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  1. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackheim, Robert L.; Roth, Axel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's activities and purposes. MSFC seeks to build on previous contacts and relationships with Russian rocket institutions, to better understand Russian rocket products and technical capabilities. The US launch vehicle and spacecraft industry are already using many Russian propulsion products and MSFC needs better technical knowledge and understanding of these products as this use increases. Further details are given on MSFC's role in determining and developing the scope of space propulsion, NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan, Earth to Orbit propulsion systems, Space Shuttle propulsion systems, proposed Shuttle safety upgrades, and in-space propulsion systems. MSFC's role in the construction and support of the International Space Station is also described.

  2. The Marshall Center: Its place in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The organizational structure and facilities available at the Marshall Space Flight Center are described and the role of the Center in NASA program management is demonstrated in a review of the Center's past history and current development projects. Particular attention is given to space shuttle and the space transportation system; the preparation of experiments and management of Spacelab missions; and the development of the space telescope. Energy related activities discussed include the automatic guidance and control of the longwall shearing machine for coal extraction, systems for the solar heating and cooling of buildings, and the design of the solar power satellite. Products developed by Center personnel highlighted include the power factor controller to reduce electrical consumption by motors and the image enhancement process being used to restore early historical photographs. A free flying solar power source to increase mission duration of the orbiter and its payloads; techniques for the orbital assembly of large space structures; facilities for materials processing in space; the orbit transfer vehicle, solar electric propulsion systems; and the preparation of science and applications payloads are also described.

  3. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Barrel-Shaped Asymmetrical Capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.; Carruth, M. R.; Edwards, D. L.; Finchum, A.; Maxwell, G.; Nabors, S.; Smalley, L.; Huston, D.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Barrel-Shaped Asymmetrical Capacitor (NACAP) has been extensively tested at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the National Space Science and Technology Center. Trichel pulse emission was first discovered here. The NACAP is a magnetohydrodynamic device for electric propulsion. In air it requires no onboard propellant nor any moving parts. No performance was observed in hard vacuum. The next step shall be optimizing the technology for future applications.

  4. FOD Prevention at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA now requires all flight hardware projects to develop and implement a Foreign Object Damage (FOD) Prevention Program. With the increasing use of composite and bonded structures, NASA now also requires an Impact Damage Protection Plan for these items. In 2009, Marshall Space Flight Center released an interim directive that required all Center organizations to comply with FOD protocols established by on-site Projects, to include prevention of impact damage. The MSFC Technical Standards Control Board authorized the development of a new MSFC technical standard for FOD Prevention.

  5. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-22

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding sustainability program that revolves around energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. MSFC identified a problematic cooling loop with six separate compressor heat exchangers and a history of poor efficiency. The facility engineering team at MSFC partnered with Flozone Services, Incorporated to implement a comprehensive water treatment platform to improve the overall efficiency of the system.

  6. Plasma Propulsion Research at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehy, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is pursuing a range of research efforts aimed at identifying and developing new technologies for primary spacecraft propulsion. Efficient high-power electric propulsion (Ep) thrusters are a particular area of emphasis; these would enable the relatively rapid transit of large payloads about the solar system for unmanned or manned science and exploration. Such a mission would make heavy demands on the propulsion system, which may be required to run reliably for several years at a specific impulse approaching 10,OOO s with an efficiency of turning electrical power into jet power of at least 70%. The transit time to a destination scales approximately inversely with the cube root of the specific power, which is the ratio of jet power to power-plant mass. Consequently, reducing a trip time by half requires roughly an eight-fold increase in specific power. Given a renewed NASA commitment to space nuclear power, developing efficient EP thrusters with high jet power (> 100 kW) would seem to provide the most direct means of significantly increasing the specific power and hence reducing trip times. In particular, electromagnetic devices, with their high inherent thrust densities, should be better suited to high power applications than thrusters which depend exclusively on electrostatic forces for propellant acceleration.

  7. Improving System Engineering Excellence at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takada, Pamela Wallace; Newton, Steve; Gholston, Sampson; Thomas, Dale (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) management feels that sound system engineering practices are essential for successful project management, NASA studies have concluded that recent project failures could be attributed in part to inadequate systems engineering. A recent survey of MSFC project managers and system engineers' resulted in the recognition of a need for training in Systems Engineering Practices, particularly as they relate to MSFC projects. In response to this survey, an internal pilot short-course was developed to reinforce accepted practices for system engineering at MSFC. The desire of the MSFC management is to begin with in-house training and offer additional educational opportunities to reinforce sound system engineering principles to the more than 800 professionals who are involved with system engineering and project management. A Systems Engineering Development Plan (SEDP) has been developed to address the longer-term systems engineering development needs of MSFC. This paper describes the survey conducted and the training course that was developed in response to that survey.

  8. Science Outreach at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebo, George

    2002-07-01

    At the end of World War II Duane Deming, an internationally known economist enunciated what later came to be called "Total Quality Management" (TQM). The basic thrust of this economic theory called for companies and governments to identify their customers and to do whatever was necessary to meet their demands and to keep them satisfied. It also called for companies to compete internally. That is, they were to build products that competed with their own so that they were always improving. Unfortunately most U.S. corporations failed to heed this advice. Consequently, the Japanese who actively sought Deming's advice and instituted it in their corporate planning, built an economy that outstripped that of the U.S. for the next three to four decades. Only after U.S. corporations reorganized and fashioned joint ventures which incorporated the tenets of TQM with their Japanese competitors did they start to catch up. Other institutions such as the U.S. government and its agencies and schools face the same problem. While the power of the U.S. government is in no danger of being usurped, its agencies and schools face real problems which can be traced back to not heeding Deming's advice. For example, the public schools are facing real pressure from private schools and home school families because they are not meeting the needs of the general public, Likewise, NASA and other government agencies find themselves shortchanged in funding because they have failed to convince the general public that their missions are important. In an attempt to convince the general public that its science mission is both interesting and important, in 1998 the Science Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) instituted a new outreach effort using the interact to reach the general public as well as the students. They have called it 'Science@NASA'.

  9. Science Outreach at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebo, George

    2002-01-01

    At the end of World War II Duane Deming, an internationally known economist enunciated what later came to be called "Total Quality Management" (TQM). The basic thrust of this economic theory called for companies and governments to identify their customers and to do whatever was necessary to meet their demands and to keep them satisfied. It also called for companies to compete internally. That is, they were to build products that competed with their own so that they were always improving. Unfortunately most U.S. corporations failed to heed this advice. Consequently, the Japanese who actively sought Deming's advice and instituted it in their corporate planning, built an economy that outstripped that of the U.S. for the next three to four decades. Only after U.S. corporations reorganized and fashioned joint ventures which incorporated the tenets of TQM with their Japanese competitors did they start to catch up. Other institutions such as the U.S. government and its agencies and schools face the same problem. While the power of the U.S. government is in no danger of being usurped, its agencies and schools face real problems which can be traced back to not heeding Deming's advice. For example, the public schools are facing real pressure from private schools and home school families because they are not meeting the needs of the general public, Likewise, NASA and other government agencies find themselves shortchanged in funding because they have failed to convince the general public that their missions are important. In an attempt to convince the general public that its science mission is both interesting and important, in 1998 the Science Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) instituted a new outreach effort using the interact to reach the general public as well as the students. They have called it 'Science@NASA'.

  10. X-Ray Optics at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Broadway, David M.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engages in research, development, design, fabrication, coating, assembly, and testing of grazing-incidence optics (primarily) for x-ray telescope systems. Over the past two decades, MSFC has refined processes for electroformed-nickel replication of grazing-incidence optics, in order to produce high-strength, thin-walled, full-cylinder x-ray mirrors. In recent years, MSFC has used this technology to fabricate numerous x-ray mirror assemblies for several flight (balloon, rocket, and satellite) programs. Additionally, MSFC has demonstrated the suitability of this technology for ground-based laboratory applications-namely, x-ray microscopes and cold-neutron microscopes and concentrators. This mature technology enables the production, at moderately low cost, of reasonably lightweight x-ray telescopes with good (15-30 arcsecond) angular resolution. However, achieving arcsecond imaging for a lightweight x-ray telescope likely requires development of other technologies. Accordingly, MSFC is conducting a multi-faceted research program toward enabling cost-effective production of lightweight high-resolution x-ray mirror assemblies. Relevant research topics currently under investigation include differential deposition for post-fabrication figure correction, in-situ monitoring and control of coating stress, and direct fabrication of thin-walled full-cylinder grazing-incidence mirrors.

  11. X-ray optics at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Broadway, David M.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.

    2015-05-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engages in research, development, design, fabrication, coating, assembly, and testing of grazing-incidence optics (primarily) for x-ray telescope systems. Over the past two decades, MSFC has refined processes for electroformed-nickel replication of grazing-incidence optics, in order to produce highstrength, thin-walled, full-cylinder x-ray mirrors. In recent years, MSFC has used this technology to fabricate numerous x-ray mirror assemblies for several flight (balloon, rocket, and satellite) programs. Additionally, MSFC has demonstrated the suitability of this technology for ground-based laboratory applications—namely, x-ray microscopes and cold-neutron microscopes and concentrators. This mature technology enables the production, at moderately low cost, of reasonably lightweight x-ray telescopes with good (15-30 arcsecond) angular resolution. However, achieving arcsecond imaging for a lightweight x-ray telescope likely requires development of other technologies. Accordingly, MSFC is conducting a multi-faceted research program toward enabling cost-effective production of lightweight high-resolution x-ray mirror assemblies. Relevant research topics currently under investigation include differential deposition for post-fabrication figure correction, in-situ monitoring and control of coating stress, and direct fabrication of thin-walled full-cylinder grazing-incidence mirrors.

  12. The Electrostatic Levitation Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert W.; Savage, Larry; Robinson, Michael B.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Containerless processing is an important area of research in materials science. Electrostatic levitation (ESL) represents an emerging technology which permits containerless processing in a vacuum environment. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) established a levitation facility to provide a critical resource to the microgravity materials science research community to continue and enhance ground-based research in the support of the development of flight experiments during the transition to Space Station. During ESL processing, charged specimens are levitated in the electrostatic field produced by the system's electrodes. Three sets of positioning electrodes represent the heart of the MSFC system. Two dual-axis position sensitive detectors provide input for the PID control-loop computer. Sample position is maintained by adjusting the control voltages for the power supplies of the positioning electrodes. A UV source refreshes the charge on specimens during processing via the photoelectric effect. Lasers permit sample heating independent of positioning. The processing chamber typically operates under vacuum condition approximately = 10(exp -7) Torr. Electrostatic levitation provides a materials science research tool for investigations of refractory solids and melts. Topics of investigation include thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable phase formation, undercooling and nucleation, time-temperature-transformation diagrams and other aspects of materials processing. Current capabilities and recent results of processing studies for metals, alloys and oxides will be reviewed.

  13. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Range Report - May 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2015-01-01

    The following is a summary of the major meteorological/atmospheric projects and research that have been or currently are being accomplished at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Listed below are highlights of work done during the past 6 months in the Engineering Directorate (ED) and in the Science and Mission Systems Office (ZP).

  14. An illustrated chronology of the NASA Marshall Center and MSFC programs 1960-1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akens, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    The role that NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center played in the space program during the past 13 years is highlighted with pictures and text, plus background information concerning events that were important in the center's formation.

  15. Climate Variability and Impact at NASA's Marshal Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, James L.; Jedlovec, Gary; Williams, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Climate analysis for the Southeast U. S. has indicated that inland regions have experienced an average temperature increase of 2F since 1970. This trend is generally characterized by warmer winters with an indication of increased precipitation in the Fall season. Extended periods of limited rainfall in the Spring and Summer periods have had greater areal coverage and, at other times the number of precipitation events has been increasing. Climate model projections for the next 10-70 years indicate warmer temperatures for the Southeast U.S., particularly in the Spring and Summer, with some indication of more extremes in temperature and precipitation as shown in the table below. The realization of these types of regional climate changes in the form of extended heat waves and droughts and their subsequent stress on facilities, infrastructure, and workforce could have substantial impact on the activities and functions of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This presentation will present the results of an examination of the 100 year temperature and precipitation record for MSFC. Local warming has cause an increase in daily maximum and minimum temperatures by nearly 3F, with a substantial increase in the number of maximum temperatures exceeding 90F and a decrease in the number of days with minimum temperatures below freezing. These trends have substantial impact of the number of heating / cooling degree days for the area. Yearly precipitation totals are inversely correlated with the change in mean temperature and the frequency of heavy rain events has remain consistent with the changes in yearly totals. An extended heat wave index was developed which shows an increase in frequency of heat waves over the last 35 years and a subsequent reduction in precipitation during the heat waves. This trend will contribute to more intense drought conditions over the northern Alabama region, increasing the potential of destructive wildfires in and around

  16. Space Science Research and Technology at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation will summarize the various projects and programs managed in the Space Science Programs and Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Projects in the portfolio include NASA's Chandra X-Ray telescope, Hinode solar physics satellite, various advanced space propulsion technologies, including solar sails and tethers, as well as NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs.

  17. Friction Stir Welding Development at NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Gentz, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state process that pan be used to join materials without melting. The process was invented by The Welding Institute (TWI), Cambridge, England. Friction stir welding exhibits several advantages over fusion welding in that it produces welds with fewer defects and higher joint efficiency and is capable of joining alloys that are generally considered non-weldable with a fusion weld process. In 1994, NASA-Marshall began collaborating with TWI to transform FSW from a laboratory curiosity to a viable metal joining process suitable for manufacturing hardware. While teamed with TWI, NASA-Marshall began its own FSW research and development effort to investigate possible aerospace applications for the FSW process. The work involved nearly all aspects of FSW development, including process modeling, scale-up issues, applications to advanced materials and development of tooling to use FSW on components of the Space Shuttle with particular emphasis on aluminum tanks. The friction stir welding process involves spinning a pin-tool at an appropriate speed, plunging it into the base metal pieces to be joined, and then translating it along the joint of the work pieces. In aluminum alloys the rotating speed typically ranges from 200 to 400 revolutions per minute and the translation speed is approximately two to five inches per minute. The pin-tool is inserted at a small lead angle from the axis normal to the work piece and requires significant loading along the axis of the tool. An anvil or reaction structure is required behind the welded material to react the load along the axis of the pin tool. The process requires no external heat input, filler material, protective shielding gas or inert atmosphere typical of fusion weld processes. The FSW solid-state weld process has resulted in aluminum welds with significantly higher strengths, higher joint efficiencies and fewer defects than fusion welds used to join similar alloys.

  18. NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center Hydrostatic Bearing Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Theodore G.

    1991-01-01

    The basic approach for analyzing hydrostatic bearing flows at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is briefly discussed. The Hydrostatic Bearing Team has responsibility for assessing and evaluating flow codes; evaluating friction, ignition, and galling effects; evaluating wear; and performing tests. The Office of Aerospace and Exploration Technology Turbomachinery Seals Tasks consist of tests and analysis. The MSFC in-house analyses utilize one-dimensional bulk-flow codes. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is used to enhance understanding of bearing flow physics or to perform parametric analysis that are outside the bulk flow database. As long as the bulk flow codes are accurate enough for most needs, they will be utilized accordingly and will be supported by CFD analysis on an as-needed basis.

  19. The NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center drop tube user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathz, Thomas J.; Robinson, Michael B.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the structural and instrumentation hardware and the experimental capabilities of the 105-meter Marshall Space Flight Center Drop Tube Facility is given. This document is to serve as a guide to the investigator who wishes to perform materials processing experiments in the Drop Tube. Particular attention is given to the Tube's hardware to which an investigator must interface to perform experiments. This hardware consists of the permanent structural hardware (with such items as vacuum flanges), and the experimental hardware (with the furnaces and the sample insertion devices). Two furnaces, an electron-beam and an electromagnetic levitator, are currently used to melt metallic samples in a process environment that can range from 10(exp -6) Torr to 1 atmosphere. Details of these furnaces, the processing environment gases/vacuum, the electrical power, and data acquisition capabilities are specified to allow an investigator to design his/her experiment to maximize successful results and to reduce experimental setup time on the Tube. Various devices used to catch samples while inflicting minimum damage and to enhance turnaround time between experiments are described. Enough information is provided to allow an investigator who wishes to build his/her own furnace or sample catch devices to easily interface it to the Tube. The experimental instrumentation and data acquisition systems used to perform pre-drop and in-flight measurements of the melting and solidification process are also detailed. Typical experimental results are presented as an indicator of the type of data that is provided by the Drop Tube Facility. A summary bibliography of past Drop Tube experiments is provided, and an appendix explaining the noncontact temperature determination of free-falling drops is provided. This document is to be revised occasionally as improvements to the Facility are made and as the summary bibliography grows.

  20. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory report, January - June 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James E.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during Jan. to Jun. 1992. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, and H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  1. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory Report, July to December 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during July-December 1992. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, an H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  2. The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center program in gamma-ray burst astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    The research program in gamma-ray burst astronomy at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center is described. Large-area scintillation detector arrays have been flown on high-altitude balloons, and an array is being developed for the Gamma-Ray Observatory. The design of these detectors is described along with results obtained from previous balloon flights.

  3. In-Space Manufacturing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center: Enabling Technologies for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, Quincy; Johnston, Mallory; Ordonez, Erick; Ryan, Rick; Prater, Tracie; Werkeiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is currently engaged in a number of in-space manufacturing(ISM)activities that have the potential to reduce launch costs, enhance crew safety, and provide the capabilities needed to undertake long duration spaceflight safely and sustainably.

  4. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory report, March - May 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during March-May 1994. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, an H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  5. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory report, January - June 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E.

    1992-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during Jan. to Jun. 1992. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, and H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  6. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center solar observatory report, January - June 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during January-June 1993. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, an H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  7. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory report, July - October 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during June-October 1993. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, an H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  8. FOD Prevention at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA-MSFC directive MID 5340.1 requires FOD prevention for all flight hardware projects, and requires all support organizations to comply. MSFC-STD-3598 implements a standard approach for FOD prevention, tailored from NAS 412. Three levels of FOD Sensitive Area are identified, adopting existing practices at other NASA facilities. Additional emphasis is given to prevention of impact damage and mitigation of facility FOD sources, especially leaks and spills. Impact Damage Susceptible (IDS) items are identified as FOD-sensitive as well as hardware vulnerable to entrapment of small items.

  9. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's Contributions to Space Plasma Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the mid-l970's, the Space Plasma Physics Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has contributed critical instrumentation to numerous satellite and sounding rocket missions exploring the plasmas of near-Earth space. This talk will review major discoveries in Earth's ionosphere, plasmasphere, and magnetosphere directly attributable to the researchers of the Space Plasma Physics Group and the significance of these discoveries to the field of plasma physics.

  10. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Saves Water With High-Efficiency Toilet and Urinal Program

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-22

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding, successful sustainability program that focuses on energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. Because MSFC was built in the 1960s, most of the buildings house outdated, inefficient restroom fixtures. The facility engineering team at MSFC developed an innovative efficiency model for replacing these older toilets and urinals.

  11. Propulsion Research at the Propulsion Research Center of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, John; Rodgers, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is engaged in research activities aimed at providing the bases for fundamental advancement of a range of space propulsion technologies. There are four broad research themes. Advanced chemical propulsion studies focus on the detailed chemistry and transport processes for high-pressure combustion, and on the understanding and control of combustion stability. New high-energy propellant research ranges from theoretical prediction of new propellant properties through experimental characterization propellant performance, material interactions, aging properties, and ignition behavior. Another research area involves advanced nuclear electric propulsion with new robust and lightweight materials and with designs for advanced fuels. Nuclear electric propulsion systems are characterized using simulated nuclear systems, where the non-nuclear power source has the form and power input of a nuclear reactor. This permits detailed testing of nuclear propulsion systems in a non-nuclear environment. In-space propulsion research is focused primarily on high power plasma thruster work. New methods for achieving higher thrust in these devices are being studied theoretically and experimentally. Solar thermal propulsion research is also underway for in-space applications. The fourth of these research areas is advanced energetics. Specific research here includes the containment of ion clouds for extended periods. This is aimed at proving the concept of antimatter trapping and storage for use ultimately in propulsion applications. Another activity in this involves research into lightweight magnetic technology for space propulsion applications.

  12. Focus on Marshall: The Marshall Center Turns 50! (Part 2)

    NASA Video Gallery

    This month, the Focus on Marshall team invites you to a very special ceremony -- the NASA verison of a "birthday party" as the Marshall Space Flight Center turns 50 years old. Join them for the unv...

  13. Capabilities of the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Revised 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Suggs, Rob; Roberts, Barry C.; Cooke, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The Natural Environment Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the responsibility to provide natural environments engineering support to programs and projects. The Natural Environments Branch is responsible for natural environments definitions, modeling, database development, and analytical assessments of effects. Natural Environments Branch personnel develop requirements for flight projects and provide operational support for space and launch vehicle systems. To accomplish these responsibilities, models and analytical tools have been developed in the areas of planetary atmospheres, meteoroids, ionizing radiation, plasmas and ionospheres, magnetic and gravitational fields, spacecraft charging modeling, and radiation effects on electronic parts. This paper will build on a previous paper published in 2006 and provide updated descriptions of the capabilities within the Natural Environments Branch1. Updates describing improvements and new releases of several analytical tools and models will be presented. Separate sections will specifically describe modifications in the Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM), and the Marshall Solar Activity Future Estimation (MSAFE) capabilities.

  14. Ares Launch Vehicles Development Awakens Historic Test Stands at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Burt, Richard K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper chronicles the rebirth of two national rocket testing assets located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: the Dynamic Test Stand (also known as the Ground Vibration Test Stand) and the Static Test Stand (also known as the Main Propulsion Test Stand). It will touch on the historical significance of these special facilities, while introducing the requirements driving modifications for testing a new generation space transportation system, which is set to come on line after the Space Shuttle is retired in 2010. In many ways, America's journey to explore the Moon begins at the Marshall Center, which is developing the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, along with managing the Lunar Precursor Robotic Program and leading the Lunar Lander descent stage work, among other Constellation Program assignments. An important component of this work is housed in Marshall's Engineering Directorate, which manages more than 40 facilities capable of a full spectrum of rocket and space transportation technology testing - from small components to full-up engine systems. The engineers and technicians who operate these test facilities have more than a thousand years of combined experience in this highly specialized field. Marshall has one of the few government test groups in the United States with responsibility for the overall performance of a test program from conception to completion. The Test Laboratory has facilities dating back to the early 1960s, when the test stands needed for the Apollo Program and other scientific endeavors were commissioned and built along the Marshall Center's southern boundary, with logistics access by air, railroad, and barge or boat on the Tennessee River. NASA and its industry partners are designing and developing a new human-rated system based on the requirements for safe, reliable, and cost-effective transportation solutions. Given below are summaries of the Dynamic Test Stand and the Static Test Stand capabilities

  15. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) Development Activities at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center - 2006 Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005-06, the Prometheus program funded a number of tasks at the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to support development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system for future manned exploration missions. These tasks include the following: 1. NTP Design Develop Test & Evaluate (DDT&E) Planning 2. NTP Mission & Systems Analysis / Stage Concepts & Engine Requirements 3. NTP Engine System Trade Space Analysis and Studies 4. NTP Engine Ground Test Facility Assessment 5. Non-Nuclear Environmental Simulator (NTREES) 6. Non-Nuclear Materials Fabrication & Evaluation 7. Multi-Physics TCA Modeling. This presentation is a overview of these tasks and their accomplishments

  16. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model-2010 Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, F. W.; Justus, C. G.

    2011-01-01

    Reference or standard atmospheric models have long been used for design and mission planning of various aerospace systems. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Global Reference Atmospheric Model was developed in response to the need for a design reference atmosphere that provides complete global geographical variability and complete altitude coverage (surface to orbital altitudes), as well as complete seasonal and monthly variability of the thermodynamic variables and wind components. In addition to providing the geographical, height, and monthly variation of the mean atmospheric state, it includes the ability to simulate spatial and temporal perturbations.

  17. Current Activities and Capabilities of the Terrestrial Environment Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Batts, Wade

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) designated Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) the center of excellence for space transportation. The Aerospace Environments and Effects (AEE) team of the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch (EL23) in the Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory at MSFC, supports the center of excellence designation by providing near-Earth space, deep space, planetary, and terrestrial environments expertise to projects as required. The Terrestrial Environment (TE) group within the AEE team maintains an extensive TE data base. Statistics and models derived from this data are applied to the design and development of new aerospace vehicles, as well as performance enhancement of operational vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. The TE is defined as the Earth's atmospheric environment extending from the surface to orbital insertion altitudes (approximately 90 km).

  18. Potential utilization of the NASA/George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in earthquake engineering research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, R. E. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Earthquake engineering research capabilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) facilities at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Alabama, were evaluated. The results indicate that the NASA/MSFC facilities and supporting capabilities offer unique opportunities for conducting earthquake engineering research. Specific features that are particularly attractive for large scale static and dynamic testing of natural and man-made structures include the following: large physical dimensions of buildings and test bays; high loading capacity; wide range and large number of test equipment and instrumentation devices; multichannel data acquisition and processing systems; technical expertise for conducting large-scale static and dynamic testing; sophisticated techniques for systems dynamics analysis, simulation, and control; and capability for managing large-size and technologically complex programs. Potential uses of the facilities for near and long term test programs to supplement current earthquake research activities are suggested.

  19. INSPACE CHEMICAL PROPULSION SYSTEMS AT NASA's MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER: HERITAGE AND CAPABILITIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRight, P. S.; Sheehy, J. A.; Blevins, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is well known for its contributions to large ascent propulsion systems such as the Saturn V rocket and the Space Shuttle external tank, solid rocket boosters, and main engines. This paper highlights a lesser known but very rich side of MSFC-its heritage in the development of in-space chemical propulsion systems and its current capabilities for spacecraft propulsion system development and chemical propulsion research. The historical narrative describes the flight development activities associated with upper stage main propulsion systems such as the Saturn S-IVB as well as orbital maneuvering and reaction control systems such as the S-IVB auxiliary propulsion system, the Skylab thruster attitude control system, and many more recent activities such as Chandra, the Demonstration of Automated Rendezvous Technology (DART), X-37, the X-38 de-orbit propulsion system, the Interim Control Module, the US Propulsion Module, and multiple technology development activities. This paper also highlights MSFC s advanced chemical propulsion research capabilities, including an overview of the center s Propulsion Systems Department and ongoing activities. The authors highlight near-term and long-term technology challenges to which MSFC research and system development competencies are relevant. This paper concludes by assessing the value of the full range of aforementioned activities, strengths, and capabilities in light of NASA s exploration missions.

  20. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Brandon S.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry (e.g. blocking diodes). Key elements of the space environment which must be accounted for in a PV system design include: Solar Photon Radiation, Charged Particle Radiation, Plasma, and Thermal Cycling. While solar photon radiation is central to generating power in PV systems, the complete spectrum includes short wavelength ultraviolet components, which photo-ionize materials, as well as long wavelength infrared which heat materials. High energy electron radiation has been demonstrated to significantly reduce the output power of III-V type PV cells; and proton radiation damages material surfaces - often impacting coverglasses and antireflective coatings. Plasma environments influence electrostatic charging of PV array materials, and must be understood to ensure that long duration arcs do not form and potentially destroy PV cells. Thermal cycling impacts all components on a PV array by inducing stresses due to thermal expansion and contraction. Given such demanding environments, and the complexity of structures and materials that form a PV array system, mission success can only be ensured through realistic testing in the laboratory. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a broad space environment test capability to allow PV array designers and manufacturers to verify their system's integrity and avoid costly on-orbit failures. The Marshall Space Flight Center test capabilities are available to government, commercial, and university customers. Test solutions are tailored to meet the customer's needs, and can include performance assessments, such as flash testing in the case of PV cells.

  1. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Contributes to Solar B/Hinode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Hinode (Sunrise), formerly known as Solar-B before reaching orbit, was launched from the Uchinoura Space Center in Japan on September 23, 2006. Hinode was designed to probe into the Sun's magnetic field to better understand the origin of solar disturbances which interfere with satellite communications, electrical power transmission grids, and the safety of astronauts traveling beyond the Earth's magnetic field. Hinode is circling Earth in a polar orbit that places the instruments in continuous sunlight for nine months each year and allows data dumps to a high latitude European Space Agency (ESA) ground station every orbit. NASA and other science teams will support instrument operations and data collection from the spacecraft's operation center at the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science facility located in Tokyo. The Hinode spacecraft is a collaboration among space agencies of Japan, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Europe. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) managed development of three instruments comprising the spacecraft; the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT); the X-Ray Telescope (XRT); and the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Provided by the Multimedia support group at MSFC, this rendering illustrates the Solar-B Spacecraft in earth orbit with its solar panels completely extended.

  2. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Contributes to Solar B/Hinode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Hinode (Sunrise), formerly known as Solar-B before reaching orbit, was launched from the Uchinoura Space Center in Japan on September 23, 2006. Hinode was designed to probe into the Sun's magnetic field to better understand the origin of solar disturbances which interfere with satellite communications, electrical power transmission grids, and the safety of astronauts traveling beyond the Earth's magnetic field. Hinode is circling Earth in a polar orbit that places the instruments in continuous sunlight for nine months each year and allows data dumps to a high latitude European Space Agency (ESA) ground station every orbit. NASA and other science teams will support instrument operations and data collection from the spacecraft's operation center at the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science facility located in Tokyo. The Hinode spacecraft is a collaboration among space agencies of Japan, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Europe. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) managed development of three instruments comprising the spacecraft; the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT); the X-Ray Telescope (XRT); and the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Provided by the Multimedia support group at MSFC, this rendering illustrates the Solar-B Spacecraft in earth orbit with its solar panels partially extended.

  3. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Contributes to Solar B/Hinode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Hinode (Sunrise), formerly known as Solar-B before reaching orbit, was launched from the Uchinoura Space Center in Japan on September 23, 2006. Hinode was designed to probe into the Sun's magnetic field to better understand the origin of solar disturbances which interfere with satellite communications, electrical power transmission grids, and the safety of astronauts traveling beyond the Earth's magnetic field. Hinode is circling Earth in a polar orbit that places the instruments in continuous sunlight for nine months each year and allows data dumps to a high latitude European Space Agency (ESA) ground station every orbit. NASA and other science teams will support instrument operations and data collection from the spacecraft's operation center at the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science facility located in Tokyo. The Hinode spacecraft is a collaboration among space agencies of Japan, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Europe. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) managed development of three instruments comprising the spacecraft; the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT); the X-Ray Telescope (XRT); and the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Provided by the Multimedia support group at MSFC, this video clip is an animated illustration of the Solar-B Spacecraft in earth orbit.

  4. An Overview of the Electrostatic Levitation Facility at Nasa's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Robinson, Michael B.; Savage, Larry; Soellner, Wolfgang; Huie, Doug

    1999-01-01

    Containerless processing represents an important area of research in microgravity materials science. This method provides access to the metastable state of an undercooled melt. Containerless processing provides a high-purity environment for the study of reactive, high-temperature materials. Reduced gravity affords several benefits for containerless processing; for example, greatly reduced positioning forces are required and therefore samples of greater mass can be studied. Additionally, in reduced gravity larger specimens will maintain spherical shape which will facilitate modeling efforts. Space Systems/LORAL developed an Electrostatic Containerless Processing System (ESCAPES) as a materials science research tool for investigations of refractory solids and melts. ESCAPES is designed for the investigation of thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable phase formation, undercooling and nucleation, time-temperature-transformation diagrams, and other aspects of materials processing. These capabilities are critical to the research programs of several Principal Investigators supported by the Microgravity Materials Science Program of NASA. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently acquired the ESCAPES system from LORAL. MSFC is now developing a levitation facility in order to provide a critical resource to the microgravity materials science research community and to continue and enhance ground-based research in the support of the development of flight experiments during the transition to Space Station.

  5. An Overview of the Electrostatic Levitation Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Robinson, Michael B.; Savage, Larry; Soellner, Wolfgang; Huie, Doug

    1998-01-01

    Containerless processing represents an important area of research in microgravity materials science. This method provides access to the metastable state of an undercooled melt. Containerless processing provides a high-purity environment for the study of reactive, high-temperature materials. Reduced gravity affords several benefits for containerless processing, for example greatly reduced positioning forces are required and therefore samples of greater mass can be studied. Additionally in reduced gravity, larger specimens will maintain spherical shape which will facilitate modeling efforts. Space Systems/LORAL developed an Electrostatic Containerless Processing System (ESCAPES) as a materials science research tool for investigations of refractory solids and melts. ESCAPES is designed for the investigation of thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable phase formation, undercooling and nucleation, time-temperature- transformation diagrams and other aspects of materials processing. These capabilities are critical to the research programs of several Principal Investigators supported by the Microgravity Materials Science Program of NASA. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently acquired the ESCAPES system from LORAL. MSFC is now developing a levitation facility to provide a critical resource to the microgravity materials science research community to continue and enhance ground-based research in the support of the development of flight experiments during the transition to Space Station.

  6. J-2X Gas Generator Development Testing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, D. C.; Hormonzian, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for upper stage and trans-lunar applications of the Ares vehicles for the Constellation program. This engine, designated the J-2X, is a higher pressure, higher thrust variant of the Apollo-era J-2 engine. Development was contracted to Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in 2006. Over the past several years, two phases of testing have been completed on the development of the gas generator for the J-2X engine. The hardware has progressed through a variety of workhorse injector, chamber, and feed system configurations. Several of these configurations have resulted in combustion instability of the gas generator assembly. Development of the final configuration of workhorse hardware (which will ultimately be used to verify critical requirements on a component level) has required a balance between changes in the injector and chamber hardware in order to successfully mitigate the combustion instability without sacrificing other engine system requirements. This paper provides an overview of the two completed test series, performed at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The requirements, facility setup, hardware configurations, and test series progression are detailed. Significant levels of analysis have been performed in order to provide design solutions to mitigate the combustion stability issues, and these are briefly covered. Also discussed are the results of analyses related to either anomalous readings or off-nominal testing throughout the two test series.

  7. Capabilities of the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Suggs, Rob; Roberts, Barry C.

    2006-01-01

    The Natural Environment Branch at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the responsibility to provide engineering support to programs and projects in natural environments. The Natural Environments Branch (EV13) is responsible for natural environments definitions, modelling, database development and effects assessments. EV13 personnel develop requirements for flight projects and provide operational support for space and launch vehicle systems. To accomplish these responsibilities, Branch . personnel have developed modelling and analytical tools which include planetary atmospheres, meteoroids, ionizing radiation, plasmas and ionospheres, magnetic and gravitational fields, spacecraft charging modelling, and radiation effects on electronic parts. NASA s Meteoroid Environment Office is operated within the EV13 and provides meteoroid engineering models and shower forecasts to spacecraft designers and operators. This paper will describe the capabilities within the Natural Environments Effects Branch including; examples of natural environment definitions, radiation transport, output from the Global Reference Atmosphere Models for Earth, Venus, Mars, Titan, and Neptune), recent NASCAP 2K results from solar sail modelling, and meteor stream models

  8. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Controls Systems Design and Analysis Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center maintains a critical national capability in the analysis of launch vehicle flight dynamics and flight certification of GN&C algorithms. MSFC analysts are domain experts in the areas of flexible-body dynamics and control-structure interaction, thrust vector control, sloshing propellant dynamics, and advanced statistical methods. Marshall's modeling and simulation expertise has supported manned spaceflight for over 50 years. Marshall's unparalleled capability in launch vehicle guidance, navigation, and control technology stems from its rich heritage in developing, integrating, and testing launch vehicle GN&C systems dating to the early Mercury-Redstone and Saturn vehicles. The Marshall team is continuously developing novel methods for design, including advanced techniques for large-scale optimization and analysis.

  9. Plasma Liner Research for MTF at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Eskridge, R.; Lee, M.; Martin, A.; Smith, J.; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Knapp, C. E.; Turchi, P. J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The current research effort at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in MTF is directed towards exploring the critical physics issues of potential embodiments of MTF for propulsion, especially standoff drivers involving plasma liners for MTF. There are several possible approaches for forming plasma liners. One approach consists of using a spherical array of plasma jets to form a spherical plasma shell imploding towards the center of a magnetized plasma, a compact toroid. Current experimental plan and status to explore the physics of forming a 2-D plasma liner (shell) by merging plasma jets are described. A first-generation coaxial plasma guns (Mark-1) to launch the required plasma jets have been built and tested. Plasma jets have been launched reproducibly with a low jitter, and velocities in excess of 50 km/s for the leading edge of the plasma jet. Some further refinements are being explored for the plasma gun, Successful completion of these single-gun tests will be followed by an experimental exploration of the problems of launching a multiple number of these jets simultaneously to form a cylindrical plasma liner.

  10. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center solar observatory report, January - June 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Given here is a summary of the solar vector magnetic field, H-alpha, and white-light observations made at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Observatory during its daily periods of operation. The MSFC Solar Observatory facilities consist of the Solar Magnetograph, an f/13, 30-cm Cassegrain system with a 3.5-cm image of the Sun, housed on top of a 12.8-meter tower; a 12.5-cm Razdow H-alpha telescope housed at the base of the tower; an 18-cm Questar telescope with a full aperture white-light filter mounted at the base of the tower; a 30-cm Cassegrain telescope located in a second metal dome; and a 16.5-cm H-alpha telescope mounted on side of the Solar Vector Magnetograph. A concrete block building provides office space, a darkroom for developing film and performing optical testing, a workshop, video displays, and a computer facility for data reduction.

  11. Applied Virtual Reality Research and Applications at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph P.

    1995-01-01

    A Virtual Reality (VR) applications program has been under development at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) since 1989. The objectives of the MSFC VR Applications Program are to develop, assess, validate, and utilize VR in hardware development, operations development and support, mission operations training and science training. Before this technology can be utilized with confidence in these applications, it must be validated for each particular class of application. That is, the precision and reliability with which it maps onto real settings and scenarios, representative of a class, must be calculated and assessed. The approach of the MSFC VR Applications Program is to develop and validate appropriate virtual environments and associated object kinematic and behavior attributes for specific classes of applications. These application-specific environments and associated simulations will be validated, where possible, through empirical comparisons with existing, accepted tools and methodologies. These validated VR analytical tools will then be available for use in the design and development of space systems and operations and in training and mission support systems. Specific validation studies for selected classes of applications have been completed or are currently underway. These include macro-ergonomic "control-room class" design analysis, Spacelab stowage reconfiguration training, a full-body micro-gravity functional reach simulator, and a gross anatomy teaching simulator. This paper describes the MSFC VR Applications Program and the validation studies.

  12. Status of Solar Sail Material Characterization at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Nehles, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (Ll) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager' and the L1 Diamond '. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar(TradeMark), Teonex(TraeMark), and CP1 (Colorless Polyimide). Experimental data will be presented on sail material response to charged particle radiation and subsequent Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Data will also be presented indicating mechanical property variations in sail material resulting from electron exposure, proton exposure, and a combined electron and proton exposure. Tabular data consisting of areal density, thickness, thermo-optical, mechanical, and electrical properties, vacuum stability and outgassing will be presented.

  13. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory report, July - December 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E.

    1992-01-01

    A summary is given of the solar vector magnetic field, H-alpha, and white light observations made at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Observatory during its daily periods of observation. The MSFC Solar Observatory facilities consist of the Solar Magnetograph, an f-13, 30 cm Cassegrain system with a 3.5 cm image of the Sun housed on top of a 12.8 meter tower, a 12.5 cm Razdow H-alpha telescope housed at the base of the tower, an 18 cm Questar telescope with a full aperture white-light filter mounted at the base of the tower, a 30 cm Cassegrain telescope located in a second metal dome, and a 16.5 cm H-alpha telescope mounted on the side of the Solar Vector Magnetograph. A concrete block building provides office space, a darkroom for developing film and performing optical testing, a workshop, video displays, and a computer facility for data reduction.

  14. Spacecraft Chemical Propulsion Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: Heritage and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRight, Patrick S.; Sheehy, Jeffrey A.; Blevins, John A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is well known for its contributions to large ascent propulsion systems such as the Saturn V and the Space Shuttle. This paper highlights a lesser known but equally rich side of MSFC - its heritage in spacecraft chemical propulsion systems and its current capabilities for in-space propulsion system development and chemical propulsion research. The historical narrative describes the efforts associated with developing upper-stage main propulsion systems such as the Saturn S-IVB as well as orbital maneuvering and reaction control systems such as the S-IVB auxiliary propulsion system, the Skylab thruster attitude control system, and many more recent activities such as Chandra, the Demonstration of Automated Rendezvous Technology, X-37, the X-38 de-orbit propulsion system, the Interim Control Module, the US Propulsion Module, and several technology development activities. Also discussed are MSFC chemical propulsion research capabilities, along with near- and long-term technology challenges to which MSFC research and system development competencies are relevant.

  15. Capabilities and History of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Hydrogen Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, T. W.

    2007-01-01

    The Hydrogen Test Facility (HTF) has conducted mechanical testing for aerospace materials at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for many years. One of the first facilities of its kind to run high-pressure cryogenic permeability tests in liquid hydrogen, HTF is now characterized as a unique national resource capable of overcoming hazardous conditions to perform tests directly in various hydrogen environments. At HTF, custom test systems are operated in eight structurally reinforced test cells from 0 to 68,948 kPa (0 to 10,000 psi) at -253 to 982 C (--423 to 1800 F) in hydrogen, air, helium, and nitrogen, with other environments available upon request. Standard mechanical procedures include compression, fatigue crack growth rate, four-point bend, high/low cycle fatigue, fracture toughness, shear, strain-to-crack, and tensile testing. Cryogenic permeability and thermal conductivity and gaseous creep testing are offered, as well as simulated service under different combinations of operating environment(s), stress, pressure, and ambient-to-extreme temperatures. Advanced tests are routinely developed upon demand, and special component testing is also available. Current efforts include the renovation of two high-pressure gaseous test cells to generate data for a J-2X engine designed for Constellation's Ares I and V vehicles. In the past, HTF has supported other critical NASA programs, such as Apollo, Space Shuttle, and Next Generation Launch Technologies. During the 1990's, hundreds of tests were conducted in liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen during development of the Space Shuttle's super lightweight tank, which provided the thrust required to achieve low Earth orbit for the International Space Station. This facility was designed and built in 1963. Originally called the Low Temperature Test Facility, it became known as the Cryogenic Test Facility in the late 1980's and HTF in the early 1990's.

  16. Accomplishments of the Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) RBCC Project at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; McArthur, J. Craig (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The focus of the NASA / Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) project is to advance and develop Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) technologies. The ART project began in 1996 as part of the Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP). The project is composed of several activities including RBCC engine ground testing, tool development, vehicle / mission studies, and component testing / development. The major contractors involved in the ART project are Aerojet and Rocketdyne. A large database of RBCC ground test data was generated for the air-augmented rocket (AAR), ramjet, scramjet, and ascent rocket modes of operation for both the Aerojet and Rocketdyne concepts. Transition between consecutive modes was also demonstrated as well as trajectory simulation. The Rocketdyne freejet tests were conducted at GASL in the Flight Acceleration Simulation Test (FAST) facility. During a single test, the FAST facility is capable of simulating both the enthalpy and aerodynamic conditions over a range of Mach numbers in a flight trajectory. Aerojet performed freejet testing in the Pebble Bed facility at GASL as well as direct-connect testing at GASL. Aerojet also performed sea-level static (SLS) testing at the Aerojet A-Zone facility in Sacramento, CA. Several flight-type flowpath components were developed under the ART project. Aerojet designed and fabricated ceramic scramjet injectors. The structural design of the injectors will be tested in a simulated scramjet environment where thermal effects and performance will be assessed. Rocketdyne will be replacing the cooled combustor in the A5 rig with a flight-weight combustor that is near completion. Aerojet's formed duct panel is currently being fabricated and will be tested in the SLS rig in Aerojet's A-Zone facility. Aerojet has already successfully tested a cooled cowl panel in the same facility. In addition to MSFC, other NASA centers have contributed to the ART project as well. Inlet testing

  17. The Direction of Fluid Dynamics for Liquid Propulsion at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.

    2012-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-designated center for the development of space launch systems. MSFC is particularly known for propulsion system development. Many engineering skills and technical disciplines are needed to accomplish this mission. This presentation will focus on the work of the Fluid Dynamics Branch (ER42). ER42 resides in the Propulsion Systems Department at MSFC. The branch is responsible for all aspects of the discipline of fluid dynamics applied to propulsion or propulsion-induced loads and environments. This work begins with design trades and parametric studies, and continues through development, risk assessment, anomaly investigation and resolution, and failure investigations. Applications include the propellant delivery system including the main propulsion system (MPS) and turbomachinery; combustion devices for liquid engines and solid rocket motors; coupled systems; and launch environments. An advantage of the branch is that it is neither analysis nor test centric, but discipline centric. Fluid dynamics assessments are made by analysis, from lumped parameter modeling through unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD); testing, which can be cold flow or hot fire; or a combination of analysis and testing. Integration of all discipline methods into one branch enables efficient and accurate support to the projects. To accomplish this work, the branch currently employs approximately fifty engineers divided into four teams -- Propellant Delivery CFD, Combustion Driven Flows CFD, Unsteady and Experimental Flows, and Acoustics and Stability. This discussion will highlight some of the work performed in the branch and the direction in which the branch is headed.

  18. Python-Based Scientific Analysis and Visualization of Precipitation Systems at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    At NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Python is used several different ways to analyze and visualize precipitating weather systems. A number of different Python-based software packages have been developed, which are available to the larger scientific community. The approach in all these packages is to utilize pre-existing Python modules as well as to be object-oriented and scalable. The first package that will be described and demonstrated is the Python Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) Data Toolkit, or PyAMPR for short. PyAMPR reads geolocated brightness temperature data from any flight of the AMPR airborne instrument over its 25-year history into a common data structure suitable for user-defined analyses. It features rapid, simplified (i.e., one line of code) production of quick-look imagery, including Google Earth overlays, swath plots of individual channels, and strip charts showing multiple channels at once. These plotting routines are also capable of significant customization for detailed, publication-ready figures. Deconvolution of the polarization-varying channels to static horizontally and vertically polarized scenes is also available. Examples will be given of PyAMPR's contribution toward real-time AMPR data display during the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx), which took place in the Carolinas during May-June 2014. The second software package is the Marshall Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor (MRMS) Mosaic Python Toolkit, or MMM-Py for short. MMM-Py was designed to read, analyze, and display three-dimensional national mosaicked reflectivity data produced by the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL). MMM-Py can read MRMS mosaics from either their unique binary format or their converted NetCDF format. It can also read and properly interpret the current mosaic design (4 regional tiles) as well as mosaics produced prior to late July 2013 (8 tiles). MMM-Py can easily stitch multiple tiles together to provide a

  19. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performance: Best Management Practice Case Study #10: Cooling Towers (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding sustainability program that revolves around energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. MSFC identified a problematic cooling loop with six separate compressor heat exchangers and a history of poor efficiency. The facility engineering team at MSFC partnered with Flozone Services, Incorporated to implement a comprehensive water treatment platform to improve the overall efficiency of the system.

  20. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Phillips, Brandon S.

    2015-01-01

    CubeSats, Communication Satellites, and Outer Planet Science Satellites all share one thing in common: Mission success depends on maintaining power in the harsh space environment. For a vast majority of satellites, spacecraft power is sourced by a photovoltaic (PV) array system. Built around PV cells, the array systems also include wiring, substrates, connectors, and protection diodes. Each of these components must function properly throughout the mission in order for power production to remain at nominal levels. Failure of even one component can lead to a crippling loss of power. To help ensure PV array systems do not suffer failures on-orbit due to the space environment, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a wide ranging test and evaluation capability. Key elements of this capability include: Testing: a. Ultraviolet (UV) Exposure b. Charged Particle Radiation (Electron and Proton) c. Thermal Cycling d. Plasma and Beam Environments Evaluation: a. Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Screening b. Optical Inspection and easurement c. PV Power Output including Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) measurements This paper will describe the elements of the space environment which particularly impact PV array systems. MSFC test capabilities will be described to show how the relevant space environments can be applied to PV array systems in the laboratory. A discussion of MSFC evaluation capabilities will also be provided. The sample evaluation capabilities offer test engineers a means to quantify the effects of the space environment on their PV array system or component. Finally, examples will be shown of the effects of the space environment on actual PV array materials tested at MSFC.

  1. The Process of Science Communications at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horack, John M.; Treise, Deborah

    1998-01-01

    The communication of new scientific knowledge and understanding is an integral component of science research, essential for its continued survival. Like any learning- based activity, science cannot continue without communication between and among peers so that skeptical inquiry and learning can take place. This communication provides necessary organic support to maintain the development of new knowledge and technology. However, communication beyond the peer-community is becoming equally critical for science to survive as an enterprise into the 21st century. Therefore, scientists not only have a 'noble responsibility' to advance and communicate scientific knowledge and understanding to audiences within and beyond the peer-community, but their fulfillment of this responsibility is necessary to maintain the survival of the science enterprise. Despite the critical importance of communication to the viability of science, the skills required to perform effective science communications historically have not been taught as a part of the training of scientist, and the culture of science is often averse to significant communication beyond the peer community. Thus scientists can find themselves ill equipped and uncomfortable with the requirements of their job in the new millennium. At NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, we have developed and implemented an integrated science communications process, providing an institutional capability to help scientist accurately convey the content and meaning of new scientific knowledge to a wide variety of audiences, adding intrinsic value to the research itself through communication, while still maintaining the integrity of the peer-review process. The process utilizes initial communication through the world-wide web at the site http://science.nasa.gov to strategically leverage other communications vehicles and to reach a wide-variety of audiences. Here we present and discuss the basic design of the science communications process, now in

  2. Marshall's George Hopson Recieves NASA's Highest Honors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    After four decades of contribution to America's space program, George Hopson, manager of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Project at Marshall Space Flight Center, accepted NASA's Distinguished Service Medal. Awarded to those who, by distinguished ability or courage, have made a personal contribution to the NASA mission, NASA's Distinguished Service Medal is the highest honor NASA confers. Hopson's contributions to America's space program include work on the country's first space station, Skylab; the world's first reusable space vehicle, the Space Shuttle; and the International Space Station. Hopson joined NASA's Marshall team as chief of the Fluid and Thermal Systems Branch in the Propulsion Division in 1962, and later served as chief of the Engineering Analysis Division of the Structures and Propulsion Laboratory. In 1979, he was named director of Marshall's Systems Dynamics Laboratory. In 1981, he was chosen to head the Center's Systems Analysis and Integration. Seven years later, in 1988, Hopson was appointed associate director for Space Transportation Systems and one year later became the manager of the Space Station Projects Office at Marshall. In 1994, Hopson was selected as deputy director for Space Systems in the Science and Engineering Directorate at Marshall where he supervised the Chief Engineering Offices of both marned and unmanned space systems. He was named manager of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Project in 1997. In addition to the Distinguished Service Medal, Hopson has also been recognized with the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal and NASA's Exceptional Service Medal.

  3. Spatial interpretation of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Payload Operations Control Center using virtual reality technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1993-01-01

    In its search for higher level computer interfaces and more realistic electronic simulations for measurement and spatial analysis in human factors design, NASA at MSFC is evaluating the functionality of virtual reality (VR) technology. Virtual reality simulation generates a three dimensional environment in which the participant appears to be enveloped. It is a type of interactive simulation in which humans are not only involved, but included. Virtual reality technology is still in the experimental phase, but it appears to be the next logical step after computer aided three-dimensional animation in transferring the viewer from a passive to an active role in experiencing and evaluating an environment. There is great potential for using this new technology when designing environments for more successful interaction, both with the environment and with another participant in a remote location. At the University of North Carolina, a VR simulation of a the planned Sitterson Hall, revealed a flaw in the building's design that had not been observed during examination of the more traditional building plan simulation methods on paper and on computer aided design (CAD) work station. The virtual environment enables multiple participants in remote locations to come together and interact with one another and with the environment. Each participant is capable of seeing herself and the other participants and of interacting with them within the simulated environment.

  4. Designing the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Element and Integrating the Stack at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyles, Garry; Otte, Neil E.

    2008-01-01

    Fielding an integrated launch vehicle system entails many challenges, not the least of which is the fact that it has been over 30 years since the United States has developed a human-rated vehicle - the venerable Space Shuttle. Over time, whole generations of rocket scientists have passed through the aerospace community without the opportunity to perform such exacting, demanding, and rewarding work. However, with almost 50 years of experience leading the design, development, and end-to-end systems engineering and integration of complex launch vehicles, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center offers the in-house talent - both junior- and senior-level personnel - to shape a new national asset to meet the requirements for safe, reliable, and affordable space exploration solutions.' These personnel are housed primarily in Marshall's Engineering Directorate and are matrixed into the programs and projects that reside at the rocket center. Fortunately, many Apollo era and Shuttle engineers, as well as those who gained valuable hands-on experience in the 1990s by conducting technology demonstrator projects such as the Delta-Clipper Experimental Advanced, X-33, X-34, and X-37, as well as the short-lived Orbital Space Plane, work closely with industry partners to advance the nation's strategic capability for human access to space. Currently, only three spacefaring nations have this distinction, including the United States, Russia, and, more recently, China. The U.S. National Space Policy of2006 directs that NASA provide the means to travel to space, and the NASA Appropriations Act of2005 provided the initial funding to begin in earnest to replace the Shuttle after the International Space Station construction is complete in 20 IO? These and other strategic goals and objectives are documented in NASA's 2006 Strategic Plan.3 In 2005, a team of NASA aerospace experts conducted the Exploration Systems Architecture Study, which recommended a two-vehicle approach to America's next space

  5. Overview of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's program on knowledge of atmospheric processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is charged with the responsibility to enhance aviation safety through improving understanding of various atmospheric phenomena. A brief discussion is presented concerning the tasks and work being accomplished by MSFC. The tasks are defined as follows: (1) to determine and define the turbulence and steady wind environments induced by buildings, towers, hills, trees, etc., (2) to identify, develop, and apply natural environment technology for the reconstruction and/or simulation of the natural environment for aircraft accident investigation and hazard identification, (3) to develop basic information about free atmosphere perturbations, (4) to develop and apply fog modification mathematical models to assess candidate fog modification schemes and to develop appropriate instrumentation to aquire basic data about fog. To accomplish these tasks MSFC has developed a program involving field data acquisition, wind tunnel studies, theoretical studies, data analysis, and flight simulation studies.

  6. Friction Stir Welding Development at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Carter, Robert W.; Ding, Robert J.; Lawless, Kirby G.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Russell, Carolyn K.; Shah, Sandeep R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of friction stir welding (FSW) process development and applications at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). FSW process development started as a laboratory curiosity but soon found support from many users. The FSW process advanced very quickly and has found many applications both within and outside the aerospace industry. It is currently being adapted for joining key elements of the Space Shuttle External Tank for improved producibility and reliability. FSW process modeling is done to better understand and improve the process. Special tools have been developed to weld variable thickness materials including thin and thick materials. FSW is now being applied to higher temperature materials such as copper and to advanced materials such as metal matrix composites. FSW technology is being successfully transferred from MSFC laboratory to shop floors of many commercial companies.

  7. Activities of the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center pump stage technology team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R.; Mcconnaughey, P.; Eastland, A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to advance rocket propulsion technology, the Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology has been formed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Consortium consists of three Teams: the turbine stage team, the pump stage team (PST), and the combustion devices team. The PST has formulated and is implementing a plan for pump technology development whose end product will be validated CFD codes suitable for application to pump components, test data suitable for validating CFD codes, and advanced pump components optimized using CFD codes. The PST's work during the fall of 1991 and the winter and spring of 1992 is discussed in this paper. This work is highlighted by CFD analyses of an advanced impeller design and collection of laser two-focus velocimeter data for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Pump impeller.

  8. Designing the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Element and Integrating the Stack at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otte, Neil E.; Lyles, Garry; Reuter, James L.; Davis, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Fielding an integrated launch vehicle system entails many challenges, not the least of which is the fact that it has been over 30 years since the United States has developed a human-rated vehicle - the venerable Space Shuttle. Over time, whole generations of rocket scientists have passed through the aerospace community without the opportunity to perform such exacting, demanding, and rewarding work. However, with almost 50 years of experience leading the design, development, and end-to-end systems engineering and integration of complex launch vehicles, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Marshall Space Flight Center offers the in-house talent - both junior- and senior-level personnel - to shape a new national asset to meet the requirements for safe, reliable, and affordable space exploration solutions. The technical personnel are housed primarily in Marshall's Engineering Directorate and are matrixed into the programs and projects that reside at the rocket center. Fortunately, many Apollo-era and Shuttle engineers, as well as those who gained valuable hands-on experience in the 1990s by conducting technology demonstrator projects such as the Delta-Clipper Experimental Advanced, X-33, X-34, and X-37, as well as the short-lived Orbital Space Plane, work closely with industry partners to advance the nation's strategic capability for human access to space. The Ares Projects Office, resident at Marshall, is managing the design and development of America's new space fleet, including the Ares I, which will loft the Orion crew capsule for its first test flight in the 2013 timeframe, as well as the heavy-lift Ares V, which will round out the capability to leave low-Earth orbit once again, when it delivers the Altair lunar lander to orbit late next decade. This paper provides information about the approach to integrating the Ares I stack and designing the upper stage in house, using unique facilities and an expert workforce to revitalize the nation

  9. Future Nanotube Commercialization Opportunities at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the US Army Aviation and Missile Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael; Shah, Sandeep; Kaul, Raj; Zhu, Shen; Vandiver, Terry; Zimmerman, Joe E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nanotube technology has broad applicability to programs at both the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). MSFC has interest in applications of nanotubes as sensors and high strength lightweight materials for propulsion system components, avionic systems, and scientific instruments. MSFC is currently pursuing internal programs to develop nanotube temperature sensors, heat pipes, and metal matrix composites. In support of these application areas MSFC is interested in growth of long nanotubes, growth of nanotubes in the microgravity environment, and nanotubes fabricated from high temperature materials such as Boron Nitride or Silicon Carbide. AMCOM is similarly interested in nanotube applications which take advantage of the nanotube thermal conductance properties, high strength, and lightweight. Applications of interest to AMCOM include rocket motor casing structures, rocket nozzles, and lightweight structure and aeronautic skins.

  10. Range Commanders Council Meteorology Group 88th Meeting: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Task Report, 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2004-01-01

    Supported Return-to-Flight activities by providing surface climate data from Kennedy Space Center used primarily for ice and dew formation studies, and upper air wind analysis primarily used for ascent loads analyses. The MSFC Environments Group's Terrestrial and Planetary Environments Team documented Space Shuttle day-of-launch support activities by publishing a document in support of SSP Return-to-Flight activities entitled "Space Shuttle Program Flight Operations Support". The team also formalized the Shuttle Natural Environments Technical Panel and chaired the first special session of the SSP Natural Environments Panel meeting at KSC, November 4-7,2003.58 participants from NASA, DOD and other government agencies from across the country attended the meeting.

  11. Tailoring Systems Engineering Processes in a Conceptual Design Environment: A Case Study at NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center's ACO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, John; Maples, C. Dauphne; Fabisinski, Leo, III

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Systems Engineering as it is applied in a conceptual design space systems department at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Spaceflight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office (ACO). Engineering work performed in the NASA MFSC's ACO is targeted toward the Exploratory Research and Concepts Development life cycle stages, as defined in the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) System Engineering Handbook. This paper addresses three ACO Systems Engineering tools that correspond to three INCOSE Technical Processes: Stakeholder Requirements Definition, Requirements Analysis, and Integration, as well as one Project Process Risk Management. These processes are used to facilitate, streamline, and manage systems engineering processes tailored for the earliest two life cycle stages, which is the environment in which ACO engineers work. The role of systems engineers and systems engineering as performed in ACO is explored in this paper. The need for tailoring Systems Engineering processes, tools, and products in the ever-changing engineering services ACO provides to its customers is addressed.

  12. Transition Report for Dr. Ken Fernandez, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Ken R.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective proposed during my tenure with the NASA Administrator's Fellowship Program (NAFP) was the use of ROBOSIM, a NASA developed robot simulation software package, to introduce the first robotics class to the School of Engineering at Alabama A&M University. The students participating in the spring of 2004 chose as their class project a simulation of the Shuttle, the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, and the inspection boom which may be used to inspect the Shuttle's tiles on-orbit. In addition to meeting this primary objective and fulfilling other activities that were required by NAFP participants, several other accomplishments are reported. Participation with the faculty of Alabama A&M in the planning and execution of the First and Second Annual Michael P. Anderson Memorial Summer Programs for minority high school students was completed. This program, funded by NASA, provided supervised "hands- on" group activities in various engineering disciplines, including robotics. A third major accomplishment during the NAFP tenure was the granting of a U.S. patent for the NASA 3-D Luggage Scanning System. International patents are also pending on this device. The device uses stereographic imaging similar to that used by NASA on the Mars Rover to enhance the contents of luggage and other items being inspected. It is believed that this device can greatly improve the efficiency and accuracy of security checkpoint screening.

  13. Space Environmental Effects (SEE) Testing Capability: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWittBurns, H.; Crave, Paul; Finckenor, Miria; Finchum, Charles; Nehls, Mary; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of the space environment on materials and systems is fundamental and essential for mission success. If not properly understood and designed for, the space environment can lead to materials degradation, reduction of functional lifetime, and system failure. Ground based testing is critical in predicting performance NASA/MSFC's expertise and capabilities make up the most complete SEE testing capability available.

  14. Research Status of IEC Experiments at NASA Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris; Hrbud, Ivana; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of IEC (Inertial Electrostatic Confinement) research and experiments at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Topics covered include: apparatus involvement, iec schematics, iec plasma images, iec deuterium experiments, thomson scattering, detector options and experiment results.

  15. The Direction of Fluid Dynamics for Liquid Propulsion at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.

    2012-01-01

    The Fluid Dynamics Branch's (ER42) at MSFC mission is to support NASA and other customers with discipline expertise to enable successful accomplishment of program/project goals. The branch is responsible for all aspects of the discipline of fluid dynamics, analysis and testing, applied to propulsion or propulsion-induced loads and environments, which includes the propellant delivery system, combustion devices, coupled systems, and launch and separation events. ER42 supports projects from design through development, and into anomaly and failure investigations. ER42 is committed to continually improving the state-of-its-practice to provide accurate, effective, and timely fluid dynamics assessments and in extending the state-of-the-art of the discipline.

  16. Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Arthur J., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department is a resource for Educator, Students and Lifelong Learners. This paper will highlight the Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department with references to other NASA Education Departments nationwide. The principal focus will be on the responsibilities of the Pre-college Education Team which is responsible for supporting K- 12 teachers highlighting how many of the NASA Pre-college Offices engage teachers and their students in better understanding NASA's inspiring missions, unique facilities, and specialized workforce to carryout these many agency-wide tasks, goals and objectives. Attendee's will learn about the Marshall Educational Alliance Teams, as well, which is responsible for using NASA's unique assets to support all types of learning. All experience and knowledge levels, all grades K-12, and teachers in these specified groupings will gain a true appreciation of what is available for them, through Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department. An agency-wide blue directory booklet will be distributed to all attendees, for future references and related points of contact.

  17. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Saves Water With High-Efficiency Toilet and Urinal Program: Best Management Practice Case Study #6 - Toilets and Urinals (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding, successful sustainability program that focuses on energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. Because MSFC was built in the 1960s, most of the buildings house outdated, inefficient restroom fixtures. The facility engineering team at MSFC developed an innovative efficiency model for replacing these older toilets and urinals.

  18. An evaluation of the total quality management implementation strategy for the advanced solid rocket motor project at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. M.S. Thesis - Tennessee Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Sullivan, Kenneth W.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation of the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) strategy to implement Total Quality Management (TQM) in the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) Project is presented. The evaluation of the implementation strategy reflected the Civil Service personnel perspective at the project level. The external and internal environments at MSFC were analyzed for their effects on the ASRM TQM strategy. Organizational forms, cultures, management systems, problem solving techniques, and training were assessed for their influence on the implementation strategy. The influence of ASRM's effort was assessed relative to its impact on mature projects as well as future projects at MSFC.

  19. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, N. F. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The Faculty Fellowship program was revived in the summer of 2015 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, following a period of diminished faculty research activity here since 2006 when budget cuts in the Headquarters' Education Office required realignment. Several senior Marshall managers recognized the need to involve the Nation's academic research talent in NASA's missions and projects to the benefit of both entities. These managers invested their funds required to establish the renewed Faculty Fellowship program in 2015, a 10-week residential research involvement of 16 faculty in the laboratories and offices at Marshall. These faculty engineers and scientists worked with NASA collaborators on NASA projects, bringing new perspectives and solutions to bear. This Technical Memorandum is a compilation of the research reports of the 2015 Marshall Faculty Fellowship program, along with the Program Announcement (appendix A) and the Program Description (appendix B). The research touched on seven areas-propulsion, materials, instrumentation, fluid dynamics, human factors, control systems, and astrophysics. The propulsion studies included green propellants, gas bubble dynamics, and simulations of fluid and thermal transients. The materials investigations involved sandwich structures in composites, plug and friction stir welding, and additive manufacturing, including both strength characterization and thermosets curing in space. The instrumentation projects involved spectral interfero- metry, emissivity, and strain sensing in structures. The fluid dynamics project studied the water hammer effect. The human factors project investigated the requirements for close proximity operations in confined spaces. Another team proposed a controls system for small launch vehicles, while in astrophysics, one faculty researcher estimated the practicality of weather modification by blocking the Sun's insolation, and another found evidence in satellite data of the detection of a warm

  20. Marshall Space Flight Center Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jeffrey T.

    2005-01-01

    The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has over 50 facilities across 400+ acres inside a secure, fenced facility. The entire Center is located inside the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal, a 40,000 acre military reservation. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength, structural dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

  1. A Decade of Friction Stir Welding R and D at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and a Glance into the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Carter, Bob; Lawless, Kirby; Nunes, Arthur; Russell, Carolyn; Suites, Michael; Schneider, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Welding at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, has taken a new direction through the last 10 years. Fusion welding processes, namely variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) were once the corner stone of welding development in the Space Flight Center's welding laboratories, located in the part of MSFC know as National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCM). Developed specifically to support the Shuttle Program's External Tank and later International Space Station manufacturing programs, was viewed as the paragon of welding processes for joining aluminum alloys. Much has changed since 1994, however, when NASA's Jeff Ding brought the FSW process to the NASA agency. Although, at that time, FSW was little more than a "lab curiosity", NASA researchers started investigating where the FSW process would best fit NASA manufacturing programs. A laboratory FSW system was procured and the first welds were made in fall of 1995. The small initial investment NASA made into the first FSW system has certainly paid off for the NASA agency in terms of cost savings, hardware quality and notoriety. FSW is now a part of Shuttle External Tank (ET) production and the preferred weld process for the manufacturing of components for the new Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) that will take this country back to the moon. It is one of the solid state welding processes being considered for on-orbit space welding and repair, and is of considerable interest for Department of Defense @OD) manufacturing programs. MSFC involvement in these and other programs makes NASA a driving force in this country's development of FSW and other solid state welding technologies. Now, a decade later, almost the entire on-going welding R&D at MSFC now focuses on FSW and other more advanced solid state welding processes.

  2. Gene Kranz Visits Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    On October 19, 2006, former NASA director of Mission Operations Gene Kranz was a keynote speaker at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) 2006 Annual Safety Day program. The best selling author of 'Failure Is Not An Option' and past Apollo flight director was featured during a morning session called 'Coffee and Kranz'. Marshall employees hung on his every word as he told the fascinating story of Apollo 13. Kranz was the acting flight director during the Apollo 13 mission, a mission that seemed doomed to fail due to an onboard explosion. Kranz and his flight control team worked around the clock relentlessly, solving problem after problem, until the crew was returned safely to Earth.

  3. The Benefits of Marshall Center’s Student Interns

    NASA Video Gallery

    Marshall Space Flight Center student interns share insight about this key NASA Education initiative, and demonstrate the variety of potential internships -- and career opportunities -- available at...

  4. Historical Sign at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This sign, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the designation of the Redstone Test Site as a National Historic Landmark. The site was inducted into the National Register of Historical Places in 1976.

  5. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Recent Studies and Technology Developments in the Area of SSA/Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegmann, Bruce M.; Hovater, Mary; Kos, Larry

    2012-01-01

    NASA/MSFC has been investigating the various aspects of the growing orbital debris problem since early 2009. Data shows that debris ranging in size from 5 mm to 10 cm presents the greatest threat to operational spacecraft today. Therefore, MSFC has focused its efforts on small orbital debris. Using off-the-shelf analysis packages, like the ESA MASTER software, analysts at MSFC have begun to characterize the small debris environment in LEO to support several spacecraft concept studies and hardware test programs addressing the characterization, mitigation, and ultimate removal, if necessary, of small debris. The Small Orbital Debris Active Removal (SODAR) architectural study investigated the overall effectiveness of removing small orbital debris from LEO using a low power, space-based laser. The Small Orbital Debris Detection, Acquisition, and Tracking (SODDAT) conceptual technology demonstration spacecraft was developed to address the challenges of in-situ small orbital debris environment classification including debris observability and instrument requirements for small debris observation. Work is underway at MSFC in the areas of hardware and testing. By combining off the shelf digital video technology, telescope lenses, and advanced video image FPGA processing, MSFC is building a breadboard of a space based, passive orbital tracking camera that can detect and track faint objects (including small debris, satellites, rocket bodies, and NEOs) at ranges of tens to hundreds of kilometers and speeds in excess of 15 km/sec,. MSFC is also sponsoring the development of a one-of-a-kind Dynamic Star Field Simulator with a high resolution large monochrome display and a custom collimator capable of projecting realistic star images with simple orbital debris spots (down to star magnitude 11-12) into a passive orbital detection and tracking system with simulated real-time angular motions of the vehicle mounted sensor. The dynamic star field simulator can be expanded for multiple

  6. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) Between NASA Headquarters and MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) for NASA Principal Center for Review of Clean Air Regulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.; Clark-Ingram, Marceia A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a memorandum of agreement on Clean Air Regulations. NASA headquarters (code JE and code M) has asked MSFC to serve as principle center for review of Clean Air Act (CAA) regulations. The purpose of the principle center is to provide centralized support to NASA headquarters for the management and leadership of NASA's CAA regulation review process and to identify the potential impact of proposed CAA reguations on NASA program hardware and supporting facilities. The materials and processes utilized in the manufacture of NASA's programmatic hardware contain HAPs (Hazardous Air Pollutants), VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds), and ODC (Ozone Depleting Chemicals). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  7. Project LASER Volunteer, Marshall Space Flight Center Education Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Education Department, over 400 MSFC employees have volunteered to support educational program during regular work hours. Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering, and Research) provides support for mentor/tutor requests, education tours, classroom presentations, and curriculum development. This program is available to teachers and students living within commuting distance of the NASA/MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama (approximately 50-miles radius). This image depicts students viewing their reflections in an x-ray mirror with Marshall optic engineer Vince Huegele at the Discovery Laboratory, which is an onsite MSFC laboratory facility that provides hands-on educational workshop sessions for teachers and students learning activities.

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center Materials and Processes Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tramel, Terri L.

    2012-01-01

    Marshall?s Materials and Processes Laboratory has been a core capability for NASA for over fifty years. MSFC has a proven heritage and recognized expertise in materials and manufacturing that are essential to enable and sustain space exploration. Marshall provides a "systems-wise" capability for applied research, flight hardware development, and sustaining engineering. Our history of leadership and achievements in materials, manufacturing, and flight experiments includes Apollo, Skylab, Mir, Spacelab, Shuttle (Space Shuttle Main Engine, External Tank, Reusable Solid Rocket Motor, and Solid Rocket Booster), Hubble, Chandra, and the International Space Station. MSFC?s National Center for Advanced Manufacturing, NCAM, facilitates major M&P advanced manufacturing partnership activities with academia, industry and other local, state and federal government agencies. The Materials and Processes Laborato ry has principal competencies in metals, composites, ceramics, additive manufacturing, materials and process modeling and simulation, space environmental effects, non-destructive evaluation, and fracture and failure analysis provide products ranging from materials research in space to fully integrated solutions for large complex systems challenges. Marshall?s materials research, development and manufacturing capabilities assure that NASA and National missions have access to cutting-edge, cost-effective engineering design and production options that are frugal in using design margins and are verified as safe and reliable. These are all critical factors in both future mission success and affordability.

  9. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center Research and Technology Report 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, A. S. (Compiler); Tinker, M. L. (Compiler); Sivak, A. D. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    Many of NASA's missions would not be possible if it were not for the investments made in research advancements and technology development efforts. The technologies developed at Marshall Space Flight Center contribute to NASA's strategic array of missions through technology development and accomplishments. The scientists, researchers, and technologists of Marshall Space Flight Center who are working these enabling technology efforts are facilitating NASA's ability to fulfill the ambitious goals of innovation, exploration, and discovery.

  10. Marshall Space Flight Center Small Business Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the small business opportunities that are available with the Marshall Space Flight Center. It includes information on all forms of opportunities available and information sources: subcontracting, websites, contacts and a separate section on Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) & Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs

  11. Hybrid Propulsion Testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Andrew S.; Cash, Stephon F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Hybrid propulsion testing involving eleven and twenty-four inch motors performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from the early 1990's to the present are discussed. Topics covered include: Solid Propulsion Investigation Program, Joint NASA Industry Research and Development (JIRAD) program, Large Subscale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (LSSRCS), Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program (HPDP), Hybrid Propulsion for Launch Vehicle Booster (HPTLV), Peroxide Hybrid Upper Stage (PHUS) and Solid Fuel Torch (SFT).

  12. NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere Model. 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, J. K.

    2002-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere Model-Version 2.0 (MET-V 2.0) and contains an explanation on the use of the computer program along with an example of the MET-V 2.0 model products. The MET-V 2.0 provides an update to the 1988 version of the model. It provides information on the total mass density, temperature, and individual species number densities for any altitude between 90 and 2,500 km as a function of latitude, longitude, time, and solar and geomagnetic activity. A description is given for use of estimated future 13-mo smoothed solar flux and geomagnetic index values as input to the model. Address technical questions on the MET-V 2.0 and associated computer program to Jerry K. Owens, Spaceflight Experiments Group, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (256-961-7576; e-mail Jerry.Owens@msfc.nasa.gov).

  13. Space Science and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James

    2005-01-01

    Space Science a t Marshall Space Flight Center is diverse and very interesting. It ranges from high energy astrophysics to astrobiology, from solar physics to space weather to dusty plasmas. I will present some of the more interesting investigations regarding auroral physics, what it takes to build a space camera, and laboratory investigations of dust. There will be time for questions and answers at the conclusion.

  14. Marshall Space Flight Center: 50 Years, 50 Seconds

    NASA Video Gallery

    Talk about time flying! Take a look at this super-fast review of highlights from the past 50 years at the Marshall Center. This year, Marshall is celebrating its 50th anniversary, highlighting its ...

  15. Propulsion at the Marshall Space Flight Center - A brief history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.; Fisher, M. F.; Mccool, A. A.; Mccarty, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    The history of propulsion development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized, beginning with the development of the propulsion system for the Redstone missile. This course of propulsion development continues through the Jupiter IRBM, the Saturn family of launch vehicles and the engines that powered them, the Centaur upper stage and RL-10 engine, the Reactor In-Flight Test stage and the NERVA nuclear engine. The Space Shuttle Main Engine and Solid Rocket Boosters are covered, as are spacecraft propulsion systems, including the reaction control systems for the High Energy Astronomy Observatory and the Space Station. The paper includes a description of several technology efforts such as those in high pressure turbomachinery, aerospike engines, and the AS203 cyrogenic fluid management flight experiment. These and other propulsion projects are documented, and the scope of activities in support of these efforts at Marshall delineated.

  16. Human Factors Engineering at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. C.; Hutchinson, Sonya L.

    1999-01-01

    The mission of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is to develop, implement, and maintain systems for space transportation and microgravity research. Factors impacting the MSFC position as a leader in advancing science and technology include: (1) heightened emphasis on safety; (2) increased interest in effective resource utilization; and (3) growing importance of employing systems and procedures that pragmatically support mission science. In light of these factors, MSFC is integrating human factors engineering (HFE) into the systems engineering process. This paper describes the HFE program, applications of HFE in MSFC projects, and the future of HFE at MSFC.

  17. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a portrait of General George C. Marshall in Army uniform. The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established in Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  18. Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Investments Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Mike

    2014-01-01

    NASA is moving forward with prioritized technology investments that will support NASA's exploration and science missions, while benefiting other Government agencies and the U.S. aerospace enterprise. center dotThe plan provides the guidance for NASA's space technology investments during the next four years, within the context of a 20-year horizon center dotThis plan will help ensure that NASA develops technologies that enable its 4 goals to: 1.Sustain and extend human activities in space, 2.Explore the structure, origin, and evolution of the solar system, and search for life past and present, 3.Expand our understanding of the Earth and the universe and have a direct and measurable impact on how we work and live, and 4.Energize domestic space enterprise and extend benefits of space for the Nation.

  19. Creating a rocket-building institution - The history of the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will examine the early history of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to identify major changes in the Center during the period that it was responsible for developing the Saturn family of launch vehicles. The principal conclusion is that the unique change experienced by Marshall during the Saturn era was its shift from an in-house, self-sustaining organization to an institution responsible for managing the Saturn-related performance of a nationwide network of aerospace contractors.

  20. Marshall Space Flight Center Autumn 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Mike; Clar, Harry E.

    2006-01-01

    The East Test Area at Marshall Space Flight Center has five major test stands, each of which has two or more test positions, not counting the SSME and RD-180 engine test facilities in the West Test Area. These research and development facilities are capable of testing high pressure pumps, both fuel and oxidizer, injectors, chambers and sea-level engine assemblies, as well as simulating deep space environments in the 12, 15 and 20 foot vacuum chambers. Liquid propellant capabilities are high pressure hydrogen (liquid and gas), methane (liquid and gas), and RP-1 and high pressure LOX. Solid propellant capability includes thrust measurement and firing capability up to 1/6 scale Shuttle SRB segment. In the past six months MSFC supported multiple space access and exploration programs in the previous six months. Major programs were Space Exploration, Shuttle External Tank research, Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) development, as well as research programs for NASA and other customers. At Test Stand 115 monopropellant ignition testing was conducted on one position. At the second position multiple ignition/variable burn time cycles were conducted on Vacuum Plasma Spatter (VPS) coated injectors. Each injector received fifty cycles; the propellants were LOX Hydrogen and the ignition source was TEA. Following completion of the monopropellant test series the stand was reconfigured to support ignition testing on a LOX Methane injector system. At TS 116 a thrust stand used to test Booster Separation Motors from the Shuttle SRB system was disassembled and moved from Chemical Systems Division s Coyote Canyon plant to MSFC. The stand was reassembled and readied for BSM testing. Also, a series of tests was run on a Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne Low Element Density (LED) injector engine. The propellants for this engine are LOX and LH2. At TS 300 the 20 foot vacuum chamber was configured to support hydrogen testing in the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) test article. This testing

  1. Research and technology, 1984: Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorehead, T. W. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center conducts research programs in space sciences, materials processing in space, and atmospheric sciences, as well as technology programs in such areas as propulsion, materials, processes, and space power. This Marshall Space Flight Center 1984 Annual Report on Research and Technology contains summaries of the more significant scientific and technical results obtained during FY-84.

  2. Digital Data Matrix Scanner Developnent At Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Research at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has resulted in a system for reading hidden identification codes using a hand-held magnetic scanner. It's an invention that could help businesses improve inventory management, enhance safety, improve security, and aid in recall efforts if defects are discovered. Two-dimensional Data Matrix symbols consisting of letters and numbers permanently etched on items for identification and resembling a small checkerboard pattern are more efficient and reliable than traditional bar codes, and can store up to 100 times more information. A team led by Fred Schramm of the Marshall Center's Technology Transfer Department, in partnership with PRI,Torrance, California, has developed a hand-held device that can read this special type of coded symbols, even if covered by up to six layers of paint. Before this new technology was available, matrix symbols were read with optical scanners, and only if the codes were visible. This latest improvement in digital Data Matrix technologies offers greater flexibility for businesses and industries already using the marking system. Paint, inks, and pastes containing magnetic properties are applied in matrix symbol patterns to objects with two-dimensional codes, and the codes are read by a magnetic scanner, even after being covered with paint or other coatings. The ability to read hidden matrix symbols promises a wide range of benefits in a number of fields, including airlines, electronics, healthcare, and the automotive industry. Many industries would like to hide information on a part, so it can be read only by the party who put it there. For instance, the automotive industry uses direct parts marking for inventory control, but for aesthetic purposes the marks often need to be invisible. Symbols have been applied to a variety of materials, including metal, plastic, glass, paper, fabric and foam, on everything from electronic parts to pharmaceuticals to livestock. The portability of the hand

  3. Optics at marshall space flight center.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W G

    1970-02-01

    The aim and direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) programs of research in optics has been to produce the technology base and to gain the knowledge prerequisite to the support of launch vehicle development. MSFC conducts and sponsors in industry research leading to the development of new orimproved optical system components, including lenses, filters, laser sources, detectors, modulators, imaging devices, and beam scanners. Much of this effort is directed primarily toward assuring that such components will survive and perform adequately in the hostile environment created by a large space booster. This research involves the development techniques for the effective utilization of optical instrumentation in measuring systems, and the extension of fundamental principles and processes developed in the field of optics to other areas of research. The current direction of the MSFC program in optics is toward development of optical systems for use in space and integrating such systems into space vehicles as principal payloads. The Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) is our major program in this area, but efforts are already under way to establish the base technology to support larger, more versatile, more universal optical facilities for flight-borne space science research. PMID:20076196

  4. Power to Explore: A History of the Marshall Space Flight Center, 1960-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunar, Andrew J.; Waring, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    This scholarly study of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center places the institution in social, political, scientific and technological context. It traces the evolution of Marshall, located in Huntsville, Alabama, from its origins as an Army missile development organization to its status in 1990 as one of the most diversified of NASA's field Center. Chapters discuss military rocketry programs in Germany and the United States, Apollo-Saturn, Skylab, Space shuttle, Spacelab, the Space Station, and various scientific and technical projects including the Hubble Space Telescope. It sheds light not only on the history of space technology, science and exploration, but also on the Cold War, federal politics and complex organizations.

  5. Marshall Center Breaks Ground For New Engineering Directorate Building Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This artist's concept portrays the plan for the new Engineering Directorate office to be constructed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The first of several new buildings to be constructed as replacements for older Center facilities, the 5-story, 139,000-square-foot building will house approximately 500 current Marshall employees that provide development and research engineering services for the Marshall Center. Ground breaking ceremonies took place on June 10, 2003 at the construction site, southwest of the Martin and Rideout Roads intersection on Redstone Arsenal. GSC Construction of Waynesboro, Georgia has been selected as the contractor for the facility, which is scheduled for a September 2004 completion.

  6. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  7. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established at Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  8. Kodak Mirror Assembly Tested at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Eastman-Kodak mirror assembly is being tested for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project at the X-Ray Calibration Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this photo, an MSFC employee is inspecting one of many segments of the mirror assembly for flaws. MSFC is supporting Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in developing the JWST by taking numerous measurements to predict its future performance. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber cooled to approximate the super cold temperatures found in space. During its 27 years of operation, the facility has performed testing in support of a wide array of projects, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Solar A, Chandra technology development, Chandra High Resolution Mirror Assembly and science instruments, Constellation X-Ray Mission, and Solar X-Ray Imager, currently operating on a Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite. The JWST is NASA's next generation space telescope, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, named in honor of NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb. It is scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle. It will take about 3 months for the spacecraft to reach its destination, an orbit of 940,000 miles in space.

  9. Kodak Mirror Assembly Tested at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo (a frontal view) is of one of many segments of the Eastman-Kodak mirror assembly being tested for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project at the X-Ray Calibration Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). MSFC is supporting Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in developing the JWST by taking numerous measurements to predict its future performance. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber cooled to approximate the super cold temperatures found in space. During its 27 years of operation, the facility has performed testing in support of a wide array of projects, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Solar A, Chandra technology development, Chandra High Resolution Mirror Assembly and science instruments, Constellation X-Ray Mission, and Solar X-Ray Imager, currently operating on a Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite. The JWST is NASA's next generation space telescope, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, named in honor of NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb. It is scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle. It will take about 3 months for the spacecraft to reach its destination, an orbit of 940,000 miles in space.

  10. Kodak Mirror Assembly Tested at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo (rear view) is of one of many segments of the Eastman-Kodak mirror assembly being tested for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project at the X-Ray Calibration Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). MSFC is supporting Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in developing the JWST by taking numerous measurements to predict its future performance. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber cooled to approximate the super cold temperatures found in space. During its 27 years of operation, the facility has performed testing in support of a wide array of projects, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Solar A, Chandra technology development, Chandra High Resolution Mirror Assembly and science instruments, Constellation X-Ray Mission, and Solar X-Ray Imager, currently operating on a Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite. The JWST is NASA's next generation space telescope, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, named in honor of NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb. It is scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle. It will take about 3 months for the spacecraft to reach its destination, an orbit of 940,000 miles in space.

  11. Kodak Mirror Assembly Tested at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo (a side view) is of one of many segments of the Eastman-Kodak mirror assembly being tested for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project at the X-Ray Calibration Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). MSFC is supporting Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in developing the JWST by taking numerous measurements to predict its future performance. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber cooled to approximate the super cold temperatures found in space. During its 27 years of operation, the facility has performed testing in support of a wide array of projects, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Solar A, Chandra technology development, Chandra High Resolution Mirror Assembly and science instruments, Constellation X-Ray Mission, and Solar X-Ray Imager, currently operating on a Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite. The JWST is NASA's next generation space telescope, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, named in honor of NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb. It is scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle. It will take about 3 months for the spacecraft to reach its destination, an orbit of 940,000 miles in space.

  12. Kodak Mirror Assembly Tested at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Eastman-Kodak mirror assembly is being tested for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project at the X-Ray Calibration Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this photo, one of many segments of the mirror assembly is being set up inside the 24-ft vacuum chamber where it will undergo x-ray calibration tests. MSFC is supporting Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in developing the JWST by taking numerous measurements to predict its future performance. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber cooled to approximate the super cold temperatures found in space. During its 27 years of operation, the facility has performed testing in support of a wide array of projects, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Solar A, Chandra technology development, Chandra High Resolution Mirror Assembly and science instruments, Constellation X-Ray Mission, and Solar X-Ray Imager, currently operating on a Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite. The JWST is NASA's next generation space telescope, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, named in honor of NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb. It is scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle. It will take about 3 months for the spacecraft to reach its destination, an orbit of 940,000 miles in space.

  13. Marshall Space Flight Center Telescience Resource Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Telescience Resource Kit (TReK) is a suite of software applications that can be used to monitor and control assets in space or on the ground. The Telescience Resource Kit was originally developed for the International Space Station program. Since then it has been used to support a variety of NASA programs and projects including the WB-57 Ascent Vehicle Experiment (WAVE) project, the Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite (FASTSAT) project, and the Constellation Program. The Payloads Operations Center (POC), also known as the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC), provides the capability for payload users to operate their payloads at their home sites. In this environment, TReK provides local ground support system services and an interface to utilize remote services provided by the POC. TReK provides ground system services for local and remote payload user sites including International Partner sites, Telescience Support Centers, and U.S. Investigator sites in over 40 locations worldwide. General Capabilities: Support for various data interfaces such as User Datagram Protocol, Transmission Control Protocol, and Serial interfaces. Data Services - retrieve, process, record, playback, forward, and display data (ground based data or telemetry data). Command - create, modify, send, and track commands. Command Management - Configure one TReK system to serve as a command server/filter for other TReK systems. Database - databases are used to store telemetry and command definition information. Application Programming Interface (API) - ANSI C interface compatible with commercial products such as Visual C++, Visual Basic, LabVIEW, Borland C++, etc. The TReK API provides a bridge for users to develop software to access and extend TReK services. Environments - development, test, simulations, training, and flight. Includes standalone training simulators.

  14. The Arecibo Remote Command Center at Franklin and Marshall College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Fronefield; Jenet, Fredrick; Siemens, Xavier; Lommen, Andrea N.; Handzo, Emma; Mahany, Nicolas; Rolph, Kristina; Blazer, Sierra; Camuccio, Richard; Gebeyehu, Abel; Haylon, Christopher; Lederer, Mark; Lefebvre, Kathleen; Liang, Yaoyue; Mix, Daniel; McMahon, John; Morrow, Christopher; Munro, Jonathan; Nesselrodt, Ryan; Rose, Caitlin; TenBrook, Chase; Tibbetts, Matthew; Tran, Lam; Umberger, Rachel; Wilson, Emily; Wymer, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of the recently established Arecibo Remote Command Center (ARCC) program at Franklin and Marshall College. ARCC allows undergraduates to remotely use the Arecibo 305-m radio telescope for pulsar survey observations and to search the data collected for new radio pulsars using a custom pulsar candidate viewer. Students at Franklin and Marshall also have the opportunity to interact with and make research presentations via teleconference to other ARCC groups located at the University of Texas at Brownsville and the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. This program serves as an effective introduction to radio pulsar research, and students develop skills that can be usefully employed in other pulsar research projects. A total of 22 Franklin and Marshall students have participated in ARCC since 2013. To date, one new pulsar has been found by the Franklin and Marshall ARCC group.

  15. NASA's National Center for Advanced Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John H.; Frazier, Michael K.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An investment in the future, NASA has designated a new initiative where government, industry, and academia collaborate to meet the manufacturing needs of future space systems. The Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama has the principal responsibility for implementation of the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM). The mission of the NCAM is to build partnerships that will jointly conduct program planning and develop strategies to perform manufacturing research and technology development for critical national missions.

  16. Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Research at NASA Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation provides an overview of research being conducted on Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines (PDRE) by the Propulsion Research Center (PRC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. PDREs have a theoretical thermodynamic advantage over Steady-State Rocket Engines (SSREs) although unsteady blowdown processes complicate effective use of this advantage in practice; PRE is engaged in a fundamental study of PDRE gas dynamics to improve understanding of performance issues. Topics covered include: simplified PDRE cycle, comparison of PDRE and SSRE performance, numerical modeling of quasi 1-D rocket flows, time-accurate thrust calculations, finite-rate chemistry effects in nozzles, effect of F-R chemistry on specific impulse, effect of F-R chemistry on exit species mole fractions and PDRE performance optimization studies.

  17. Marshall Space Flight Center's Virtual Reality Applications Program 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph P., II

    1993-01-01

    A Virtual Reality (VR) applications program has been under development at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) since 1989. Other NASA Centers, most notably Ames Research Center (ARC), have contributed to the development of the VR enabling technologies and VR systems. This VR technology development has now reached a level of maturity where specific applications of VR as a tool can be considered. The objectives of the MSFC VR Applications Program are to develop, validate, and utilize VR as a Human Factors design and operations analysis tool and to assess and evaluate VR as a tool in other applications (e.g., training, operations development, mission support, teleoperations planning, etc.). The long-term goals of this technology program is to enable specialized Human Factors analyses earlier in the hardware and operations development process and develop more effective training and mission support systems. The capability to perform specialized Human Factors analyses earlier in the hardware and operations development process is required to better refine and validate requirements during the requirements definition phase. This leads to a more efficient design process where perturbations caused by late-occurring requirements changes are minimized. A validated set of VR analytical tools must be developed to enable a more efficient process for the design and development of space systems and operations. Similarly, training and mission support systems must exploit state-of-the-art computer-based technologies to maximize training effectiveness and enhance mission support. The approach of the VR Applications Program is to develop and validate appropriate virtual environments and associated object kinematic and behavior attributes for specific classes of applications. These application-specific environments and associated simulations will be validated, where possible, through empirical comparisons with existing, accepted tools and methodologies. These validated VR analytical

  18. Initiating Sustainable Operations at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Daniel E.; Orrell, Josh

    2003-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a preliminary sustainability assessment to identify sustainable projects for potential implementation at its facility in Huntsville, Alabama. This presentation will discuss the results of that assessment, highlighting current and future initiatives aimed at integrating sustainability into daily operations.

  19. Marshall Space Flight Center 1990 annual chronology of events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael

    1991-01-01

    A chronological listing is provided of the major events for the Marshall Space Flight Center for the calendar year 1990. The MSFC Historian, Management Operations Office, compiled the chronology from various sources and from supplemental information provided by the major MSFC organizations.

  20. Marshall Space Flight Center 1989 annual chronology of events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael

    1990-01-01

    A chronological listing of the major events for the Marshall Space Flight Center for the calendar year 1989 is provided. The MSFC Historian, Management Operations Office, compiled the chronology from various sources and from supplemental information provided by the major MSFC organizations.

  1. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  2. NASA propagation information center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  3. The 1991 Marshall Space Flight Center research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A compilation of 194 articles addressing research and technology activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is given. Activities are divided into three major areas: advanced studies addressing transportation systems, space systems, and space science activities conducted primarily in the Program Development Directorate; research tasks carried out in the Space Science Laboratory; and technology programs hosted by a wide array of organizations at the Center. The theme for this year's report is 'Building for the Future'.

  4. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  5. NASA Principal Center for Review of Clean Air Act Regulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark-Ingram, Marceia; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Clean Air Act (CAA) regulations have greatly impacted materials and processes utilized in the manufacture of aerospace hardware. Code JE/ NASA's Environmental Management Division at NASA Headquarters recognized the need for a formal, Agency-wide review process of CAA regulations. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was selected as the 'Principal Center for Review of Clean Air Act Regulations'. This presentation describes the centralized support provided by MSFC for the management and leadership of NASA's CAA regulation review process.

  6. Green Monopropellant Status at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Christopher G.; Pierce, Charles W.; Pedersen, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is continuing investigations into the use of green monopropellants as a replacement for hydrazine in spacecraft propulsion systems. Work to date has been to push technology development through multiple activities designed to understand the capabilities of these technologies. Future work will begin to transition to mission pull as these technologies are mature while still keeping a solid goal of pushing technology development as opportunities become available. The AF-M315E activities began with hot-fire demonstration testing of a 1N monopropellant thruster in FY 14 and FY15. Following successful completion of the preliminary campaign, changes to the test stand to accommodate propellant conditioning capability and better control of propellant operations was incorporated to make testing more streamlined. The goal is to conduct hot-fire testing with warm and cold propellants using the existing feed system and original thruster design. Following the 1N testing, a NASA owned 100 mN thruster will be hot-fire tested in the same facility to show feasibility of scaling to smaller thrusters for cubesat applications. The end goal is to conduct a hot-fire test of an integrated cubesat propulsion system using an SLM printed propellant tank, an MSFC designed propulsion system electronic controller and the 100 mN thruster. In addition to the AF-M315E testing, MSFC is pursuing hot-fire testing with LMP-103S. Following our successful hot-fire testing of the 22N thruster in April 2015, a test campaign was proposed for a 440N LMP-103S thruster with Orbital ATK and Plasma Processes. This activity was funded through the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) ACO funding call in the last quarter of CY15. Under the same funding source a test activity with Busek and Glenn Research Center for testing of 5N AF-M315E thrusters was proposed and awarded. Both activities are in-work with expected completion of hot-fire testing by the end of FY17. MSFC is

  7. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) KM Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnadoe, Tom; McCarter, Mike

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center s Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities with in the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center Of Excellence (AISCE), Intergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KM implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to support the planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have been performed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural/KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960% then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  9. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Gray, Perry

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California, The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a 'National Asset' by the DoD, The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  10. Vehicle Engineering Development Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Mark F.; Champion, Robert H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    New initiatives in the Space Transportation Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center include an emphasis on Vehicle Engineering to enhance the strong commitment to the Directorate's projects in the development of flight hardware and flight demonstrators for the advancement of space transportation technology. This emphasis can be seen in the activities of a newly formed organization in the Transportation Directorate, The Vehicle Subsystems Engineering Group. The functions and type of activities that this group works on are described. The current projects of this group are outlined including a brief description of the status and type of work that the group is performing. A summary section is included to describe future activities.

  11. The Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Porter, J. G.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.; Noble, M. W.; Lewis, M.; Thomas, Roger J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will describe the objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. In order to test the scientific feasibility of measuring magnetic fields in the UV, a sounding rocket payload is being developed. This paper will discuss: (1) the scientific measurements that will be made by the SUMI sounding rocket program, (2) how the optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic lines CIV (1550Angstroms) and MgII (2800Angstroms), and (3) the optical, reflectance, transmission and polarization measurements that have been made on the SUMI telescope mirrors and polarimeter.

  12. The Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Utraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Porter, J. G.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.; Noble, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will describe the objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. In order to test the scientific feasibility of measuring magnetic fields in the W, a sounding rocket payload is being developed. This paper will discuss: (1) the scientific measurements that will be made by the SUMI sounding rocket program, (2) how the optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic lines CIV (1550 Angstroms) and MgII (2800 Angstroms), and (3) the optical, reflectance, transmission and polarization measurements that have been made on the SUMI telescope mirrors and polarimeter.

  13. NASA's Principal Center for Review of Clean Air Act Regulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark-Ingram, Marceia

    2003-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was selected as the Principal Center for review of Clean Air Act (CAA) regulations. The CAA Principal Center is tasked to: 1) Provide centralized support to NASA/HDQ Code JE for the management and leadership of NASA's CAA regulation review process; 2) Identify potential impact from proposed CAA regulations to NASA program hardware and supporting facilities. The Shuttle Environmental Assurance Initiative, one of the responsibilities of the NASA CAA Working Group (WG), is described in part of this viewgraph presentation.

  14. NASA New England Outreach Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA New England Outreach Center in Nashua, New Hampshire was established to serve as a catalyst for heightening regional business awareness of NASA procurement, technology and commercialization opportunities. Emphasis is placed on small business participation, with the highest priority given to small disadvantaged businesses, women-owned businesses, HUBZone businesses, service disabled veteran owned businesses, and historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions. The Center assists firms and organizations to understand NASA requirements and to develop strategies to capture NASA related procurement and technology opportunities. The establishment of the NASA Outreach Center serves to stimulate business in a historically underserved area. NASA direct business awards have traditionally been highly present in the West, Midwest, South, and Southeast areas of the United States. The Center guides and assists businesses and organizations in the northeast to target opportunities within NASA and its prime contractors and capture business and technology opportunities. The Center employs an array of technology access, one-on-one meetings, seminars, site visits, and targeted conferences to acquaint Northeast firms and organizations with representatives from NASA and its prime contractors to learn about and discuss opportunities to do business and access the inventory of NASA technology. This stimulus of interaction also provides firms and organizations the opportunity to propose the use of their developed technology and ideas for current and future requirements at NASA. The Center provides a complement to the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center in developing prospects for commercialization of NASA technology. In addition, the Center responds to local requests for assistance and NASA material and documents, and is available to address immediate concerns and needs in assessing opportunities, timely support to interact with NASA Centers on

  15. A History of Solid Propulsion at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Ben

    1998-01-01

    The talk describes the solid propulsion systems used on space launch vehicles developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The development approach, in simple terms, some of the technology developed, and features of the motors will be described. Vehicle programs involved are the SATURN vehicles, the Space Shuttle, the joint Air Force/NASA Inertial Upper Stage, and the McDonald Douglas Payload Assist Module series. The documentation supporting the talk consists of illustrations of the vehicles, and the solid propellant rocket motors, and includes some summary information on the motors.

  16. Actions Needed to Ensure Scientific and Technical Information is Adequately Reviewed at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This audit was initiated in response to a hotline complaint regarding the review, approval, and release of scientific and technical information (STI) at Johnson Space Center. The complainant alleged that Johnson personnel conducting export control reviews of STI were not fully qualified to conduct those reviews and that the reviews often did not occur until after the STI had been publicly released. NASA guidance requires that STI, defined as the results of basic and applied scientific, technical, and related engineering research and development, undergo certain reviews prior to being released outside of NASA or to audiences that include foreign nationals. The process includes technical, national security, export control, copyright, and trade secret (e.g., proprietary data) reviews. The review process was designed to preclude the inappropriate dissemination of sensitive information while ensuring that NASA complies with a requirement of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (the Space Act)1 to provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information resulting from NASA research activities. We focused our audit on evaluating the STI review process: specifically, determining whether the roles and responsibilities for the review, approval, and release of STI were adequately defined and documented in NASA and Center-level guidance and whether that guidance was effectively implemented at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Johnson was included in the review because it was the source of the initial complaint, and Goddard, Langley, and Marshall were included because those Centers consistently produce significant amounts of STI.

  17. Processes and Procedures of the Higher Education Programs at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Pamala D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of my research was to investigate the policies, processes, procedures and timelines for the higher education programs at Marshall Space Flight Center. The three higher education programs that comprised this research included: the Graduate Student Researchers Program (GSRP), the National Research Council/Resident Research Associateships Program (NRC/RRA) and the Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP). The GSRP award fellowships each year to promising U.S. graduate students whose research interest coincides with NASA's mission. Fellowships are awarded for one year and are renewable for up to three years to competitively selected students. Each year, the award provides students the opportunity to spend a period in residence at a NASA center using that installation's unique facilities. This program is renewable for three years, students must reapply. The National Research Council conducts the Resident Research Associateships Program (NRC/RRA), a national competition to identify outstanding recent postdoctoral scientists and engineers and experience senior scientists and engineers, for tenure as guest researchers at NASA centers. The Resident Research Associateship Program provides an opportunity for recipients of doctoral degrees to concentrate their research in association with NASA personnel, often as a culmination to formal career preparation. The program also affords established scientists and engineers an opportunity for research without any interruptions and distracting assignments generated from permanent career positions. All opportunities for research at NASA Centers are open to citizens of the U.S. and to legal permanent residents. The Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP) is conducted each summer. NASA awards research fellowships to university faculty through the NASA/American Society for Engineering Education. The program is designed to promote an exchange of ideas between university faculties, NASA scientists and engineers. Selected

  18. Human Motion Tracking at Marshall Space Flight Center's Collaborative Engineering Center ANVIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Steven J.; Hamilton, George S.

    2004-01-01

    The installation and use of electromagnetic human motion trackers requires a specially designed and metal-free environment for optimal performance. Such an area is not readily available at the Marshall Space Flight Center Collaborative Engineering Center ANVIL. Our paper details a systems engineering approach to installing and operating Ascension Technologies Ethernet MotionStar tracking system in a sub-optimal environment, used with the JACK human computer model's motion capture capabilities. We also discuss how this system is integrated into the Marshall Space Flight Center's Human Engineering process.

  19. Status of Marshall Space Flight Center solar house

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) solar facility is described herein, and test results obtained from late May 1974 to September 1974 are discussed. This facility was assembled to provide operational experience in the utilization of solar energy for heating and cooling buildings. The major subsystems are the solar collector, the energy storage tank, the simulated living space, the air conditioning and heating subsystems, and the controls. These subsystems are described with emphasis placed on major results and conclusions. A cursory evaluation of the system for cooling is given from energy and power consumption viewpoints. This data evaluation indicates the current system is capable of supplying 50 per cent of the thermal energy required to drive the air conditioner. A preliminary evaluation of winter data indicates that more than 90 per cent of the heating required can be provided by the solar system.

  20. Nanotechnology Concepts at Marshall Space Flight Center: Engineering Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B.; Kaul, R.; Shah, S.; Smithers, G.; Watson, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the art and science of building materials and devices at the ultimate level of finesse: atom by atom. Our nation's space program has need for miniaturization of components, minimization of weight, and maximization of performance, and nanotechnology will help us get there. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Engineering Directorate is committed to developing nanotechnology that will enable MSFC missions in space transportation, space science, and space optics manufacturing. MSFC has a dedicated group of technologists who are currently developing high-payoff nanotechnology concepts. This poster presentation will outline some of the concepts being developed including, nanophase structural materials, carbon nanotube reinforced metal and polymer matrix composites, nanotube temperature sensors, and aerogels. The poster will outline these concepts and discuss associated technical challenges in turning these concepts into real components and systems.

  1. Marshall Space Flight Center High Speed Turbopump Bearing Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Moore, Chip; Thom, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a unique test rig that is used to test and develop rolling element bearings used in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. The tester is unique in that it uses liquid hydrogen as the coolant for the bearings. This test rig can simulate speeds and loads experienced in the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopumps. With internal modifications, the tester can be used for evaluating fluid film, hydrostatic, and foil bearing designs. At the present time, the test rig is configured to run two ball bearings or a ball and roller bearing, both with a hydrostatic bearing. The rig is being used to evaluate the lifetimes of hybrid bearings with silicon nitride rolling elements and steel races.

  2. Capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Nehls, Mary; Young, Whitney; Gray, Perry; Suggs, Bart; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2011-01-01

    The test and analysis capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center are described. Nine different gun systems accommodate a wide range of projectile and target sizes and shapes at velocities from subsonic through hypersonic, to accomplish a broad range of ballistic and hypervelocity impact tests. These gun systems include ballistic and microballistic gas and powder guns, a two-stage light gas gun, and specialty guns for weather encounter studies. The ITF "rain gun" is the only hydrometeor impact gun known to be in existence in the United States that can provide single impact performance data with known raindrop sizes. Simulation of high velocity impact is available using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic Code. The Impact Testing Facility provides testing, custom test configuration design and fabrication, and analytical services for NASA, the Department of Defense, academic institutions, international space agencies, and private industry in a secure facility located at Marshall Space Flight Center, on the US Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility performs tests that are subject to International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and DoD secret classified restrictions as well as proprietary and unrestricted tests for civil space agencies, academic institutions, and commercial aerospace and defense companies and their suppliers.

  3. Marshall Space Flight Center - Launching the Future of Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivers, Alisa; Shivers, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Topics include: NASA Centers around the country, launching a legacy (Explorer I), Marshall's continuing role in space exploration, MSFC history, lifting from Earth, our next mission STS 133, Space Shuttle propulsion systems, Space Shuttle facts, Space Shuttle and the International Space Station, technologies/materials originally developed for the space program, astronauts come from all over, potential future missions and example technologies, significant accomplishments, living and working in space, understanding our world, understanding worlds beyond, from exploration to innovation, inspiring the next generation, space economy, from exploration to opportunity, new program assignments, NASA's role in education, and images from deep space including a composite of a galaxy with a black hole, Sagittarius A, Pillars of Creation, and an ultra deep field

  4. Marshall Space Flight Center Engineering Directorate Overview: Launching the Future of Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    The Marshall Small Business Association (MSBA) serves as a central point of contact to inform and educate small businesses interested in pursuing contracting and subcontracting opportunities at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The MSBA meets quarterly to provide industry with information about how to do business with Marshall and to share specific information about Marshall s mission, which allows private businesses to envision how they might contribute. For the February 19 meeting, the Engineering Directorate will give an overview of its unique capabilities and how it is organized to provide maximum support for the programs and projects resident at Marshall, for example, the Space Shuttle Propulsion Office, Ares Projects Office, and Science and Mission Systems Office. This briefing provides a top-level summary of the work conducted by Marshall s largest organization, while explaining how resources are deployed to perform the volume of work under Marshall s purview.

  5. NASA InterCenter Collaboration Increases ROI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, Kimberly; Best, Susan; Felton, Larry; Newhouse, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Funding for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space mission operations is tighter than ever in the current environment of federal government deficit reductions. Conventional wisdom would expect this environment to drive increasing competition between NASA centers for the limited available funds. However, recent inter-center activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center emphasize collaboration rather than competition and demonstrate the value of partnerships to increase the return on shrinking investments. These efforts cover a variety of activities and potential returns. To facilitate sharing data from test and verification through operations without levying requirements on data format or software tools, the HOSC is working with multiple centers on an evolutionary path toward a distributed data architecture and archive. The approach reduces the required investment by allowing the partners to reuse their existing formats and tools, while facilitating gone ]stop h user visibility into and controlled access to the full complement of data regardless of user or data location. The HOSC is also working on two activities to promote sharing operations implementations and leveraging the experts and expertise across multiple NASA sites. In one, the use of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standards for the message abstraction layer provides an interoperability layer on top of existing ground data system communication architectures. This allows missions to select the most appropriate solutions for their requirements with a minimal investment in rehosting the components in a coherent operational environment. The other emphasizes shared tools and increased remote access to minimize travel for tests and critical activities and reduce the floor space required for a dedicated operations center. This paper summarizes these and other inter-center collaboration activities at the HOSC and the

  6. Research and technology, fiscal year 1986, Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is continuing its vigorous efforts in space-related research and technology. Extensive activities in advanced studies have led to the approval of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle as a new start. Significant progress was made in definition studies of liquid rocket engine systems for future space transportation needs and the conceptualization of advanced laucnch vehicles. The space systems definition studies have brought the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and Gravity Probe-B to a high degree of maturity. Both are ready for project implementation. Also discussed include significant advances in low gravity sciences, solar terrestrial physics, high energy astrophysics, atmospheric sciences, propulsion systems, and on the critical element of the Space Shuttle Main Engine in particular. The goals of improving the productivity of high-cost repetitive operations on reusable transportation systems, and extending the useful life of such systems are examined. The research and technology highlighted provides a foundation for progress on the Hubble Space Telescope, the Space Station, all elements of the Space Transportation System, and the many other projects assigned to this Center.

  7. Development of Advanced Hydrocarbon Fuels at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, S. D.; Dumbacher, P.; Cole, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    This was a small-scale, hot-fire test series to make initial measurements of performance differences of five new liquid fuels relative to rocket propellant-1 (RP-1). The program was part of a high-energy-density materials development at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the fuels tested were quadricyclane, 1-7 octodiyne, AFRL-1, biclopropylidene, and competitive impulse noncarcinogenic hypergol (CINCH) (di-methyl-aminoethyl-azide). All tests were conducted at MSFC. The first four fuels were provided by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Edwards Air Force Base, CA. The U.S. Army, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, AL, provided the CINCH. The data recorded in all hot-fire tests were used to calculate specific impulse and characteristic exhaust velocity for each fuel, then compared to RP-1 at the same conditions. This was not an exhaustive study, comparing each fuel to RP-1 at an array of mixture ratios, nor did it include important fuel parameters, such as fuel handling or long-term storage. The test hardware was designed for liquid oxygen (lox)/RP-1, then modified for gaseous oxygen/RP-1 to avoid two-phase lox at very small flow rates. All fuels were tested using the same thruster/injector combination designed for RP-1. The results of this test will be used to determine which fuels will be tested in future test programs.

  8. Eisenhower Unveils Marshall Bust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Mrs. George C. Marshall unveil the bronze bust of General George C. Marshall during the dedication ceremony of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, on September 8, 1960. On October 21, 1959, President Eisenhower directed the transfer of personnel from the Redstone Arsenal's Army Ballistic Missile Agency Development Operations Division to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A new field installation of NASA was designated as George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and its complex was formed within the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. MSFC began its operation on July 1, 1960 after the transfer ceremony, with Dr. Werher von Braun as Center Director.

  9. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula s "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA s National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA s SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT s experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  10. Marshall Space Flight Center Ground Systems Development and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Ground Systems Development and Integration performs a variety of tasks in support of the Mission Operations Laboratory (MOL) and other Center and Agency projects. These tasks include various systems engineering processes such as performing system requirements development, system architecture design, integration, verification and validation, software development, and sustaining engineering of mission operations systems that has evolved the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) into a leader in remote operations for current and future NASA space projects. The group is also responsible for developing and managing telemetry and command configuration and calibration databases. Personnel are responsible for maintaining and enhancing their disciplinary skills in the areas of project management, software engineering, software development, software process improvement, telecommunications, networking, and systems management. Domain expertise in the ground systems area is also maintained and includes detailed proficiency in the areas of real-time telemetry systems, command systems, voice, video, data networks, and mission planning systems.

  11. J-2X Engine Components Tested at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Chosen to power the upper stages of the new Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and the Ares V cargo segment, the J-2X engine is a stepped up version of the hydrogen/oxygen-fuelled Apollo-era J-2 engine. It was developed for NASA by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR), a business unit of United Technologies Corporation of Canoga Park, California. As seen in this photograph, the engine underwent a series of hot fire tests, performed on sub scale main injector hardware in the Test Stand 116 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The injector is a major component of the engine that injects and mixes propellants in the combustion chamber, where they are ignited and burned to produce thrust.

  12. Robotic and automatic welding development at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. S.; Jackson, M. E.; Flanigan, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    Welding automation is the key to two major development programs to improve quality and reduce the cost of manufacturing space hardware currently undertaken by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Variable polarity plasma arc welding has demonstrated its effectiveness on class 1 aluminum welding in external tank production. More than three miles of welds were completed without an internal defect. Much of this success can be credited to automation developments which stabilize the process. Robotic manipulation technology is under development for automation of welds on the Space Shuttle's main engines utilizing pathfinder systems in development of tooling and sensors for the production applications. The overall approach to welding automation development undertaken is outlined. Advanced sensors and control systems methodologies are described that combine to make aerospace quality welds with a minimum of dependence on operator skill.

  13. NASA Ames Research Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Ames Research Center is presented. The topics include: 1) First Century of Flight, 1903-2003; 2) NACA Research Centers; 3) 65 Years of Innovation; 4) Ames Projects; 5) NASA Ames Research Center Today-founded; 6) Astrobiology; 7) SOFIA; 8) To Explore the Universe and Search for Life: Kepler: The Search for Habitable Planets; 9) Crew Exploration Vehicle/Crew Launch Vehicle; 10) Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS); 11) Thermal Protection Materials and Arc-Jet Facility; 12) Information Science & Technology; 13) Project Columbia Integration and Installation; 14) Air Traffic Management/Air Traffic Control; and 15) New Models-UARC.

  14. Internal Social Media at Marshall Space Flight Center - An Engineer's Snapshot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.

    2013-01-01

    In the brief span of about six years (2004-2010), social media radically enhanced people's ways of maintaining recreational friendships. Social media's impact on public affairs (PAO) and community engagement is equally striking: NASA has involved millions of non-NASA viewers in its activities via outward-facing social media, often in a very two-way street fashion. Use of social media as an internal working tool by NASA's tens of thousands of civil servants, onsite contractor employees, and external stakeholders is evolving more slowly. This paper examines, from an engineer's perspective, Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) efforts to bring the power of social media to the daily working environment. Primary emphasis is on an internal Social Networking Service called Explornet that could be scaled Agency-wide. Other topics include MSFC use of other social media day-to-day for non-PAO purposes, some specialized uses of social techniques in space flight control operations, and how to help a community open up so it can discover and adopt what works well.

  15. An improvement in the numerical integration procedure used in the NASA Marshall engineering thermosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Michael Philip

    1988-01-01

    A proposed replacement scheme for the integration of the barometric and diffusion equations in the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET) model is presented. This proposed integration scheme is based on Gaussian Quadrature. Extensive numerical testing reveals it to be faster, more accurate and more reliable than the present integration scheme (a modified form of Simpson's Rule) used in the MET model. Numerous graphical examples are provided, along with a listing of a modified form of the MET model in which subroutine INTEGRATE (using Simpson's Rule) is replaced by subroutine GAUSS (which uses Gaussian Quadrature). It is recommended that the Gaussian Quadrature integration scheme, as used here, be used in the MET model.

  16. NASA's National Center for Advanced Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John

    2003-01-01

    NASA has designated the Principal Center Assignment to the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for implementation of the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM). NCAM is NASA s leading resource for the aerospace manufacturing research, development, and innovation needs that are critical to the goals of the Agency. Through this initiative NCAM s people work together with government, industry, and academia to ensure the technology base and national infrastructure are available to develop innovative manufacturing technologies with broad application to NASA Enterprise programs, and U.S. industry. Educational enhancements are ever-present within the NCAM focus to promote research, to inspire participation and to support education and training in manufacturing. Many important accomplishments took place during 2002. Through NCAM, NASA was among five federal agencies involved in manufacturing research and development (R&D) to launch a major effort to exchange information and cooperate directly to enhance the payoffs from federal investments. The Government Agencies Technology Exchange in Manufacturing (GATE-M) is the only active effort to specifically and comprehensively address manufacturing R&D across the federal government. Participating agencies include the departments of Commerce (represented by the National Institute of Standards and Technology), Defense, and Energy, as well as the National Science Foundation and NASA. MSFC s ongoing partnership with the State of Louisiana, the University of New Orleans, and Lockheed Martin Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) progressed significantly. Major capital investments were initiated for world-class equipment additions including a universal friction stir welding system, composite fiber placement machine, five-axis machining center, and ten-axis laser ultrasonic nondestructive test system. The NCAM consortium of five universities led by University of New Orleans with Mississippi State University

  17. Precision Cleaning and Verification Processes Used at Marshall Space Flight Center for Critical Hardware Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.

    1999-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs many research and development programs that require hardware and assemblies to be cleaned to levels that are compatible with fuels and oxidizers (liquid oxygen, solid propellants, etc.). Also, the Center is responsible for developing large telescope satellites which requires a variety of optical systems to be cleaned. A precision cleaning shop is operated with-in MSFC by the Fabrication Services Division of the Materials & Processes Division. Verification of cleanliness is performed for all precision cleaned articles in the Analytical Chemistry Branch. Since the Montreal Protocol was instituted, MSFC had to find substitutes for many materials that has been in use for many years, including cleaning agents and organic solvents. As MSFC is a research Center, there is a great variety of hardware that is processed in the Precision Cleaning Shop. This entails the use of many different chemicals and solvents, depending on the nature and configuration of the hardware and softgoods being cleaned. A review of the manufacturing cleaning and verification processes, cleaning materials and solvents used at MSFC and changes that resulted from the Montreal Protocol will be presented.

  18. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  19. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-03-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  20. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, David; Wetzel, Scott

    2000-01-01

    The NASA SLR Operational Center is responsible for: 1) NASA SLR network control, sustaining engineering, and logistics; 2) ILRS mission operations; and 3) ILRS and NASA SLR data operations. NASA SLR network control and sustaining engineering tasks include technical support, daily system performance monitoring, system scheduling, operator training, station status reporting, system relocation, logistics and support of the ILRS Networks and Engineering Working Group. These activities ensure the NASA SLR systems are meeting ILRS and NASA mission support requirements. ILRS mission operations tasks include mission planning, mission analysis, mission coordination, development of mission support plans, and support of the ILRS Missions Working Group. These activities ensure than new mission and campaign requirements are coordinated with the ILRS. Global Normal Points (NP) data, NASA SLR FullRate (FR) data, and satellite predictions are managed as part of data operations. Part of this operation includes supporting the ILRS Data Formats and Procedures Working Group. Global NP data operations consist of receipt, format and data integrity verification, archiving and merging. This activity culminates in the daily electronic transmission of NP files to the CDDIS. Currently of all these functions are automated. However, to ensure the timely and accurate flow of data, regular monitoring and maintenance of the operational software systems, computer systems and computer networking are performed. Tracking statistics between the stations and the data centers are compared periodically to eliminate lost data. Future activities in this area include sub-daily (i.e., hourly) NP data management, more stringent data integrity tests, and automatic station notification of format and data integrity issues.

  1. Unveiling the Broze Bust of General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    President Eisenhower and Mrs. Marshall unveil the bronze bust of General George C. Marshall at the dedication ceremony of the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center on September 8. 1960. On March 15, 1960, a Presidential Executive Order arnouced that the missile development complex within the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal would become the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Center was activated on July 1, 1960

  2. Advanced Manufacturing at the Marshall Space Flight Center and Application to Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    There are various aspects of advanced manufacturing technology development at the field centers of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been given the assignment to lead the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM) at MSFC and pursue advanced development and coordination with other federal agencies for NASA. There are significant activities at the Marshall Center as well as at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans which we operate in conjunction with the University of New Orleans. New manufacturing processes in metals processing, component development, welding operations, composite manufacturing and thermal protection system material and process development will be utilized in the manufacturing of the United States two new launch vehicles, the Ares I and the Ares V. An overview of NCAM will be presented as well as some of the development activities and manufacturing that are ongoing in Ares Upper Stage development. Some of the tools and equipment produced by Italian owned companies and their application in this work will be mentioned.

  3. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthan, A.; Limaye, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula's "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA's SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT's experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  4. Design and implementation of robust decentralized control laws for the ACES structure at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; Phillips, Douglas J.; Hyland, David C.

    1990-01-01

    Many large space system concepts will require active vibration control to satisfy critical performance requirements such as line-of-sight accuracy. In order for these concepts to become operational it is imperative that the benefits of active vibration control be practically demonstrated in ground based experiments. The results of the experiment successfully demonstrate active vibration control for a flexible structure. The testbed is the Active Control Technique Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES) structure at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The ACES structure is dynamically traceable to future space systems and especially allows the study of line-of-sight control issues.

  5. An Overview of In-Stu Treatability Studies at Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Bill; Keith, Amy; Glasgow, J. K.; Dasappa, Srini; McCaleb, Rebecca (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is located in Huntsville, Alabama (north-central Alabama), on approximately 1,840 acres near the center of the U.S. Army's Redstone Arsenal (RSA). MSFC is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) principal propulsion development center. Its scientists, engineers, and support personnel play a major role in the National Space Transportation System by managing space shuttle mission activities, including the microgravity laboratory. In addition, MSFC will be a significant contributor to several of NASA's future programs, including the Reusable Launch Vehicle (X-33), International Space Station, and Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, as well as research on a variety of space science applications. MSFC has been used to develop, test and manufacture space vehicles and components since 1960, when civilian rocketry and missile activities were transferred from RSA to MSFC. In 1994, MSFC was placed on the National Priority List for the management of hazardous waste sites, under the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). One requirement of the CERCLA program is to evaluate the nature and extent of environmental contamination resulting from identified CERCLA sites, assess the public health and environmental risks associated with the identified contamination, and identify potential remedial actions. A CERCLA remedial investigation (RI) for the groundwater system has identified at least five major plumes of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) in the groundwater beneath the facility. These plumes are believed to be the result of former management practices at 14 main facility locations (termed "source areas") where CVOCs were released to the subsurface. Trichloroethene (TCE) is the predominant CVOC and is common to all the plumes. Perchloroethene (PCE) also exists in two of the plumes. In addition to TCE and PCE, carbon tetrachloride and 1

  6. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at the Marshall Space Flight Center's neutral buoyancy simulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director, points and asks a question about the operation of the center's neutral buoyancy facility in the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory. The facility was used to test and evaluate hardware and operations hat were planned for Apollo applications program flights.

  7. Marshall Space Flight Center Research and Technology Report 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, A. S. (Compiler); Tinker, M. L. (Compiler); Sivak, A. D. (Compiler); Morris, H. C. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The investments in technology development we made in 2015 not only support the Agency's current missions, but they will also enable new missions. Some of these projects will allow us to develop an in-space architecture for human space exploration; Marshall employees are developing and testing cutting-edge propulsion solutions that will propel humans in-space and land them on Mars. Others are working on technologies that could support a deep space habitat, which will be critical to enable humans to live and work in deep space and on other worlds. Still others are maturing technologies that will help new scientific instruments study the outer edge of the universe-instruments that will provide valuable information as we seek to explore the outer planets and search for life.

  8. NASA Dryden's Educator and Visitor Centers Reopen

    NASA Video Gallery

    The City of Palmdale, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center and the AERO Institute recently hosted the reopening of NASA Dryden's Educator Resource and Visitor Centers. Now housed at the AERO Instit...

  9. 'Focus on Marshall' Features Marshall’s 50th Anniversary

    NASA Video Gallery

    On March 15, 1960, President Dwight Eisenhower issued an executive order designating NASA's first field center as the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. On the November episode of “Focus on ...

  10. Assessment of MSFC's supervisory training programs and courses. [marshall space flight center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    Courses and special programs to train supervisors at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) were to determine the adequacy of the present MSFC Supervisory Training Program and to recommend changes, if appropriate. The content, procedures, and student evaluations of the required Office of Personnel Management (OPM) 80 hours training for supervisors, the optional 120 hours, the MSFC Management Development Program (MDP), NASA's Management Education Program (MEP), various OPM and special contract programs, pertinent procedural guidelines, regulations, and letters, as well as various MSFC computer reports which indicate who took what training were analyzed. Various interviews with MSFC personnel involved in training are included. Recommendations consist of: (1) the choice of courses selected for the basic required OPM 80 hours be improved; (2) the optional 120 hours be discontinued and a shorter module be developed dealing with managerial decision making and human relations skills; (3) the MDP and MEP be continued as at present; and (4) that a broad array of developmental strategies be incorporated to provide a variety of opportunities for supervisory improvement.

  11. Rocket injector single element characterization at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutt, J.; Robertson, T.; Mcdaniels, D.; Eskridge, R.; Fisher, M.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes three experimental facilities which are being developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for rocket injector cold-flow characterization. The first of these is an already operational cold-flow ambient-backpressure facility, which uses water and air to simulate LOX and gaseous hydrogen, respectively; the facility can be used to obtain discharge coefficients, to measure flow uniformity, and to develop diagnostic techniques for use in the high-backpressure cold-flow chamber that is being currently developed at MSFC. The second is a cold-flow acrylic model facility to be used for evaluating the effect of changes in the internal flow geometry on the performance and combustion stability characteristics of a swirl coaxial LOX post. The third is a high-pressure cold-flow facility to be used for the characterization of the injector elements' performance; a specific application is to determine the effect of swirl elements on the temperature striations in the SSME preburners.

  12. Rocket injector single element characterization at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutt, J.; Robertson, T.; McDaniels, D.; Eskridge, R.; Fisher, M.

    1993-06-01

    The paper describes three experimental facilities which are being developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for rocket injector cold-flow characterization. The first of these is an already operational cold-flow ambient-backpressure facility, which uses water and air to simulate LOX and gaseous hydrogen, respectively; the facility can be used to obtain discharge coefficients, to measure flow uniformity, and to develop diagnostic techniques for use in the high-backpressure cold-flow chamber that is being currently developed at MSFC. The second is a cold-flow acrylic model facility to be used for evaluating the effect of changes in the internal flow geometry on the performance and combustion stability characteristics of a swirl coaxial LOX post. The third is a high-pressure cold-flow facility to be used for the characterization of the injector elements' performance; a specific application is to determine the effect of swirl elements on the temperature striations in the SSME preburners.

  13. Powder Processing of High Temperature Cermets and Carbides at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Pat; Panda, Binayak; Hickman, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    The Materials and Processing Laboratory at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is developing Powder Metallurgy (PM) processing techniques for high temperature cermet and carbide material consolidation. These new group of materials would be utilized in the nuclear core for Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR). Cermet materials offer several advantages for NTR such as retention of fission products and fuels, better thermal shock resistance, hydrogen compatibility, high thermal conductivity, and high strength. Carbide materials offer the highest operating temperatures but are sensitive to thermal stresses and are difficult to process. To support the effort, a new facility has been setup to process refractory metal, ceramic, carbides and depleted uranium-based powders. The facility inciudes inert atmosphere glove boxes for the handling of reactive powders, a high temperature furnace, and powder processing equipment used for blending, milling, and sieving. The effort is focused on basic research to identify the most promising compositions and processing techniques. Several PM processing methods including Cold and Hot Isostatic Pressing are being evaluated to fabricate samples for characterization and hot hydrogen testing.

  14. Using the World Wide Web for GIDEP Problem Data Processing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, John W.; Haraway, Sandra W.; Whirley, J. Don

    1999-01-01

    Since April 1997, Marshall Space Flight Center has been using electronic transfer and the web to support our processing of the Government-Industry Data Exchange Program (GIDEP) and NASA ALERT information. Specific aspects include: (1) Extraction of ASCII text information from GIDEP for loading into Word documents for e-mail to ALERT actionees; (2) Downloading of GIDEP form image formats in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) for internal storage display on the MSFC ALERT web page; (3) Linkage of stored GRDEP problem forms with summary information for access from the MSFC ALERT Distribution Summary Chart or from an html table of released MSFC ALERTs (4) Archival of historic ALERTs for reference by GIDEP ID, MSFC ID, or MSFC release date; (5) On-line tracking of ALERT response status using a Microsoft Access database and the web (6) On-line response to ALERTs from MSFC actionees through interactive web forms. The technique, benefits, effort, coordination, and lessons learned for each aspect are covered herein.

  15. Marshall Space Flight Center and the Reactor-in-Flight Stage: A Look Back at Using Nuclear Propulsion to Power Space Vehicles in the 1960's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Mike

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the Marshall Space Flight Center s role in the Reactor-In-Flight (RIlT) project that NASA was involved with in the early 1960 s. The paper outlines the project s relation to the joint NASA-Atomic Energy Commission nuclear initiative known as Project Rover. It describes the justification for the RIFT project, its scope, and the difficulties that were encountered during the project. It also provides as assessment of NASA s overall capabilities related to nuclear propulsion in the early 1960 s.

  16. Battery and cell testing at NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitt, Tom; Jackson, Lorna

    1992-01-01

    An overview covering the ten cell/battery tests ongoing at MSFC are presented. The presentation is not intended to give specific test results on any test. The purpose and related program that applies to each test is acknowledged. Except for the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES), all are energy-stored and retrieval devices at low earth orbit (LEO) cycles.

  17. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center atomic oxygen investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    An overview of the MSFC atomic oxygen investigations is provided, including descriptions of flight studies, ground-based testing, contractual efforts, and future focus. Summary results of flight experiments on STS-5, STS-8, and STS 41-G are presented. The development of the MSFC Atomic Oxygen Resistive Monitor for the upcoming EOIM-3 (Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials 3) flight experiment is reviewed. Materials characterization work and ground-based testing are described. Contractual efforts, such as the development of atomic oxygen resistant coatings for the space station, are discussed. Future emphasis is placed on ground-based testing via the development and operation of a state-of-the-art atomic oxygen simulation system and on the continuation of flight studies in support of multi-programs.

  18. Cooperative VAS program with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of mesoscale moisture information in the forecasting of weather events is discussed. A test is being prepared with the March 6, 1982 Vertical Atmospheric Sounder/Atmospheric Variability Experiment (VAS/AVE) case study to be run on the sub-synoptic scale model (SSM). Model intracomparison of three carefully designed simulations should isolate the role of mesoscale information in the initial conditions for both mositure and vertical motion. Three simulations will be made for the period 1200Z 6 March to 0000Z 7 March starting with the regular synoptic time data of 1200Z. The distinction between the three cases arises from data manipulation at 1800Z midway through the forecast period: (1) Control Case: no alterations at 1800Z. (2) Moisture Information Suppression: at 1800Z the model simulation field for water vapor, which by this time contains considerable mesoscale structure, is replaced by a smoothed version from which the mesoscale structure has been eliminated. No other variables are structure altered. (3) Vertical Motion Information Suppression: at 1800Z the model is subjected to a dead start procedure which primarily imposes a nondivergent constraint of the horizontal motion field field suppressing vertical motion. The main effect is to eliminate the mesoscale component. Comparison of results for the 1800Z to 0000Z time period will give the information desired.

  19. Environmental statement for the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center and Mississippi Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The environmental impact was investigated for the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, and the Mississippi Test Facility. The installations are described, and the missions, environmental impact, and commitment of resources are discussed. It is concluded that there are negligible adverse environmental effects related to these two installations.

  20. Scientific involvement in Skylab by the Space Sciences Laboratory of the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, C. E. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The involvement of the Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Sciences Laboratory in the Skylab program from the early feasibility studies through the analysis and publication of flight scientific and technical results is described. This includes mission operations support, the Apollo telescope mount, materials science/manufacturing in space, optical contamination, environmental and thermal criteria, and several corollary measurements and experiments.

  1. The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center High Reynolds Number Wind Tunnel Technical Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwin, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    The High Reynolds Number Wind Tunnel at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The following items are presented to illustrate the operation and capabilities of the facility: facility descriptions and specifications, operational and performance characteristics, model design criteria, instrumentation and data recording equipment, data processing and presentation, and preliminary test information required.

  2. Physical Examination to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Employees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Nurse performs tonometry examination, which measure the tension of the eyeball, during an employee's arnual physical examination given by MSFC Occupational Medicine Environmental Health Services under the Center Operations Directorate.

  3. The Role of Computational Fluid Dynamics at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto

    1998-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the Center of Excellence for Space Propulsion Technology within NASA. One of MSFC's goals is to lower the cost of access to space. MSFC's Fluid Dynamics Division, a part of the Structures and Dynamics Lab, assists in accomplishing this goal. This division is divided into two branches: experimental and analytical, whose work is complimentary and integrated. In the analysis branch, the emphasis is to apply, rather than develop computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to reduce the cost of design and development of: (1) pump and turbine feedlines and feed manifolds; (2) all primary and secondary flow paths in pumps; (3) all primary and secondary flow paths in turbines; (4) combustion chambers; (5) rocket engine nozzles and plumes; and (6) launch vehicles ascent. The broad range of applications imposes unique constraints on the software. The use of CFD in evaluating rocket engine hardware, specifically, is of value due to several reasons: (1) Rocket engine hardware is extremely expensive to build and test; (2) high engineering and development cost is due to limited production; (3) the cost of one engine test is greater than the average yearly hardware and software cost; (4) CFD represents a relatively small investment relative to the impact it has on the engine development; and (5) computing costs are continuously decreasing. In terms of accuracy the predictable error is more useful than the inconsistent accuracy. The achievable accuracy varies from application to application. The lack of accuracy is often caused by improper analyses: such as improperly applied or located boundary conditions, or attempting steady analysis of unsteady flows. This report is in viewgraph format.

  4. NASA Shared Services Center breaks ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA officials and elected leaders were on hand for the groundbreaking ceremony of the NASA Shared Services Center Feb. 24, 2006, on the grounds of Stennis Space Center. The NSSC provides agency centralized administrative processing, human resources, procurement and financial services. From left, Louisiana Economic Development Secretary Mike Olivier, Stennis Space Center Director Rick Gilbrech, Computer Sciences Corp. President Michael Laphen, NASA Deputy Administrator Shana Dale, Rep. Gene Taylor, Sen. Trent Lott, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, NASA Administrator Mike Griffin and Shared Services Center Executive Director Arbuthnot use golden shovels to break ground at the site.

  5. Laboratory Instruments Available to Support Space Station Researchers at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Binayak; Gorti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    A number of research instruments are available at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to support ISS researchers and their investigations. These modern analytical tools yield valuable and sometimes new informative resulting from sample characterization. Instruments include modern scanning electron microscopes equipped with field emission guns providing analytical capabilities that include angstron-level image resolution of dry, wet and biological samples. These microscopes are also equipped with silicon drift X-ray detectors (SDD) for fast yet precise analytical mapping of phases, as well as electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) units to map grain orientations in crystalline alloys. Sample chambers admit large samples, provide variable pressures for wet samples, and quantitative analysis software to determine phase relations. Advances in solid-state electronics have also facilitated improvements for surface chemical analysis that are successfully employed to analyze metallic materials and alloys, ceramics, slags, and organic polymers. Another analytical capability at MSFC is a mganetic sector Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) that quantitatively determines and maps light elements such as hydrogen, lithium, and boron along with their isotopes, identifies and quantifies very low level impurities even at parts per billion (ppb) levels. Still other methods available at MSFC include X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) that can determine oxidation states of elements as well as identify polymers and measure film thicknesses on coated materials, Scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (SAM) which combines surface sensitivity, spatial lateral resolution (approximately 20 nm), and depth profiling capabilities to describe elemental compositions in near surface regions and even the chemical state of analyzed atoms. Conventional Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) for observing internal microstructures at very high magnifications and the Electron Probe

  6. Contamination Control and Hardware Processing Solutions at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, DeWitt H.; Hampton, Tammy; Huey, LaQuieta; Mitchell, Mark; Norwood, Joey; Lowrey, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    The Contamination Control Team of Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processes Laboratory supports many Programs/ Projects that design, manufacture, and test a wide range of hardware types that are sensitive to contamination and foreign object damage (FOD). Examples where contamination/FOD concerns arise include sensitive structural bondline failure, critical orifice blockage, seal leakage, and reactive fluid compatibility (liquid oxygen, hydrazine) as well as performance degradation of sensitive instruments or spacecraft surfaces such as optical elements and thermal control systems. During the design phase, determination of the sensitivity of a hardware system to different types or levels of contamination/FOD is essential. A contamination control and FOD control plan must then be developed and implemented through all phases of ground processing, and, sometimes, on-orbit use, recovery, and refurbishment. Implementation of proper controls prevents cost and schedule impacts due to hardware damage or rework and helps assure mission success. Current capabilities are being used to support recent and on-going activities for multiple Mission Directorates / Programs such as International Space Station (ISS), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Space Launch System (SLS) elements (tanks, engines, booster), etc. The team also advances Green Technology initiatives and addresses materials obsolescence issues for NASA and external customers, most notably in the area of solvent replacement (e.g. aqueous cleaners containing hexavalent chrome, ozone depleting chemicals (CFC s and HCFC's), suspect carcinogens). The team evaluates new surface cleanliness inspection and cleaning technologies (e.g. plasma cleaning), and maintains databases for processing support materials as well as outgassing and optical compatibility test results for spaceflight environments.

  7. Space Environmental Effects Testing Capability at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWittBurns, H.; Craven, Paul; Finckenor, Miria; Nehls, Mary; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of the space environment on materials and systems is fundamental and essential for mission success. If not properly understood and designed for, the effects of the environment can lead to degradation of materials, reduction of functional lifetime, and system failure. In response to this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center has developed world class Space Environmental Effects (SEE) expertise and test facilities to simulate the space environment. Capabilities include multiple unique test systems comprising the most complete SEE testing capability available. These test capabilities include charged particle radiation (electrons, protons, ions), ultraviolet radiation (UV), vacuum ultraviolet radiation (VUV), atomic oxygen, plasma effects, space craft charging, lunar surface and planetary effects, vacuum effects, and hypervelocity impacts as well as the combination of these capabilities. In addition to the uniqueness of the individual test capabilities, MSFC is the only NASA facility where the effects of the different space environments can be tested in one location. Combined with additional analytical capabilities for pre- and post-test evaluation, MSFC is a one-stop shop for materials testing and analysis. The SEE testing and analysis are performed by a team of award winning experts nationally recognized for their contributions in the study of the effects of the space environment on materials and systems. With this broad expertise in space environmental effects and the variety of test systems and equipment available, MSFC is able to customize tests with a demonstrated ability to rapidly adapt and reconfigure systems to meet customers needs. Extensive flight experiment experience bolsters this simulation and analysis capability with a comprehensive understanding of space environmental effects.

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center 1960-1985: 25th anniversary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Marshall Space FLight Center marks its 25th aniversary with a record of notable achievements. These accomplishments are the essence of the Marshall Center's history. Behind the scenes of the space launches and missions, however, lies the story of challenges faced and problems solved. The highlights of that story are presented. The story is organized not as a straight chronology but as three parallel reviews of the major assignments: propulsion systems and launch vehicles, space science research and technology, and manned space systems. The general goals were to reach space, to know and understand the space environment, and to inhabit and utilize space for the benefit of mankind. Also included is a chronology of major events, presented as a fold-out chart for ready reference.

  9. The Marshall Space Flight Center KC-135 zero gravity test program for FY 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shurney, R. E. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    During FY-82, researchers and experimenters from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted 11 separate investigations during 26.3 hr of testing aboard the KC-135 zero-gravity aircraft, based at Ellington Air force Base, Texas. Although this represented fewer hours than initially projected, all experiment and test objectives were met or exceeded. This Technical Memorandum compiles all results achieved by MSFC users during FY-82, a year considered to be highly productive.

  10. [X-33 Research By NASA Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works has compiled an Annual Performance Report of the X-33/RLV Program. This report consists of individual reports from all industry team members, as well as NASA team centers. This portion of the report is comprised of overviews of each NASA Center's contribution to the program during the period 1 Apr. 1998 - 31 Mar. 1999.

  11. Capabilities of the Materials Contamination Team at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Howard; Albyn, Keith; Edwards, David; Boothe, Richard; Finchum, Charles; Finckenor, Miria

    2003-01-01

    The Materials Contamination Team at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been recognized for its contributions supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacecraft development programs. These programs include the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and the International Space Station (ISS). The Environmental Effects Group, with the Materials Contamination Team and the Space Environmental Effects Team has been an integral part of NASA's success by the testing, evaluation, and qualification of materials, hardware, and processes. This paper focuses on the capabilities of the Materials Contamination Team. The Materials Contamination Team's realm of responsibility includes establishing contamination control during all phases of hardware development, including design, manufacturing, assembly, test, transportation, launch site processing, on-orbit exposure, return, and refurbishment. The team continues its mission of reducing the risk of equipment failure due to molecular or particulate contamination. Contamination is a concern in the Space Shuttle with sensitive bond-lines and reactive fluid (liquid oxygen) compatibility as well as for spacecraft with sensitive optics, such as Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Materials Contamination Team has a variety of facilities and instrumentation capable of contaminant detection, identification, and monitoring. The team addresses material applications dealing with environments, including production facilities, clean rooms, and on-orbit exposure. The optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE) system, the Ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence (UVF) surface contamination detection, and the Surface Optics Corporation 400 (SOC 400) portable hand-held Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer are state-of-the-art tools for in-process molecular contamination detection. The team of engineers and technicians also develop contamination calibration standards

  12. Transition Marshall Space Flight Center Wind Profiler Splicing Algorithm to Launch Services Program Upper Winds Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2014-01-01

    NASAs LSP customers and the future SLS program rely on observations of upper-level winds for steering, loads, and trajectory calculations for the launch vehicles flight. On the day of launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds and provide forecasts to the launch team via the AMU-developed LSP Upper Winds tool for launches at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This tool displays wind speed and direction profiles from rawinsondes released during launch operations, the 45th Space Wing 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP, and output from numerical weather prediction models.The goal of this task was to splice the wind speed and direction profiles from the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) 915-MHz Doppler radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP at altitudes where the wind profiles overlap to create a smooth profile. In the first version of the LSP Upper Winds tool, the top of the 915-MHz DRWP wind profile and the bottom of the 50-MHz DRWP were not spliced, sometimes creating a discontinuity in the profile. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (NE) created algorithms to splice the wind profiles from the two sensors to generate an archive of vertically complete wind profiles for the SLS program. The AMU worked with MSFC NE personnel to implement these algorithms in the LSP Upper Winds tool to provide a continuous spliced wind profile.The AMU transitioned the MSFC NE algorithms to interpolate and fill data gaps in the data, implement a Gaussian weighting function to produce 50-m altitude intervals in each sensor, and splice the data together from both DRWPs. They did so by porting the MSFC NE code written with MATLAB software into Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). After testing the new algorithms in stand-alone VBA modules, the AMU replaced the existing VBA code in the LSP Upper Winds tool with the new

  13. The Marshall Space Flight Center development of mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-09-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module consist of 28 nested Ni/Co thin shells giving an effective area of 65 cm2 at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. Delivery of these modules to the IKI is scheduled for summer 2013. We present a status of the ART x-ray modules development at the MSFC.

  14. The Marshall Space Flight Center Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Ramsey, B.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module consist of 28 nested Ni/Co thin shells giving an effective area of 65 sq cm at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. Delivery of these modules to the IKI is scheduled for summer 2013. We present a status of the ART x-ray modules development at the MSFC.

  15. NASA's engineering research centers and interdisciplinary education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Gordon I.

    1990-01-01

    A new program of interactive education between NASA and the academic community aims to improve research and education, provide long-term, stable funding, and support cross-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary research. The mission of NASA's Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) is discussed and it is pointed out that the OAET conducts about 10 percent of its total R&D program at U.S. universities. Other NASA university-based programs are listed including the Office of Commercial Programs Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) and the National Space Grant program. The importance of university space engineering centers and the selection of the nine current centers are discussed. A detailed composite description is provided of the University Space Engineering Research Centers. Other specialized centers are described such as the Center for Space Construction, the Mars Mission Research Center, and the Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration. Approaches to educational outreach are discussed.

  16. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) Knowledge Management (KM) Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnedoe, Tom; Smith, Randy; McCarter, Mike; Wilson, Barry; Porter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities within the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center of Excellence (AISCE), lntergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KNI implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to suppoth e planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have beon pedormed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural1KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  17. NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffery R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the purpose, potential members and participants of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC). Included in the overview is a brief description of the administration and current activities of the NHHPC.

  18. Development of a EUV Test Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Pavelitz, Steve; Kobayashi, Ken; Robinson, Brian; Cirtain, Johnathan; Gaskin, Jessica; Winebarger, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe a new EUV test facility that is being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test EUV telescopes. Two flight programs, HiC - high resolution coronal imager (sounding rocket) and SUVI - Solar Ultraviolet Imager (GOES-R), set the requirements for this new facility. This paper will discuss those requirements, the EUV source characteristics, the wavelength resolution that is expected and the vacuum chambers (Stray Light Facility, Xray Calibration Facility and the EUV test chamber) where this facility will be used.

  19. Improving Performance of the System Safety Function at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiessling, Ed; Tippett, Donald D.; Shivers, Herb

    2004-01-01

    The Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) determined that organizational and management issues were significant contributors to the loss of Space Shuttle Columbia. In addition, the CAIB observed similarities between the organizational and management climate that preceded the Challenger accident and the climate that preceded the Columbia accident. To prevent recurrence of adverse organizational and management climates, effective implementation of the system safety function is suggested. Attributes of an effective system safety program are presented. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) system safety program is analyzed using the attributes. Conclusions and recommendations for improving the MSFC system safety program are offered in this case study.

  20. Optical Characteristics of the Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Porter, J. G.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.; Adams, M.; Smith, S.; Hraba, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. In order to test the scientific feasibility of measuring magnetic fields in the UV, a sounding rocket payload is being developed. This paper will discuss: (1) the scientific measurements that will be made by the SUMI sounding rocket program, (2) how the optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic lines CIV (1550 Angstroms) and MgII (2800 Angstroms), and (3) the optical, reflectance, transmission and polarization measurements that have been made on the SUMI telescope mirror and polarimeter.

  1. In-situ Thermal Treatment of Trichloroethene at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jason; McElroy, William J.; Glasgow, Jason; Heron, Gorm; Galligan, Jim; Parker, Ken; Davis, E. F.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the in-situ thermal treatment of trichloroethene at Marshall space Flight Center. The contents include: 1) Background 1 and 2; 2) Source Area-13; 3) In-situ Thermal Treatment; 4) SA-13 Lithology; 5) SA-13 In-Situ Thermal TS; 6) SA-13 ISTD System Components; 7) ISTD Overview; 8) Heaters; 9) SA-13 ISTD Wellfield Layout; 10) SA-13 Well Field; 11) ISTD Process and Instrumentation; 12) Treatment Zone Temperature; 13) SA-13 System Removals; 14) SA-13 DNAPL (typical photos); 15) Treatment Results 1-5; and 16) SA-13 TCE Removal Summary.

  2. Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearing Testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Thom, Robert; Moore, Chip

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle has three main engines that are used for lift off into orbit. These engines are fed propellants by low and high pressure turbopumps on each engine. A main element of the pumps are the bearings supporting the main shaft that spins the turbine and pumps. These bearings must spin at high speeds, support the radial and axial thrust loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of lubrication. This paper describes the bearing testing that was done at the Marshall Space Flight Center and the results that were obtained to provide the best bearing design possible for safe and reliable engine performance.

  3. Development of a EUV test facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Edward; Pavelitz, Steve; Kobayashi, Ken; Robinson, Brian; Cirtain, Jonathan; Gaskin, Jessica; Winebarger, Amy; Krause, Linda; McGuirk, Michael; Darnel, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    This paper will describe a new Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) test facility that is being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test EUV telescopes. Two flight programs, Hi-C, the high resolution coronal imager (a sounding rocket program), and SUVI, the Solar Ultraviolet Imager (GOES-R), set the requirements for this new facility. This paper will discuss those requirements, the EUV source characteristics, the wavelength resolution that is expected and the vacuum chambers (Stray Light Facility, Xray Calibration Facility and the NSSTC EUV test chamber) where this facility will be used.

  4. GHRC: NASAs Hazardous Weather Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Bugbee, Kaylin

    2016-01-01

    The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC; ghrc.nsstc.nasa.gov) is one of NASA's twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers responsible for providing access to NASA's Earth science data to users worldwide. Each of NASA's twelve DAACs focuses on a specific science discipline within Earth science, provides data stewardship services and supports its research community's needs. Established in 1991 as the Marshall Space Flight Center DAAC and renamed GHRC in 1997, the data center's original mission focused on the global hydrologic cycle. However, over the years, data holdings, tools and expertise of GHRC have gradually shifted. In 2014, a User Working Group (UWG) was established to review GHRC capabilities and provide recommendations to make GHRC more responsive to the research community's evolving needs. The UWG recommended an update to the GHRC mission, as well as a strategic plan to move in the new direction. After a careful and detailed analysis of GHRC's capabilities, research community needs and the existing data landscape, a new mission statement for GHRC has been crafted: to provide a comprehensive active archive of both data and knowledge augmentation services with a focus on hazardous weather, its governing dynamical and physical processes, and associated applications. Within this broad mandate, GHRC will focus on lightning, tropical cyclones and storm-induced hazards through integrated collections of satellite, airborne, and in-situ data sets. The new mission was adopted at the recent 2015 UWG meeting. GHRC will retain its current name until such time as it has built substantial data holdings aligned with the new mission.

  5. Networking at NASA. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garman, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A series of viewgraphs on computer networks at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) are given. Topics covered include information resource management (IRM) at JSC, the IRM budget by NASA center, networks evolution, networking as a strategic tool, the Information Services Directorate charter, and SSC network requirements, challenges, and status.

  6. The NRC Research Associateship Program has Greatly Enhanced the Solar Research at Marshall Space Flight Center During the Last Quarter Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    Under the educational Resident Research Associateships (RRA) program, NASA Headquarters funds post-doctoral research scientists through a contract with the National Research Council (NRC). This short article reviews the important influence that the RRAs have had on solar research at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Through the RRA program the National Research Council under the National Academy of Sciences has provided the Marshall Space Flight Center s Solar Physics Group with 29 post-doctorial research associateships since 1975. This starting date corresponds with the increased research activity in solar physics at MSFC. A number of MSFC scientists had been working on and supporting NASA s Skylab Mission in operation from May 1973 until February 1974. This scientific effort included the development MSFC s X-ray telescope SO56 and the development of the United States first full-vector magnetograph. Numerous engineers and scientists at MSFC supported the development and operation of the cluster of solar telescopes on the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), a principal part of the Skylab orbiting workshop. With the enormous volume of new and exciting solar data of the solar corona, MSFC dedicated a group of scientists to analyze these data and develop new solar instruments and programs. With this new initiative, came the world- renowned solar prominence expert, Dr. Einar Tandberg-Hanssen, from the High Altitude Observatory in Boulder, Colorado and the support of the first two RRAs in support of solar physics research.

  7. Marshall Space Flight Center's role in EASE/ACCESS mission management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Gerald W.

    1987-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Spacelab Payload Project Office was responsible for the mission management and development of several successful payloads. Two recent space construction experiments, the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) and the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS), were combined into a payload managed by the center. The Ease/ACCESS was flown aboard the Space Shuttle Mission 61-B. The EASE/ACCESS experiments were the first structures assembled in space, and the method used to manage this successful effort will be useful for future space construction missions. The MSFC mission management responsibilities for the EASE/ACCESS mission are addressed and how the lessons learned from the mission can be applied to future space construction projects are discussed.

  8. Supporting Multiple Programs and Projects at NASA's Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Camiren L.

    2014-01-01

    With the conclusion of the shuttle program in 2011, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had found itself at a crossroads for finding transportation of United States astronauts and experiments to space. The agency would eventually hand off the taxiing of American astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) that orbits in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) about 210 miles above the earth under the requirements of the Commercial Crew Program (CCP). By privatizing the round trip journey from Earth to the ISS, the space agency has been given the additional time to focus funding and resources to projects that operate beyond LEO; however, adding even more stress to the agency, the premature cancellation of the program that would succeed the Shuttle Program - The Constellation Program (CxP) -it would inevitably delay the goal to travel beyond LEO for a number of years. Enter the Space Launch System (SLS) and the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, the SLS is under development at NASA's Marshall Spaceflight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, while the Orion Capsule, built by government contractor Lockheed Martin Corporation, has been assembled and is currently under testing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. In its current vision, SLS will take Orion and its crew to an asteroid that had been captured in an earlier mission in lunar orbit. Additionally, this vehicle and its configuration is NASA's transportation to Mars. Engineers at the Kennedy Space Center are currently working to test the ground systems that will facilitate the launch of Orion and the SLS within its Ground Services Development and Operations (GSDO) Program. Firing Room 1 in the Launch Control Center (LCC) has been refurbished and outfitted to support the SLS Program. In addition, the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) is the underlying control system for monitoring and launching manned launch vehicles. As NASA finds itself at a junction, so does all of its

  9. 77 FR 67029 - NASA Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory... are local time. ADDRESSES: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Building 4200, Room P- 110,...

  10. Test and Analysis Capabilities of the Space Environment Effects Team at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Edwards, D. L.; Vaughn, J. A.; Schneider, T. A.; Hovater, M. A.; Hoppe, D. T.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed world-class space environmental effects testing facilities to simulate the space environment. The combined environmental effects test system exposes temperature-controlled samples to simultaneous protons, high- and low-energy electrons, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, and near-ultraviolet (NUV) radiation. Separate chambers for studying the effects of NUV and VUV at elevated temperatures are also available. The Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility exposes samples to atomic oxygen of 5 eV energy to simulate low-Earth orbit (LEO). The LEO space plasma simulators are used to study current collection to biased spacecraft surfaces, arcing from insulators and electrical conductivity of materials. Plasma propulsion techniques are analyzed using the Marshall magnetic mirror system. The micro light gas gun simulates micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. Candidate materials and hardware for spacecraft can be evaluated for durability in the space environment with a variety of analytical techniques. Mass, solar absorptance, infrared emittance, transmission, reflectance, bidirectional reflectance distribution function, and surface morphology characterization can be performed. The data from the space environmental effects testing facilities, combined with analytical results from flight experiments, enable the Environmental Effects Group to determine optimum materials for use on spacecraft.

  11. 14 CFR 1206.401 - Location of NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Location of NASA Information Centers. 1206... § 1206.401 Location of NASA Information Centers. (a) NASA will maintain the following Information Centers... which copies of Agency forms may be obtained: (1) NASA Headquarters (HQ) Information Center,...

  12. 14 CFR 1206.401 - Location of NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Location of NASA Information Centers. 1206... § 1206.401 Location of NASA Information Centers. (a) NASA will maintain the following Information Centers... which copies of Agency forms may be obtained: (1) NASA Headquarters (HQ) Information Center,...

  13. 14 CFR 1206.401 - Location of NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Location of NASA Information Centers. 1206... § 1206.401 Location of NASA Information Centers. (a) NASA will maintain the following Information Centers... which copies of Agency forms may be obtained: (1) NASA Headquarters (HQ) Information Center,...

  14. Friction Stir Welding Development at National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Carter, Robert W.; Ding, Robert J.; Lawless, Kirby G.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Russell, Carolyn K.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an over-view of friction stir welding (FSW) process development and applications at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). FSW process development started as a laboratory curiosity but soon found support from many users. The FSW process advanced very quickly and has found many applications both within and outside the aerospace industry. It is currently being adapted for joining key elements of the Space Shuttle External Tank for improved producibility and reliability. FSW process modeling is done to better understand and improve the process. Special tools have been developed to weld variable thickness materials including very thin and very thick materials. FSW is now being applied to higher temperature materials such as copper and to advanced materials such as metal matrix composites. FSW technology is being successfully transferred from MSFC laboratory to shop floors of many commercial companies.

  15. Nozzle Side Load Testing and Analysis at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.; Brown, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    Realistic estimates of nozzle side loads, the off-axis forces that develop during engine start and shutdown, are important in the design cycle of a rocket engine. The estimated magnitude of the nozzle side loads has a large impact on the design of the nozzle shell and the engine s thrust vector control system. In 2004 Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) began developing a capability to quantify the relative magnitude of side loads caused by different types of nozzle contours. The MSFC Nozzle Test Facility was modified to measure nozzle side loads during simulated nozzle start. Side load results from cold flow tests on two nozzle test articles, one with a truncated ideal contour and one with a parabolic contour are provided. The experimental approach, nozzle contour designs and wall static pressures are also discussed

  16. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is the second volume in the 1994 annual report for the NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center's Sixth Annual Symposium. This conference covered: (1) Combustors and Nozzles; (2) Turbomachinery Aero- and Hydro-dynamics; (3) On-board Propulsion systems; (4) Advanced Propulsion Applications; (5) Vaporization and Combustion; (6) Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics; and (7) Atomization and Sprays.

  17. An Overview of the Materials Science Research at the Marshall Space Flight Center Electrostatic Levitator Facility and Recent CDDF Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Containerless processing is an important tool for materials research. The freedom from a crucible allows processing of liquid materials in a metastable undercooled state, as well as allowing processing of high temperature and highly reactive melts. Electrostatic levitation (ESL) is a containerless method which provides a number of unique advantages, including the ability to process non-conducting materials, the ability to operate in ultra-high vacuum or at moderate gas pressure (approx. = 5 atm), and the decoupling of positioning force from sample heating. ESL also has the potential to reduce internal flow velocities below those possible with electromagnetic, acoustic, or aero-acoustic techniques. In electrostatic levitation, the acceleration of gravity (or residual acceleration in reduced gravity) is opposed by the action of an applied electric field on a charged sample. Microgravity allows electrostatic levitation to work even more effectively. The ESL facility at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center is in use for materials research and thermophysical property measurement by a number of different internal and external investigators. Results from the recent CDDF studies on the high energy X-ray beamline at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory will be presented. The Microgravity Research Program supports the facility.

  18. STS-35 Mission Manager Actions Room at the Marshall Space Flight Center Spacelab Payload Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Due to loss of data used for pointing and operating the ultraviolet telescopes, MSFC ground teams were forced to aim the telescopes with fine tuning by the flight crew. This photo captures the activities at the Mission Manager Actions Room during the mission.

  19. HUT Data Inspected at Marshall Space Flight Center During the STS-35 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Due to loss of data used for pointing and operating the ultraviolet telescopes, MSFC ground teams were forced to aim the telescopes with fine tuning by the flight crew. This photo captures the activity of viewing HUT data in the Mission Manager Actions Room during the mission.

  20. The Center Master Plan For NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigach, Kristin M.

    2004-01-01

    The Center Master Plan for NASA Glenn Research Center is a comprehensive survey of NASA Glenn's current facility assets and a vision of how we see the facilities will change over the next 20 years in order to support the changing NASA Mission. This Center Master Plan is a vital management tool used by all organizations for making near term decisions and in future planning. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Joseph Morris, the Chief Architect in the Facilities Division, on beginning this Center Master Planning Process. The previous Master Plan was completed by the Center in 1985 and contained general information on the background of the facility as well as maps detailing environmental and historic records, land use, utilities, etc. The new Master Plan is required for the Center by NASA headquarters and will include similar types of information as used in the past. The new study will provide additional features including showing how individual buildings are linked to the programs and missions that they serve. The Master Plan will show practical future options for the facility s assets with a twenty year look ahead. The Plan will be electronically retrievable so that it becomes a communications tool for Center personnel. A Center Master Plan, although required, is very beneficial to NASA Glenn Research Center in aiding management with the future direction of the campus. Keeping up-to-date information and future plans readily available to all of NASA Glenn will insure that future real property development efficiently and effectively supports the missions camed out and supported by the Center. A Center Master Plan will also facilitate coordination with Center supported programs, stakeholders, and customers. In addition, it will provide a basis for cooperative planning with local and other governmental organizations and ultimately ensure that future budgets include the Center program needs described in the plan. This will ensure that development plans are safe

  1. Test Facilities Capability Handbook: Volume 1 - Stennis Space Center (SSC); Volume 2 - Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensarling, Paula L.

    2007-01-01

    The John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is located in Southern Mississippi near the Mississippi-Louisiana state line. SSC is chartered as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Center of Excellence for large space transportation propulsion system testing. This charter has led to many unique test facilities, capabilities and advanced technologies provided through the supporting infrastructure. SSC has conducted projects in support of such diverse activities as liquid, and hybrid rocket testing and development; material development; non-intrusive plume diagnostics; plume tracking; commercial remote sensing; test technology and more. On May 30, 1996 NASA designated SSC the lead center for rocket propulsion testing, giving the center total responsibility for conducting and/or managing all NASA rocket engine testing. Test services are now available not only for NASA but also for the Department of Defense, other government agencies, academia, and industry. This handbook was developed to provide a summary of the capabilities that exist within SSC. It is intended as a primary resource document, which will provide the reader with the top-level capabilities and characteristics of the numerous test facilities, test support facilities, laboratories, and services. Due to the nature of continually evolving programs and test technologies, descriptions of the Center's current capabilities are provided. Periodic updates and revisions of this document will be made to maintain its completeness and accuracy.

  2. NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, William P.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) offers integrated supercomputing, visualization, and data interaction technologies to enhance NASA's weather and climate prediction capabilities. It serves hundreds of users at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, as well as other NASA centers, laboratories, and universities across the US. Over the past year, NCCS has continued expanding its data-centric computing environment to meet the increasingly data-intensive challenges of climate science. We doubled our Discover supercomputer's peak performance to more than 800 teraflops by adding 7,680 Intel Xeon Sandy Bridge processor-cores and most recently 240 Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Core (MIG) co-processors. A supercomputing-class analysis system named Dali gives users rapid access to their data on Discover and high-performance software including the Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT), with interfaces from user desktops and a 17- by 6-foot visualization wall. NCCS also is exploring highly efficient climate data services and management with a new MapReduce/Hadoop cluster while augmenting its data distribution to the science community. Using NCCS resources, NASA completed its modeling contributions to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCG) Fifth Assessment Report this summer as part of the ongoing Coupled Modellntercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Ensembles of simulations run on Discover reached back to the year 1000 to test model accuracy and projected climate change through the year 2300 based on four different scenarios of greenhouse gases, aerosols, and land use. The data resulting from several thousand IPCC/CMIP5 simulations, as well as a variety of other simulation, reanalysis, and observationdatasets, are available to scientists and decision makers through an enhanced NCCS Earth System Grid Federation Gateway. Worldwide downloads have totaled over 110 terabytes of data.

  3. Precision Cleaning and Verification Processes Used at Marshall Space Flight Center for Critical Hardware Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.; Cox, Jack A.; McGee, Kathleen A.

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration performs many research and development programs that require hardware and assemblies to be cleaned to levels that are compatible with fuels and oxidizers (liquid oxygen, solid propellants, etc.). Also, MSFC is responsible for developing large telescope satellites which require a variety of optical systems to be cleaned. A precision cleaning shop is operated within MSFC by the Fabrication Services Division of the Materials & Processes Laboratory. Verification of cleanliness is performed for all precision cleaned articles in the Environmental and Analytical Chemistry Branch. Since the Montreal Protocol was instituted, MSFC had to find substitutes for many materials that have been in use for many years, including cleaning agents and organic solvents. As MSFC is a research center, there is a great variety of hardware that is processed in the Precision Cleaning Shop. This entails the use of many different chemicals and solvents, depending on the nature and configuration of the hardware and softgoods being cleaned. A review of the manufacturing cleaning and verification processes, cleaning materials and solvents used at MSFC and changes that resulted from the Montreal Protocol will be presented.

  4. Overview of Fluid Dynamics Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa W.; Wang, Ten-See

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception 40 years ago, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has had the need to maintain and advance state-of-the-art flow analysis and cold-flow testing capability to support its roles and missions. This overview discusses the recent organizational changes that have occurred at MSFC with emphasis on the resulting three groups that form the core of fluid dynamics expertise at MSFC: the Fluid Physics and Dynamics Group, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, and the Experimental Fluid Dynamics Group. Recently completed activities discussed include the analysis and flow testing in support of the Fastrac engine design, the X-33 vehicle design, and the X34 propulsion system design. Ongoing activities include support of the RLV vehicle design, Liquid Fly Back Booster aerodynamic configuration definition, and RLV focused technologies development. Other ongoing activities discussed are efforts sponsored by the Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) to develop an advanced incompressible flow code and to develop optimization techniques. Recently initiated programs and their anticipated required fluid dynamics support are discussed. Based on recent experiences and on the anticipated program needs, required analytical and experimental technique improvements are presented. Due to anticipated budgetary constraints, there is a strong need to leverage activities and to pursue teaming arrangements in order to advance the state-of-the-art and to adequately support concept development. Throughout this overview there is discussion of the lessons learned and of the capabilities demonstrated and established in support of the hardware development programs.

  5. Faces of Marshall: Erika Andrews

    NASA Video Gallery

    Several Marshall employees were interviewed as part of Marshall's 50th Anniversary activities. Human Resources Specialist Erika Andrews tells how she came to work at NASA as a specialist in organiz...

  6. Faces of Marshall: Arthur Brown

    NASA Video Gallery

    Several Marshall employees were interviewed as part of Marshall's 50th Anniversary activities. Metallurgist Arthur Brown shares how his high school drafting and welding success led him to a NASA ca...

  7. Stress Analysis and Testing at the Marshall Space Flight Center to Study Cause and Corrective Action of Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingate, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    After the launch scrub of Space Shuttle mission STS-133 on November 5, 2010, large cracks were discovered in two of the External Tank intertank stringers. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, as managing center for the External Tank Project, coordinated the ensuing failure investigation and repair activities with several organizations, including the manufacturer, Lockheed Martin. To support the investigation, the Marshall Space Flight Center formed an ad-hoc stress analysis team to complement the efforts of Lockheed Martin. The team undertook six major efforts to analyze or test the structural behavior of the stringers. Extensive finite element modeling was performed to characterize the local stresses in the stringers near the region of failure. Data from a full-scale tanking test and from several subcomponent static load tests were used to confirm the analytical conclusions. The analysis and test activities of the team are summarized. The root cause of the stringer failures and the flight readiness rationale for the repairs that were implemented are discussed.

  8. Optical computing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Bualat, Maria G.; Downie, John D.; Galant, David; Gary, Charles K.; Hine, Butler P.; Ma, Paul W.; Pryor, Anna H.; Spirkovska, Lilly

    1991-01-01

    Optical computing research at NASA Ames Research Center seeks to utilize the capability of analog optical processing, involving free-space propagation between components, to produce natural implementations of algorithms requiring large degrees of parallel computation. Potential applications being investigated include robotic vision, planetary lander guidance, aircraft engine exhaust analysis, analysis of remote sensing satellite multispectral images, control of space structures, and autonomous aircraft inspection.

  9. Meteorological regimes for the classification of aerospace air quality predictions for NASA-Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Sloan, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for developing a statistical air quality assessment for the launch of an aerospace vehicle from the Kennedy Space Center in terms of existing climatological data sets. The procedure can be refined as developing meteorological conditions are identified for use with the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion (REED) description. Classical climatological regimes for the long range analysis can be narrowed as the synoptic and mesoscale structure is identified. Only broad synoptic regimes are identified at this stage of analysis. As the statistical data matrix is developed, synoptic regimes will be refined in terms of the resulting eigenvectors as applicable to aerospace air quality predictions.

  10. NASA(Field Center Based) Technology Commercialization Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Under the direction of the IC(sup 2) Institute, the Johnson Technology Commercialization Center has met or exceeded all planned milestones and metrics during the first two and a half years of the NTCC program. The Center has established itself as an agent for technology transfer and economic development in- the Clear Lake community, and is positioned to continue as a stand-alone operation. This report presents data on the experimental JTCC program, including all objective measures tracked over its duration. While the metrics are all positive, the data indicates a shortage of NASA technologies with strong commercial potential, barriers to the identification and transfer of technologies which may have potential, and small financial return to NASA via royalty-bearing licenses. The Center has not yet reached the goal of self-sufficiency based on rental income, and remains dependent on NASA funding. The most important issues raised by the report are the need for broader and deeper community participation in the Center, technology sourcing beyond JSC, and the form of future funding which will be appropriate.

  11. Marshall Space Flight Center's Tower Vector Magnetograph: Upgrades, Hardware, and Operations for the HESSI Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Hagyard, M. J.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. E.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) solar group announces the successful upgrade of our tower vector magnetograph. In operation since 1973, the last major alterations to the system (which includes telescope, filter, polarizing optics, camera, and data acquisition computer) were made in 1982, when we upgraded from an SEC Vidicon camera to a CCD. In 1985, other changes were made which increased the field-of-view from 5 x 5 arc min (2.4 arc sec per pixel) to 6 x 6 arc min with a resolution of 2.81 arc sec. In 1989, the Apollo Telescope Mount H-alpha telescope was coaligned with the optics of the magnetograph. The most recent upgrades (year 2000), funded to support the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission, have resulted in a pixel size of 0.64 arc sec over a 7 x 5.2 arc min field-of-view (binning 1x1). This poster describes the physical characteristics of the new system and compares spatial resolution, timing, and versatility with the old system. Finally, we provide a description of our Internet web site, which includes images of our most recent observations, and links to our data archives, as well as the history of magnetography at MSFC and education outreach pages.

  12. Results of Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Cook, Jerry

    1993-06-01

    The Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (SSRCS) program was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and used a government/industry team consisting of Hercules Aerospace Corporation, Aerotherm Corporation, United Technology Chemical Systems Division, Thiokol Corporation and MSFC personnel to study the feasibility of simulating the combustion species, temperatures and flow fields of a conventional solid rocket motor (SRM) with a versatile simulator system. The SSRCS design is based on hybrid rocket motor principles. The simulator uses a solid fuel and a gaseous oxidizer. Verification of the feasibility of a SSRCS system as a test bed was completed using flow field and system analyses, as well as empirical test data. A total of 27 hot firings of a subscale SSRCS motor were conducted at MSFC. Testing of the Small-scale SSRCS program was completed in October 1992. This paper, a compilation of reports from the above team members and additional analysis of the instrumentation results, will discuss the final results of the analyses and test programs.

  13. Results of Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Cook, Jerry

    1993-01-01

    The Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (SSRCS) program was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and used a government/industry team consisting of Hercules Aerospace Corporation, Aerotherm Corporation, United Technology Chemical Systems Division, Thiokol Corporation and MSFC personnel to study the feasibility of simulating the combustion species, temperatures and flow fields of a conventional solid rocket motor (SRM) with a versatile simulator system. The SSRCS design is based on hybrid rocket motor principles. The simulator uses a solid fuel and a gaseous oxidizer. Verification of the feasibility of a SSRCS system as a test bed was completed using flow field and system analyses, as well as empirical test data. A total of 27 hot firings of a subscale SSRCS motor were conducted at MSFC. Testing of the Small-scale SSRCS program was completed in October 1992. This paper, a compilation of reports from the above team members and additional analysis of the instrumentation results, will discuss the final results of the analyses and test programs.

  14. A comparison of vector magnetograms from the Marshall Space Flight Center and Mees Solar Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronan, R. S.; Orrall, F. Q.; Mickey, D. L.; West, E. A.; Hagyard, M. J.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper compares completely independent vector magnetic field measurements from two very different polarimetric instruments. The Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) imaging vector magnetograph is based on a birefringent filter, routinely measuring all four Stokes parameters integrated over the filter bandpass (1/8 A) which is tunable across the Fe I 5250 line in 10 mA steps. The Haleakala Stokes Polarimeter of the Mees Solar Observatory (MSO) is based on a spectrometer, routinely measuring all four Stokes parameters of the Fe I 6302.5 line simultaneously and then spatially scanning to build up a vector magnetogram. Active region magnetic field data were obtained with both the MSFC and MSO systems on five days during June 1985. After interpolating the MSFC vector fields onto the more coarse spatial grid of MSO, a point-by-point comparison of the two vector fields is made for data obtained on two of these days (June 8 and 9). From this comparison it is concluded that the spatially-averaged line-of-sight components agree quite well, and that although the MSO spatial grid is coarser, the quality of the MSO image is better than that of the MSFC data because of better seeing conditions.

  15. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    On 8-9 Sep. 1993, the Propulsion Engineering Research Center (PERC) at The Pennsylvania State University held its Fifth Annual Symposium. PERC was initiated in 1988 by a grant from the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology as a part of the University Space Engineering Research Center (USERC) program; the purpose of the USERC program is to replenish and enhance the capabilities of our Nation's engineering community to meet its future space technology needs. The Centers are designed to advance the state-of-the-art in key space-related engineering disciplines and to promote and support engineering education for the next generation of engineers for the national space program and related commercial space endeavors. Research on the following areas was initiated: liquid, solid, and hybrid chemical propulsion, nuclear propulsion, electrical propulsion, and advanced propulsion concepts.

  16. Saturn I (SA-1) in Marshall Space Flight Center Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    On October 27, 1961, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the Nation marked a high point in the 3-year-old Saturn development program when the first Saturn vehicle flew a flawless 215-mile ballistic trajectory from Cape Canaveral, Florida. SA-1 is pictured here, five months before launch, in the MSFC test stand on May 16, 1961. Developed and tested at MSFC under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun, SA-1 incorporated a Saturn I, Block I engine. The typical height of a Block I vehicle was approximately 163 feet. and had only one live stage. It consisted of eight tanks, each 70 inches in diameter, clustered around a central tank, 105 inches in diameter. Four of the external tanks were fuel tanks for the RP-1 (kerosene) fuel. The other four, spaced alternately with the fuel tanks, were liquid oxygen tanks, as was the large center tank. All fuel tanks and liquid oxygen tanks drained at the same rates respectively. The thrust for the stage came from eight H-1 engines, each producing a thrust of 165,000 pounds, for a total thrust of over 1,300,000 pounds. The engines were arranged in a double pattern. Four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis and canted outward slightly, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern offset 40 degrees from the inner pattern. Unlike the inner engines, each outer engine was gimbaled. That is, each could be swung through an arc. They were gimbaled as a means of steering the rocket, by letting the instrumentation of the rocket correct any deviations of its powered trajectory. The block I required engine gimabling as the only method of guiding and stabilizing the rocket through the lower atmosphere. The upper stages of the Block I rocket reflected the three-stage configuration of the Saturn I vehicle.

  17. NASA Lewis Research Center Futuring Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boroush, Mark; Stover, John; Thomas, Charles

    1987-01-01

    On October 21 and 22, 1986, the Futures Group ran a two-day Futuring Workshop on the premises of NASA Lewis Research Center. The workshop had four main goals: to acquaint participants with the general history of technology forecasting; to familiarize participants with the range of forecasting methodologies; to acquaint participants with the range of applicability, strengths, and limitations of each method; and to offer participants some hands-on experience by working through both judgmental and quantitative case studies. Among the topics addressed during this workshop were: information sources; judgmental techniques; quantitative techniques; merger of judgment with quantitative measurement; data collection methods; and dealing with uncertainty.

  18. NASA Lewis Research Center photovoltaic application experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A.; Bifano, W.; Martz, J.; Odonnell, P.

    1978-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has installed 16 geographically dispersed terrestrial photovoltaic systems as part of the DOE National Photovoltaic Program. Four additional experiments are in progress. Currently, operating systems are powering refrigerators, a highway warning sign, forest lookout towers, remote weather stations, a water chiller and insect survey traps. Experiments in progress include the world's first village power system, an air pollution monitor and seismic sensors. Under a separate activity, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, a PV-powered water pump and grain grinder is being prepared for an African village. System descriptions and status are included in this report.

  19. Using CFD as Rocket Injector Design Tool: Recent Progress at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Kevin; West, Jeff; Williams, Robert; Lin, Jeff; Rocker, Marvin; Canabal, Francisco; Robles, Bryan; Garcia, Robert; Chenoweth, James

    2003-01-01

    The choice of tools used for injector design is in a transitional phase between exclusive reliance on the empirically based correlations and extensive use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program goals emphasizing lower costs and increased reliability have produced a need to enable CFD as an injector design tool in a shorter time frame. This is the primary objective of the Staged Combustor Injector Technology Task currently under way at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The documentation of this effort begins with a very brief status of current injector design tools. MSFC's vision for use of CFD as a tool for combustion devices design is stated and discussed with emphasis on the injector. The concept of the Simulation Readiness Level (SRL), comprised of solution fidelity, robustness and accuracy, is introduced and discussed. This quantitative measurement is used to establish the gap between the current state of demonstrated capability and that necessary for regular use in the design process. MSFC's view of the validation process is presented and issues associated with obtaining the necessary data are noted and discussed. Three current experimental efforts aimed at generating validation data are presented. The importance of uncertainty analysis to understand the data quality is also demonstrated. First, a brief status of current injector design tools is provided as context for the current effort. Next, the MSFC vision for using CFD as an injector design tool is stated. A generic CFD-based injector design methodology is also outlined and briefly discussed. Three areas where MSFC is using injector CFD analyses for program support will be discussed. These include the Integrated Powerhead Development (IPD) engine which uses hydrogen and oxygen propellants in a full flow staged combustion (FFSC) cycle and the TR-107 and the RS84 engine both of which use RP-1 and oxygen in an ORSC cycle. Finally, an attempt is made to

  20. NASA Now: International Space Station Payload Operations

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this episode of NASA Now, you’ll hear Katie Presson of the Payload Operations Integration team at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., discuss investigations being conducte...

  1. NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, James P.

    2001-01-01

    This report is a summary of the primary activities and metrics for the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center, operated by the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC). This report covers the contract period January 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001. This report includes a summary of the overall CTC Metrics, a summary of the Major Outreach Events, an overview of the NASA Business Outreach Program, a summary of the Activities and Results of the Technology into the Zone program, and a Summary of the Major Activities and Initiatives performed by CTC in supporting this contract. Between January 1, 2000 and March 31, 2001, CTC has facilitated 10 license agreements, established 35 partnerships, provided assistance 517 times to companies, and performed 593 outreach activities including participation in 57 outreach events. CTC also assisted Goddard in executing a successful 'Technology into the Zone' program.' CTC is pleased to have performed this contract, and looks forward to continue providing their specialized services in support of the new 5 year RTTC Contract for the Northeast region.

  2. 14 CFR 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false NASA Industrial Applications Centers. 1201... ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION General Information § 1201.402 NASA Industrial Applications Centers. (a... and innovative technology to nonaerospace sectors of the economy—NASA operates a network of...

  3. 14 CFR 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true NASA Industrial Applications Centers. 1201... ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION General Information § 1201.402 NASA Industrial Applications Centers. (a... and innovative technology to nonaerospace sectors of the economy—NASA operates a network of...

  4. 14 CFR 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false NASA Industrial Applications Centers. 1201... ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION General Information § 1201.402 NASA Industrial Applications Centers. (a... and innovative technology to nonaerospace sectors of the economy—NASA operates a network of...

  5. CFD Modeling Activities at the NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on NASA Stennis Space Center's Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling activities is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of NASA Stennis Space Center; 2) Role of Computational Modeling at NASA-SSC; 3) Computational Modeling Tools and Resources; and 4) CFD Modeling Applications.

  6. History of Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearing Testing at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Thom, Robert; Moore, Chip; Haluck, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is propelled into orbit by two solid rocket motors and three liquid fed main engines. After the solid motors fall away, the shuttle engines continue to run for a total time of 8 minutes. These engines are fed propellants by low and high pressure turbopumps. A critical part of the turbopump is the main shaft that supports the drive turbine and the pump inducer and impeller. Rolling element bearings hold the shaft in place during rotation. If the bearings were to fail, the shaft would move, allowing components to rub in a liquid oxygen or hydrogen environment, which could have catastrophic results. These bearings are required to spin at very high speeds, support radial and axial loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of a conventional means of lubrication. The Rocketdyne built Shuttle turbopumps demonstrated their capability to perform during launches; however, the seven hour life requirement was not being met. One of the limiting factors was the bearings. In the late 1970's, an engineering team was formed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), to develop a test rig and plan for testing the Shuttle s main engine high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. The goals of the program were to better understand the operation of bearings in a cryogenic environment and to further develop and refine existing computer models used to predict the operational limits of these bearings. In 1982, testing began in a rig named the Bearing and Seal Material Tester or BSMT as it was commonly called. The first testing investigated the thermal margin and thermal runaway limits of the HPOTP bearings. The test rig was later used to explore potential bearing improvements in the area of increased race curvatures, new cage materials for better lubrication, new wear resistant rolling element materials, and other ideas to improve wear life. The most notable improvements during this tester s time was the incorporation of silicon nitride balls and

  7. Thermal performance evaluation of the Northrop model NSC-01-0732 concentrating solar collector array at outdoor conditions. [Marshall Space Flight Center solar house test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The thermal efficiency of the concentrating, tracking solar collector was tested after ten months of operation at the Marshall Space Flight Center solar house. The test procedures and results are presented.

  8. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-11-01

    Over the past year, the Propulsion Engineering Research Center at The Pennsylvania State University continued its progress toward meeting the goals of NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers (USERC) program. The USERC program was initiated in 1988 by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology to provide an invigorating force to drive technology advancements in the U.S. space industry. The Propulsion Center's role in this effort is to provide a fundamental basis from which the technology advances in propulsion can be derived. To fulfill this role, an integrated program was developed that focuses research efforts on key technical areas, provides students with a broad education in traditional propulsion-related science and engineering disciplines, and provides minority and other under-represented students with opportunities to take their first step toward professional careers in propulsion engineering. The program is made efficient by incorporating government propulsion laboratories and the U.S. propulsion industry into the program through extensive interactions and research involvement. The Center is comprised of faculty, professional staff, and graduate and undergraduate students working on a broad spectrum of research issues related to propulsion. The Center's research focus encompasses both current and advanced propulsion concepts for space transportation, with a research emphasis on liquid propellant rocket engines. The liquid rocket engine research includes programs in combustion and turbomachinery. Other space transportation modes that are being addressed include anti-matter, electric, nuclear, and solid propellant propulsion. Outside funding supports a significant fraction of Center research, with the major portion of the basic USERC grant being used for graduate student support and recruitment. The remainder of the USERC funds are used to support programs to increase minority student enrollment in engineering, to maintain Center

  9. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Over the past year, the Propulsion Engineering Research Center at The Pennsylvania State University continued its progress toward meeting the goals of NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers (USERC) program. The USERC program was initiated in 1988 by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology to provide an invigorating force to drive technology advancements in the U.S. space industry. The Propulsion Center's role in this effort is to provide a fundamental basis from which the technology advances in propulsion can be derived. To fulfill this role, an integrated program was developed that focuses research efforts on key technical areas, provides students with a broad education in traditional propulsion-related science and engineering disciplines, and provides minority and other under-represented students with opportunities to take their first step toward professional careers in propulsion engineering. The program is made efficient by incorporating government propulsion laboratories and the U.S. propulsion industry into the program through extensive interactions and research involvement. The Center is comprised of faculty, professional staff, and graduate and undergraduate students working on a broad spectrum of research issues related to propulsion. The Center's research focus encompasses both current and advanced propulsion concepts for space transportation, with a research emphasis on liquid propellant rocket engines. The liquid rocket engine research includes programs in combustion and turbomachinery. Other space transportation modes that are being addressed include anti-matter, electric, nuclear, and solid propellant propulsion. Outside funding supports a significant fraction of Center research, with the major portion of the basic USERC grant being used for graduate student support and recruitment. The remainder of the USERC funds are used to support programs to increase minority student enrollment in engineering, to maintain Center

  10. 'Focus on Marshall' Highlights 10 Years of Space Station Support and World's Largest 'Can Crusher'

    NASA Video Gallery

    Ten years ago, NASA's Payload Operations Center at Marshall worked its first science mission for the International Space Station. Since then, the science command post has coordinated over 1,100 exp...

  11. Using CFD as a Rocket Injector Design Tool: Recent Progress at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Kevin; West, Jeff; Williams, Robert; Lin, Jeff; Canabal, Francisco; Rocker, marvin; Robles, Bryan; Garcia, Robert; Chenoweth, James

    2005-01-01

    New programs are forcing American propulsion system designers into unfamiliar territory. For instance, industry s answer to the cost and reliability goals set out by the Next Generation Launch Technology Program are engine concepts based on the Oxygen- Rich Staged Combustion Cycle. Historical injector design tools are not well suited for this new task. The empirical correlations do not apply directly to the injector concepts associated with the ORSC cycle. These legacy tools focus primarily on performance with environment evaluation a secondary objective. Additionally, the environmental capability of these tools is usually one-dimensional while the actual environments are at least two- and often three-dimensional. CFD has the potential to calculate performance and multi-dimensional environments but its use in the injector design process has been retarded by long solution turnaround times and insufficient demonstrated accuracy. This paper has documented the parallel paths of program support and technology development currently employed at Marshall Space Flight Center in an effort to move CFD to the forefront of injector design. MSFC has established a long-term goal for use of CFD for combustion devices design. The work on injector design is the heart of that vision and the Combustion Devices CFD Simulation Capability Roadmap that focuses the vision. The SRL concept, combining solution fidelity, robustness and accuracy, has been established as a quantitative gauge of current and desired capability. Three examples of current injector analysis for program support have been presented and discussed. These examples are used to establish the current capability at MSFC for these problems. Shortcomings identified from this experience are being used as inputs to the Roadmap process. The SRL evaluation identified lack of demonstrated solution accuracy as a major issue. Accordingly, the MSFC view of code validation and current MSFC-funded validation efforts were discussed in

  12. The Evolution of Friction Stir Welding Theory at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C.

    2012-01-01

    From 1995 to the present the friction stir welding (FSW) process has been under study at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This is an account of the progressive emergence of a set of conceptual tools beginning with the discovery of the shear surface, wiping metal transfer, and the invention of a kinematic model and making possible a treatment of both metallurgical structure formation and process dynamics in friction stir welding from a unified point of view. It is generally observed that the bulk of the deformation of weld metal around the FSW pin takes place in a very narrow, almost discontinuous zone with high deformation rates characteristic of metal cutting. By 1999 it was realized that this zone could be treated as a shear surface like that in simple metal cutting models. At the shear surface the seam is drawn out and compressed and pressure and flow conditions determine whether or not a sound weld is produced. The discovery of the shear surface was followed by the synthesis of a simple 3- flow kinematic model of the FSW process. Relative to the tool the flow components are: (1) an approaching translational flow at weld speed V, (2) a rotating cylindrical plug flow with the angular velocity of the tool , and (3) a relatively slow ring vortex flow (like a smoke ring) encircling the tool and driven by shoulder scrolls and pin threads. The rotating plug flow picks up an element of weld metal, rotates it around with the tool, and deposits it behind the tool ( wiping metal transfer ); it forms plan section loops in tracers cut through by the tool. Radially inward flow from the ring vortex component retains metal longer in the rotating plug and outward flow expels metal earlier; this interaction forms the looping weld seam trace and the tongue and groove bimetallic weld contour. The radial components of the translational and ring vortex flows introduce parent metal intrusions into the small grained nugget material close to the tool shoulder; if this feature is

  13. NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER EMPLOYEE ENJOYS CAPTURING NASA'S NEXT GENERATION ASTRONAUT PORTRAITS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER EMPLOYEE ENJOYS CAPTURING NASA'S NEXT GENERATION ASTRONAUT PORTRAITS AT PICTURE YOURSELF IN SPACE BOOTH AT THE WRIGHT PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE OPEN HOUSE - AIR POWER 2003, MAY 10-11, 2003

  14. NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. R.; Richard, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) will provide a collaborative and virtual forum to integrate all disciplines of the human system to address spaceflight, aviation, and terrestrial human health and performance topics and issues. The NHHPC will serve a vital role as integrator, convening members to share information and capture a diverse knowledge base, while allowing the parties to collaborate to address the most important human health and performance topics of interest to members. The Center and its member organizations will address high-priority risk reduction strategies, including research and technology development, improved medical and environmental health diagnostics and therapeutics, and state-of-the art design approaches for human factors and habitability. Once full established in 2011, the NHHPC will focus on a number of collaborative projects focused on human health and performance, including workshops, education and outreach, information sharing and knowledge management, and research and technology development projects, to advance the study of the human system for spaceflight and other national and international priorities.

  15. The Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial Demonstration Program at Marshall Space Flight Center - Some problems and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial Demonstration Program by the Department of Energy and the Marshall Space Flight Center activities supporting this program from its conception are defined and discussed. Problems are summarized in the design and financial areas. It is concluded that the program has significantly assisted the creation of a viable solar testing and cooling industry. The cost effective procedures evolving from the program are expected to make a major contribution to reducing the effective life cycle cost of solar installation.

  16. 14 CFR § 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false NASA Industrial Applications Centers. Â... STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION General Information § 1201.402 NASA Industrial... aerospace knowledge and innovative technology to nonaerospace sectors of the economy—NASA operates a...

  17. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center C-17 Research Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris

    2007-01-01

    A general overview of NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's C-17 Aircraft is presented. The topics include: 1) 2006 Activities PHM Instrumentation Refurbishment; 2) Acoustic and Vibration Sensors; 3) Gas Path Sensors; 4) NASA Instrumentation System Racks; 5) NASA C-17 Simulator; 6) Current Activities; 7) Future Work; 8) Lawn Dart ; 9) Weight Tub; and 10) Parachute Test Vehicle.

  18. The Western Aeronautical Test Range of NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) is presented in this paper. The three WATR facilities are discussed, and three WATR elements - mission control centerns, communications systems, real-time processing and display systems, and tracking systems -are reviewed. The relationships within the NASA WATR, with respect to the NASA aeronautics program, are also discussed.

  19. ISDN at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakes, Catherine Murphy; Goldberg, Fredric; Eubanks, Steven W.

    1992-01-01

    An expository investigation of the potential impact of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) at NASA Lewis Research Center is described. To properly frame the subject, the paper contains a detailed survey of the components of Narrowband ISDN. The principles and objectives are presented as decreed by the Consultative Committee for International Telephone and Telegraph (CCITT). The various channel types are delineated and their associated service combinations are described. The subscriber-access network functions are explained pictorially via the ISDN reference configuration. A section on switching techniques is presented to enable the reader to understand the emergence of the concept of fast packet switching. This new technology is designed to operate over the high bandwidth, low error rate transmission media that characterizes the LeRC environment. A brief introduction to the next generation of networks is covered with sections on Broadband ISDM (B-ISDN), Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), and Synchronous Optical Networks (SONET). Applications at LeRC are presented, first in terms of targets of opportunity, then in light of compatibility constraints. In-place pilot projects and testing are described that demonstrate actual usage at LeRC.

  20. Aerothermodynamics at NASA-Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weilmuenster, K. James

    2001-01-01

    The Aerothermodynamics Branch at NASA - Langley Research Center is tasked with developing, assessing and applying aerothermodynamic technologies to enable the development of hypersonic aircraft, launch vehicles, and planetary/earth entry systems. To accomplish this mission, the Branch capitalizes on the synergism between the experimental and computational facilities/tools which reside in the branch and a staff that can draw on five decades of experience in aerothermodynamics. The Aerothermodynamics Branch is staffed by 30 scientists/engineers. The staff, of which two-thirds are less than 40 years old, is split evenly between experimentalists and computationalists. Approximately 90 percent of the staff work on space transportation systems while the remainder work on planetary missions. The Branch manages 5 hypersonic wind tunnels which are staffed by 14 technicians, numerous high end work stations and a SGI Origin 2000 system. The Branch also utilizes other test facilities located at Langley as well as other national and international test sites. Large scale computational requirements are met by access to Agency resources.

  1. NASA Johnson Space Center: Total quality partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlan, Charlie; Boyd, Alfred A.

    1992-01-01

    The development of and benefits realized from a joint NASA, support contractor continuous improvement process at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is traced. The joint effort described is the Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance Directorate relationship with its three support contractors which began in early 1990. The Continuous Improvement effort started in early 1990 with an initiative to document and simplify numerous engineering change evaluation processes. This effort quickly grew in scope and intensity to include process improvement teams, improvement methodologies, awareness, and training. By early 1991, the support contractor had teams in place and functioning, program goals established and a cultural change effort underway. In mid-l991 it became apparent that a major redirection was needed to counter a growing sense of frustration and dissatisfaction from teams and managers. Sources of frustration were isolated to insufficient joint participation on teams, and to a poorly defined vision. Over the next year, the effort was transformed to a truly joint process. The presentation covers the steps taken to define vision, values, goals, and priorities and to form a joint Steering Committee and joint process improvement teams. The most recent assessment against the President's award criteria is presented as a summary of progress. Small, but important improvement results have already demonstrated the value of the joint effort.

  2. NASA's Robotic Lander Takes Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Wednesday, June 8, the lander prototype managed by the Robotic Lunar Lander Development Project at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., hovered autonomously for 15 seconds at...

  3. PSP Testing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. H.; Hand, L. A.; Schairer, E. T.; Mehta, R. D.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paints (PSPs) are now used routinely for measuring surface pressures on wind tunnel models at transonic and supersonic Mach numbers. The method utilizes a surface coating containing fluorescent or phosphorescent materials, the brightness of which varies with the local air pressure on the surface. The present paper will summarize PSP activities (in progress and planned) at the NASA Ames Research Center. One of the main accomplishments at NASA Ames has been the development of a PSP measurement system that is production testing capable. This system has been integrated successfully into the large-scale wind tunnel facilities at Ames. There are several problems related to PSP testing which are unique to large-scale wind tunnel testing. The hardware is often difficult to set-up and must operate under harsh conditions (e.g. high pressures and low temperatures). The data acquisition and reduction times need to be kept to a minimum so that the overall wind tunnel productivity is not compromised. The pressure sensitive paints needs to be very robust; the paints must readily adhere to different surfaces with varying geometries and remain functional for long running times. The paint must have well understood, and preferably minimal, temperature sensitivity since fine control of the tunnel temperature is not easily achievable in the larger wind tunnels. In an effort to improve the overall accuracy of the PSP technique, we are currently evaluating some referenced pressure sensitive paints which contain a pressure- independent luminophor in addition to the one which is affected by the surface pressure. The two luminophors are chosen so that their emission wavelengths are somewhat different. Then by taking two 'wind-on' images with either two cameras (with different filters) or one camera with a rotating filter system, the need for 'wind-off' images can be eliminated. The ratio of the two wind-on images accounts for nonuniform lighting and model motion problems

  4. NASA CORE - A Worldwide Distribution Center for Educational Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser-Holscott, K.

    2005-05-01

    The Lorain County Joint Vocational School District (JVS) administers NASA's Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE) for the purpose of: A. Operating a mail order service to supply educators around the world with NASA's educational materials; B. Servicing NASA Education Programs/Projects with NASA's educational materials; C. Supporting the NASA Educator Resource Center Network with technology resources for the next generation of ERC. D. Support NASA's mission to inspire the next generation of explorers...as only NASA can; E. Inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in geography, science, technology, engineering and mathematics. This is accomplished by the continued operation of a central site that educators can contact to obtain information about NASA educational programs and research; obtain NASA educational publications and media; and receive technical support for NASA multimedia materials. In addition CORE coordinates the efforts of the 67 NASA Educator Resource Centers to establish a more effective network to serve educators. CORE directly supports part of NASA's core mission, To Inspire the Next Generation of Explorers.as only NASA can. CORE inspires and motivates students to pursue careers in geography, science, technology, engineering and mathematics by providing educators with exciting and NASA-unique educational material to enhance the students' learning experience. CORE is located at the Lorain County Joint Vocational School (JVS) in Oberlin, Ohio. Students at the JVS assist with the daily operations of CORE. This assistance provides the students with valuable vocational training opportunities and helps the JVS reduce the amount of funding needed to operate CORE. CORE has vast experience in the dissemination of NASA educational materials as well as a network of NASA Education Resource Centers who distribute NASA materials to secondary and post-secondary schools and universities, informal educators, and other interested individuals and

  5. Renewable Energy at NASA's Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowall, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center has implemented a great number of renewable energy systems. Renewable energy systems are necessary to research and implement if we humans are expected to continue to grow and thrive on this planet. These systems generate energy using renewable sources - water, wind, sun - things that we will not run out of. Johnson Space Center is helping to pave the way by installing and studying various renewable energy systems. The objective of this report will be to examine the completed renewable energy projects at NASA's Johnson Space Center for a time span of ten years, beginning in 2003 and ending in early 2014. This report will analyze the success of each project based on actual vs. projected savings and actual vs. projected efficiency. Additionally, both positive and negative experiences are documented so that lessons may be learned from past experiences. NASA is incorporating renewable energy wherever it can, including into buildings. According to the 2012 JSC Annual Sustainability Report, there are 321,660 square feet of green building space on JSC's campus. The two projects discussed here are major contributors to that statistic. These buildings were designed to meet various Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certification criteria. LEED Certified buildings use 30 to 50 percent less energy and water compared to non-LEED buildings. The objectives of this project were to examine data from the renewable energy systems in two of the green buildings onsite - Building 12 and Building 20. In Building 12, data was examined from the solar photovoltaic arrays. In Building 20, data was examined from the solar water heater system. By examining the data from the two buildings, it could be determined if the renewable energy systems are operating efficiently. Objectives In Building 12, the data from the solar photovoltaic arrays shows that the system is continuously collecting energy from the sun, as shown by the graph below. Building 12

  6. Educator Resource Center for NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridgford, Todd; Koltun, Nick R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the ERCN is to provide expertise and facilities to help educators access and utilize science, mathematics, and technology instructional products aligned with national standards and appropriate state frameworks and based on NASA s unique mission and results. The NASA Langley s Office of Education has established the service area for this ERC to be the five states of Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia. This educational grant activity is associated with NASA s Mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.. .as only NASA can. The communication of NASA s knowledge is the prime role of this ERC. Functioning as a dissemination system of instructional materials and support for pre-college education programs we have met the NASA Education ERCN Program's goal. The following ERCN objectives have been accomplished: Demonstrate and facilitate the use of NASA educational products and technologies in print, video and web based formats. Examples include but are not limited to NASA approved Educator s Guides with Activities based on national standards for appropriate subjects and grade levels. We have demonstrated the use videotape series in analogue format and the new digital video instructional systems along with the use of NASA TV. The promotion of web page based resources such as the new NASA Portal web and the ability to download print resources is continuously facilitated in workshops. This objective has been completed by educator contacts that include on-site visits, phone requests, postal mail requests, e-mail requests, fax requests and workshops offered.

  7. Materials and Manufacturing Research and Collaboration with the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John H.

    2005-01-01

    A strong materials and manufacturing base is an essential element to enable sustained and affordable human and robotic space exploration. NASA requires development and implementation of advanced technologies from wide-ranging segments of materials and manufacturing to provide capabilities in areas such as propulsion, power, vehicle and habitat structures, optics, radiation protection, thermal protection, in-situ manufacturing, and information technologies. This presentation will explore the latest challenges, opportunities, initiatives, and developments aimed at addressing NASA technological needs.

  8. Implementing DSpace at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Greta

    2007-01-01

    This presentation looks at the implementation of the DSpace institutional repository system at the NASA Langley Technical Library. NASA Langley Technical Library implemented DSpace software as a replacement for the Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS). DSpace was also used to develop the Langley Technical Library Digital Repository (LTLDR). LTLDR contains archival copies of core technical reports in the aeronautics area dating back to the NACA era and other specialized collections relevant to the NASA Langley community. Extensive metadata crosswalks were created to facilitate moving data from various systems and formats to DSpace. The Dublin Core metadata screens were also customized. The OpenURL standard and Ex Libris Metalib are being used in this environment to assist our customers with either discovering full-text content or with initiating a request for the item.

  9. NDE Software Developed at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Donald J.; Martin, Richard E.; Rauser, Richard W.; Nichols, Charles; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has developed several important Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) related software packages for different projects in the last 10 years. Three of the software packages have been created with commercial-grade user interfaces and are available to United States entities for download on the NASA Technology Transfer and Partnership Office server (https://sr.grc.nasa.gov/). This article provides brief overviews of the software packages.

  10. SBIR Success Stories at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Bitler, Dean W.; Prok, George M.; Metzger, Marie E.; Dreibelbis, Cindy L.; Howe, Meghan R.; Novak, George D.

    1999-01-01

    This booklet of success stories summarizes the NASA Glenn Research Center's accomplishments and successes by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. These success stories are the results of selecting projects that best support NASA missions and also have commercialization potential. Each success story describes the innovation accomplished, commercialization of the technology, and further applications and usages. The company name and the NASA contact person are identified to encourage further interest and communication to occur.

  11. Nasa Langley Research Center seventy-fifth anniversary publications, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The following are presented: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Charter; Exploring NASA's Roots, the History of NASA Langley Research Center; NASA Langley's National Historic Landmarks; The Mustang Story: Recollections of the XP-51; Testing the First Supersonic Aircraft: Memoirs of NACA Pilot Bob Champine; NASA Langley's Contributions to Spaceflight; The Rendezvous that was Almost Missed: Lunar Orbit Rendezvous and the Apollo Program; NASA Langley's Contributions to the Apollo Program; Scout Launch Vehicle Program; NASA Langley's Contributions to the Space Shuttle; 69 Months in Space: A History of the First LDEF; NACA TR No. 460: The Characteristics of 78 Related Airfoil Sections from Tests in the Variable-Density Wind Tunnel; NACA TR No. 755: Requirements for Satisfactory Flying Qualities of Airplanes; 'Happy Birthday Langley' NASA Magazine Summer 1992 Issue.

  12. Aerospace Communications at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    The Communications Division at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland Ohio has as its charter to provide NASA and the Nation with our expertise and services in innovative communications technologies that address future missions in Aerospace Technology, Spaceflight, Space Science, Earth Science, Life Science and Exploration.

  13. The NASA radar entomology program at Wallops Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    NASA contribution to radar entomology is presented. Wallops Flight Center is described in terms of its radar systems. Radar tracking of birds and insects was recorded from helicopters for airspeed and vertical speed.

  14. NASA Center for Computational Sciences: History and Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Nasa Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS) has been a leading capacity computing facility, providing a production environment and support resources to address the challenges facing the Earth and space sciences research community.

  15. Transfer Wisdom Workshops: Coming to a NASA Center Near You

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Denise

    2003-01-01

    In november 2001, the APPL Knowledge Sharing Initiative introduced a new product, the transfer wisdom workshop. The idea was to give practitioners at each of the NASA centers the opportunity to engage in a knowledge sharing activity.

  16. Composites research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Duffy, Stephen; Vary, Alex; Nathal, Michael V.; Miner, Robert V.; Arnold, Steven M.; Castelli, Michael G.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Meador, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Composites research at NASA Lewis is focused on their applications in aircraft propulsion, space propulsion, and space power, with the first being predominant. Research on polymer-, metal-, and ceramic-matrix composites is being carried out from an integrated materials and structures viewpoint. This paper outlines some of the topics being pursued from the standpoint of key technical issues, current status, and future directions.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center Space Transportation Directorate Risk Management Implementation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duarte, Luis Alberto; Kross, Denny (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The US civil aerospace program has been a great contributor to the creation and implementation of techniques and methods to identify, analyze, and confront risk. NASA has accomplished mission success in many instances, but also has had many failures. Anomalies have kept the Agency from achieving success on other occasions, as well. While NASA has mastered ways to prevent risks, and to quickly and effectively react and recover from anomalies or failures, it was not until few years ago that a comprehensive Risk Management process started being implemented in some of its programs and projects. A Continuous Risk Management (CRM) cycle process was developed and has been promoted and used successfully in programs and projects across the Agency.

  18. Theoretical Chemistry At NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical work being carried out in the Computational Chemistry Branch at NASA Ames will be overviewed. This overview will be followed by a more in-depth discussion of our theoretical work to determine molecular opacities for the TiO and water molecules and a discussion of our density function theory (DFT) calculations to determine the harmonic frequencies and intensities to the vibrational bands of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to assess their role as carriers to the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands. Finally, a more in-depth discussion of our work in the area of computational molecular nanotechnology will be presented.

  19. NASA Glenn Research Center Electrochemistry Branch Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Hoberecht, Mark; Reid, Concha

    2010-01-01

    This presentation covers an overview of NASA Glenn's history and heritage in the development of electrochemical systems for aerospace applications. Current programs related to batteries and fuel cells are addressed. Specific areas of focus are Li-ion batteries and Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel cells systems and their development for future Exploration missions. The presentation covers details of current component development efforts for high energy and ultra high energy Li-ion batteries and non-flow-through fuel cell stack and balance of plant development. Electrochemistry Branch capabilities and facilities are also addressed.

  20. Women@NASA 2015 Rosalind Cylar

    NASA Video Gallery

    Rosalind Cylar serves as an attorney and advisor in the Office of Chief Counsel at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Cylar supports NASA by providing legal support to all ...

  1. Marshall Space Flight Center Electromagnetic Compatibility Design and Interference Control (MEDIC) handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, T. L.; McCollum, M. B.; Trout, D. H.; Javor, K.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the MEDIC Handbook is to provide practical and helpful information in the design of electrical equipment for electromagnetic compatibility (EMS). Included is the definition of electromagnetic interference (EMI) terms and units as well as an explanation of the basic EMI interactions. An overview of typical NASA EMI test requirements and associated test setups is given. General design techniques to minimize the risk of EMI and EMI suppression techniques at the board and equipment interface levels are presented. The Handbook contains specific EMI test compliance design techniques and retrofit fixes for noncompliant equipment. Also presented are special tests that are useful in the design process or in instances of specification noncompliance.

  2. Marshall Space Flight Center Electromagnetic Compatibility Design and Interference Control (MEDIC) handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. L.; Mccollum, M. B.; Trout, D. H.; Javor, K.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the MEDIC Handbook is to provide practical and helpful information in the design of electrical equipment for electromagnetic compatibility (EMS). Included is the definition of electromagnetic interference (EMI) terms and units as well as an explanation of the basic EMI interactions. An overview of typical NASA EMI test requirements and associated test setups is given. General design techniques to minimize the risk of EMI and EMI suppression techniques at the board and equipment interface levels are presented. The Handbook contains specific EMI test compliance design techniques and retrofit fixes for noncompliant equipment. Also presented are special tests that are useful in the design process or in instances of specification noncompliance.

  3. 14 CFR 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Department of Computer Science, Baton Rouge, LA 70813-2065. (b) To obtain access to NASA-developed computer software, contact: Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC), University of Georgia... Research Application Center (NERAC), One Technology Drive, Tolland, CT 06084. (6) North Carolina...

  4. Technology Transfer Challenges: A Case Study of User-Centered Design in NASA's Systems Engineering Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quick, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Stage (US) section of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ares I rocket will require internal access platforms for maintenance tasks performed by humans inside the vehicle. Tasks will occur during expensive critical path operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) including vehicle stacking and launch preparation activities. Platforms must be translated through a small human access hatch, installed in an enclosed worksite environment, support the weight of ground operators and be removed before flight - and their design must minimize additional vehicle mass at attachment points. This paper describes the application of a user-centered conceptual design process and the unique challenges encountered within NASA's systems engineering culture focused on requirements and "heritage hardware". The NASA design team at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) initiated the user-centered design process by studying heritage internal access kits and proposing new design concepts during brainstorming sessions. Simultaneously, they partnered with the Technology Transfer/Innovative Partnerships Program to research inflatable structures and dynamic scaffolding solutions that could enable ground operator access. While this creative, technology-oriented exploration was encouraged by upper management, some design stakeholders consistently opposed ideas utilizing novel, untested equipment. Subsequent collaboration with an engineering consulting firm improved the technical credibility of several options, however, there was continued resistance from team members focused on meeting system requirements with pre-certified hardware. After a six-month idea-generating phase, an intensive six-week effort produced viable design concepts that justified additional vehicle mass while optimizing the human factors of platform installation and use. Although these selected final concepts closely resemble heritage internal access platforms, challenges from the application of the

  5. The writers guide to NASA. [NASA Centers and public affairs contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA services of interest to writers and to the news media include personal interviews, daily audio reports of major missions, and projects via automated telephone, research assistance from historians or history monitors at technical libraries, the use of a collection of historical photographs, and the free loan of sound films of NASA research and development activities. The names and phones numbers are listed for public affairs contacts at Headquarters and at each of the major centers and their component installations. An overview of the six NASA program offices is included along with a vicinity map of each center and a description of their facilities and management responsibilities.

  6. Development and Implementation of NASA's Lead Center for Rocket Propulsion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    With the new millennium, NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) continues to develop and refine its role as rocket test service provider for NASA and the Nation. As Lead Center for Rocket Propulsion Testing (LCRPT), significant progress has been made under SSC's leadership to consolidate and streamline NASA's rocket test infrastructure and make this vital capability truly world class. NASA's Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) capability consists of 32 test positions with a replacement value in excess of $2B. It is dispersed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Johnson Space Center (JSC)-White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), Glenn Research Center (GRC)-Plum Brook (PB), and SSC and is sized appropriately to minimize duplication and infrastructure costs. The LCRPT also provides a single integrated point of entry into NASA's rocket test services. The RPT capability is managed through the Rocket Propulsion Test Management Board (RPTMB), chaired by SSC with representatives from each center identified above. The Board is highly active, meeting weekly, and is key to providing responsive test services for ongoing operational and developmental NASA and commercial programs including Shuttle, Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle, and 2nd and 3rd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicles. The relationship between SSC, the test provider, and the hardware developers, like MSFC, is critical to the implementation of the LCRPT. Much effort has been expended to develop and refine these relationships with SSC customers. These efforts have met with success and will continue to be a high priority to SSC for the future. To data in the exercise of its role, the LCRPT has made 22 test assignments and saved or avoided approximately $51M. The LCRPT directly manages approximately $30M annually in test infrastructure costs including facility maintenance and upgrades, direct test support, and test technology development. This annual budges supports rocket propulsion test programs which have an annual budget

  7. Ground System Harmonization Efforts at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the efforts made at Goddard Space Flight Center in harmonizing the ground systems to assist in collaboration in space ventures. The key elements of this effort are: (1) Moving to a Common Framework (2) Use of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Standards (3) Collaboration Across NASA Centers (4) Collaboration Across Industry and other Space Organizations. These efforts are working to bring into harmony the GSFC systems with CCSDS standards to allow for common software, use of Commercial Off the Shelf Software and low risk development and operations and also to work toward harmonization with other NASA centers

  8. NASA AMES Remote Operations Center for 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, M.; Marshall, J.; Cox, S.; Galal, K.

    1999-01-01

    There is a Memorandum of Agreement between NASA Ames, JPL, West Virginia University and University of Arizona which led to funding for the MECA microscope and to the establishment of an Ames facility for science analysis of microscopic and other data. The data and analysis will be by agreement of the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA), Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) and other PI's. This facility is intended to complement other analysis efforts with one objective of this facility being to test the latest information technologies in support of actual mission science operations. Additionally, it will be used as a laboratory for the exploration of collaborative science activities. With a goal of enhancing the science return for both Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) and Astrobiology we shall utilize various tools such as superresolution and the Virtual Environment Vehicle Interface (VEVI) virtual reality visualization tools. In this presentation we will describe the current planning for this facility.

  9. Results from the NMSU-NASA Marshall Space Flight Center LCROSS observational campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, N. J.; Miller, C.; Hamilton, R. T.; Suggs, R. M.; McMillan, R.

    2011-08-01

    We observed the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) lunar impact on 9 October 2009 using three telescope and instrument combinations in southern New Mexico: the Agile camera with a V filter on the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory (APO), a StellaCam video camera with an R filter on the New Mexico State University (NMSU) 1 m telescope at APO, and a Goodrich near-IR (J and H band) video camera on the NMSU 0.6 m telescope at Tortugas Mountain Observatory. The three data sets were analyzed to search for evidence of the debris plume that rose above the Cabeus crater shortly after the LCROSS impact. Although we saw no evidence of the plume in any of our data sets, we constrained its surface brightness through analysis of our photometrically calibrated data. The minimum surface brightness that we could have detected in our Agile data was 9.69 magnitudes arc sec-2, which is 177 times fainter than the brightest part of the foreground ridge of Cabeus. In our near-IR data, our minimum detectable surface brightness was 8.58 magnitudes arc sec-2, which is 370 times fainter than the brightest part of the foreground ridge in the J and H bands. The debris plume was detected by the LCROSS shepherding spacecraft and the Diviner radiometer on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Given the plume radiance observed by LCROSS, we cannot distinguish between a conical or cylindrical plume geometry because when seen from Earth, both are below our detection thresholds.

  10. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Tri-gas Thruster Performance Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorado, Vanessa; Grunder, Zachary; Schaefer, Bryce; Sung, Meagan; Pedersen, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Historically, spacecraft reaction control systems have primarily utilized cold gas thrusters because of their inherent simplicity and reliability. However, cold gas thrusters typically have a low specific impulse. It has been determined that a higher specific impulse can be achieved by passing a monopropellant fluid mixture through a catalyst bed prior to expulsion through the thruster nozzle. This research analyzes the potential efficiency improvements from using tri-gas, a mixture of hydrogen, oxygen, and an inert gas, which in this case is helium. Passing tri-gas through a catalyst causes the hydrogen and oxygen to react and form water vapor, ultimately heating the exiting fluid and generating a higher specific impulse. The goal of this project was to optimize the thruster performance by characterizing the effects of varying several system components including catalyst types, catalyst lengths, and initial catalyst temperatures.

  11. The Process of Science Communications at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horack, John M.; Treise, Deborah

    1998-01-01

    The communication of new scientific knowledge and understanding is an integral component of science research, essential for its continued survival. Like any learning-based activity, science cannot continue without communication between and among peers so that skeptical inquiry and learning can take place. This communication provides necessary organic support to maintain the development of new knowledge and technology. However, communication beyond the peer-community is becoming equally critical for science to survive as an enterprise into the 21st century. Therefore, scientists not only have a 'noble responsibility' to advance and communicate scientific knowledge and understanding to audiences within and beyond the peer-community, but their fulfillment of this responsibility is necessary to maintain the survival of the science enterprise. Despite the critical importance of communication to the viability of science, the skills required to perform effective science communications historically have not been taught as a part of the training of scientist, and the culture of science is often averse to significant communication beyond the peer community. Thus scientists can find themselves ill equipped and uncomfortable with the requirements of their job in the new millennium.

  12. A status of the activities of the NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center Combustion Devices Technology Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Kevin

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Applications in Propulsion Technology was established to focus on computational fluid dynamics applications in propulsion. Specific areas of effort include developing the CFD technology required to address rocket propulsion issues, validating the technology, and applying the validated technology to design problems. The Combustion Devices Technology Team was formed to implement the above objectives in the broad area of combustion driven flows. In an effort to bring CFD to bear in the design environment, the team has focused its efforts on the Space Transportation Main Engine nozzle. The main emphasis has been on the film cooling scheme used to cool the nozzle wall. Benchmark problems have been chosen to validate CFD film cooling capabilities. CFD simulations of the subscale nozzle have been made. Also, CFD predictions of the base flow resulting from this type of nozzle have been made. The status of these calculations is presented along with future plans. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  13. Study of data entry requirements at Marshall Space Flight Computation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    An economic and systems analysis of a data center was conducted. Current facilities for data storage of documentation are shown to be inadequate and outmoded for efficient data handling. Redesign of documents, condensation of the keypunching operation, upgrading of hardware, and retraining of personnel are the solutions proposed to improve the present data system.

  14. Space Weather Forecasting at NASA GSFC Space Weather Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Maddox, M. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Lee, H.; Hesse, M.; Evans, R. M.; Berrios, D.; Mullinix, R.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA GSFC Space Weather Research Center (http://swrc.gsfc.nasa.gov) is committed to providing research forecasts and notifications to address NASA's space weather needs - in addition to its critical role in space weather education. We provide a host of services including spacecraft anomaly resolution, historical impact analysis, real-time monitoring and forecasting, tailored space weather alerts and products, weekly summaries and reports, and most recently - video casts. In this presentation, we will focus on how near real-time data (both in space and on ground), in combination with modeling capabilities and an innovative dissemination system called the Integrated Space Weather Analysis System (iSWA http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov), enable space weather forecasting and quality space weather products provided by our Center. A few critical near real-time data streams for space weather forecasting will be identified and discussed.

  15. Distance Learning With NASA Lewis Research Center's Learning Technologies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Learning Technologies Project (LTP) has responded to requests from local school district technology coordinators to provide content for videoconferencing workshops. Over the past year we have offered three teacher professional development workshops that showcase NASA Lewis-developed educational products and NASA educational Internet sites. In order to determine the direction of our involvement with distance learning, the LTP staff conducted a survey of 500 U.S. schools. We received responses from 72 schools that either currently use distance learning or will be using distance learning in 98-99 school year. The results of the survey are summarized in the article. In addition, the article provides information on distance learners, distance learning technologies, and the NASA Lewis LTP videoconferencing workshops. The LTP staff will continue to offer teacher development workshops through videoconferencing during the 98-99 school year. We hope to add workshops on new educational products as they are developed at NASA Lewis.

  16. NASA Lewis Research Center Workshop on Forced Response in Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, George L. (Compiler); Murthy, Durbha V. (Compiler); Morel, Michael (Compiler); Hoyniak, Dan (Compiler); Gauntner, Jim W. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    A summary of the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Workshop on Forced Response in Turbomachinery in August, 1993 is presented. It was sponsored by the following NASA organizations: Structures, Space Propulsion Technology, and Propulsion Systems Divisions of NASA LeRC and the Aeronautics and Advanced Concepts & Technology Offices of NASA Headquarters. In addition, the workshop was held in conjunction with the GUIde (Government/Industry/Universities) Consortium on Forced Response. The workshop was specifically designed to receive suggestions and comments from industry on current research at NASA LeRC in the area of forced vibratory response of turbomachinery blades which includes both computational and experimental approaches. There were eight presentations and a code demonstration. Major areas of research included aeroelastic response, steady and unsteady fluid dynamics, mistuning, and corresponding experimental work.

  17. Strategic Project Management at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Jerome P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes Project Management at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) from a strategic perspective. It develops the historical context of the agency and center's strategic planning process and illustrates how now is the time for KSC to become a center which has excellence in project management. The author describes project management activities at the center and details observations on those efforts. Finally the author describes the Strategic Project Management Process Model as a conceptual model which could assist KSC in defining an appropriate project management process system at the center.

  18. Overview of CMC Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    CMC technology development in the Ceramics Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center addresses Aeronautics propulsion goals across subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic flight regimes. Combustor, turbine and exhaust nozzle applications of CMC materials will enable NASA to demonstrate reduced fuel consumption, emissions, and noise in advanced gas turbine engines. Applications ranging from basic Fundamental Aeronautics research activities to technology demonstrations in the new Integrated Systems Research Program will be discussed.

  19. NASA Johnson Space Center Biomedical Research Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    Johnson Space Center (JSC) medical sciences laboratories constitute a national resource for support of medical operations and life sciences research enabling a human presence in space. They play a critical role in evaluating, defining, and mitigation the untoward effect of human adaption to space flight. Over the years they have developed the unique facilities and expertise required to perform: biomedical sample analysis and physiological performance tests supporting medical evaluations of space flight crew members and scientific investigations of the operationally relevant medical, physiological, cellular, and biochemical issues associated with human space flight. A general overview of these laboratories is presented in viewgraph form.

  20. 14 CFR § 1206.401 - Location of NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Location of NASA Information Centers. Â... § 1206.401 Location of NASA Information Centers. (a) NASA will maintain the following Information Centers... which copies of Agency forms may be obtained: (1) NASA Headquarters (HQ) Information Center,...

  1. Gear and Transmission Research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is a review of some of the research work of the NASA Lewis Research Center Mechanical Components Branch. It includes a brief review of the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Mechanical Components Branch. The research topics discussed are crack propagation of gear teeth, gear noise of spiral bevel and other gears, design optimization methods, methods we have investigated for transmission diagnostics, the analytical and experimental study of gear thermal conditions, the analytical and experimental study of split torque systems, the evaluation of several new advanced gear steels and transmission lubricants and the evaluation of various aircraft transmissions. The area of research needs for gearing and transmissions is also discussed.

  2. Life testing of the vapor compression distillation urine processor assembly (VCD/UPA) at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

    PubMed

    Wieland, P

    1998-01-01

    Wastewater and urine generated on the International Space Station (ISS) will be processed to recover pure water using vapor compression distillation (VCD). To verify the long-term reliability and performance of the VCD Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), life testing was performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from January 1993 to April 1996. Two UPAs, the VCD-5 and VCD-5A, were tested for 204 days and 665 days, respectively. The compressor gears and the distillation centrifuge drive belt were found to have operating lives of approximately 4800 h, equivalent to 3.9 years of operation on ISS for a crew of three at an average processing rate of 1.76 kg/h (3.87 lb/h). Precise alignment of the flex-splines of the fluids and purge pump motor drives is essential to avoid premature failure after about 400 h of operation. Results indicate that, with some design and procedural modifications and suitable quality control, the required performance and operational life can be met with the VCD/UPA. PMID:11540460

  3. Life Testing of the Vapor Compression Distillation Urine Processing Assembly (VCD/UPA) at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Paul O.

    1998-01-01

    Wastewater and urine generated on the International Space Station will be processed to recover pure water. The method selected is vapor compression distillation (VCD). To verify the long-term reliability and performance of the VCD Urine Processing Assembly (UPA), accelerated life testing was performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from January 1993 to April 1996. Two UPAS, the VCD-5 and VCD-5A, were tested for 204 days and 665 days, respectively. The compressor gears and the distillation centrifuge drive belt were found to have an operating life of approximately 4800 hours. Precise alignment of the flex-spline of the fluids pump is essential to avoid failure of the pump after about 400 hours of operation. Also, leakage around the seals of the drive shaft of the fluids pump and purge pump must be eliminated for continued good performance. Results indicate that, with some design and procedural modifications and suitable quality control, the required performance and operational life can be met with the VCD/UPA.

  4. NASA Langley Teacher Resource Center at the Virginia Air and Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, Kim L.

    1999-01-01

    Nation's education goals through expanding and enhancing the scientific an technological competence of students and educators. To help disseminate NASA instructional materials and educational information, NASA's Education Division has established the Educator Resource Center Network. Through this network (ERCN), educators are provided the opportunity to receive free instructional information, materials, consultation, and training workshops on NASA educational products. The Office of Education at NASA Langley Research Center offers an extension of its Precollege Education program by supporting the NASA LARC Educator Resource Center at the Virginia Air & Space Center, the official visitor center for NASA LARC. This facility is the principal distribution point for educators in the five state service region that includes Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina and South Carolina. The primary goal, to provide expertise and facilities to help educators access and utilize science, mathematics, and technology instructional products aligned with national standards and appropriate state frameworks and based on NASA's unique mission and results, has been accomplished. This ERC had 15,200 contacts and disseminated over 190,000 instructional items during the period of performance. In addition the manager attended 35 conferences, workshops, and educational meetings as an GR, presenter, or participant. The objective to demonstrate and facilitate the use of educational technologies has been accomplished through the following: The ERC's web page has been developed as a cyber-gateway to a multitude of NASA and other educational resources as well as to Our own database of current resource materials. NASA CORE CD-ROM technology is regularly demonstrated and promoted using the center's computers. NASA TV is available, demonstrated to educators, and used to facilitate the downlinking of NASA educational programming.

  5. NASA Langley Research Center outreach in astronautical education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has traditionally maintained an active relationship with the academic community, especially at the graduate level, to promote the Center's research program and to make graduate education available to its staff. Two new institutes at the Center - the Joint Institute for Acoustics and Flight Sciences, and the Institute for Computer Applications - are discussed. Both provide for research activity at the Center by university faculties. The American Society of Engineering Education Summer Faculty Fellowship Program and the NASA-NRC Postdoctoral Resident Research Associateship Program are also discussed.

  6. NASA Lewis Research Center combustion MHD experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The MHD power generation experiments were conducted in a high field strength cryomagnet which was adapted from an existing facility. In its original construction, it consisted of 12 high purity aluminum coils pool cooled in a bath of liquid neon. In this configuration, a peak field of 15 tesla was produced. For the present experiments, the center four coils were removed and a 23 cm diameter transverse warm bore tube was inserted to allow the placement of the MHD experiment between the remaining eight coils. In this configuration, a peak field of 6 tesla should be obtainable. The time duration of the experiment is limited by the neon supply which allows on the order of 1 minute of total operating time followed by an 18-hour reliquefaction period. As a result, the experiments are run in a pulsed mode. The run duration for the data presented here was 5 sec. The magnetic field profile along the MHD duct is shown. Since the working fluid is in essence superheated steam, it is easily water quenched at the exit of the diffuser and the components are designed vacuum tight so that the exhaust pipe and demister an be pumped down to simulate the vacuum of outer space.

  7. Two Micron Laser Technology Advancements at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    An Independent Laser Review Panel set up to examine NASA s space-based lidar missions and the technology readiness of lasers appropriate for space-based lidars indicated a critical need for an integrated research and development strategy to move laser transmitter technology from low technical readiness levels to the higher levels required for space missions. Based on the review, a multiyear Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) was initiated by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that ensure the successful development of the broad range of lidar missions envisioned by NASA. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of pulsed 2-micron solid-state laser technologies at NASA Langley Research Center for enabling space-based measurement of wind and carbon dioxide.

  8. Flight simulation software at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norlin, Ken A.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has developed a versatile simulation software package that is applicable to a broad range of fixed-wing aircraft. This package has evolved in support of a variety of flight research programs. The structure is designed to be flexible enough for use in batch-mode, real-time pilot-in-the-loop, and flight hardware-in-the-loop simulation. Current simulations operate on UNIX-based platforms and are coded with a FORTRAN shell and C support routines. This paper discusses the features of the simulation software design and some basic model development techniques. The key capabilities that have been included in the simulation are described. The NASA Dryden simulation software is in use at other NASA centers, within industry, and at several universities. The straightforward but flexible design of this well-validated package makes it especially useful in an engineering environment.

  9. Technology transfer within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, Henry H.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center presented to Civil Space Technology Development workshop on technology transfer and effectiveness are provided. Topics covered include: obstacles to technology transfer; technology transfer improvement program at GSFC: communication between technology developers and users; and user feedback to technologists.

  10. ADVANCED COMPOSITES TECHNOLOGY CASE STUDY AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes work conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) in Hampton, VA, under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. Support for...

  11. Rocket Propulsion Testing at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwer, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Viewgraph presentation on the design and testing Liquid Hydrogen Barge Vaporizers at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center is shown. The topics include: 1) Vaporizer Requirements; 2) Vaporizer Design; 3) LH2 # 2 Vaporizer Statistics; 4) Corrective Actions; and 5) Lessons Learned.

  12. A User's Evaluation of a NASA Regional Dissemination Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sovel, M. Terry; Coddington, Dean C.

    Retrospective searches provided by a NASA Regional Dissemination Center (RDC) were found to be of substantial value to researchers during a six-month experimental period at the University of Denver's Research Institute (DRI). The purpose of the experiment was to gain a better understanding of the usefulness of an RDC to a user organization. DRI…

  13. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Supply Chain Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the working of the Supplier Assessment Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The program supports many GSFC projects to ensure suppliers are aware of and are following the contractual requirements, to provide an independent assessment of the suppliers' processes, and provide suppliers' safety and mission assurance organizations information to make the changes within their organization.

  14. Computational mechanics and physics at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    South, Jerry C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is given of computational mechanics and physics at NASA Langley Research Center. Computational analysis is a major component and tool in many of Langley's diverse research disciplines, as well as in the interdisciplinary research. Examples are given for algorithm development and advanced applications in aerodynamics, transition to turbulence and turbulence simulation, hypersonics, structures, and interdisciplinary optimization.

  15. UAS Related Activities at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center is completing its refurbishment and initial flights of one the pre-production Global Hawk aircraft it received from the U.S. Air Force. NASA Dryden has an agreement with the Global Hawk s manufacturer, Northrop Grumman, to partner in the refurbishment and flight operations of the vehicles. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has also partnered on the project and is assisting NASA with project management and pilot responsibilities for the aircraft. NASA and NOAA will be using the Global Hawks to conduct earth science research. The earth science community is increasing utilizing UAS of all sizes and capabilities to collect important data on a variety of issues including important global climate change issues. To pursue the data collection needs of the science community there is a growing demand for international collaboration with respect to operating UAS in global airspace. Operations of NASA s Ikhana aircraft continued this past year. The Ikhana is a modified Predator B UAS. A UAS dedicated to research at NASA Dryden is the X-48B blended wing body research aircraft. Flight tests with the 500- pound, remotely piloted test vehicle are now in a block 4 phase involving parameter identification and maneuvers to research the limits of the engine in stall situations. NASA s participation in the blended wing body research effort is focused on fundamental, advanced flight dynamics and structural design concepts within the Subsonic Fixed Wing project, part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program managed through NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. Potential benefits of the aircraft include increased volume for carrying capacity, efficient aerodynamics for reduced fuel burn and possibly significant reductions in noise due to propulsion integration options. NASA Dryden continues to support the UAS industry by facilitating access to three specially designated test areas on Edwards Air Force Base for the

  16. Revitalization of the NASA Langley Research Center's Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Mastaler, Michael D.; Craft, Stephen J.; Kegelman, Jerome T.; Hope, Drew J.; Mangum, Cathy H.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (Langley) was founded in 1917 as the nation's first civilian aeronautical research facility and NASA's first field center. For nearly 100 years, Langley has made significant contributions to the Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Earth Science missions through research, technology, and engineering core competencies in aerosciences, materials, structures, the characterization of earth and planetary atmospheres and, more recently, in technologies associated with entry, descent, and landing. An unfortunate but inevitable outcome of this rich history is an aging infrastructure where the longest serving building is close to 80 years old and the average building age is 44 years old. In the current environment, the continued operation and maintenance of this aging and often inefficient infrastructure presents a real challenge to Center leadership in the trade space of sustaining infrastructure versus not investing in future capabilities. To address this issue, the Center has developed a forward looking revitalization strategy that ties future core competencies and technical capabilities to the Center Master Facility Plan to maintain a viable Center well into the future. This paper documents Langley's revitalization strategy which integrates the Center's missions, the Langley 2050 vision, the Center Master Facility Plan, and the New Town repair-by-replacement program through the leadership of the Vibrant Transformation to Advance Langley (ViTAL) Team.

  17. EGIS - An Environmental GIS Developed for NASA Field Center Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, James; Cohan, Tyrus; O'Connor, Christina; Johnson, Gary; Carr, Hugh

    2001-01-01

    As the principal center for Environmental Geographic Information Systems (EGIS), the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC), located in Hancock County, Mississippi, has been assigned technical support requirements to design and to implement a basic EGIS data base for all NASA Field Centers. The intent of this Phase I effort is to produce a baseline EGIS data base incorporating newly available remotely sensed data as well as existing environmental data. A example application of the use of the data base at Stennis Space Center will be to illustrate baseline environmental conditions for consideration with proposed propulsion test stand development and operation. To effectively answer questions related to environmental issues at each center, organization of the data layers and sources will include the following categories: Cadastral/Geodetic; Geopolitical; Hydrography; Infrastructure; Physical Geography; Socioeconomic; Remote Sensing Imagery; Associated Metadata. As part of a Phase II effort, site-specific data and applications will be implemented and added to the data base at each Field Center. This poster illustrates the framework of the design and implementation of a basic EGIS data base. Shown are example data sources, hardware and software, and data base delivery and installation. The poster also depicts future recommendations for a centrally located server to house each of the NASA Field Center data bases. The server will allow real-time data base updates with additional layers and models for each center. Expansion of the EGIS data base will continue to grow as site-specific applications are developed addressing the ongoing evolution of environmental concerns at all NASA Field Centers.

  18. NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahl, Joseph M.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Montegani, Francis J.

    1996-01-01

    During the summer of 1996, a ten-week Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in collaboration with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), and the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). This is the thirty-third summer of this program at Lewis. It was one of nine summer programs sponsored by NASA in 1996, at various field centers under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science educators, (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) to enrich and refresh the research activities of participants' institutions. (4) to contribute to the research objectives of LeRC. This report is intended to recapitulate the activities comprising the 1996 Lewis Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, to summarize evaluations by the participants, and to make recommendations regarding future programs.

  19. NASA's Meteorologist Center: Online Resources to Promote Climate Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R.; Tenenbaum, L. F.; Witte, J.

    2012-12-01

    In a recent survey by George Mason University, a significant number of meteorologists and weathercasters in America cited lack of access to appropriate visuals and graphics as a basic impediment to reporting the reality of anthropogenic climate change. To address this need, NASA's Global Climate Change Website, climate.nasa.gov, has developed an online Meteorologist Center, stocked with high quality graphics and animations, public education materials, and a list of credible online resources. The goal of the project is to provide weathercasters with a "one-stop shop" for broadcast-ready materials that can be used to report on global climate change and to educate audiences.;

  20. NASA Space Weather Center Services: Potential for Space Weather Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Masha; Pulkkinen, Antti; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Lee, H.; Hesse, M.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Space Weather Center's primary objective is to provide the latest space weather information and forecasting for NASA's robotic missions and its partners and to bring space weather knowledge to the public. At the same time, the tools and services it possesses can be invaluable for research purposes. Here we show how our archive and real-time modeling of space weather events can aid research in a variety of ways, with different classification criteria. We will list and discuss major CME events, major geomagnetic storms, and major SEP events that occurred during the years 2010 - 2012. Highlights of major tools/resources will be provided.

  1. Climate Change Adaptation Science Activities at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Lulla, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC), located in the southeast metropolitan region of Houston, TX is the prime NASA center for human spaceflight operations and astronaut training, but it also houses the unique collection of returned extraterrestrial samples, including lunar samples from the Apollo missions. The Center's location adjacent to Clear Lake and the Clear Creek watershed, an estuary of Galveston Bay, puts it at direct annual risk from hurricanes, but also from a number of other climate-related hazards including drought, floods, sea level rise, heat waves, and high wind events all assigned Threat Levels of 2 or 3 in the most recent NASA Center Disaster/Risk Matrix produced by the Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group. Based on prior CASI workshops at other NASA centers, it is recognized that JSC is highly vulnerable to climate-change related hazards and has a need for adaptation strategies. We will present an overview of prior CASI-related work at JSC, including publication of a climate change and adaptation informational data brochure, and a Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Risks Workshop that was held at JSC in early March 2012. Major outcomes of that workshop that form a basis for work going forward are 1) a realization that JSC is embedded in a regional environmental and social context, and that potential climate change effects and adaptation strategies will not, and should not, be constrained by the Center fence line; 2) a desire to coordinate data collection and adaptation planning activities with interested stakeholders to form a regional climate change adaptation center that could facilitate interaction with CASI; 3) recognition that there is a wide array of basic data (remotely sensed, in situ, GIS/mapping, and historical) available through JSC and other stakeholders, but this data is not yet centrally accessible for planning purposes.

  2. Review of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. B.; Sims, Herb; Martin, James; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond; Fant, Wallace

    2003-01-01

    The significant energy density of matter-antimatter annihilation is attractive to the designers of future space propulsion systems, with the potential to offer a highly compact source of power. Many propulsion concepts exist that could take advantage of matter-antimatter reactions, and current antiproton production rates are sufficient to support basic proof-of-principle evaluation of technology associated with antimatter- derived propulsion. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, allowing antiprotons to be trapped, stored, and transported for use at an experimental facility. To address this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Research Center is developing a storage system referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) with a design goal of containing 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. The HiPAT makes use of an electromagnetic system (Penning- Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Telsa superconductor, high voltage electrode structure, radio frequency (RF) network, and ultra high vacuum system. To evaluate the system normal matter sources (both electron guns and ion sources) are used to generate charged particles. The electron beams ionize gas within the trapping region producing ions in situ, whereas the ion sources produce the particles external to the trapping region and required dynamic capture. A wide range of experiments has been performed examining factors such as ion storage lifetimes, effect of RF energy on storage lifetime, and ability to routinely perform dynamic ion capture. Current efforts have been focused on improving the FW rotating wall system to permit longer storage times and non-destructive diagnostics of stored ions. Typical particle detection is performed by extracting trapped ions from HiPAT and destructively colliding them with a micro-channel plate detector (providing number and energy information). This improved RF system has been used to detect various

  3. A Proposed Approach for Prioritizing Maintenance at NASA Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Sawyer, Melvin H.

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) manages a vast array of infrastructure assets across ten National Centers with a worth of at least 30 billion dollars. Eighty percent of this infrastructure is greater than 40 years old and is in degraded condition. Maintenance budgets are typically less than one percent of current replacement value (CRV), much less than the 2-4% recommended by the National Research Council. The maintenance backlog was 2.55 billion dollars in FY10 and growing. NASA s annual budgets have flattened and are at risk of being reduced, so the problem is becoming even more difficult. NASA Centers utilize various means to prioritize and accomplish maintenance within available budgets, though data is suspect and processes are variable. This paper offers a structured means to prioritize maintenance based on mission criticality and facility performance (ability of the facility to deliver on its purpose). Mission alignment is assessed using the current timeframe Mission Dependence Index and a measure of facility alignment with the 2011 NASA Strategic Plan for the long-term perspective. Facility performance is assessed by combining specific findings from a structured facility condition assessment and an assessment of actual functional output. These are then combined in a matrix to identify the facilities most critical to mission and able to deliver services. The purpose of this approach is to provide the best benefits for the available funding. Additionally, this rationale can also be applied to the prioritization of investment (recapitalization) projects so that the ultimate customers of this paper, the senior infrastructure managers at each NASA Center, are better able to strategically manage their capabilities.

  4. A future perspective on technological obsolescenceat NASA, Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The present research effort was the first phase of a study to forecast whether technological obsolescence will be a problem for the engineers, scientists, and technicians at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). There were four goals of the research: to review the literature on technological obsolescence; to determine through interviews of division chiefs and branch heads Langley's perspective on future technological obsolescence; to begin making contacts with outside industries to find out how they view the possibility of technological obsolescence; and to make preliminary recommendations for dealing with the problem. A complete description of the findings of this research can be reviewed in a technical report in preparation. The following are a small subset of the key findings of the study: NASA's centers and divisions vary in their missions and because of this, in their capability to control obsolescence; research-oriented organizations within NASA are believed by respondents to keep up to date more than the project-oriented organizations; asked what are the signs of a professional's technological obsolescence, respondents had a variety of responses; top performing scientists were viewed as continuous learners, keeping up to date by a variety of means; when asked what incentives were available to aerospace technologists for keeping up to data, respondents specified a number of ideas; respondents identified many obstacles to professionals' keeping up to date in the future; and most respondents expressed some concern for the future of the professionals at NASA vis a vis the issue of professional obsolescence.

  5. Corrosion Activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report documents summer faculty fellow efforts in the corrosion test bed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. During the summer of 2002 efforts were concentrated on three activities: a short course on corrosion control for KSC personnel, evaluation of commercial wash additives used for corrosion control on Army aircraft, and improvements in the testing of a new cathodic protection system under development at KSC.

  6. Ion Thruster Development at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Hamley, John A.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent ion propulsion technology efforts at NASA's Lewis Research Center including development of kW-class xenon ion thrusters, high power xenon and krypton ion thrusters, and power processors are reviewed. Thruster physical characteristics, performance data, life projections, and power processor component technology are summarized. The ion propulsion technology program is structured to address a broad set of mission applications from satellite stationkeeping and repositioning to primary propulsion using solar or nuclear power systems.

  7. NASA Space Engineering Research Center Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) is proud to offer, at its second symposium on VLSI design, presentations by an outstanding set of individuals from national laboratories and the electronics industry. These featured speakers share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design. Questions of reliability in the space environment along with new directions in CAD and design are addressed by the featured speakers.

  8. NASA Johnson Space Center's Energy and Sustainability Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewert, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the efforts that NASA is making to assure a sustainable environment and energy savings at the Johnson Space Center. Sustainability is defined as development that meets the needs of present generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The new technologies that are required for sustainable closed loop life support for space exploration have uses on the ground to reduce energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and water use. Some of these uses are reviewed.

  9. Activities in Aeroelasticity at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of recently-completed research and presents status reports of current research being performed within the Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center. Within the paper this research is classified as experimental, analytical, and theoretical aeroelastic research. The paper also describes the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, its features, capabilities, a new open-architecture data acquisition system, ongoing facility modifications, and the subsequent calibration of the facility.

  10. Human Centered Design and Development for NASA's MerBoard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the design and development process for NASA's MerBoard. These devices are large interactive display screens which can be shown on the user's computer, which will allow scientists in many locations to interpret and evaluate mission data in real-time. These tools are scheduled to be used during the 2003 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) expeditions. Topics covered include: mission overview, Mer Human Centered Computers, FIDO 2001 observations and MerBoard prototypes.

  11. Aerospace Battery Activities at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2006-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center has "pioneered" rechargeable secondary battery design, test, infusion and in-orbit battery management among NASA installations. Nickel cadmium batteries of various designs and sizes have been infused for LEO, GEO and Libration Point spacecraft. Nickel-Hydrogen batteries have currently been baselined for the majority of our missions. Li-Ion batteries from ABSL, JSB, SaFT and Lithion have been designed and tested for aerospace application.

  12. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for VLSI systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This annual review reports the center's activities and findings on very large scale integration (VLSI) systems design for 1990, including project status, financial support, publications, the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) Symposium on VLSI Design, research results, and outreach programs. Processor chips completed or under development are listed. Research results summarized include a design technique to harden complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) memory circuits against single event upset (SEU); improved circuit design procedures; and advances in computer aided design (CAD), communications, computer architectures, and reliability design. Also described is a high school teacher program that exposes teachers to the fundamentals of digital logic design.

  13. 2003 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahl, Joseph M.; Heyward, An O.; Kankam, Mark D.

    2003-01-01

    The Office of Education at NASA Headquarters provides overall policy and direction for the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP). The American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) have joined in partnership to recruit participants, accept applications from a broad range of participants, and provide overall evaluation of the NFFP. The NASA Centers, through their University Affairs Officers, develop and operate the experiential part of the program. In concert with co-directing universities and the Centers, Fellows are selected and provided the actual research experiences. This report summarizes the 2003 session conducted at the Glenn Research Center (GRC).Research topics covered a variety of areas including, but not limited to, biological sensors, modeling of biological fluid systems, electronic circuits, ceramics and coatings, unsteady probablistic analysis and aerodynamics, gas turbines, environmental monitoring systems for water quality, air quality, gaseous and particulate emissions, bearings for flywheel energy storage, shape memory alloys,photonic interrogation and nanoprocesses,carbon nanotubes, polymer synthesis for fuel cells, aviation communications, algorithm development and RESPlan Database.

  14. The NASA Lewis Research Center: An Economic Impact Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austrian, Ziona

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), established in 1941, is one of ten NASA research centers in the country. It is situated on 350 acres of land in Cuyahoga County and occupies more than 140 buildings and over 500 specialized research and test facilities. Most of LeRC's facilities are located in the City of Cleveland; some are located within the boundaries of the cities of Fairview Park and Brookpark. LeRC is a lead center for NASA's research, technology, and development in the areas of aeropropulsion and selected space applications. It is a center of excellence for turbomachinery, microgravity fluid and combustion research, and commercial communication. The base research and technology disciplines which serve both aeronautics and space areas include materials and structures, instrumentation and controls, fluid physics, electronics, and computational fluid dynamics. This study investigates LeRC's economic impact on Northeast Ohio's economy. It was conducted by The Urban Center's Economic Development Program in Cleveland State University's Levin College of Urban Affairs. The study measures LeRC's direct impact on the local economy in terms of jobs, output, payroll, and taxes, as well as the indirect impact of these economic activities when they 'ripple' throughout the economy. To fully explain LeRC's overall impact on the region, its contributions in the areas of technology transfer and education are also examined. The study uses a highly credible and widely accepted research methodology. First, regional economic multipliers based on input-output models were used to estimate the effect of LERC spending on the Northeast Ohio economy. Second, the economic models were complemented by interviews with industrial, civic, and university leaders to qualitatively assess LeRC's impact in the areas of technology transfer and education.

  15. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 12: An initial investigation into the production and use of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) at five NASA centers: Results of a telephone survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Nanci A.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to provide NASA management with an 'initial' look at the production and use of scientific and technical information (STI) at five NASA centers (Ames, Goddard, Langley, Lewis, and Marshall). The 550 respondents who were interviewed by telephone held favorable views regarding the NASA STI system. About 65 percent of the respondents stated that it is either very or somewhat important for them to publish their work through the NASA STI system. About 10 percent of those respondents encountered problems using the NASA STI system services for publication. The most frequently reported problem was 'the process is too time consuming' (8.6 percent). Overall, those respondents using the NASA STI system to publish their work rated the system as excellent (24.6 percent) or good (37.6 percent). About 79 percent of the respondents stated that it is either very or somewhat important for them to use the NASA STI system to access information. The most frequently reported problems were 'the time and effort it takes to locate and obtain information through the system' (14.4 percent). Overall, about 83 percent of the respondents stated that the NASA STI system is important to performing their work. Overall, about 73 percent of the respondents stated that the NASA STI system meets their information needs.

  16. TRW Ships NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory To Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-04-01

    Two U.S. Air Force C-5 Galaxy transport planes carrying the observatory and its ground support equipment landed at Kennedy's Space Shuttle Landing Facility at 2:40 p.m. EST this afternoon. REDONDO BEACH, CA.--(Business Wire)--Feb. 4, 1999--TRW has shipped NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory ("Chandra") to the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), in Florida, in preparation for a Space Shuttle launch later this year. The 45-foot-tall, 5-ton science satellite will provide astronomers with new information on supernova remnants, the surroundings of black holes, and other celestial phenomena that produce vast quantities of X-rays. Cradled safely in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System (SCTS), NASA's newest space telescope was ferried on Feb. 4 from Los Angeles International Airport to KSC aboard an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter. The SCTS, an Air Force container, closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests at KSC and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. A launch date for the Space Shuttle STS-93 mission is expected to be announced later this week. The third in NASA's family of Great Observatories that includes the Hubble Space Telescope and the TRW-built Compton Gamma Ray observatory, Chandra will use the world's most powerful X-ray telescope to allow scientists to "see" and monitor cosmic events that are invisible to conventional optical telescopes. Chandra's X-ray images will yield new insight into celestial phenomena such as the temperature and extent of gas clouds that comprise clusters of galaxies and the superheating of gas and dust particles as they swirl into black holes. A TRW-led team that includes the Eastman Kodak Co., Raytheon Optical Systems Inc., and Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. designed and built the Chandra X-ray Observatory for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The

  17. NASA Engineering Safety Center NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group 2007 Proactive Task Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2007-01-01

    In 2007, the NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) chartered the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to bring forth and address critical battery-related performance/manufacturing issues for NASA and the aerospace community. A suite of tasks identifying and addressing issues related to Ni-H2 and Li-ion battery chemistries was submitted and selected for implementation. The current NESC funded are: (1) Wet Life of Ni-H2 Batteries (2) Binding Procurement (3) NASA Lithium-Ion Battery Guidelines (3a) Li-Ion Performance Assessment (3b) Li-Ion Guidelines Document (3b-i) Assessment of Applicability of Pouch Cells for Aerospace Missions (3b-ii) High Voltage Risk Assessment (3b-iii) Safe Charge Rates for Li-Ion Cells (4) Availability of Source Material for Li-Ion Cells (5) NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop This presentation provides a brief overview of the tasks in the 2007 plan and serves as an introduction to more detailed discussions on each of the specific tasks.

  18. Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2007-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. Also the propulsion systems required to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Vision for Space Exploration in an affordable manner will need to have high reliability, safety and autonomous operation capability. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet these challenges through the concept of Intelligent Propulsion Systems. This paper describes the current activities of the CDB under the NASA Aeronautics Research and Exploration Systems Missions. The programmatic structure of the CDB activities is described along with a brief overview of each of the CDB tasks including research objectives, technical challenges, and recent accomplishments. These tasks include active control of propulsion system components, intelligent propulsion diagnostics and control for reliable fault identification and accommodation, distributed engine control, and investigations into unsteady propulsion systems.

  19. NASA Engineering and Safety Center NDE Super Problem Resolution Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosser, W. H.

    2007-03-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) is an independent organization, which was charted in the wake of the Space Shuttle Columbia accident to serve as an Agency-wide technical resource focused on engineering excellence. The objective of the NESC is to improve safety by performing in-depth independent engineering assessments, testing, and analysis to uncover technical vulnerabilities and to determine appropriate preventative and corrective actions for problems, trends or issues within NASA's programs, projects and institutions. Critical to the NESC are teams of experts in a number of core disciplines including nondestructive evaluation (NDE). These teams, designated Super Problem Resolution Teams (SPRTs), draw upon the best engineering expertise from across the Agency and include partnerships with other government agencies, national laboratories, universities and industry. The NESC NDE SPRT provides a ready resource of NDE technical expertise to support NESC Independent Technical Assessments and Investigations. The purpose of this session will be to provide an overview of the NESC and the NDE SPRT along with a few examples of NDE related problems that the team has addressed for NASA Programs. It is hoped that this session will be of interest to the general NDE community and will foster contacts with additional NDE experts that might provide future support to the NASA NESC NDE SPRT.

  20. Liquid droplet radiator program at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presler, A. F.; Coles, C. E.; Diem-Kirsop, P. S.; White, K. A., III

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) are jointly engaged in a program for technical assessment of the Liquid Droplet Radiator (LDR) concept as an advanced high performance heat ejection component for future space missions. NASA Lewis has responsibility for the technology needed for the droplet generator, for working fluid qualification, and for investigating the physics of droplets in space; NASA Lewis is also conducting systems/mission analyses for potential LDR applications with candidate space power systems. For the droplet generator technology task, both micro-orifice fabrication techniques and droplet stream formation processes have been experimentally investigated. High quality micro-orifices (to 50 micron diameter) are routinely fabricated with automated equipment. Droplet formation studies have established operating boundaries for the generation of controlled and uniform droplet streams. A test rig is currently being installed for the experimental verification, under simulated space conditions, of droplet radiation heat transfer performance analyses and the determination of the effect radiative emissivity of multiple droplet streams. Initial testing has begun in the NASA Lewis Zero-Gravity Facility for investigating droplet stream behavior in microgravity conditions. This includes the effect of orifice wetting on jet dynamics and droplet formation. Results for both Brayton and Stirling power cycles have identified favorable mass and size comparisons of the LDR with conventional radiator concepts.

  1. Shaping NASA's Kennedy Space Center Safety for the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Paul; McDaniel, Laura; Smith, Maynette

    2011-01-01

    With the completion of the Space Shuttle Program, the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) safety function will be required to evolve beyond the single launch vehicle launch site focus that has held prominence for almost fifty years. This paper will discuss how that evolution is taking place. Specifically, we will discuss the future of safety as it relates to a site that will have multiple, very disparate, functions. These functions will include new business; KSC facilities not under the control of NASA; traditional payload and launch vehicle processing; and, operations conducted by NASA personnel, NASA contractors or a combination of both. A key element in this process is the adaptation of the current KSC set of safety requirements into a multi-faceted set that can address each of the functions above, while maintaining our world class safety environment. One of the biggest challenges that will be addressed is how to protect our personnel and property without dictating how other Non-NASA organizations protect their own employees and property. The past history of KSC Safety will be described and how the lessons learned from previous programs will be applied to the future. The lessons learned from this process will also be discussed as information for other locations that may undergo such a transformation.

  2. NASA's astrophysics archives at the National Space Science Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenberg, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    NASA maintains an archive facility for Astronomical Science data collected from NASA's missions at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) at Goddard Space Flight Center. This archive was created to insure the science data collected by NASA would be preserved and useable in the future by the science community. Through 25 years of operation there are many lessons learned, from data collection procedures, archive preservation methods, and distribution to the community. This document presents some of these more important lessons, for example: KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid) in system development. Also addressed are some of the myths of archiving, such as 'scientists always know everything about everything', or 'it cannot possibly be that hard, after all simple data tech's do it'. There are indeed good reasons that a proper archive capability is needed by the astronomical community, the important question is how to use the existing expertise as well as the new innovative ideas to do the best job archiving this valuable science data.

  3. Science Data Center concepts for moderate-sized NASA missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, R.; Han, D.; Pedelty, J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the approaches taken by the NASA Science Data Operations Center to the concepts for two future NASA moderate-sized missions, the Orbiting Solar Laboratory (OSL) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The OSL space science mission will be a free-flying spacecraft with a complement of science instruments, placed in a high-inclination, sun synchronous orbit to allow continuous study of the sun for extended periods. The TRMM is planned to be a free-flying satellite for measuring tropical rainfall and its variations. Both missions will produce 'standard' data products for the benefit of their communities, and both depend upon their own scientific community to provide algorithms for generating the standard data products.

  4. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeff; Walden, Harvey; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the development of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair, including its history and outgrowth from the traditional regional science fairs supported by NASA. The results of the 1999 Virtual Science Fair pilot program, the mechanics of running the 2000 Virtual Science Fair and its results, and comments and suggestions for future Virtual Science Fairs are provided. The appendices to the report contain supporting documentation, including the original proposal for this project, the judging criteria, the user's guide and the judge's guide to the Virtual Science Fair Web site, the Fair publicity brochure and the Fair award designs, judges' and students' responses to survey questions about the Virtual Science Fair, and lists of student entries to both the 1999 and 2000 Fairs.

  5. Applied Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has advanced to the point where it can now be used for many applications in fluid mechanics research and aerospace vehicle design. A few applications being explored at NASA Ames Research Center will be presented and discussed. The examples presented will range in speed from hypersonic to low speed incompressible flow applications. Most of the results will be from numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes or Euler equations in three space dimensions for general geometry applications. Computational results will be used to highlight the presentation as appropriate. Advances in computational facilities including those associated with NASA's CAS (Computational Aerosciences) Project of the Federal HPCC (High Performance Computing and Communications) Program will be discussed. Finally, opportunities for future research will be presented and discussed. All material will be taken from non-sensitive, previously-published and widely-disseminated work.

  6. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeff; Walden, Harvey; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the development of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Virtual Science Fair, including its history and outgrowth from the traditional regional science fairs supported by NASA. The results of the 1999 Virtual Science Fair pilot program, the mechanics of running the 2000 Virtual Science Fair and its results, and comments and suggestions for future Virtual Science Fairs are provided. The appendices to the report include the original proposal for this project, the judging criteria, the user's guide and the judge's guide to the Virtual Science Fair Web site, the Fair publicity brochure and the Fair award designs, judges' and students' responses to survey questions about the Virtual Science Fair, and lists of student entries to both the 1999 and 2000 Fairs.

  7. Microgravity noncontact temperature requirements at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G.

    1989-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is currently supporting 66 microgravity science and applications projects. The 66 projects are separated into 23 flight projects and 43 ground-based projects. The part of the NASA Lewis program dealing with flight experiments is divided into six areas: Combustion Science, Materials Science, Fluid Physics, Instrumentation/Equipment, Advanced Technology Development, and Space Station Multi-User Facility studies. The part of the NASA Lewis program dealing with ground-based experiments is coincidentally also divided into six areas: Electronic Materials, Combustion Science, Fluid Dynamics and Transport Phenomena, Metals and Alloys, Glasses and Ceramics, and Physics and Chemistry Experiments. Several purposes exist for ground-based experimenting. Preliminary information is necessary before a decision can be made for flight status, the short low gravity durations available in ground facilities are adequate for a particular study, or extensive ground-based research must be conducted to define and support the microgravity science endeavors contemplated for space. Not all of the 66 microgravity science and application projects at NASA Lewis have temperature requirements, but most do. Since space allocation does not permit a review of all the pertinent projects, a decision was made to restrict the coverage to the science flight projects, flight projects minus the advanced technology development, and multiuser facility efforts. Very little is lost by this decision as the types of temperature requirements for science flight projects can be considered representative of those for the ground-based projects. The noncontact temperature needs at NASA Lewis, as represented by the science flight projects are discussed by describing briefly the experiments themselves, by displaying an illustration of each experimental setup, and by specifying their temperature requisites.

  8. Applied imaging at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Howard A.; Owens, Jay C.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio has just completed the celebration of its 50th anniversary. `During the past 50 years, Lewis helped win World War II, made jet aircraft safer and more efficient, helped Americans land on the Moon ... and engaged in the type of fundamental research that benefits all of us in our daily lives.' As part of the center's long history, the Photographic and Printing Branch has continued to develop and meet the center's research imaging requirements. As imaging systems continue to advance and researchers more clearly understand the power of imaging, investigators are relying more and more on imaging systems to meet program objectives. Today, the Photographic and Printing Branch supports a research community of over 5,000 including advocacy for NASA Headquarters and other government agencies. Complete classified and unclassified imaging services include high- speed image acquisition, technical film and video documentaries, still imaging, and conventional and unconventional photofinishing operations. These are the foundation of the branch's modern support function. This paper provides an overview of the varied applied imaging programs managed by the Photographic and Printing Branch. Emphasis is placed on recent imaging projects including icing research, space experiments, and an on-line image archive.

  9. NASA Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's program for the civilian exploration of space is a challenge to scientists and engineers to help maintain and further develop the United States' position of leadership in a focused sphere of space activity. Such an ambitious plan requires the contribution and further development of many scientific and technological fields. One research area essential for the success of these space exploration programs is Intelligent Robotic Systems. These systems represent a class of autonomous and semi-autonomous machines that can perform human-like functions with or without human interaction. They are fundamental for activities too hazardous for humans or too distant or complex for remote telemanipulation. To meet this challenge, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) has established an Engineering Research Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration (CIRSSE). The Center was created with a five year $5.5 million grant from NASA submitted by a team of the Robotics and Automation Laboratories. The Robotics and Automation Laboratories of RPI are the result of the merger of the Robotics and Automation Laboratory of the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering (ECSE) and the Research Laboratory for Kinematics and Robotic Mechanisms of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering, and Mechanics (ME,AE,&M), in 1987. This report is an examination of the activities that are centered at CIRSSE.

  10. Space Chemical Propulsion Test Facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especially encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. An overview of the Lewis test facilities is presented.

  11. Infrared Detector Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Sulima, O. V.; Amzajerdian, F.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared detector development and characterization at NASA Langley Research Center will be reviewed. These detectors were intended for ground, airborne, and space borne remote sensing applications. Discussion will be focused on recently developed single-element infrared detector and future development of near-infrared focal plane arrays (FPA). The FPA will be applied to next generation space-based instruments. These activities are based on phototransistor and avalanche photodiode technologies, which offer high internal gain and relatively low noise-equivalent-power. These novel devices will improve the sensitivity of active remote sensing instruments while eliminating the need for a high power laser transmitter.

  12. NASA Glenn Research Center Experience with "LENR Phenomenon"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1989 NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has performed some small-scale limited experiments that show evidence of effects claimed by some to be evidence of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR). The research at GRC has involved observations and work on measurement techniques for observing the temperature effects in reactions of isotopes of hydrogen with palladium hydrides. The various experiments performed involved loading Pd with gaseous H2 and D2, and exposing Pd thin films to multi-bubble sonoluminescence in regular and deuterated water. An overview of these experiments and their results will be presented.

  13. NASA Glenn Research Center Experience with LENR Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1989 NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has performed some small-scale limited experiments that show evidence of effects claimed by some to be evidence of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR). The research at GRC has involved observations and work on measurement techniques for observing the temperature effects in reactions of isotopes of hydrogen with palladium hydrides. The various experiments performed involved loading Pd with gaseous H2 and D2, and exposing Pd thin films to multi-bubble sonoluminescence in regular and deuterated water. An overview of these experiments and their results will be presented.

  14. Current research in composite structures at NASA's Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Michael F.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Research on the mechanics of composite structures at NASA's Langley Research Center is discussed. The advantages and limitations of special purpose and general purpose analysis tools used in research are reviewed. Future directions in computational structural mechanics are described to address analysis short-comings. Research results on the buckling and postbuckling of unstiffened and stiffened composite structures are presented. Recent investigations of the mechanics of failure in compression and shear are reviewed. Preliminary studies of the dynamic response of composite structures due to impacts encountered during crash-landings are presented. Needs for future research are discussed.

  15. Precision orbit determination at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, B.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Smith, D.; Dunn, P.; Torrence, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the GEODYN computer program developed by the Geodynamics Branch at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and outlines the procedure for accurate satellite orbit and tracking-data analyses. The capabilities of the program allow the development of gravity fields as large as 90 by 90, and a complete modeling of tidal parameters. It is also feasible to numerically integrate a continuous orbit of a satellite such as Lageos for up to 12 years. The evolution of the orbit can be studied, and, by comparison with locally determined orbits, force model improvements can be made. The GEODYN flow diagrams are presented.

  16. Planning and scheduling research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Planning and scheduling is the area of artificial intelligence research that focuses on the determination of a series of operations to achieve some set of (possibly) interacting goals and the placement of those operations in a timeline that allows them to be accomplished given available resources. Work in this area at the NASA Ames Research Center ranging from basic research in constrain-based reasoning and machine learning, to the development of efficient scheduling tools, to the application of such tools to complex agency problems is described.

  17. NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory: Five year retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Beth A.; Akers, James C.; Passe, Paul J.

    2005-09-01

    In the five years since the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) opened its doors in September, 2000, it has developed a comprehensive array of services and products that support hearing conservation goals within NASA and industry. The ATL provides acoustic emission testing and noise control engineering services for a variety of specialized customers, particularly developers of equipment and science experiments manifested for NASA's manned space missions. The ATL aggressively supports the vision of a low-noise on-orbit environment, which facilitates mission success as well as crew health, safety, and comfort. In concert with these goals, the ATL also produces and distributes free educational resources and low-noise advocacy tools for hearing conservation education and awareness. Among these are two compact discs of auditory demonstrations (of phenomena in acoustics, hearing conservation, and communication), and presentations, software packages, and other educational materials for use by engineers, audiologists, and other hearing conservation stakeholders. This presentation will highlight ATL's construction, history, technical capabilities, and current projects and will feature demonstrations of some of the unique educational resource materials that are distributed by the ATL.

  18. NASA Glenn Research Center Support of the ASRG Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    A high efficiency radioisotope power system is being developed for long-duration NASA space science missions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managed a flight contract with Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) to build Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs), with support from NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Sunpower Inc. held two parallel contracts to produce Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), one with DOELockheed Martin to produce ASC-F flight units, and one with GRC for the production of ASC-E3 engineering unit pathfinders that are built to the flight design. In support of those contracts, GRC provided testing, materials expertise, government furnished equipment, inspections, and related data products to DOELockheed Martin and Sunpower. The technical support includes material evaluations, component tests, convertor characterization, and technology transfer. Material evaluations and component tests have been performed on various ASC components in order to assess potential life-limiting mechanisms and provide data for reliability models. Convertor level tests have been used to characterize performance under operating conditions that are representative of various mission conditions. Technology transfers enhanced contractor capabilities for specialized production processes and tests. Despite termination of flight ASRG contract, NASA continues to develop the high efficiency ASC conversion technology under the ASC-E3 contract. This paper describes key government furnished services performed for ASRG and future tests used to provide data for ongoing reliability assessments.

  19. Overview of active flow control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Joslin, Ronald D.

    1998-06-01

    The paper summarizes active flow control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state- of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R and D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry.

  20. Air Traffic Management Research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Katharine

    2005-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA Ames researchers have been investigating ways to improve the air transportation system through the development of decision support automation. These software advances, such as the Center-TRACON Automation System (eTAS) have been developed with teams of engineers, software developers, human factors experts, and air traffic controllers; some ASA Ames decision support tools are currently operational in Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) facilities and some are in use by the airlines. These tools have provided air traffic controllers and traffic managers the capabilities to help reduce overall delays and holding, and provide significant cost savings to the airlines as well as more manageable workload levels for air traffic service providers. NASA is continuing to collaborate with the FAA, as well as other government agencies, to plan and develop the next generation of decision support tools that will support anticipated changes in the air transportation system, including a projected increase to three times today's air-traffic levels by 2025. The presentation will review some of NASA Ames' recent achievements in air traffic management research, and discuss future tool developments and concepts currently under consideration.

  1. NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW Power Supply Modernization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, Yuen Ching; Ilinets, Boris V.; Miller, Ted; Nagel, Kirsten (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW DC Power Supply was built in 1974 to provide controlled DC power for the Thermophysics Facility Arc Jet Laboratory. The Power Supply has gradually losing reliability due to outdated technology and component life limitation. NASA has decided to upgrade the existing rectifier modules with contemporary high-power electronics and control equipment. NASA plans to complete this project in 2001. This project includes a complete replacement of obsolete thyristor stacks in all six rectifier modules and rectifier bridge control system. High power water-cooled thyristors and freewheeling diodes will be used. The rating of each of the six modules will be 4000 A at 5500 V. The control firing angle signal will be sent from the Facility Control System to six modules via fiberoptic cable. The Power Supply control and monitoring system will include a Master PLC in the Facility building and a Slave PLC in each rectifier module. This system will also monitor each thyristor level in each stack and the auxiliary equipment.

  2. Overview of Active Flow Control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, L. G.; Joslin, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper summarizes Active Flow Control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state-of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R&D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry. Keywords: active flow control, separation control, MEMS, review

  3. Spaceflight revolution: NASA Langley Research Center from Sputnik to Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James R.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the transition to the broad research scope of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) starting in the late 1950's, the Langley Research Center underwent many changes in program content, organization and management, and areas of personnel expertise. This book describes and evaluates the evolution and activities of the Langley Research Center during the seventeen-year period from 1958 to 1975. The book was based on the analysis of hundreds of written records, both published and unpublished, as well as numerous personal interviews with many of the key individuals involved in the transition of Langley. Some of the projects and research areas covered include Project Echo, magnetoplasmadynamics research, Scout Rocket Program, lunar-orbit rendezvous research, manned space laboratory development, and Apollo and the Lunar Orbiter Project.

  4. 70 Years of Aeropropulsion Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Dhanireddy R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of air-breathing propulsion research conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) over the past 70 years. It includes a historical perspective of the center and its various stages of propulsion research in response to the countrys different periods of crises and growth opportunities. GRCs research and technology development covered a broad spectrum, from a short-term focus on improving the energy efficiency of aircraft engines to advancing the frontier technologies of high-speed aviation in the supersonic and hypersonic speed regimes. This paper highlights major research programs, showing their impact on industry and aircraft propulsion, and briefly discusses current research programs and future aeropropulsion technology trends in related areas

  5. NASA Space Weather Research Center: Addressing the Unique Space Weather Needs of NASA Robotic Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Maddox, M. M.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Chulaki, A.; Thompson, B. J.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Muglach, K.; Evans, R. M.; Wiegand, C.; MacNeice, P. J.; Rastaetter, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Space Weather Research Center (SWRC) has been providing space weather monitoring and forecasting services to NASA's robotic missions since its establishment in 2010. Embedded within the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) (see Maddox et al. in Session IN026) and located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, SWRC has easy access to state-of-the-art modeling capabilities and proximity to space science and research expertise. By bridging space weather users and the research community, SWRC has been a catalyst for the efficient transition from research to operations and operations to research. In this presentation, we highlight a few unique aspects of SWRC's space weather services, such as addressing space weather throughout the solar system, pushing the frontier of space weather forecasting via the ensemble approach, providing direct personnel and tool support for spacecraft anomaly resolution, prompting development of multi-purpose tools and knowledge bases (see Wiegand et al. in the same session SM004), and educating and engaging the next generation of space weather scientists.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Program at NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed and discussed. The technical elements of the CFD Program are listed and briefly discussed. These elements include algorithm research, research and pilot code development, scientific visualization, advanced surface representation, volume grid generation, and numerical optimization. Next, the discipline of CFD is briefly discussed and related to other areas of research at NASA Ames including experimental fluid dynamics, computer science research, computational chemistry, and numerical aerodynamic simulation. These areas combine with CFD to form a larger area of research, which might collectively be called computational technology. The ultimate goal of computational technology research at NASA Ames is to increase the physical understanding of the world in which we live, solve problems of national importance, and increase the technical capabilities of the aerospace community. Next, the major programs at NASA Ames that either use CFD technology or perform research in CFD are listed and discussed. Briefly, this list includes turbulent/transition physics and modeling, high-speed real gas flows, interdisciplinary research, turbomachinery demonstration computations, complete aircraft aerodynamics, rotorcraft applications, powered lift flows, high alpha flows, multiple body aerodynamics, and incompressible flow applications. Some of the individual problems actively being worked in each of these areas is listed to help define the breadth or extent of CFD involvement in each of these major programs. State-of-the-art examples of various CFD applications are presented to highlight most of these areas. The main emphasis of this portion of the presentation is on examples which will not otherwise be treated at this conference by the individual presentations. Finally, a list of principal current limitations and expected future directions is given.

  7. Institutional Memory Preservation at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, J.; Moreman, Douglas; Dyer, J.; Hemminger, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    In this era of downsizing and deficit reduction, the preservation of institutional memory is a widespread concern for U.S. companies and governmental agencies. The National Aeronautical and Space Administration faces the pending retirement of many of the agency's long-term, senior engineers. NASA has a marvelous long-term history of success, but the agency faces a recurring problem caused by the loss of these engineers' unique knowledge and perspectives on NASA's role in aeronautics and space exploration. The current work describes a knowledge elicitation effort aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of preserving the more personal, heuristic knowledge accumulated over the years by NASA engineers, as contrasted with the "textbook" knowledge of launch vehicles. Work on this project was performed at NASA Glenn Research Center and elsewhere, and focused on launch vehicle systems integration. The initial effort was directed toward an historic view of the Centaur upper stage which is powered by two RL-10 engines. Various experts were consulted, employing a variety of knowledge elicitation techniques, regarding the Centaur and RL-10. Their knowledge is represented in searchable Web-based multimedia presentations. This paper discusses the various approaches to knowledge elicitation and knowledge representation employed, and assesses successes and challenges in trying to perform large-scale knowledge preservation of institutional memory. It is anticipated that strategies for knowledge elicitation and representation that have been developed in this grant will be utilized to elicit knowledge in a variety of domains including the complex heuristics that underly use of simulation software packages such as that being explored in the Expert System Architecture for Rocket Engine Numerical Simulators.

  8. Transmission diagnostic research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.; Lewicki, D. G.; Decker, H. J.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory are involved in a joint research program to advance the technology of aerospace transmissions. Within the last six years, a transmission diagnostics research team was formed to address current and future technology barriers in transmission diagnostics. The diagnostics team conducted a survey to determine critical needs of the diagnostics community. Survey results indicated that experimental verification of gear and bearing fault detection methods and damage magnitude assessment were considered the two most critical research areas of a highly reliable health and usage monitoring system. A plan was implemented by the diagnostics team to address these key research areas, by in-house research and university grants. A variety of transmission fault detection methods were applied to experimentally obtained fatigue data. Failure modes of the fatigue tests include a variety of gear pitting failures, tooth wear, tooth fracture, and bearing spalling failures. Accomplishments to date include verification of several specific gear diagnostic methods, verification of a new pattern recognition method to determine failure, and development of a new method to model gear tooth damage. This paper presents the results of these accomplishments in transmission diagnostics research at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  9. Nanomaterials Work at NASA-Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2005-01-01

    Nanomaterials activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center focus on single wall carbon nanotube production, characterization and their applications for aerospace. Nanotubes are produced by arc and laser methods and the growth process is monitored by in-situ diagnostics using time resolved passive emission and laser induced fluorescence of the active species. Parametric study of both these processes are conducted to monitor the effect of production parameters including temperature, buffer gas, flow rate, pressure, laser fluence and arc current. Characterization of the nanotube material is performed using the NASA-JSC protocol developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA. Efforts at JSC over the past five years in composites have centered on structural polymernanotube systems. Recent activities broadened this focus to multifunctional materials, supercapacitors, fuel cells, regenerable CO2 absorbers, electromagnetic shielding, radiation dosimetry and thermal management systems of interest for human space flight. Preliminary tests indicate improvement of performance in most of these applications because of the large surface area as well as high conductivity exhibited by SWCNTs.

  10. Nanotube Activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Nanotube activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center include production, purification, characterization as well as applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A parametric study of the pulsed laser ablation process is recently completed to monitor the effect of production parameters including temperature, buffer gas, flow rate, pressure, and laser fluence. Enhancement of production is achieved by rastering the graphite target and by increasing the target surface temperature with a cw laser. In-situ diagnostics during production included time resolved passive emission and laser induced fluorescence from the plume. The improvement of the purity by a variety of steps in the purification process is monitored by characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, Raman, UV-VIS-NIR and TGA. A recently established NASA-JSC protocol for SWCNT characterization is undergoing revision with feedback from nanotube community. Efforts at JSC over the past five years in composites have centered on structural polymer/nanotube systems. Recent activities broadened this focus to multifunctional materials, supercapacitors, fuel cells, regenerable CO2 absorbers, electromagnetic shielding, radiation dosimetry and thermal management systems of interest for human space flight. Preliminary tests indicate improvement of performance in most of these applications because of the large Surface area as well as high electrical and thermal conductivity exhibited by SWCNTs. Comparison with existing technologies and possible future improvements in the SWCNT materials sill be presented.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2006-01-01

    Research activities on carbon nanotubes at NASA-Johnson Space Center include production, purification, characterization and their applications for human space flight. In-situ diagnostics during nanotube production by laser oven process include collection of spatial and temporal data of passive emission and laser induced fluorescence from C2, C3 and Nickel atoms in the plume. Details of the results from the "parametric study" of the pulsed laser ablation process indicate the effect of production parameters including temperature, buffer gas, flow rate, pressure, and laser fluence. Improvement of the purity by a variety of steps in the purification process is monitored by characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, Raman, UV-VIS-NIR and TGA. A recently established NASA-JSC protocol for SWCNT characterization is undergoing revision with feedback from nanotube community. Efforts at JSC over the past five years in composites have centered on structural polymednanotube systems. Recent activities broadened this focus to multifunctional materials, supercapacitors, fuel cells, regenerable CO2 absorbers, electromagnetic shielding, radiation dosimetry and thermal management systems of interest for human space flight. Preliminary tests indicate improvement of performance in most of these applications because of the large surface area as well as high electrical and thermal conductivity exhibited by SWCNTs.

  12. Computational Nanotechnology at NASA Ames Research Center, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Bailey, David; Langhoff, Steve; Pohorille, Andrew; Levit, Creon; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Some forms of nanotechnology appear to have enormous potential to improve aerospace and computer systems; computational nanotechnology, the design and simulation of programmable molecular machines, is crucial to progress. NASA Ames Research Center has begun a computational nanotechnology program including in-house work, external research grants, and grants of supercomputer time. Four goals have been established: (1) Simulate a hypothetical programmable molecular machine replicating itself and building other products. (2) Develop molecular manufacturing CAD (computer aided design) software and use it to design molecular manufacturing systems and products of aerospace interest, including computer components. (3) Characterize nanotechnologically accessible materials of aerospace interest. Such materials may have excellent strength and thermal properties. (4) Collaborate with experimentalists. Current in-house activities include: (1) Development of NanoDesign, software to design and simulate a nanotechnology based on functionalized fullerenes. Early work focuses on gears. (2) A design for high density atomically precise memory. (3) Design of nanotechnology systems based on biology. (4) Characterization of diamonoid mechanosynthetic pathways. (5) Studies of the laplacian of the electronic charge density to understand molecular structure and reactivity. (6) Studies of entropic effects during self-assembly. Characterization of properties of matter for clusters up to sizes exhibiting bulk properties. In addition, the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) supercomputer division sponsored a workshop on computational molecular nanotechnology on March 4-5, 1996 held at NASA Ames Research Center. Finally, collaborations with Bill Goddard at CalTech, Ralph Merkle at Xerox Parc, Don Brenner at NCSU (North Carolina State University), Tom McKendree at Hughes, and Todd Wipke at UCSC are underway.

  13. NASA/Ames Research Center's science and applications aircraft program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. Warren

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Ames Research Center operates a fleet of seven Science and Applications Aircraft, namely the C-141/Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), DC-8, C-130, Lear Jet, and three ER-2s. These aircraft are used to satisfy two major objectives, each of equal importance. The first is to acquire remote and in-situ scientific data in astronomy, astrophysics, earth sciences, ocean processes, atmospheric physics, meteorology, materials processing and life sciences. The second major objective is to expedite the development of sensors and their attendant algorithms for ultimate use in space and to simulate from an aircraft, the data to be acquired from spaceborne sensors. NASA-Ames Science and Applications Aircraft are recognized as national and international facilities. They have performed and will continue to perform, operational missions from bases in the United States and worldwide. Historically, twice as many investigators have requested flight time than could be accommodated. This situation remains true today and is expected to increase in the years ahead. A major advantage of the existing fleet of aircraft is their ability to cover a large expanse of the earth's ecosystem from the surface to the lower stratosphere over large distances and time aloft. Their large payload capability allows a number of scientists to use multi-investigator sensor suites to permit simultaneous and complementary data gathering. In-flight changes to the sensors or data systems have greatly reduced the time required to optimize the development of new instruments. It is doubtful that spaceborne systems will ever totally replace the need for airborne science aircraft. The operations philosophy and capabilities exist at NASA-Ames Research Center.

  14. 14 CFR 1206.401 - Location of NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...://george.arc.nasa.gov/dx/FOIA/elec.html; (3) (DFRC) http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/FOIA/readroom.html; (4) (GRC....htm; (6) (JSC) http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/pao/public/foia/edocs.html; (7) (KSC) http://www-foia.ksc.nasa.gov/foia/READROOM.HTM; (8) (LaRC) http://foia.larc.nasa.gov/readroom.html; (9) (MSFC)...

  15. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Education, Aeronautics, Space, Autonomy, Earth and Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamshidi, M. (Editor); Lumia, R. (Editor); Tunstel, E., Jr. (Editor); White, B. (Editor); Malone, J. (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This first volume of the Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE) Center Press Series on NASA University Research Center's (URC's) Advanced Technologies on Space Exploration and National Service constitute a report on the research papers and presentations delivered by NASA Installations and industry and Report of the NASA's fourteen URC's held at the First National Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico from February 16-19, 1997.

  16. Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a

  17. Collaborative Mission Design at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, Kerry M.; Allen, B. Danette; Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed and tested two facilities dedicated to increasing efficiency in key mission design processes, including payload design, mission planning, and implementation plan development, among others. The Integrated Design Center (IDC) is a state-of-the-art concurrent design facility which allows scientists and spaceflight engineers to produce project designs and mission plans in a real-time collaborative environment, using industry-standard physics-based development tools and the latest communication technology. The Mission Simulation Lab (MiSL), a virtual reality (VR) facility focused on payload and project design, permits engineers to quickly translate their design and modeling output into enhanced three-dimensional models and then examine them in a realistic full-scale virtual environment. The authors were responsible for envisioning both facilities and turning those visions into fully operational mission design resources at LaRC with multiple advanced capabilities and applications. In addition, the authors have created a synergistic interface between these two facilities. This combined functionality is the Interactive Design and Simulation Center (IDSC), a meta-facility which offers project teams a powerful array of highly advanced tools, permitting them to rapidly produce project designs while maintaining the integrity of the input from every discipline expert on the project. The concept-to-flight mission support provided by IDSC has shown improved inter- and intra-team communication and a reduction in the resources required for proposal development, requirements definition, and design effort.

  18. Unique life sciences research facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Vasques, M.; Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Life Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center has a suite of specialized facilities that enable scientists to study the effects of gravity on living systems. This paper describes some of these facilities and their use in research. Seven centrifuges, each with its own unique abilities, allow testing of a variety of parameters on test subjects ranging from single cells through hardware to humans. The Vestibular Research Facility allows the study of both centrifugation and linear acceleration on animals and humans. The Biocomputation Center uses computers for 3D reconstruction of physiological systems, and interactive research tools for virtual reality modeling. Psycophysiological, cardiovascular, exercise physiology, and biomechanical studies are conducted in the 12 bed Human Research Facility and samples are analyzed in the certified Central Clinical Laboratory and other laboratories at Ames. Human bedrest, water immersion and lower body negative pressure equipment are also available to study physiological changes associated with weightlessness. These and other weightlessness models are used in specialized laboratories for the study of basic physiological mechanisms, metabolism and cell biology. Visual-motor performance, perception, and adaptation are studied using ground-based models as well as short term weightlessness experiments (parabolic flights). The unique combination of Life Science research facilities, laboratories, and equipment at Ames Research Center are described in detail in relation to their research contributions.

  19. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    This lecture will provide an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the current state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. The traditional engine control problem has been to provide a means to safely transition the engine from one steady-state operating point to another based on the pilot throttle inputs. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, other government agencies, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research Mission. The second part of the lecture provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges and the key progress to date are summarized. The technologies to be discussed include system level engine control concepts, gas path diagnostics, active component control, and distributed engine control architecture. The lecture will end with a futuristic perspective of how the various current technology developments will lead to an Intelligent and Autonomous Propulsion System requiring none to very minimum pilot interface

  20. NASA Now: The Sun: The Impact of Solar Activity on Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    Meet Mitzi Adams, an astrophysicist studying the sun. Adams has been working as a solar scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., since 1988. She analyzes data in an att...

  1. Advanced Stirling Convertor Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Salvatore

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Space Systems (LMSS), Sunpower Inc., and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system on space science and exploration missions. This generator will make use of the free-piston Stirling convertors to achieve higher conversion efficiency than currently available alternatives. The ASRG will utilize two Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC) to convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source to electricity. NASA GRC has initiated several experiments to demonstrate the functionality of the ASC, including: in-air extended operation, thermal vacuum extended operation, and ASRG simulation for mobile applications. The in-air and thermal vacuum test articles are intended to provide convertor performance data over an extended operating time. These test articles mimic some features of the ASRG without the requirement of low system mass. Operation in thermal vacuum adds the element of simulating deep space. This test article is being used to gather convertor performance and thermal data in a relevant environment. The ASRG simulator was designed to incorporate a minimum amount of support equipment, allowing integration onto devices powered directly by the convertors, such as a rover. This paper discusses the design, fabrication, and implementation of these experiments.

  2. NASA Lewis Research Center's combustor test facilities and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Jean

    1995-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) presently accommodates a total of six combustor test facilities with unique capabilities. The facilities are used to evaluate combustor and afterburner concepts for future engine applications, and also to test the survivability and performance of innovative high temperature materials, new instrumentation, and engine components in a realistic jet engine environment. The facilities provide a variety of test section interfaces and lengths to allow for flametube, sector and component testing. The facilities can accommodate a wide range of operating conditions due to differing capabilities in the following areas: inlet air pressure, temperature, and flow; fuel flow rate, pressure, and fuel storage capacity; maximum combustion zone temperature; cooling water flow rate and pressure; types of exhaust - atmospheric or altitude; air heater supply pressure; and types of air heaters - vitiated or nonvitiated. All of the facilities have provisions for standard gas (emissions) analysis, and a few of the facilities are equipped with specialized gas analysis equipment, smoke and particle size measurement devices, and a variety of laser systems. This report will present some of the unique features of each of the high temperature/high pressure combustor test facilities at NASA LeRC.

  3. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance, and affordability, as well as the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA Aeronautics Research Mission programs. The rest of the paper provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges, and the key progress to date are summarized.

  4. Advanced Stirling Technology Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been developing advanced energy-conversion technologies for use with both radioisotope power systems and fission surface power systems for many decades. Under NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Science Theme, Technology Program, Glenn is developing the next generation of advanced Stirling convertors (ASCs) for use in the Department of Energy/Lockheed Martin Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). The next-generation power-conversion technologies require high efficiency and high specific power (watts electric per kilogram) to meet future mission requirements to use less of the Department of Energy's plutonium-fueled general-purpose heat source modules and reduce system mass. Important goals include long-life (greater than 14-yr) reliability and scalability so that these systems can be considered for a variety of future applications and missions including outer-planet missions and continual operation on the surface of Mars. This paper provides an update of the history and status of the ASC being developed for Glenn by Sunpower Inc. of Athens, Ohio.

  5. Space chemical propulsion test facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especiallly encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. This paper presents an overview of the Lewis test facilities. These facilities are clustered into three test areas: the Rocket Engine Test Facilities (RETF), the Rocket Laboratory (RL), and the Cryogenic Components Laboratory (CCL).

  6. The NASA Lewis Research Center Water Tunnel Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    A water tunnel facility specifically designed to investigate internal fluid duct flows has been built at the NASA Research Center. It is built in a modular fashion so that a variety of internal flow test hardware can be installed in the facility with minimal facility reconfiguration. The facility and test hardware interfaces are discussed along with design constraints for future test hardware. The inlet chamber flow conditioning approach is also detailed. Instrumentation and data acquisition capabilities are discussed. The incoming flow quality has been documented for about one quarter of the current facility operating range. At that range, there is some scatter in the data in the turbulent boundary layer which approaches 10 percent of the duct radius leading to a uniform core.

  7. Vibro-Acoustics Modal Testing at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes on-going modal testing activities at the NASA Langley Research Center for two aircraft fuselage structures: a generic "aluminum testbed cylinder" (ATC) and a Beechcraft Starship fuselage (BSF). Subsequent acoustic tests will measure the interior noise field created by exterior mechanical and acoustic sources. These test results will provide validation databases for interior noise prediction codes on realistic aircraft fuselage structures. The ATC is a 12-ft-long, all-aluminum, scale model assembly. The BSF is a 40-ft-long, all-composite, complete aircraft fuselage. To date, two of seven test configurations of the ATC and all three test configurations of the BSF have been completed. The paper briefly describes the various test configurations, testing procedure, and typical results for frequencies up to 250 Hz.

  8. Coherent Lidar Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing and using coherent lidar systems for many years. The current projects at LaRC are the Global Wind Observing Sounder (GWOS) mission preparation, the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), the Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) compact, rugged Doppler wind lidar project, the Autonomous precision Landing and Hazard detection and Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project for lunar landing, and the Skywalker project to find and use thermals to extend UAV flight time. These five projects encompass coherent lidar technology development; characterization, validation, and calibration facilities; compact, rugged packaging; computer simulation; trade studies; data acquisition, processing, and display development; system demonstration; and space mission design. This paper will further discuss these activities at LaRC.

  9. Matrix resin development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    The polymer program at NASA Langley Research Center involves exploratory studies in polymer science. These include the synthesis of novel polymers and their characterization. Polymer synthesis programs involve the development of novel thermoplastics, pseudothermoplastics, and thermosets. Recent investigations have led to the development of more easily processable polyimides, solvent-resistant polysulfones and polyphenylquinoxalines, and tougher high and intermediate-temperature polymers. Characterization efforts have included high-pressure liquid chromatography methodology, the development of toughness tests for fiber-reinforced composites, a study of electrical properties of metal-ion-filled polyimides, and a study of the mutagenicity of aromatic diamines. Also the mechanism of cure/degradation of experimental polymers has been studied by rheology, mechanical behavior, separation techniques and spectroscopy. Some of these programs have involved the degradation crosslinking of alkyl-containing polyimides, the separation and identification of crosslinked phenylquinoxalines, the rheological behavior of hot-melt polyimides, and the elucidation of the cure of norbornene endcapped imides.

  10. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, Roberto J.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI) Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  11. Assessment of Electromagnetic Fields at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ficklen, Carter B.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of ElectroMagnetic Fields (EMF) completed at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars Program. This project was performed to determine levels of electromagnetic fields, determine the significance of the levels present, and determine a plan to reduce electromagnetic field exposure, if necessary. This report also describes the properties of electromagnetic fields and their interaction with humans. The results of three major occupational epidemiological studies is presented to determine risks posed to humans by EMF exposure. The data for this report came from peer-reviewed journal articles and government publications pertaining to the health effects of electromagnetic fields.

  12. Helicopter transmission testing at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Coy, John J.

    1987-01-01

    The helicopter has evolved into a highly valuable air mobile vehicle for both military and civilian needs. The helicopter transmission requires advanced studies to develop a technology base for future rotorcraft advances. A joint helicopter transmission research program between the NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command has existed since 1970. Program goals are to reduce weight and noise and to increase life and reliability. The current experimental activities at Lewis consist of full-scale helicopter transmission testing, a base effort in gearing technology, and a future effort in noise reduction technology. The experimental facilities at Lewis for helicopter transmission testing are described. A description of each of the rigs is presented along with some significant results and near-term plans.

  13. The NASA Glen Research Center's Hypersonic Tunnel Facility. Chapter 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.; Willis, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center's Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, freejet wind tunnel that provides true enthalpy flight conditions for Mach numbers of 5, 6, and 7. The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility is unique due to its large scale and use of non-vitiated (clean air) flow. A 3MW graphite core storage heater is used to heat the test medium of gaseous nitrogen to the high stagnation temperatures required to produce true enthalpy conditions. Gaseous oxygen is mixed into the heated test flow to generate the true air simulation. The freejet test section is 1.07m (42 in.) in diameter and 4.3m (14 ft) in length. The facility is well suited for the testing of large scale airbreathing propulsion systems. In this chapter, a brief history and detailed description of the facility are presented along with a discussion of the facility's application towards hypersonic airbreathing propulsion testing.

  14. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI), Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  15. Overview of Stirling Technology Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Williams, Zachary D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) are under development to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, fly by, land, or rove using less than a quarter of the plutonium the currently available RPS uses to produce about the same power. NASA Glenn Research Center's newly formulated Stirling Cycle Technology Development Project (SCTDP) continues development of Stirling-based systems and subsystems, which include a flight-like generator and related housing assembly, controller, and convertors. The project also develops less mature technologies under Stirling Technology Research, with a focus on demonstration in representative environments to increase the technology readiness level (TRL). Matured technologies are evaluated for selection in future generator designs. Stirling Technology Research tasks focus on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, reducing generator mass and/or size, improving reliability and system fault tolerance, and developing alternative designs. The task objectives and status are summarized.

  16. NASA HUNCH Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Nancy R.; Wagner, James; Phelps, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    What is NASA HUNCH? High School Students United with NASA to Create Hardware-HUNCH is an instructional partnership between NASA and educational institutions. This partnership benefits both NASA and students. NASA receives cost-effective hardware and soft goods, while students receive real-world hands-on experiences. The 2014-2015 was the 12th year of the HUNCH Program. NASA Glenn Research Center joined the program that already included the NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, Langley Research Center and Goddard Space Flight Center. The program included 76 schools in 24 states and NASA Glenn worked with the following five schools in the HUNCH Build to Print Hardware Program: Medina Career Center, Medina, OH; Cattaraugus Allegheny-BOCES, Olean, NY; Orleans Niagara-BOCES, Medina, NY; Apollo Career Center, Lima, OH; Romeo Engineering and Tech Center, Washington, MI. The schools built various parts of an International Space Station (ISS) middeck stowage locker and learned about manufacturing process and how best to build these components to NASA specifications. For the 2015-2016 school year the schools will be part of a larger group of schools building flight hardware consisting of 20 ISS middeck stowage lockers for the ISS Program. The HUNCH Program consists of: Build to Print Hardware; Build to Print Soft Goods; Design and Prototyping; Culinary Challenge; Implementation: Web Page and Video Production.

  17. NASA Design Strengthens Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process-a combination of extruding and forging-ideal for use when the original metal characteristics must remain as unchanged as possible. While exploring methods to improve the use of FSW in manufacturing, engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center created technologies to address the method's shortcomings. MTS Systems Corporation, of Eden Prairie, Minnesota, discovered the NASA-developed technology and then signed a co-exclusive license agreement to commercialize Marshall's design for use in high-strength structural alloys. The resulting process offers the added bonuses of being cost-competitive, efficient, and most importantly, versatile.

  18. NASA Earth-to-Orbit Engineering Design Challenges: Thermal Protection Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), 2010

    2010-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center, Dryden Flight Research Center, and their partners at other NASA centers and in private industry are currently developing X-33, a prototype to test technologies for the next generation of space transportation. This single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch…

  19. NASA-OAI Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program at NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.; Montegani, Francis J.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, a IO-week activity for university faculty entitled the NASA-OAI Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program (CFP) was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in collaboration with the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). This is a companion program to the highly successful NASA Faculty Fellowship Program and its predecessor, the NASA- ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, that operated for 38 years at Glenn. This year s program began officially on June 3, 2002 and continued through August 9, 2002. This report is intended primarily to summarize the research activities comprising the 2002 CFP Program at Glenn. Fifteen research summaries are included.

  20. Ion Propulsion Technology Programs at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, M. J.; Oleson, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    As lead center for the agency in electric and ion propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is pursuing technology development in ion propulsion for a range of mission applications. The program goal is to develop key technologies for advanced NSTAR-derivative high-power ion propulsion, lightweight low power high-performance ion propulsion, 'micro' ion propulsion, and engine and component technologies for high-power electric propulsion for very ambitious missions. Products include: (1) a 5 kW, 400 kg throughput ion thruster and power processing technology; (2) extremely-lightweight high-efficiency sub-kilowatt ion thruster and power processor; (3) a 1-25 W high-specific impulse ion engine; and (4) engine and component technologies for high-power (30 kW class) ion and Hall engines. Identified applications include outer planetary science missions such as Europa orbiter/lander, Comet Nucleus Sample Return mission, Titan Explorer, Neptune/Triton, Pluto-Kuiper Belt Objects Mission, various second generation interplanetary Micro spacecraft, and the Interstellar Probe Mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. NASA Data Acquisitions System (NDAS) Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dawn; Duncan, Michael; Franzl, Richard; Holladay, Wendy; Marshall, Peggi; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The NDAS Software Project is for the development of common low speed data acquisition system software to support NASA's rocket propulsion testing facilities at John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC), White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), Plum Brook Station (PBS), and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  2. Advanced Stirling Convertor Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Poriti, Sal

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been testing high-efficiency free-piston Stirling convertors for potential use in radioisotope power systems (RPSs) since 1999. The current effort is in support of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Sunpower, Inc., and the NASA GRC. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) to convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As reliability is paramount to a RPS capable of providing spacecraft power for potential multi-year missions, GRC provides direct technology support to the ASRG flight project in the areas of reliability, convertor and generator testing, high-temperature materials, structures, modeling and analysis, organics, structural dynamics, electromagnetic interference (EMI), and permanent magnets to reduce risk and enhance reliability of the convertor as this technology transitions toward flight status. Convertor and generator testing is carried out in short- and long-duration tests designed to characterize convertor performance when subjected to environments intended to simulate launch and space conditions. Long duration testing is intended to baseline performance and observe any performance degradation over the life of the test. Testing involves developing support hardware that enables 24/7 unattended operation and data collection. GRC currently has 14 Stirling convertors under unattended extended operation testing, including two operating in the ASRG Engineering Unit (ASRG-EU). Test data and high-temperature support hardware are discussed for ongoing and future ASC tests with emphasis on the ASC-E and ASC-E2.

  3. Small Radioisotope Power System Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugala, Gina; Bell, Mark; Oriti, Salvatore; Fraeman, Martin; Frankford, David; Duven, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    In April 2009, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) formed an integrated product team (IPT) to develop a Small Radioisotope Power System (SRPS) utilizing a single Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) with passive balancer. A single ASC produces approximately 80 We making this system advantageous for small distributed lunar science stations. The IPT consists of Sunpower, Inc., to provide the single ASC with a passive balancer, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL) to design an engineering model Single Convertor Controller (SCC) for an ASC with a passive balancer, and NASA GRC to provide technical support to these tasks and to develop a simulated lunar lander test stand. The single ASC with a passive balancer, simulated lunar lander test stand, and SCC were delivered to GRC and were tested as a system. The testing sequence at GRC included SCC fault tolerance, integration, electromagnetic interference (EMI), vibration, and extended operation testing. The SCC fault tolerance test characterized the SCCs ability to handle various fault conditions, including high or low bus power consumption, total open load or short circuit, and replacing a failed SCC card while the backup maintains control of the ASC. The integrated test characterized the behavior of the system across a range of operating conditions, including variations in cold-end temperature and piston amplitude, including the emitted vibration to both the sensors on the lunar lander and the lunar surface. The EMI test characterized the AC and DC magnetic and electric fields emitted by the SCC and single ASC. The vibration test confirms the SCCs ability to control the single ASC during launch. The extended operation test allows data to be collected over a period of thousands of hours to obtain long term performance data of the ASC with a passive balancer and the SCC. This paper will discuss the results of each of these tests.

  4. Small Radioisotope Power System at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugala, Gina M.; Fraeman, Martin; Frankford, David P.; Duven, Dennis; Shamkovich, Andrei; Ambrose, Hollis; Meer, David W.

    2012-01-01

    In April 2009, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) formed an integrated product team (IPT) to develop a Small Radioisotope Power System (SRPS) utilizing a single Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) with passive balancer for possible use by the International Lunar Network (ILN) program. The ILN program is studying the feasibility of implementing a multiple node seismometer network to investigate the internal lunar structure. A single ASC produces approximately 80 W(sub e) and could potentially supply sufficient power for that application. The IPT consists of Sunpower, Inc., to provide the single ASC with balancer, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to design an engineering model Single Convertor Controller (SCC) for an ASC with balancer, and NASA GRC to provide technical support to these tasks and to develop a simulated lunar lander test stand. A controller maintains stable operation of an ASC. It regulates the alternating current produced by the linear alternator of the convertor, provides a specified output voltage, and maintains operation at a steady piston amplitude and hot end temperature. JHU/APL also designed an ASC dynamic engine/alternator simulator to aid in the testing and troubleshooting of the SCC. This paper describes the requirements, design, and development of the SCC, including some of the key challenges and the solutions chosen to overcome those issues. In addition, it describes the plans to analyze the effectiveness of a passive balancer to minimize vibration from the ASC, characterize the effect of ASC vibration on a lunar lander, characterize the performance of the SCC, and integrate the single ASC, SCC, and lunar lander test stand to characterize performance of the overall system.

  5. NASA Center for Astronomy Education: Building a Community of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissenden, Gina; Prather, E. E.; Slater, T. F.; Greene, W. M.; Thaller, M.; Alvidrez, R.

    2007-12-01

    The NASA Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) is devoted to the professional development of introductory college astronomy instructors teaching at community colleges. The primary goal is building a "community of practice." Evaluation results suggest this community of practice model is effective at improving instructional practices, particularly in settings where instructors feel isolated from their peers. For community college faculty this isolation can be quite real. Many are the only astronomer, if not the only scientist, at their institution. In addition, they may be adjunct instructors who have no office, no institutional email address, nor appear in the campus directory. CAE works to prevent this sense of isolation by building both actual and virtual communities for these instructors, as well as provide actual and virtual professional development opportunities. CAE's major effort is providing multi-tiered "Teaching Excellence Workshops" offered at national and regional venues. Recently added to our workshop offerings is a Tier II, or advanced, workshop for instructors who have attended a previous Teaching Excellence Workshop. The focus of the Tier II workshops is on implementation issues. In addition, we are now also offering a workshop exclusively for post-docs, graduates, and undergraduate students. Ongoing support is offered through the CAE website. Instructors can learn about, and register for, upcoming workshops. They can engage in discussions about educational issues and share best practices with peers using the moderated discussion group Astrolrner@CAE. CAE also provides an updated article "This Month's Teaching Strategy” which is a reflection on teaching strategies discussed in the workshops. Instructors can also find their peers through the online map of US community colleges offering introductory astronomy courses. Lastly, CAE Regional Teaching Exchanges facilitate local, and sustained, community building. CAE is supported by the NASA/JPL Navigator

  6. NASA Center for Astronomy Education: Building a Community of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissenden, Gina; Prather, E.; Slater, T. F.; Greene, W. M.; Thaller, M.

    2006-12-01

    The NASA Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) is devoted to the professional development of introductory college astronomy instructors teaching at community colleges. The primary goal is building a "community of practice." Evaluation results suggest this community of practice model is effective at improving instructional practices, particularly in settings where instructors feel isolated from their peers. For community college faculty this isolation can be quite real. Many are the only astronomer, if not the only scientist, at their institution. In addition, they may be adjunct instructors who have no office, no institutional email address, nor appear in the campus directory. CAE works to prevent this sense of isolation by building both actual and virtual communities for these instructors, as well as provide actual and virtual professional development opportunities. CAE’s major effort is providing multi-tiered "Teaching Excellence Workshops" offered at national and regional venues. Ongoing support is offered through the CAE website. Instructors can learn about, and register for, upcoming workshops. They can engage in discussions about educational issues and share best practices with peers using the moderated discussion group AstroLrner@CAE. CAE also provides an updated article "This Month’s Teaching Strategy” which is a reflection on teaching strategies discussed in the workshops. Instructors can also find their peers through the online map of US community colleges offering introductory astronomy courses. Lastly, CAE Regional Teaching Exchanges facilitate local, and sustained, community building. CAE is supported by the NASA/JPL Navigator Public Engagement Program and the Spitzer Space Telescope Education and Public Outreach Program.

  7. 'Focus on Marshall' Marks Milestone With 50th Episode

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hard to believe, but it's been five years since the Marshall Space Flight Center began a video program called "Focus on Marshall." In those five years, co-hosts Bill Hubscher and Lori Meggs, have t...

  8. NASA Performance Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Introduction NASA's mission is to advance and communicate scientific knowledge and understanding of Earth, the solar system, and the universe; to advance human exploration, use, and development of space; and to research, develop, verify, and transfer advanced aeronautics, space, and related technologies. In support of this mission, NASA has a strategic architecture that consists of four Enterprises supported by four Crosscutting Processes. The Strategic Enterprises are NASA's primary mission areas to include Earth Science, Space Science, Human Exploration and Development of Space, and Aerospace Technology. NASA's Crosscutting Processes are Manage Strategically, Provide Aerospace Products and Capabilities, Generate Knowledge and Communicate Knowledge. The implementation of NASA programs, science, and technology research occurs primarily at our Centers. NASA consists of a Headquarters, nine Centers, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, as well as several ancillary installations and offices in the United States and abroad. The nine Centers are as follows: (1) Ames Research Center, (2) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), (3) Glenn Research Center (GRC), (4) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), (5) Johnson Space Center, (6) Kennedy Space Center (KSC), (7) Langley Research Center (LaRC), (8) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and (9) Stennis Space Center (SSC).

  9. Earth Radiation Budget Research at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Harrison, Edwin F.; Gibson, Gary G.

    2014-01-01

    In the 1970s research studies concentrating on satellite measurements of Earth's radiation budget started at the NASA Langley Research Center. Since that beginning, considerable effort has been devoted to developing measurement techniques, data analysis methods, and time-space sampling strategies to meet the radiation budget science requirements for climate studies. Implementation and success of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) was due to the remarkable teamwork of many engineers, scientists, and data analysts. Data from ERBE have provided a new understanding of the effects of clouds, aerosols, and El Nino/La Nina oscillation on the Earth's radiation. CERES spacecraft instruments have extended the time coverage with high quality climate data records for over a decade. Using ERBE and CERES measurements these teams have created information about radiation at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and throughout the atmosphere for a better understanding of our climate. They have also generated surface radiation products for designers of solar power plants and buildings and numerous other applications

  10. NASA/Ames Research Center DC-8 data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherniss, S. C.; Scofield, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    In-flight facility data acquisition, distribution, and recording on the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) DC-8 are performed by the Data Acquisition and Distribution System (DADS). Navigational and environmental data collected by the DADS are converted to engineering units and distributed real-time to investigator stations once per second. Selected engineering units data are printed and displayed on closed circuit television monitors throughout flights. An in-flight graphical display of the DC-8 flight track (with barbs indicating wind direction and magnitude) has recently been added to the DADS capabilities. Logging of data run starts/stops and commentary from the mission director are also provided. All data are recorded to hard disk in-flight and archived to tape medium post-flight. Post-flight, hard copies of the track map and mission director's log are created by the DADS. The DADS is a distributed system consisting of a data subsystem, an Avionic Serial Data-to-VMEbus (ASD2VME) subsystem, and a host subsystem. Each subsystem has a dedicated central processing unit (CPU) and is capable of stand-alone operation. All three subsystems are housed in a single 20-slot VME chassis and communicate with each other over the VMEbus. The data and host subsystems are briefly discussed, and the DC-8 DADS internal configuration and system block diagram are presented.

  11. Extended Operation of Stirling Convertors at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Salvatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting development of free-piston Stirling conversion technology for spaceflight electrical power generation since 1999. GRC has also been supporting the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) since 2006. A key element of the ASRG project is providing life, reliability, and performance data for the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). The Thermal Energy Conversion branch at GRC is conducting extended operation of several free-piston Stirling convertors. The goal of this effort is to generate long-term performance data (tens of thousands of hours) on multiple units to build a life and reliability database. Currently, GRC is operating 18 convertors. This hardware set includes Technology Demonstration Convertors (TDCs) from Infinia Corporation, of which one pair (TDCs #13 and #14) has accumulated over 60,000 hr (6.8 years) of operation. Also under test are various Sunpower, Inc. convertors that were fabricated during the ASC development activity, including ASC-0, ASC-E (including those in the ASRG engineering unit), and ASC-E2. The ASC-E2s also completed, or are in progress of completing workmanship vibration testing, performance mapping, and extended operation. Two ASC-E2 units will also be used for durability testing, during which components will be stressed to levels above nominal mission usage. Extended operation data analyses from these tests are covered in this paper.

  12. NASA Lewis Research Center's Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemets, Steve A.; Ehlers, Robert C.; Parrott, Edith

    1995-01-01

    The Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility (PCMTF) in the Engine Research Building (ERB) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is one of two unique combustor facilities that provide a nonvitiated air supply to two test stands, where the air can be used for research combustor testing and high-temperature materials testing. Stand A is used as a research combustor stand, whereas stand B is used for cyclic and survivability tests of aerospace materials at high temperatures. Both stands can accommodate in-house and private industry research programs. The PCMTF is capable of providing up to 30 lb/s (pps) of nonvitiated, 450 psig combustion air at temperatures ranging from 850 to 1150 g F. A 5000 gal tank located outdoors adjacent to the test facility can provide jet fuel at a pressure of 900 psig and a flow rate of 11 gal/min (gpm). Gaseous hydrogen from a 70,000 cu ft (CF) tuber is also available as a fuel. Approximately 500 gpm of cooling water cools the research hardware and exhaust gases. Such cooling is necessary because the air stream reaches temperatures as high as 3000 deg F. The PCMTF provides industry and Government with a facility for studying the combustion process and for obtaining valuable test information on advanced materials. This report describes the facility's support systems and unique capabilities.

  13. Enhanced Product Generation at NASA Data Centers Through Grid Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Hinke, Thomas H.; Gavali, Shradha; Seufzer, William J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes how grid technology can support the ability of NASA data centers to provide customized data products. A combination of grid technology and commodity processors are proposed to provide the bandwidth necessary to perform customized processing of data, with customized data subsetting providing the initial example. This customized subsetting engine can be used to support a new type of subsetting, called phenomena-based subsetting, where data is subsetted based on its association with some phenomena, such as mesoscale convective systems or hurricanes. This concept is expanded to allow the phenomena to be detected in one type of data, with the subsetting requirements transmitted to the subsetting engine to subset a different type of data. The subsetting requirements are generated by a data mining system and transmitted to the subsetter in the form of an XML feature index that describes the spatial and temporal extent of the phenomena. For this work, a grid-based mining system called the Grid Miner is used to identify the phenomena and generate the feature index. This paper discusses the value of grid technology in facilitating the development of a high performance customized product processing and the coupling of a grid mining system to support phenomena-based subsetting.

  14. Upgrades at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paryz, Roman W.

    2012-01-01

    Several projects have been completed or are nearing completion at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) National Transonic Facility (NTF). The addition of a Model Flow-Control/Propulsion Simulation test capability to the NTF provides a unique, transonic, high-Reynolds number test capability that is well suited for research in propulsion airframe integration studies, circulation control high-lift concepts, powered lift, and cruise separation flow control. A 1992 vintage Facility Automation System (FAS) that performs the control functions for tunnel pressure, temperature, Mach number, model position, safety interlock and supervisory controls was replaced using current, commercially available components. This FAS upgrade also involved a design study for the replacement of the facility Mach measurement system and the development of a software-based simulation model of NTF processes and control systems. The FAS upgrades were validated by a post upgrade verification wind tunnel test. The data acquisition system (DAS) upgrade project involves the design, purchase, build, integration, installation and verification of a new DAS by replacing several early 1990's vintage computer systems with state of the art hardware/software. This paper provides an update on the progress made in these efforts. See reference 1.

  15. Flight researh at NASA Ames Research Center: A test pilot's perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. Warren

    1987-01-01

    In 1976 NASA elected to assign responsibility for each of the various flight regimes to individual research centers. The NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California was designated lead center for vertical and short takeoff and landing, V/STOL research. The three most recent flight research airplanes being flown at the center are discussed from the test pilot's perspective: the Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft; the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft; and the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft.

  16. NASA as a Convener: Government, Academic and Industry Collaborations Through the NASA Human Health and Performance Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2011-01-01

    On October 18, 2010, the NASA Human Health and Performance center (NHHPC) was opened to enable collaboration among government, academic and industry members. Membership rapidly grew to 60 members (http://nhhpc.nasa.gov ) and members began identifying collaborative projects as detailed below. In addition, a first workshop in open collaboration and innovation was conducted on January 19, 2011 by the NHHPC resulting in additional challenges and projects for further development. This first workshop was a result of the SLSD successes in running open innovation challenges over the past two years. In 2008, the NASA Johnson Space Center, Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) began pilot projects in open innovation (crowd sourcing) to determine if these new internet-based platforms could indeed find solutions to difficult technical problems. From 2008 to 2010, the SLSD issued 34 challenges, 14 externally and 20 internally. The 14 external challenges were conducted through three different vendors: InnoCentive, Yet2.com and TopCoder. The 20 internal challenges were conducted using the InnoCentive platform, customized to NASA use, and promoted as NASA@Work. The results from the 34 challenges involved not only technical solutions that were reported previously at the 61st IAC, but also the formation of new collaborative relationships. For example, the TopCoder pilot was expanded by the NASA Space Operations Mission Directorate to the NASA Tournament Lab in collaboration with Harvard Business School and TopCoder. Building on these initial successes, the NHHPC workshop in January of 2011, and ongoing NHHPC member discussions, several important collaborations are in development: Space Act Agreement between NASA and GE for collaborative projects, NASA and academia for a Visual Impairment / Intracranial Hypertension summit (February 2011), NASA and the DoD through the Defense Venture Catalyst Initiative (DeVenCI) for a technical needs workshop (June 2011), NASA and the San Diego Zoo

  17. NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER AND THE TIDEWATER INTERAGENCY POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s Langley Research Center (LaRC) is an 807-acre research center devoted to aeronautics and space research. aRC has initiated a broad-based pollution prevention program guided by a Pollution Prevention Program Plan and implement...

  18. A Program of Research and Education in Astronautics at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of the Program were to conduct research at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of astronautics and to provide a comprehensive education program at the Center leading to advanced degrees in Astronautics. We believe that the program has successfully met the objectives and has been of significant benefit to NASA LaRC, the GWU and the nation.

  19. Educational opportunities within the NASA specialized center of research and training in gravitational biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guikema, James A.; Spooner, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) in Gravitational Biology was established at Kansas State University, supported through NASA's Life Science Division, Office of Space Science and Applications. Educational opportunities, associated with each of the research projects which form the nucleus of the Center, are complemented by program enrichments such as scholar exchanges and linkages to other NASA and commercial programs. The focus of this training program, and a preliminary assessment of its successes, are described.

  20. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for VLSI System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This annual report outlines the activities of the past year at the NASA SERC on VLSI Design. Highlights for this year include the following: a significant breakthrough was achieved in utilizing commercial IC foundries for producing flight electronics; the first two flight qualified chips were designed, fabricated, and tested and are now being delivered into NASA flight systems; and a new technology transfer mechanism has been established to transfer VLSI advances into NASA and commercial systems.

  1. Advanced Composite Structures At NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Eldred's presentation will discuss several NASA efforts to improve and expand the use of composite structures within aerospace vehicles. Topics will include an overview of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP), Space Launch System (SLS) applications, and Langley's ISAAC robotic composites research tool.

  2. ADVANCED COMPOSITES TECHNOLOGY CASE STUDY AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Chesapeake Bay Agreement, NASA-LaRC is a member of the Tidewater Interagency Pollution Prevention Program (TIPPP). t NASA-LaRC, a technique for producing advanced composite materials without the use of solvents has been developed. his assessment was focused on the produ...

  3. Summary of Stirling Convertor Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been testing free-piston Stirling convertors for potential use in radioisotope power systems. These convertors tend to be in the 35 to 80 W electric power output range. Tests at GRC have accumulated over 80,000 hr of operation. Test articles have been received from Infinia Corporation of Kennewick, Washington and from Sunpower of Athens, Ohio. Infinia designed and built the developmental Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertors (TDC) in addition to the more advanced Test Bed and Engineering Unit convertors. GRC has eight of the TDC's under test including two that operate in a thermal vacuum environment. Sunpower designed and developed the EE-35 and the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). GRC has six of the EE- 35 s and is preparing for testing multiple ASC s. Free-piston Stirling convertors for radioisotope power systems make use of non-contacting operation that eliminates wear and is suited for long-term operation. Space missions with radioisotope power systems are often considered that extend from three to 14 years. One of the key capabilities of the GRC test facility is the ability to support continuous, unattended operation. Hardware, software, and procedures for preparing the test articles were developed to support these tests. These included the processing of the convertors for minimizing the contaminants in the working fluid, developing a helium charging system for filling and for gas sample analysis, and the development of new control software and a high-speed protection circuit to insure safe, round-the-clock operation. Performance data of Stirling convertors over time is required to demonstrate that a radioisotope power system is capable of providing reliable power for multi-year missions. This paper will discuss the status of Stirling convertor testing at GRC.

  4. Electronic Photography at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Jack; Judge, Nancianne

    1995-01-01

    An electronic photography facility has been established in the Imaging & Photographic Technology Section, Visual Imaging Branch, at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The purpose of this facility is to provide the LaRC community with access to digital imaging technology. In particular, capabilities have been established for image scanning, direct image capture, optimized image processing for storage, image enhancement, and optimized device dependent image processing for output. Unique approaches include: evaluation and extraction of the entire film information content through scanning; standardization of image file tone reproduction characteristics for optimal bit utilization and viewing; education of digital imaging personnel on the effects of sampling and quantization to minimize image processing related information loss; investigation of the use of small kernel optimal filters for image restoration; characterization of a large array of output devices and development of image processing protocols for standardized output. Currently, the laboratory has a large collection of digital image files which contain essentially all the information present on the original films. These files are stored at 8-bits per color, but the initial image processing was done at higher bit depths and/or resolutions so that the full 8-bits are used in the stored files. The tone reproduction of these files has also been optimized so the available levels are distributed according to visual perceptibility. Look up tables are available which modify these files for standardized output on various devices, although color reproduction has been allowed to float to some extent to allow for full utilization of output device gamut.

  5. Data Information for Global Change Studies: NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers and Cooperating Data Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is an integral part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE). ESE is a long-term global change research program designed to improve our understanding of the Earth's interrelated processes involving the atmosphere, oceans, land surfaces, and polar regions. Data from EOS instruments and other Earth science measurement systems are useful in understanding the causes and processes of global climate change and the consequences of human activities. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) provides a structure for data management and user services for products derived from EOS satellite instruments and other NASA Earth science data. Within the EOSDIS framework, the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) have been established to provide expertise in one or more Earth science disciplines. The DAACs and cooperating data centers provide data and information services to support the global change research community. Much of the development of the DAACs has been in anticipation of the enormous amount of data expected from EOS instruments to be launched within the next two decades. Terra, the EOS flagship launched in December 1999, is the first of a series of EOS satellites to carry several instruments with multispectral capabilities. Some data products from these instruments are now available from several of the DAACs. These and other data products can be ordered through the EOS Data Gateway (EDG) and DAAC-specific online ordering systems.

  6. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-12-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  7. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  8. Dr. von Braun Touring the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This photograph is dated October 14, 1964, and shows Dr. von Braun, left, during a tour of the NASA Marned Spacecraft Center, now the Johnson Space Center. He is with Dr. J.P. Kuettner, center, from the Marshall Space Flight Center, and Warren J. North from the Manned Spacecraft Center.

  9. Bimetallic Treatment System (BTS) for Removal and Remediation of Polychlorinated Biphenyl from Marshall Space Flight Center's 4696 Fl Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    This Office of Space Flight (OSF)-funded project sought to demonstrate the application of a Bi-metallic Treatment System (BTS) to remove and degrade PCBs found on NASA facilities. The project initiated with the collection of PCB-containing materials from various MSFC and KSC structures, followed by laboratory evaluation of the BTS' PCB-removal efficiency, and concluded with a field demonstration at MSFC. The project evaluated the optimum formulation required to remove PCBs from aged and weathered paint with the goal of achieving final PCB concentrations less than 50 mg/Kg or 50 percent reduction where PCB starting levels were already below the 50 mg/Kg levels. Using lessons learned from this study, it was anticipated that the research team would be better able to make further recommendation on application strategies for future use of BTS for the treatment of PCB laden coatings on structures.

  10. The NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) in Gravitational Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Guikema, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Life Sciences Division of NASA has initiated a NASA Specialized Centers of Research and Training (NSCORT) program. Three Centers were designated in late 1990, as the culmination of an in-depth peer review analysis of proposals from universities across the nation and around the world. Kansas State University was selected as the NSCORT in Gravitational Biology. This Center is headquartered in the KSU Division of Biology and has a research, training, and outreach function that focuses on cellular and developmental biology.

  11. NASA - Johnson Space Center's New Capabilities for Air Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John

    2015-01-01

    NASA has some unique and challenging air purification problems that cannot be adequately met with COTS technology: 1) ammonia removal from air, 2) hydrazine removal from air, 3) CO conversion to CO2 in low temperature, high humidity environments. NASA has sponsored the development of new sorbents and new catalysts. These new sorbents and catalysts work better than COTS technology for our application. If attendees have a need for an effective ammonia sorbent, an effective hydrazine sorbent, or an effective CO conversion catalyst, we should learn to see if NASA sponsored technology development can help.

  12. NASA Engineering Design Challenges: Thermal Protection Systems. EP-2008-09-122-MSFC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Nick; McWilliams, Harold; Wagoner, Paul

    2007-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center, and their partners at other NASA centers and in private industry, are designing and beginning to develop the next generation of spacecraft to transport cargo, equipment, and human explorers to space. These vehicles--the Ares I and Ares V launch…

  13. NASA Engineering Design Challenges: Spacecraft Structures. EP-2008-09-121-MSFC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Nick; McWilliams, Harold; Wagoner, Paul

    2007-01-01

    NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center along with their partners at other NASA centers, and in private industry, are designing and beginning to develop the next generation of spacecraft to transport cargo, equipment, and human explorers to space. These vehicles are part of the Constellation…

  14. Human operator performance of remotely controlled tasks: Teleoperator research conducted at NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, N., Jr.; Piccione, F.; Kirkpatrick, M., III; Malone, T. B.

    1982-01-01

    The combination of human and machine capabilities into an integrated engineering system which is complex and interactive interdisciplinary undertaking is discussed. Human controlled remote systems referred to as teleoperators, are reviewed. The human factors requirements for remotely manned systems are identified. The data were developed in three principal teleoperator laboratories and the visual, manipulator and mobility laboratories are described. Three major sections are identified: (1) remote system components, (2) human operator considerations; and (3) teleoperator system simulation and concept verification.

  15. Human operator performance of remotely controlled tasks: Teleoperator research conducted at NASA's George C. Marshal Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, N., Jr.; Piccione, F.; Kirkpatrick, M., III; Malone, T. B.

    1982-01-01

    The capabilities within the teleoperator laboratories to perform remote and teleoperated investigations for a wide variety of applications are described. Three major teleoperator issues are addressed: the human operator, the remote control and effecting subsystems, and the human/machine system performance results for specific teleoperated tasks.

  16. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center Dynamics and Controls Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Steve

    2015-01-01

    NASA Armstrong continues its legacy of exciting work in the area of Dynamics and Control of advanced vehicle concepts. This presentation describes Armstrongs research in control of flexible structures, peak seeking control and adaptive control in the Spring of 2015.

  17. Curation of Antarctic Meteorites at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBride, K. M.; Satterwhite, C. E.; Righter, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Antarctic meteorite program began in the 1970 s and has provided more than 18,000 samples in over three decades. The program is based on a three agency agreement between NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution. The collection, stored at the Johnson Space Center and the Smithsonian, is one of the largest collections of meteorites in the world and features samples from the moon and Mars, asteroids, and material from the early solar system. A brief consideration of the collection shows that it contains 92.2% ordinary chondrites, 3.2% carbonaceous chondrites, 3.7% achondrites (1.7% HED), as well as many puzzling ungrouped meteorites. JSC has sent splits of nearly 20,000 meteorite samples to more than 500 scientists around the world since 1977. After the meteorites are collected in Antarctica, they are shipped frozen to JSC in Houston, usually arriving in April following the field season. The Astromaterials Curation Office at JSC is responsible for: - receiving the frozen meteorites. - staging: repackaging and changing the samples field identification numbers with official names. - submitting the names to the Nomenclature Committee of the Meteoritical Society for approval as new meteorites. - initial processing: weighing, measuring, describing and photographing the sample and providing a chip for classification to the Smithsonian Institution staff. - the issuing of two newsletters per year, announcing hundreds of new meteorites. - the handling of requests from the scientific community and the allocation of those requests that are approved. - providing supplies and tools for the field team such as teflon bags and tape, aluminum foil, clean tweezers and tongs. - maintaining the meteorite database with more than 76,000 sample splits. - making petrographic thin and thick sections for the JSC library and scientific investigators. - providing storage and handling of the meteorites in a class 10,000 clean room. Samples that have not been

  18. Teams and teamwork at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The recent reorganization and shift to managing total quality at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has placed an increasing emphasis on teams and teamwork in accomplishing day-to-day work activities and long-term projects. The purpose of this research was to review the nature of teams and teamwork at LaRC. Models of team performance and teamwork guided the gathering of information. Current and former team members served as participants; their collective experience reflected membership in over 200 teams at LaRC. The participants responded to a survey of open-ended questions which assessed various aspects of teams and teamwork. The participants also met in a workshop to clarify and elaborate on their responses. The work accomplished by the teams ranged from high-level managerial decision making (e.g., developing plans for LaRC reorganization) to creating scientific proposals (e.g., describing spaceflight projects to be designed, sold, and built). Teams typically had nine members who remained together for six months. Member turnover was around 20 percent; this turnover was attributed to heavy loads of other work assignments and little formal recognition and reward for team membership. Team members usually shared a common and valued goal, but there was not a clear standard (except delivery of a document) for knowing when the goal was achieved. However, members viewed their teams as successful. A major factor in team success was the setting of explicit a priori rules for communication. Task interdependencies between members were not complex (e.g., sharing of meeting notes and ideas about issues), except between members of scientific teams (i.e., reliance on the expertise of others). Thus, coordination of activities usually involved scheduling and attendance of team meetings. The team leader was designated by the team's sponsor. This leader usually shared power and responsibilities with other members, such that team members established their own operating

  19. Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development at NASA Langley Research Center for NASA Space-Based 3-D Winds Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Koch, Grady J.

    2012-01-01

    We review the 20-plus years of pulsed transmit laser development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to enable a coherent Doppler wind lidar to measure global winds from earth orbit. We briefly also discuss the many other ingredients needed to prepare for this space mission.

  20. Semantic Data Access Services at NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffer, E.; Hertz, J.; Kusterer, J.

    2012-12-01

    The corpus of Earth Science data products at the Atmospheric Science Data Center at NASA's Langley Research Center comprises a widely heterogeneous set of products, even among those whose subject matter is very similar. Two distinct data products may both contain data on the same parameter, for instance, solar irradiance; but the instruments used, and the circumstances under which the data were collected and processed, may differ significantly. Understanding the differences is critical to using the data effectively. Data distribution services must be able to provide prospective users with enough information to allow them to meaningfully compare and evaluate the data products offered. Semantic technologies - ontologies, triple stores, reasoners, linked data - offer functionality for addressing this issue. Ontologies can provide robust, high-fidelity domain models that serve as common schema for discovering, evaluating, comparing and integrating data from disparate products. Reasoning engines and triple stores can leverage ontologies to support intelligent search applications that allow users to discover, query, retrieve, and easily reformat data from a broad spectrum of sources. We argue that because of the extremely complex nature of scientific data, data distribution systems should wholeheartedly embrace semantic technologies in order to make their data accessible to a broad array of prospective end users, and to ensure that the data they provide will be clearly understood and used appropriately by consumers. Toward this end, we propose a distribution system in which formal ontological models that accurately and comprehensively represent the ASDC's data domain, and fully leverage the expressivity and inferential capabilities of first order logic, are used to generate graph-based representations of the relevant relationships among data sets, observational systems, metadata files, and geospatial, temporal and scientific parameters to help prospective data consumers

  1. The Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpati, Gabriel; Martin, John; Steiner, Mark; Reinhardt, K.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Goddard has used its Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) to perform more than 150 mission concept studies. The IMDC performs rapid development of high-level, end-to-end mission concepts, typically in just 4 days. The approach to the studies varies, depending on whether the proposed mission is near-future using existing technology, mid-future using new technology being actively developed, or far-future using technology which may not yet be clearly defined. The emphasis and level of detail developed during any particular study depends on which timeframe (near-, mid-, or far-future) is involved and the specific needs of the study client. The most effective mission studies are those where mission capabilities required and emerging technology developments can synergistically work together; thus both enhancing mission capabilities and providing impetus for ongoing technology development.

  2. Usable Translational Hand Controllers for NASA's Habitability Design Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westbrook, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    This summer I was given the opportunity to work at the Habitability Design Center (HDC). NASA Johnson Space Center's HDC is currently developing Cislunar and Mars spacecraft mockups. I contributed to this effort by designing from scratch low cost, functional translational hand controllers (THCs) that will be used in spacecraft mission simulation in low to medium fidelity exploration spacecraft mockups. This project fell under the category of mechatronics, a combination of mechanical, electrical, and computer engineering. Being an aerospace engineering student, I was out of my comfort zone. And that was a wonderful thing. The autonomy that my mentor, Dr. Robert Howard, allowed me gave me the opportunity to learn by trying, failing, and trying again. This project was not only a professional success for me, but a significant learning experience. I appreciated the freedom that I had to take the time to learn new things for myself rather than blindly follow instructions. I was the sole person working on this project, and was required to work independently to solve the many hardware and software challenges that the project entailed. I researched THCs that have been used on the ISS, the Space Shuttle, and the Orion MPVC and based my design off of these. I worked through many redesigns before finding an optimal configuration of the necessary mechanisms and electrical components for the THC. Once I had a functional hardware design, I dove into the challenge of getting an Arduino Uno, an extremely low cost and easily programmable microcontroller, to behave as a human interface device. The THCs I built needed to be able to integrate to a mission simulation designed by NASA's Graphics and Visualization Lab. This proved to be the most challenging aspect of the project. To accomplish this I learned how to change the firmware of the USB serial converter microcontroller. The process was very complicated as it involved multiple software programs and manual flashing of pins on the

  3. Life Testing of the Vapor Compression Distillation/Urine Processing Assembly (VCD/UPA) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (1993 to 1997)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, P.; Hutchens, C.; Long, D.; Salyer, B.

    1998-01-01

    Wastewater and urine generated on the International Space Station will be processed to recover pure water using vapor compression distillation (VCD). To verify the long-term reliability and performance of the VCD Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), life testing was performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from January 1993 to April 1996. Two UPA'S, the VCD-5 and VCD-5A, were tested for 204 days and 665 days, respectively. The compressor gears and the distillation centrifuge drive belt were found to have operating lives of approximately 4,800 hours, equivalent to 3.9 years of operation on ISS for a crew of three at an average processing rate of 1.76 kg/h (3.97 lb/h). Precise alignment of the flex-splines of the fluids and purge pump motor drives is essential to avoid premature failure after about 400 hours of operation. Results indicate that, with some design and procedural modifications and suitable quality control, the required performance and operational life can be met with the VCD/UPA.

  4. Sunspot: A program to model the behavior of hypervelocity impact damaged multilayer insulation in the Sunspot thermal vacuum chamber of Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, W. K.; Hayashida, K. B.

    1992-01-01

    The development of a computer program to predict the degradation of the insulating capabilities of the multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket of Space Station Freedom due to a hypervelocity impact with a space debris particle is described. A finite difference scheme is used for the calculations. The computer program was written in Microsoft BASIC. Also described is a test program that was undertaken to validate the numerical model. Twelve MLI specimens were impacted at hypervelocities with simulated debris particles using a light gas gun at Marshall Space Flight Center. The impact-damaged MLI specimens were then tested for insulating capability in the space environment of the Sunspot thermal vacuum chamber at MSFC. Two undamaged MLI specimens were also tested for comparison with the test results of the damaged specimens. The numerical model was found to adequately predict behavior of the MLI specimens in the Sunspot chamber. A parameter, called diameter ratio, was developed to relate the nominal MLI impact damage to the apparent (for thermal analysis purposes) impact damage based on the hypervelocity impact conditions of a specimen.

  5. 2002 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahl, Joseph M.; Heyward, Ann O.; Montegani, Francis J.

    2003-01-01

    While several objectives are served with this program, the central mechanism involved is the conduct of research assignments by faculty in direct support of NASA programs. In general, the results of the research will be assimilated by NASA program managers into an overall effort and will ultimately find their way into the literature. Occasionally, specific assignments result directly in reports for publication or conference presentation. Taken as a body, the assignments represent a large intellectual contribution by the academic community to NASA programs. It is appropriate therefore to summarize the research that was accomplished. The remainder of this report consists of research summaries arranged alphabetically by participant name. For each summary, the faculty fellow is briefly identified and the assignment prepared by the GRC host organization is given. This is followed by a brief narrative, prepared by the fellow, of the research performed. Narratives provided by the accompanying students immediately follow the narratives of their professors.

  6. Overview of Active Flow Control Actuator Development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Hepner, Timothy E.; Jones, Gregory S.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the actuator development work that is currently underway at NASA Langley Research Center in the context of some of the Active Flow Control research being conducted at NASA Langley. The actuator development effort has provided a focused, centralized location for this work within NASA Langley. The multidisciplinary team approach utilized in this effort has allowed input from multiple disciplines on how various actuator challenges can be addressed and has lead to some unique approaches in actuation.

  7. NASA Glenn Research Center's Fuel Cell Stack, Ancillary and System Test and Development Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyselle, Patricia L.; Prokopius, Kevin P.; Becks, Larry A.; Burger, Thomas H.; Dick, Joseph F.; Rodriguez, George; Bremenour, Frank; Long, Zedock

    2011-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a fully operational fuel cell test and evaluation laboratory is available which is capable of evaluating fuel cell components and systems for future NASA missions. Components and subsystems of various types can be operated and monitored under a variety of conditions utilizing different reactants. This fuel cell facility can test the effectiveness of various component and system designs to meet NASA's needs.

  8. 14 CFR 1206.402 - Documents available for inspection at NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... documents: (1) 5 U.S.C. 552; (2) Title 14 CFR Chapter V, and Title 41 CFR Chapter 18, and material published... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Documents available for inspection at NASA... Agency Records § 1206.402 Documents available for inspection at NASA Information Centers. (a) Each...

  9. 14 CFR 1206.402 - Documents available for inspection at NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... documents: (1) 5 U.S.C. 552; (2) Title 14 CFR Chapter V, and Title 41 CFR Chapter 18, and material published... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Documents available for inspection at NASA... Agency Records § 1206.402 Documents available for inspection at NASA Information Centers. (a) Each...

  10. 14 CFR § 1206.402 - Documents available for inspection at NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... documents: (1) 5 U.S.C. 552; (2) Title 14 CFR Chapter V, and Title 41 CFR Chapter 18, and material published... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Documents available for inspection at NASA... Agency Records § 1206.402 Documents available for inspection at NASA Information Centers. (a) Each...

  11. 14 CFR 1206.402 - Documents available for inspection at NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... documents: (1) 5 U.S.C. 552; (2) Title 14 CFR Chapter V, and Title 41 CFR Chapter 18, and material published... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Documents available for inspection at NASA... Agency Records § 1206.402 Documents available for inspection at NASA Information Centers. (a) Each...

  12. Selected Topics in Overset Technology Development and Applications At NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview of overset technology development and applications at NASA Ames Research Center. The topics include: 1) Overview of overset activities at NASA Ames; 2) Recent developments in Chimera Grid Tools; 3) A general framework for multiple component dynamics; 4) A general script module for automating liquid rocket sub-systems simulations; and 5) Critical future work.

  13. NASA Headquarters/Kennedy Space Center: Organization and Small Spacecraft Launch Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sierra, Albert; Beddel, Darren

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELV) Program are to provide safe, reliable, cost effective ELV launches, maximize customer satisfaction, and perform advanced payload processing capability development. Details are given on the ELV program organization, products and services, foreign launch vehicle policy, how to get a NASA launch service, and some of the recent NASA payloads.

  14. Sun-Earth Day WEBCAST - NASA TV; Host Paul Mortfield, Astronomer Stanford Solar Center and visiting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sun-Earth Day WEBCAST - NASA TV; Host Paul Mortfield, Astronomer Stanford Solar Center and visiting students from San Francisco Bay Area Schools Documentation Technology Branch Video communications van (code-JIT)

  15. Overview of Engineering Design and Analysis at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congiardo, Jared; Junell, Justin; Kirkpatrick, Richard; Ryan, Harry

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a general overview of the design and analysis division of NASA John C. Stennis Space Center. This division develops and maintains propulsion test systems and facilities for engineering competencies.

  16. Space Day 2002; Directors Breakfast @ NASA Ames Visitors Center for student Winners of Santa Clara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Space Day 2002; Directors Breakfast @ NASA Ames Visitors Center for student Winners of Santa Clara Valley Science & Engineering Fair and San Francisco Bay Aera Science Fair (Students are addressed by Bob Rosen, Ames Associate Director for Aerospace Programs)

  17. HOME AND HOME CONFERENCE EVENT WITH NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER AND THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    HOME AND HOME CONFERENCE EVENT WITH NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER AND THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION WITH LOCAL INDUSTRIES AND ASSOCIATION / GROUP SHOT - LEFT TO RIGHT - CATERERS / DON CAMPBELL / CHRIS TITRAN

  18. Mechanical design of NASA Ames Research Center vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelbert, D. F.; Bakke, A. P.; Chargin, M. K.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    NASA has designed and is constructing a new flight simulator with large vertical travel. Several aspects of the mechanical design of this Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) are discussed, including the multiple rack and pinion vertical drive, a pneumatic equilibration system, and the friction-damped rigid link catenaries used as cable supports.

  19. Solid State Technology Branch of NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A collection of papers written by the members of the Solid State Technology Branch of NASA LeRC from Jun. 1991 - Jun. 1992 is presented. A range of topics relating to superconductivity, Monolithic Microwave Circuits (MMIC's), coplanar waveguides, and material characterization is covered.

  20. Advanced launch vehicle propulsion at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    Several programs are investigating the benefits of advanced propellant and propulsion systems for future launch vehicles and upper stages. The two major research areas are the Metallized Propellants Program and the Advanced Concepts Program. Both of these programs have theoretical and experimental studies underway to determine the system-level performance effects of these propellants on future NASA vehicles.

  1. Current Level of Mission Control Automation at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maks, Lori; Breed, Julie; Rackley, Michael; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA is particularly concerned with reducing mission operations costs through increased automation. This paper examines the operations procedures within NASA Mission Control Centers in order to uncover the level of automation that currently exists within them. Based on an assessment of mission operations procedures within three representative control centers, this paper recommends specific areas where there is potential for mission cost reduction through increased automation.

  2. NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William; McNamara, Heather

    2004-01-01

    The Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has recently been formed within the Engineering Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. With agency-wide responsibility for defining the meteoroid environments for spacecraft engineering operations purposes, the MEO will distribute a state-of-the-art sporadic meteoroid model as well as meteor shower forecasts for spacecraft operators. To improve these models and forecasts, the MEO will manage an observation and research program. Office responsibilities, products, and plans will be discussed in this paper. The MEO is sponsored by the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance at NASA Headquarters.

  3. Dr. von Braun, Governor Wallace and NASA Administrator Webb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    In this photograph are Alabama Governor George Wallace (left), Marshall Space Flight Center Dr. Wernher von Braun (Center) and NASA Administrator James Webb (right). Governor Wallace and Dr. Webb were at MSFC to witness the first test firing of a Saturn V Booster, along with members of the Alabama legislature and press reporters.

  4. Successes of Small Business Innovation Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Bitler, Dean W.; Prok, George M.; Metzger, Marie E.; Dreibelbis, Cindy L.; Ganss, Meghan

    2002-01-01

    This booklet of success stories highlights the NASA Glenn Research Center's accomplishments and successes by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs. These success stories are the results of selecting projects that support NASA missions and also have high commercialization potential. Each success story describes the innovation accomplished, commercialization of the technology, and further applications and usages. This booklet emphasizes the integration and incorporation of technologies into NASA missions and other government projects. The company name and the NASA contact person are identified to encourage further usage and application of the SBIR developed technologies and also to promote further commercialization of these products.

  5. The NASA Lewis Research Center SBIR program: An assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, Hubert H.; Metzger, Marie E.; Kim, Walter S.

    1993-01-01

    An assessment was made of the NASA Lewis Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program for the years 1983 to 1989. The assessment was based on the study of 99 Phase 1 contracts and 39 Phase 2 contracts. The overall impact of SBIR was found to be very positive, contributing strongly to many NASA programs. In addition, many successful efforts were commercialized benefiting the small business, federal agencies, and the aerospace industry. The program was evaluated in terms of contract quality, innovativeness, comparison to the state-of-the-art, achievement of goals, difficulty, and impact. Program difficulties were also identified, which could suggest possible program improvements. Much of the information gained in this assessment provided a basis for a SBIR data base which will be updated every year. This data base is computerized and will provide an excellent source of information about past SBIR efforts and company capabilities.

  6. NASA Glenn Research Center Electrochemistry Branch Battery Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation covers an overview of NASA Glenn s history and heritage in the development of electrochemical systems for aerospace applications. Specific areas of focus are Li-ion batteries and their development for future Exploration missions. Current component development efforts for high energy and ultra high energy Li-ion batteries are addressed. Electrochemical systems are critical to the success of Exploration, Science and Space Operations missions. NASA Glenn has a long, successful heritage with batteries and fuel cells for aerospace applications. GRC Battery capabilities and expertise span basic research through flight hardware development and implementation. There is a great deal of synergy between energy storage system needs for aerospace and terrestrial applications.

  7. New developments at the NASA Astronomical Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The need for a compilation catalog containing a large variety of astronomical data for the Astronomical Data Base of NASA is considered. It is suggested that the catalog should be prepared directly from the SIMBAD data base by processing through a single software program and made available for distribution on magnetic tape or microfilm. Annual updating is recommended to ensure the quality of the catalog. Data recommended for inclusion in the compilation catalog are listed in a table.

  8. Analysis and Assessment of Peak Lightning Current Probabilities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Vaughan, W. W.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum presents a summary by the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch at the Marshall Space Flight Center of lightning characteristics and lightning criteria for the protection of aerospace vehicles. Probability estimates are included for certain lightning strikes (peak currents of 200, 100, and 50 kA) applicable to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during rollout, on-pad, and boost/launch phases. Results of an extensive literature search to compile information on this subject are presented in order to answer key questions posed by the Space Shuttle Program Office at the Johnson Space Center concerning peak lightning current probabilities if a vehicle is hit by a lightning cloud-to-ground stroke. Vehicle-triggered lightning probability estimates for the aforementioned peak currents are still being worked. Section 4.5, however, does provide some insight on estimating these same peaks.

  9. 9. AERIAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT THE GEORGE C. MARSHALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. AERIAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT THE GEORGE C. MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER. DODD ROAD RUNS DOWN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTO. THE EAST TEST AREA IS TOWARDS THE BOTTOM OF THE PHOTO, FABRICATION, ENGINEERING AND ADMINISTRATION NEAR THE TOP OF THE PHOTO. 1961, MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. NASA's Commercial Space Centers: Bringing Together Government and Industry for "Out of this World" Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. Keith; Henderson, Robin N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is making significant effort to accommodate commercial research in the utilization plans of the International Space Station (ISS)[1]. NASA is providing 30% of the research accommodations in the ISS laboratory modules to support commercial endeavors. However, the availability of resources alone does not necessarily translate into significant private sector participation in NASA's ISS utilization plans. Due to the efforts of NASA's Commercial Space Centers (CSC's), NASA has developed a very robust plan for involving the private sector in ISS utilization activities. Obtaining participation from the private sector requires a demonstrated capability for obtaining commercially significant research results. Since 1985, NASA CSC's have conducted over 200 commercial research activities aboard parabolic aircraft, sounding rockets, the Space Shuttle, and the ISS. The success of these activities has developed substantial investment from private sector companies in commercial space research.

  11. Development of a High Resolution Weather Forecast Model for Mesoamerica Using the NASA Ames Code I Private Cloud Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew; Case, Jonathan; Venner, Jason; Moreno-Madrinan, Max J.; Delgado, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Two projects at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have collaborated to develop a high resolution weather forecast model for Mesoamerica: The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, which integrates unique NASA satellite and weather forecast modeling capabilities into the operational weather forecasting community. NASA's SERVIR Program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data, and forecast models to improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas.

  12. Materials research and applications at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1987-01-01

    The facilities and instruments of the Lewis Research Center specialized for materials research are discussed. The main objectives of the Center are to provide R & D relevant to main propulsion plants and auxiliary power systems for aeronautics, space, and energy conversion applications. The Center is concerned with microstructure-property relations and their effect on processing; intermetallic compounds and high temperature metal matrix composites; ceramics with improved reliability for use in heat engines; polymer matrix composites for aerospace applcations; understanding the high temperature corrosive attack in the hostile environments of aircraft, rockets, and other heat engines; high temperature lubrication and wear; and microgravity materials research. The various types of schemes and techniques, provided by the Center, for analyzing data are described.

  13. NASA TEERM Principal Center Non-Chrome Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) Principal Center Mission is to identify and validate environmental technologies through joint activities that enhance mission readiness and reduce risk while minimizing duplication and associated costs.

  14. NASA Lewis Research Center's Program on Icing Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Shaw, R. J.; Olsen, W. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The helicopter and general aviation, light transport, and commercial transport aircraft share common icing requirements: highly effective, lightweight, low power consuming deicing systems, and detailed knowledge of the aeropenalties due to ice on aircraft surfaces. To meet current and future needs, NASA has a broadbased icing research program which covers both research and engineering applications, and is well coordinated with the FAA, DOD, universities, industry, and some foreign governments. Research activity in ice protection systems, icing instrumentation, experimental methods, analytical modeling, and in-flight research are described.

  15. Structural Health Monitoring Sensor Development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Wu, M. C.; Allison, S. G.; DeHaven, S. L.; Ghoshal, A.

    2002-01-01

    NASA is applying considerable effort on the development of sensor technology for structural health monitoring (SHM). This research is targeted toward increasing the safety and reliability of aerospace vehicles, while reducing operating and maintenance costs. Research programs are focused on applications to both aircraft and space vehicles. Sensor technologies under development span a wide range including fiber-optic sensing, active and passive acoustic sensors, electromagnetic sensors, wireless sensing systems, MEMS, and nanosensors. Because of their numerous advantages for aerospace applications, fiber-optic sensors are one of the leading candidates and are the major focus of this presentation. In addition, recent advances in active and passive acoustic sensing will also be discussed.

  16. Engine component instrumentation development facility at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; Buggele, Alvin E.; Lepicovsky, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The Engine Components Instrumentation Development Facility at NASA Lewis is a unique aeronautics facility dedicated to the development of innovative instrumentation for turbine engine component testing. Containing two separate wind tunnels, the facility is capable of simulating many flow conditions found in most turbine engine components. This facility's broad range of capabilities as well as its versatility provide an excellent location for the development of novel testing techniques. These capabilities thus allow a more efficient use of larger and more complex engine component test facilities.

  17. Photographer: NASA Administrators Award for: 1. 'Turning Goals into Reality' presented to Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Photographer: NASA Administrators Award for: 1. 'Turning Goals into Reality' presented to Center TRACON Automation System Team, Langley Research Center October 9, 1998 2. 'Turning Goals into Reality 1998 Goal Award for Excetptional Progress toward Next-Generation Design Tools and Experimental Aircraft acrylic

  18. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for utilization of local planetary resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar; Lewis, John S.

    1990-01-01

    The University of Arizona and NASA have joined to form the UA/NASA Space Engineering Research Center. The purpose of the Center is to discover, characterize, extract, process, and fabricate useful products from the extraterrestrial resources available in the inner solar system (the moon, Mars, and nearby asteroids). Individual progress reports covering the center's research projects are presented and emphasis is placed on the following topics: propellant production, oxygen production, ilmenite, lunar resources, asteroid resources, Mars resources, space-based materials processing, extraterrestrial construction materials processing, resource discovery and characterization, mission planning, and resource utilization.

  19. The feasibility of a unified role for NASA regional dissemination centers and technology application teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Insights and recommendations arising from a study of the feasibility of combining the NASA Regional Dissemination Center (RDC) and Technology Application Team (Tateam) roles to form Regional Application Centers (RADC's) are presented. The apparent convergence of the functions of RDC's and Tateams is demonstrated and strongly supportive of the primary recommendation that an applications function be added to those already being performed by the RDC's. The basis of a national network for technology transfer and public and private sector problem solving is shown to exist, the skeleton of which is an interactive network of Regional Application Centers and NASA Field Centers. The feasibility of developing and extending this network is considered and the detailed ramifications of so doing are discussed and the imperatives emphasized. It is hypothesized that such a national network could become relatively independent of NASA funding within five years.

  20. Active Control Technology at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antcliff, Richard R.; McGowan, Anna-Marie R.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Langley has a long history of attacking important technical Opportunities from a broad base of supporting disciplines. The research and development at Langley in this subject area range from the test tube to the test flight, The information covered here will range from the development of innovative new materials, sensors and actuators, to the incorporation of smart sensors and actuators in practical devices, to the optimization of the location of these devices, to, finally, a wide variety of applications of these devices utilizing Langley's facilities and expertise. Advanced materials are being developed for sensors and actuators, as well as polymers for integrating smart devices into composite structures. Contributions reside in three key areas: computational materials; advanced piezoelectric materials; and integrated composite structures.

  1. NASA Johnson Space Center: Mini AERCam Testing with GSS6560

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cryant, Scott P.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the testing of the Miniature Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (Mini AERCam) with the GPS/SBAS simulation system, GSS6560. There is a listing of several GPS based programs at NASA Johnson, including the testing of Shuttle testing of the GPS system. Including information about Space Integrated GPS/INS (SIGI) testing. There is also information about the standalone ISS SIGI test,and testing of the SIGI for the Crew Return Vehicle. The Mini AERCam is a small, free-flying camera for remote inspections of the ISS, it uses precise relative navigation with differential carrier phase GPS to provide situational awareness to operators. The closed loop orbital testing with and without the use of the GSS6550 system of the Mini AERCam system is reviewed.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is beginning to play a major role in the aircraft industry of the United States because of the realization that CFD can be a new and effective design tool and thus could provide a company with a competitive advantage. It is also playing a significant role in research institutions, both governmental and academic, as a tool for researching new fluid physics, as well as supplementing and complementing experimental testing. In this presentation, some of the progress made to date in CFD at NASA Ames will be reviewed. The presentation addresses the status of CFD in terms of methods, examples of CFD solutions, and computer technology. In addition, the role CFD will play in supporting the revolutionary goals set forth by the Aeronautical Policy Review Committee established by the Office of Science and Technology Policy is noted. The need for validated CFD tools is also briefly discussed.

  3. NASA Langley Research Center's distributed mass storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, Juliet Z.; Humes, D. Creig

    1993-01-01

    There is a trend in institutions with high performance computing and data management requirements to explore mass storage systems with peripherals directly attached to a high speed network. The Distributed Mass Storage System (DMSS) Project at NASA LaRC is building such a system and expects to put it into production use by the end of 1993. This paper presents the design of the DMSS, some experiences in its development and use, and a performance analysis of its capabilities. The special features of this system are: (1) workstation class file servers running UniTree software; (2) third party I/O; (3) HIPPI network; (4) HIPPI/IPI3 disk array systems; (5) Storage Technology Corporation (STK) ACS 4400 automatic cartridge system; (6) CRAY Research Incorporated (CRI) CRAY Y-MP and CRAY-2 clients; (7) file server redundancy provision; and (8) a transition mechanism from the existent mass storage system to the DMSS.

  4. Scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Walatka, Pamela P.; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The visualization methods used in computational fluid dynamics research at the NASA-Ames Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation facility are examined, including postprocessing, tracking, and steering methods. The visualization requirements of the facility's three-dimensional graphical workstation are outlined and the types hardware and software used to meet these requirements are discussed. The main features of the facility's current and next-generation workstations are listed. Emphasis is given to postprocessing techniques, such as dynamic interactive viewing on the workstation and recording and playback on videodisk, tape, and 16-mm film. Postprocessing software packages are described, including a three-dimensional plotter, a surface modeler, a graphical animation system, a flow analysis software toolkit, and a real-time interactive particle-tracer.

  5. Regional-Scale Modeling at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Adler, R.; Baker, D.; Braun, S.; Chou, M.-D.; Jasinski, M. F.; Jia, Y.; Kakar, R.; Karyampudi, M.; Lang, S.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Goddard Mesoscale Modeling and Dynamics Group has used a popular regional scale model, MM5, to study precipitation processes. Our group is making contributions to the MM5 by incorporating the following physical and numerical packages: improved Goddard cloud processes, a land processes model (Parameterization for Land-Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange - PLACE), efficient but sophisticated radiative processes, conservation of hydrometeor mass (water budget), four-dimensional data assimilation for rainfall, and better computational methods for trace gas transport. At NASA Goddard, the MM5 has been used to study: (1) the impact of initial conditions, assimilation of satellite-derived rainfall, and cumulus parameterizations on rapidly intensifying oceanic cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons, (2) the dynamic and thermodynamic processes associated with the development of narrow cold frontal rainbands, (3) regional climate and water cycles, (4) the impact of vertical transport by clouds and lightning on trace gas distributiodproduction associated with South and North American mesoscale convective systems, (5) the development of a westerly wind burst (WWB) that occurred during the TOGA COARE and the diurnal variation of precipitation in the tropics, (6) a Florida sea breeze convective event and a Mid-US flood event using a sophisticated land surface model, (7) the influence of soil heterogeneity on land surface energy balance in the southwest GCIP region, (8) explicit simulations (with 1.33 to 4 km horizontal resolution) of hurricanes Bob (1991) and Bonnie (1998), (9) a heavy precipitation event over Taiwan, and (10) to make real time forecasts for a major NASA field program. In this paper, the modifications and simulated cases will be described and discussed.

  6. Seals Related Research at NASA. Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    Some current efforts in seal research at the Lewis Research Center include self-sealing linear segmented ceramic configurations, the T700 brush seal engine test, flow and duration characteristics of brush seals and other configurations, cryogenic hydrogen brush seal tests, and a brush seal tester. Information is given in diagram and graphs for a labyrinth seal and a straight cylindrical seal.

  7. NASA Finds Heavy Rainfall in Tropical Depression 8's Center

    NASA Video Gallery

    The core of newborn Tropical Depression 8 contained heavy rainfall. On Aug. 28, 2016 at 11 a.m. EDT GPM saw rainfall rates over 4.9 inches (124.8 mm) per hour in a few storms in the center of Tropi...

  8. NASA. Lewis Research Center materials research and technology: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Division at the Lewis Research Center has a long record of contributions to both materials and process technology as well as to the understanding of key high-temperature phenomena. This paper overviews the division staff, facilities, past history, recent progress, and future interests.

  9. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  10. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  11. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  12. Faces of Marshall: Sam Ortega

    NASA Video Gallery

    Several Marshall employees were interviewed as part of Marshall's 50th Anniversary activities. Engineer Sam Ortega tells his story of how he came to work as an engineer at Marshall and how sewing a...

  13. Marshall Team Complete Testing for Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swofford, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Huu Trinh and his team with the Propulsion Systems and Test Departments at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. successfully complete a simulated cold-flow test series on the propulsion system used for the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft. NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., is leading NASA s work on the development of the LADEE spacecraft, and the Marshall center is the program office for the project. The spacecraft, scheduled for launch this fall, will orbit the Moon and gather information about the lunar atmosphere, conditions near the surface of the Moon, and collect samples of lunar dust. A thorough understanding of these characteristics will address long-standing unknowns, and help scientists understand other planetary bodies as well. The test team at the Marshall center conducted the cold flow test to identify how the fluid flows through the propulsion system feed lines, especially during critical operation modes. The test data will be used to assist the LADEE team in identifying any potential flow issues in the propulsion system, and allow them to address and correct them in advance of the launch.

  14. A Unique RCM Application at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonagofski, James M.; Machala, Anthony C.; Smith, Anthony M.; Presley, Leroy L. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is known internationally as a center of excellence for its capabilities and achievements in the field of developmental aerodynamics. The Center has a variety of aerodynamic test facilities including the largest wind tunnel in the world (with 40 x 80 deg and 80 x 120 deg atmospheric test sections) and the 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel which is the subject of this paper. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. NASA Langley Teacher Resource Center (TRC): Brochure and Home Page Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogbill, Monet Leigh

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's Educational Programs Officer, Marchelle D. Canright, gave me two main assignments to be completed by the end of the ten-week LARSS Program. These assignments were to redesign the NASA Langley Teacher Research Center (TRC) brochure and create new home page templates for the TRC and Office of Education. I worked with NASA Education Specialist, Jane George and the TRC director Nick Koltun for instruction in copmleting these assignments. The main objective of my assigned projects was to create designs that reflected NASA's educational goals, related to the TRC, and the Office of Education's desire for high aesthetics in their multimedia materials. The Office of Education did not just want their current TRC brochure and home page to be reworked, but; they wanted these items to be strong visual representations of the TRC's purpose.

  16. NASA Langley Research Center Force and Strain Measurement Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.

    1999-01-01

    Direct measurements of forces and moments are some of the most important data acquired during aerodynamic testing. This paper deals with the force and strain measurement capabilities at the Langley Research Center (LaRC). It begins with a progressive history of LaRC force measurement developments beginning in the 1940's and ends with the center's current capabilities. Various types of force and moment transducers used at LaRC are discussed including six-component sting mounted balances, semi-span balances, hinge moment balances, flow-through balances, rotor balances, and many other unique transducers. Also discussed are some unique strain-gage applications, such as those used in extreme environments. The final topics deal with the LaRC's ability to perform custom calibrations and our current levels of effort in the area of force and strain measurement.

  17. Chemical Inventory Management at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Shirley S.; Homan, Joseph R.; Bajorek, Michael J.; Dominguez, Manuel B.; Smith, Vanessa L.

    1997-01-01

    The Chemical Management System (CMS) is a client/server application developed with Power Builder and Sybase for the Lewis Research Center (LeRC). Power Builder is a client-server application development tool, Sybase is a Relational Database Management System. The entire LeRC community can access the CMS from any desktop environment. The multiple functions and benefits of the CMS are addressed.

  18. Overview of Rocket Propulsion Testing at NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, S.; Gilbrech, R.; Lightfoot, R.; Dawson, M.

    1999-01-01

    THe recent nationwide thrust toward development of low-cost space transportation has precipitated a sharp increase in demand for subscale and full-scale propulsion test services. This paper highlights the unique capabilities of Stennis Space Center(SSC) to meet these demands, and summarizes several major propulsion test activities and other related milestone achievements during the 1999 calendar year. The current and projected list of SSC test projects heralds an even more vigorous, interesting, and challenging future in propulsion test.

  19. Dr. John Stack and other NASA Langley Research Center Visitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Front Row, left to right: Mrs. Elsa Hoare and Major Philip L. Teed - staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England: Dr. Barnes Wallis - Chief of Aeronautical Research, Vicers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge, England. Back Row, left to right: Norman W. Boorer and Cecil W. Hayes - Staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England; John R. Christie - Ministry of Supply, London, England; Philip A. Hufton - Chief Supt., Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedford, England; Lindsey I. Turner, Jr. - Langley Research Center. Photographed November 13, 1958.

  20. Reliability Practice at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruessner, Paula S.; Li, Ming

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes in brief the Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) Programs performed directly by the reliability branch at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The mission assurance requirements flow down is explained. GSFC practices for PRA, reliability prediction/fault tree analysis/reliability block diagram, FMEA, part stress and derating analysis, worst case analysis, trend analysis, limit life items are presented. Lessons learned are summarized and recommendations on improvement are identified.