the potential underlying mechanisms of SN, we tested whether for highly sexually narcissistic males (measured with the German language version of the Sexual Narcissism Scale) the subtle priming of sexual concepts would evoke aggressive behavior in a standard measure of aggressive behavior, the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. Results showed that only for sexually narcissistic men did a subtle priming with mildly erotic words lead to an increase in shock volumes administered to the alleged competitor on this task. For women, it was postulated that physical force would not be represented as a functional behavioral script for sexually narcissistic females and, in line with this hypothesis, no effects were found for women. The results were discussed with regard to the underlying processes of SN and the importance of an individual difference perspective in sex-aggression links. PMID:23430086

Imhoff, Roland; Bergmann, Xenia; Banse, Rainer; Schmidt, Alexander F

2013-08-01

103

Factor structure and psychometric properties of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory among Chinese university students.  

PubMed

The Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI) is a multidimensional measure of narcissistic pathology. This study examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of the PNI in a sample of Chinese university students in Hong Kong. Eight hundred and thirty-one students completed an online battery of questionnaires assessing narcissistic pathology, self-esteem, unstable sense of self, and maladaptive self-defense strategies. Results replicated the 7 first-order factors and the 2 second-order factors of the PNI. Each of the 7 first-order factors and the 2 second-order factors had good internal consistency. Preliminary findings also supported the concurrent validity of the PNI. The PNI appeared to be a valid measure of narcissistic pathology among Chinese. Findings of this study suggest that the core pathology of pathological narcissism might involve an inflated sense of self-importance that is not substantiated by actual achievement, and bearing this unsubstantiated sense of self-importance renders narcissists highly susceptible to self-deflation when their narcissistic needs are not met. PMID:22966841

You, Jianing; Leung, Freedom; Lai, Katty Kit Yee; Fu, Kei

2013-01-01

104

Are narcissists hardy or vulnerable? The role of narcissism in the production of stress-related biomarkers in response to emotional distress.  

PubMed

Does narcissism provide a source of hardiness or vulnerability in the face of adversity? The present research addressed this question by testing whether narcissism is associated with increased physiological reactivity to emotional distress, among women. Drawing on the "fragile-ego" account, we predicted that narcissists would show a heightened physiological stress profile in response to everyday frustrations. Results supported this prediction; across a 3-day period, highly narcissistic individuals showed elevated output of 2 biomarkers of stress--cortisol and alpha--amylase-to the extent that they experienced negative emotions. In contrast, among those low in narcissism there was no association between these biomarkers and emotions. These findings suggest that narcissists' stress-response systems are particularly sensitive to everyday negative emotions, consistent with the notion that narcissism comes with physiological costs. PMID:24219398

Cheng, Joey T; Tracy, Jessica L; Miller, Gregory E

2013-12-01

105

Male Narcissism and Attitudes Toward Heterosexual Women and Men, Lesbian Women, and Gay Men: Hostility toward Heterosexual Women Most of All  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated links between heterosexual men’s narcissism and attitudes toward heterosexual and non-heterosexual\\u000a women and men. Male narcissism was predicted to be associated with hostility toward heterosexual women more than toward other\\u000a groups, indicating investment in patriarchal power more than in conservative gender ideology or nonspecific disdain toward\\u000a all people. Hierarchical regression analyses of responses from 104 male

Scott W. Keiller

2010-01-01

106

Why are narcissists so charming at first sight? Decoding the narcissism-popularity link at zero acquaintance.  

PubMed

On the basis of a realistic behavioral approach, the authors showed that narcissists are popular at zero acquaintance and aimed to explain why this is the case. In Study 1, a group of psychology freshmen (N = 73) judged each other on the basis of brief self-introductions using a large round-robin design (2,628 dyads). Three main findings were revealed: First, narcissism leads to popularity at first sight. Second, the aspects of narcissism that are most maladaptive in the long run (exploitativeness/entitlement) proved to be most attractive at zero acquaintance. Third, an examination of observable verbal and nonverbal behaviors as well as aspects of physical appearance provided an explanation for why narcissists are more popular at first sight. Results were confirmed using judgments of uninvolved perceivers under 3 different conditions for which the amount of available information was varied systematically: (a) full information (video and sound, Study 2), (b) nonverbal information only (video only, Study 3), or (c) physical information only (still photograph of clothing, Study 4). These findings have important implications for understanding the inter- and intrapersonal dynamics of narcissism. PMID:20053038

Back, Mitja D; Schmukle, Stefan C; Egloff, Boris

2010-01-01

107

Initial Reliability of the Diagnostic Interview for Narcissism Adapted for Preadolescents: Parent Version (P-DIN)  

PubMed Central

Introduction the Diagnostic Interview for Narcissism, an instrument developed by Gunderson and associates to assess pathological narcissistic traits in adults, has been adapted for use with parents of preadolescents as a semi-structured interview. A sixth section has been added to assess the parental narcissistic investment of the child. Methods the sample consists of 21 parents of children (aged 8–13 years) at risk for narcissistic personality disorder. An interviewer-observer design, with independent interview evaluation, was used to assess inter-rater reliabilities. Both raters were blind to diagnostic information. Results Very good inter-rater reliabilities (ranging from .85 to 1.00) were obtained for all 35 statements of this Parent version of the DIN (P-DIN). Good internal consistencies a=0.82, a=0.88, a=0.69, respectively) were obtained for the first three Sections of the P-DIN, which include all the DSM-IV criteria for Narcissistic Personality Disorder. Section V, Social/Moral Adaptation (a=0.54), and Section VI, Parental Narcissistic Investment of the Child (a=0.62), had weaker internal consistencies. Section IV, Mood States, had the lowest internal consistency (a=0.50). Finally, a high reliability coefficient was obtained for the total scale (a=0.92, 32 statements for Sections I to V). Conclusion present results of this pilot study justify further research into the P-DIN psychometric properties.

Guile, Jean-Marc; Sayegh, Liliane; Bergeron, Line; Fortier, Helene; Goldberg, Deborah; Gunderson, John

2004-01-01

108

Issues of Narcissism and Omnipotence treated by the use of physical limits with a symbolic meaning in Pesso Boyden System Psychomotor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the central roles of issues of narcissism, omnipotence and limits in early sequences of human development, as well as how these issues are dealt with in the psychotherapeutic process developed by Al Pesso and Diane Boyden-Pesso (Pesso Boyden System Psychomotor, PBSP). The article describes practical steps for strengthening the client's ability to contain omnipotent forces and wishes,

Lowijs Perquin; Certified Trainer; Pesso Boyden

109

A test of two brief measures of grandiose narcissism: the narcissistic personality inventory-13 and the narcissistic personality inventory-16.  

PubMed

The most widely used measure of trait narcissism is the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI), which can provide both total and subscale scores. However, with a length of 40 items, this measure may not be ideal in settings in which time or participant attention may limit the types of measures that can be administered. In response, Ames, Rose, and Anderson (2006) created the NPI-16, which provides a shorter, unidimensional measure of the construct. In the present research, we examine the reliability and validity of the NPI-16 in conjunction with a new short measure of narcissism, the NPI-13, which provides both a total score and 3 subscale scores (Leadership/Authority; Grandiose Exhibitionism; Entitlement/Exploitativeness). Across 2 studies, we demonstrate that both short measures manifest good convergent and discriminant validity and adequate overall reliability. The NPI-13 may be favored over the NPI-16 because it allows for the extraction of 3 subscales, consistent with the use of its parent measure. PMID:23815119

Gentile, Brittany; Miller, Joshua D; Hoffman, Brian J; Reidy, Dennis E; Zeichner, Amos; Campbell, W Keith

2013-12-01

110

Discrepancies between implicit and explicit self-concepts of intelligence: relations to modesty, narcissism, and achievement motivation.  

PubMed

Previous research has shown that different configurations of the implicit self-concept of intelligence (iSCI) and the explicit self-concept of intelligence (eSCI) are consistently related to individuals' performance on different intelligence tests (Dislich etal., 2012). The results indicated that any discrepant configuration between the iSCI and the eSCI impairs performance. In the present study, how correspondence between the iSCI and the eSCI is related to intelligence test performance as well as personality traits of modesty (low eSCI, high iSCI), narcissism (high eSCI, low iSCI), and achievement motivation was investigated. Furthermore, a moderated mediation analysis showed that the relation between the iSCI-eSCI configurations and intelligence test performance was mediated by achievement motivation for modest individuals. PMID:24575063

Gerstenberg, Friederike X R; Imhoff, Roland; Banse, Rainer; Schmitt, Manfred

2014-01-01

111

Discrepancies between implicit and explicit self-concepts of intelligence: relations to modesty, narcissism, and achievement motivation  

PubMed Central

Previous research has shown that different configurations of the implicit self-concept of intelligence (iSCI) and the explicit self-concept of intelligence (eSCI) are consistently related to individuals’ performance on different intelligence tests (Dislich etal., 2012). The results indicated that any discrepant configuration between the iSCI and the eSCI impairs performance. In the present study, how correspondence between the iSCI and the eSCI is related to intelligence test performance as well as personality traits of modesty (low eSCI, high iSCI), narcissism (high eSCI, low iSCI), and achievement motivation was investigated. Furthermore, a moderated mediation analysis showed that the relation between the iSCI–eSCI configurations and intelligence test performance was mediated by achievement motivation for modest individuals.

Gerstenberg, Friederike X. R.; Imhoff, Roland; Banse, Rainer; Schmitt, Manfred

2014-01-01

112

Threatened egotism, narcissism, self-esteem, and direct and displaced aggression: does self-love or self-hate lead to violence?  

PubMed

It has been widely asserted that low self-esteem causes violence, but laboratory evidence is lacking, and some contrary observations have characterized aggressors as having favorable self-opinions. In 2 studies, both simple self-esteem and narcissism were measured, and then individual participants were given an opportunity to aggress against someone who had insulted them or praised them or against an innocent third person. Self-esteem proved irrelevant to aggression. The combination of narcissism and insult led to exceptionally high levels of aggression toward the source of the insult. Neither form of self-regard affected displaced aggression, which was low in general. These findings contradict the popular view that low self-esteem causes aggression and point instead toward threatened egotism as an important cause. PMID:9686460

Bushman, B J; Baumeister, R F

1998-07-01

113

The King of Norway: negative individuation, the hero myth and psychopathic narcissism in extreme violence and the life of Anders Behring Breivik.  

PubMed

The paper discusses negative individuation and the hero myth as developmental concepts. It is suggested that in negative individuation healthy psychological development is hindered and goes astray. Aggression then becomes the central psychic system. Repressed anger is the core element in psychopathic narcissism (Diamond) and malignant narcissism (Kernberg). Both Diamond and Kernberg extend narcissistic personality structure to antisocial, psychopathic personality in an effort to better understand extreme violence. According to Freud, love (libido) and hate (the death drive) are the major motivational systems in the human psyche. In contrast to Freud, Jung sees libido as a life force in general, not simply as a sexual drive. Jung writes about evil and the shadow but does not present a comprehensive theory of the negative development of an individual's life. The concept of negative individuation connects the shadow and the death drive with psychopathology, psychiatry and psychotherapy. In this paper, I explore these concepts in the light of contemporary affect theory according to Kernberg. I also ask how ideology is tied to extreme violence and how it is possible that narcissistic personality structures can lead to such radically different outcomes as were manifested in the lives of Anders Behring Breivik and Steve Jobs. PMID:24237209

Virtanen, Harri

2013-11-01

114

[Masuda's Central Serous Chorioretinopathy (C.S.C.R.) and its somatic investment in Narcissism: our observations on new psychiatric nosography].  

PubMed

Case report. Co-morbidity between central serous chorioretinopathy (C.R.S.C.) and narcissistic personality disorder. A reflection on the importance of an integrated approach to this ophthalmological disease through the description of its psychosomatic aspects and the evaluation of the nosographic definition in psychiatry. The central serous chorioretinopathy (C.R.S.C.) is a transudative disease affecting the posterior pole of the eye, that rapidly compromises the visual acuity, although it is a self-limited disease. Narcissism is a personality disorder characterised by an extreme gratification of self, without actually taking care of other people. In the current work both the diseases, along with the respective psychosomatic consequences the patient received, are examined. PMID:24589947

Carlesimo, S C; Piazzi, G; Leone, C; Di Santo, L; Coccanari dè Fornari, M A

2014-01-01

115

Narcissism, Sadism, and Loneliness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jeffrey Dahmer, the notorious Milwaukee, Wisconsin, serial killer, was charged with 15 counts of first-degree intentional\\u000a homicide. The homicides took place between 1987 and 1990 and were discovered during the summer of 1991. Dahmer pleaded not\\u000a guilty by reason of mental disease or defect. The author was the court-appointed forensic psychiatric expert in the case.\\u000a This chapter reports historical and

George B. Palermo

116

Narcissism and Toxic Leaders.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Why would a leader in the Army or in any organization choose to micro-manage subordinates; show a lack of respect for them; choose not to listen to or value their input; or be rude, mean-spirited, and threatening. Most leaders would not. Most people do no...

J. Doty J. Fenlason

2013-01-01

117

Narcissism and the personal myth.  

PubMed

Kris (1956) described the concept of the personal myth as an autobiographical story built around a family romance fantasy seen specifically in obsessive characters and serving a defensive function. In this paper the concept of the personal myth was expanded to include similar defensive constellations originating from within the grandiose self, built around omnipotent and omniscient fantasies and occurring in character formations with pregenital, narcissistic pathology. The case of a known author and poet, Nikos Kazantzakis, was used to illustrate the thesis of the paper. The available biographical material and the work of the author offer evidence to support the claim that the author's personal myth was a protective shield against anxiety originating in early narcissistic traumata. PMID:3749397

Lester, E P

1986-07-01

118

Narcissism and Intimacy: Treating the Wounded Couple.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Couples whose early wounds cause narcissistic and borderline defenses may benefit from treatment with a psychodynamically oriented couples therapist. This article presents a treatment method that helps partners become attuned to each other's underlying injuries and vulnerabilities. The goal is to rebuild damaged structures of the self and to…

Solomon, Marion F.

1994-01-01

119

Narcissism, defence and the positive transference.  

PubMed

Questions concerning the positive transference and its therapeutic use have been raised by the psychology of the self. By drawing upon Freud, Abraham and Sharpe, an attempt is made to test whether classical structural, dynamic and developmental theories still provide an adequate theoretical framework for understanding the vicissitudes of the positive transference in patients with significant narcissistic psychopathology. I propose the concept of a narcissistic mechanism of defence which, relying upon the convertibility of object libido into narcissistic libido (and the reverse), utilizes the substitution of activities and inanimate objects for persons in order to compensate for narcissistic injuries and to carry out unconscious aggression motivated by the same injuries. The case of Mrs M reveals that narcissistic transference phenomena, while requiring specific therapeutic interpretation, nevertheless are intrinsically related developmentally to object libidinal conflicts. The patient's narcissistic injuries were found to be intrinsically related to stage specific traumata at the oral, anal and phallic stages. Thus while the narcissistic aspects of these traumata had to be treated therapeutically in their own right, they could not have been successfully treated without the concurrent or sequential treatment of the object libidinal conflicts connected with them. Finally, it is argued that the hypothesis of a narcissistic defence mechanism supported by the hypothesis of pre-oedipal narcissistic projective and introjective identifications with narcissistically divinized or demonized parents within the framework of classical theory can account for the clinical phenomena of narcissistic neuroses. PMID:7152806

Hanly, C

1982-01-01

120

The destruction of time in pathological narcissism.  

PubMed

This paper describes the characteristics of subjective time (in contrast to objective time), with particular reference to a specific form of pathological experience and relation to the passage of time in patients with narcissistic personality undergoing psychoanalytic treatment. The clinical manifestations and technical approach to this pathology of time experience are outlined in the context of illustrative clinical vignettes. PMID:18405285

Kernberg, Otto F

2008-04-01

121

Religiosity and Adolescent Narcissism: Implications for Values Counseling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The fact that religiosity has been consistently associated with positive mental health outcomes is a warrant for counselors to explore the resources of one's religious tradition for therapeutic change. Argues that pastoral counseling is particularly suited for addressing the ego development needs of adolescents, and that the vicissitudes of…

Aalsma, Matthew C.; Lapsley, Daniel K.

1999-01-01

122

When Daughter's Sexual Abuse Is an Injury to Mother's Narcissism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mother's reaction to the disclosure of sexual abuse is often dramatic and her particular type of response in turn affects the daughter's coping mechanisms to deal with the abuse and the disclosure. The type of symptoms developed are thus considered in part dependent on the mother's reaction. Mothers of children who have been sexually abused…

DePinho, Connie Maria

123

Rhetoric as Narcissism: A Hobbesian theory of Ideology  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, I will argue that Hobbes posits a theory of social and political conflict alternately dependent upon vitalistic and mechanistic theories of human motivation and action. In presenting his new “science� of politics, Hobbes attempts to lodge the human self within a natural world newly wed to physicalist theories of causality. And yet Leviathan undercuts wholly mechanistic paradigms

Winifred Amaturo

124

The usage of Facebook as it relates to narcissism, self-esteem and loneliness  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the rapid increase of adolescent participation in sites such as Facebook, and with the critical developmental task of identity formation during adolescence, there are vital questions for further investigation regarding the utilization of social networking sites, the development of feelings about the self and personality traits. The present study examined the relationship of older adolescents' use of Facebook to

Madeline Schwartz

2010-01-01

125

Optimism and Hope versus Anxiety and Narcissism: Some Thoughts on Children's Welfare Yesterday and Today  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article seeks to raise a number of issues concerning children's well-being in late modernity. In order to provide historical contrasts, the first part of the article considers three "optimistic" periods: the Liberal Reform Programme, 1906-1911; interwar developments in New Psychology, progressive education and child guidance; the post-1945…

Hendrick, Harry

2007-01-01

126

Narcissism, Entitlement, and Questionable Research Practices in Counseling: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although reports of research misconduct and questionable research practices (QRPs) have been prevalent in the literature, very little has been written about these issues in the field of counseling. The current pilot study addresses (a) the continuous drive for evidence-based practice in education and counseling and (b) the relationship between…

Davis, Mark S.; Wester, Kelly L.; King, Bridgett

2008-01-01

127

The Relative Influence of Sensation Seeking and Normal Narcissism on Academic Cheating in Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Numerous research studies reveal that cheating is a significant problem on the campuses of American colleges and universities. Traditional college-aged students (aged 18-25) fall within a time-frame of the life-span that has been labeled emerging adulthood, a time in which risk-taking behavior is common. The present study conceptualized academic…

Romanek, John L.

2009-01-01

128

Mysticism, motherhood, and pathological narcissism? A Kohutian analysis of Marie de l'Incarnation.  

PubMed

The following paper makes use of Kohutian self-psychology as a hermeneutic for interpreting Marie de l'Incarnation and her perplexing decision to abandon her young son Claude in favor of religious life. The author argues that filtered through the lens of Kohutian self-psychology, Marie de l'Incarnation emerges as a pathological narcissist and the decision to abandon Claude symptomatic of a narcissistic grandiosity. PMID:23297185

Dunn, Mary

2013-06-01

129

Ethics and Personality: Empathy and Narcissism as Moderators of Ethical Decision Making in Business Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many studies have reported that business students have been more apt to act in self-interested ways when compared to their counterparts in other academic fields. Beginning with the premise that ethical behavior derives in part from personality characteristics, the authors tested whether (a) measures of an empathetic or narcissistic personality…

Brown, Todd A.; Sautter, John A.; Littvay, Levente; Sautter, Alberta C.; Bearnes, Brennen

2010-01-01

130

Exploring Narcissism, Psychopathy, and Machiavellianism in Youth: Examination of Associations with Antisocial Behavior and Aggression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We sought to explore the differential associations of callous-unemotional (CU) traits, narcissistic traits, and Machiavellian traits with overt aggression, relational aggression, delinquency, behavioral dysregulation, and emotional dysregulation in a community sample of boys and girls (ages 11-17). Results indicated that the three personality…

Lau, Katherine S. L.; Marsee, Monica A.

2013-01-01

131

Narcissism guides mate selection: Humans mate assortatively, as revealed by facial resemblance, following an algorithm of \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theoretical studies suggest that mating and pair formation is not likely to be random. Computer simulations suggested that sex among genetically complex organisms requires mate choice strategies for its evolutionary maintenance, to reduce excessive genetic variance produced by out-crossing. One strategy achieving this aim efficiently in computer simulations is assortative mating modeled as \\

Liliana Alvarez; Klaus Jaffe

132

Experts and Cultural Narcissism: Relations in the Early 21th Century  

Microsoft Academic Search

Local and global dependencies and interactions between individuals, groups and institutions are becoming increasingly opaque and risky. This is due to increased importance of highly complex abstract systems created and supported in order to maintain of transport, communications, finance, energy, media, security infrastructure, as well as social and cultural institutions. These systems require the knowledge and skills of experts. Professionals

Andrzej Klimczuk

2012-01-01

133

Linking Gambling and Trauma: A Phenomenological Hermeneutic Case Study Using Almaas' Transformation of Narcissism Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to examine the phenomenon of pathological gambling and addiction from the perspective of writer and teacher A.H Almaas. By drawing on his Diamond Mind approach we trace the origin of addictive behaviors and pathological gambling to narcissistic wounding, which constitutes the loss of connection with the Essential…

Nixon, Gary; Solowoniuk, Jason; Boni, Lauren Julia; Kalischuk, Ruth Grant

2013-01-01

134

Discrepancies Between Implicit and Explicit Self-Esteem: Implications for Narcissism and Self-Esteem Instability  

Microsoft Academic Search

There appear to be two forms of high self-esteem: secure high self-esteem (which is often linked with psychological health) and fragile high self-esteem (which is generally associated with poor psycho- logical adjustment and impaired interpersonal relationships). Discrepant high self-esteem is a form of fragile self-esteem characterized by high ex- plicit self-esteem and low implicit self-esteem. The present study examined whether

Virgil Zeigler-Hill

2006-01-01

135

Autaptic self-inhibition of cortical GABAergic neurons: synaptic narcissism or useful introspection?  

PubMed

Fast synaptic inhibition sculpts all forms of cortical activity by means of a specialized connectivity pattern between highly heterogeneous inhibitory interneurons and principal excitatory cells. Importantly, inhibitory neurons connect also to each other extensively, following a detailed blueprint, and, indeed, specific forms of disinhibition affect important behavioral functions. Here we discuss a peculiar form of cortical disinhibition: the massive autaptic self-inhibition of parvalbumin-(PV) positive basket cells. Despite being described long ago, autaptic inhibition onto PV basket cells is rarely included in cortical circuit diagrams, perhaps because of its still elusive function. We propose here a potential dual role of autaptic feedback inhibition in temporally coordinating PV basket cells during cortical network activity. PMID:24434607

Deleuze, Charlotte; Pazienti, Antonio; Bacci, Alberto

2014-06-01

136

Is the Narcissistic Personality Inventory Still Relevant? A Test of Independent Grandiosity and Entitlement Scales in the Assessment of Narcissism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some scholars have called for the replacement of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) with more narrow scales measuring grandiosity and entitlement instead. In the current study, the authors examined the relations among the NPI and measures of grandiosity and entitlement, as well as in relation to a measure of the Five-Factor Model (FFM).…

Miller, Joshua D.; Price, Joanna; Campbell, W. Keith

2012-01-01

137

Structural Validity of the MACI Psychopathy and Narcissism Scales: Evidence of Multidimensionality and Implications for Use in Research and Screening  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the psychometric properties and predictive validity of three self-report scales (the Psychopathy Content Scale, the Psychopathy-16 scale, and the Egotistic scale) derived from the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) to screen for the presence of psychopathic and narcissistic personality characteristics. Exploratory…

Penney, Stephanie R.; Moretti, Marlene M.; Da Silva, Kimberley S.

2008-01-01

138

National Denial, Splitting, and Narcissism: Group Defence Mechanisms of Teachers and Students in Palestine in Response to the Holocaust.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the national defense mechanisms used by the education system of the Yishuv, the Jewish community in pre-independence Israel, in response to the Holocaust, as well as the significance of these responses and their contemporary implications. Concludes with contemporary applications of national defense mechanisms and their possible…

Dror, Yuval

1996-01-01

139

Structural Validity of the MACI Psychopathy and Narcissism Scales: Evidence of Multidimensionality and Implications for Use in Research and Screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the psychometric properties and predictive validity of three self-report scales (the Psychopathy Content Scale, the Psychopathy-16 scale, and the Egotistic scale) derived from the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) to screen for the presence of psychopathic and narcissistic personality characteristics. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed in a sample of 173 clinic-referred adolescents (ages 12–17), results

Stephanie R. Penney; Marlene M. Moretti; Kimberley S. Da Silva

2008-01-01

140

[Narcissistic personality disorder].  

PubMed

Narcissism is a multifaceted term which encompasses traits of normal personality as well as a specific personality disorder. While much research has been concerned with narcissism as a trait there are only few empirical studies available on narcissistic personality disorder (NPS). The current diagnostic of NPS according to DSM-IV-TR focuses on grandiose type narcissism whereas vulnerable narcissism, which has been described by clinicians and researchers has not yet been recognised. Psychotherapy of narcissistic patients through different psychotherapeutic schools focuses mainly on processes in the therapeutic relationship, the analysis and change of grandiose and vulnerable schemas, emotion regulation techniques and correction of narcissistic behavior in favor of prosocial interactions. PMID:23636574

Lammers, C-H; Vater, A; Roepke, S

2013-07-01

141

The person in the purchase: narcissistic consumers prefer products that positively distinguish them.  

PubMed

Narcissists, who seek keenly to self-enhance, strive to positively distinguish themselves. Might they therefore be inclined to purchase consumer products that enable them to do so? Study 1 found that narcissism, but not self-esteem, predicted dispositions to purchase products for the purpose of promoting personal uniqueness. Studies 2 and 3 found that narcissism predicted greater interest in exclusive, customizable, and personalizable products. Study 3 also found participants higher in narcissism regarded their prized possessions as less likely to be owned by others. Finally, Studies 3 and 4 found that interest in a hypothetical product, respectively, to be bought either for oneself or someone else, covaried with an experimental manipulation of product exclusivity and scarcity, but principally when levels of narcissism were high. Our findings illustrate the impact of narcissism on consumer preferences and support an agentic interpretation of narcissistic self-enhancement. PMID:23773040

Lee, Seung Yun; Gregg, Aiden P; Park, Seong Hoon

2013-08-01

142

[Sexuality and Narcisism in the work of Philip Roth].  

PubMed

The aim of this paper is to describe aspects of the relation between sexuality and narcissism in the elderly starting from some fragments of The dying animal, written by the american novelist Philip Roth. PMID:24260756

Matusevich, Daniel

2013-07-01

143

Whose Journey Is It? A Critic's Plea to Actors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laments the narcissism that the author sees in too many contemporary approaches to acting and directing. Argues that actors must focus on the world outside themselves, where the play and the audience most need them to be. (SR)

Lasser, Michael

1999-01-01

144

Sources of self-esteem: From theory to measurement and back again  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to some conceptions, self-esteem possesses a moral dimension; according to others, it does not. According to some, the realism of the self-evaluation matters; according to others, it does not. For some investigators, narcissism is just high self-esteem; for others, narcissism involves internal conflicts within one's self-evaluation, which is strongly dependent on admiration extracted from other people. The best known

Robert L. Campbell; Sarah Eisner; Nicole Riggs

2010-01-01

145

Automatic imitation is reduced in narcissists.  

PubMed

Narcissism is a personality trait that has been extensively studied in normal populations. Individuals high on subclinical narcissism tend to display an excessive self-focus and reduced concern for others. Does their disregard of others have roots in low-level processes of social perception? We investigated whether narcissism is related to the automatic imitation of observed actions. In the automatic imitation task, participants make cued actions in the presence of action videos displaying congruent or incongruent actions. The difference in response times and accuracy between congruent and incongruent trials (i.e., the interference effect) is a behavioral index of motor resonance in the brain-a process whereby observed actions activate matching motor representations in the observer. We found narcissism to be negatively related to interference in the automatic imitation task, such that high narcissism is associated with reduced imitation. Thus, levels of narcissism predict differences in the tendency to automatically resonate with others, and the pattern of data we observe suggests that a key difference is that high narcissists possess an improved ability to suppress automatic imitation when such imitation would be detrimental to task performance. To the extent that motor resonance is a product of a human mirror system, our data constitute evidence for a link between narcissistic tendencies and mirror system functioning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23957308

Obhi, Sukhvinder S; Hogeveen, Jeremy; Giacomin, Miranda; Jordan, Christian H

2014-06-01

146

Child and Parent Variables Associated with Treatment Response in Narcissistic Youths: The Role of Self-Blame and Shame  

PubMed Central

Introduction this retrospective study aimed at exploring the impact of parental and youth narcissism on service utilization and response to psychotherapy. Method thirty-six 9–13 years-old narcissistic youths receiving a combined treatment (psychodynamic psychotherapy + parental counselling) were independently assessed for child pathological narcissism, parental narcissism, child’s treatment attitude and psychiatric/ psychosocial services utilization. Results Parent and child narcissistic characteristics were negatively correlated with the use of OPD services. Child self-blame and lack of empathy predicted a lesser OPD utilization. Child pathological narcissism was significantly correlated with the specific treatment response pattern composed of the set of attitudes consistently observed in psychotherapy with narcissistic youths. Sixty percent of the variance in treatment response was accounted for by four narcissistic characteristics of the child: devaluation of others, avoidance of vulnerability, boredom, and self-blame. Post hoc analyses highlighted the role of the child’s self-blame, which mediated the relation between parental narcissism and service use while acting as a moderator in reversing the relation between parent narcissism and treatment response. Relationships between self-blame, shame-proneness and guilt, and limitations of the study are discussed. Conclusion Prospective studies with a larger sample are needed to confirm the association between self-blame and response to treatment in narcissistic youths.

Guile, Jean-Marc; Mbekou, Valentin; Lageix, Philippe

2004-01-01

147

Response to commentaries: Modernity and narcissistic personality disorder.  

PubMed

Replies to comments by Twenge, Miller, and Campbell (see record 2014-16207-001), Trull (see record 2014-16207-002), and Wright (see record 2014-16207-003) on the original article by Paris (see record 2012-18549-001) on the topic of narcissism and modernity. The current author would like to thank all three commentators for focusing on points in the original article that need clarification. Wright (2014) underlines the problem of precisely defining narcissism, arguing that research cannot progress until we agree on the meaning of the construct. Trull (2014) makes the useful point that cohort changes in narcissism do not translate into changes in the prevalence of NPD. Finally, Twenge, Miller, and Campbell (2014) are leaders in the empirical study of narcissism and NPD. The current author is pleased that they agree with some of his conclusions. However, they should not consider the case for dramatic increases in trait narcissism to be settled. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24796571

Paris, Joel

2014-04-01

148

The role of cortisol and psychopathic traits in aggression among at-risk girls: Tests of mediating hypotheses.  

PubMed

Multiple etiological factors (e.g., biological and personality predispositions) have been linked to the development of aggression. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relation between proactive/reactive aggression and biological (HPA-axis functioning) and personality characteristics (subdimensions of psychopathy) among girls at risk for aggressive behavior. Participants included girls (N?=?158) admitted for acute psychiatric inpatient treatment (M age?=?9.72; SD?=?1.99). Parents completed a measure of proactive/reactive aggression and psychopathy upon admission. Fasting plasma cortisol levels were obtained the morning following the child's admission. Correlational analyses revealed a significant negative correlation between cortisol and the narcissism and impulsivity subdimensions of psychopathy as well as proactive/reactive aggression. A significant positive relation between proactive and reactive aggression and the three subdimensions of psychopathy was also observed. Path analyses revealed that only narcissism was uniquely and positively related to proactive and reactive aggression. Tests of indirect effects from cortisol to aggression through subdimensions of psychopathy indicated significant pathways via narcissism to proactive and reactive aggression. The findings support previous research linking narcissism uniquely to aggression for girls and suggest that the relation between cortisol and proactive/reactive aggression is mediated by narcissism. Aggr. Behav. 40:263-272, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24302544

Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani; Luebbe, Aaron; Fite, Paula; Becker, Stephen P

2014-05-01

149

Internal Consistency Reliability of the Self-Report Antisocial Process Screening Device  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The self-report version of the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD) has become a popular measure for assessing psychopathic features in justice-involved adolescents. However, the internal consistency reliability of its component scales (Narcissism, Callous-Unemotional, and Impulsivity) has been questioned in several studies. This study…

Poythress, Norman G.; Douglas, Kevin S.; Falkenbach, Diana; Cruise, Keith; Lee, Zina; Murrie, Daniel C.; Vitacco, Michael

2006-01-01

150

Self-Esteem: Balance between Individual and Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Differentiates self-esteem from narcissism and traces societal preoccupation with self-esteem. Maintains that placing so much importance on an individual and self-esteem obscures the value of a balance between individuality and mutual responsibility. Describes Montessori's emphasis on the child's inner development and on community and mutual…

Woods, Carol S.

1999-01-01

151

Appreciating Similarities and Valuing Differences: The Miville-Guzman Universality-Diversity Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes results of study of a 45-item scale developed to measure the construct and administered to four separate samples. The Miville-Guzman Universality-Diversity Scale significantly correlated in theoretically predicted ways with measures of racial identity, empathy, health narcissism, feminism, androgyny, homophobia, and dogmatism (the last…

Miville, Marie L.; Gelso, Charles J.; Pannu, Raji; Liu, Will; Touradji, Pegah; Holloway, Pauline; Fuertes, Jairo

1999-01-01

152

Ruminations on narcissistic personality disorder.  

PubMed

Comments on the original article by Paris (see record 2012-18549-001) which provides an interesting and provocative overview of the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of narcissistic personality disorder (NPD). In this commentary, the author focuses on several assessment issues for narcissism, as well as NPD in particular. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24796569

Trull, Timothy J

2014-04-01

153

Development and Initial Validation of the Narcissistic Personality Questionnaire for Children: A Preliminary Investigation Using School-Based Asian Samples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Narcissistic Personality Questionnaire for Children (NPQC) is a brief self-report scale for measuring narcissism in children. In Study 1, a factor analysis on 370 children's NPQC scores revealed four factors that were labeled superiority, exploitativeness, self-absorption, and leadership. Study 2 established convergent and discriminant…

Ang, Rebecca P.; Yusof, Noradlin

2006-01-01

154

The narcissistic mask: an exploration of 'the defensive grandiosity hypothesis'.  

PubMed

Narcissism has been conceptualized as involving attempts to defend against negative self-schemata (implicit negative beliefs about one's own self-worth). This idea has been termed the 'mask model of narcissism'. This study explores the mask model, examining the association between extreme narcissistic personality traits and performance on a task purported to assess the influence of negative self-schemata. Participants (n?=?232) from the UK and the UAE completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and also performed an incidental learning task involving the surprise recall of self-referential adjectives (traits). A greater recall of negative adjectives was viewed as indicative of negative self-schemata. Looking at the sample as a whole, there were no associations between narcissistic traits and negative adjective recall. However, amongst those scoring in the upper quartile of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, narcissism scores were positively correlated with the recall of negative adjectives even after controlling for age and memory. Narcissism may reflect self-enhancement strategies rooted in negative self-beliefs. PMID:24343942

Thomas, Justin; Hashmi, Amani Al; Chung, Man Cheung; Morgan, Keith; Lyons, Minna

2013-05-01

155

Self-Esteem and Service Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maintains that self-esteem is more than simply "feeling good" about oneself. It derives from having experienced meaningful success. A service learning program can accomplish this and avoid the self-preoccupation and narcissism that occasionally accompany self-esteem efforts. Service learning can replace this with empathy and commitment. (MJP)

Pereira, Carolyn

1997-01-01

156

Survival of the scheming: a genetically informed link between the dark triad and mental toughness.  

PubMed

The present study is the first behavioral genetic investigation of the Dark Triad traits of personality, consisting of Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy, and the variable of mental toughness, reflecting individual differences in the ability to cope when under pressure. The purpose of this investigation was to explore a potential explanation for the success of individuals exhibiting the Dark Triad traits in workplace and social settings. Participants were adult twins who completed the MACH-IV, the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, and the Self-Report Psychopathy Scale assessing Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy, respectively, as well as the MT48, measuring mental toughness. Correlational analyses of the data revealed significant positive phenotypic associations between mental toughness and narcissism. Psychopathy and Machiavellianism, however, both showed some significant negative phenotypic correlations with mental toughness. Bivariate behavioral genetic analyses of the data were conducted to assess the extent to which these significant phenotypic correlations were attributable to common genetic and/or common environmental factors. Results indicate that correlations between narcissism and mental toughness were attributable primarily to common non-shared environmental factors, correlations between Machiavellianism and mental toughness were influenced by both common genetic and common non-shared environmental factors, and the correlations between psychopathy and mental toughness were attributable entirely to correlated genetic factors. Implications of these findings in the context of etiology and organizational adaptation are discussed. PMID:24074275

Onley, Michael; Veselka, Livia; Schermer, Julie Aitken; Vernon, Philip A

2013-12-01

157

Externalizing Shame Responses in Children: The Role of Fragile-Positive Self-Esteem  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When faced with shame, children can either respond in submissive ways to withdraw from their environment or in externalizing ways to oppose their environment. This study tested the hypothesis that fragile-positive views of self predispose children to respond in externalizing ways to shame situations. Narcissism, actual and perceived social…

Thomaes, Sander; Stegge, Hedy; Olthof, Tjeert

2007-01-01

158

The Dirty Dozen: A Concise Measure of the Dark Triad  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been an exponential increase of interest in the dark side of human nature during the last decade. To better understand this dark side, the authors developed and validated a concise, 12-item measure of the Dark Triad: narcissism, psychopathy, Machiavellianism. In 4 studies involving 1,085 participants, they examined its structural…

Jonason, Peter K.; Webster, Gregory D.

2010-01-01

159

An Examination of the Dirty Dozen Measure of Psychopathy: A Cautionary Tale about the Costs of Brief Measures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given substantial interest in the traits conceived of as part of the "Dark Triad"--psychopathy, narcissism, and Machiavellianism--assessment of these traits is of great importance. The Dirty Dozen (DD; Jonason & Webster, 2010) is a brief measure of the Dark Triad constructs that uses 4 items to assess each of these constructs. In the present…

Miller, Joshua D.; Few, Lauren R.; Seibert, L. Alana; Watts, Ashley; Zeichner, Amos; Lynam, Donald R.

2012-01-01

160

The Utility of the Child and Adolescent Psychopathy Construct in Hong Kong, China  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This cross-sectional study examined the nature of child and adolescent psychopathy using the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD) in 3,675 schoolchildren (ages 11-16) in Hong Kong, China. A confirmatory factor analysis observed a good fit for the three-factor model (callous-unemotional, impulsivity, narcissism) of APSD, with boys scoring…

Fung, Annis Lai-Chu; Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian

2010-01-01

161

The 'As If' Faculty/Student Advocate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a type of educational administrator in terms of demographic, emotional, behavioral, and interpersonal characteristics, underscoring this individual's less than fully authentic concern for others. This administrative personality type is then related to psychological theories of narcissism, obsessive-compulsive personality, and aggression.…

Misch, Donald A.

2002-01-01

162

CHANGING IDENTITIES IN PAUL AUSTER'S MOON PALACE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advances in psychological knowledge have often been made in fiction long before psychological research made equivalent discoveries. Suffice it here to mention the Oedipus complex and the problem of narcissism, which were known in stories a couple of thousand years before the creation of the field of psychology. Paul Auster's Moon Palace from 1989 deals with psychological material that was

Anniken Telnes Iversen

163

Child Physical and Sexual Abuse: The Roles of Sadism and Sexuality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A hypothesis, based on concepts of narcissism and perversion, is presented of the mental functioning of the physically and sexually abusive parent. The concept also gives insight into the structuring of the personality of the child-victim, who undergoes the risk of himself becoming a physically and/or sexually abusive parent. (DB)

Criville, Albert

1990-01-01

164

Child physical-sexual abuse: The role of sadism the role of sexuality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Starting from several examples of clinical material, the author proposes an understanding of the mental functioning of a physically and\\/or sexually abusive parent. He bases his theoretical reflection on two analytical concepts: narcissism and perversion Relating the sadistic instinct to the former and the sexual instinct to the latter, he discerns two modes of functioning which have some points in

Albert Crivillé

1987-01-01

165

Theorizing without Totalizing: Specularity and Televised Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines specularity (the pleasure derived from looking at television) in the context of sports. Argues that televised sports' popularity reflects: (1) fetishism (motivation by fascinated desire); (2) voyeurism (uninvited viewing); and (3) narcissism (identification with athletes). Describes a study of sports telecast viewing. Argues against…

Brummett, Barry; Duncan, Margaret Carlisle

1990-01-01

166

Contemporary film and the representative anecdote of ‘unmasking’: Coping strategies for a narcissistic society  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kenneth Burke's concepts of the “representative anecdote” and “equipment for living” are prolific tools for rhetorical and media criticism. As applied to the discourse of contemporary film, these methods reveal an underlying story of “unmasking” which effectively provides equipment for living or coping strategies to an audience struggling to deal with the problems associated with narcissism in today's society.

Christine Scodari

1987-01-01

167

Rhetoric, Projection, and the Authority of the Signifier.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clarifies some common misconceptions about the nature of narcissism and projection and employs recent developments in post-Freudian psychoanalytic theory to explain how projective activities are filtered and altered by a certain notion of textual objectivity: objectivity as defined by the text's material signifiers. (FL)

Alcorn, Marshall W., Jr.

1987-01-01

168

Spiritual Bypass: A Preliminary Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The phenomenon of spiritual bypass has received limited attention in the transpersonal psychology and counseling literature and has not been subjected to empirical inquiry. This study examines the phenomenon of spiritual bypass by considering how spirituality, mindfulness, alexithymia (emotional restrictiveness), and narcissism work together to…

Cashwell, Craig S.; Glosoff, Harriet L.; Hammond, Cheree

2010-01-01

169

Couple Therapy as a Method for Treating Male Exhibitionism: "Flashing"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The exhibiting of the genitals by males has previously been defined as symptomatic of narcissism and infantile sexuality. As an alternative, defining the problem as symptomatic of disturbances in basic relationships and treating the current central relationships as the focus offers a strong opportunity for inducing satisfactory changes. (Author)

Johnson, Thomas F.

1977-01-01

170

What Does the Narcissistic Personality Inventory Really Measure?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is a widely used measure of narcissism. However, debates persist about its exact factor structure with researchers proposing solutions ranging from two to seven factors. The present research aimed to clarify the factor structure of the NPI and further illuminate its nomological network. Four studies…

Ackerman, Robert A.; Witt, Edward A.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Trzesniewski, Kali H.; Robins, Richard W.; Kashy, Deborah A.

2011-01-01

171

The World's Top Stealth Bug Ends Marriages, Friendships and Jobs Bartonella Promotes Addiction, Aggression and Character Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

I hate medical drama. If I want drama I will watch a movie, a sporting event or a TV show. Bartonella has almost 2,000 articles on PubMed, but almost no one realizes it is a major source of depression and suicide, panic attacks and social anxiety, seizures, heart attacks, personality change, pushy be- havior, divorce, profound narcissism, eccentric obsessions, irritability,

James Schaller

172

Teaching Generation Me  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today's college students are significantly different from previous generations. On average, they are overconfident, have high expectations, report higher narcissism, are lower in creativity, are less interested in civic issues, and are less inclined to read long passages of text. They are highly confident of their abilities and received…

Twenge, Jean M.

2013-01-01

173

Self-Recognition of the Body and Its Parts during Late Adolescence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Male and female student volunteers were photographed nude in three orientations and asked to identify bodily parts from an array of photographs grouped according to height and linearity. Results are discussed in terms of ego involvement, narcissism, and the increased attention given to the body during adolescence. (Author/GK)

Collins, John K.

1981-01-01

174

Carl Rogers, Religion, and the Role of Psychology in American Culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Humanistic psychology is often caricatured as having both aided and abetted the rise of modern narcissism. This charge is, however, a seriously misguided one as becomes evident through a closer reading of one of the movement's preeminent spokespersons—Carl Rogers. This article explores the ontological framework underlying Rogers' thought and in so doing demonstrates the important sense in which his writings

Robert C. Fuller

1982-01-01

175

Kohut and Contextualism: Toward a Post-Cartesian Psychoanalytic Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article portrays Heinz Kohut as a pivotal transitional figure in the development of a post-Cartesian, fully contextual psychoanalytic psychology. Despite his contextualization of narcissism and movement toward phenomenology and perspectivalism, remnants of Cartesian, isolated-mind thinking persisted in his metapsychology of the self and in his view of analytic empathy.

Robert D. Stolorow; George E. Atwood; Donna M. Orange

1999-01-01

176

The Use of Creative Drama with Acting-Out Sixth and Seventh Grade Boys and Girls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes development and use of creative drama with 30 children over a six month period. Over time, the dramas evolved through four stages: chaos, control and chaos; control; and flexibility. Certain developmental and psychological themes also emerged: narcissism, exhibitionism, activity, orality, dominance, morality, social themes, comedy and…

Allan, John B.

1977-01-01

177

Do changes in selfishness explain 12-step benefit?: A prospective lagged analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: 12-step attendance is associated with increased abstinence. A strong claim made in 12-step literature is that alcoholics are pathologically selfish and that working the 12 steps reduces this selfishness which, in turn, leads to sustained alcohol abstinence. This study tested this assumption by investigating the linkages between 12-step attendance, pathological narcissism, and drinking. Method: 130 early AA affiliates with

J. Scott Tonigan; Kristina Rynes; Radka Toscova; Kylee Hagler

2013-01-01

178

POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD), ACTUALPATHOLOGY, AND THE QUESTION OF REPRESENTABILITY A Reply to \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reading a reaction to one's publication is usually a good thing for one's narcissism. In the best of cases, it is a good thing for one's thinking as well, as it obliges us to reconsider critically a number of our ideas. This is the case with the paper published by J. Mills, as a reaction to our \\

179

Social Information Processing as a Mediator between Cognitive Schemas and Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This longitudinal investigation assessed whether cognitive schemas of justification of violence, mistrust, and narcissism predicted social information processing (SIP), and SIP in turn predicted aggressive behavior in adolescents. A total of 650 adolescents completed measures of cognitive schemas at Time 1, SIP in ambiguous social scenarios at…

Calvete, Esther; Orue, Izaskun

2012-01-01

180

Returning to the Self Psychoanalytically.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the importance (in Heinz Kohut's post-Freudian conception) of narcissism in postmodern pedagogy. Maintains that the affects (despair, depression, anger, joy) are the means by which students most fully understand the implications for their self-understanding of what they are being taught. (SR)

Tingle, Nick

1991-01-01

181

Poetry and the "Me" Generation: Democratizing the "Ars Poetica".  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The art of poetry is being worn away by democracy, the rule of the average, and by an attitude of narcissism which equates sincere endeavor with significant endeavor. The opening lines of several poems taken from a poetry journal reveal a distinct lack of significant emotion. While poetry is the most significant expression of the Self, the "I" of…

Rice, Paul

182

Values of Youth: Messages from the Most Popular Songs of Four Decades.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzed the lyrics of the 100 most popular songs in America from the 1950s to the 1980s to assess their value themes. Extracted nine value themes: romantic love, celebration, humanitarianism, antiestablishmentarianism, friendship, patriotism, narcissism, self-esteem, and nostalgia. Romantic love, particularly that of "innocent" young love,…

Ostlund, Deborah R.; Kinnier, Richard T.

1997-01-01

183

Personality Profiles of Veterans Entering Treatment for Domestic Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to reveal the typical personality profiles of veterans who have been perpetrators of domestic violence. Cluster analysis revealed that the MCMI-II profiles of 183 veterans entering treatment for domestic violence at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center fell into three clusters. These clusters were labeled Subclinical Narcissism, Narcissistic Personality Disorder, and High General Psychopathology\\/ Substance

Bertram Rothschild; Carolyn Dimson; Ragnar Storaasli; Lori Clapp

1997-01-01

184

The Decline of Play and the Rise of Psychopathology in Children and Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past half century, in the United States and other developed nations, children's free play with other children has declined sharply. Over the same period, anxiety, depression, suicide, feelings of helplessness, and narcissism have increased sharply in children, adolescents, and young adults. This article documents these historical changes…

Gray, Peter

2011-01-01

185

Modernity and narcissistic personality disorder.  

PubMed

Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) is a trait-based disorder that can be understood as a pathological amplification of narcissistic traits. While temperamental vulnerability and psychological adversity are risk factors for NPD, sociocultural factors are also important. This review hypothesizes that increases in narcissistic traits and cultural narcissism could be associated with changes in the prevalence of NPD. These shifts seem to be a relatively recent phenomenon, driven by social changes associated with modernity. While the main treatment for NPD remains psychotherapy, that form of treatment is itself a product of modernity and individualism. The hypothesis is presented that psychological treatment, unless modified to address the specific problems associated with NPD, could run the risk of supporting narcissism. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22800179

Paris, Joel

2014-04-01

186

[A short version of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI-15): dimensionality and psychometric properties in a representative sample of the German population].  

PubMed

The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is a commonly used measure of narcissism. This study administered a 15 item short version of the NPI (NPI-15). Central aims of the present study were to examine its dimensionality, and to provide data on its psychometric properties. NPI-15 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D) were assessed in a representative sample of the German population (N=2,512). According to Scree-plot and model fit, a solution with 2 or 3 factors seemed feasible. Because of factor loadings and item-level associations to depression/anxiety we decided to favour a 2-factor-solution. 2 subscales reflecting different facets of narcissism were compiled (leadership ability/personality [LA/LP], grandiosity [G]). The psychometric properties of these scales were good (LA/LP) respectively unsatisfactory (G). The validity of the NPI-15 needs to be further studied. PMID:23475762

Spangenberg, Lena; Romppel, Matthias; Bormann, Bianca; Hofmeister, Dirk; Brähler, Elmar; Strauß, Bernhard

2013-08-01

187

The human and animal baby schema effect: correlates of individual differences.  

PubMed

We investigated the animal and human baby schema effect (BSE) in relation to gender, parental status, and individual features. In three, independent online surveys, conducted during three consecutive years, (Ntotal=1389), ratings of photographs of human and animal infants as well as of adults, sociodemographic variables (age, gender, parental status) and personality attributes (empathy, attachment, interpersonal closeness, narcissism, and need to belong) were assessed. We demonstrated that humans are sensitive to the baby schemata of both humans and animals and that both are weakly positively correlated. BSE is positively associated with female gender and (affective) empathy. Higher interpersonal closeness and need to belong were additionally connected specifically to the human BSE. In contrast, narcissism and insecure attachment were not related to the BSE, suggesting a robustness of this phenomenon to possible negative influences of these two personality attributes. PMID:23353724

Lehmann, Vicky; Huis in't Veld, Elisabeth M J; Vingerhoets, Ad J J M

2013-03-01

188

You Probably Think this Paper's About You: Narcissists' Perceptions of their Personality and Reputation  

PubMed Central

Do narcissists have insight into the negative aspects of their personality and reputation? Using both clinical and subclinical measures of narcissism, we examined others’ perceptions, self-perceptions and meta-perceptions of narcissists across a wide range of traits for a new acquaintance and close other (Study 1), longitudinally with a group of new acquaintances (Study 2), and among coworkers (Study 3). Results bring us to three surprising conclusions about narcissists: 1) they understand that others see them less positively than they see themselves (i.e., their meta-perceptions are less biased than are their self-perceptions), 2) they have some insight into the fact that they make positive first impressions that deteriorate over time, and 3) they have insight into their narcissistic personality (e.g., they describe themselves as arrogant). These findings shed light on some of the psychological mechanisms underlying narcissism.

Carlson, Erika N.; Vazire, Simine; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

2011-01-01

189

The metamorphosis of Narcissus: communal activation promotes relationship commitment among narcissists.  

PubMed

Three studies tested the hypotheses that the activation of communal mental representations promotes relationship commitment (communal activation hypothesis) and that this effect is stronger among narcissists than among nonnarcissists (Communal Activation x Narcissism hypothesis). Across experimental, longitudinal, and interaction-based research methods, and in participant samples ranging from college students to married couples, results supported the communal activation hypothesis in two of three studies and the Communal Activation x Narcissism hypothesis in all three studies. Moreover, a meta-analytic summary of the results across the three studies revealed that the association of communal activation with commitment was significant overall and that it was stronger among narcissists than among nonnarcissists. Narcissists tended to be less committed than nonnarcissists at low levels of communal activation, but this effect diminished and sometimes even reversed at high levels. This work is the first to identify a mechanism by which narcissists can become more committed relationship partners. PMID:19622759

Finkel, Eli J; Campbell, W Keith; Buffardi, Laura E; Kumashiro, Madoka; Rusbult, Caryl E

2009-10-01

190

A New Measure of Interpersonal Exploitativeness  

PubMed Central

Measures of exploitativeness evidence problems with validity and reliability. The present set of studies assessed a new measure [the Interpersonal Exploitativeness Scale (IES)] that defines exploitativeness in terms of reciprocity. In Studies 1 and 2, 33 items were administered to participants. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that a single factor consisting of six items adequately assess interpersonal exploitativeness. Study 3 results revealed that the IES was positively associated with “normal” narcissism, pathological narcissism, psychological entitlement, and negative reciprocity and negatively correlated with positive reciprocity. In Study 4, participants competed in a commons dilemma. Those who scored higher on the IES were more likely to harvest a greater share of resources over time, even while controlling for other relevant variables, such as entitlement. Together, these studies show the IES to be a valid and reliable measure of interpersonal exploitativeness. The authors discuss the implications of these studies.

Brunell, Amy B.; Davis, Mark S.; Schley, Dan R.; Eng, Abbey L.; van Dulmen, Manfred H.M.; Wester, Kelly L.; Flannery, Daniel J.

2013-01-01

191

[Severe depression : psychoanalysis].  

PubMed

The indication for psychoanalysis in severe depression is not clear. And yet, demands for this type of intervention are increasing, despite the absence of any form of consensus on the subject. Freud considered depression as a failure of analytical efforts and, based on this observation, revised his theory, in particular to include the notions of narcissism and the death drive. Many analysts have been reluctant to follow his teachings on this last point and provide depressed patients with analytical-type therapies aimed at restoring narcissism. Melanie Klein pushed Freud's ideas about depression even further and brought such therapies back to the heart of analytical practice. Jacques Lacan took the debate to another level by proposing an overhaul of the principles on which analysis has been based. Today, while following certain precautionary rules, true psychoanalyses can be proposed to patients with severe depression, whether of the bipolar, recurring or even neurotic type that can reach this level of severity. PMID:20141799

Bouvet de la Maisonneuve, O

2009-12-01

192

An examination of the factor structure of DSM-IV Narcissistic Personality Disorder Criteria  

PubMed Central

A growing body of research has suggested that narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) contains two factors or types: overt/grandiose and covert/vulnerable. A recent factor analysis of DSM-IV NPD symptoms supported a similar two-factor model. The present research tested this proposed two-factor solution against a one-factor solution (N = 298; 72% patients) using both confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and an examination of associations between the resultant factors and theoretically relevant criteria (other PDs; depression, anxiety). The results of the CFA supported a one-factor solution. Likewise, the two factors each yielded a similar pattern of correlations with relevant criteria. Together, these results argue against a two-factor structure for the current DSM-IV NPD symptoms. Given the broader research literature suggesting a two-factor structure of narcissism, strategies for assessing both overt/grandiose and covert/vulnerable forms of narcissism in DSM-V are discussed.

Miller, Joshua D.; Hoffman, Brian J.; Campbell, W. Keith; Pilkonis, Paul A.

2008-01-01

193

Excitement in shame: the price we pay.  

PubMed

This paper explores the role of excitement in shame, extending the theoretical underpinnings of my work (Aledort, 2002, 2003, 2008, 2009) on narcissism and the omnipotent child syndrome. Shame, excitement, and early narcissistic self-states are complexly intermingled, each influencing the other. Empathy alone is insufficient; the passion connected to shame can be easily hidden. Detailed case studies describe a model for working with the excitement in shame, how it functions, and how it gets resolved. PMID:24320576

Aledort, Stewart L

2014-01-01

194

Finding Keys to School Change: A 40Year Odyssey  

Microsoft Academic Search

I’ve been working at understanding change in schools for more than forty years. Being given a license to reflect on my intellectual\\u000a adventures in the study of school change — in public — is a delightful and faintly alarming charge. I need to avoid sheer\\u000a narcissism on the one hand, and detached encyclopedic syntheses on the other. And not succumb

Matthew B. Miles

195

Treating Depression and Compensatory Narcissistic Personality Style in a Man With Chronic Lyme Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The following case study illustrates a client-centered, cognitive-behavioral approach to the psychological treatment of Mr. M, a 41-year-old male diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease, a mood disorder from Lyme disease, and narcissistic personality disorder. Mr. M's personality difficulties are conceptualized as representing compensatory narcissism, a strategic way of coping with feelings of insecurity. The goals of treatment included positively integrating

Melissa J. Leedy; Melissa Jackson; Jennifer L. Callahan

2007-01-01

196

Relationships between the Dark Triad and humor styles: A replication and extension  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two hundred undergraduate students completed paper-and-pencil measures of the Dark Triad (Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy) and the Humor Styles Questionnaire, which taps two adaptive (affiliative and self-enhancing) and two maladaptive (aggressive and self-defeating) styles of humor. The first purpose of the study was to replicate relationships between these variables reported by Veselka et al. (2010). The second purpose was to

Rod A. Martin; Jessica M. Lastuk; Jennifer Jeffery; Philip A. Vernon; Livia Veselka

197

Social Information Processing as a Mediator Between Cognitive Schemas and Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This longitudinal investigation assessed whether cognitive schemas of justification of violence, mistrust, and narcissism\\u000a predicted social information processing (SIP), and SIP in turn predicted aggressive behavior in adolescents. A total of 650\\u000a adolescents completed measures of cognitive schemas at Time 1, SIP in ambiguous social scenarios at Time 1 and Time 2, and\\u000a reactive aggression at Time 1, Time 2,

Esther Calvete; Izaskun Orue

198

Symptom formations and character changes due to upheavals of war: examples from Cyprus.  

PubMed

This article offers a review of the psychoanalytic and psychiatric literature on symptom formation and individual and collective character changes triggered by war or by similarly violent civil upheaval. It is suggested that each such event should be studied by itself since many different circumstances can bring man to acts of aggression. The effects of the war on Cyprus, where group narcissism developed to compensate for hurt, constitute a case example of such focused study. PMID:377997

Volkan, V D

1979-04-01

199

A principal-components analysis of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and further evidence of its construct validity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the internal and external validity of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI). Study 1 explored the internal structure of the NPI responses of 1,018 subjects. Using principal-components analysis, we analyzed the tetrachoric correlations among the NPI item responses and found evidence for a general construct of narcissism as well as seven first-order components, identified as Authority, Exhibitionism, Superiority, Vanity,

Robert Raskin; Howard Terry

1988-01-01

200

Narcissistic Features in Young Adolescents: Relations to Aggression and Internalizing Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research and theory suggest narcissistic features contribute to aggression in adults. The present study examined the association of narcissistic features with aggression and internalizing symptoms in 233 students of 5th–8th grade at three inner-city schools. A factor analysis of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory in this sample revealed three factors: Adaptive Narcissism, Exploitativeness, and Exhibitionism. Regression analyses were used to

Jason J. Washburn; Susan D. McMahon; Cheryl A. King; Mark A. Reinecke; Carrie Silver

2004-01-01

201

A test of two brief measures of the dark triad: the Dirty Dozen and Short Dark Triad.  

PubMed

There has been a substantial increase in the simultaneous study of 3 related constructs--psychopathy, Machiavellianism, and narcissism--since being termed the dark triad (DT; Paulhus & Williams, 2002). Growing interest in the DT has led to the development of 2 short, efficient measures that reduce the number of items typically used from 124 to 12 (Dirty Dozen, or DD; Jonason & Webster, 2010) and 27 (Short Dark Triad, or SD3; Jones & Paulhus, in press), respectively. Using a community sample collected online (N = 287), we examined the convergent, discriminant, incremental, and criterion validity of scores from 2 brief measures of the DT. In general, scores from the SD3 scales manifested stronger convergent and incremental validity in relation to longer, more established measures of the DT constructs. Scores from both brief DT measures evidenced adequate discriminant validity as well as criterion validity in relation to traits from the five-factor model. However, the SD3 Narcissism Scale appears to assess primarily the grandiose aspects of this construct, whereas the DD captures both vulnerable and grandiose features of narcissism. Overall, if a short measure of the DT is required, the SD3 yields data that are more consistent with these constructs as they are measured using more established and validated measures. PMID:24274044

Maples, Jessica L; Lamkin, Joanna; Miller, Joshua D

2014-03-01

202

Narcissistic configurations: violence and its absence in treatment.  

PubMed

'On narcissism: An introduction' constitutes a turning point in psychoanalysis. Although narcissism is a concept which has not been explicitly referred to by many important thinkers for decades, it could be said that there is no paper written in psychoanalysis since Freud that does not implicitly take into account the modifications in thinking that the work brought about. In this paper, the author contrasts two types of narcissistic configurations: in the first, the intolerance of the other is dealt with by expulsion and violence; in the second, by withdrawal. The author contrasts patients who express manifest violent behaviour with patients for whom the violent behaviour is absent but who, nevertheless, present similar background histories, which might have led to a prediction of violence. They are also profoundly different in terms of what they provoke in the countertransference. In addition, this paper argues that the treatment of narcissistic personalities has allowed in recent years the understanding of a modality of depression. Following Green, the author argues that, instead of a fruitless debate that involves evolutionary issues around the concept of narcissism, it is necessary to distinguish the narcissistic aspect in any analytic relationship, to identify the narcissistic transference in different types of psychopathologies. PMID:15509332

Perelberg, Rosine Jozef

2004-10-01

203

A test of the construct validity of the Elemental Psychopathy Assessment scores in a community sample of adults.  

PubMed

The Elemental Psychopathy Assessment (EPA) is a relatively new self-report measure of the basic traits associated with psychopathy. Using community participants (N = 104) oversampled for the presence of psychopathic traits, we examined the convergent and criterion validity of the EPA total and factor scores (i.e., Antagonism, Emotional Stability, Disinhibition, and Narcissism) in relation to self- and informant reports of psychopathy and the general personality dimensions of the HEXACO (Honesty-Humility, Emotionality, Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and Openness to Experience; Ashton & Lee, 2009), as well as self-reported scores on narcissism, Machiavellianism, and externalizing behaviors (EBs) such as antisocial behavior and aggression. The EPA total and factor scores manifested substantial positive correlations with self- and informant-reported psychopathy scores and dimensions from the HEXACO, narcissism, Machiavellianism, and EBs. The patterns of these relations became clearer and more differentiated when examined via regression analyses such that the EPA factors manifested differential relations with various aspects of psychopathy (e.g., EPA Antagonism was the only unique correlate of psychopathy traits related to callousness and manipulation). Overall, the EPA is a promising assessment tool given the breadth of its coverage, the flexibility with which it can be used (total score; 4-factor scores; 18 subscale scores), and its ties to a popular model of basic personality traits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24548152

Miller, Joshua D; Hyatt, Courtland S; Rausher, Steven; Maples, Jessica L; Zeichner, Amos

2014-06-01

204

Why Do People Use Facebook?  

PubMed Central

The social networking site, Facebook, has gained an enormous amount of popularity. In this article, we review the literature on the factors contributing to Facebook use. We propose a model suggesting that Facebook use is motivated by two primary needs: (1) The need to belong and (2) the need for self-presentation. Demographic and cultural factors contribute to the need to belong, whereas neuroticism, narcissism, shyness, self-esteem and self-worth contribute to the need for self presentation. Areas for future research are discussed.

Nadkarni, Ashwini; Hofmann, Stefan G.

2011-01-01

205

Commentary: toward a psychodynamic understanding of filicide--beyond psychosis and into the heart of darkness.  

PubMed

Much of the literature on filicide explores acute psychosis, sociopathy, or malignant narcissism (psychiatrically ill versus not psychiatrically ill) as primary explanations of why parents kill children. In this issue, Hatters Friedman et al. review the literature on acute psychiatric symptoms in an effort to identify key risk factors for filicide that might have predictive value. In this commentary, we assert the argument that filicide is a complex phenomenon that is the result of more than just psychosis or environmental stressors and that, because not all parents who become psychiatrically ill kill, there may be specific risk factors related to individual underlying psychodynamic conflicts. PMID:16394227

Papapietro, Daniel J; Barbo, Elizabeth

2005-01-01

206

"These anxieties are not mine": adolescence, the oedipal configuration, and transgenerational factors.  

PubMed

Part 1 of this paper draws on the film Back to the Future (1985) to highlight various aspects of adolescence, the oedipal situation, and transgenerational factors. The authors then discuss the Oedipus myth and its themes of adolescence, narcissism, identity, acting out, repetition, aggression, and the parent-child relationship, among others. Comments drawn from Winnicott's writing on oedipal issues are discussed as well. As an illustration of some of these issues, in Part 2, the authors present the clinical case of Osvaldo, age sixteen. Transference-countertransference issues in this treatment are explored in depth. PMID:25074052

Bonaminio, Vincenzo; DI Renzo, Mariassunta

2014-07-01

207

Nuclear death: an unprecedented challenge to psychiatry and religion  

SciTech Connect

The growing danger of a nuclear holocaust has intensified two aspects of the human predicament that concern both religion and psychiatry: the inevitability of death and the disastrous consequences of the characteristic termed pride by theologians and narcissism by psychiatrists. For the first time, humans have power to exterminate themselves and death threatens all ages equally. Pride of power causes leaders to exaggerate their ability to control nuclear weapons; moral pride leads to demonizing enemies. The author considers implications for psychiatrists and clergy, with special reference to preventing a nuclear holocaust.

Frank, J.D.

1984-11-01

208

Oppositional defiant disorder symptoms in relation to psychopathic traits and aggression among psychiatrically hospitalized children: ADHD symptoms as a potential moderator.  

PubMed

Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is associated with elevated rates of psychopathic traits and aggression. However, it remains unclear if attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms exacerbate these relations, particularly in samples of children who are severely clinically distressed. The purpose of the present study was to test ADHD symptoms as a potential moderator of the relations of ODD symptoms to psychopathic traits (i.e., callous-unemotional [CU] traits, narcissism) and to aggressive subtypes (i.e., proactive, reactive aggression) in a large sample of children in an acute psychiatric inpatient facility (n = 699; ages 6-12). Multiple regression analyses indicated that, after controlling for child demographic variables, ADHD symptoms marginally exacerbated the relation between ODD symptoms and CU traits. Both ODD and ADHD symptoms had an additive, but not a multiplicative effect, in predicting narcissism. In addition, for a subset of the full sample for whom data were available (n =351), ADHD symptoms exacerbated the relation between ODD symptoms and both reactive and proactive aggression. These results suggest that ADHD symptoms tend to have a negative effect on the relation between ODD symptoms and markers of antisociality among children receiving acute psychiatric care. PMID:23436456

Becker, Stephen P; Luebbe, Aaron M; Fite, Paula J; Greening, Leilani; Stoppelbein, Laura

2013-01-01

209

Empathy in narcissistic personality disorder: From clinical and empirical perspectives.  

PubMed

Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) is associated with an assortment of characteristics that undermine interpersonal functioning. A lack of empathy is often cited as the primary distinguishing feature of NPD. However, clinical presentations of NPD suggest that empathy is not simply deficient in these individuals, but dysfunctional and subject to a diverse set of motivational and situational factors. Consistent with this presentation, research illustrates that empathy is multidimensional, involving 2 distinct emotional and cognitive processes associated with a capacity to respectively understand and respond to others' mental and affective states. The goal of this practice review is to bridge the gap between our psychobiological understanding of empathy and its clinical manifestations in NPD. We present 3 case studies highlighting the variability in empathic functioning in people with NPD. Additionally, we summarize the literature on empathy and NPD, which largely associates this disorder with deficient emotional empathy, and dysfunctional rather than deficient cognitive empathy. Because this research is limited, we also present empathy-based findings for related syndromes (borderline and psychopathy). Given the complexity of narcissism and empathy, we propose that multiple relationships can exist between these constructs. Ultimately, by recognizing the multifaceted relationship between empathy and narcissism, and moving away from an all or nothing belief that those with NPD simply lack empathy, therapists may better understand narcissistic patients' behavior and motivational structure. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24512457

Baskin-Sommers, Arielle; Krusemark, Elizabeth; Ronningstam, Elsa

2014-07-01

210

On ideals and idealization.  

PubMed

This chapter repositions ideals away from their role as defensive structures restraining aggressive and lustful drives (as traditionally viewed) toward their place in shaping creativity and love. We select and mold our particular ideals in providing meaning and in this manner help to create those selfobjects needed to resolve or soothe our needs. This creative process may include "reshaping" of the available object to represent the "idealized other." From this perspective, Kohut's view of idealization and the idealized parental imago will be considered, including my own notion of a one-and-a-half person psychology. Our ideals inevitably conflict and clash, leading to internal self-conflicts that generate what I call the dialectic of narcissism. Narcissism is here considered broadly, reflecting all attributes of self-experience. Shame plays an important role in this dialectic, relating to failure with regard to ideals and to falling short of cherished goals. Ultimately, it is the shaping of, and approximation to, flexible and meaningful ideals that comprise that lofty, ineffable, human ideal--wisdom. Clinical vignettes will be offered to illustrate these themes. PMID:19379233

Morrison, Andrew P

2009-04-01

211

What have you done for me lately? Friendship-selection in the shadow of the Dark Triad traits.  

PubMed

The current studies examined how the Dark Triad personality traits (i.e., Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy) facilitate the strategic structuring of an individual's social environment in terms of same- and opposite-sex friends. In one study using normative questions (N = 267) and another using a budget-allocation task (N = 114), we found that the Dark Triad traits were associated with choosing friends for strategic purposes and to create a volatile environment. Narcissistic individuals reported relatively more reasons to form friendships, such as shared interests, makes me feel good, and intelligence. Women high in narcissism chose same-sex friends who were attractive and women high on Machiavellianism chose same-sex friends who have social status. Men high on psychopathy devalued traits associated with good social relationships in favor of friends who could facilitate their mating efforts and to offset risks incurred in their life history strategy. Results are discussed using the selection-manipulation-evocation framework for explaining how personality traits interact with social environments and integrated with findings from evolutionary biology. PMID:22947669

Jonason, Peter K; Schmitt, David P

2012-01-01

212

Do changes in selfishness explain 12-step benefit? A prospective lagged analysis.  

PubMed

12-Step attendance is associated with increased abstinence. A strong claim made in 12-step literature is that alcoholics are pathologically selfish and that working the 12 steps reduces this selfishness, which, in turn, leads to sustained alcohol abstinence. This study tested this assumption by investigating the linkages between 12-step attendance, pathological narcissism, and drinking. One hundred thirty early Alcohol Anonymous (AA) affiliates with limited AA and treatment histories were recruited from treatment and community-based AA. A majority of the sample was alcohol dependent and reported illicit drug use before recruitment. Participants were interviewed at intake and at 3, 6, and 9 months. A majority of participants attended AA meetings throughout follow-up and such attendance predicted increased abstinence and reduced drinking intensity. 12-Step affiliates were significantly higher on pathological narcissism (PN) relative to general population samples and their PN remained elevated. Contrary to predictions, PN was unrelated to 12-step meeting attendance and did not predict later abstinence or drinking intensity. The findings did not support the hypothesis that reductions in PN explain 12-step benefit. An alternative function for the emphasis placed on pathological selfishness in 12-step programs is discussed and a recommendation is made to use unobtrusive measures of selfishness in future research. PMID:23327500

Tonigan, J Scott; Rynes, Kristina; Toscova, Radka; Hagler, Kylee

2013-01-01

213

The associations among dark personalities and sexual tactics across different scenarios.  

PubMed

Although malevolent individuals may be willing to use any tactic necessary to obtain sex, not all antagonistic traits will predict coercion or coaxing in all situations. A sample of 447 adult men, collected in two waves, reported their intentions to engage in coercion or coaxing of hypothetical targets. Study 1 provided three hypothetical scenarios that result in sexual rejection: (a) an expensive date, (b) a stranger, and (c) a relationship partner, and Study 2 provided the same scenarios, and three additional scenarios: (d) a rival's partner, (e) a bet, and (f) a powerful person. A Structural Equations Model indicated that a common antagonistic factor, indicated by Social Dominance and the Dark Triad traits of psychopathy, narcissism, and Machiavellianism, predicted coaxing across all situations, whereas only psychopathy predicted coercion across all situations. In addition, narcissism accounted for additional variance in coaxing when rejected by an expensive date. These findings suggest that across the different scenarios, psychopathy is primarily associated with coercive tactics and the common malevolent core among the traits is associated with coaxing tactics. PMID:24288187

Jones, Daniel N; Olderbak, Sally G

2014-04-01

214

A behavioral genetic analysis of alexithymia and the Dark Triad traits of personality.  

PubMed

The present study is the first to assess phenotypic correlations between alexithymia and the Dark Triad traits of personality in a community sample, as well as the common genetic and environmental factors underlying these correlations. Participants were 232 North American adult twin pairs who completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, the Self-Report Psychopathy Scale, the MACH-IV, and the Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Results revealed that alexithymia correlates significantly and positively with psychopathy and Machiavellianism, and negatively with narcissism. Subsequent bivariate behavioral genetic analysis demonstrated that these phenotypic correlations were primarily attributable to common genetic and common non-shared environmental factors. The implication of these findings regarding the maladaptive functions of alexithymia within the antisocial realm of behavior and the need for replication are discussed. PMID:23561050

Cairncross, Molly; Veselka, Livia; Schermer, Julie Aitken; Vernon, Philip A

2013-06-01

215

[The Dresden Body Image Inventory (DKB-35): validity in a clinical sample].  

PubMed

The Dresden Body Image Questionnaire (DKB-35) measures 5 dimensions of body image: vitality, self-acceptance, self-aggrandisement, physical closeness, and sexual fulfilment. This article presents data on the reliability and validity of the DKB-35. The sample consisted of 560 pa-tients with psychosomatic disorders. To analyse the factor structure, a confirmatory factor analysis was conducted. To examine the convergent validity, correlations between the DKB-35 scales and the Frankfurt Body Concept Scales (FKKS, [1]), the Narcissism Personality Inventory (NPI, [2]) and the self-esteem subscale of the Frankfurt Self-Concept Scales (FSKN, [3]) were computed. The 5 scales of the DKB-35 showed excellent reliability. Between the 5 DKB-35 scales and the corresponding scales of the FKKS, the NPI, and the FSKN, moderate correlations were found. The results confirm the reliability and validity of the DKB-35. Possible fields of applications and further developments are discussed. PMID:23966276

Pöhlmann, Karin; Roth, Marcus; Brähler, Elmar; Joraschky, Peter

2014-03-01

216

Some youths have a gloomy side: correlates of the dark triad personality traits in non-clinical adolescents.  

PubMed

This cross-sectional study examined the Dark Triad personality traits and their correlates in non-clinical youths aged 12-18 years (N = 117). Child- and parent-report data were obtained on Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy as well as on Big Five personality factors and symptoms of aggression and delinquency. Results indicated that especially Machiavellianism and psychopathy were in a theoretically meaningful way related to Big Five factors: that is, both traits were associated with lower levels of agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness/intellect, and higher levels of emotional instability. Further, Machiavellianism and psychopathy also emerged as significant and unique correlates of symptoms of aggression and delinquency, which further underlines the importance of these Dark Triad traits in the pathogenesis of disruptive behavior problems in youths. PMID:23334267

Muris, Peter; Meesters, Cor; Timmermans, Anke

2013-10-01

217

Introducing the short Dark Triad (SD3): a brief measure of dark personality traits.  

PubMed

Three socially aversive traits-Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy-have been studied as an overlapping constellation known as the Dark Triad. Here, we develop and validate the Short Dark Triad (SD3), a brief proxy measure. Four studies (total N = 1,063) examined the structure, reliability, and validity of the subscales in both community and student samples. In Studies 1 and 2, structural analyses yielded three factors with the final 27 items loading appropriately on their respective factors. Study 3 confirmed that the resulting SD3 subscales map well onto the longer standard measures. Study 4 validated the SD3 subscales against informant ratings. Together, these studies indicate that the SD3 provides efficient, reliable, and valid measures of the Dark Triad of personalities. PMID:24322012

Jones, Daniel N; Paulhus, Delroy L

2014-02-01

218

Behavioral confirmation of everyday sadism.  

PubMed

Past research on socially aversive personalities has focused on subclinical psychopathy, subclinical narcissism, and Machiavellianism-the "Dark Triad" of personality. In the research reported here, we evaluated whether an everyday form of sadism should be added to that list. Acts of apparent cruelty were captured using two laboratory procedures, and we showed that such behavior could be predicted with two measures of sadistic personality. Study 1 featured a bug-killing paradigm. As expected, sadists volunteered to kill bugs at greater rates than did nonsadists. Study 2 examined willingness to harm an innocent victim. When aggression was easy, sadism and Dark Triad measures predicted unprovoked aggression. However, only sadists were willing to work for the opportunity to hurt an innocent person. In both studies, sadism emerged as an independent predictor of behavior reflecting an appetite for cruelty. Together, these findings support the construct validity of everyday sadism and its incorporation into a new "Dark Tetrad" of personality. PMID:24022650

Buckels, Erin E; Jones, Daniel N; Paulhus, Delroy L

2013-11-01

219

Success in everyday physics: The role of personality and academic variables  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two studies examined students' intuitive physics ability and characteristics associated with physics competence. In Study 1, although many students did well on a physics quiz, more than 25% of students performed below levels predicted by chance. Better performance on the physics quiz was related to physics grades, highest level of math taken, and students' perceived scholastic competence, but was not related to a number of other hypothesized personality variables. Study 2 further explored personality and academic variables and also examined students' awareness of their own physics ability. Results indicate that the personality variables were again unrelated to ability, but narcissism may be related to subjects' estimates of knowledge. Also, academic variables and how important students think it is to understand the physical world are related to both measured and estimated physics proficiency.

Norvilitis, Jill M.; Reid, Howard M.; Norvilitis, Bret M.

2002-05-01

220

The internal world of Don Giovanni.  

PubMed

The author tries to account for the disturbing impact of Mozart's opera Don Giovanni. Some writers idealize Don Giovanni's power and vitality. The author view is that Mozart's music depicts him as a much emptier character, using phallic narcissism as a way of surviving a psychic catastrophe by projecting his pain into others. The music shows how Giovanni lives in projective identification with many other objects and part-objects, masculine and feminine; and how he seduces them into complicity with his defensive system. This situation is contrasted musically with the world of the other characters, particularly the women, who are depicted as more ordinary, more complex and, in fact, more sensual. PMID:18290798

Rusbridger, Richard

2008-02-01

221

Addictive behaviors in the aged.  

PubMed

This review is devoted to alcoholism but also to other substance-dependences (tobacco, medication, illicit drugs) and behavioral addictions (gambling) in the aged. Compared to younger subjects, addictions in older people are marked by the high frequency of somatic comorbidities, physiological changes related to age, increased severity due to atypical presentations. Moreover, usual screening tests and diagnostic questionnaires are often not suited for the aged. Psychopathology of addictions in the aged points out vulnerabilities not resolved with the advance in age, in connection with separation, narcissism, oral regression, alexithymia and other pathological dimensions of personality. The weight of the environment, dominated by a certain agism, remains a brake to the global care that must be based, as in younger adults, on motivational approach and specific treatments with special pharmacological vigilance. PMID:23015240

Nubukpo, Philippe; Laot, Lucie; Clément, Jean-Pierre

2012-09-01

222

Karl Abraham's revolution of 1916: from sensual sucking to the oral-aggressive wish of destruction.  

PubMed

The author argues that "The First Pregenital Stage of the Libido" (Abraham 1916-1917) expounds a new conception of orality, i.e., of purposeful oral aggression directed against an object during the first stage of psychic development. This conception is shown to be contrary to Freud's view of orality as elaborated in Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905), as well as in other writings of late 1914 and 1915. Abraham's conception ignores fundamental dimensions of Freud's thinking during these years, namely, the difference between autoerotism/narcissism and object love, on the one hand, and also between the leading role of sexuality and the secondary role of aggression, on the other. Thus, Abraham's thinking represents a basic theoretical change that had far-reaching consequences for psychoanalytic practice. PMID:22423435

May, Ulrike

2012-01-01

223

What does the narcissistic personality inventory really measure?  

PubMed

The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is a widely used measure of narcissism. However, debates persist about its exact factor structure with researchers proposing solutions ranging from two to seven factors. The present research aimed to clarify the factor structure of the NPI and further illuminate its nomological network. Four studies provided support for a three-factor model consisting of the dimensions of Leadership/Authority, Grandiose Exhibitionism, and Entitlement/Exploitativeness. The Leadership/Authority dimension was generally linked to adaptive outcomes whereas the other two dimensions, particularly Entitlement/Exploitativeness, were generally linked to maladaptive outcomes. These results suggest that researchers interested in the psychological and behavioral outcomes associated with the NPI should examine correlates at the facet level. In light of the findings, we propose a hierarchical model for the structure of the NPI and provide researchers with a scoring scheme for this commonly used instrument. PMID:20876550

Ackerman, Robert A; Witt, Edward A; Donnellan, M Brent; Trzesniewski, Kali H; Robins, Richard W; Kashy, Deborah A

2011-03-01

224

Predicting premature termination from counseling using the Butcher Treatment Planning Inventory.  

PubMed

This investigation examined the extent to which premature termination from counseling could be predicted from selected scales on the Butcher Treatment Planning Inventory (BTPI). Ninety-five new clients at a university counseling center agreed to participate in the study and completed the BTPI as part of the intake evaluation. Premature termination occurred when a participant missed a scheduled appointment and unilaterally dropped out of counseling. Higher scores on Closed-Mindedness, Problems in Relationship Formation, Somatization of Conflict, Self-Oriented/Narcissism, Perceived Lack of Environmental Support, and the Treatment Difficulty Composite were associated with premature termination. The General Pathology Composite, a general index of symptomatic distress, also enhanced the prediction of premature termination by suppressing irrelevant variance in other BTPI scales. The results provide support for the validity of the BTPI in identifying clients at risk for premature termination from counseling. PMID:12066830

Hatchett, Gregory T; Han, Kyunghee; Cooker, Philip G

2002-06-01

225

[Hysteria and aging].  

PubMed

In the elderly, the manifestations of hysteria can take uncommon aspects such as durable conversion disorders for which a diagnosis is difficult in the context of polypathology, dissociative symptoms looking like some dementia syndromes, noisy psychiatric symptomatology with, in particular, severe depressive episodes or hallucinations. These disorders can appear without a context of histrionic personality. The evolution of hysterical disorders during life is not well known. First of all, because the nosographic systems are not constant and, secondly, because the disorders themselves can vary when observed at different times. The aging subject is exposed to an increasing symptomatology or conversely, to an improvement due to the waekening of the narcissism. It is also possible that a continuum could be established from hysterical symptoms in the adulthood to delusions or hallucinations in the elderly. The relation with the old hysteric subject must be marked by empathy and by the conviction that improvement will only lead back to a basal symptomatology. PMID:15683945

Pellerin, Jérôme; Pinquier, Clément; Potart, Chantal

2003-06-01

226

Cognitive, personality, and social factors associated with adolescents' online personal information disclosure.  

PubMed

The current study aims to understand the factors that influence adolescents' disclosure of personally identifiable information (PII) on social networking sites (SNSs). A survey was conducted among 780 adolescent participants (between 13 and 18) who were Facebook users. Structural equation modeling was used for analyzing the data and obtaining an overarching model that include cognitive, personality, and social factors that influence adolescents' PII disclosure. Results showed privacy concern as the cognitive factor reduces adolescents' PII disclosure and it serves as a potential mediator for personality and social factors. Amongst personality factors, narcissism was found to directly increase PII disclosure, and social anxiety indirectly decreases PII disclosure by increasing privacy concern. Amongst social factors, active parental mediation decreases PII disclosure directly and indirectly by increasing privacy concern. Restrictive parental mediation decreases PII disclosure only indirectly by increasing privacy concern. Implications of the findings to parents, educators, and policy makers were discussed. PMID:23849657

Liu, Cong; Ang, Rebecca P; Lwin, May O

2013-08-01

227

Explicit and Implicit Approach Motivation Interact to Predict Interpersonal Arrogance  

PubMed Central

Self-reports of approach motivation are unlikely to be sufficient in understanding the extent to which the individual reacts to appetitive cues in an approach-related manner. A novel implicit probe of approach tendencies was thus developed, one that assessed the extent to which positive affective (versus neutral) stimuli primed larger size estimates, as larger perceptual sizes co-occur with locomotion toward objects in the environment. In two studies (total N = 150), self-reports of approach motivation interacted with this implicit probe of approach motivation to predict individual differences in arrogance, a broad interpersonal dimension previously linked to narcissism, antisocial personality tendencies, and aggression. The results of the two studies were highly parallel in that self-reported levels of approach motivation predicted interpersonal arrogance in the particular context of high, but not low, levels of implicit approach motivation. Implications for understanding approach motivation, implicit probes of it, and problematic approach-related outcomes are discussed.

Robinson, Michael D.; Ode, Scott; Spencer L., Palder; Fetterman, Adam K.

2012-01-01

228

The out-of-body experience and personality adjustment.  

PubMed

Relationships between the out-of-body experience and personality adjustment were studied. A total of 445 college students, including 65 reporting out-of-body experiences, completed self-report measures of death orientation, defensive style, narcissism, paranormal beliefs, self-concept, and social desirability. No significant differences were found between respondents reporting out-of-body experiences and nonreporters on any of the instruments, except for the Paranormal Belief Scale. Reporters of out-of-body experiences showed significantly greater belief in precognition, psi, spiritualism, and witchcraft than did nonreporters. Findings indicate considerable similarity between reporters and nonreporters in personality adjustment. It is clear that, on these personality adjustment measures, the out-of-body experience was associated with neither less effective nor more effective adjustment. PMID:3585314

Tobacyk, J J; Mitchell, T P

1987-06-01

229

Metacognitive interpersonal therapy for narcissistic personality disorder and associated perfectionism.  

PubMed

Treating narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) successfully is possible but requires a thorough understanding of the pathology and appropriate clinical procedures. Perfectionism is one prominent feature often associated with narcissistic difficulties. Metacognitive Interpersonal Therapy (MIT) for NPD adopts manualized step-by-step procedures aimed at progressively dismantling narcissistic processes by first stimulating an autobiographical mode of thinking and then improving access to inner states and awareness of dysfunctional patterns. Finally, adaptive patterns of thinking, feeling, and acting are promoted, together with a sense of autonomy and agency and a reduction of perfectionistic regulatory strategies. Throughout, there needs to be constant attention to regulation of the therapy relationship to avoid ruptures and maximize cooperation. We describe here a successful case of MIT applied to a man in his early 20's with narcissism, perfectionism, and significant co-occurrence of Axis I and Axis II disorders. PMID:22729358

Dimaggio, Giancarlo; Attinà, Giovanna

2012-08-01

230

[Medical students' attitudes towards mental illness: a matter of studies or personality?].  

PubMed

Stigmatization of mental illness is a widespread phenomenon even among health professionals. To explore the origins of this inappropriate attitude, medical students at the beginning and in the end of their studies were examined with self-report measures of social distance towards mentally ill persons, beliefs about etiology of mental disorders, valuation of psychotherapy and the personality features empathy and narcissism. While the students' attitudes turn out to be unrelated to the personality features, significant differences between the two groups were found indicating that distance towards mentally ill patients in the medical role and ambivalence about the etiological factors of mental disorders are stronger pronounced in the end of the studies compared to the beginning. These findings underline the need to prepare medical students better for contacts with mentally ill patients. PMID:22334088

Neumann, Eva; Obliers, Rainer; Albus, Christian

2012-02-01

231

The almost untreatable narcissistic patient.  

PubMed

Clinical experience in the Personality Disorders Institute at Weill Cornell Medical College suggests that patients with borderline personality organization and a narcissistic personality disorder have a more serious prognosis than all other personality disorders functioning at the borderline level, and that those who in addition present significant antisocial behavior have an even worse prognosis (Clarkin, Yeomans, and Kernberg 1999; Stone 1990). This negative trend culminates in a group of practically untreatable patients with antisocial personality disorder, who represent the most severe cases of pathological narcissism. There are also patients with severe narcissistic personality disorder, functioning at an overt borderline level with significant antisocial features, but not presenting an antisocial personality disorder proper, who at times respond to treatment, while others do not. These patients are explored here, with a focus on particular psychotherapeutic techniques that have proven helpful, as well as on the limits of these technical approaches. PMID:17601104

Kernberg, Otto F

2007-01-01

232

Trauma: the seductive hypothesis.  

PubMed

In much of contemporary culture, "trauma" signifies not so much terrible experience as a particular context for understanding and responding to a terrible experience. In therapy, in the media, and in international interventions, the traumatized are seen not simply as people who suffer and so are deserving of concern and aid; they are seen also as people who suffer for us, who are given special dispensation. They are treated with awe if they tell a certain kind of trauma story, and are ignored or vilified if they tell another. Trauma has become not simply a story of pain and its treatment, but a host of sub-stories involving the commodification of altruism, the justification of violence and revenge, the entry point into "true experience," and the place where voyeurism and witnessing intersect. Trauma is today the stuff not only of suffering but of fantasy. Historically, trauma theory and treatment have shown a tension, exemplified in the writings of Freud and Janet, between those who view trauma as formative and those who view it as exceptional. The latter view, that trauma confers exceptional status deserving of special privilege, has gained ground in recent years and has helped to shape the way charitable dollars are distributed, how the traumatized are presented in the media, how governments justify and carry out international responses to trauma, and how therapists attend to their traumatized patients. This response to trauma reflects an underlying, unarticulated belief system derived from narcissism; indeed, trauma has increasingly become the venue, in society and in treatment, where narcissism is permitted to prevail. PMID:12866751

Reisner, Steven

2003-01-01

233

Variants of callous-unemotional conduct problems in a community sample of adolescents.  

PubMed

Callous-unemotional traits are believed to be a childhood precursor to psychopathy, and among youth with conduct problems they designate those showing a particularly severe, stable, and aggressive pattern of antisocial behavior. Youth with callous-unemotional traits are a heterogeneous population and, analogous to adults with psychopathy, research suggests that lower anxious primary and high-anxious secondary variants exist. Using a community sample of 2,306 Greek-Cypriot adolescents (M age = 16 years; 49.7 % female), the first aim of the study was to examine whether variants of callous-unemotional traits could be identified using latent profile analysis of scores on measures of callous-unemotional traits, conduct problems, and anxiety. Additional aims of the study were to compare the identified clusters on external measures theorized to distinguish them (i.e., self-esteem, narcissism, impulsivity, sensation seeking and proactive/reactive aggression) and social factors relevant to adolescent development. Results indicated that, in addition to low risk (i.e., low scores on callous-unemotional traits, conduct problems, and anxiety) and anxious (i.e., high scores on anxiety, low scores on callous-unemotional traits and conduct problems) subgroups, two groups of youth scoring high on callous-unemotional traits and conduct problems were identified. High-anxious secondary callous-unemotional variants were distinguished by lower self-esteem in combination with greater narcissism, aggression, and markedly higher conduct problems, whereas lower anxious primary variants showed higher self-esteem. Secondary callous-unemotional variants also reported greater susceptibility to peer pressure and popularity striving than primary variants. Both variants exhibited poorer outcomes relative to low risk and anxious youth, although anxious youth reported lower self-esteem and higher impulsivity and reactive aggression scores in comparison with low risk youth. Findings integrate two lines of inquiry focused on subtyping children and adults with psychopathic traits and antisocial behaviors. They also support the utility of subtyping callous-unemotional traits based on conduct problems and anxiety levels and provide information on common and distinct risk factors associated with primary and secondary callous-unemotional variants in a community sample of adolescent boys and girls. PMID:23644815

Fanti, Kostas A; Demetriou, Chara A; Kimonis, Eva R

2013-07-01

234

More, more, more: the dark side of self-expansion motivation.  

PubMed

Self-expansion without regard for others' well-being may represent the dark side of an otherwise healthy motive. Guided by Amoebic Self-Theory (AST), we developed the Engulfing Self Scale (ESS) to measure acquisitive tendencies across AST's three domains of the self. Four studies revealed that bodily engulfment appeared generally benign, and that the problematic aspects of social engulfment were generally restricted to interpersonal contexts. Spatial-symbolic engulfment motivation was linked to a breadth of problematic indices such as psychopathy, Machiavellianism, narcissism, psychological entitlement, social dominance orientation, economic system justification, greed, and valuation of power. It also predicted reluctance to expose a cheating group leader when doing so would threaten one's own positive outcomes, greater justification of a looter's behavior when prompted take his or her perspective, and greater justification of self-serving reward allocations after defeating an ostensible competitor. Spatial-symbolic engulfment may be a motivational fountainhead for behaviors that negate others' well-being. PMID:23504598

Burris, Christopher T; Rempel, John K; Munteanu, Armand R; Therrien, Patrick A

2013-05-01

235

Identity disturbance in distant patients.  

PubMed

Chronically distant, emotionally isolated patients often present with identity disturbance. Identity, it is argued, develops as a thematic pattern of narcissism, shaped by the nature of the mother's early libidinal influences on the child's sense of self. Identity provides a form of self-definition that addresses the question, Who am I? In the treatment of these patients, resistances to narcissistic vulnerabilities (narcissistic resistances) provide an illusory sense of security and induce the analyst to avoid attention to a central pathological problem: primitive and frightening needs for, and unconscious fantasies of, dependence on, and functionality for, another. Patients' avoidance of material and therapeutic interactions that deal with their dependencies are aspects of a tacit contract with the analyst to foreclose examination of their considerable problems with inner stability. Among these problems are anxieties regarding intrusion and loss of separateness. As analysis proceeds, elements of such a patient's identity become clarified and are used to understand and organize the material for both analyst and patient. This can allow the patient to articulate a more embodied and vital experience of individuality. A case is presented to illustrate the analysis of a patient using this approach. PMID:23526544

Hoffman, Irwin

2013-04-01

236

The scenic function of the ego and its role in symptom and character formation.  

PubMed

The author argues that the scenic function of the ego permits the situationally appropriate representation of an unconscious, infantile configuration - that is, of a relatively stable, personality-based drive scene having the same status as latent dream thoughts. The products of conflict elaboration (symptoms, etc.) are manifested in different ways in accordance with the conditions of the relevant situation. The contents of the drive scene are created by the psychical apparatus on the basis of infantile perceptions and are revealed in screen memories. The capacity for situationally appropriate representation is apparently bound up with the mobile drive, including its narcissistic transformations. Desexualization (in the sense of neutralization) renders scenic elaboration impossible. The drive derivatives withdrawn from the scenic configuration contribute to ego organization and the formation of character traits, which no longer vary according to the situation, but can only be modified by a change in personality structure itself. It is as yet unclear whether a process of resexualization can make them amenable once more to analytic work. The form of narcissistic libido that can assume a scenic configuration is closely related to primary narcissism. Its manifestations, which may likewise emerge in situation-dependent symptom formations, appear accessible to analysis. PMID:23560907

Argelander, Hermann

2013-04-01

237

An examination of the factor structure of the Elemental Psychopathy Assessment.  

PubMed

The Elemental Psychopathy Assessment (EPA) is a self-report measure designed to assess the basic elements of psychopathy from a Five-Factor Model perspective. Using two large undergraduate samples, the aim of the current study was to further validate this new measure by examining its factor structure and the relations of the factors with established psychopathy measures and externalizing behaviors (Sample 2 only). Exploratory factor analytic results were highly consistent across the two samples and generated a four-factor structure characterized by Antagonism, Emotional Stability, Disinhibition, and Narcissism. These factors converged as expected with factors from alternative self-report conceptualizations of psychopathy and externalizing behaviors. The EPA factors also provided incremental validity in the prediction of the alternative psychopathy measures and externalizing behaviors above and beyond the other psychopathy measures. The stable factor structure and relations with constructs relevant to the study of psychopathy provide further support for the EPA as a stand-alone, comprehensive assessment of psychopathic personality. PMID:23544429

Few, Lauren R; Miller, Joshua D; Lynam, Donald R

2013-07-01

238

Suppose Freud had chosen Orestes instead.  

PubMed

The paper argues that the story of Oedipus, however understood, conveys psychic truth of no greater or more central importance to human development than do the stories of many other myths. A distinction is made between sophisticated theories developed out of Freud's original concept of the Oedipus complex, and the adherence by some clinicians to his original sexual theory. The meaning of Sophocles' play Oedipus the King is found to lie in the clash between Oedipus' omnipotent narcissism (hubris) and the power of the unconscious psyche, rather than in cross-generational sex. Emphasis is placed on the clinical usefulness of understanding all myths symbolically. The Oresteia by Aeschylus is offered as a story about pre-Oedipal (in the Freudian sense) psychic states. This trilogy shows symbolically the developing of an ego, the establishment of moral judgement and the integration of our shadow (the Furies). It also shows the parallel development of structures of law in society to replace instinctive blood feuds. It is suggested that had Freud chosen Orestes instead of Oedipus, the course of both psychoanalysis and of Western society would have had a different emphasis. PMID:19344316

Clark, Margaret

2009-04-01

239

[Personality pathological traits and brain metabolites as predictors of non-abstinence in addicts with personality disorders].  

PubMed

Differences in pathological personality traits and disturbances in brain metabolites between non consumers, abstinent and non abstinent consumers were assessed. Participants (n=113) aged between 18-45 years with personality disorder (PD) were diagnosed with clinical interview and scales for depression, anxiety, impulsivity and dimensions of personality pathology. Brain metabolites were analyzed with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and multiple comparisons. Abstinent and non-abstinent differentiated from non-consumers in emotional deregulation, inhibition, and restricted expression; abstinent and non-abstinent differentiated from each other in self-aggression, dissocial behaviour, conduct disorder, stimulus seeking and intimacy problems. N-Acetyl Aspartate and creatine values were lower between non-abstinent in prefrontal, anterior cingulate cortex, cerebellar vermis and superior corona radiata. For abstinent, choline levels were greater in cerebellar vermis and n-acetyl aspartate were lower in dorso-lateral prefrontal and anterior cingulated cortex and insula. Regarding personality traits, insecure attachment, narcissism, lability, self-aggression and anxiety characterize consumers and abstinent, while suspiciousness, rejection and character hardness are found in consumers (non-abstinent and abstinent). Compulsive traits, unplanned body impulsiveness and lack of control in emotional regulation predominated in non-abstinent and participants with co-morbidities. Detachment and inhibition predominate in alcohol abuse disorder and narcissistic traits in substance abuse. PMID:23880833

Serrani Azcurra, Daniel

2013-01-01

240

Psychic skin: psychotic defences, borderline process and delusions.  

PubMed

In this paper, I apply the concept of psychic skin to analytic work with people suffering from personality disorders and psychoses. When psychoses emerge, the defensive skin which protects the ego is breached and violent unconscious forces rip through the personality. Some of the patients diagnosed as schizophrenic with whom I work have identified with archetypal characters such as Christ, Satan, John Lennon and the Queen. I attempt to show how the adoption of these inflated personas can serve as secondary psychic skins. Such delusional identifications can provide a protective shield to hide the denuded self and prevent intrusion from the external world. Through clinical example, I try to demonstrate how these archetypal 'second skins' can preserve life until internal and external conditions make it possible for the self to emerge. I contrast such psychotic identifications with 'thin-skinned' and 'thick-skinned' narcissism as well as 'defences of the self' in borderline states where the psychic skin may be damaged but does not disintegrate. I also look at the ways in which Jung's own personal experience was different from this and how he managed to avert psychotic breakdown. PMID:22288539

Schmidt, Martin

2012-02-01

241

"Experience-sharing" as an antidote to dependence-making behavior of general practitioners.  

PubMed

This article explores how group-dynamic interventions can be used to teach health professionals to counter impulses to make clients dependent on them. The basic assumption, derived from Kohut's work on narcissism, is that dependence-making behavior is connected with deep-rooted feelings of insufficiency resulting from a defective autonomy. A part of the standard Dutch General Practice (GP) training program, experience-sharing in groups of 12 GP trainees, offers opportunities to explore these feelings. The format of this experience-sharing (well-defined boundaries, minimal structure, facilitating leaders) often evokes behavior in which the peculiarities of the dependence-making behavior of the GP's vis-à-vis patients are mirrored: that is, dependent behavior. In order to analyze and influence this behavior, use can be made of Levine's model of group psychotherapy, which focuses on enhancing autonomy. In this paper we show, by means of four group cases, how Levine's framework can be used to enhance autonomy, lessen dependence, and thus diminish the tendency of GP's toward dependence-making behavior. PMID:7890451

Runia, E; Nijenhuis, E

1995-01-01

242

A fairbairnian structural analysis of the narcissistic personality disorder.  

PubMed

Fairbairn's structural theory is based on the developing child's need to dissociate actual events between himself or herself and his or her objects that are excessively rejecting in order to contine an uninterrupted, pristine attachment to them. This eventuates in three selves in relation to three objects: One pair is conscious (the central ego which relates to the ideal object), while the other two pairs (the antilibidinal ego, which relates to the rejecting object, and the libidinal ego, which relates to the exciting object) are mostly held in the unconscious. Fairbairn saw the fluid relationship between the two split-off pairs of unconscious part selves and the conscious central ego as the primary dynamic of the human personality. The author proposes a specific variation in Fairbairn's structural theory to account for the development of narcissism. Specifically, this disorder is viewed as the result of a developmental history in which the child finds himself or herself in an exceedingly hostile interpersonal environment that precludes the child from using an idealized version either of his or her parental objects as the "exciting object." The child therefore substitutes a grandiose view of himself or herself as the exciting object. This defense deflects external influences and replaces relationships with external objects with a closed internal world that is comprised of an admiring part-self basking in reflected love from its relationship with an exciting part-object. PMID:24866161

Celani, David P

2014-06-01

243

Test Facilities and Experience on Space Nuclear System Developments at the Kurchatov Institute  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The complexity of space fission systems and rigidity of requirement on minimization of weight and dimension characteristics along with the wish to decrease expenditures on their development demand implementation of experimental works which results shall be used in designing, safety substantiation, and licensing procedures. Experimental facilities are intended to solve the following tasks: obtainment of benchmark data for computer code validations, substantiation of design solutions when computational efforts are too expensive, quality control in a production process, and ``iron'' substantiation of criticality safety design solutions for licensing and public relations. The NARCISS and ISKRA critical facilities and unique ORM facility on shielding investigations at the operating OR nuclear research reactor were created in the Kurchatov Institute to solve the mentioned tasks. The range of activities performed at these facilities within the implementation of the previous Russian nuclear power system programs is briefly described in the paper. This experience shall be analyzed in terms of methodological approach to development of future space nuclear systems (this analysis is beyond this paper). Because of the availability of these facilities for experiments, the brief description of their critical assemblies and characteristics is given in this paper.

Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Garin, Vladimir P.; Glushkov, Evgeny S.; Kompaniets, George V.; Kukharkin, Nikolai E.; Madeev, Vicktor G.; Papin, Vladimir K.; Polyakov, Dmitry N.; Stepennov, Boris S.; Tchuniyaev, Yevgeny I.; Tikhonov, Lev Ya.; Uksusov, Yevgeny I.

2004-02-01

244

Psychometric examination and normative data for the narcissistic personality inventory 29 item version.  

PubMed

The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) is commonly used in empirical studies of narcissism. Few population-based studies have been published. Our aim was to do a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the NPI 29 item version with a four-factor structure, in two population-based samples and in a patient sample, and present normative population-based data. The NPI-29 was filled in by 324 respondents from the Norwegian population, 231 from the Swedish population and 167 Norwegian psychiatric patients. The four-factor structure of the NPI-29 with Leadership/Power, Exhibitionism/Self-admiration, Superiority/Arrogance and Uniqueness/Entitlement was reproduced in these samples. The CFA models showed good fit indices in all samples. Mean scores on the NPI-29 and four subscales hardly differed between the samples. For the NPI-29 total score and factors, few significant differences were observed. CFA of the samples supported the factor structure of the NPI-29 formerly identified by principal component analysis of the Swedish population sample. PMID:18826419

Svindseth, Marit F; Sørebø, Oystein; Nøttestad, Jim Aage; Roaldset, John Olav; Wallin, Juliska; Dahl, Alv A

2009-04-01

245

Perceived humiliation during admission to a psychiatric emergency service and its relation to socio-demography and psychopathology  

PubMed Central

Background There is a lack of empirical studies of patients’ level of humiliation during the hospital admission process and its implications for the clinical setting. We wanted to explore associations between self-rated humiliation and socio-demography and psychopathology in relation to admission to a psychiatric emergency unit. Methods Consecutively admitted patients (N?=?186) were interviewed with several validated instruments. The patients self-rated humiliation by The Cantril Ladder, and 35% of the sample was defined as the high humiliation group. Results Final multivariate analysis found significant associations between compulsory admission, not being in paid work, high scores on hostility, and on entitlement, and high levels of humiliation. No significant interactions were observed between these variables, and the narcissism score was not a confounder concerning humiliation. Conclusions High level of humiliation during the admission process was mainly related to patient factors, but also to compulsory admission which should be avoided as much as possible protecting the self-esteem of the patients.

2013-01-01

246

[Adolescent sexuality].  

PubMed

The social Adolescent features are insecurity, narcissism, eroticism, more impetuosity than reason. 1/3 of adolescents have risk behaviour for health. The pregnancy rate in adolescent are 9/1,000 (11,720, the abort about 50 %). The total abort (2009) were 114,480. Increase the rate of 8,4 (1990) to 14,6/ 1,000 (2009). The sexual education fails. The consulting about contraceptives get pregnancy of the OR 3,2, condom OR 2,7. The adolescent are influenced in his matter: oeer have 70-75 % of influence, mother 30-40 %, father 15 %, for yhe environment and education Cyberspace access to information: 33 % exposed to unwanted sexual materials, 1 in 7 solicited sexual online. The argument have 4 central topic: Morality and Responsibility, Desire (responsibility vs gratification), Danger (fear related to pregnancy and STD/VIH), and Victimization. The prevention of STD: so called safe sex, delayed, and abstinence, Prevention HPV vaccine. The information is not enough, are necessary personal integral formation in values as self control, abstinence, mutual respect, responsibility, reasonable decisions. PMID:21877398

Calero, Juan del Rey

2010-01-01

247

Idealization and mourning in love relationships: normal and pathological spectra.  

PubMed

Prior to the last two decades, psychoanalytic literature focused on the psychopathology of sexual life, rather than on an integrated overview of love relationships. Only in the last twenty-five years has its scope been expanded to include the psychodynamics and phenomenology of love relationships per se. Nevertheless, a selective, critical review of the literature indicates that little attention has been paid to a) the interrelation of narcissism, self-esteem, and love relationships; b) the role of the ego-ideal and idealizations in the capacity for falling in love and sustaining love relationships; and c) the faculty for, and/or impediments to, transcending intrapsychic self-boundaries in mature love relationships. In this paper, a brief exposition of the ego-ideal developmental sequences and their integration into the superego as a differentiated structure serves as an introduction to the proposal of a developmental continuum of mechanisms of idealization and their respective nodal transmutations throughout the life cycle. This developmental continuum may contribute to the ongoing elucidation of the aforementioned problems. This referential frame is ultimately applied to the exploration of categorical and dimensional pathological variations of idealization and mourning in love relationships and in different levels of personality organization: neurotic, borderline, and narcissistic structures. A clinical vignette illustrates some of the correspondence criteria between this frame of reference and its clinical applications. PMID:10729945

Garza-Guerrero, C

2000-01-01

248

Lethal altruists: itineraries along the dark outskirts of moralistic prosociality.  

PubMed

Suicide bombers are the most spectacular example of an impregnable morality toward one's own group that co-exists alongside a radical amorality toward members of another group. Suicide bombers carry out massacres with the utter conviction that they are acting in accordance with values associated with the greatest good. Suicidal attacks are conceived as a form of lethal altruism, a damaging drift from human cooperative tendencies and one that requires a detailed understanding. Strong altruism is a main component of a cluster of temperamental traits that may distinguish individuals with propensities to put themselves at the threshold of major progroupal sacrifices. Among all populations there will be pockets of extreme moralizing altruists willing to make high investments in others, investments involving great personal risk. A research framework is outlined to study other constitutionally based traits (dominance, boldness, aggressiveness, machiavellianism, narcissism, messianism, credulity/religiosity) that may also contribute to the different roles played by self-recruited members in combative cells that in turn are crucial for the ties they establish and the tactics employed. Individually oriented research may reveal profiles distinguishing between potential inducers and performers of martyrdom. As a rule, machiavellistic leaders do not usually squander their personal choices on group commitments; on the contrary, their gift for simulating altruism is used for individual gains. Potential martyrs, on the other hand, are by definition squanderers. Evidence accrued in recent years in fields going from behavioral economics to cognitive neuroimaging makes such an endeavor feasible. PMID:19580547

Tobeña, Adolf

2009-06-01

249

The psychology of spite and the measurement of spitefulness.  

PubMed

Spite is an understudied construct that has been virtually ignored within the personality, social, and clinical psychology literatures. This study introduces a self-report Spitefulness Scale to assess individual differences in spitefulness. The scale was initially tested on a large sample of 946 college students and cross-validated on a national sample of 297 adults. The scale was internally consistent in both samples. Factor analysis supported a 1-factor solution for the initial pool of 31 items. Item response theory analysis was used to identify the best performing of the original 31 items in the university sample and reduce the scale to 17 items. Tests of measurement invariance indicated that the items functioned similarly across both university and national samples, across both men and women, and across both ethnic majority and minority groups. Men reported higher levels of spitefulness than women, younger people were more spiteful than older people, and ethnic minority members reported higher levels of spitefulness than ethnic majority members. Across both samples, spitefulness was positively associated with aggression, psychopathy, Machiavellianism, narcissism, and guilt-free shame, and negatively correlated with self-esteem, guilt-proneness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Ideally, this Spitefulness Scale will be able to predict behavior in both laboratory settings (e.g., ultimatum games, aggression paradigms) and everyday life, contribute to the diagnosis of personality disorders and oppositional defiant disorder, and encourage further study of this neglected, often destructive, trait. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24548150

Marcus, David K; Zeigler-Hill, Virgil; Mercer, Sterett H; Norris, Alyssa L

2014-06-01

250

Autism, early narcissistic injury and self-organization: a role for the image of the mother's eyes?  

PubMed

Holland elucidated the new paradigm of self-organization in complex adaptive systems. This paradigm holds for all living systems, including the personality. In conjunction with the theory of archetypes, self-organization suggests two radical hypotheses, one about early development, the other about the origins of autism. Autism is associated with several medical conditions, with genetic markers, and with infant visual deprivation. However none of these factors is either necessary or sufficient to cause autism. It is hypothesized that each of these factors increases the likelihood of a primary psychological deficit: failure to acquire, or retain, the image of the mother's eyes. This hypothesis was initially derived from analytic work with patients who have early narcissistic injury and with patients who have mild autistic traits. Both diagnoses may arise from the same initial disturbance: Symington argued that autism is an extreme form of infantile narcissism. Indirect evidence for the image-of-the-eyes hypotheses comes from the evolution of primates, from infant-mother observations, from observations of infant vision, and from experiments on vision in other vertebrates. Byrd recently confirmed that the incidence of autism is increasing dramatically. The image-of-the-eyes hypotheses suggest that this increase may be linked to increased use of non-maternal childcare for young infants. PMID:15317530

McDowell, Maxson J

2004-09-01

251

An interest in fame: confirming the measurement and empirical conceptualization of fame interest.  

PubMed

The following paper introduces and develops the conceptualization of Fame Interest. Study 1 (N=1,978), through the use of factor analysis techniques, introduces the Fame Interest Scale which comprises six dimensions of Fame Interest (intensity, vulnerability, celebrity life-style, drive, perceived suitability, and altruistic) with evidence for the reliability and validity of the scale. Study 2 (N=376) examined the relationship between an interest in fame and measures of the five-factor model of personality, narcissism, self-esteem, curiosity, attachment style and perceived family, and peer and media influence. From this second study four findings emerge; (1) Fame Interest typified by a perceived suitability and intensity for a celebrity life-style was associated with perceived family, peer and media influence, (2) Fame Interest that arises from a vulnerability is a reflection of neuroticism, low self-esteem, and problematic attachments, (3) Fame Interest for altruistic reasons is associated with agreeableness, and (4) Fame Interest that reflects an overall drive is associated with conscientiousness. PMID:19646329

Maltby, John

2010-08-01

252

Sex differences in the etiology of psychopathic traits in youth.  

PubMed

Few studies have examined the etiology of psychopathic traits in youth, and even fewer have tested whether the genetic and environmental influences underlying these traits differ for boys and girls. We tested for sex differences in the etiology of 3 trait dimensions-impulsivity, narcissism, and callous-unemotionality (CU)-previously found to underlie youth psychopathy in our sample. Using biometric modeling we tested whether constraining the genetic and environmental influences for each dimension across sex reduced model fit. We also tested for qualitative sex differences in the influences underlying these dimensions by allowing the genetic and environmental correlations between opposite sex dizygotic twins to be less than their respective values in same-sex dizygotic twins. Although the magnitudes of the genetic and environmental influences underlying the CU and narcissistic trait dimensions did not differ for boys and girls, nonshared environmental influences contributed significantly greater variance to impulsive traits in boys. No qualitative sex differences were found in the influences underlying any of the 3 trait dimensions, suggesting that the same genes and environments contribute to these psychopathic traits in males and females. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24886014

Ficks, Courtney A; Dong, Lu; Waldman, Irwin D

2014-05-01

253

Screen memory: its importance to object relations and transference.  

PubMed

A screen memory of an obsessive and narcissistic man, reported early in psychoanalysis, both represented and disguised the patient's oedipal conflict, incestuous wishes, and sibling rivalry. It symbolized for him his relationship with his mother and was treated by him, in a repetitive and fetishistic manner throughout treatment, as the reason for his bitterness toward life, his sense of entitlement, his narcissism, and his distrust of women. In the transference, the memory-far from being inert- constantly played an active role in his wishes and disappointments regarding the analyst, and in his fantasied oedipal triumph over him. As the analysis progressed, and after years of treatment, the encapsulated nature of this memory began to give way to the patient's growing awareness of his oedipal wishes, the full range of his feelings toward his mother, and his sense of abandonment by her. The nature of screen memory is explored, including how it relates to a patient's personality and use of the past in general, how it may figure in the development of a person's object relations, and the decisive role it may play throughout a treatment. PMID:18515702

Reichbart, Richard

2008-06-01

254

[Diogenes syndrome: a transnosographic approach].  

PubMed

Diogenes syndrome is a behavioural disorder of the elderly. Symptoms include living in extreme squalor, a neglected physical state and unhygienic conditions. This is accompanied by a self-imposed isolation, the refusal of external help and a tendency to accumulate heteroclite objects. This particular geriatric syndrome has been described for the first time only quite recently, as the 2 primary descriptions by geriatricians and psychiatrists date from 1966 and 1975 respectively. Its rare occurrence contrasts with the fact that it is well-known, partly due to it being named after the Greek philosopher "Diogene de Sinope", who taught cynicism philosophy and a return to a natural way of life, and partly because of its rare characteristics. The Diogenes syndrome is a fascinating object of study for the clinician who takes care of patients living in uncommon conditions, on the edge of society and unaware of the particularity of their lifestyles. Patients suffering from Diogenes syndrome are usually discovered by chance, either because of a somatic illness, or as a result of social intervention related to their behavioural problems. Management of the syndrome is difficult and ethically challenging, as the patient does not seek help. Moreover, 46% of patients have a 5 year mortality rate. Hospitalisation has to be avoided whenever possible and ambulatory treatment and social measures should be favoured. Psychotropic treatment prescription may be necessary, depending on clinical features and the possible underlying psychiatric disease. Although several clinical hypotheses have been suggested, the true ethiopathogeny of the syndrome remains unclear. Most authors agree that this behaviour does not reflect free will and has consequently no theoretical relationship to the Greek philosopher. There is no true consensus about diagnostic criteria. They include the main features of the syndrome and exclude known psychiatric syndromes. Clark and Mankikar, who named this syndrome, reckon it may represent stress-related defence mechanisms of the elderly or may be related to natural ageing process. However, psychiatric pathologies as paranoid and paranoiac psychoses, mood disorders and obsessive and compulsive disorders have been described to be associated with it in the literature. Dementia, in particular temporo-frontal dementia, should be looked for and excluded clinically. Alcohol abuse seems to be an aggravating rather than a precipitating factor. Finally, the link between these pathologies and Diogenes syndrome is not yet determined: are they triggering, co-morbid or etiological factors? Should this syndrome be considered as a true illness or as a symptom? This paper presents Diogenes syndrome as a behavioural disorder and distinguishes 2 types: the "active type"--patients who collect from outside to clutter inside--and the "passive type"--patients who passively become invaded by their rubbish. Active type patients fill their home to fill in the vacuum of their life, as it deteriorates and looses its narcissical appeal. Passive type patients accumulate by default and emptiness. A psychopathological understanding is presented here, referring to psychoanalytical theories of the Moi-peau (ego-skin) described by Anzieu. The Moi-peau represents a structure of the psyche founded on the following principle: any psychic function develops itself according to a bodily function from which it transposes its functioning at a mental level. The skin has three functions: the containing shell, the protective barrier of the psyche, and a medium of exchange. The Moi-peau is organised as a double-wall acting both as a defence mechanism and as a filter between the psyche and the external world. It preserves the relationship and the cohesion "container-content". As a result of a narcissical wound, the Moi-peau is damaged and looses its function of a container. In the case of Diogenes Syndrome, the accumulated items repair the Moi-peau and the home becomes an "exterior-proof", thus playing the role of the Moi-

Hanon, C; Pinquier, C; Gaddour, N; Saïd, S; Mathis, D; Pellerin, J

2004-01-01

255

Further development and construct validation of MMPI-2-RF indices of global psychopathy, fearless-dominance, and impulsive-antisociality in a sample of incarcerated women.  

PubMed

Replicating and extending research by Sellbom et al. (M. Sellbom, Y. S. Ben-Porath, C. J. Patrick, D. B. Wygant, D. M. Gartland, & K. P. Stafford, 2012, Development and Construct Validation of the MMPI-2-RF Measures of Global Psychopathy, Fearless-Dominance, and Impulsive-Antisociality, Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, 3, 17-38), the current study examined the criterion-related validity of three self-report indices of psychopathy that were derived from scores on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Y. S. Ben-Porath & A. Tellegen, 2008, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form: Manual for Administration, Scoring, and Interpretation, Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press). We estimated psychopathy indices by regressing scores from the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; S. O. Lilienfeld & B. P. Andrews, 1996, Development and Preliminary Validation of a Self-Report Measure of Psychopathic Personality Traits in Noncriminal Populations, Journal of Personality Assessment, 66, 488-524) and its two distinct facets, Fearless-Dominance and Impulsive-Antisociality, onto conceptually selected MMPI-2-RF scales. Data for a newly collected sample of 230 incarcerated women were combined with existing data from Sellbom et al.'s (2012) male correctional and mixed-gender college samples to establish regression equations with optimal generalizability. Correlation and regression analyses were then used to examine associations between the MMPI-2-RF-based estimates of PPI psychopathy and criterion measures (i.e., other well-established measures of psychopathy and conceptually related personality traits), and to evaluate whether gender moderated these associations. The MMPI-2-RF-based psychopathy indices correlated as expected with criterion measures and showed only one significant moderating effect for gender, namely, in the association between psychopathy and narcissism. These results provide further support for the validity of the MMPI-2-RF-based estimates of PPI psychopathy, and encourage their use in research and clinical contexts. PMID:23855322

Phillips, Tasha R; Sellbom, Martin; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Patrick, Christopher J

2014-02-01

256

The PMHT: solutions for some of its problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tracking multiple targets in a cluttered environment is a challenging task. Probabilistic Multiple Hypothesis Tracking (PMHT) is an efficient approach for dealing with it. Essentially PMHT is based on the method of Expectation-Maximization for handling with association conflicts. Linearity in the number of targets and measurements is the main motivation for a further development and extension of this methodology. Unfortunately, compared with the Probabilistic Data Association Filter (PDAF), PMHT has not yet shown its superiority in terms of track-lost statistics. Furthermore, the problem of track extraction and deletion is apparently not yet satisfactorily solved within this framework. Four properties of PMHT are responsible for its problems in track maintenance: Non-Adaptivity, Hospitality, Narcissism and Local Maxima.1, 2 In this work we present a solution for each of them and derive an improved PMHT by integrating the solutions into the PMHT formalism. The new PMHT is evaluated by Monte-Carlo simulations. A sequential Likelihood-Ratio (LR) test for track extraction has been developed and already integrated into the framework of traditional Bayesian Multiple Hypothesis Tracking.3 As a multi-scan approach, also the PMHT methodology has the potential for track extraction. In this paper an analogous integration of a sequential LR test into the PMHT framework is proposed. We present an LR formula for track extraction and deletion using the PMHT update formulae. As PMHT provides all required ingredients for a sequential LR calculation, the LR is thus a by-product of the PMHT iteration process. Therefore the resulting update formula for the sequential LR test affords the development of Track-Before-Detect algorithms for PMHT. The approach is illustrated by a simple example.

Wieneke, Monika; Koch, Wolfgang

2007-08-01

257

Measurement and structural invariance of the Antisocial Process Screening Device.  

PubMed

Despite increasing study of psychopathic traits in children and adolescents, evidence regarding the factor structure of these traits has been inconsistent across community, clinic-referred, and incarcerated samples. Empirical support exists for both 2-factor (Impulsivity-Conduct Problems and Callous-Unemotional) and 3-factor (Narcissism, Callous-Unemotional, and Impulsivity) models, and factorial invariance across various samples has not been either tested or supported in the extant literature. We conducted confirmatory factor analyses of the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; Frick & Hare, 2001) in 838 nonreferred twin pairs (M = 10.57 years, SD = 3.19 years) and 251 clinic-referred children (M = 10.82 years, SD = 3.39 years). Factorial invariance was tested across zygosity (monozygotic vs. dizygotic twins), sex (males vs. females), and age (younger vs. older children, divided by median age of 10.37 years) in the community sample and across sample type in both the community and clinic-referred samples. Results suggested that the 3-factor model fit better than did the 2-factor model in both community and clinic-referred samples. Using the best fitting 3-factor model, full measurement and structural invariance were found across zygosity, sex, and age in the community sample. Full measurement and structural invariance were also found across sample type except for differences in factor means across samples, suggesting excellent psychometric properties of the APSD. These results strongly support the robustness of the 3-factor model of psychopathic traits in children as well as the generalizability of the APSD across samples. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24274050

Dong, Lu; Wu, Hao; Waldman, Irwin D

2014-06-01

258

[Comparative study on elderly and disabled subjects with various degrees of dementia].  

PubMed

This study aims at showing the positive effects of arts therapies in individual and group sessions, with an aging, valid or dependent population, presenting symptoms of dementia or not. The improvement of cognition (including memory), well-being, as well as of certain medical problems (pain, tension...) was underlined in several studies on arts therapies, including especially the use of music therapeutic techniques. Indeed, music stimulates the emotional memory, causing the emergence of ancient memories, thus restoring narcissism. The well-being of participants is increased. Our population consists of elderly people, most of them suffering from dementia. They come to the workshops by themselves or led by their families. Music but also pictorial arts are used as a therapeutic mediation for one session per week during the time of hospitalization. This period varies depending on the condition of the subject. The scales used in T1 and T2 with patients suffering from dementia are the Echelle d'appréciation clinique en gériatrie by Bouvard & Cottraux and the Fragebogen zur Beurteilung der Behandlung durch den Therapeuten (FBB-T) by Mattejat and Remschmidt. Regarding the criteria for external validation, a semi-structured interview is proposed to the nurses in T2. The scales used with valid people are the Index of Well-being by Campbell et al, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) by Zigmond and Snaith, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSES), validated by Vallières and Vallerand in 1990, and the Stressverarbeitungsfragebogen (SVF 78) by Janke et al. CDC: There was a positive effect for most seniors who attended the sessions: an increased well-being and a temporary appropriation of memories. However, given the small size and the heterogeneity of samples, the irregularity of attendance, the results cannot be generalized. More regular sessions of arts therapies would be favorable for a consolidation of results. PMID:20653190

Ciccarello, A

2010-01-01

259

Individual, social, and behavioral factors associated with co-occurring conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits.  

PubMed

Conduct problems (CP) and callous-unemotional (CU) traits can have a long-lasting negative impact into adulthood. Importantly, among youth with CP, those high on CU traits engage in a more severe, aggressive, and persistent pattern of antisocial behavior. The current study investigates the co-occurrence between CP and CU traits among a large sample of Greek-Cypriot adolescents (N?=?1,674; 50.1 % girls). Five distinct groups were identified with Latent Profile Analysis: low risk (48.7 %), average risk (33.8 %), co-occurring high CP-high CU (5.4 %), high CP-low CU (5.2 %), and low CP-high CU (6.9 %). Although more boys were identified in the higher risk groups, boys and girls within each group were not differentiated on levels of CP or CU traits during early adolescence. Youth in the identified groups were compared on early (Mean age?=?12.12) and middle (Mean age?=?14.02) adolescence individual and contextual factors. Youth with high CP-high CU were at higher risk for behavioral (bullying and substance use), individual (inattention, impulsivity, narcissism), and contextual (low family-support) problems compared to youth in the high CP-low CU and low CP-high CU groups, providing evidence that the combination of CP and CU traits might constitute a pathological group. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of sub-typing CP based on CU traits for the forthcoming fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Additional novel findings suggested that adolescents scoring high on CP, irrespective of CU, were not differentiated on hyperactivity, victimization, and anxiety/depression, and adolescents scoring high on CU traits, with or without CP, reported similar low levels of self-esteem and peer and family social-support. PMID:23408037

Fanti, Kostas A

2013-07-01

260

Adolescent sexual offenders: a self-psychological perspective.  

PubMed

Following a request for assistance in formulating a treatment philosophy for adolescent sexual offenders, a qualitative study of seven adolescent offenders was designed with a view to elaborating pre-offense, and post-offense dynamics. The point of departure was the hypothesis that sexual offending had relation to object relations. It was further hypothesized that offenders' object relations and self-development had been disfigured in childhood and adolescent development. The developmental theories of Mahler, Stern, Winnicott, and Kohut were reviewed in order to shed light on the connection between disfigured self-development and sexual offending. Mahler's work suggested that anomalies during the separation-individuation process were heavily implicated. Winnicott's thinking on transitional functioning in potential space and his employment of the concepts of the true self and false self were especially useful. These bodies of work were assimilated to Kohut's theory of self development in which three nuclear sectors of the self, namely, the grandiose-exhibitionistic sector, the idealizing-voyeuristic sector, and the twinship-alterego sector, gradually coalesce and cohere through the moderating influence of parental empathy with the child's developmental tasks. Where such empathy is unforthcoming, or when the normal parental functions are obliterated by traumatic experiences of abuse, unmoderated needs for exhibitionism and voyeurism continue through childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Victims of sexual offending were hypothesized to perform functions of restoration and preservation of a chronically weak and threatened self. The sample's interview transcripts were qualitatively analyzed and aggregated. Analysis suggested that, indeed, offenses appeared to have been motivated to preserve a weakened sense of self and that the thoughts and perceptions surrounding the offenses resonated with expressions of problematic separation from parental objects. In addition, it was noted that in the post-offense period, offenders had become subject to close supervision, or proctoring, from both formal and informal systems. In close supervision, offenders tended to rapidly crystallize a foreclosed, negative, deviant sexual identity in defense of unmoderated narcissism. Other observations were that intrafamilial offending was consistent with enmeshment in the family, adjudication and apparent treatment readiness, while extrafamilial offending was consistent with exclusion from the family, no adjudication and resistance to treatment. PMID:9196788

Chorn, R; Parekh, A

1997-01-01

261

Teaching strategies for coping with stress - the perceptions of medical students  

PubMed Central

Background The undergraduate medical course is a period full of stressors, which may contribute to the high prevalence of mental disorders among students and a decrease in life’s quality. Research shows that interventions during an undergraduate course can reduce stress levels. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the Strategies for Coping with Professional Stress class offered to medical students of the Federal University of Goiás, at Goiânia, Goiás, in Brazil. Methods Qualitative research, developed with medical students in an elective class addressing strategies for coping with stress after a focal group (composed of nine of the 33 students taking this course) identified stress factors in the medical course and the coping strategies that these students use. Analysis of the results of the class evaluation questionnaire filled out by the students on the last day of class. Results Stress factors identified by students in the focus group: lack of time, excessive class content, tests, demanding too much of themselves, overload of extracurricular activities, competitiveness among students and family problems. Coping strategies mentioned in the focus group: respecting one’s limits, setting priorities, avoiding comparisons, leisure activities (movies, literature, sports, meeting with friends and family). Results of the questionnaires: class content that was considered most important: quality of life, strategies for coping with stress, stress factors, assertiveness, community therapy, relaxation, cognitive restructuring, career choice, breathing, social networking, taking care of the caregiver, music therapy and narcissism. Most popular methodologies: relaxation practice, drawing words and discussion them in a group, community therapy, music therapy, simulated jury, short texts and discussion. Meaning of the class: asking questions and reinforcing already known strategies (22.6%), moment of reflection and self-assessment (19.4%), new interest and a worthwhile experience (19.4%), improvement in quality of life (16.1%), expression’s opportunity (9.7%), other (6.4%). Conclusion The stressors perceived by the medical students are intense and diverse, and the coping strategies used by them are wide-ranging. Most students felt that the class was a worthwhile learning experience, incorporated new practices for improving quality of life and recognized the importance of sharing and reflecting on one’s stressors and life choices.

2013-01-01