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1

NASA Shuttle Logistics Depot (NSLD) - The application of ATE  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The concept of the NASA Shuttle Logistics Depot (NSLD) developed for the Space Shuttle Orbiter Program is described. The function of the NSLD at Cape Canaveral is to perform the acceptance and diagnostic testing of the Shuttle's space-rated line-replaceable units and shop-replaceable units (SRUs). The NSLD includes a comprehensive electronic automatic test station, program development stations, and assorted manufacturing support equipment (including thermal and vibration test equipment, special test equipment, and a card SRU test system). The depot activities also include the establishment of the functions for manufacturing of mechanical parts, soldering, welding, painting, clean room operation, procurement, and subcontract management.

Simpkins, Lorenz G.; Jenkins, Henry C.; Mauceri, A. Jack

1990-01-01

2

Space Shuttle operational logistics plan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center plan for logistics to support Space Shuttle Operations and to establish the related policies, requirements, and responsibilities are described. The Directorate of Shuttle Management and Operations logistics responsibilities required by the Kennedy Organizational Manual, and the self-sufficiency contracting concept are implemented. The Space Shuttle Program Level 1 and Level 2 logistics policies and requirements applicable to KSC that are presented in HQ NASA and Johnson Space Center directives are also implemented.

Botts, J. W.

1983-01-01

3

Continual Improvement in Shuttle Logistics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It has been said that Continual Improvement (CI) is difficult to apply to service oriented functions, especially in a government agency such as NASA. However, a constrained budget and increasing requirements are a way of life at NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), making it a natural environment for the application of CI tools and techniques. This paper describes how KSC, and specifically the Space Shuttle Logistics Project, a key contributor to KSC's mission, has embraced the CI management approach as a means of achieving its strategic goals and objectives. An overview of how the KSC Space Shuttle Logistics Project has structured its CI effort and examples of some of the initiatives are provided.

Flowers, Jean; Schafer, Loraine

1995-01-01

4

NASA revises shuttle schedule  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The new schedule for Space Shuttle missions and expendable launch vehicles (ELV's) calls for a 7-month delay in sending up the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA was forced to put off launching the telescope until February 1990 to keep the Magellan and Galileo missions within their narrow launch windows. The first post-Challenger shuttle launch is now scheduled for late this month. Discovery's most recent delays were due to a hydrogen leak discovered July 29 that has still not been corrected and an engine valve malfunction during an August 4 test fire.

Wainger, Lisa A.

5

NASA Space Rocket Logistics Challenges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Launch System (SLS) is the new NASA heavy lift launch vehicle in development and is scheduled for its first mission in 2017. SLS has many of the same logistics challenges as any other large scale program. However, SLS also faces unique challenges. This presentation will address the SLS challenges, along with the analysis and decisions to mitigate the threats posed by each.

Bramon, Chris; Neeley, James R.; Jones, James V.; Watson, Michael D.; Inman, Sharon K.; Tuttle, Loraine

2014-01-01

6

NASA Space Rocket Logistics Challenges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Launch System (SLS) is the new NASA heavy lift launch vehicle and is scheduled for its first mission in 2017. The goal of the first mission, which will be uncrewed, is to demonstrate the integrated system performance of the SLS rocket and spacecraft before a crewed flight in 2021. SLS has many of the same logistics challenges as any other large scale program. Common logistics concerns for SLS include integration of discreet programs geographically separated, multiple prime contractors with distinct and different goals, schedule pressures and funding constraints. However, SLS also faces unique challenges. The new program is a confluence of new hardware and heritage, with heritage hardware constituting seventy-five percent of the program. This unique approach to design makes logistics concerns such as commonality especially problematic. Additionally, a very low manifest rate of one flight every four years makes logistics comparatively expensive. That, along with the SLS architecture being developed using a block upgrade evolutionary approach, exacerbates long-range planning for supportability considerations. These common and unique logistics challenges must be clearly identified and tackled to allow SLS to have a successful program. This paper will address the common and unique challenges facing the SLS programs, along with the analysis and decisions the NASA Logistics engineers are making to mitigate the threats posed by each.

Neeley, James R.; Jones, James V.; Watson, Michael D.; Bramon, Christopher J.; Inman, Sharon K.; Tuttle, Loraine

2014-01-01

7

Logistics Lessons Learned in NASA Space Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Vision for Space Exploration sets out a number of goals, involving both strategic and tactical objectives. These include returning the Space Shuttle to flight, completing the International Space Station, and conducting human expeditions to the Moon by 2020. Each of these goals has profound logistics implications. In the consideration of these objectives,a need for a study on NASA logistics lessons learned was recognized. The study endeavors to identify both needs for space exploration and challenges in the development of past logistics architectures, as well as in the design of space systems. This study may also be appropriately applied as guidance in the development of an integrated logistics architecture for future human missions to the Moon and Mars. This report first summarizes current logistics practices for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and the International Space Station (ISS) and examines the practices of manifesting, stowage, inventory tracking, waste disposal, and return logistics. The key findings of this examination are that while the current practices do have many positive aspects, there are also several shortcomings. These shortcomings include a high-level of excess complexity, redundancy of information/lack of a common database, and a large human-in-the-loop component. Later sections of this report describe the methodology and results of our work to systematically gather logistics lessons learned from past and current human spaceflight programs as well as validating these lessons through a survey of the opinions of current space logisticians. To consider the perspectives on logistics lessons, we searched several sources within NASA, including organizations with direct and indirect connections with the system flow in mission planning. We utilized crew debriefs, the John Commonsense lessons repository for the JSC Mission Operations Directorate, and the Skylab Lessons Learned. Additionally, we searched the public version of the Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS) and verified that we received the same result using the internal version of LLIS for our logistics lesson searches. In conducting the research, information from multiple databases was consolidated into a single spreadsheet of 300 lessons learned. Keywords were applied for the purpose of sorting and evaluation. Once the lessons had been compiled, an analysis of the resulting data was performed, first sorting it by keyword, then finding duplication and root cause, and finally sorting by root cause. The data was then distilled into the top 7 lessons learned across programs, centers, and activities.

Evans, William A.; DeWeck, Olivier; Laufer, Deanna; Shull, Sarah

2006-01-01

8

NASA Space Exploration Logistics Workshop Proceedings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As NASA has embarked on a new Vision for Space Exploration, there is new energy and focus around the area of manned space exploration. These activities encompass the design of new vehicles such as the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and the identification of commercial opportunities for space transportation services, as well as continued operations of the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. Reaching the Moon and eventually Mars with a mix of both robotic and human explorers for short term missions is a formidable challenge in itself. How to achieve this in a safe, efficient and long-term sustainable way is yet another question. The challenge is not only one of vehicle design, launch, and operations but also one of space logistics. Oftentimes, logistical issues are not given enough consideration upfront, in relation to the large share of operating budgets they consume. In this context, a group of 54 experts in space logistics met for a two-day workshop to discuss the following key questions: 1. What is the current state-of the art in space logistics, in terms of architectures, concepts, technologies as well as enabling processes? 2. What are the main challenges for space logistics for future human exploration of the Moon and Mars, at the intersection of engineering and space operations? 3. What lessons can be drawn from past successes and failures in human space flight logistics? 4. What lessons and connections do we see from terrestrial analogies as well as activities in other areas, such as U.S. military logistics? 5. What key advances are required to enable long-term success in the context of a future interplanetary supply chain? These proceedings summarize the outcomes of the workshop, reference particular presentations, panels and breakout sessions, and record specific observations that should help guide future efforts.

deWeek, Oliver; Evans, William A.; Parrish, Joe; James, Sarah

2006-01-01

9

NASA/CP--2006214202 NASA Space Exploration Logistics Workshop  

E-print Network

NASA/CP--2006­214202 NASA Space Exploration Logistics Workshop Proceedings January 17-18, 2006 Washington, DC April 2006 #12;NASA STI Program ... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA scientific and technical information (STI) program

de Weck, Olivier L.

10

NASA nixes Centaur launches from shuttle  

Microsoft Academic Search

James C. Fletcher, the administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announced on June 19, 1986, that because of safety considerations, the space shuttle will not be used to launch the Centaur Upper Stage. The Ulysses and Galileo missions, which were originally to have been launched in May 1986, would have been launched from the shuttle with the

Judith A. Katzoff

1986-01-01

11

NESTA: NASA Engineering Shuttle Telemetry Agent  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Spaceport Processing Systems Branch at NASA Kennedy Space Center has developed and deployed an agent based tool to monitor the Space Shuttle's ground processing telemetry stream. The application, the NASA Engineering Shuttle Telemetry Agent, increases situational awareness for system and hardware engineers during ground processing of the Shuttle's subsystems. The agent provides autonomous monitoring of the telemetry stream and automatically alerts system engineers when predefined criteria have been met. Efficiency and safety are improved through increased automation. Sandia National Labs' Java Expert System Shell is employed as the rule engine. The shell's predicate logic lends itself well to capturing the heuristics and specifying the engineering rules of this spaceport domain. The declarative paradigm of the rule-based agent yields a highly modular and scalable design spanning multiple subsystems of the Shuttle. Several hundred monitoring rules have been written thus far with corresponding notifications sent to Shuttle engineers. This paper discusses the rule-based telemetry agent used for Space Shuttle ground processing and explains the problem domain, development of the agent software, benefits of AT technology, and deployment and sustaining engineering of the product.

Semmel, Glenn S.; Davis, Steven R.; Leucht, Kurt W.; Rowe, Dan A.; Smith, Kevin E.; Boloni, Ladislau

2005-01-01

12

Holography on the NASA Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SL-3 flight on the Space Shuttle will carry a 25 mW He-Ne laser holographic recorder for recording the solution growth of triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals under low-zero gravity conditions. Three hundred holograms (two orthogonal views) will be taken (on SO-253 film) of each growth experiment. Processing and analysis (i.e., reconstructed imagery, holographic schlieren, reverse reference beam microscopy, and stored beam interferometry) of the holographic records will be done at NASA/MSFC. Other uses of the recorder on the Shuttle have been proposed.

Wuerker, R. F.; Heflinger, L. O.; Flannery, J. V.; Kassel, A.; Rollauer, A. M.

1980-01-01

13

NASA study backs SSTO, urges shuttle phaseout  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A brief discusion of a Congressionally ordered NASA study on how to meet future US Government space launch needs is presented. Three options were examined: (1) improvement ofthe Space Shuttle; (2) development of expendable launch vehicles (ELVs); and (3) development of a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), manned vehicle that is reusable with advanced technology. After examining the three options, it was determined that the most economical approach to space access through the year 2030 would be to develop the SSTO vehicle and phase out Space Shuttle operations within 15 years and ELVs within 20 years. Other aspects of the study's findings are briefly covered.

Asker, James R.

1994-03-01

14

NASA newsletters for the Weber Student Shuttle Involvement Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Biweekly reports generated for the Weber Student Shuttle Involvement Project (SSIP) are discussed. The reports document the evolution of science, hardware, and logistics for this Shuttle project aboard the eleventh flight of the Space Transportation System (STS-41B), launched from Kennedy Space Center on February 3, 1984, and returned to KSC 8 days later. The reports were intended to keep all members of the team aware of progress in the project and to avoid redundancy and misunderstanding. Since the Weber SSIP was NASA's first orbital rat project, documentation of all actions was essential to assure the success of this complex project. Eleven reports were generated: October 3, 17 and 31; November 14 and 28; and December 12 and 17, 1983; and January 3, 16, and 23; and May 1, 1984. A subject index of the reports is included. The final report of the project is included as an appendix.

Morey-Holton, E. R.; Sebesta, P. D.; Ladwig, A. M.; Jackson, J. T.; Knott, W. M., III

1988-01-01

15

NASA's Original Shuttle Carrier Departs Dryden - Duration: 1:24.  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA's Space Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) No. 905, departed NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Oct. 24, 2012 for the final time, ending a 38-year association with the NASA field center at Ed...

16

NASA/TP-2006-214203 Logistics Lessons Learned in NASA Space Flight  

E-print Network

NASA/TP-2006-214203 Logistics Lessons Learned in NASA Space Flight William A. (Andy) Evans, United 2006 #12;NASA STI Program ... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA scientific and technical information (STI) program plays a key part

de Weck, Olivier L.

17

NASA Now: Shuttle Engineering Challenge - Duration: 6:08.  

NASA Video Gallery

In this installment of NASA Now, youâ??ll meet Guidance, Navigation and Flight Controls engineer George Hatcher, who talks about the complex system needed to fly the space shuttle at extreme speeds...

18

NASA Contingency Shuttle Crew Support (CSCS) Medical Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The genesis of the space shuttle began in the 1930's when Eugene Sanger came up with the idea of a recyclable rocket plane that could carry a crew of people. The very first Shuttle to enter space was the Shuttle "Columbia" which launched on April 12 of 1981. Not only was "Columbia" the first Shuttle to be launched, but was also the first to utilize solid fuel rockets for U.S. manned flight. The primary objectives given to "Columbia" were to check out the overall Shuttle system, accomplish a safe ascent into orbit, and to return back to earth for a safe landing. Subsequent to its first flight Columbia flew 27 more missions but on February 1st, 2003 after a highly successful 16 day mission, the Columbia, STS-107 mission, ended in tragedy. With all Shuttle flight successes come failures such as the fatal in-flight accident of STS 107. As a result of the STS 107 accident, and other close-calls, the NASA Space Shuttle Program developed contingency procedures for a rescue mission by another Shuttle if an on-orbit repair was not possible. A rescue mission would be considered for a situation where a Shuttle and the crew were not in immediate danger, but, was unable to return to Earth or land safely. For Shuttle missions to the International Space Station (ISS), plans were developed so the Shuttle crew would remain on board ISS for an extended period of time until rescued by a "rescue" Shuttle. The damaged Shuttle would subsequently be de-orbited unmanned. During the period when the ISS Crew and Shuttle crew are on board simultaneously multiple issues would need to be worked including, but not limited to: crew diet, exercise, psychological support, workload, and ground contingency support

Adams, Adrien

2010-01-01

19

Monitoring Agents for Assisting NASA Engineers with Shuttle Ground Processing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Spaceport Processing Systems Branch at NASA Kennedy Space Center has designed, developed, and deployed a rule-based agent to monitor the Space Shuttle's ground processing telemetry stream. The NASA Engineering Shuttle Telemetry Agent increases situational awareness for system and hardware engineers during ground processing of the Shuttle's subsystems. The agent provides autonomous monitoring of the telemetry stream and automatically alerts system engineers when user defined conditions are satisfied. Efficiency and safety are improved through increased automation. Sandia National Labs' Java Expert System Shell is employed as the agent's rule engine. The shell's predicate logic lends itself well to capturing the heuristics and specifying the engineering rules within this domain. The declarative paradigm of the rule-based agent yields a highly modular and scalable design spanning multiple subsystems of the Shuttle. Several hundred monitoring rules have been written thus far with corresponding notifications sent to Shuttle engineers. This chapter discusses the rule-based telemetry agent used for Space Shuttle ground processing. We present the problem domain along with design and development considerations such as information modeling, knowledge capture, and the deployment of the product. We also present ongoing work with other condition monitoring agents.

Semmel, Glenn S.; Davis, Steven R.; Leucht, Kurt W.; Rowe, Danil A.; Smith, Kevin E.; Boeloeni, Ladislau

2005-01-01

20

Shuttle Spinoffs www.nasa.gov  

E-print Network

to the uncovered land mine, then ignited from a safe distance using a battery-triggered electric match and cars are kinder to the environment with NASA's high-performance, biodegradable lubricants developed

21

Power line based LAN on board the NASA Space Shuttle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Without exception, vehicles have a power distribution system based on metallic conductors of some type. It would be advantageous to make this power distribution network perform double-duty, as an infrastructure supporting both power delivery and broadband digital connectivity. We study the possibility of re-using existing power cables on board the NASA Orbiter (also knows as the Space Shuttle) for providing

Stefano Galli; Thomas Banwell; David Waring

2004-01-01

22

NASA's Implementation Plan for Space Shuttle Return to Flight and Beyond June 3, 2005  

E-print Network

#12;#12;NASA's Implementation Plan for Space Shuttle Return to Flight and Beyond June 3, 2005 NASA plan is available at www.nasa.gov #12;#12;NASA's Implementation Plan for Space Shuttle Return to Flight and Beyond June 3, 2005 Tenth Edition Summary June 3, 2005 This edition of NASA's Implementation Plan

23

NASA management of the Space Shuttle Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The management system and management technology described have been developed to meet stringent cost and schedule constraints of the Space Shuttle Program. Management of resources available to this program requires control and motivation of a large number of efficient creative personnel trained in various technical specialties. This must be done while keeping track of numerous parallel, yet interdependent activities involving different functions, organizations, and products all moving together in accordance with intricate plans for budgets, schedules, performance, and interaction. Some techniques developed to identify problems at an early stage and seek immediate solutions are examined.

Peters, F.

1975-01-01

24

New antenna feed revitalizes Space Shuttle tracker at NASA Edwards  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An account is given of the upgrading of a 12-ft-diameter single-channel monopulse tracking system, which had been relegated to slaved backup status at NASA Edwards, to support research flights for Ames Dryden Research Center and for tracking orbital passes of the Space Shuttle and Shuttle landings both at Edwards and at White Sands. The improved system is now a stand-alone telemetry tracking system. A new conical scanning feed (known as Radscan) replaces the single channel monopulse feed in the upgraded system. Where previously the system would not autotrack at elevation angles below 5 degrees, it now automatically acquires the Space Shuttle when it appears on the horizon and autotracks from approximately 2 degrees in elevation to touchdown, and does so virtually unattended.

Wrin, J. W.; Sullivan, A.

1984-01-01

25

NASA Advanced Explorations Systems: Concepts for Logistics to Living  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project strives to enable a largely mission-independent cradle-to-grave-to-cradle approach to minimize logistics contributions to total mission architecture mass. The goals are to engineer logistics materials, common crew consumables, and container configurations to meet the following five basic goals: 1. Minimize intrinsic logistics mass and improve ground logistics flexibility. 2. Allow logistics components to be directly repurposed for on-orbit non-logistics functions (e.g., crew cabin outfitting) thereby indirectly reducing mass/volume. 3. Compact and process logistics that have not been directly repurposed to generate useful on-orbit components and/or compounds (e.g., radiation shielding, propellant, other usable chemical constituents). 4. Enable long-term stable storage and disposal of logistics end products that cannot be reused or repurposed (e.g., compaction for volume reduction, odor control, and maintenance of crew cabin hygienic conditions). 5. Allow vehicles in different mission phases to share logistics resources. This paper addresses the work being done to meet the second goal, the direct repurposing of logistics components to meet other on-orbit needs, through a strategy termed Logistics to Living (L2L). L2L has several areas but can be defined as repurposing or converting logistical items (bags, containers, foam, components, etc.) into useful crew items or life support augmentation on-orbit after they have provided their primary logistics function. The intent is that by repurposing items, dedicated crew items do not have to be launched and overall launch mass is decreased. For non-LEO missions, the vehicle interior volume will be relatively fixed so L2L will enable this volume to be used more effectively through reuse and rearrangement of logistical components. Past work in the area of L2L has already conceptually developed several potential technologies [Howe, Howard 2010]. Several of the L2L concepts that have shown the most potential in the past are based on NASA cargo transfer bags (CTBs) or their equivalents which are currently used to transfer cargo to and from the ISS. A high percentage of all logistics supplies are packaging mass and for a 6-month mission a crew of four might need over 100 CTBs. These CTBs are used for on-orbit transfer and storage but eventually becomes waste after use since down mass is very limited. The work being done in L2L also considering innovative interior habitat construction that integrate the CTBs into the walls of future habitats. The direct integration could provide multiple functions: launch packaging, stowage, radiation protection, water processing, life support augmentation, as well as structure. Reuse of these CTBs would reduce the amount of waste generated and also significantly reduce future up mass requirements for exploration missions. Also discussed here is the L2L water wall , an innovative reuse of an unfolded CTB as a passive water treatment system utilizing forward osmosis. The bags have been modified to have an inner membrane liner that allows them to purify wastewater. They may also provide a structural water-wall element that can be used to provide radiation protection and as a structural divider. Integration of the components into vehicle/habitat architecture and consideration of operations concepts and human factors will be discussed. In the future these bags could be designed to treat wastewater, concentrated brines, and solid wastes, and to dewater solid wastes and produce a bio-stabilized construction element. This paper will describe the follow-on work done in design, fabrication and demonstrations of various L2L concepts, including advanced CTBs for reuse/repurposing, internal outfitting studies and the CTB-based forward osmosis water wall.

Shull, Sarah A.; Howe, A. Scott; Flynn, Michael T.; Howard, Robert

2012-01-01

26

NASA Shuttle Web: John Glenn Returns to Space  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

John Glenn, the first American in space, became the world's oldest astronaut when he returned to the stars yesterday, 36 years after his first flight on the nation's 123rd manned mission. At the NASA Shuttle Website for the mission, users can read about the crew, payloads, mission objectives, some of the experiments on aging and space involving Senator Glenn, and updates on the mission's current status. Realtime data offered at the site include telemetry, tracking displays, sightings, and orbital elements. The site also hosts several multimedia offerings such as preflight and launch videos (MPEG), animations (MPEG), Net Show broadcasts of NASA TV, photos, and RealPlayer audio broadcasts.

27

NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft 911's Final Flight - Duration: 1:35.  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA 911, one of NASA's two modified Boeing 747 space shuttle carrier aircraft, flew its final flight Feb. 8, a short hop from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base to the ...

28

NASA and ESA Ground Facility Simulations of Shuttle Orbiter Aerothermodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper reviews a combined numerical and experimental activity on the Shuttle Orbiter, first performed at NASA Langley within the OEX workshop and subsequently at ESA, as part of the AGARD FDP WG 18 activities. The study at Langley was undertaken to resolve the pitch up anomaly observed during the entry of the first flight of the Shuttle Orbiter. The facilities used at NASA Langley were the 15-in. Mach 6, the 20-in, Mach 6, the 31-in. Mach 10 and the 20-in. Mach 6 CF4 facility. The paper focuses on the high Mach, high altitude portion of the first entry of the Shuttle where the vehicle exhibited a nose-up pitching moment relative to pre-flight prediction of (Delta C(sub m)) = 0 03. In order to study the relative contribution of compressibility, viscous interaction and real gas effects on basic body pitching moment and flap efficiency, an experimental study was undertaken to examine the effects of Mach, Reynolds and ratio of specific heats at NASA. At high Mach, a decrease of gamma occurs in the shock layer due to high temperature effects. The primary effect of this lower specific heat ratio is a decrease of the pressure on the aft windward expansion surface of the Orbiter causing the nose-up pitching moment. Testing in the heavy gas, Mach 6 CF4 tunnel, gave a good simulation of high temperature effects.

Muylaert, J.; Rostand, P.; Rapuc, M.; Paulson, J.; Brauckmann, G.; Trockmorton, D.; Steijl, R.

1997-01-01

29

Formalizing New Navigation Requirements for NASA's Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We describe a recent NASA-sponsored pilot project intended to gauge the effectiveness of using formal methods in Space Shuttle software requirements analysis. Several Change Requests (CRs) were selected as promising targets to demonstrate the utility of formal methods in this demanding application domain. A CR to add new navigation capabilities to the Shuttle, based on Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, is the focus of this industrial usage report. Portions of the GPS CR were modeled using the language of SRI's Prototype Verification System (PVS). During a limited analysis conducted on the formal specifications, numerous requirements issues were discovered. We present a summary of these encouraging results and conclusions we have drawn from the pilot project.

DiVito, Ben L.

1996-01-01

30

NASA Flight Planning Branch Space Shuttle Lessons Learned  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Planning products and procedures that allowed the mission Flight Control Teams and the Astronaut crews to plan, train and fly every Space Shuttle mission were developed by the Flight Planning Branch at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. As the Space Shuttle Program came to a close, lessons learned were collected from each phase of the successful execution of these Space Shuttle missions. Specific examples of how roles and responsibilities of console positions that develop the crew and vehicle attitude timelines have been analyzed and will be discussed. Additionally, the relationships and procedural hurdles experienced through international collaboration have molded operations. These facets will be explored and related to current and future operations with the International Space Station and future vehicles. Along with these important aspects, the evolution of technology and continual improvement of data transfer tools between the Space Shuttle and ground team has also defined specific lessons used in improving the control team s effectiveness. Methodologies to communicate and transmit messages, images, and files from the Mission Control Center to the Orbiter evolved over several years. These lessons were vital in shaping the effectiveness of safe and successful mission planning and have been applied to current mission planning work in addition to being incorporated into future space flight planning. The critical lessons from all aspects of previous plan, train, and fly phases of Space Shuttle flight missions are not only documented in this paper, but are also discussed regarding how they pertain to changes in process and consideration for future space flight planning.

Clevenger, Jennifer D.; Bristol, Douglas J.; Whitney, Gregory R.; Blanton, Mark R.; Reynolds, F. Fisher, III

2011-01-01

31

Software Architecture of the NASA Shuttle Ground Operations Simulator - SGOS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SGOS executive and its subsystems have been an integral component of the Shuttle Launch Safety Program for almost thirty years. It is usable (via the LAN) by over 2000 NASA employees at the Kennedy Space Center and 11,000 contractors. SGOS supports over 800 models comprised of several hundred thousand lines of code and over 1,000 MCP procedures. Yet neither language has a for loop!! The simulation software described in this paper is used to train ground controllers and to certify launch countdown readiness.

Cook, Robert P.; Lostroscio, Charles T.

2005-01-01

32

Simulation of Range Safety for the NASA Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes a simulation environment that seamlessly combines a number of safety and environmental models for the launch phase of a NASA Space Shuttle mission. The components of this simulation environment represent the different systems that must interact in order to determine the Expectation of casualties (E(sub c)) resulting from the toxic effects of the gas dispersion that occurs after a disaster affecting a Space Shuttle within 120 seconds of lift-off. The utilization of the Space Shuttle reliability models, trajectory models, weather dissemination systems, population models, amount and type of toxicants, gas dispersion models, human response functions to toxicants, and a geographical information system are all integrated to create this environment. This simulation environment can help safety managers estimate the population at risk in order to plan evacuation, make sheltering decisions, determine the resources required to provide aid and comfort, and mitigate damages in case of a disaster. This simulation environment may also be modified and used for the landing phase of a space vehicle but will not be discussed in this paper.

Rabelo, Luis; Sepulveda, Jose; Compton, Jeppie; Turner, Robert

2005-01-01

33

Status of Thermal NDT of Space Shuttle Materials at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, NASA has focused on improving advanced NDE techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels that comprise the orbiter s wing leading edge and nose cap. Various nondestructive inspection techniques have been used in the examination of the RCC, but thermography has emerged as an effective inspection alternative to more traditional methods. Thermography is a non-contact inspection method as compared to ultrasonic techniques which typically require the use of a coupling medium between the transducer and material. Like radiographic techniques, thermography can inspect large areas, but has the advantage of minimal safety concerns and the ability for single-sided measurements. Details of the analysis technique that has been developed to allow insitu inspection of a majority of shuttle RCC components is discussed. Additionally, validation testing, performed to quantify the performance of the system, will be discussed. Finally, the results of applying this technology to the Space Shuttle Discovery after its return from the STS-114 mission in July 2005 are discussed.

Cramer, K. Elliott; Winfree, William P.; Hodges, Kenneth; Koshti, Ajay; Ryan, Daniel; Reinhardt, Walter W.

2007-01-01

34

Status of Thermal NDT of Space Shuttle Materials at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, NASA has focused on improving advanced NDE techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels that comprise the orbiter's wing leading edge and nose cap. Various nondestructive inspection techniques have been used in the examination of the RCC, but thermography has emerged as an effective inspection alternative to more traditional methods. Thermography is a non-contact inspection method as compared to ultrasonic techniques which typically require the use of a coupling medium between the transducer and material. Like radiographic techniques, thermography can inspect large areas, but has the advantage of minimal safety concerns and the ability for single-sided measurements. Details of the analysis technique that has been developed to allow insitu inspection of a majority of shuttle RCC components is discussed. Additionally, validation testing, performed to quantify the performance of the system, will be discussed. Finally, the results of applying this technology to the Space Shuttle Discovery after its return from the STS-114 mission in July 2005 are discussed.

Cramer, K. Elliott; Winfree, William P.; Hodges, Kenneth; Koshti, Ajay; Ryan, Daniel; Rweinhardt, Walter W.

2006-01-01

35

Status of Thermal NDT of Space Shuttle Materials at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, NASA has focused on improving advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels that comprise the orbiter's wing leading edge and nose cap. Various nondestructive inspection techniques have been used in the examination of the RCC, but thermography has emerged as an effective inspection alternative to more traditional methods. Thermography is a non-contact inspection method as compared to ultrasonic techniques which typically require the use of a coupling medium between the transducer and material. Like radiographic techniques, thermography can inspect large areas, but has the advantage of minimal safety concerns and the ability for single-sided measurements. Details of the analysis technique that has been developed to allow insitu inspection of a majority of shuttle RCC components is discussed. Additionally, validation testing, performed to quantify the performance of the system, will be discussed. Finally, the results of applying this technology to the Space Shuttle Discovery after its return from the STS-114 mission in July 2005 are discussed.

Cramer, K. Elliott; Winfree, William P.; Hodges, Kenneth; Koshti, Ajay; Ryan, Daniel; Reinhardt, Walter W.

2006-01-01

36

Lori Garver, NASA Deputy Administrator Smithsonian/Boeing Space Shuttle Tribute Reception  

E-print Network

Lori Garver, NASA Deputy Administrator Smithsonian/Boeing Space Shuttle Tribute Reception National this extraordinary salute to the Space Shuttle. From its beginnings, human space flight has been an American success, for your outstanding contributions to America and the space program as a combat pilot, shuttle commander

37

Techniques and Tools of NASA's Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Columbia accident investigation was a fusion of many disciplines into a single effort. From the recovery and reconstruction of the debris, Figure 1, to the analysis, both destructive and nondestructive, of chemical and metallurgical samples, Figure 2, a multitude of analytical techniques and tools were employed. Destructive and non-destructive testing were utilized in tandem to determine if a breach in the left wing of the Orbiter had occurred, and if so, the path of the resultant high temperature plasma flow. Nondestructive analysis included topometric scanning, laser mapping, and real-time radiography. These techniques were useful in constructing a three dimensional virtual representation of the reconstruction project, specifically the left wing leading edge reinforced carbon/carbon heat protectant panels. Similarly, they were beneficial in determining where sampling should be performed on the debris. Analytic testing included such techniques as Energy Dispersive Electron Microprobe Analysis (EMPA), Electron Spectroscopy Chemical Analysis (ESCA), and X-Ray dot mapping; these techniques related the characteristics of intermetallics deposited on the leading edge of the left wing adjacent to the location of a suspected plasma breach during reentry. The methods and results of the various analyses, along with their implications into the accident, are discussed, along with the findings and recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. Likewise, NASA's Return To Flight efforts are highlighted.

McDanels, Steve J.

2005-01-01

38

The Space Shuttle Decision: NASA's Search for a Reusable Space Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This significant new study of the decision to build the Space Shuttle explains the Shuttle's origins and early development. In addition to internal NASA discussions, this work details the debates in the late 1960s and early 1970s among policymakers in Congress, the Air Force, and the Office of Management and Budget over the roles and technical designs of the Shuttle. Examining the interplay of these organizations with sometimes conflicting goals, the author not only explains how the world's premier space launch vehicle came into being, but also how politics can interact with science, technology, national security, and economics in national government. The weighty policy decision to build the Shuttle represents the first component of the broader story: future NASA volumes will cover the Shuttle's development and operational histories.

Heppenheimer, T. A.

1999-01-01

39

Environmentally-driven Materials Obsolescence: Material Replacements and Lessons Learned from NASA's Space Shuttle Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Program was terminated in 2011 with the last flight of the Shuttle Endeavour. During the 30 years of its operating history, the number of domestic and international environmental regulations increased rapidly and resulted in materials obsolescence risks to the program. Initial replacement efforts focused on ozone depleting substances. As pressure from environmental regulations increased, Shuttle worked on the replacement of heavy metals. volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Near the end of the program. Shuttle identified potential material obsolescence driven by international regulations and the potential for suppliers to reformulate materials. During the Shuttle Program a team focused on environmentally-driven materials obsolescence worked to identify and mitigate these risks. Lessons learned from the Shuttle experience can be applied to new NASA Programs as well as other high reliability applications.

Meinhold, Anne

2013-01-01

40

Understanding IV&V in a Safety Critical and Complex Evolutionary Environment: The NASA Space Shuttle Program1  

E-print Network

, NASA makes every reasonable effort to minimize that risk. To that end for the Space Shuttle program on the Space Shuttle program and provide an analysis of the use of metrics to document and control this process independent verification and validation, Metrics, Process characterization, Space Shuttle program, Software

Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

41

International Space Station (ISS) Gas Logistics Planning in the Post Shuttle Era  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over its life the International Space Station (ISS) has received gas (nitrogen, oxygen, and air) from various sources. Nitrogen and oxygen are used in the cabin to maintain total pressure and oxygen partial pressures within the cabin. Plumbed nitrogen is also required to support on-board experiments and medical equipment. Additionally, plumbed oxygen is required to support medical equipment as well as emergency masks and most importantly EVA support. Gas are supplied to ISS with various methods and vehicles. Vehicles like the Progress and ATV deliver nitrogen (both as a pure gas and as air) and oxygen via direct releases into the cabin. An additional source of nitrogen and oxygen is via tanks on the ISS Airlock. The Airlock nitrogen and oxygen tanks can deliver to various users via pressurized systems that run throughout the ISS except for the Russian segment. Metabolic oxygen is mainly supplied via cabin release from the Elektron and Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA), which are water electrolyzers. As a backup system, oxygen candles (Solid Fuel Oxygen Generators-SFOGs) supply oxygen to the cabin as well. In the past, a major source of nitrogen and oxygen has come from the Shuttle via both direct delivery to the cabin as well as to recharge the ISS Airlock tanks. To replace the Shuttle capability to recharge the ISS Airlock tanks, a new system was developed called Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS). NIORS consists of high pressure (7000 psi) tanks which recharge the ISS Airlock tanks via a blowdown fill for both nitrogen and oxygen. NORS tanks can be brought up on most logistics vehicles such as the HTV, COTS, and ATV. A proper balance must be maintained to insure sufficient gas resources are available on-orbit so that all users have the required gases via the proper delivery method (cabin and/or plumbed).

Leonard, Daniel J.; Cook, Anthony J.; Lehman, Daniel A.

2011-01-01

42

Managing NASA's International Space Station Logistics and Maintenance Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The International Space Station's Logistics and Maintenance program has had to develop new technologies and a management approach for both space and ground operations. The ISS will be a permanently manned orbiting vehicle that has no landing gear, no international borders, and no organizational lines - it is one Station that must be supported by one crew, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. It flies partially assembled for a number of years before it is finally completed in 2006. It has over 6,000 orbital replaceable units (ORU), and spare parts which number into the hundreds of thousands, from 127 major US vendors and 70 major international vendors. From conception to operation, the ISS requires a unique approach in all aspects of development and operations. Today the dream is coming true; hardware is flying and hardware is failing. The system has been put into place to support the Station for both space and ground operations. It started with the basic support concept developed for Department of Defense systems, and then it was tailored for the unique requirements of a manned space vehicle. Space logistics is a new concept that has wide reaching consequences for both space travel and life on Earth. This paper discusses what type of organization has been put into place to support both space and ground operations and discusses each element of that organization. In addition, some of the unique operations approaches this organization has had to develop is discussed.

Butina, Anthony

2001-01-01

43

An Overview of contributions of NASA Space Shuttle to Space Science and Engineering education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper provides an indepth overview of the enormous contrbutions made by the NASA Space Shuttle Program to Space science and engineering education over the past thirty years. The author has served as one of the major contributors and editors of NASA book "Wings In Orbit: Scientific and Engineering Legacies of the Space Shuttle program" (NASA SP-2010-3409). Every Space Shuttle mission was an education mission: student involvement programs such as Get Away Specials housed in Shuttle payload allowed students to propose research and thus enrich their university education experience. School students were able to operate "EarthKAM" to learn the intricacies of orbital mechanics, earth viewing opportunities and were able to master the science and art of proposal writing and scientific collaboration. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce the global student and teaching community in space sciences and engineering to the plethora of educational resources available to them for engaging a wide variety of students (from early school to the undergraduate and graduate level and to inspire them towards careers in Space sciences and technologies. The volume "Wings In Orbit" book is one example of these ready to use in classroom materials. This paper will highlight the educational payloads, experiments and on-orbit classroom activities conducted for space science and engineering students, teachers and non-traditional educators. The presentation will include discussions on the science content and its educational relevance in all major disiciplines in which the research was conducted on-board the Space Shuttle.

Lulla, Kamlesh

2012-07-01

44

NASA payload data book: Payload analysis for space shuttle applications, volume 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data describing the individual NASA payloads for the space shuttle are presented. The document represents a complete issue of the original payload data book. The subjects discussed are: (1) astronomy, (2) space physics, (3) planetary exploration, (4) earth observations (earth and ocean physics), (5) communications and navigation, (6) life sciences, (7) international rendezvous and docking, and (8) lunar exploration.

1972-01-01

45

Actinide Sub-Actinide Flux Ratio Estimated from NASA Challenger Space Shuttle Borne Passive Detector Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A video trace analysis of 117 ultra heavy cosmic nuclei detected by NASA space shuttle borne lexan detectors has been presented here. The major axes of the elliptical track etch pits in the long hour etched detectors have been measured using a Hund microscope computerized for the measurements using a Pentium. The major axes distribution exhibits the existence of ultra

Basudhara Basu; D. P. Bhattacharyya; S. Biswas; D. O'Sullivan; A. Thompson

1998-01-01

46

NASA/MOD Operations Impacts from Shuttle Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Operations plays a pivotal role in the success of any human spaceflight program. This paper will highlight some of the core tenets of spaceflight operations from a systems perspective and use several examples from the Space Shuttle Program to highlight where the success and safety of a mission can hinge upon the preparedness and competency of the operations team. Further, awareness of the types of operations scenarios and impacts that can arise during human crewed space missions can help inform design and mission planning decisions long before a vehicle gets into orbit. A strong operations team is crucial to the development of future programs; capturing the lessons learned from the successes and failures of a past program will allow for safer, more efficient, and better designed programs in the future. No matter how well a vehicle is designed and constructed, there are always unexpected events or failures that occur during space flight missions. Preparation, training, real-time execution, and troubleshooting are skills and values of the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) flight controller; these operational standards have proven invaluable to the Space Shuttle Program. Understanding and mastery of these same skills will be required of any operations team as technology advances and new vehicles are developed. This paper will focus on individual Space Shuttle mission case studies where specific operational skills, techniques, and preparedness allowed for mission safety and success. It will detail the events leading up to the scenario or failure, how the operations team identified and dealt with the failure and its downstream impacts. The various options for real-time troubleshooting will be discussed along with the operations team final recommendation, execution, and outcome. Finally, the lessons learned will be summarized along with an explanation of how these lessons were used to improve the operational preparedness of future flight control teams.

Fitzpatrick, Michael; Mattes, Gregory; Grabois, Michael; Griffith, Holly

2011-01-01

47

Research pressure instrumentation for NASA space shuttle main engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The breadboard feasibility model of a silicon piezoresistive pressure transducer suitable for space shuttle main engine (SSME) applications was demonstrated. The development of pressure instrumentation for the SSME was examined. The objective is to develop prototype pressure transducers which are targeted to meet the SSME performance design goals and to fabricate, test and deliver a total of 10 prototype units. Effective utilization of the many advantages of silicon piezoresistive strain sensing technology to achieve the objectives of advanced state-of-the-art pressure sensors for reliability, accuracy and ease of manufacture is analyzed. Integration of multiple functions on a single chip is the key attribute of the technology.

Anderson, P. J.; Nussbaum, P.; Gustafson, G.

1985-01-01

48

From Ship to Shuttle: NASA Orbiter Naming Program, September 1988 - May 1989  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

By congressional action in 1987, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was authorized to provide an opportunity for American school students to name the new Space Shuttle orbiter being built to replace the Challenger. The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), an education organization representing the chief education officials of the nation, was asked by NASA to assist in the development and administration of this exciting and important educational activity. A selection of interdisciplinary activities related to the Space Shuttle that were designed by students for the NASA Orbiter-Naming Program are presented. The national winner's project is first followed by other projects listed in alphabetical order by state, and a bibliography compiled from suggestions by the state-level winning teams.

1991-01-01

49

From Ship to Shuttle: NASA Orbiter Naming Program, September 1988 - May 1989  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By congressional action in 1987, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was authorized to provide an opportunity for American school students to name the new Space Shuttle orbiter being built to replace the Challenger. The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), an education organization representing the chief education officials of the nation, was asked by NASA to assist in the development and administration of this exciting and important educational activity. A selection of interdisciplinary activities related to the Space Shuttle that were designed by students for the NASA Orbiter-Naming Program are presented. The national winner's project is first followed by other projects listed in alphabetical order by state, and a bibliography compiled from suggestions by the state-level winning teams.

1991-10-01

50

The epistemic integrity of NASA practices in the Space Shuttle Program.  

PubMed

This article presents an account of epistemic integrity and uses it to demonstrate that the epistemic integrity of different kinds of practices in NASA's Space Shuttle Program was limited. We focus on the following kinds of practices: (1) research by working engineers, (2) review by middle-level managers, and (3) communication with the public. We argue that the epistemic integrity of these practices was undermined by production pressure at NASA, i.e., the pressure to launch an unreasonable amount of flights per year. Finally, our findings are used to develop some potential strategies to protect epistemic integrity in aerospace science. PMID:23432770

De Winter, Jan; Kosolosky, Laszlo

2013-01-01

51

Neutron Diffraction Characterization of Residual Strain in Welded Inconel 718 for NASA Space Shuttle Flow Liners  

SciTech Connect

This work quantitatively assesses residual strains and stresses associated with the weld repair process used to repair cracks on NASA's space shuttle flow liners. The coupons used in this investigation were made of the same INCONEL 718 alloy used for the flow liners. They were subjected to identical welding and certification procedures that were carried out on the space shuttle. Neutron diffraction measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory determined residual strains at selected locations in a welded coupon at 293 K and 135 K. The weld repair process introduced Mises effective residual stresses of up to 555 MPa. On comparing the measurements at 293 K and 135 K, no significant change to the residual strain profile was noted at the low temperature. This indicated minimal mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the base metal and the weld.

Rathod, C.R.; Vaidyanathan, R. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, 32816 (United States); Livescu, V.; Clausen, B.; Bourke, M. A. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States); Notardonato, W.U.; Femminineo, M. [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, 32899 (United States)

2004-06-28

52

NSTA-NASA Shuttle Student Involvement Project. Experiment Results: Insect Flight Observation at Zero Gravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flight responses of common houseflies, velvetbean caterpillar moths, and worker honeybees were observed and filmed for a period of about 25 minutes in a zero-g environment during the third flight of the Space Shuttle Vehicle (flight number STS-3; March 22-30, 1982). Twelve fly puparia, 24 adult moths, 24 moth pupae, and 14 adult bees were loaded into an insect flight box, which was then stowed aboard the Shuttle Orbiter, the night before the STS-3 launch at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The main purpose of the experiment was to observe and compare the flight responses of the three species of insects, which have somewhat different flight control mechanisms, under zero-g conditions.

Nelson, T. E.; Peterson, J. R.

1982-01-01

53

Anomaly Analysis: NASA's Engineering and Safety Center Checks Recurring Shuttle Glitches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), set up in the wake of the Columbia accident to backstop engineers in the space shuttle program, is reviewing hundreds of recurring anomalies that the program had determined don't affect flight safety to see if in fact they might. The NESC is expanding its support to other programs across the agency, as well. The effort, which will later extend to the International Space Station (ISS), is a principal part of the attempt to overcome the normalization of deviance--a situation in which organizations proceeded as if nothing was wrong in the face of evidence that something was wrong--cited by sociologist Diane Vaughn as contributing to both space shuttle disasters.

Morring, Frank, Jr.

2004-01-01

54

Ventilation Loss in the NASA Space Shuttle Crew Protective Garments: Potential for Heat Stress  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) S1035 Launch/Entry suit (LES) for producing heat stress in a simulated Space Shuttle cabin environment has been studied. The testing was designed to determine if the NASA S1035 poses a greater threat of inducing heat stress than the NASA S1032. Conditions were designed to simulate an extreme prelaunch situation, with chamber temperatures maintained at dry bulb temperature 27.2 +/- 0.1 C, globe temperature - 27.3 +/- 0.1 C, and wet bulb temperature 21.1 +/- 0.3 C. Four males, aged 28-48, were employed in this study, with three subjects having exposures in all four conditions and the fourth subject exposed to 3 conditions. Test durations in the ventilated (V) and unventilated (UV) conditions were designed for 480 minutes, which all subjects achieved. No significant differences related to experimental conditions were noted in rectal temperatures, heart rates or sweat rates. The results indicate that the S1032 and S1035 garments, in either the V or UV state, poses no danger of inducing unacceptable heat stress under the conditions expected within the Shuttle cabin during launch or re-entry.

Askew, Gregory K.; Kaufman, Jonathan W.

1991-01-01

55

Software Architecture of the NASA Shuttle Ground Operations Simulator--SGOS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SGOS executive and its subsystems have been an integral component of the Shuttle Launch Safety Program for almost thirty years. it is usable (via the LAN) by over 2000 NASA employees at the Kennedy Space Center and 11,000 contractors. SGOS supports over 800 models comprised of several hundred thousand lines of code and over 1,00 MCP procedures. Yet neither language has a for loop!! The simulation software described in this paper is used to train ground controllers and to certify launch countdown readiness.

Cook Robert P.; Lostroscio, Charles T.

2005-01-01

56

The five crew members of the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-98 mission depart NASA Dryden to retu  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The five crew members of the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-98 mission depart NASA Dryden to return to the Johnson Space Center at Houston. They briefly extended greetings to Dryden staff members on the ramp area behind Dryden's Main Building at a crew ceremony on February 21, 2001. Space Shuttle Atlantis landed at 12:33 p.m. February 20, 2001, on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, where NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center is located. The mission, which began February 7, logged 5.3 million miles as the shuttle orbited earth while delivering the Destiny science laboratory to the International Space Station. Inclement weather conditions in Florida prompted the decision to land Atlantis at Edwards. The last time a space shuttle landed at Edwards was Oct. 24, 2000.

2001-01-01

57

Development of NASA's Accident Precursor Analysis Process Through Application on the Space Shuttle Orbiter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accident Precursor Analysis (APA) serves as the bridge between existing risk modeling activities, which are often based on historical or generic failure statistics, and system anomalies, which provide crucial information about the failure mechanisms that are actually operative in the system. APA docs more than simply track experience: it systematically evaluates experience, looking for under-appreciated risks that may warrant changes to design or operational practice. This paper presents the pilot application of the NASA APA process to Space Shuttle Orbiter systems. In this effort, the working sessions conducted at Johnson Space Center (JSC) piloted the APA process developed by Information Systems Laboratories (ISL) over the last two years under the auspices of NASA's Office of Safety & Mission Assurance, with the assistance of the Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) Shuttle & Exploration Analysis Branch. This process is built around facilitated working sessions involving diverse system experts. One important aspect of this particular APA process is its focus on understanding the physical mechanism responsible for an operational anomaly, followed by evaluation of the risk significance of the observed anomaly as well as consideration of generalizations of the underlying mechanism to other contexts. Model completeness will probably always be an issue, but this process tries to leverage operating experience to the extent possible in order to address completeness issues before a catastrophe occurs.

Maggio, Gaspare; Groen, Frank; Hamlin, Teri; Youngblood, Robert

2010-01-01

58

Volume 4 Issue 4 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis April 2009 Space shuttle Atlantis sits at Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space  

E-print Network

. As with all other previ- ous shuttle missions, Stennis engineers tested all three main engines to be usedVolume 4 Issue 4 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis April 2009 Space shuttle Atlantis sits at Launch Pad in launching Atlantis on its mission. STS-125 at launch pad Space shuttle Discovery returned to Earth on March

59

Space shuttle operations at the NASA Kennedy Space Center: the role of emergency medicine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Division of Emergency Medicine at the University of Florida coordinates a unique program with the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to provide emergency medical support (EMS) for the United States Space Transportation System. This report outlines the organization of the KSC EMS system, training received by physicians providing medical support, logistic and operational aspects of the mission, and experiences of team members. The participation of emergency physicians in support of manned space flight represents another way that emergency physicians provide leadership in prehospital care and disaster management.

Rodenberg, H.; Myers, K. J.

1995-01-01

60

SPACE SHUTTLE PROGRAM Space Shuttle Projects Office (MSFC)  

E-print Network

SPACE SHUTTLE PROGRAM Space Shuttle Projects Office (MSFC) NASA Marshall Space Flight Center SHUTTLE PROGRAM Space Shuttle Projects Office (MSFC) NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville · No Significant Changes · Readiness Statement #12;SPACE SHUTTLE PROGRAM Space Shuttle Projects Office (MSFC) NASA

Christian, Eric

61

Concepts and embodiment design of a reentry recumbent seating system for the NASA Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report deals with the generation of a recumbent seating system which will be used by NASA to shuttle astronauts from the Russian space station Mir. We begin by examining the necessity for designing a special couch for the returning astronauts. Next, we discuss the operating conditions and constraints of the recumbent seating system and provide a detailed function structure. After working through the conceptual design process, we came up with ten alternative designs which are presented in the appendices. These designs were evaluated and weighted to systematically determine the best choice for embodiment design. A detailed discussion of all components of the selected system follows with design calculations for the seat presented in the appendices. The report concludes with an evaluation of the resulting design and recommendations for further development.

Mcmillan, Scott; Looby, Brent; Devany, Chris; Chudej, Chris; Brooks, Barry

1993-01-01

62

Actinide Sub-Actinide Flux Ratio Estimated from NASA Challenger Space Shuttle Borne Passive Detector Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A video trace analysis of 117 ultra heavy cosmic nuclei detected by NASA space shuttle borne lexan detectors has been presented here. The major axes of the elliptical track etch pits in the long hour etched detectors have been measured using a Hund microscope computerized for the measurements using a Pentium. The major axes distribution exhibits the existence of ultra heavy nuclei of charges of Z ranging from 72 to 96 compatible with the expected results from restricted energy loss calculations. The estimated actinide sub-actinide flux ratio has been found to be 0.0636±0.0248 which is comparable to the earlier observations by Fowler et al., Thompson et al. and O'Sullivan.

Basu, Basudhara; Bhattacharyya, D. P.; Biswas, S.; O'Sullivan, D.; Thompson, A.

63

SRTM Data on Cyber-ShARE The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data collected by NASA represents the  

E-print Network

SRTM Data on Cyber-ShARE The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data collected by NASA substantially mis-located in existing databases. Cyber-ShARE hosts two versions of the SRTM dataset, stored Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), available from http://srtm.csi.cgiar.org." On the CyberShARE site

Smith-Konter, Bridget

64

Six astronauts of NASA's recent space shuttle mission STS-120 visited  

E-print Network

performance of the space shuttle's main engines, or SSMEs, which on Oct. 23 launched them aboard space shuttle on the space shuttle is the rocket engines. We can't go without them. It's crucial we continue to test shuttle main engine tests that kept the program on schedule and included the incorporation of the new

65

Structural analysis of a frangible nut used on the NASA Space Shuttle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A structural analysis methodology has been developed for the NASA 2.5-inch frangible nut used on the Space Shuttle. Two of these nuts are used to secure the External Tank to the aft end of the Orbiter. Both nuts must completely fracture before the Orbiter can safely separate from the External Tank. Ideally, only one of the two explosive boosters contained in each nut must detonate to completely break a nut. However, after an uncontrolled change in the Inconel 718 material processing, recent tests indicate that in certain circumstances both boosters may be required. This report details the material characterization and subsequent structural analyses of nuts manufactured from two lots of Inconel 718. The nuts from the HSX lot were observed to consistently separate with only one booster, while the nuts from the HBT lot never completely fracture with a single booster. The material characterization requires only tensile test data and the determination of a tearing parameter based on a computer simulation of a tensile test. Subsequent structural analyses using the PRONTO2D finite element code correctly predict the differing response of nuts fabricated from these two lots. This agreement is important because it demonstrates that this technique can be used to screen lots of Inconel 718 before manufacturing frangible nuts from them. To put this new capability to practice, Sandia personnel have transferred this technology to the Pyrotechnics Group at NASA-JSC.

Metzinger, K. E.

1993-11-01

66

The residue-measure criterion for model reduction in the analysis of the NASA Space Shuttle's digital flight control system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A residue-measure criterion model reduction technique is applied to the vehicle dynamics model used in the design and analysis of the NASA Space Shuttle's digital flight control system. As implemented in this study the residue-measure technique involved an a priori residue calculation with control system biasing. The predictions of the reduced model are compared to vehicle level dynamic stability test data. These comparisons show an excellent correlation of the dominant spectral and response features between the model and test data. In addition, the application of the reduction technique to various Shuttle mission flight phases is demonstrated.

Gluch, D. P.

1982-01-01

67

Vibro-Acoustic Analysis of NASA's Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A Flame Trench Wall  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A vital element to NASA's manned space flight launch operations is the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39's launch pads A and B. Originally designed and constructed In the 1960s for the Saturn V rockets used for the Apollo missions, these pads were modified above grade to support Space Shuttle missions. But below grade, each of the pad's original walls (including a 42 feet deep, 58 feet wide, and 450 feet long tunnel designed to deflect flames and exhaust gases, the flame trench) remained unchanged. On May 31, 2008 during the launch of STS-124, over 3500 of the. 22000 interlocking refractory bricks that lined east wall of the flame trench, protecting the pad structure were liberated from pad 39A. The STS-124 launch anomaly spawned an agency-wide initiative to determine the failure root cause, to assess the impact of debris on vehicle and ground support equipment safety, and to prescribe corrective action. The investigation encompassed radar imaging, infrared video review, debris transport mechanism analysis using computational fluid dynamics, destructive testing, and non-destructive evaluation, including vibroacoustic analysis, in order to validate the corrective action. The primary focus of this paper is on the analytic approach, including static, modal, and vibro-acoustic analysis, required to certify the corrective action, and ensure Integrity and operational reliability for future launches. Due to the absence of instrumentation (including pressure transducers, acoustic pressure sensors, and accelerometers) in the flame trench, defining an accurate acoustic signature of the launch environment during shuttle main engine/solid rocket booster Ignition and vehicle ascent posed a significant challenge. Details of the analysis, including the derivation of launch environments, the finite element approach taken, and analysistest/ launch data correlation are discussed. Data obtained from the recent launch of STS-126 from Pad 39A was instrumental in validating the design analysis philosophies outlined in this paper.

Margasahayam, Ravi N.

2009-01-01

68

NASA Research Center Contributions to Space Shuttle Return to Flight (SSRTF)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contributions provided by the NASA Research Centers to key Space Shuttle return-to-flight milestones, with an emphasis on debris and Thermal Protection System (TPS) damage characterization, are described herein. Several CAIB recommendations and Space Shuttle Program directives deal with the mitigation of external tank foam insulation as a debris source, including material characterization as well as potential design changes, and an understanding of Orbiter TPS material characteristics, damage scenarios, and repair options. Ames, Glenn, and Langley Research Centers have performed analytic studies, conducted experimental testing, and developed new technologies, analysis tools, and hardware to contribute to each of these recommendations. For the External Tank (ET), these include studies of spray-on foam insulation (SOFI), investigations of potential design changes, and applications of advanced non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technologies to understand ET TPS shedding during liftoff and ascent. The end-to-end debris assessment included transport analysis to determine the probabilities of impact for various debris sources. For the Orbiter, methods were developed, and validated through experimental testing, to determine thresholds for potential damage of Orbiter TPS components. Analysis tools were developed and validated for on-orbit TPS damage assessments, especially in the area of aerothermal environments. Advanced NDE technologies were also applied to the Orbiter TPS components, including sensor technologies to detect wing leading edge impacts during liftoff and ascent. Work is continuing to develop certified TPS repair options and to develop improved methodologies for reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) damage progression to assist in on-orbit repair decision philosophy.

Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Barnes, Robert S.; Belvin, Harry L.; Allmen, John; Otero, Angel

2005-01-01

69

Space Shuttle Program Tin Whisker Mitigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The discovery of tin whiskers (TW) on space shuttle hardware led to a program to investigate and removal and mitigation of the source of the tin whiskers. A Flight Control System (FCS) avionics box failed during vehicle testing, and was routed to the NASA Shuttle Logistics Depot for testing and disassembly. The internal inspection of the box revealed TW growth visible without magnification. The results of the Tiger Team that was assembled to investigate and develop recommendations are reviewed in this viewgraph presentation.

Nishimi, Keith

2007-01-01

70

The evolution of the WPI Advance Space Design Program-an evolving program of technical and social analysis using the NASA Space Shuttle for engineering education  

Microsoft Academic Search

In December of 1982, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, with the cooperation and support of the Mitre Corporation, initiated a primarily undergraduate educational program to develop experiments to be flown onboard a NASA Space Shuttle. Christened the MITRE WPI Space Shuttle Program, it sponsored the development of five educationally meritorious experiments over a period of four years. Although the experiments were ready

Fred J. Looft; Robert C. Labonte; William W. Durgin

1991-01-01

71

Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design of the spacecraft is described. Focus is placed on the external tanks, the solid rocket boosters, the main engine, and the space shuttle orbiter. The logistics of the project were reviewed and included the management plan, the facilities involved in construction and testing of the space shuttle, and the benefits expected from the project.

1976-01-01

72

The Orbit-on-Demand and Shuttle II Studies at NASA Langley  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reviews advanced space transportation studies that have been conducted at the Langley Research Center recently. The Orbit-on-Demand Vehicle Study focused on concepts capable of rapid launch. The Shuttle II Study considered concepts with the potential to reduce the cost of transportation to orbit for payloads in the Shuttle class or less.

Martin, James A.; Eldred, Charles H.

1987-01-01

73

Volume 4 Issue 2 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis February 2009 Stennis tests shuttle valves  

E-print Network

Space Center engineers per- formed a series of space shuttle flow valve tests this month to provide. For Apollo, we certified stages that carried us to the moon. We currently certify the Space Shuttle Main Space Center engineers perform one of dozens of shut- tle flow valve tests. Stennis engineers teamed

74

An analysis of Space Shuttle countdown activities: Preliminaries to a computational model of the NASA Test Director  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Before all systems are go just prior to the launch of a space shuttle, thousands of operations and tests have been performed to ensure that all shuttle and support subsystems are operational and ready for launch. These steps, which range from activating the orbiter's flight computers to removing the launch pad from the itinerary of the NASA tour buses, are carried out by launch team members at various locations and with highly specialized fields of expertise. The liability for coordinating these diverse activities rests with the NASA Test Director (NTD) at NASA-Kennedy. The behavior is being studied of the NTD with the goal of building a detailed computational model of that behavior; the results of that analysis to date are given. The NTD's performance is described in detail, as a team member who must coordinate a complex task through efficient audio communication, as well as an individual taking notes and consulting manuals. A model of the routine cognitive skill used by the NTD to follow the launch countdown procedure manual was implemented using the Soar cognitive architecture. Several examples are given of how such a model could aid in evaluating proposed computer support systems.

John, Bonnie E.; Remington, Roger W.; Steier, David M.

1991-01-01

75

Preparing for the High Frontier: The Role and Training of NASA Astronauts in the Post- Space Shuttle Era  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In May 2010, the National Research Council (NRC) was asked by NASA to address several questions related to the Astronaut Corps. The NRC s Committee on Human Spaceflight Crew Operations was tasked to answer several questions: 1. How should the role and size of the activities managed by the Johnson Space Center Flight Crew Operations Directorate change after space shuttle retirement and completion of the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS)? 2. What are the requirements for crew-related ground-based facilities after the Space Shuttle program ends? 3. Is the fleet of aircraft used for training the Astronaut Corps a cost-effective means of preparing astronauts to meet the requirements of NASA s human spaceflight program? Are there more cost-effective means of meeting these training requirements? Although the future of NASA s human spaceflight program has garnered considerable discussion in recent years and there is considerable uncertainty about what the program will involve in the coming years, the committee was not tasked to address whether human spaceflight should continue or what form it should take. The committee s task restricted it to studying activities managed by the Flight Crew Operations Directorate or those closely related to its activities, such as crew-related ground-based facilities and the training aircraft.

2011-01-01

76

Space shuttle utilization. [and Fly-Before-Buy Analysis Ground Rules from NASA/STS Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The information and rationale required to assess the level and pattern of space shuttle utilization that best serves the national interest are provided. Comparisons are given for civil program, national total program and Dept. of Defense total program costs.

1977-01-01

77

Design of the software development and verification system (SWDVS) for shuttle NASA study task 35  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of the Software Development and Verification System (SWDVS) for the space shuttle is presented. The design considerations, goals, assumptions, and major features of the design are examined. A scenario that shows three persons involved in flight software development using the SWDVS in response to a program change request is developed. The SWDVS is described from the standpoint of different groups of people with different responsibilities in the shuttle program to show the functional requirements that influenced the SWDVS design. The software elements of the SWDVS that satisfy the requirements of the different groups are identified.

Drane, L. W.; Mccoy, B. J.; Silver, L. W.

1973-01-01

78

Shared visions: Partnership of Rockwell International and NASA Cost Effectiveness Enhancements (CEE) for the space shuttle system integration program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a result of limited resources and tight fiscal constraints over the past several years, the defense and aerospace industries have experienced a downturn in business activity. The impact of fewer contracts being awarded has placed a greater emphasis for effectiveness and efficiency on industry contractors. It is clear that a reallocation of resources is required for America to continue to lead the world in space and technology. The key to technological and economic survival is the transforming of existing programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program, into more cost efficient programs so as to divert the savings to other NASA programs. The partnership between Rockwell International and NASA and their joint improvement efforts that resulted in significant streamlining and cost reduction measures to Rockwell International Space System Division's work on the Space Shuttle System Integration Contract is described. This work was a result of an established Cost Effectiveness Enhancement (CEE) Team formed initially in Fiscal Year 1991, and more recently expanded to a larger scale CEE Initiative in 1992. By working closely with the customer in agreeing to contract content, obtaining management endorsement and commitment, and involving the employees in total quality management (TQM) and continuous improvement 'teams,' the initial annual cost reduction target was exceeded significantly. The CEE Initiative helped reduce the cost of the Shuttle Systems Integration contract while establishing a stronger program based upon customer needs, teamwork, quality enhancements, and cost effectiveness. This was accomplished by systematically analyzing, challenging, and changing the established processes, practices, and systems. This examination, in nature, was work intensive due to the depth and breadth of the activity. The CEE Initiative has provided opportunities to make a difference in the way Rockwell and NASA work together - to update the methods and processes of the organizations. The future success of NASA space programs and Rockwell hinges upon the ability to adopt new, more efficient and effective work processes. Efficiency, proficiency, cost effectiveness, and teamwork are a necessity for economic survival. Continuous improvement initiatives like the CEE are, and will continue to be, vehicles by which the road can be traveled with a vision to the future.

Bejmuk, Bohdan I.; Williams, Larry

79

Shared visions: Partnership of Rockwell International and NASA Cost Effectiveness Enhancements (CEE) for the space shuttle system integration program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As a result of limited resources and tight fiscal constraints over the past several years, the defense and aerospace industries have experienced a downturn in business activity. The impact of fewer contracts being awarded has placed a greater emphasis for effectiveness and efficiency on industry contractors. It is clear that a reallocation of resources is required for America to continue to lead the world in space and technology. The key to technological and economic survival is the transforming of existing programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program, into more cost efficient programs so as to divert the savings to other NASA programs. The partnership between Rockwell International and NASA and their joint improvement efforts that resulted in significant streamlining and cost reduction measures to Rockwell International Space System Division's work on the Space Shuttle System Integration Contract is described. This work was a result of an established Cost Effectiveness Enhancement (CEE) Team formed initially in Fiscal Year 1991, and more recently expanded to a larger scale CEE Initiative in 1992. By working closely with the customer in agreeing to contract content, obtaining management endorsement and commitment, and involving the employees in total quality management (TQM) and continuous improvement 'teams,' the initial annual cost reduction target was exceeded significantly. The CEE Initiative helped reduce the cost of the Shuttle Systems Integration contract while establishing a stronger program based upon customer needs, teamwork, quality enhancements, and cost effectiveness. This was accomplished by systematically analyzing, challenging, and changing the established processes, practices, and systems. This examination, in nature, was work intensive due to the depth and breadth of the activity. The CEE Initiative has provided opportunities to make a difference in the way Rockwell and NASA work together - to update the methods and processes of the organizations. The future success of NASA space programs and Rockwell hinges upon the ability to adopt new, more efficient and effective work processes. Efficiency, proficiency, cost effectiveness, and teamwork are a necessity for economic survival. Continuous improvement initiatives like the CEE are, and will continue to be, vehicles by which the road can be traveled with a vision to the future.

Bejmuk, Bohdan I.; Williams, Larry

1992-01-01

80

NASA Advisory Council Space Operations Committee July 2010  

E-print Network

. Leroy Chiao Former NASA Astronaut and International Space Station Commander Mr. Tommy Holloway Former Space Shuttle and International Space Station Program Manager Mr. Glynn Lunney Former NASA Flight) International Space Station Logistics Plan KSC Site Visit · · · · · · Space Life Sciences Lab, Launch Complexes

Waliser, Duane E.

81

Research pressure instrumentation for NASA Space Shuttle main engine, modification no. 6  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research concerning the utilization of silicon piezoresistive strain sensing technology for space shuttle main engine applications is reported. The following specific topics were addressed: (1) transducer design and materials, (2) silicon piezoresistor characterization at cryogenic temperatures, (3) chip mounting characterization, and (4) frequency response optimization.

P. J. Anderson; R. L. Johnson

1984-01-01

82

Successful application of software reliability engineering for the NASA Space Shuttle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given. The Space Shuttle Primary Avionics Software Subsystem (PASS) represents a successful integration of many of the computer industry's most advanced software engineering practices and approaches. Beginning in the late 1970's this software development and maintenance project has evolved one of the world's most mature software processes applying the principles of the highest levels of the Software

T. Keller; N. F. Schneidewind

1997-01-01

83

Autonomy, Interdependence, and Social Control: NASA and the Space Shuttle "Challenger."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Shows that the organizations responsible for regulating safety at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) failed to identify flaws in management procedures and technical design that, if corrected, might have prevented the "Challenger" tragedy. Regulatory effectiveness was inhibited by the autonomy and interdependence of NASA and…

Vaughan, Diane

1990-01-01

84

Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at the NASA Kennedy Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the test procedures and the selection criteria used in selecting the best runway surface texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-kt crosswinds if desired. This 5-kt increase over the previous 15-kt limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions where space station rendezvous is planned.

Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

1996-01-01

85

Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator Bearing Testing For NASA Return to Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle body flap is located beneath the main engine nozzles and is required for proper aerodynamic control during orbital descent. Routine inspection of one of four body flap actuatols found one of the actuator bearings had degraded and blackened balls. A test program was initiated to demonstrate that it is acceptable to operate bearings which are degraded from operation over several flights. This test exposed the bearing to predicted flight axial loads, speeds and temperatures. Testing has been completed, and results indicate the previously flown bearings are acceptable for up to 12 additional missions.

Jett, Timothy R.; Thom, Robert L.; Moore, Lewis E.; Gibson, Howard G.; Hall, Phillip B.; Predmore, Roamer E.

2005-01-01

86

Assessment of Atmospheric Winds Aloft during NASA Space Shuttle Program Day-of-Launch Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Natural Environments Branch at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Marshall Space Flight Center monitors the winds aloft at Kennedy Space Center in support of the Space Shuttle Program day of launch operations. High resolution wind profiles are derived from radar tracked Jimsphere balloons, which are launched at predetermined times preceding the launch, for evaluation. The spatial (shear) and temporal (persistence) wind characteristics are assessed against a design wind database to ensure wind change does not violate wind change criteria. Evaluations of wind profies are reported to personnel at Johnson Space Center.

Decker, Ryan K.; Leach, Richard

2005-01-01

87

NASA Lewis Thermal Barrier Feasibility Investigated for Use in Space Shuttle Solid-Rocket Motor Nozzle-to-Case Joints  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Assembly joints of modern solid-rocket motor cases are usually sealed with conventional O-ring seals. The 5500 F combustion gases produced by rocket motors are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation and by special compounds that fill assembly split-lines in the insulation. On limited occasions, NASA has observed charring of the primary O-rings of the space shuttle solid-rocket nozzle-assembly joints due to parasitic leakage paths opening up in the gap-fill compounds during rocket operation. Thus, solid-rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol approached the NASA Lewis Research Center about the possibility of applying Lewis braided-fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. This thermal barrier would be placed upstream of the primary O-rings in the nozzle-to-case joints to prevent hot gases from impinging on the O-ring seals (see the following illustration). The illustration also shows joints 1 through 5, which are potential sites where the thermal barrier could be used.

Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

1999-01-01

88

NASA\\/JSC Radio Frequency Analysis in support of Space Shuttle Communication System Design & Operations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Electronic Systems Test Laboratory (ESTL) and Communication System Simulation Laboratory (CSSL) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)\\/Johnson Space Center (JSC) were established to perform manned spacecraft communication system performance and compatibility tests and simulation analysis. The ESTL and CSSL have developed system design evaluation testing techniques as well as analytical and numerical simulation tools that model spacecraft

S. U. Hwu

2011-01-01

89

NASA's New Educator Astronauts Face Long Wait for Their Shuttle Missions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When the U.S. space agency pinned badges on the 11 newest members of its astronaut corps this winter, it also increased by three its cadre of educator astronauts. Three former teachers-Dorothy M. Metcalf-Lindenburger, Richard R. Arnold II, and Joseph M. Acaba-graduated from NASA's grueling training program. The gauntlet of fitness test, survival…

Trotter, Andrew

2006-01-01

90

Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator Bearing Testing for NASA Return to Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle body flap is located beneath the main engine nozzles and is required for proper aerodynamic control during orbital descent. Routine inspection of one of four body flap actuators found one of the actuator bearings had degraded and blackened balls. A test program was initiated to demonstrate that it is acceptable to operate bearings which are degraded from operation over several flights. This test exposed the bearing to predicted flight axial loads, speeds and temperatures. Testing at 140 F has been completed, and results indicate the previously flown bearings are acceptable for up to 12 additional missions. Additional testing is underway to determine the lubricant life at various temperatures and stresses and to further understand the mechanism that caused the blacken balls. Initial results of this testing indicates that bearing life is shorten at room temperature possibly due fact that higher temperature (140 F) accelerates the flow of grease and oil into the wear surface

Jett, Timothy R.; Predmore, Roamer E.; Dube, Michael J.; Jones, William R., Jr.

2006-01-01

91

Tropospheric Wind Monitoring During Day-of-Launch Operations for NASA's Space Shuttle Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Environments Group at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center monitors the winds aloft above Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in support of the Space Shuttle Program day-of-launch operations. Assessment of tropospheric winds is used to support the ascent phase of launch. Three systems at KSC are used to generate independent tropospheric wind profiles prior to launch; 1) high resolution jimsphere balloon system, 2) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) and 3) low resolution radiosonde system. All independent sources are compared against each other for accuracy. To assess spatial and temporal wind variability during launch countdown each jimsphere profile is compared against a design wind database to ensure wind change does not violate wind change criteria.

Decker, Ryan; Leach, Richard

2004-01-01

92

An experimental investigation of the NASA space shuttle external tank at hypersonic Mach numbers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pressure and heat transfer tests were conducted simulating flight conditions which the space shuttle external tank will experience prior to break-up. The tests were conducted in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel and simulated entry conditions for nominal, abort-once-around (AOA), and return to launch site (RTLS) launch occurrences. Surface pressure and heat-transfer-rate distributions were obtained with and without various protuberences (or exterior hardware) on the model at Mach numbers from 15.2 to 17.7 at angles of attack from -15 deg to -180 deg and at several roll angles. The tests were conducted over a Reynolds number range from 1300 to 58,000, based on model length.

Wittliff, C. E.

1975-01-01

93

Assessment of the NASA Space Shuttle Program's Problem Reporting and Corrective Action System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper documents the general findings and recommendations of the Design for Safety Programs Study of the Space Shuttle Programs (SSP) Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA) System. The goals of this Study were: to evaluate and quantify the technical aspects of the SSP's PRACA systems, and to recommend enhancements addressing specific deficiencies in preparation for future system upgrades. The Study determined that the extant SSP PRACA systems accomplished a project level support capability through the use of a large pool of domain experts and a variety of distributed formal and informal database systems. This operational model is vulnerable to staff turnover and loss of the vast corporate knowledge that is not currently being captured by the PRACA system. A need for a Program-level PRACA system providing improved insight, unification, knowledge capture, and collaborative tools was defined in this study.

Korsmeryer, D. J.; Schreiner, J. A.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

94

Retrofitting the heating system for NASA's space shuttle engine test facility  

SciTech Connect

The John C. Stennis Space Center is one of nine NASA field installations and is the second largest NASA Center, occupying 13,480 acres (55 km{sup 2}) and surrounded by a 125,327-acre (507 km{sup 2}) unpopulated buffer zone. Since its beginnings, the center has been the prime NASA installation for static firing. This paper reports that because of the critical nature of the center's missions, precise instrumentation and comfortable personnel environments must be constantly and efficiency maintained. When the site was built nearly 30 years ago, two main boiler plants were installed. One was in the base area (which houses administrative and engineering offices) and the second was in the test area where the test stands and test support buildings are located. These two boiler plants generated high pressure, high temperature water (400{degrees} F, 400 psi; 204{degrees} C, 2,756 kPa) that was used for heating, reheating and absorption cooling. This high temperature hot water (HTHW) was circulated by pumps to various buildings on the site through an underground piping network. Once in the buildings, the HTHW passed through absorption chillers for cooling and high temperature-to-medium temperature water converters for heating and reheating.

Arceneaux, T.W. (NASA, St. Louis, MO (US))

1992-07-01

95

Volume 4 Issue 5 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis May 2009 Under a dry, hot Florida sky, space shuttle  

E-print Network

) presents a commemorative photo of a space shuttle main engine test firing to STS-119 Mission Commander Lee of the Shuttle Program, Atlantis was lifted into orbit by a trio of main engines tested and proven flight worthy at Stennis Space Center. Since the first shuttle launch in 1981, no mission has failed due to engine

96

Annual report to the NASA Administrator by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. Part 2: Space shuttle program. Section 1: Observations and conclusions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA and contractor management systems, including policies, practices, and procedures for the development of critical systems, subsystems and integration of the program elements, were investigated. The technical development status of critical systems, subsystems, and interfaces is presented. Space shuttle elements were qualified as to potential risks and hazards. The elements included the orbiter, external tanks, main engine, solid rocket boosters, and the ground support facilities.

1975-01-01

97

Latest Space Shuttle News  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from NASA offers the latest news on the space shuttle program. It features a variety of articles on the program. Links to other sites on the shuttle program provide provide resources such as posters, educational materials and interactive resources. Users can use the site to learn more about the most recent space shuttle missions or any of the past missions.

2002-01-01

98

NASA replanning efforts continue  

Microsoft Academic Search

A task force of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is producing new launch schedules for NASA's three remaining space shuttle orbiters, possibly supplemented by expendable launch vehicles. In the wake of the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger on January 28, 1986, the task force is assuming a delay of 12-18 months before resumption of shuttle flights.NASA's Headquarters

Judith A. Katzoff

1986-01-01

99

Organizational Learning Post Catastrophic Events: A Descriptive Case Study Exploring NASA's Learning over Time Following Two Catastrophic Shuttle Accidents Using the Schwandt's Organizational Learning System Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 30-year contribution of the Space Shuttle Program is the evolution of NASA's social actions through organizational learning. This study investigated how NASA learned over time following two catastrophic accidents. Schwandt's (1997) organizational Learning System Model (OLSM) characterized the learning in this High Reliability…

Castro, Edgar Oscar

2013-01-01

100

Logistics: An integral part of cost efficient space operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The logistics of space programs and its history within NASA are discussed, with emphasis on manned space flight and the Space Shuttle program. The lessons learned and the experience gained during these programs are reported on. Key elements of logistics are highlighted, and the problems and issues that can be expected to arise in relation to the support of long-term space operations and future space programs, are discussed. Such missions include the International Space Station program and the reusable launch vehicle. Possible solutions to the problems identified are outlined.

Montgomery, Ann D.

1996-01-01

101

NASA's approach to commercial cargo and crew transportation  

Microsoft Academic Search

To stimulate the commercial space industry and potentially serve the logistics needs of the International Space Station (ISS) in the post-Space Shuttle era, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in 2006 began the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) initiative. NASA entered into agreements with two U.S. firms, Rocketplane Kistler and Space Exploration Technologies to share up to 485,000,000 USD

Dennis Stone; Alan Lindenmoyer; George French; Elon Musk; David Gump; Chirinjeev Kathuria; Charles Miller; Mark Sirangelo; Tom Pickens

2008-01-01

102

Potential Future Shuttle Improvements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has just recently completed the 104th flight of the Space Shuttle. Each of the four Orbiters in the Shuttle fleet have a design life of 100 flights each. Thus the fleet is capable of almost 300 more flights, and at current flight rates could potentially operate well past 2020 if necessary. This paper addresses some of the potential Shuttle system improvements that could be considered if the decision is made to continue operations of this vehicle for such an extended period. The national space transportation policy envisions a decision around 2005-2006 concerning readiness to start development of a Shuttle replacement system. Leading up to that decision point NASA is investing in the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) to reduce the development risks associated with key technologies needed for the next generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The Shuttle replacement could be a new design RLV or could be based on a Shuttle derived design: i.e., a vehicle based on the current Shuttle but with major design changes. The technology investment strategy of SLI is supportive of either approach. However, if NASA and industry are not ready to develop a replacement vehicle in the 2006-2012 timeframe, then another option would be to continue to make important, but evolutionary changes, to the existing Shuttle fleet. The overall strategy for next generation RLV planning, including possible Shuttle evolution, is captured in Figure 1.

Henderson, Edward

2001-01-01

103

United States Space Shuttle Firsts  

E-print Network

Space Shuttle Challenger's first launch. [NASA Digital] 06/18/1983 STS-7 (Challenger) CREW: R. Crippen United States Space Shuttle Firsts 25th Anniversary National Aeronautics and Space Administration #12; Foreword This summary of the United States Space Shuttle Program firsts was compiled from various

104

SPACE SHUTTLE MISSION Finishing Touches  

E-print Network

SPACE SHUTTLE MISSION STS-132 Finishing Touches PRESS KIT/May 2010 www.nasa.gov National ....................................... 57 HISTORY OF SPACE SHUTTLE ATLANTIS .................................................................................................. 101 #12;MAY 2010 MISSION OVERVIEW 1 STS-132/ULF4 MISSION OVERVIEW The space shuttle Atlantis' crew

105

A waning of technocratic faith - NASA and the politics of the Space Shuttle decision, 1967-1972  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper analyzes the decision to build the Space Shuttle as part of a broader public policy trend away from a deference to technical experts and toward greater politicization of traditionally apolitical issues. At the beginning of the 1960s U.S. leaders had a strong faith in the ability of technology to solve most problems. By 1970 this commitment to technological answers had waned and a resurgence of the right of elected officials to control technical matters was gaining currency. The lengthy and bitter Shuttle decision-making process was part of a much broader shift in the formation of public policy, played out in other arenas as well, aimed at the reemergence of direct political management of technological and scientific affairs by politicians.

Launius, R. D.

1992-01-01

106

A Model for Space Shuttle Orbiter Tire Side Forces Based on NASA Landing Systems Research Aircraft Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Forces generated by the Space Shuttle orbiter tire under varying vertical load, slip angle, speed, and surface conditions were measured using the Landing System Research Aircraft (LSRA). Resulting data were used to calculate a mathematical model for predicting tire forces in orbiter simulations. Tire side and drag forces experienced by an orbiter tire are cataloged as a function of vertical load and slip angle. The mathematical model is compared to existing tire force models for the Space Shuttle orbiter. This report describes the LSRA and a typical test sequence. Testing methods, data reduction, and error analysis are presented. The LSRA testing was conducted on concrete and lakebed runways at the Edwards Air Force Flight Test Center and on concrete runways at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Wet runway tire force tests were performed on test strips made at the KSC using different surfacing techniques. Data were corrected for ply steer forces and conicity.

Carter, John F.; Nagy, Christopher J.; Barnicki, Joseph S.

1997-01-01

107

Engineering report. Part 2: NASA wheel and brake material tradeoff study for space shuttle type environmental requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The study included material selection and trade-off for the structural components of the wheel and brake optimizing weight vs cost and feasibility for the space shuttle type application. Analytical methods were used to determine section thickness for various materials, and a table was constructed showing weight vs. cost trade-off. The wheel and brake were further optimized by considering design philosophies that deviate from standard aircraft specifications, and designs that best utilize the materials being considered.

Bok, L. D.

1973-01-01

108

The space shuttle Atlantis and its seven-  

E-print Network

The space shuttle Atlantis and its seven- member crew lifted off June 8 from NASA's Kennedy Space to Earth on space shuttle Discovery's STS-120 mission in October. On June 11, STS-117 spacewalkers Reilly.nasa.gov/centers/stennis June 2007 STS-117 begins ISS mission ON-TIME LAUNCH ­ Trailing fire, Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts away

109

Autonomous space shuttle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The continued assembly and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) is the cornerstone within NASA's overall strategic plan. As indicated in NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP), the International Space Station requires shuttle to fly through at least the middle of the next decade to complete assembly of the station, provide crew transport, and to provide heavy lift up

J. A. Siders; R. H. Smith

2004-01-01

110

Shuttle Landing Facility - Duration: 6:28.  

NASA Video Gallery

The Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida marked the finish line for space shuttle missions since 1984. It is also staffed by a group of air traffic controllers who wor...

111

A Compendium of Wind Statistics and Models for the NASA Space Shuttle and Other Aerospace Vehicle Programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The wind profile with all of its variations with respect to altitude has been, is now, and will continue to be important for aerospace vehicle design and operations. Wind profile databases and models are used for the vehicle ascent flight design for structural wind loading, flight control systems, performance analysis, and launch operations. This report presents the evolution of wind statistics and wind models from the empirical scalar wind profile model established for the Saturn Program through the development of the vector wind profile model used for the Space Shuttle design to the variations of this wind modeling concept for the X-33 program. Because wind is a vector quantity, the vector wind models use the rigorous mathematical probability properties of the multivariate normal probability distribution. When the vehicle ascent steering commands (ascent guidance) are wind biased to the wind profile measured on the day-of-launch, ascent structural wind loads are reduced and launch probability is increased. This wind load alleviation technique is recommended in the initial phase of vehicle development. The vehicle must fly through the largest load allowable versus altitude to achieve its mission. The Gumbel extreme value probability distribution is used to obtain the probability of exceeding (or not exceeding) the load allowable. The time conditional probability function is derived from the Gumbel bivariate extreme value distribution. This time conditional function is used for calculation of wind loads persistence increments using 3.5-hour Jimsphere wind pairs. These increments are used to protect the commit-to-launch decision. Other topics presented include the Shuttle Shuttle load-response to smoothed wind profiles, a new gust model, and advancements in wind profile measuring systems. From the lessons learned and knowledge gained from past vehicle programs, the development of future launch vehicles can be accelerated. However, new vehicle programs by their very nature will require specialized support for new databases and analyses for wind, atmospheric parameters (pressure, temperature, and density versus altitude), and weather. It is for this reason that project managers are encouraged to collaborate with natural environment specialists early in the conceptual design phase. Such action will give the lead time necessary to meet the natural environment design and operational requirements, and thus, reduce development costs.

Smith, O. E.; Adelfang, S. I.

1998-01-01

112

REMARKS FOR DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR GARVER SHUTTLE DISCOVERY ARRIVAL  

E-print Network

this morning and making arrangements for NASA to fly our Shuttle Carrier Aircraft and the space shuttle this National Treasure to its new home. Discovery was the longest-serving veteran of NASA's space shuttle fleet will continue her mission to educate and inspire a grateful nation. The Space Shuttle's 30-year history

113

Air cargo market outlook and impact via the NASA CLASS project. [Cargo/Logistics Airlift Systems Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is given of the Cargo/Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS) project which was a 10 man-year effort carried out by two contractor teams, aimed at defining factors impacting future system growth and obtaining market requirements and design guidelines for future air freighters. Growth projection was estimated by two approaches: one, an optimal systems approach with a more efficient and cost effective system considered as being available in 1990; and the other, an evolutionary approach with an econometric behavior model used to predict long term evolution from the present system. Both approaches predict significant growth in demand for international air freighter services and less growth for U.S. domestic services. Economic analysis of air freighter fleet options indicate very strong market appeal of derivative widebody transports in 1990 with little incentive to develop all new dedicated air freighters utilizing the 1990's technology until sometime beyond the year 2000. Advanced air freighters would be economically attractive for a wide range of payload sizes (to 500 metric tons), however, if a government would share in the RD and T costs by virtue of its needs for a slightly modified version of a civil air freighter design (a.g. military airlifter).

Winston, M. M.; Conner, D. W.

1980-01-01

114

Autonomous Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The continued assembly and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) is the cornerstone within NASA's overall Strategic P an. As indicated in NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP), the International Space Station requires Shuttle to fly through at least the middle of the next decade to complete assembly of the Station, provide crew transport, and to provide heavy lift up and down mass capability. The ISTP reflects a tight coupling among the Station, Shuttle, and OSP programs to support our Nation's space goal . While the Shuttle is a critical component of this ISTP, there is a new emphasis for the need to achieve greater efficiency and safety in transporting crews to and from the Space Station. This need is being addressed through the Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program. However, the OSP is being designed to "complement" the Shuttle as the primary means for crew transfer, and will not replace all the Shuttle's capabilities. The unique heavy lift capabilities of the Space Shuttle is essential for both ISS, as well as other potential missions extending beyond low Earth orbit. One concept under discussion to better fulfill this role of a heavy lift carrier, is the transformation of the Shuttle to an "un-piloted" autonomous system. This concept would eliminate the loss of crew risk, while providing a substantial increase in payload to orbit capability. Using the guidelines reflected in the NASA ISTP, the autonomous Shuttle a simplified concept of operations can be described as; "a re-supply of cargo to the ISS through the use of an un-piloted Shuttle vehicle from launch through landing". Although this is the primary mission profile, the other major consideration in developing an autonomous Shuttle is maintaining a crew transportation capability to ISS as an assured human access to space capability.

Siders, Jeffrey A.; Smith, Robert H.

2004-01-01

115

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle Era Facts  

E-print Network

boosters (SRBs), giant external fuel tank (ET) and three space shuttle main engines (SSMEs). It also putNational Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAfacts Space Shuttle Era Facts NASA's shuttle Shuttle Program's 30 years of missions. The space shuttle, officially called the Space Transportation

116

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle Era Facts  

E-print Network

National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAfacts Space Shuttle Era Facts NASA's shuttle Shuttle Program's 30 years of missions. The space shuttle, officially called the Space Transportation vehicle (OV), its twin solid rocket boosters (SRBs), giant external fuel tank (ET) and three space shuttle

117

NASA Human Spaceflight  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides information on the International Space Station, space shuttle missions, and future human missions to Mars; current NASA news, NASA TV schedules, and information on spacecraft sighting opportunities; and descriptions of past NASA missions. There is a gallery of images, videos, and audio from NASA missions; outreach information on high school, college, teacher and faculty programs and resources; and a form to send questions to a space shuttle crew, space station crew, or mission control center.

2007-12-12

118

Space Shuttle Columbia News  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The official US gateway to all government information, FirstGov.gov, has compiled a number of informative links that chronicle the February 2003 Shuttle Columbia disaster. Visitors can read President Bush's address to the nation regarding Columbia and its crew; review the latest information from NASA about the Shuttle mission, crew, and current investigation; and discover how the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Environmental Protection Agency are assisting in the shuttle recovery and clean-up. The user-friendly FirstGov.gov does a good job of providing citizens with a well organized point of entry to links regarding recent governmental news and information.

2003-01-01

119

The ceremonial transfer of Leonardo, the first MPLM, from ASI to NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin speaks at the Space Station Processing Facility ceremony transferring the 'Leonardo' Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) to NASA. Standing behind him in front of Leonardo is KSC Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. The MPLM, a reusable logistics carrier, will be the primary delivery system used to resupply and return International Space Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the first of three MPLM carriers for the International Space Station. It is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Mission STS-100, targeted for April 2000.

1998-01-01

120

The ceremonial transfer of Leonardo, the first MPLM, from ASI to NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin (at right) shakes the hand of Sergio De Julio, president of the Italian Space Agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), during the ceremony transferring the 'Leonardo' Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from ASI to NASA. The event was held in the Space Station Processing Facility beside Leonardo. The MPLM, a reusable logistics carrier, will be the primary delivery system used to resupply and return International Space Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the first of three MPLM carriers for the International Space Station. It is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Mission STS-100, targeted for April 2000.

1998-01-01

121

The ceremonial transfer of Leonardo, the first MPLM, from ASI to NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sergio De Julio (at right), president of the Italian Space Agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), shakes the hand of NASA Adminstrator Daniel S. Goldin while holding the document which signifies the transfer of the 'Leonardo' Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from ASI to NASA. The ceremonial event was held in the Space Station Processing Facility beside Leonardo. The MPLM, a reusable logistics carrier, will be the primary delivery system used to resupply and return International Space Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the first of three MPLM carriers for the International Space Station. It is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Mission STS-100, targeted for April 2000.

1998-01-01

122

Space shuttle operational risk assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Space Shuttle system has recently been completed. This year-long effort represents a development resulting from seven years of application of risk technology to the Space Shuttle. These applications were initiated by NASA shortly after the Challenger accident as recommended by the Rogers and Slay Commission reports. The current effort is the first integrated quantitative assessment of the risk of the loss of the shuttle vehicle from 3 seconds prior to liftoff to wheel-stop at mission end. The study which was conducted under the direction of NASA's Shuttle Safety and Mission Assurance office at Johnson Spaceflight Center focused on shuttle operational risk but included consideration of all the shuttle flight and test history since the beginning of the program through Mission 67 in July of 1994.

Fragola, Joseph R.; Maggio, Gaspare

1996-03-01

123

Space shuttle operational risk assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Space Shuttle system has recently been completed. This year-long effort represents a development resulting from seven years of application of risk technology to the Space Shuttle. These applications were initiated by NASA shortly after the Challenger accident as recommended by the Rogers and Slay Commission reports. The current effort is the first integrated

Joseph R. Fragola; Gaspare Maggio

1996-01-01

124

STS-102 Space Shuttle Discovery Liftoff  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Discovery, STS-102 mission, clears launch pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center as the sun peers over the Atlantic Ocean on March 8, 2001. STS-102's primary cargo was the Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency built Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station's (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. NASA's 103rd overall flight and the eighth assembly flight, STS-102 was also the first flight involved with Expedition Crew rotation. The Expedition Two crew was delivered to the station while Expedition One was returned home to Earth.

2003-01-01

125

STS-102 Space Shuttle Discovery Liftoff  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-102 mission blasts off from launch pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center at dawn on March 8, 2001 aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. STS-102's primary cargo was the Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency-built Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station's (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. NASA's 103rd overall mission and the 8th Space Station Assembly Flight, STS-102 mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the Station and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.

2001-01-01

126

Space Shuttle Familiarization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation visualizes the NASA space center and research facility sites, as well as the geography, launching sites, launching pads, rocket launching, pre-flight activities, and space shuttle ground operations located at NASA Kennedy Space Center. Additionally, highlights the international involvement behind the International Space Station and the space station mobile servicing system. Extraterrestrial landings, surface habitats and habitation systems, outposts, extravehicular activity, and spacecraft rendezvous with the Earth return vehicle are also covered.

Mellett, Kevin

2006-01-01

127

Volume 4 Issue 12 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis December 2009 Space shuttle Atlantis crewmembers began their STS-129 mission to the International Space Station  

E-print Network

began their STS-129 mission to the International Space Station with a perfect, on-time launch Nov. 16, other equipment and supplies to the International Space Station. The STS-129 mission featured three. Space Shuttle Main Engines tested here lifted four shuttle missions to the space station, plus the final

128

NASA Vision  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This newsletter contains several articles, primarily on International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers and their activities, as well as the activities of NASA administrators. Other subjects covered in the articles include the investigation of the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, activities at NASA centers, Mars exploration, a collision avoidance test on a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The ISS articles cover landing in a Soyuz capsule, photography from the ISS, and the Expedition Seven crew.

Fenton, Mary (Editor); Wood, Jennifer (Editor)

2003-01-01

129

Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space shuttle flight system and mission profile are briefly described. Emphasis is placed on the economic and social benefits of the space transportation system. The space shuttle vehicle is described in detail.

1976-01-01

130

Space Shuttle.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The plans for utilizing reusable space shuttles which could replace almost all present expendable launch vehicles are briefly described. Many illustrations are included showing the artists' concepts of various configurations proposed for space shuttles. (PR)

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

131

NASA replanning efforts continue  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A task force of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is producing new launch schedules for NASA's three remaining space shuttle orbiters, possibly supplemented by expendable launch vehicles. In the wake of the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger on January 28, 1986, the task force is assuming a delay of 12-18 months before resumption of shuttle flights.NASA's Headquarters Replanning Task Force, which meets daily, is separate from the agency's Data and Design Analysis Task Force, which collects and analyzes information about the accident for the use of the investigative commission appointed by President Ronald Reagan.

Katzoff, Judith A.

132

Space Shuttle Main Engine Public Test Firing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new NASA Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) roars to the approval of more than 2,000 people who came to John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., on July 25 for a flight-certification test of the SSME Block II configuration. The engine, a new and significantly upgraded shuttle engine, was delivered to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida for use on future shuttle missions. Spectators were able to experience the 'shake, rattle and roar' of the engine, which ran for 520 seconds - the length of time it takes a shuttle to reach orbit.

2000-01-01

133

Space Shuttle: The Next Generation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In a May 2003 online feature of Popular Science magazine, several potential candidates for replacing NASA's aging space shuttles are examined. Although budget problems have made the outlook somewhat bleak for any new designs in the near future, a number of existing proposals are outlined. An especially eye-catching concept is an enormous flying wing, which would climb to 40,000 feet and serve as a launching pad for a rocket. Another possibility, which would be an intermediate step before the full-fledged shuttle replacement, is the Orbital Space Plane. This would likely be less complex than the shuttle while serving as a manned or unmanned taxi to space. The five-page article also describes NASA's changing needs and how the shuttle no longer meets them.

Sweetman, Bill.

134

New shuttle schedule released  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hubble Space Telescope has a tentative launch date of November 17, 1988, according to an announcement made October 3, 1986, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The plan calls for the first shuttle launch to take place on February 18, 1988, when Discovery is slated to launch a second Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS). A TDRS satellite was aboard Challenger when it exploded on January 28, 1986.The $1.3 billion telescope would be launched aboard the fifth shuttle mission in 1988. After launching the TDRS satellite, NASA plans to send Atlantis and then Columbia spacebound with military payloads. In September 1988, Discovery would be launched again with a third TDRS satellite.

1986-10-01

135

Mobile Christian - shuttle flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Louis Stork, 13, and Erin Whittle, 14, look on as Brianna Johnson, 14, conducts a 'test' of a space shuttle main engine in the Test Control Center exhibit in StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The young people were part of a group from Mobile Christian School in Mobile, Ala., that visited StenniSphere on April 21.

2009-01-01

136

NASA: Data on the Web.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an annotated bibliography of selected NASA Web sites for K-12 math and science teachers: the NASA Lewis Research Center Learning Technologies K-12 Home Page, Spacelink, NASA Quest, Basic Aircraft Design Page, International Space Station, NASA Shuttle Web Site, LIFTOFF to Space Education, Telescopes in Education, and Space Educator's…

Galica, Carol

1997-01-01

137

Human Factor Investigation of Waste Processing System During the HI-SEAS 4-month Mars Analog Mission in Support of NASA's Logistic Reduction and Repurposing Project: Trash to Gas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project is a collaborative effort in which NASA is tasked with reducing total logistical mass through reduction, reuse and recycling of various wastes and components of long duration space missions and habitats. Trash to Gas (TtG) is a sub task to LRR with efforts focused on development of a technology that converts wastes generated during long duration space missions into high-value products such as methane, water for life support, raw material production feedstocks, and other energy sources. The reuse of discarded materials is a critical component to reducing overall mission mass. The 120 day Hawaii Space Exploration and Analog Simulation provides a unique opportunity to answer questions regarding crew interface and system analysis for designing and developing future flight-like versions of a TtG system. This paper will discuss the human factors that would affect the design of a TtG or other waste processing systems. An overview of the habitat, utility usage, and waste storage and generation is given. Crew time spent preparing trash for TtG processing was recorded. Gas concentrations were measured near the waste storage locations and at other locations in the habitat. In parallel with the analog mission, experimental processing of waste materials in a TtG reactor was performed in order to evaluate performance with realistic waste materials.

Caraccio, Anne; Hintze, Paul E.; Miles, John D.

2014-01-01

138

Multipurpose Logistics Module, Leonardo, Rests in Discovery's Payload Bay  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This in-orbit close up shows the Italian Space Agency-built multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM), Leonardo, the primary cargo of the STS-102 mission, resting in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station's (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. The eighth station assembly flight and NASA's 103rd overall flight, STS-102 launched March 8, 2001 for an almost 13 day mission.

2001-01-01

139

Space Shuttle Strategic Planning Status  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Program is aggressively flying the Space Shuttle manifest for assembling the International Space Station and servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Completing this flight manifest while concurrently transitioning to the Exploration architecture creates formidable challenges; the most notable of which is retaining critical skills within the Shuttle Program workforce. The Program must define a strategy that will allow safe and efficient fly-out of the Shuttle, while smoothly transitioning Shuttle assets (both human and facility) to support early flight demonstrations required in the development of NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (Orion) and Crew and Cargo Launch Vehicles (Ares I). The Program must accomplish all of this while maintaining the current level of resources. Therefore, it will be necessary to initiate major changes in operations and contracting. Overcoming these challenges will be essential for NASA to fly the Shuttle safely, accomplish the Vision for Space Exploration, and ultimately meet the national goal of maintaining a robust space program. This paper will address the Space Shuttle Program s strategy and its current status in meeting these challenges.

Norbraten, Gordon L.; Henderson, Edward M.

2007-01-01

140

Lunar Commercial Mining Logistics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Innovative commercial logistics is required for supporting lunar resource recovery operations and assisting larger consortiums in lunar mining, base operations, camp consumables and the future commercial sales of propellant over the next 50 years. To assist in lowering overall development costs, ``reuse'' innovation is suggested in reusing modified LTS in-space hardware for use on the moon's surface, developing product lines for recovered gases, regolith construction materials, surface logistics services, and other services as they evolve, (Kistler, Citron and Taylor, 2005) Surface logistics architecture is designed to have sustainable growth over 50 years, financed by private sector partners and capable of cargo transportation in both directions in support of lunar development and resource recovery development. The author's perspective on the importance of logistics is based on five years experience at remote sites on Earth, where remote base supply chain logistics didn't always work, (Taylor, 1975a). The planning and control of the flow of goods and materials to and from the moon's surface may be the most complicated logistics challenges yet to be attempted. Affordability is tied to the innovation and ingenuity used to keep the transportation and surface operations costs as low as practical. Eleven innovations are proposed and discussed by an entrepreneurial commercial space startup team that has had success in introducing commercial space innovation and reducing the cost of space operations in the past. This logistics architecture offers NASA and other exploring nations a commercial alternative for non-essential cargo. Five transportation technologies and eleven surface innovations create the logistics transportation system discussed.

Kistler, Walter P.; Citron, Bob; Taylor, Thomas C.

2008-01-01

141

The Space Shuttle in perspective  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Commercial aspects of the Space Shuttle are examined, with attention given to charges to users, schedule of launches and reimbursement, kinds of payload and their selection, NASA authority, space allocation, and risk, liability, and insurance. It is concluded that insurance to reduce the risk, incentives that NASA is willing to make available to U.S. industry, and the demonstrated willingness of industry and the financial community to invest their funds in space ventures indicate that the new Shuttle capabilities will exponentially increase commercial activities in space during the 1980s.

Hosenball, S. N.

1981-01-01

142

The ceremonial transfer of Leonardo, the first MPLM, from ASI to NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Participants pose for a photo at the Space Station Processing Facility ceremony transferring the 'Leonardo' Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from the Italian Space Agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), to NASA. From left, they are astronaut Jim Voss, European Space Agency astronauts Umberto Guidoni of Italy and Christer Fuglesang of Sweden, NASA International Space Station Program Manager Randy Brinkley, NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin, ASI President Sergio De Julio and Stephen Francois, director, International Space Station Launch Site Support at KSC. The MPLM, a reusable logistics carrier, will be the primary delivery system used to resupply and return International Space Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the first of three MPLM carriers for the International Space Station. It is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Mission STS-100, targeted for April 2000.

1998-01-01

143

Launch of STS-66 Space Shuttle Atlantis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Atlantis returns to work after a refurbishing and a two-year layoff, as liftoff for NASA's STS-66 occurs at noon (EDT), November 3, 1994. A 'fish-eye' lens was used to record the image.

1994-01-01

144

Student Experiments Fly with the Shuttle.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes various experiments which high school students are preparing, to be carried on NASA's 500 or more Space Shuttle flights in the 1980s. The project is intended to stimulate superior secondary school students. (SA)

Saunders, Walter; And Others

1979-01-01

145

Report to the NASA Administrator by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel on the Space Shuttle Program. Part 1: Observations and Conclusions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Each system was chosen on the basis of its importance with respect to crew safety and mission success. An overview of the systems management is presented. The space shuttle main engine, orbiter thermal protection system, avionics, external tanks and solid rocket boosters were examined. The ground test and ground support equipment programs were studied. Program management was found to have an adequate understanding of the significant ground and flight risks involved.

1976-01-01

146

Liftoff of STS-67 Space Shuttle Endeavour  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carrying a crew of seven and a compliment of astronomic experiments, the Space Shuttle Endeavour embarks on NASA's longest Shuttle flight to date. Endeavour's liftoff from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 1:38:13 a.m. (EST), March 2, 1995.

1995-01-01

147

Liftoff of STS-67 Space Shuttle Endeavour  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carrying a crew of seven and a complement of astronomic experiments, the Space Shuttle Endeavour embarks on NASA's longest Shuttle flight to date. Endeavour's liftoff from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 1:38:13 a.m. (EST), March 2, 1995.

1995-01-01

148

Launch of STS-67 Space Shuttle Endeavour  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carrying a crew of seven and a complement of astronomic experiments, the Space Shuttle Endeavour embarks on NASA's longest shuttle flight to date. Endeavour's liftoff from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 1:38:13 a.m. (EST), March 2, 1995. In this view the fence line near the launch pad is evident in the foreground.

1995-01-01

149

today@nasa.gov  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Today@nasa.gov, contains the latest information and news releases from NASA missions. Visitors can also find out information about NASA's four strategic enterprises: Aeronautics, Human Exploration and Development of Space, Mission to Planet Earth, and Space Science. NASA related sites describe current happenings at NASA and also provide homepages of NASA missions including the Cassini space probe, the Mars Global Surveyor and, most recently, the launch of the Columbia space shuttle. Space exploration provides clues to how the solar system was formed, why life exists on earth and not on other known planets, and what the structures of the universe, matter, and energy are.

1998-01-01

150

Results of investigations on the 0.004-scale model 74-0 of the configuration 4 (modified) space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the NASA/MSFC 14-by-14-inch trisonic wind tunnel (oa131)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of an oil flow boundary-layer visualization wind tunnel test of an 0.004-scale model of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Orbiter in the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center 14-by-14-inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel are presented. The model was tested at Mach numbers from 0.60 through 2.75, at angles-of-attack from 0 through 25 degrees, and at unit Reynolds numbers from 5.0 to 7.0 million per foot. The test program involved still and motion picture photography of oil-paint flow patterns on the orbiter, during and immediately after tunnel flow, to determine areas of boundary layer separation and regions of potential auxiliary power unit exhaust recirculation during transonic and low supersonic re-entry flight.

Nichols, M. E.

1975-01-01

151

]Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Shuttle program is one of the most complex engineering activities undertaken anywhere in the world at the present time. The Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team (SIAT) was chartered in September 1999 by NASA to provide an independent review of the Space Shuttle sub-systems and maintenance practices. During the period from October through December 1999, the team led by Dr. McDonald and comprised of NASA, contractor, and DOD experts reviewed NASA practices, Space Shuffle anomalies, as well as civilian and military aerospace experience. In performing the review, much of a very positive nature was observed by the SIAT, not the least of which was the skill and dedication of the workforce. It is in the unfortunate nature of this type of review that the very positive elements are either not mentioned or dwelt upon. This very complex program has undergone a massive change in structure in the last few years with the transition to a slimmed down, contractor-run operation, the Shuttle Flight Operations Contract (SFOC). This has been accomplished with significant cost savings and without a major incident. This report has identified significant problems that must be addressed to maintain an effective program. These problems are described in each of the Issues, Findings or Observations summarized, and unless noted, appear to be systemic in nature and not confined to any one Shuttle sub-system or element. Specifics are given in the body of the report, along with recommendations to improve the present systems.

2000-01-01

152

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle Transition and Retirement  

E-print Network

was used to protect the space shuttle main engines and provide an aerodynamic shape when the ArtifactsNational Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAfacts Space Shuttle Transition and Retirement Three NASA space shuttles are undergoing an extensive transition and retirement (T&R) phase

153

Formal Verification for a Next-Generation Space Shuttle  

E-print Network

Formal Verification for a Next-Generation Space Shuttle Stacy D. Nelson1 , Charles Pecheur2 1 for integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM), in the context of NASA's next-generation space shuttle. We technologies for monitoring the health of future space shuttles and their ground support equipment

Bonaventure, Olivier

154

NASA's Getaway Special.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Getaway Special" is NASA's semiofficial program for low-budget researchers, who can arrange bookings for their own space experiments on regular flights of the space shuttle. Information about arranging for NASA to take individual experiment packages is presented. (LBH)

Randal, Judith

1978-01-01

155

Shuttle accident stalls science plans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plans to make 1986 a uniquely productive year for U.S. space science activities ended in one horrible moment with the January 28, 1986, explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. The joyless scene at Cape Canaveral, Fla., stood in sharp contrast to the overwhelming success of Voyager 2 in its encounter with Uranus 4 days earlier. (Scientific details of that encounter will follow in upcoming issues of Eos.)Of the 15 space shuttle flights planned for fiscal year 1986, beginning October 1, 1985, a total of seven were to have carried scientific payloads for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The remaining eight flights were evenly divided between missions for the U.S. Department of Defense and commercial missions for NASA's paying customers. The explosion caused NASA to put its entire space shuttle program on hold to allow time for engineers to find the cause of the accident and for NASA to implement corrective measures. As Eos went to press, NASA acting administrator William R. Graham had not yet released the names of those who would serve on the formal investigative panel. “I think everybody's agreed that it will take weeks to months to unravel,” said Alexander Dessler, director of the space science laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center near Huntsville, Ala. Dessler speculated that investigators would begin with a list of hundreds of possible causes for the explosion.

Katzoff, Judith A.

156

NASA Human Spaceflight  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The NASA Human Spaceflight site provides information on all crewed NASA missions, especially the Space Shuttle and International Space Station. Materials include realtime data and tracking information, updates for ongoing missions, press releases, videos and photos, and daily news and events from the various NASA centers. There is also information on historic crewed missions, and fact sheets on astronauts, shuttle missions, first flights, and scientific research facilities. Users may also subscribe to an e-mail service to receive status reports, news releases, and other current information.

2002-01-01

157

Shuttle seated extraction feasibility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following the Space Shuttle Challenger accident, serious attention has turned to in-flight escape. Prior to the resumption of flight, a manual bailout system was qualified and installed. For the long term, a seated extraction system to expand the escape envelope is being investigated. This paper describes a 1987 study, conducted jointly by NASA\\/Johnson Space Center and Langley Research Center, to

Steven R. Onagel; Laurence J. Bement

1989-01-01

158

The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission produced the most complete, highest-resolution digital elevation model of the Earth. The project was a joint endeavor of NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and the German and Italian Space Agencies and flew in February 2000. It used dual radar antennas to acquire interferometric radar data, processed to digital topographic data at 1 arc sec resolution.

Tom G. Farr; Paul A. Rosen; Edward Caro; Robert Crippen; Riley Duren; Scott Hensley; Michael Kobrick; Mimi Paller; Ernesto Rodriguez; Ladislav Roth; David Seal; Scott Shaffer; Joanne Shimada; Jeffrey Umland; Marian Werner; Michael Oskin; Douglas Burbank; Douglas Alsdorf

2007-01-01

159

The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which flew successfully aboard Endeavour in February 2000, is a cooperative project between NASA and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA). The mission was designed to use a single-pass radar interferometer to produce a digital elevation model of the Earth's land surface between about 60 degrees north and 56 degrees south latitude. The

T. G. Farr; M. Kobrick

2001-01-01

160

Liquid lift for the Shuttle  

Microsoft Academic Search

After the operational failure of a Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) led to the Space Shuttle Challenger accident, NASA reexamined the use of liquid-fueled units in place of the SRBs in order to ascertain whether they could improve safety and payload. In view of favorable study results obtained, the posibility has arisen of employing a common liquid rocket booster for the

Richard Demeis

1989-01-01

161

Shuttle Reference Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This collection of shuttle reference data contains the following information: shuttle abort history, shuttle abort modes, abort decisions, space shuttle rendezvous maneuvers, space shuttle main engines, space shuttle solid rocket boosters, hold-down posts, SRB (solid rocket boosters) ignition, electrical power distribution, hydraulic power units, thrust vector control, SBR rate gyro assemblies, SBR separation and Space Shuttle Super Super Light Weight Tank (SLWT).

2002-12-01

162

Shuttle Reference Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This collection of shuttle reference data contains the following information: shuttle abort history, shuttle abort modes, abort decisions, space shuttle rendezvous maneuvers, space shuttle main engines, space shuttle solid rocket boosters, hold-down posts, SRB (solid rocket boosters) ignition, electrical power distribution, hydraulic power units, thrust vector control, SBR rate gyro assemblies, SBR separation and Space Shuttle Super Super Light Weight Tank (SLWT).

2002-01-01

163

Logistic Regression  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The logistic regression originally is intended to explain the relationship between the probability of an event and a set of covariables. The model's coefficients can be interpreted via the odds and odds ratio, which are presented in introduction of the chapter. The observations are possibly got individually, then we speak of binary logistic regression. When they are grouped, the logistic regression is said binomial. In our presentation we mainly focus on the binary case. For statistical inference the main tool is the maximum likelihood methodology: we present the Wald, Rao and likelihoods ratio results and their use to compare nested models. The problems we intend to deal with are essentially the same as in multiple linear regression: testing global effect, individual effect, selection of variables to build a model, measure of the fitness of the model, prediction of new values… . The methods are demonstrated on data sets using R. Finally we briefly consider the binomial case and the situation where we are interested in several events, that is the polytomous (multinomial) logistic regression and the particular case of ordinal logistic regression.

Grégoire, G.

2014-01-01

164

Shuttle Rocket Motor Program: NASA should delay awarding some construction contracts. Report to the Chair, Subcommittee on Government Activities and Transportation, Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Even though the executive branch has proposed terminating the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) program, NASA is proceeding with all construction activity planned for FY 1992 to avoid schedule slippage if the program is reinstated by Congress. However, NASA could delay some construction activities for at least a few months without affecting the current launch data schedule. For example, NASA could delay Yellow Creek's motor storage and dock projects, Stennis' dock project, and Kennedy's rotation processing and surge facility and dock projects. Starting all construction activities as originally planned could result in unnecessarily incurring additional costs and termination liability if the funding for FY 1993 is not provided. If Congress decides to continue the program, construction could still be completed in time to avoid schedule slippage.

1992-01-01

165

Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Cargo Heat Exchanger  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the New Shuttle Orbiter's Multi- Purpose Logistics Modulo (MPLM) Cargo Heat Exchanger (HX) and associated MPLM cooling system. This paper presents Heat Exchanger (HX) design and performance characteristics of the system.

Zampiceni, John J.; Harper, Lon T.

2002-01-01

166

Results of the 0.015 scale space shuttle vehicle orbiter test (OA17) in the NASA low turbulence pressure tunnel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a 0.015 scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter in a low turbulence pressure tunnel. Six component static aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded while the model was pitched from -2 deg to +26 deg angle of attack. The yaw angles during these pitch sweeps were 0 deg, -5 deg, and 7 1/2 deg. Base, sting cavity, vertical tail, wing trailing edge, and elevon pressures, as well as elevon and rudder hinge moment data were also obtained. The tests were conducted at a nominal Mach number of 0.25. The Reynolds number was varied throughout the test program from 2.5 million to 4.7 million to 10.0 million to 12.5 million.

Milam, M. D.; Petrozzi, M. T.

1974-01-01

167

Hypersonic aeroheating test of space shuttle vehicle configuration 3 (model 22-OTS) in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH20), volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of hypersonic wind tunnel testing of an 0.0175 scale version of the vehicle 3 space shuttle configuration are presented. Temperature measurements were made on the launch configuration, orbiter plus tank, orbiter alone, tank alone, and solid rocket booster alone to provide heat transfer data. The test was conducted at free-stream Mach numbers of 5.3 and 7.3 and at free-stream Reynolds numbers of 1.5 million, 3.7 million, 5.0 million, and 7.0 million per foot. The model was tested at angles of attack from -5 deg to 20 deg and side slip angles of -5 deg and 0 deg.

Kingsland, R. B.; Lockman, W. K.

1975-01-01

168

Success Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program: Changes in Shuttle Post Challenger and Columbia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the legacy of successes in the space shuttle program particularly with regards to the changes in the culture of NASA's organization after the Challenger and Columbia accidents and some of the changes to the shuttles that were made manifest as a result of the accidents..

Jarrell, George

2010-01-01

169

Payload Flight Assignments: NASA Mixed Fleet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This manifest summarizes the missions planned by NASA for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELV's) as of the date of publication. Space Shuttle and ELV missions are shown through calendar year 2003. Space Shuttle missions for calendar years 2002-2003 are under review pending the resolution of details in the assembly sequence of the International Space Station (ISS).

Parker, Robert A. R.

1997-01-01

170

The ceremonial transfer of Leonardo, the first MPLM, from ASI to NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Participants pose for a photo at the Space Station Processing Facility ceremony transferring the 'Leonardo' Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from the Italian Space Agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), to NASA. From left, they are astronaut Jim Voss, ASI President Sergio De Julio, European Space Agency astronaut Umberto Guidoni of Italy, NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin and European Space Agency astronaut Christer Fuglesang of Sweden. The MPLM, a reusable logistics carrier, will be the primary delivery system used to resupply and return International Space Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the first of three MPLM carriers for the International Space Station. It is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Mission STS-100, targeted for April 2000.

1998-01-01

171

Shuttle Endeavour Flyover of Los Angeles Landmarks - Duration: 15:11.  

NASA Video Gallery

Space shuttle Endeavour atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft flew over many Los Angeles area landmarks on its final ferry flight Sept. 21, 2012, including the Coliseum, the Hollywood Sign, Griffith...

172

Future NASA spaceborne SAR missions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two Earth-orbiting radar missions are planned for the near future by NASA-Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and LightSAR. The SRTM will fly aboard the Shuttle using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) to provide a global digital elevation map. SRTM is jointly sponsored by NASA and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA). The LightSAR will utilize emerging technology to reduce

Jeffrey E. Hilland; Frederick V. Stuhr; Anthony Freeman; David Imel; Yuhsyen Shen; R. L. Jordan; E. R. Caro

1998-01-01

173

EVA 2010: Preparing for International Space Station EVA Operations Post-Space Shuttle Retirement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The expected retirement of the NASA Space Transportation System (also known as the Space Shuttle ) by 2011 will pose a significant challenge to Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The EVA hardware currently used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed assuming that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for refurbishment, or if necessary for failure investigation. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support hardware and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2015, and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, the EVA 2010 Project was jointly initiated by NASA and the OneEVA contractor team. The challenges addressed were to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, to secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, to protect for EMU hardware operability on-orbit, and to determine the source of high water purity to support recharge of PLSSs (no longer available via Shuttle). EVA 2010 Project includes the following tasks: the development of a launch fixture that would allow the EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to be launched on-board alternate vehicles; extension of the EMU hardware maintenance interval from 3 years (current certification) to a minimum of 6 years (to extend to 2015); testing of recycled ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) water for use in the EMU cooling system in lieu of water resupplied by International Partner (IP) vehicles; development of techniques to remove & replace critical components in the PLSS on-orbit (not routine); extension of on-orbit certification of EVA tools; and development of an EVA hardware logistical plan to support the ISS without the Space Shuttle. Assumptions for the EVA 2010 Project included no more than 8 EVAs per year for ISS EVA operations in the Post-Shuttle environment and limited availability of cargo upmass on IP launch vehicles. From 2010 forward, EVA operations on-board the ISS without the Space Shuttle will be a paradigm shift in safely operating EVA hardware on orbit and the EVA 2010 effort was initiated to accommodate this significant change in EVA evolutionary history.

Chullen, Cinda; West, William W.

2010-01-01

174

Sensitivity of Space Shuttle Weight and Cost to Structure Subsystem Weights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Quantitative relationships between changes in space shuttle weights and costs with changes in weight of various portions of space shuttle structural subsystems are investigated. These sensitivity relationships, as they apply at each of three points in the development program (preliminary design phase, detail design phase, and test/operational phase) have been established for five typical space shuttle designs, each of which was responsive to the missions in the NASA Shuttle RFP, and one design was that selected by NASA.

Wedge, T. E.; Williamson, R. P.

1973-01-01

175

www.nasa.gov National Aeronautics and Space Administration  

E-print Network

Center Director's Breakfast New Directions New Challenges New Opportunities #12;Space Shuttle Program Safety & Mission Assurance Directorate Ares Project Science and Mission Systems Shuttle Propulsion Spacewww.nasa.gov National Aeronautics and Space Administration marshall Robert Lightfoot August 2, 2011

176

Results of tests to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of two potential aeromaneuvering orbit-to-orbit shuttle (AMOOS) vehicle configurations in the NASA-Ames 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An aerodynamic wind tunnel investigation was conducted in the NASA-Ames Research Center (ARC) 3.5-foot hypersonic facility to provide data for use in obtaining experimental force and static stability characteristics of two potential aeromaneuvering orbit-to-orbit shuttle (AMOOS) vehicle configurations. The experimental data were compared with the aerodynamic characteristics estimated using Newtonian theory, thus establishing the usefulness of these predictions. The candidate AMOOS configurations selected for the wind tunnel tests were the AMOOS 5B and HB configurations. Two flap configurations were tested for each candidate - a forward or compression surface flap and an aft or expansion flap. Photographs and sketches of the two configurations with different control surfaces are shown. It was determined that Newtonian theory generally predicted the aerodynamics of the 5B configuration with acceptable accuracy for all expansion flap deflections and for compression flap deflections less than or equal to 10 degrees. Flow separation upstream of large compression flap deflections was detected from the experimental data.

Ketter, F. C., Jr.

1974-01-01

177

Endeavour on Shuttle Carrier Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour passes over KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility atop NASA's Boeing 747 Shuttle carrier Aircraft (SCA) as it returns March 27, 1997 from Palmdale, California, after an eight-month Orbiter Maintenance Down Period (OMDP). Nearly 100 modifications were made to Endeavour during that time period, including some that were directly associated with work required to support International Space Station (ISS) operations. The most extensive of the modifications was the installation of an external airlock to allow the orbiter to dock with the Station. Other modifications included upgrades to Endeavour's power supply system, general purpose computers and thermal protection system, along with the installation of new light-weight commander and pilot seats and other weight-saving modifications.

1997-01-01

178

Liquid lift for the Shuttle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

After the operational failure of a Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) led to the Space Shuttle Challenger accident, NASA reexamined the use of liquid-fueled units in place of the SRBs in order to ascertain whether they could improve safety and payload. In view of favorable study results obtained, the posibility has arisen of employing a common liquid rocket booster for the Space Shuttle, its cargo version ('Shuttle-C'), and the next-generation Advanced Launch System. The system envisioned would involve two booster units, whose four engines/unit would be fed by integral LOX and kerosene tanks. Mission aborts with one-booster unit and two-unit failures would not be catastrophic, and would respectively allow LEO or an emergency landing in Africa.

Demeis, Richard

1989-02-01

179

Shuttle Hitchhiker Experiment Launcher System (SHELS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Shuttle Small Payloads Project (SSPP), in partnership with the United States Air Force and NASA's Explorer Program, is developing a Shuttle based launch system called SHELS (Shuttle Hitchhiker Experiment Launcher System), which shall be capable of launching up to a 400 pound spacecraft from the Shuttle cargo bay. SHELS consists of a Marman band clamp push-plate ejection system mounted to a launch structure; the launch structure is mounted to one Orbiter sidewall adapter beam. Avionics mounted to the adapter beam will interface with Orbiter electrical services and provide optional umbilical services and ejection circuitry. SHELS provides an array of manifesting possibilities to a wide range of satellites.

Daelemans, Gerry

1999-01-01

180

SESAC statement on shuttle accident  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Space and Earth Science Advisory Committee (SESAC) of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC) shares NASA's and the nation's grief in the loss of the Challenger crew—seven exceptional individuals whose lives were dedicated to some of our country's loftiest goals. Over the years, these dedicated individuals and their fellow astronauts have worked closely with the scientific community to ensure that the scientific aspects of the United States space program would be productive in the era of the space shuttle. Through their efforts, the value of manned space flight for accomplishing important research in several areas of space science has been unambiguously demonstrated. Further, as space science has become increasingly an international enterprise, the capabilities of the space shuttle have become central to much scientific planning worldwide.

181

Integrated logistics: achieving logistics performance improvements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presents the results of a recent survey of logistics executives concerning their perceptions regarding integrated logistics. Focuses discussion on an assessment of the current level of implementation of the integrated logistics concept among US firms and provides support for a relationship between integration and logistical performance improvements. Reveals that the results have significant managerial implications as more organizations place emphasis

Patricia J. Daugherty; Alexander E. Ellinger; Craig M. Gustin

1996-01-01

182

Green Logistics Management of Logistics Enterprises  

Microsoft Academic Search

The modern logistics industry plays an important role in promoting economic development. However, it also has serious adverse effects on the environment. Therefore it is necessary to practice green logistics management, particularly in goods transportation, packaging, storage, loading and unloading. This article analyzes the green management system of logistics enterprises and advances the concept of Green Logistics, which should be

Zhang Guirong; Mu Yuxin

2010-01-01

183

Space shuttle main engine meets test objectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The second, full-duration test of the space shuttle's main propulsion system was conducted successfully on February 28, at the NASA test site in Mississippi. Officials responsible for shuttle propulsion system development said afterwards that all test objectives had been met during the 555-second firing.Cited as noteworthy was the fact that the three main engines used in the test were successfully

Peter M. Bell

1980-01-01

184

Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team (SIAT) Report  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Review Panel Report represents the work of a review team contracted by NASA to analyze its programs and practices. The 135-page "Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team (SIAT) Report" reviews the Space Shuttle's "sub-systems and maintenance practices." The report identifies systemic problems and organizes them into nine main issues, discusses technical issues, and offers recommendations. An additional report, from the Mars Independent Assessment Team chaired by Thomas Young, will be available by the end of March.

185

Legal issues inherent in Space Shuttle operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (NASAct) is discussed with reference to its relevance to the operation of the Space Shuttle. The law is interpreted as giving NASA authority to regulate specific Shuttle missions, as well as authority to decide how much space aboard the Shuttle gets rented to whom. The Shuttle will not, however, be considered a 'common carrier' either in terms of NASAct or FAA regulations, because it will not be held available to the public-at-large, as are the flag carriers of various national airlines, e.g., Lufthansa, Air France, Aeroflot, etc. It is noted that the Launch Policy of 1972, which ensures satellite launch assistance to other countries or international organizations, shall not be interpreted as conferring common carrier status on the Space Shuttle.

Mossinghoff, G. J.; Sloup, G. P.

1978-01-01

186

Shuttle interaction study extension  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implications of using the Shuttle with the SOC were analyzed, including constraints that the Shuttle places upon the SOC design. All the considerations involved in the use of the shuttle as a part of the SOC concept were identified.

1981-01-01

187

The Shuttle Era  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of the Space Shuttle Program is presented. The missions of the space shuttle orbiters, the boosters and main engine, and experimental equipment are described. Crew and passenger accommodations are discussed as well as the shuttle management teams.

1981-01-01

188

A Brief History of NASA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This brief history of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) begins with the agency's origins during the Cold War and recounts the early manned and unmanned missions (Mercury, Gemini, Pioneer, Voyager, and others), the landmark Apollo Moon missions, and NASA's later projects, such as the Space Shuttle, the Hubble telecope, and the International Space Station.

189

ISS Logistics Hardware Disposition and Metrics Validation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

I was assigned to the Logistics Division of the International Space Station (ISS)/Spacecraft Processing Directorate. The Division consists of eight NASA engineers and specialists that oversee the logistics portion of the Checkout, Assembly, and Payload Processing Services (CAPPS) contract. Boeing, their sub-contractors and the Boeing Prime contract out of Johnson Space Center, provide the Integrated Logistics Support for the ISS activities at Kennedy Space Center. Essentially they ensure that spares are available to support flight hardware processing and the associated ground support equipment (GSE). Boeing maintains a Depot for electrical, mechanical and structural modifications and/or repair capability as required. My assigned task was to learn project management techniques utilized by NASA and its' contractors to provide an efficient and effective logistics support infrastructure to the ISS program. Within the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) I was exposed to Logistics support components, such as, the NASA Spacecraft Services Depot (NSSD) capabilities, Mission Processing tools, techniques and Warehouse support issues, required for integrating Space Station elements at the Kennedy Space Center. I also supported the identification of near-term ISS Hardware and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) candidates for excessing/disposition prior to October 2010; and the validation of several Logistics Metrics used by the contractor to measure logistics support effectiveness.

Rogers, Toneka R.

2010-01-01

190

Shuttle Atlantis Landing at Edwards  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Atlantis touches down at 3:35 p.m. PST on 6 December 1988 at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility at the conclusion of the STS-27 Department of Defense mission. Landing took place on runway 17 of the Rogers Dry Lake, concluding the 4-day, 9-hour, 6-minute mission. The five-man crew was led by Commander Robert L. Gibson and included Pilot Guy S. Gardner; Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, William M. Sheperd, and Richard M. Mullane. Atlantis was launched on December 2 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1988-01-01

191

Shuttle Discovery Mated to 747 SCA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Discovery rides atop '905,' NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, on its delivery flight from California to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, where it was prepared for its first orbital mission for 30 August to 5 September 1984. The NASA 747, obtained in 1974, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the additional weight of the orbiters. Small vertical fins have also been added to the tips of the horizontal stabilizers for additional stability due to air turbulence on the control surfaces caused by the orbiters. A second modified 747, no. 911, went in to service in November 1990 and is also used to ferry orbiters to destinations where ground transportation is not practical. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Cali

1983-01-01

192

Results of experimental investigations to determine external tank protuberance loads using a 0.03-scale model of the Space Shuttle launch configuration (Model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC unitary plan wind tunnel, volume 2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA19OA/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA19OA) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA19OB). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline; (2) GO2 pressure line; (3) LO2 antigeyser line; (4) GH2 pressure line; (5) LH2 tank cable tray; (6) LO2 tank cable tray; (7) Bipod; (8) ET/SRB cable tray; and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above; 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements; Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures; and Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

Houlihan, S. R.

1992-02-01

193

Results of experimental investigations to determine external tank protuberance loads using a 0.03-scale model of the Space Shuttle launch configuration (model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC unitary plan wind tunnel, volume 1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA190A/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA190A) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA190B). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline, (2) GO2 pressure line, (3) LO2 antigeyser line, (4) GH2 pressure line, (5) LH2 tank cable tray, (6) LO2 tank cable tray, (7) Bipod, (8) ET/SRB cable tray, and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: (1) Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above. (2) 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements. (3) Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures. (4) Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

Houlihan, S. R.

1992-02-01

194

NASA Video Catalog  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Subject Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

2006-01-01

195

Direct Visualization of Shock Waves in Supersonic Space Shuttle Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Direct observation of shock boundaries is rare. This Technical Memorandum describes direct observation of shock waves produced by the space shuttle vehicle during STS-114 and STS-110 in imagery provided by NASA s tracking cameras.

OFarrell, J. M.; Rieckhoff, T. J.

2011-01-01

196

Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Turbine Studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A NASA scientist displays Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbine component which underwent air flow tests at Marshall's Structures and Dynamics Lab. Such studies could improve efficiency of aircraft engines, and lower operational costs.

1996-01-01

197

Closeup view looking into the nozzle of the Space Shuttle ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Close-up view looking into the nozzle of the Space Shuttle Main Engine number 2061 looking at the cooling tubes along the nozzle wall and up towards the Main Combustion Chamber and Injector Plate - Space Transportation System, Space Shuttle Main Engine, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

198

Analysis of the Space Shuttle main engine simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a final report on an analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Program, a digital simulator code written in Fortran. The research was undertaken in ultimate support of future design studies of a shuttle life-extending Intelligent Control System (ICS). These studies are to be conducted by NASA Lewis Space Research Center. The primary purpose of the analysis was

J. Alex Deabreu-Garcia; John T. Welch

1993-01-01

199

Thousands gather to watch a Space Shuttle Main Engine Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Approximately 13,000 people fill the grounds at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center for the first-ever evening public engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. The test marked Stennis Space Center's 20th anniversary celebration of the first Space Shuttle mission.

2001-01-01

200

3Space Shuttle Endeavor -Last Flight Time Altitude  

E-print Network

3Space Shuttle Endeavor - Last Flight Time Altitude (meters) Speed (m/s) 0 0 0 1 3 5 2 7 12 3 17 17 acceleration of the shuttle during its first 20 seconds of flight? Space Math http 15 665 100 16 755 106 17 888 117 18 1019 126 19 1158 136 20 1334 148 The final launch of NASA's space

201

STS-102 Astronaut Thomas Views International Space Station Through Shuttle Window  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-102 astronaut and mission specialist, Andrew S.W. Thomas, gazes through an aft window of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery as it approaches the docking bay of the International Space Station (ISS). Launched March 8, 2001, STS-102's primary cargo was the Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency-built Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the ISS's moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. NASA's 103rd overall mission and the 8th Space Station Assembly Flight, STS-102 mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the Station and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.

2001-01-01

202

Remote Observations of Reentering Spacecraft Including the Space Shuttle Orbiter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flight measurement is a critical phase in development, validation and certification processes of technologies destined for future civilian and military operational capabilities. This paper focuses on several recent NASA-sponsored remote observations that have provided unique engineering and scientific insights of reentry vehicle flight phenomenology and performance that could not necessarily be obtained with more traditional instrumentation methods such as onboard discrete surface sensors. The missions highlighted include multiple spatially-resolved infrared observations of the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter during hypersonic reentry from 2009 to 2011, and emission spectroscopy of comparatively small-sized sample return capsules returning from exploration missions. Emphasis has been placed upon identifying the challenges associated with these remote sensing missions with focus on end-to-end aspects that include the initial science objective, selection of the appropriate imaging platform and instrumentation suite, target flight path analysis and acquisition strategy, pre-mission simulations to optimize sensor configuration, logistics and communications during the actual observation. Explored are collaborative opportunities and technology investments required to develop a next-generation quantitative imaging system (i.e., an intelligent sensor and platform) with greater capability, which could more affordably support cross cutting civilian and military flight test needs.

Horvath, Thomas J.; Cagle, Melinda F.; Grinstead, jay H.; Gibson, David

2013-01-01

203

Shuttle bioresearch laboratory breadboard simulations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Laboratory breadboard simulations (Tests I and II) were conducted to test concepts and assess problems associated with bioresearch support equipment, facilities, and operational integration for conducting manned earth orbital Shuttle missions. This paper describes Test I and discusses the major observations made in Test II. The tests emphasized candidate experiment protocols and requirements: Test I for biological research and Test II for crew members (simulated), subhuman primates, and radioisotope tracer studies on lower organisms. The procedures and approaches developed for these simulation activities could form the basis for Spacelab simulations and developing preflight integration, testing, and logistics of flight payloads.

Taketa, S. T.

1975-01-01

204

NASA Human Spaceflight Conjunction Assessment: Recent Conjunctions of Interest  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation discusses a brief history of NASA Human Spaceflight Conjunction Assessment (CA) activities, an overview of NASA CA process for ISS and Shuttle, and recent examples from Human Spaceflight conjunctions.

Browns, Ansley C.

2010-01-01

205

Space Shuttle thermal protection system inspection by 3D imaging laser radar  

Microsoft Academic Search

NASA has developed a sensor suite to inspect the Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System while the Shuttle is flying in orbit. When the Space Shuttle returns to flight, it will carry a 3D Imaging Laser Radar as part of the sensor suite to observe the Thermal Protection System and indicate any damages that may need to be repaired before return

James C. Lamoreux; James D. Siekierski; J. P. N. Carter

2004-01-01

206

EFFECTS OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE COCKPIT AVIONICS UPGRADE ON CREWMEMBER PERFORMANCE AND SITUATION AWARENESS  

E-print Network

EFFECTS OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE COCKPIT AVIONICS UPGRADE ON CREWMEMBER PERFORMANCE AND SITUATIONCann, Ph.D. NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA The Space Shuttle Cockpit Avionics Upgrade (CAU was used. The Space Shuttles are now scheduled to be retired by 2010 without incorporating CAU; however

Hayashi, Miwa

207

An Integrated Approach to Thermal Management of International Space Station Logistics Flights, Improving the Efficiency  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The efficiency of re-useable aerospace systems requires a focus on the total operations process rather than just orbital performance. For the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module this activity included special attention to terrestrial conditions both pre-launch and post-landing and how they inter-relate to the mission profile. Several of the efficiencies implemented for the MPLM Mission Engineering were NASA firsts and all served to improve the overall operations activities. This paper will provide an explanation of how various issues were addressed and the resulting solutions. Topics range from statistical analysis of over 30 years of atmospheric data at the launch and landing site to a new approach for operations with the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. In each situation the goal was to "tune" the thermal management of the overall flight system for minimizing requirement risk while optimizing power and energy performance.

Holladay, Jon; Day, Greg; Roberts, Barry; Leahy, Frank

2003-01-01

208

Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) Fleet Photo  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's two Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) are seen here nose to nose at Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The front mounting attachment for the Shuttle can just be seen on top of each. The SCAs are used to ferry Space Shuttle orbiters from landing sites back to the launch complex at the Kennedy Space Center, and also to and from other locations too distant for the orbiters to be delivered by ground transportation. The orbiters are placed atop the SCAs by Mate-Demate Devices, large gantry-like structures which hoist the orbiters off the ground for post-flight servicing, and then mate them with the SCAs for ferry flights. Features which distinguish the two SCAs from standard 747 jetliners are; three struts, with associated interior structural strengthening, protruding from the top of the fuselage (two aft, one forward) on which the orbiter is attached, and two additional vertical stabilizers, one on each end of the standard horizontal stabilizer, to enhance directional stability. The two SCAs are under the operational control of NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) t

1995-01-01

209

Shuttle Case Study Collection Website Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As a continuation from summer 2012, the Shuttle Case Study Collection has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. Decades of information related to processing and launching the Space Shuttle is gathered into a single database to provide educators with an alternative means to teach real-world engineering processes. The goal is to provide additional engineering materials that enhance critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills. During this second phase of the project, the Shuttle Case Study Collection website was developed. Extensive HTML coding to link downloadable documents, videos, and images was required, as was training to learn NASA's Content Management System (CMS) for website design. As the final stage of the collection development, the website is designed to allow for distribution of information to the public as well as for case study report submissions from other educators online.

Ransom, Khadijah S.; Johnson, Grace K.

2012-01-01

210

Space Shuttle Main Engine performance analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

For a number of years, NASA has relied primarily upon periodically updated versions of Rocketdyne's power balance model (PBM) to provide space shuttle main engine (SSME) steady-state performance prediction. A recent computational study indicated that PBM predictions do not satisfy fundamental energy conservation principles. More recently, SSME test results provided by the Technology Test Bed (TTB) program have indicated significant

L. Michael Santi

1993-01-01

211

Launch of STS-66 Space Shuttle Atlantis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Atlantis returns to work after a refurbishing and a two-year layoff, as liftoff for NASA's STS-66 occurs at noon (EDT), November 3, 1994. A 70mm camera was used to record the image. Note the vegetation and the reflection of the launch in the water across from the launch pad.

1994-01-01

212

Launch of STS-66 Space Shuttle Atlantis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Atlantis returns to work after a refurbishing and a two-year layoff, as liftoff for NASA's STS-66 occurs at noon (EDT), November 3, 1994. A 35mm camera was used to record the image, which includes much of the base of the launch site as well as the launch itself.

1994-01-01

213

Applying Reliability Models to the Space Shuttle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experience of a team that evaluated many reliability models and tried to validate them for the on-board system software of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) space shuttle is presented. It is shown that three separate but related functions comprise an integrated reliability program: prediction, control, and assessment. The application of the reliability model and the allocation of

Norman F. Schneidewind; Ted W. Keller

1992-01-01

214

NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center was recognized Nov.  

E-print Network

Space Station after the space shuttle retires and to explore destinations beyond low-Earth orbit the space shuttle Columbia tragedy. That vision called for retiring the space shuttles in 2010, endingNASA's John C. Stennis Space Center was recognized Nov. 6 as the first site to earn certification

215

Shuttle Discovery Landing at Edwards  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery mission lands at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards AFB, California, early Saturday morning, 18 March 1989. Touchdown was at 6:35:49 a.m. PST and wheel stop was at 6:36:40 a.m. on runway 22. Controllers chose the concrete runway for the landing in order to make tests of braking and nosewheel steering. The STS-29 mission was very successful, completing the launch of a Tracking and Data Relay communications satellite, as well as a range of scientific experiments. Discovery's five-man crew was led by Commander Michael L. Coats, and included pilot John E. Blaha and mission specialists James P. Bagian, Robert C. Springer, and James F. Buchli. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the

1989-01-01

216

Shuttle Atlantis Landing at Edwards  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Space Shuttle Atlantis touched down on the lakebed runway at Edwards Air Force Base in California's Mojave Desert Tuesday, 3 December 1985 at 1:33:49 p.m. Pacific Standard Time, concluding the STS 61-B international mission. The eight-day mission successfully deployed three communications satellites including the Mexican Morelos B, the Australian Aussat 2 and an RCA Satcom K-2 satellite. In addition, two spacewalks were performed to experiment with construction of structures in space. Crew of the 61-B mission included Commander Brewster H. Shaw, Jr.; Pilot Bryan D. O'Connor; Mission Specialists Mary L. Cleave, Sherwood C. Spring and Jerry L. Ross; and Payload Specialists Rudolfo Neri Vela of Mexico and Charles Walker of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Resear

1985-01-01

217

Michoud Assembly Facility A component of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center  

E-print Network

propellant, which is fed to the shuttle's three main engines during launch to power the vehicle to space: the space shuttle. Nearly three decades later, the NASA facility contin ues to support the Space Shuttle. The final assembly phase of space shuttle lightweight external tanks 5, 6 and 7 is under way at Michoud

218

By Stephan R. McCandliss THE DECISION by NASA Administrator Sean  

E-print Network

the space shuttle's return to flight after the Columbia disaster were cited as only one of many reasons shuttle. The shuttle was sold to Congress as the means for astronauts to learn to work in space that the decision by President Bush to give NASA a new mission with no role for the space shuttle beyond satisfying

219

Logistics Reduction Technologies for Exploration Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human exploration missions under study are limited by the launch mass capacity of existing and planned launch vehicles. The logistical mass of crew items is typically considered separate from the vehicle structure, habitat outfitting, and life support systems. Although mass is typically the focus of exploration missions, due to its strong impact on launch vehicle and habitable volume for the crew, logistics volume also needs to be considered. NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) Project is developing six logistics technologies guided by a systems engineering cradle-to-grave approach to enable after-use crew items to augment vehicle systems. Specifically, AES LRR is investigating the direct reduction of clothing mass, the repurposing of logistical packaging, the use of autonomous logistics management technologies, the processing of spent crew items to benefit radiation shielding and water recovery, and the conversion of trash to propulsion gases. Reduction of mass has a corresponding and significant impact to logistical volume. The reduction of logistical volume can reduce the overall pressurized vehicle mass directly, or indirectly benefit the mission by allowing for an increase in habitable volume during the mission. The systematic implementation of these types of technologies will increase launch mass efficiency by enabling items to be used for secondary purposes and improve the habitability of the vehicle as mission durations increase. Early studies have shown that the use of advanced logistics technologies can save approximately 20 m(sup 3) of volume during transit alone for a six-person Mars conjunction class mission.

Broyan, James L., Jr.; Ewert, Michael K.; Fink, Patrick W.

2014-01-01

220

The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On February 22, 2000 Space Shuttle Endeavour landed at Kennedy Space Center, completing the highly successful 11-day flight of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Onboard were over 300 high-density tapes containing data for the highest resolution, most complete digital topographic map of Earth ever made. SRTM is a cooperative project between NASA and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense. The mission was designed to use a single-pass radar interferometer to produce a digital elevation model (DEM) of the Earth's land surface between about 60 deg north and 56 deg south latitude. When completed, the DEM will have 30 m pixel spacing and about 15 m vertical accuracy. Two orthorectified image mosaics (one from the ascending passes with illumination from the southeast and one from descending passes with illumination from the southwest) will also be produced.

Farr, Tom G.; Kobrick, Mike

2000-01-01

221

Shuttle seated extraction feasibility study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Following the Space Shuttle Challenger accident, serious attention has turned to in-flight escape. Prior to the resumption of flight, a manual bailout system was qualified and installed. For the long term, a seated extraction system to expand the escape envelope is being investigated. This paper describes a 1987 study, conducted jointly by NASA/Johnson Space Center and Langley Research Center, to determine the feasibility of modifying the Space Shuttle Orbiters to incorporate the seated extraction system. Results of the study are positive, indicating retrofit opportunity and high probability of escape for early ascent, late entry, and even for uncontrolled flight such as the Challenger breakup. The system, as envisioned, can extract seven crewmembers within two seconds.

Onagel, Steven R.; Bement, Laurence J.

222

Shuttle seated extraction feasibility study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following the Space Shuttle Challenger accident, serious attention has turned to in-flight escape. Prior to the resumption of flight, a manual bailout system was qualified and installed. For the long term, a seated extraction system to expand the escape envelope is being investigated. This paper describes a 1987 study, conducted jointly by NASA/Johnson Space Center and Langley Research Center, to determine the feasibility of modifying the Space Shuttle Orbiters to incorporate the seated extraction system. Results of the study are positive, indicating retrofit opportunity and high probability of escape for early ascent, late entry, and even for uncontrolled flight such as the Challenger breakup. The system, as envisioned, can extract seven crewmembers within two seconds.

Onagel, Steven R.; Bement, Laurence J.

1989-01-01

223

Shuttle Entry Imaging Using Infrared Thermography  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the Columbia Accident Investigation, imaging teams supporting debris shedding analysis were hampered by poor entry image quality and the general lack of information on optical signatures associated with a nominal Shuttle entry. After the accident, recommendations were made to NASA management to develop and maintain a state-of-the-art imagery database for Shuttle engineering performance assessments and to improve entry imaging capability to support anomaly and contingency analysis during a mission. As a result, the Space Shuttle Program sponsored an observation campaign to qualitatively characterize a nominal Shuttle entry over the widest possible Mach number range. The initial objectives focused on an assessment of capability to identify/resolve debris liberated from the Shuttle during entry, characterization of potential anomalous events associated with RCS jet firings and unusual phenomenon associated with the plasma trail. The aeroheating technical community viewed the Space Shuttle Program sponsored activity as an opportunity to influence the observation objectives and incrementally demonstrate key elements of a quantitative spatially resolved temperature measurement capability over a series of flights. One long-term desire of the Shuttle engineering community is to calibrate boundary layer transition prediction methodologies that are presently part of the Shuttle damage assessment process using flight data provided by a controlled Shuttle flight experiment. Quantitative global imaging may offer a complementary method of data collection to more traditional methods such as surface thermocouples. This paper reviews the process used by the engineering community to influence data collection methods and analysis of global infrared images of the Shuttle obtained during hypersonic entry. Emphasis is placed upon airborne imaging assets sponsored by the Shuttle program during Return to Flight. Visual and IR entry imagery were obtained with available airborne imaging platforms used within DoD along with agency assets developed and optimized for use during Shuttle ascent to demonstrate capability (i.e., tracking, acquisition of multispectral data, spatial resolution) and identify system limitations (i.e., radiance modeling, saturation) using state-of-the-art imaging instrumentation and communication systems. Global infrared intensity data have been transformed to temperature by comparison to Shuttle flight thermocouple data. Reasonable agreement is found between the flight thermography images and numerical prediction. A discussion of lessons learned and potential application to a potential Shuttle boundary layer transition flight test is presented.

Horvath, Thomas; Berry, Scott; Alter, Stephen; Blanchard, Robert; Schwartz, Richard; Ross, Martin; Tack, Steve

2007-01-01

224

www.nasa.gov Fiscal Year  

E-print Network

's progress toward achieving the challenging mission of space exploration, scientific discovery four successful Space Shuttle launches to the International Space Station (ISS) since last Novemberwww.nasa.gov Fiscal Year PERFORMANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT 2010 National Aeronautics and Space

225

NASA Advisory Council Space Operations Committee September 2010  

E-print Network

. Leroy Chiao ­ Former NASA Astronaut and International Space Station Commander · Mr. Tommy Holloway ­ Former Space Shuttle and International Space Station Program Manager · Mr. Glynn Lunney ­ Former NASA (Neumann) · Space Shuttle Program Update (Casper) · International Space Station Program Update (Suffredini

Waliser, Duane E.

226

Hypersonic ramjets for space shuttles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author briefly describes why he thinks air-breathing propulsion merits serious consideration as an alternative or supplement to rocket propulsion for space shuttle missions. Several aspects of hypersonic ramjet technology are discussed which are indicative of the current state of development and of the compromises which are made in arriving at effective engine configuration concepts. Points of interest in the current NASA Hypersonic Research Engine Project are cited as to exemplify the actual development of a hydrogen-fueled, regeneratively cooled, flight-weight, dual-combustion mode hypersonic ramjet.

Rubert, K. F.

1970-01-01

227

Space Shuttle Main Engine Test on B-1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., is NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing. Stennis Space Center tests all main engines that power the Space Shuttle into low-Earth orbit. Shown here is a test firing of a powerful main engine on the B-1 test stand at Stennis.

1996-01-01

228

Space Shuttle Propulsion Finishing Strong  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerous lessons have been documented from the Space Shuttle Propulsion elements. Major events include loss of the SRB's on STS-4 and shutdown of an SSME during ascent on STS- 51F. On STS-112 only half the pyrotechnics fired to release the vehicle from the launch pad, a testament for redundancy. STS-91 exhibited freezing of a main combustion chamber pressure measurement and on STS-93 nozzle tube ruptures necessitated a low liquid level oxygen cut off of the main engines. A number of on pad aborts were experienced during the early program resulting in delays. And the two accidents, STS-51L and STS-107, had unique heritage in history from early Program decisions and vehicle configuration. Following STS-51L significant resources were invested in developing fundamental physical understanding of solid rocket motor environments and material system behavior. Human rating of solid rocket motors was truly achieved. And following STS-107, the risk of ascent debris was better characterized and controlled. Situational awareness during all mission phases improved, and the management team instituted effective risk assessment practices. These major events and lessons for the future are discussed. The last 22 flights of the Space Shuttle, following the Columbia accident, were characterized by remarkable improvement in safety and reliability. Numerous problems were solved in addition to reduction of the ascent debris hazard. The propulsion system elements evolved to high reliability and heavy lift capability. The Shuttle system, though not a operable as envisioned in the 1970's, successfully assembled the International Space Station (ISS) and provided significant logistics and down mass for ISS operations. By the end of the Program, the remarkable Space Shuttle Propulsion system achieved very high performance, was largely reusable, exhibited high reliability, and is a heavy lift earth to orbit propulsion system. The story of this amazing system is discussed in detail in the paper.

Owen, James W.; Singer, Jody

2011-01-01

229

Shuttle Transportation System Case-Study Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A case-study collection was developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Using lessons learned and documented by NASA KSC engineers, analysts, and contractors, decades of information related to processing and launching the Space Shuttle was gathered into a single database. The goal was to provide educators with an alternative means to teach real-world engineering processes and to enhance critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills. Suggested formats were created to assist both external educators and internal NASA employees to develop and contribute their own case-study reports to share with other educators and students. Via group project, class discussion, or open-ended research format, students will be introduced to the unique decision making process related to Shuttle missions and development. Teaching notes, images, and related documents will be made accessible to the public for presentation of Space Shuttle reports. Lessons investigated included the engine cutoff (ECO) sensor anomaly which occurred during mission STS-114. Students will be presented with general mission infom1ation as well as an explanation of ECO sensors. The project will conclude with the design of a website that allows for distribution of information to the public as well as case-study report submissions from other educators online.

Ransom, Khadijah

2012-01-01

230

Research on Logistics Resources Integration in View of Logistics Networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the status quo of China's logistics industry, this paper indicates that the structural contradiction of the logistics supply-demand be attributed to the unsteady development of logistics industry. Integrating logistics resources is the everlasting topic and intrinsic requirement for logistics development, whereas logistics networking is the essential approach to achieve logistics resources integration. In this paper, principal meaning and

Wenzheng Wu; Songdong Ju; Jie Xu

2010-01-01

231

Space Shuttle Program Status  

E-print Network

1 Space Shuttle Program Status John Casper Associate Manager Space Shuttle Program September 13, 2010 NAC Space Operations Committee #12;2 Operations #12;3 Flown Manifest March 2009 ­ May 2010 #12, 2010 · 132nd Space Shuttle mission · 32nd Flight of Atlantis (120,650,907 statute miles) · 294 Total

Waliser, Duane E.

232

STS-129 shuttle crew visits Stennis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Members of the STS-129 space shuttle crew visited NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center on Jan. 19 to share details of their November visit to the International Space Station. During their 11-day mission aboard shuttle Atlantis, crew members delivered equipment, supplies and spare parts to the ISS. Following their mission report, astronauts visited with Stennis employees during a brief reception. Astronauts visiting Stennis were Pilot Barry Wilmore, Mission Specialist Randy Bresnik, Commander Charles Hobaugh and Mission Specialists Mike Foreman and Robert Satcher.

2010-01-01

233

STS-129 shuttle crew visits Stennis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Members of the STS-129 space shuttle crew visited NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center on Jan. 19 to share details of their November visit to the International Space Station. During their 11-day mission aboard shuttle Atlantis, crew members delivered equipment, supplies and spare parts to the ISS. Following their mission report, the astronauts traded commemorative plaques with Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (center). Astronauts visiting Stennis were (l to r) Pilot Barry Wilmore, Mission Specialist Randy Bresnik, Commander Charles Hobaugh and Mission Specialists Mike Foreman and Robert Satcher.

2010-01-01

234

Shuttle Student Involvement Project for Secondary Schools  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated the Shuttle Student Involvement Project for Secondary Schools (SSIP-S), an annual nationwide competition to select student proposals for experiments suitable for flight aboard the Space Shuttle. The objective of the project is to stimulate the study of science and technology in grades 9 through 12 by directly relating students to a space research program. This paper will analyze the first year of the project from a standpoint of how the competition was administered; the number and types of proposals that were submitted; and will discuss the process involved in preparing the winning experiments for eventual flight.

Wilson, G. P.; Ladwig, A.

1981-01-01

235

NASA future missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA astrophysics programs are outlined. The Hubble Space Telescope; the infrared background explorer, COBE; the Shuttle-based Astro-1/BBXRT UV and X-ray experiments; the extreme ultraviolet explorer, EUVE, the diffuse X-ray experiment, DXS, and the Gamma Ray Observatory, are described, and NASA involvement in ROSAT, exploring the X-ray sky, and ORFEUS, exploring the UV sky, is shown; SCOUT-class explorers are mentioned. Suborbital science obtained from aircraft and rockets will continue and expand; supporting research and technology will also continue and substantial effort will be expended on improvement of data systems to promote data accessibility and ease of use.

Pellerin, Charles J.; Stachnik, Robert V.

1988-01-01

236

Service based logistics optimization  

E-print Network

This thesis explores the use of a service based logistics optimization (SBLO) methodology for an inbound reverse logistics network. Currently, Quest Diagnostics solves the vehicle routing problem with time windows (VRPTW) ...

Price, Gregory D., Jr

2014-01-01

237

The October 1973 space shuttle traffic model, revision 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Traffic model data for the space shuttle for calendar years 1980 through 1991 are presented along with some supporting and summary data. This model was developed from the 1973 NASA Payload Model, dated October 1973, and the NASA estimate of the 1973 Non-NASA/Non-DoD Payload Model. The estimates for the DoD flights included are based on the 1971 DoD Mission Model.

1974-01-01

238

Simple Logistic Regression  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page has two calculators. One will cacluate a simple logistic regression, while the other calculates the predicted probability and odds ratio. There is also a brief tutorial covering logistic regression using an example involving infant gestational age and breast feeding. Please note, however, that the logistic regression accomplished by this page is based on a simple, plain-vanilla empirical regression.

Lowry, Richard, 1940-

239

Space Shuttle Status News Conference  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Richard Gilbech, External Tank "Tiger Team" Lead, begins this space shuttle news conference with detailing the two major objectives of the team. The objectives include: 1) Finding the root cause of the foam loss on STS-114; and 2) Near and long term improvements for the external tank. Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Manager, presents a chart to explain the external tank foam loss during STS-114. He gives a possible launch date for STS-121 after there has been a repair to the foam on the External Tank. He further discusses the changes that need to be made to the surrounding areas of the plant in New Orleans, due to Hurricane Katrina. Bill Gerstemaier, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations, elaborates on the testing of the external tank foam loss. The discussion ends with questions from the news media about a fix for the foam, replacement of the tiles, foam loss avoidance, the root cause of foam loss and a possible date for a new external tank to be shipped to NASA Kennedy Space Center.

2005-01-01

240

Flight-engine test gets '06 under way Volume I, No. 1 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis January 2006  

E-print Network

Test Stand at NASA's Stennis Space Center on Jan. 9 during the first space shuttle main engine test of the year. The test was an engine acceptance test of flight engine 2058. It's the first space shuttle main shuttle main engine for NASA. Corr and Ferrill each received a Silver Snoopy pin flown on a STS-114

241

Volume 1 Issue 5 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis May 2006 Stennis marks rocket engine testing,  

E-print Network

shuttle anniversaries A space shuttle main engine test April 21 at NASA Stennis Space Center marked the 40 of the space shuttle main engine to commemorate the 40th anniver- sary of rocket engine testing at StennisVolume 1 Issue 5 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis May 2006 Stennis marks rocket engine testing, space

242

December 2009 ARMY MEDICAL LOGISTICS  

E-print Network

Logistics Management Center .............................................................. 1-6 Section IV........................................................... 1-8 Section V -- Synchronizing Medical Logistics for Army Health System Support.................................................................................2-5 Medical Logistics Management Center

US Army Corps of Engineers

243

The NASA trend analysis program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The four main areas of the NASA trend analysis program (problem/reliability, performance, supportability, and programmatic trending) are defined and illustrated with examples from Space Shuttle applications. Emphasis is on the programmatic-trending component of the program and several of the statistical techniques used. Also described is the NASA safety, reliability, maintainability, and quality assurance management information center, used to focus management attention on key near-term launch concerns and long-range mission trend issues.

Crawford, J. Larry; Weinstock, Robert

1990-01-01

244

NASA: How Does This Work?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The videos on this website from NASA demonstrate how things developed and used at NASA work, including such things as solid rocket boosters, space shuttle main engines, and parachutes. The website is intended to "showcase the creativity and dedication that allow the challenges of space flight to become some of our greatest achievements." The videos footage and silted graphics are accompanied by narration and printed subtitles.

245

Analysis of Logistics in Support of a Human Lunar Outpost  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Strategic level analysis of the integrated behavior of lunar transportation system and lunar surface system architecture options is performed to inform NASA Constellation Program senior management on the benefit, viability, affordability, and robustness of system design choices. This paper presents an overview of the approach used to perform the campaign (strategic) analysis, with an emphasis on the logistics modeling and the impacts of logistics resupply on campaign behavior. An overview of deterministic and probabilistic analysis approaches is provided, with a discussion of the importance of each approach to understanding the integrated system behavior. The logistics required to support lunar surface habitation are analyzed from both 'macro-logistics' and 'micro-logistics' perspectives, where macro-logistics focuses on the delivery of goods to a destination and micro-logistics focuses on local handling of re-supply goods at a destination. An example campaign is provided to tie the theories of campaign analysis to results generation capabilities.

Cirillo, William; Earle, Kevin; Goodliff, Kandyce; Reeves, j. D.; Andrashko, Mark; Merrill, R. Gabe; Stromgren, Chel

2008-01-01

246

Orbital impacts and the Space Shuttle windshield  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Transportation System (STS) fleet has flown more than sixty missions over the fourteen years since its first flight. As a result of encounters with on-orbit particulates (space debris and micrometeoroids), 177 impact features (chips) have been found on the STS outer windows (through STS-65). Forty-five of the damages were large enough to warrant replacement of the window. NASA's orbital operations and vehicle inspection procedures have changes over the history of the shuttle program, in response to concerns about the orbital environment and the cost of maintaining the space shuttle. These programmatic issues will be discussed, including safety concerns, maintenance issues, inspection procedures and flight rule changes. Examples of orbital debris impacts to the shuttle windows will be provided. There will also be a brief discussion of the impact properties of glass and what design changes have been considered to improve the impact properties of the windows.

Edelstein, Karen S.

1995-01-01

247

Issues in NASA program and project management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This new collection of papers on aerospace management issues contains a history of NASA program and project management, some lessons learned in the areas of management and budget from the Space Shuttle Program, an analysis of tools needed to keep large multilayer programs organized and on track, and an update of resources for NASA managers. A wide variety of opinions and techniques are presented.

Hoban, Francis T. (editor)

1989-01-01

248

NASA OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL  

E-print Network

NASA'sactivities in a way not seen since the final Space Shuttle flight. Similarly, successful commercial resupply missions and performance challenges: (1) The Future of U.S. Human Space Flight, (2) Project Management, (3) Infrastructure Engine Test Stand at Stennis International Space Station in orbit Space Exploration Technologies' Falcon

249

Understanding the Columbia Space Shuttle Accident  

SciTech Connect

On February 1, 2003, the NASA space shuttle Columbia broke apart during re-entry over East Texas at an altitude of 200,000 feet and a velocity of approximately 12,000 mph. All aboard perished. Prof. Osheroff was a member of the board that investigated the origins of this accident, both physical and organizational. In his talk he will describe how the board was able to determine with almost absolute certainty the physical cause of the accident. In addition, Prof. Osherhoff will discuss its organizational and cultural causes, which are rooted deep in the culture of the human spaceflight program. Why did NASA continue to fly the shuttle system despite the persistent failure of a vital sub-system that it should have known did indeed pose a safety risk on every flight? Finally, Prof. Osherhoff will touch on the future role humans are likely to play in the exploration of space.

Osheroff, Doug (Stanford University) [Stanford University

2004-06-16

250

Space Shuttle MMOD Threat Mitigation Techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prior to each shuttle mission, threat assessments are performed to determine the risk of critical penetration, payload bay door radiator tube leak and crew module window replacement from Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD). Mission parameters, such as vehicle attitude, exposure time and altitude are used as inputs for the analysis. Ballistic limit equations, based on hypervelocity impact testing of shuttle materials are used to estimate the critical particle diameters of the outer surfaces of the vehicle. The assessments are performed using the BUMPER computer code at the NASA/JSC Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HITF). The most critical involves the calculation of Loss of Crew and Vehicle (LOCV) risk. In recent years, NASA has implemented several techniques to reduce the risk to the Shuttle from MMOD impacts. This paper will describe on-orbit inspection of the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) regions and the methods used discern hypervelocity impact damage. Impact damage contingency plans and on-orbit repair techniques will also be discussed. The wing leading edge impact detection system (WLEIDS) and it's role in the reduction of on-orbit risk reduction will be presented. Finally, an analysis of the effectivity of alternative shuttle flight attitudes on MMOD risk will be demonstrated.

Hyde, Justin L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Kerr, James H.

2007-01-01

251

Shuttle Enterprise Mated to 747 SCA for Delivery to Smithsonian  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Enterprise atop the NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft as it leaves NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Enterprise, first orbiter built, was not spaceflight rated and was used in 1977 to verify the landing, approach, and glide characteristics of the orbiters. It was also used for engineering fit-checks at the shuttle launch facilities. Following approach and landing tests in 1977 and its use as an engineering vehicle, Enterprise was donated to the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1983-01-01

252

NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 12  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report lists 1878 video productions from the NASA STI Database. This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The listing of the entries is arranged by STAR categories. A complete Table of Contents describes the scope of each category. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

2002-01-01

253

NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 15  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Coverage Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

2005-01-01

254

Shuttle radar topography mission produces a wealth of data  

Microsoft Academic Search

On February 22, 2000, the Space Shuttle Endeavour landed at Kennedy Space Center, completing the highly successful 11-day flight of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Onboard were over 300 high-density tapes containing data for the highest resolution digital topographic map of Earth ever made.SRTM is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National

Tom G. Farr; Mike Kobrick

2000-01-01

255

Processing near-infrared imagery of hypersonic space shuttle reentries  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-resolution, calibrated, near-infrared imagery of the Space Shuttle during reentry has been obtained by a US Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft as part of NASA's HYTHIRM (Hypersonic Thermodynamic InfraRed Measurements) project. The long-range optical sensor package is called Cast Glance. Three sets of imagery have been processed thus far: 1) STS- 119 when Shuttle Discovery was at 52 km away at

Thomas S. Spisz; Jeff C. Taylor; David M. Gibson; Kwame Osei-Wusu; Thomas J. Horvath; Joseph N. Zalameda; Deborah M. Tomek; Alan B. Tietjen; Steve Tack; Richard J. Schwartz

2010-01-01

256

Space Shuttle: The Renewed Promise.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet describes the history of the space shuttle, especially after the Challenger accident. Topics include: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Return to Flight: The Recovery"; (3) "Space Shuttle Chronology"; (4) "Examples of Other Modifications on Shuttle's Major Systems"; (5) "Space Shuttle Recovery Chronology"; (6) "Poised for Launch: Space Shuttle

McAleer, Neil

257

Base pressure and heat transfer tests of the 0.0225-scale space shuttle plume simulation model (19-OTS) in yawed flight conditions in the NASA-Lewis 10x10-foot supersonic wind tunnel (test IH83)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind tunnel tests were performed to determine pressures, heat transfer rates, and gas recovery temperatures in the base region of a rocket firing model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle during simulated yawed flight conditions. First and second stage flight of the space shuttle were simulated by firing the main engines in conjunction with the SRB rocket motors or only the SSME's into the continuous tunnel airstream. For the correct rocket plume environment, the simulated altitude pressures were halved to maintain the rocket chamber/altitude pressure ratio. Tunnel freestream Mach numbers from 2.2 to 3.5 were simulated over an altitude range of 60 to 130 thousand feet with varying angle of attack, yaw angle, nozzle gimbal angle and SRB chamber pressure. Gas recovery temperature data derived from nine gas temperature probe runs are presented. The model configuration, instrumentation, test procedures, and data reduction are described.

Foust, J. W.

1979-01-01

258

An Engineering Look at Space Shuttle and ISS Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation, in Spanish, is an overview of NASA's Space Shuttle operations and preparations for serving the International Space Station. There is information and or views of the shuttle's design, the propulsion system, the external tanks, the foam insulation, the reusable solid rocket motors, the vehicle assembly building (VAB), the mobile launcher platform being moved from the VAB to the launch pad. There is a presentation of some of the current issues with the space shuttle: cracks in the LH2 flow lines, corrosion and pitting, the thermal protection system, and inspection of the thermal protection system while in orbit. The shuttle system has served for more than 20 years, it is still a challenge to re-certify the vehicles for flight. Materials and material science remain as chief concerns for the shuttle,

Hernandez, Jose M.

2004-01-01

259

Shuttle Engine Designs Revolutionize Solar Power  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Main Engine was built under contract to Marshall Space Flight Center by Rocketdyne, now part of Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR). PWR applied its NASA experience to solar power technology and licensed the technology to Santa Monica, California-based SolarReserve. The company now develops concentrating solar power projects, including a plant in Nevada that has created 4,300 jobs during construction.

2014-01-01

260

Space shuttle main engine plume radiation model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The methods are described which are used in predicting the thermal radiation received by space shuttles, from the plumes of the main engines. Radiation to representative surface locations were predicted using the NASA gaseous plume radiation GASRAD program. The plume model is used with the radiative view factor (RAVFAC) program to predict sea level radiation at specified body points. The GASRAD program is described along with the predictions. The RAVFAC model is also discussed.

Reardon, J. E.; Lee, Y. C.

1978-01-01

261

Liftoff of STS-59 Shuttle Endeavour  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Endeavour heads for its sixth mission in space. Liftoff occurred at 7:05 a.m., April 9, 1994. This photograph was taken by Karen Dillon of San Jose, California, who observed the liftoff from the NASA causeway. It shows the orbiter as a bright spot at the top of a trail of smoke, with the water from a nearby marsh in the foreground.

1994-01-01

262

Space Shuttle S-band antenna system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter presents some very challenging antenna design problems for the S-band Orbiter to ground and Orbiter to relay satellite communications links. The line of sight to the ground and\\/or relay satellite during the various mission phases dictates an almost omni-directional coverage requirement, but the circuit margins require at least a 3 dB gain over this same

M. D. Walton; H. D. Cubley

1974-01-01

263

Results of an aerodynamic force and moment investigation of an 0.015-scale configuration 3 space shuttle orbiter in the NASA/ARC 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (OA58)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objective of the test was to obtain stability and control data for the basic configuration and an alternate configuration for the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Pitch runs were made with 0 deg of sideslip at Mach numbers of 5.3, 7.3 and 10.3. Six-component force data and fuselage base pressures were recorded for each run. Shadowgraph pictures were taken at selected points. Model 420 was used for the tests.

Dziubala, T. J.; Cleary, J. W.

1974-01-01

264

Results of investigation on an 0.004-scale 140c modified configuration space shuttle vehicle orbiter model (74-0) in the NASA/Langley Research Center hypersonic nitrogen tunnel (OA89)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind tunnel test data for the modified space shuttle vehicle orbiter is documented. Tests were made at various elevon settings and additionally in wing off/bodyflap off configuration at angles of attack from -5 to 42.5 degrees at zero yaw. Data obtained on high hypersonic longitudinal and lateral directional stability and control characteristics of the updated SSV configuration in an initially diatomic medium are included.

Hawthorne, P. J.

1975-01-01

265

Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Debris Assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Columbia Accident revealed a fundamental problem of the Space Shuttle Program regarding debris. Prior to the tragedy, the Space Shuttle requirement stated that no debris should be liberated that would jeopardize the flight crew and/or mission success. When the accident investigation determined that a large piece of foam debris was the primary cause of the loss of the shuttle and crew, it became apparent that the risk and scope of - damage that could be caused by certain types of debris, especially - ice and foam, were not fully understood. There was no clear understanding of the materials that could become debris, the path the debris might take during flight, the structures the debris might impact or the damage the impact might cause. In addition to supporting the primary NASA and USA goal of returning the Space Shuttle to flight by understanding the SRB debris environment and capability to withstand that environment, the SRB debris assessment project was divided into four primary tasks that were required to be completed to support the RTF goal. These tasks were (1) debris environment definition, (2) impact testing, (3) model correlation and (4) hardware evaluation. Additionally, the project aligned with USA's corporate goals of safety, customer satisfaction, professional development and fiscal accountability.

Kendall, Kristin; Kanner, Howard; Yu, Weiping

2006-01-01

266

How Space Shuttles Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site explains the complexity of the entire mission of a space shuttle launch, orbit, activities, and return to Earth. Students and teachers can learn about the precise nature of space science including extensive preparations and examine the monumental technology behind Americas shuttle program, as well as the extraordinarily difficult mission it was designed to carry out. Information is also provided on the background and history of the space shuttle. Diagrams, full-color photos, highlighted terms and supplementary definitions assist users in understanding scientific terminology used to describe the extraordinary missions of shuttle astronauts, crew and specialists. A printable version of this information is also available on site.

Craig Freudenrich, Ph.D.

2008-01-01

267

Logistics Management in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

China, as the bright spot in the international economic development, has being joined into the global market. The sustained\\u000a economic growth in China is the driving force to the rapid development of logistics. In this chapter we first present a general\\u000a overview of China’s logistics developments. Summarizing the current development of China’s logistics industry, we can say\\u000a that the market

Gengzhong Feng; Gang Yu; Wei Jiang

268

Infrared spectral measurement of space shuttle glow  

SciTech Connect

Infrared spectral measurements of the space shuttle glow were successfully conducted during the STS-39 space shuttle mission. Analysis indicates that NO, NO[sup +], OH, and CO are among the molecules associated with the infrared glow phenomenon. During orbiter thruster firings the glow intensities in the infrared are enhanced by factors of 10x to 100x with significant changes in spectral distribution. These measurements were obtained with the Spacecraft Kinetic Infrared Test (SKIRT) payload which included a cryogenic infrared circular variable filter (CVF) spectrometer (0.6 [mu]m to 5.4 [mu]) and a number of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometers (0.2 [mu]m to 5.4 [mu]m and 9.9 [mu]m to 10.4 [mu]m). In addition, glow measurements were unsuccessfully attempted with the Cryogenic Infrared Radiance Instrumentation for Shuttle (CIRRIS-1A) with its 2.5 [mu]m to 25 [mu]m Fourier transform interferometer. SKIRT CVF obtained over 14,000 spectra of quiescent shuttle glow, thruster enhanced shuttle glow, upper atmosphere airglow, aurora, orbiter environment, and deep space non-glow backgrounds during its eight day mission. The SKIRT radiometers operated almost continuously throughout the mission to provide a detailed history of the IR/VIS/UV optical environment associated with the operation of large spacecraft structures in low earth orbit. This dissertation will primarily address those measurements conducted by the SKIRT spectrometer as they relate to space shuttle glow in the infrared. The STS-39 Space Shuttle Discovery was launched from the NASA Kennedy Space Center on 28 April 1991 into a 57 degree inclination circular orbit at an altitude of 260 km.

Ahmadijian, M.

1992-01-01

269

This is NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Highlights of NASA's first 20 years are described including the accomplishments of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics from its creation in 1915 until its absorption into NASA in 1958. Current and future activities are assessed in relation to the Federal R&D research plan for FY 1980 and to U.S. civil space policy. A NASA organization chart accompanies descriptions of the responsibilities of Headquarters, its various offices, and field installations. Directions are given for contacting the agency for business activities or contracting purposes; for obtaining educational publications and other media, and for tours. Manpower statistics are included with a list of career opportunities. Special emphasis is given to manned space flight, space launch vehicles, space shuttle, planetary exploration, and investigations of the stars and the solar system.

1979-01-01

270

Results of tests in the NASA/LARC 31-inch CFHT on an 0.010-scale model (32-OT) of the space shuttle configuration 3 to determine the RCS jet flowfield interaction effects on aerodynamic characteristics (IA60/OA105), volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-inch continuous Flow Hypersonic Wind Tunnel to determine RCS jet interaction effect on the hypersonic aerodynamic and stability and control characteristics prior to return to launch site (RTLS) abort separation. The model used was an 0.010-scale replica of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Configuration 3. Hypersonic stability data were obtained from tests at Mach 10.3 and dynamic pressure of 150 psf for the integrated Orbiter and external tank and the Orbiter alone. RCS modes of pitch, yaw, and roll at free flight dynamic pressure simulation of 7, 20, and 50 psf were investigated. The effects of speedbrake, bodyflap, elevon, and aileron deflections were also investigated.

Thornton, D. E.

1974-01-01

271

Results of tests in the NASA/LaRC 31-inch CFHT on an 0.010-scale model (32-OT) of the space shuttle configuration 3 to determine the RCS jet flowfield interaction effects on aerodynamic characteristics (IA60/0A105), volume 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-inch continuous flow hypersonic wind tunnel from 14 February to 22 February 1974, to determine RCS jet interaction effect on the hypersonic aerodynamic and stability and control characteristics prior to RTLS abort separation. The model used was an 0.010-scale replica of the space shuttle vehicle configuration 3. Hypersonic stability data were obtained from tests at Mach 10.3 and dynamic pressure of 150 psf for the intergrated orbiter and external tank and the orbiter alone. RCS modes of pitch, yaw, and roll at free flight dynamic pressure simulation of 7, 20, and 50 psf were investigated. The effects of speedbrake, bodyflap, elevon, and aileron deflections were also investigated.

Thornton, D. E.

1974-01-01

272

Heat transfer test of an 0.006-scale thin-skin thermocouple space shuttle model (50-0, 41-T) in the NASA-Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 5.3 (IH28), volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data obtained from a heat transfer test conducted on an 0.006-scale space shuttle orbiter and external tank in the NASA-Ames Research Center 3.5-foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel are presented. The purpose of this test was to obtain data under simulated return-to-launch-site abort conditions. Configurations tested were integrated orbiter and external tank, orbiter alone, and external tank alone at angles of attack of 0, + or - 30, + or - 60, + or - 90, and + or - 120 degrees. Runs were conducted at Mach numbers of 5.2 and 5.3 for Reynolds numbers of 1.0 and 4.0 million per foot, respectively. Heat transfer data were obtained from 75 orbiter and 75 external tank iron-constantan thermocouples.

Cummings, J. W.; Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.

1976-01-01

273

Shuttle Columbia Mated to 747 SCA with Crew  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The crew of NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), seen mated with the Space Shuttle Columbia behind them, are from viewers left: Tom McMurtry, pilot; Vic Horton, flight engineer; Fitz Fulton, command pilot; and Ray Young, flight engineer. The SCA is used to ferry the shuttle between California and the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and other destinations where ground transportation is not practical. The NASA 747 has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the additional weight of the orbiters. Small vertical fins have also been added to the tips of the horizontal stabilizers for additional stability due to air turbulence on the control surfaces caused by the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary

1981-01-01

274

Report of the Space Shuttle Management Independent Review Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At the request of the NASA Administrator a team was formed to review the Space Shuttle Program and propose a new management system that could significantly reduce operating costs. Composed of a group of people with broad and extensive experience in spaceflight and related areas, the team received briefings from the NASA organizations and most of the supporting contractors involved in the Shuttle Program. In addition, a number of chief executives from the supporting contractors provided advice and suggestions. The team found that the present management system has functioned reasonably well despite its diffuse structure. The team also determined that the shuttle has become a mature and reliable system, and--in terms of a manned rocket-propelled space launch system--is about as safe as today's technology will provide. In addition, NASA has reduced shuttle operating costs by about 25 percent over the past 3 years. The program, however, remains in a quasi-development mode and yearly costs remain higher than required. Given the current NASA-contractor structure and incentives, it is difficult to establish cost reduction as a primary goal and implement changes to achieve efficiencies. As a result, the team sought to create a management structure and associated environment that enables and motivates the Program to further reduce operational costs. Accordingly, the review team concluded that the NASA Space Shuttle Program should (1) establish a clear set of program goals, placing a greater emphasis on cost-efficient operations and user-friendly payload integration; (2) redefine the management structure, separating development and operations and disengaging NASA from the daily operation of the space shuttle; and (3) provide the necessary environment and conditions within the program to pursue these goals.

1995-01-01

275

Issues in NASA program and project management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This volume is the fifth in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover: an overview of the project cycle; SE&I management for manned space flight programs; shared experiences from NASA Programs and Projects - 1975; cost control for Mariner Venus/Mercury 1973; and the Space Shuttle - a balancing of design and politics. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

Hoban, Francis T. (editor)

1992-01-01

276

Logistics Reduction Technologies for Exploration Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human exploration missions under study are very limited by the launch mass capacity of existing and planned vehicles. The logistical mass of crew items is typically considered separate from the vehicle structure, habitat outfitting, and life support systems. Consequently, crew item logistical mass is typically competing with vehicle systems for mass allocation. NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) Project is developing five logistics technologies guided by a systems engineering cradle-to-grave approach to enable used crew items to augment vehicle systems. Specifically, AES LRR is investigating the direct reduction of clothing mass, the repurposing of logistical packaging, the use of autonomous logistics management technologies, the processing of spent crew items to benefit radiation shielding and water recovery, and the conversion of trash to propulsion gases. The systematic implementation of these types of technologies will increase launch mass efficiency by enabling items to be used for secondary purposes and improve the habitability of the vehicle as the mission duration increases. This paper provides a description and the challenges of the five technologies under development and the estimated overall mission benefits of each technology.

Broyan, James L., Jr.; Ewert, Michael K.; Fink, Patrick W.

2014-01-01

277

NASA FactsNational Aeronautics and Space Administration  

E-print Network

NASA FactsNational Aeronautics and Space Administration Washington, D.C. 20546 (202) 358-1600 FACT into the solar system. NASA is working to make this transition ­ from the Space Shuttle Program to the Constellation Program ­ seamless and safe. NASA has a vast array of unique and critical resources that have

278

Commander Mark Polansky and the STS-116 crew were back home for the holidays. They arrived at NASA's  

E-print Network

on Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility as the sun sets Dec. 22. STS-116 home for holidays A space shuttle main engine test conducted April 21, 2006, at NASA Stennis Space Center marked opportunities as well as challenges for Stennis Space Center and NASA. Our performance is crucial for space

279

NASA's SCAs--Birds of a Feather Flock Together - Duration: 1:48.  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA's two modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft briefly flew in formation for the first time ever over the Edwards Air Force Base test range on Aug. 2, 2011. NASA 911 was on a pilot profici...

280

Space Shuttle Main Engine Joint Data List Applying Today's Desktop Technologies to Facilitate Engine Processing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boeing-Rocketdyne's Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is the world's first large reusable liquid rocket engine. The space shuttle propulsion system has three SSMEs, each weighing 7,400 lbs and providing 470,000 lbs of thrust at 100% rated power level. To ensure required safety and reliability levels are achieved with the reusable engines, each SSME is partially disassembled, inspected, reassembled, and retested at Kennedy Space Center between each flight. Maintenance processing must be performed very carefully to replace any suspect components, maintain proper engine configuration, and avoid introduction of contaminants that could affect performance and safety. The long service life, and number, complexity, and pedigree of SSME components makes logistics functions extremely critical. One SSME logistics challenge is documenting the assembly and disassembly of the complex joint configurations. This data (joint nomenclature, seal and fastener identification and orientation, assembly sequence, fastener torques, etc.) must be available to technicians and engineers during processing. Various assembly drawings and procedures contain this information, but in this format the required (practical) joint data can be hard to find, due to the continued use of archaic engineering drawings and microfilm for field site use. Additionally, the release system must traverse 2,500 miles between design center and field site, across three time zones, which adds communication challenges and time lags for critical engine configuration data. To aid in information accessibility, a Joint Data List (JDL) was developed that allows efficient access to practical joint data. The published JDL has been a very useful logistics product, providing illustrations and information on the latest SSME configuration. The JDL identifies over 3,350 unique parts across seven fluid systems, over 300 joints, times two distinct engine configurations. The JDL system was recently converted to a web-based, navigable electronic manual that contains all the required data and illustrations in expanded view format using standard PC products (Word, Excel, PDF, Photoshop). The logistics of accurately releasing this information to field personnel was greatly enhanced via the utilization of common office products to produce a more user-friendly format than was originally developed under contract to NASA. This was done without reinventing the system, which would be cost prohibitive on a program of this maturity. The brunt of the joint part tracking is done within the logistics organization and disseminated to all field sites, without duplicating effort at each site. The JDL is easily accessible across the country via the NASA intranet directly at the SSME workstand. The advent of this logistics data product has greatly enhanced the reliability of tracking dynamic changes to the SSME and greatly reduces engineering change turnaround time and potential for errors. Since the inception of the JDL system in 1997, no discrepant parts have propagated to engine assembly operations. This presentation focuses on the challenges overcome and the techniques used to apply today's desktop technologies to an existing logistics data source.

Jacobs, Kenneth; Drobnick, John; Krell, Don; Neuhart, Terry; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

281

Modeling the space shuttle  

Microsoft Academic Search

We summarize our methodology for modeling space shuttle processing using discrete event simulation. Why the project was initiated, what the overall goals were, how it was funded, and who were the members of the project team are identified. We describe the flow of the space shuttle flight hardware through the supporting infrastructure and how the-model was created to accurately portray

Grant R. Cates; Martin J. Steele; M. Mollaghasemi; G. Rabadi

2002-01-01

282

An investigation to determine the static pressure distribution of the 0.00548 scale shuttle solid rocket booster (MSFC model number 468) during reentry in the NASA/MSFC 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel (SA28F)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of a pressure test of a .00548 scale 146 inch Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) with and without protuberances, conducted in a 14 x 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel are presented. Static pressure distributions for the SRB at reentry attitudes and flight conditions were obtained. Local longitudinal and ring pressure distributions are presented in tabulated form. Integration of the pressure data was performed. The test was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.40 to 4.45 over an angle of attack range from 60 to 185 degrees. Roll angles of 0, 45, 90 and 315 degrees were investigated. Reynolds numbers per foot varied for selected Mach numbers.

Braddock, W. F.; Streby, G. D.

1977-01-01

283

Investigations to the space shuttle orbiter 2A configuration 0.015-scale model in the NASA Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach numbers 5, 7 and 10 (OA11B)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of a wind tunnel test to determine the force, moment, and hinge-moment characteristics of the Configuration 2A Space Shuttle Vehicle Orbiter at Mach numbers 5, 7 and 10 are presented. The model was an 0.015-scale representation of the Orbiter Configuration 2A used in test 0A11A and later tests. Six-component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded from a 1.50-inch internal strain-gage balance, and base pressures were taken for axial and drag force corrections. Hinge-moment data were obtained for the rudder and the inboard and outboard elevon panels of the starboard wing.

Mellenthin, J. A.; Cleary, J. W.; Nichols, M. E.; Milam, M. D.

1974-01-01

284

13Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-135) -Plume speed This sequence of images  

E-print Network

it in the opposite direction to its exhaust. The plume of gas is ejected at high speed from the Shuttle main engines13Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-135) - Plume speed This sequence of images shows the historic launch of the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-135) on July 8, 2011 at 11:29 a.m. EDT, from launch pad 39A at the NASA Cape

285

8Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-135) Launch Speed This sequence of images shows the  

E-print Network

8Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-135) Launch Speed This sequence of images shows the historic launch of the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-135) on July 8, 2011 at 11:29 a.m. EDT, from launch pad 39A at the NASA Cape:29:18.0, and 11:29:19.0. The length of the space shuttle orbiter (not the red fuel tank) is 37 meters. The launch

Christian, Eric

286

NASA Quest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces NASA Quest as part of NASA's Learning Technologies Project, which connects students to the people of NASA through the various pages at the website where students can glimpse the various types of work performed at different NASA facilities and talk to NASA workers about the type of work they do. (ASK)

Ashby, Susanne

2000-01-01

287

HOW TO BREAK UP NASA bridges vol. 10, June 2006 / Pielke's Perspective  

E-print Network

are the challenges of transitioning to the post-Space Shuttle era. NASA's attempts to complete the space station asked to accomplish too much with too little," finding the agency to be unsustainable. The Space Shuttle program with the space shuttle while beginning to implement President Bush's "Vision for Space Exploration

Colorado at Boulder, University of

288

Mission Possible: BioMedical Experiments on the Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Biomedical research, both applied and basic, was conducted on every Shuttle mission from 1981 to 2011. The Space Shuttle Program enabled NASA investigators and researchers from around the world to address fundamental issues concerning living and working effectively in space. Operationally focused occupational health investigations and tests were given priority by the Shuttle crew and Shuttle Program management for the resolution of acute health issues caused by the rigors of spaceflight. The challenges of research on the Shuttle included: limited up and return mass, limited power, limited crew time, and requirements for containment of hazards. The sheer capacity of the Shuttle for crew and equipment was unsurpassed by any other launch and entry vehicle and the Shuttle Program provided more opportunity for human research than any program before or since. To take advantage of this opportunity, life sciences research programs learned how to: streamline the complicated process of integrating experiments aboard the Shuttle, design experiments and hardware within operational constraints, and integrate requirements between different experiments and with operational countermeasures. We learned how to take advantage of commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and developed a hardware certification process with the flexibility to allow for design changes between flights. We learned the importance of end-to-end testing for experiment hardware with humans-in-the-loop. Most importantly, we learned that the Shuttle Program provided an excellent platform for conducting human research and for developing the systems that are now used to optimize research on the International Space Station. This presentation will include a review of the types of experiments and medical tests flown on the Shuttle and the processes that were used to manifest and conduct the experiments. Learning Objective: This paper provides a description of the challenges related to launching and implementing biomedical experiments aboard the Space Shuttle.

Bopp, E.; Kreutzberg, K.

2011-01-01

289

Space Shuttle RTOS Bayesian Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With shrinking budgets and the requirements to increase reliability and operational life of the existing orbiter fleet, NASA has proposed various upgrades for the Space Shuttle that are consistent with national space policy. The cockpit avionics upgrade (CAU), a high priority item, has been selected as the next major upgrade. The primary functions of cockpit avionics include flight control, guidance and navigation, communication, and orbiter landing support. Secondary functions include the provision of operational services for non-avionics systems such as data handling for the payloads and caution and warning alerts to the crew. Recently, a process to selection the optimal commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) real-time operating system (RTOS) for the CAU was conducted by United Space Alliance (USA) Corporation, which is a joint venture between Boeing and Lockheed Martin, the prime contractor for space shuttle operations. In order to independently assess the RTOS selection, NASA has used the Bayesian network-based scoring methodology described in this paper. Our two-stage methodology addresses the issue of RTOS acceptability by incorporating functional, performance and non-functional software measures related to reliability, interoperability, certifiability, efficiency, correctness, business, legal, product history, cost and life cycle. The first stage of the methodology involves obtaining scores for the various measures using a Bayesian network. The Bayesian network incorporates the causal relationships between the various and often competing measures of interest while also assisting the inherently complex decision analysis process with its ability to reason under uncertainty. The structure and selection of prior probabilities for the network is extracted from experts in the field of real-time operating systems. Scores for the various measures are computed using Bayesian probability. In the second stage, multi-criteria trade-off analyses are performed between the scores. Using a prioritization of measures from the decision-maker, trade-offs between the scores are used to rank order the available set of RTOS candidates.

Morris, A. Terry; Beling, Peter A.

2001-01-01

290

Behind the Scenes: Shuttle Crawls to Launch Pad - Duration: 14:37.  

NASA Video Gallery

In this episode of NASA Behind the Scenes, take a look at what's needed to roll a space shuttle out of the Vehicle Assembly Building and out to the launch pad. Astronaut Mike Massimino talks to som...

291

A Celebration of the Space Shuttle Program - Duration: 1:45.  

NASA Video Gallery

On September 23, 2011, NASA Langley hosted a Shuttle Celebration at the Virginia Air & Space Center in Hampton, Va. More than 650 guests attended, including STS-135 Commander Chris Ferguson and NAS...

292

Space Shuttle Documentary (Narrated by William Shatner) - Duration: 1:20:44.  

NASA Video Gallery

This feature-length documentary looks at the history of the most complex machine ever built. For 30 years, NASA's space shuttle carried humans to and from space, launched amazing observatories, and...

293

48 CFR 1852.228-72 - Cross-waiver of liability for space shuttle services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...1266), NASA agreements involving Space Shuttle flights are required to...entities to encourage participation in space exploration, use, and investment. The...of encouraging participation in space activities. (b) As used...

2012-10-01

294

Results of tests using a 0.030-scale model (45-0) of space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the NASA/ARC 12-foot pressure wind tunnel (OA159)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation (test OA159) was conducted in the NASA/ARC 12-foot Pressure Wind Tunnel from June 23 through July 8, 1975. The objective was to obtain detailed strut tare and interference effects of the support system used in the NASA/ARC 40 x 80-foot wind tunnel during 0.36-scale orbiter testing (OA100). Six-component force and moment data were obtained through an angle-of-attack range from -9 through +18 degrees with 0 deg angle of sideslip and a sideslip angle range from -9 through +18 degrees at 9 deg angle of attack results are presented.

Marroquin, J.

1975-01-01

295

First-ever evening public engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thousands of people watch the first-ever evening public engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. The spectacular test marked Stennis Space Center's 20th anniversary celebration of the first Space Shuttle mission.

2001-01-01

296

The Launch Processing System for Space Shuttle.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to reduce costs and accelerate vehicle turnaround, a single automated system will be developed to support shuttle launch site operations, replacing a multiplicity of systems used in previous programs. The Launch Processing System will provide real-time control, data analysis, and information display for the checkout, servicing, launch, landing, and refurbishment of the launch vehicles, payloads, and all ground support systems. It will also provide real-time and historical data retrieval for management and sustaining engineering (test records and procedures, logistics, configuration control, scheduling, etc.).

Springer, D. A.

1973-01-01

297

NASA Celebrates Atlantis as Pioneer, Inspiration - Duration: 3:31.  

NASA Video Gallery

Astronauts and senior NASA management noted the contributions of space shuttle Atlantis as they signed the spacecraft over for a new mission of inspiration as it goes on public display at the Kenne...

298

NASA's Increase of Awesome to Continue - Duration: 4:13.  

NASA Video Gallery

Wondering what's up post-shuttle, popular Internet vlogger Hank Green of Vlogbrothers gets the straight skinny from Charlie Bolden and others at NASA about the agency's plans for future human space...

299

Shuttle Columbia Post-landing Tow - with Reflection in Water  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rare rain allowed this reflection of the Space Shuttle Columbia as it was towed 16 Nov. 1982, to the Shuttle Processing Area at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (from 1976 to 1981 and after 1994, the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, following its fifth flight in space. Columbia was launched on mission STS-5 11 Nov. 1982, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base on concrete runway 22. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines withtwo solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. MartinMarietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

1982-01-01

300

National Aeronautics and Space Administration www.nasa.gov  

E-print Network

by a shuttle main engine. A second, heav begins soon, with the development of a new space- ship. Building on the best of Apollo and shuttleNational Aeronautics and Space Administration www.nasa.gov Volume 1 Issue 6 September 2005 Goddard

Christian, Eric

301

NASA Advisory Council Space Operations Committee February 2011  

E-print Network

Holloway Former Space Shuttle and International Space Station Program Manager Dr. John Grunsfeld Former Administrator for Space Shuttle · International Space Station and ISS Non-Profit Organization · Mark Uhran Station 8 #12;NASA Advisory Council Space Operations Committee February 2011 International Space Station 9

Waliser, Duane E.

302

NCI Shady Grove Shuttle Schedule  

Cancer.gov

NCI Shady Grove Shuttle Service Schedule Live Shuttle Route: http://ncishadygroveshuttle.com/map Effective March 2014 Shady Grove Metro Shuttle NCI Express Shuttle NCI SG SG Metro -- 6:00 AM -- 6:15 AM 6:15 AM 6:30 AM 6:30 AM 6:45 AM 6:45 AM

303

The MATHEMATICA economic analysis of the Space Shuttle System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Detailed economic analysis shows the Thrust Assisted Orbiter Space Shuttle System (TAOS) to be the most economic Space Shuttle configuration among the systems studied. The development of a TAOS Shuttle system is economically justified within a level of space activities between 300 and 360 Shuttle flights in the 1979-1990 period, or about 25 to 30 flights per year, well within the U.S. Space Program including NASA and DoD missions. If the NASA and DoD models are taken at face value (624 flights), the benefits of the Shuttle system are estimated to be $13.9 billion with a standard deviation of plus or minus $1.45 billion in 1970 dollars (at a 10% social rate of discount). If the expected program is modified to 514 flights (in the 1979-1990 period), the estimated benefits of the Shuttle system are $10.2 billion, with a standard deviation of $940 million (at a 10% social rate of discount).

Heiss, K. P.

1973-01-01

304

NASA program plan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Major facts are given for NASA'S planned FY-1981 through FY-1985 programs in aeronautics, space science, space and terrestrial applications, energy technology, space technology, space transportation systems, space tracking and data systems, and construction of facilities. Competition and cooperation, reimbursable launchings, schedules and milestones, supporting research and technology, mission coverage, and required funding are considered. Tables and graphs summarize new initiatives, significant events, estimates of space shuttle flights, and major missions in astrophysics, planetary exploration, life sciences, environmental and resources observation, and solar terrestrial investigations. The growth in tracking and data systems capabilities is also depicted.

1980-01-01

305

NASA RFID Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph document reviews some potential uses for Radio Frequency Identification in space missions. One of these is inventory management in space, including the methods used in Apollo, the Space Shuttle, and Space Station. The potential RFID uses in a remote human outpost are reviewed. The use of Ultra-Wideband RFID for tracking are examined such as that used in Sapphire DART The advantages of RFID in passive, wireless sensors in NASA applications are shown such as: Micrometeoroid impact detection and Sensor measurements in environmental facilities The potential for E-textiles for wireless and RFID are also examined.

Fink, Patrick, Ph.D.; Kennedy, Timothy, Ph.D; Powers, Anne; Haridi, Yasser; Chu, Andrew; Lin, Greg; Yim, Hester; Byerly, Kent, Ph.D.; Barton, Richard, Ph.D.; Khayat, Michael, Ph.D.; Studor, George; Brocato, Robert; Ngo, Phong; Arndt, G. D., Ph.D.; Gross, Julia; Phan, Chau; Ni, David, Ph.D.; Dusl, John; Dekome, Kent

2007-01-01

306

NASA World Wind  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This open-source application lets users experience Earth terrain in three dimensions, visiting any location by zooming in from satellite altitude. Fly-ins begin with a true-color image of the entire Earth (the "Blue Marble"), then employ Landsat 7 satellite imagery and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data to display landmarks, geographic and cultural features, eye-level views and fly-throughs. The website includes instructions for downloading the software, a description of its features, screenshots, and a users' forum. There are also example applications, data add-on packs for use while the NASA server is offline, a frequently-asked-questions feature, and an instruction manual.

307

Green Logistics Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nowadays, environmental management becomes a critical business consideration for companies to survive from many regulations and tough business requirements. Most of world-leading companies are now aware that environment friendly technology and management are critical to the sustainable growth of the company. The environment market has seen continuous growth marking 532B in 2000, and 590B in 2004. This growth rate is expected to grow to 700B in 2010. It is not hard to see the environment-friendly efforts in almost all aspects of business operations. Such trends can be easily found in logistics area. Green logistics aims to make environmental friendly decisions throughout a product lifecycle. Therefore for the success of green logistics, it is critical to have real time tracking capability on the product throughout the product lifecycle and smart solution service architecture. In this chapter, we introduce an RFID based green logistics solution and service.

Chang, Yoon S.; Oh, Chang H.

308

Logistic Curve Demo  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive demo illustrates the generation of a logistic curve. This demo is appropriate for a pre-calculus course, but is quite effective in a calculus class immediately after a discussion of inflection points.

Roberts, Lila F.; Hill, David R.

2002-02-03

309

Space Shuttle MMOD Threat Mitigation Techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prior to each shuttle mission, threat assessments are performed to determine the risk of critical penetration, payload bay door radiator tube leak and crew module window replacement from Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD). Mission parameters, such as vehicle attitude, exposure time and altitude are used as inputs for the analysis. Ballistic limit equations, based on hypervelocity impact testing of shuttle materials are used to estimate the critical particle diameters of the outer surfaces of the vehicle. The assessments are performed using the BUMPER computer code at the NASA/JSC Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HITF). The most critical involves the calculation of Loss of Crew and Vehicle (LOCV) risk. An overview of significant MMOD impacts on the Payload Bay Door radiators, wing leading edge reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels and crew module windows will be presented, along with a discussion of the techniques NASA has implemented to reduce the risk from MMOD impacts. This paper will describe on-orbit inspection of the RCC regions and the methods used discern hypervelocity impact damage. Impact damage contingency plans and on-orbit repair techniques will also be discussed. The wing leading edge impact detection system (WLEIDS) and it s role in the reduction of on-orbit risk reduction will be presented. Finally, an analysis of alternative shuttle flight attitudes on MMOD risk will be demonstrated.

Hyde, J. L.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.; Kerr, J. H.

2008-01-01

310

Space Station fluid management logistics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs and discussion on space station fluid management logistics are presented. Topics covered include: fluid management logistics - issues for Space Station Freedom evolution; current fluid logistics approach; evolution of Space Station Freedom fluid resupply; launch vehicle evolution; ELV logistics system approach; logistics carrier configuration; expendable fluid/propellant carrier description; fluid carrier design concept; logistics carrier orbital operations; carrier operations at space station; summary/status of orbital fluid transfer techniques; Soviet progress tanker system; and Soviet propellant resupply system observations.

Dominick, Sam M.

1990-01-01

311

A low speed wind tunnel test of the 0.050 scale NASA-JSC shuttle orbiter 089B to determine the longitudinal and lateral directional effects of control surface modifications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind tunnel tests to determine the longitudinal and lateral-directional effects of control surface modifications on the space shuttle orbiter aerodynamic characteristics are discussed. A total of 103 data runs were made which consisted of pitch runs through a range of zero to 28 degrees at a zero yaw angle and yaw runs from minus 6 to plus 6 degrees at various fixed pitch angles. At each data point, data from an internal strain gage balance was sampled with the digital data system. Also recorded were the model angles of pitch and yaw and the test section static pressure. Results are presented in the form of tabulated aerodynamic coefficient data about the model reference center.

Oldenbuttel, R. H.

1973-01-01

312

Reentry aerodynamic characteristics of a space shuttle solid rocket booster (MSFC model 454) at high angles of attack and high Mach number in the NASA/Langley four-foot unitary plan wind tunnel (SA25F)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A force test of a 2.112 percent scale Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), MSFC Model 454, was conducted in test section no. 2 of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Sixteen (16) runs (pitch polars) were performed over an angle of attack range from 144 through 179 degrees. Test Mach numbers were 2.30, 2.70, 2.96, 3.48, 4.00 and 4.63. The first three Mach numbers had a test Reynolds number of 1.5 million per foot. The remaining three were at 2.0 million per foot. The model was tested in the following configurations: (1) SRB without external protuberances, and (2) SRB with an electrical tunnel and a SRB/ET thrust attachment structure. Schlieren photographs were taken during the testing of the first configuration. The second configuration was tested at roll angles of 45, 90, and 135 degrees.

Johnson, J. D.; Braddock, W. F.

1975-01-01

313

Results of investigations on a 0.010-scale 140A/B configuration space shuttle vehicle orbiter model 72-0 in the NASA/Langley Research Center continuous flow hypersonic tunnel (OA90)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data are documented which were obtained during wind tunnel tests. The test was conducted beginning 4 March and ending 6 March 1974 for a total of 24 occupancy hours. all test runs were conducted at a Mach number of 10.3 and at Reynolds numbers of 0.65, 1.0 and 1.33 million per foot. Only the complete 140A/B was tested with various elevon, speedbrake, and bodyflap settings at angles of attack from 12 to 37 degrees at 0 and -5 degrees of beta, and from 0 to -9 degrees of beta at 20 and 30 degrees angle of attack. The purpose was to obtain hypersonic longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control characteristics of the updated space shuttle vehicle configuration.

Hawthorne, P. J.

1975-01-01

314

High supersonic stability and control characteristics of a 0.015-scale (remotely controlled elevon) model 44-0 space shuttle orbiter tested in the NASA/LaRC 4-foot UPWT (LEG 2) (LA75), volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind tunnel tests are reported on a 0.015-scale SSV orbiter model with remote independently operated left and right elevon surfaces. Special attention was directed to definition of nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics by taking data at small increments. Six component aerodynamic force and moment and elevon position data were recorded for the space shuttle orbiter with various elevon, aileron rudder and speed brake deflection combinations over an angle of attack range from -4 deg to 32 deg at angles of sideslip of 0 deg and 3 deg. Additional tests were made over an angle of sideslip range from -6 deg to 8 deg at selected angles of attack. Test Mach numbers were 2.86, 2.90, 3.90 and 4.60 with Reynolds numbers held at a constant 2.0 x 1 million per foot.

Ball, J. W.

1976-01-01

315

Results of investigations on an 0.015-scale model (49-0) of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle orbiter in the NASA-Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (0A98)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of a wind tunnel test are presented; the model used for this test was 0.015-scale 140 A/B hybrid configuration of the space shuttle orbiter. The primary test objectives were to obtain incremental data on the effects of a sting mount on base pressures and force and moment data. The increments obtained included the addition of MPS nozzles as well as the deletion of the simulated sting mount. Six-component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded over an angle of attack range from 12 to 42 degrees at 0 and 5 degrees angles of sideslip. The testing was accomplished at Mach 5.3 and Mach 10.3. The effects of various elevon, body flap, and speed brake settings were investigated, and static pressures were measured at the fuselage base for use in force-data reduction.

Milam, M. D.; Dzuibala, T. J.

1975-01-01

316

Issues in Collaborative Logistics  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Collaborative logistics is becoming more important in today’s industry. This is driven by improved economic and environmental\\u000a efficiency through collaborative planning supporting resources sharing and new business models implementation. This paper\\u000a presents a survey of contributions to the field of collaborative logistics. It first describes current opportunities in collaborative\\u000a planning. It then discusses important issues related to building the coalition,

Sophie D’Amours; Mikael Rönnqvist

317

Space Shuttle: The Renewed Promise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA celebrated its 30th anniversary in 1988, two days after the Space Shuttle soared into space once more. When Congress approved the creation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in 1958, the United States had successfully launched only four small satellites and no American astronaut had yet flown in space. In the three decades since, four generations of manned spacecraft have been built and flown, twelve men have walked on the Moon, more than 100 Americans have flown and worked in space, and communications satellites and other Space-Age technologies have transformed life on planet Earth. When NASA's Golden Anniversary is celebrated in 2008, it is likely that men and women will be permanently living and working in space. There may be a base on the Moon, and a manned mission to Mars may only be years away. If a brief history of the first half-century of the Space Age is written for that event, it will show clearly how the exploration of space has altered the course of human history and allowed us to take a better hold of our destiny on and off planet Earth.

McAleer, Neil

1989-01-01

318

Habitability study shuttle orbiter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Habitability design concepts for the Shuttle Orbiter Program are provided for MSC. A variety of creative solutions for the stated tasks are presented. Sketches, mock-ups, mechanicals and models are included for establishing a foundation for future development.

1973-01-01

319

Shuttle Inventory Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Inventory Management System (SIMS) consists of series of integrated support programs providing supply support for both Shuttle program and Kennedy Space Center base opeations SIMS controls all supply activities and requirements from single point. Programs written in COBOL.

1983-01-01

320

NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf after landing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian Space Station Mir since late September 1997, greets his friend, Tammy Kruse, shortly after his return to Earth on Jan. 31. Dr. Wolf returned aboard the orbiter Endeavour with the rest of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded Dr. Wolf on Mir and is scheduled to remain on the Russian space station until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts.

1998-01-01

321

Space shuttle revitalization system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle air revitalization system is discussed. The sequential steps in loop closure are examined and a schematic outline of the regenerative air revitalization system is presented. Carbon dioxide reduction subsystem concepts are compared. Schemes are drawn for: static feedwater electrolysis cell, solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis cell, air revitalization system, nitrogen generation reactions, nitrogen subsystem staging, vapor compression distillation subsystem, thermoelectric integrated membrane evaporation subsystem, catalytic distillation water reclamation subsystem, and space shuttle solid waste management system.

Quattrone, P. D.

1985-01-01

322

Space Shuttle Launch: STS-129 - Duration: 11:32.  

NASA Video Gallery

STS-129. Space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member crew began an 11-day delivery flight to the International Space Station on Monday, Nov 16, 2009, with a 2:28 p.m. EST launch from NASA's Kennedy S...

323

The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission: Introduction to Special Session  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which flew successfully aboard Endeavour in February 2000, is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, and the German and Italian Space Agencies. The mission was designed to use a single-pass radar interferometer to produce a digital elevation model of the Earth's land surface between about 60^o north and 56^o

T. G. Farr; M. Werner; M. Kobrick

2003-01-01

324

Formalizing space shuttle software requirements: four case studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes four case studies in which requirements for new flight software subsystems on NASA's Space Shuttle were analyzed using mechanically supported formal methods. Three of the studies used standard formal specification and verification techniques, and the fourth used state exploration. These applications illustrate two thesis: (1) formal methods complement conventional requirements analysis processes effectively and (2) formal methods

Judith Crow; Ben L. Di Vito

1998-01-01

325

STS-89 Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay doors closure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Endeavour's payload bay doors were successfully cycled and closed for flight on Jan. 19 following replacement of a seal on the left door. Endeavour will be carrying the SPACEHAB module in the payload bay of the orbiter. The double module configuration will house experiments to be performed by Endeavour's crew along with logistics equipment to be transferred to the Russian Space Station Mir, where Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will succeed David Wolf, M.D. STS-89 will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with Mir. Launch is scheduled for January 22 at 9:48 p.m. EST.

1998-01-01

326

Liftoff of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-98  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Like 10,000 fireworks going off at once, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars into the moonlit sky while clouds of steam and smoke cascade behind. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle's robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. EST.

2001-01-01

327

Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls back to Launch Pad 39A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the sun clears the horizon, it creates a silhouette of the Space Shuttle Atlantis as it makes the 3.4-mile crawl from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A. The Shuttle has been in the VAB undergoing tests on the solid rocket booster cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA's SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis, causing return of the Shuttle to the VAB a week ago. Launch of Atlantis on STS-98 has been rescheduled to Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST.

2001-01-01

328

NASA and the practice of space law  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper discusses the need for increased awareness in space law due to advances in space technology and a trend toward commercialization of space. A list of national and international treaties, conventions, agreements, laws, and regulations relevant to space activities is presented. NASA lawyers specialize in international and municipal laws that affect the NASA space mission; an example of the lawyers working with insurance companies in negotiating the first Space Shuttle liability policy is provided. The increased participation of the public sector in space activities, for example, the commercialization of the Space Shuttle transportation system, is examined.

Hosenball, S. N.

1985-01-01

329

Space platforms for NASA - Opportunity or pitfall  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper describes NASA efforts to determine if platform to pool payload services are cost effective. It is shown that the platform concept originated from the short Shuttle life on orbit, the Shuttle capability to assemble aggregating structures, and the belief that economics might be obtained from shared services and repair. In addition, about eighty payloads in NASAs future were identified for consideration. Attention is given to platform configurations produced by contractor and in house studies, noting that comparative cost studies are currently being done.

Cuneo, W. J., Jr.; Williams, D. P., III

1979-01-01

330

NASA FY1984  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The White House budget request for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for fiscal year 1984 contains a number of continuing problems for outside investigators in universities and in the private sector. Nonetheless, the budget climate for NASA seems to be improving. (For more information on the budget for FY 1984, see Eos, February 15, 1983, p. 65, and May 17, 1983, p. 378.)Several new program starts are responsible for the feeling of optimism being sensed in many sectors of the scientific community. These include the Venus Radar Mapper, a shuttle-tethered satellite to study the earth's upper atmosphere (the tether could be 100 km in length), and the EUVE experiment (Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer).

Bell, Peter M.

331

Asymmetrical booster ascent guidance and control system design study. Volume 1: Summary. [space shuttle development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dynamics and control, stability, and guidance analyses are summarized for the asymmetrical booster ascent guidance and control system design studies, performed in conjunction with space shuttle planning. The mathematical models developed for use in rigid body and flexible body versions of the NASA JSC space shuttle functional simulator are briefly discussed, along with information on the following: (1) space shuttle stability analysis using equations of motion for both pitch and lateral axes; (2) the computer program used to obtain stability margin; and (3) the guidance equations developed for the space shuttle powered flight phases.

Williams, F. E.; Lemon, R. S.; Jaggers, R. F.; Wilson, J. L.

1974-01-01

332

Application of Terahertz Radiation to the Detection of Corrosion under the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There is currently no method for detecting corrosion under Shuttle tiles except for the expensive process of tile removal and replacement; hence NASA is investigating new NDE methods for detecting hidden corrosion. Time domain terahertz radiation has been applied to corrosion detection under tiles in samples ranging from small lab samples to a Shuttle with positive results. Terahertz imaging methods have been able to detect corrosion at thicknesses of 5 mils or greater under 1" thick Shuttle tiles and 7-12 mils or greater under 2" thick Shuttle tiles.

Madaras, Eric I.; Anastasi, Robert F.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Walker, James L.; Lomness, Janice K.; Hintze, Paul E.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Winfree, William P.; Russell, Richard W.

2007-01-01

333

Logistics Reduction and Repurposing Beyond Low Earth Orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

All human space missions, regardless of destination, require significant logistical mass and volume that is strongly proportional to mission duration. Anything that can be done to reduce initial mass and volume of supplies or reuse items that have been launched will be very valuable. Often, the logistical items require disposal and represent a trash burden. Utilizing systems engineering to analyze logistics from cradle-to-grave and then to potential reuse, can minimize logistics contributions to total mission architecture mass. In NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Logistics Reduction and Repurposing Project , various tasks will reduce the intrinsic mass of logistical packaging, enable reuse and repurposing of logistical packaging and carriers for other habitation, life support, crew health, and propulsion functions, and reduce or eliminate the nuisances aspects of trash at the same time. Repurposing reduces the trash burden and eliminates the need for hardware whose function can be provided by use of spent logistic items. However, these reuse functions need to be identified and built into future logical systems to enable them to effectively have a secondary function. These technologies and innovations will help future logistic systems to support multiple exploration missions much more efficiently.

Broyan, James Lee, Jr.; Ewert, Michael K.

2011-01-01

334

An Overview of Quantitative Risk Assessment of Space Shuttle Propulsion Elements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the Space Shuttle Challenger accident in 1986, NASA has been working to incorporate quantitative risk assessment (QRA) in decisions concerning the Space Shuttle and other NASA projects. One current major NASA QRA study is the creation of a risk model for the overall Space Shuttle system. The model is intended to provide a tool to estimate Space Shuttle risk and to perform sensitivity analyses/trade studies, including the evaluation of upgrades. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a part of the NASA team conducting the QRA study; MSFC responsibility involves modeling the propulsion elements of the Space Shuttle, namely: the External Tank (ET), the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), and the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). This paper discusses the approach that MSFC has used to model its Space Shuttle elements, including insights obtained from this experience in modeling large scale, highly complex systems with a varying availability of success/failure data. Insights, which are applicable to any QRA study, pertain to organizing the modeling effort, obtaining customer buy-in, preparing documentation, and using varied modeling methods and data sources. Also provided is an overall evaluation of the study results, including the strengths and the limitations of the MSFC QRA approach and of qRA technology in general.

Safie, Fayssal M.

1998-01-01

335

STS-98 Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls back to Launch Pad 39A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Dozens of storks are roused from the ground near the Vehicle Assembly Building after the Space Shuttle Atlantis has moved out. The Shuttle has been in the VAB undergoing tests on the solid rocket booster cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis, causing return of the Shuttle to the VAB a week ago. The Shuttle rolled back to Launch Pad 39A to get ready for launch on Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST.

2001-01-01

336

Work continues on Leonardo, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, in the Space Station Processing Faci  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility work on Leonardo, the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) built by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). The MPLM, a reusable logistics carrier, will be the primary delivery system used to resupply and return International Space Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the first of three MPLM carriers for the International Space Station. It is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Mission STS-102, targeted for June 2000. Leonardo shares space in the SSPF with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), targeted for launch in September 1999, and Destiny, the U.S. Lab module, targeted for mission STS-98 in late April 2000.

1999-01-01

337

NASA: Year in Review 2004  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Through the use of Macromedia Flash Player, this NASA website revisits the key NASA space exploration events and missions of 2004. Users can view videos illustrating the Vision for Space Exploration and articles describing the advances to help make the vision a reality. The website discusses the redesigning of the Shuttle External Fuel Tank and its significance in flight missions. Visitors can find out about the newest NASA research, watch a photo essay of the Cassini mission to Saturn, drive a Mars rover to explore the geology of that planet, learn about the next generation of NASA astronauts, and much more. Individuals can view photos, hear accounts, and read articles about the three crews that lived on the International Space Station in 2004.

338

The Network of Logistics Decisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter provides a framework for business logistics decision-making by classifying logistics decisions and highlighting the relevant linkages among them. We focus on the precedence relationships among logistics decisions and on how each decision influences and is influenced by other decisions. We also identify the key information required for making various logistics decisions. The core of our framework is a

Diane Riopel; André Langevin; James Campbell

339

NASA Mir program: Mission operations concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The joint NASA/Russian Space Agency mission program is discussed, considering the lessons learned. The initial Shuttle Mir science program and the NASA Mir program are described. The NASA Mir program is organized into ten distinct working groups which are co-chaired by representatives from the two cooperating nations. The NASA component is managed from the Johnson Space Center (TX). The support provided by NASA for long-duration missions and Mir expeditions is described. The scope of the scientific research carried out within the framework of the joint program is considered. The NASA Mir training approach is discussed and the mission operations are reviewed with emphasis on the Mir 21/NASA 2 mission.

Cardenas, Jeffrey A.

1996-01-01

340

Heat-transfer test results for a .0275-scale space shuttle external tank with a 10 deg/40 deg double cone-ogive nose in the NASA/AMES 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (FH14), volume 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A .0275 scale forebody model of the new baseline configuration of the space shuttle external tank vent cap configuration was tested to determine the flow field due to the double cone configuration. The tests were conducted in a 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel at alpha = -5 deg, -4.59 deg, 0 deg, 5 deg, and 10 deg; beta = 0 deg, -3 deg, -5.51 deg, -6 deg, -9 deg, and +6 deg; nominal freestream Reynolds numbers per foot of 1.5 x 1 million, 3.0 x 1 million, and 5.0 x 1 million; and a nominal Mach number of 5. Separation and reattached flow from thermocouple data, shadowgraphs, and oil flows indicate that separation begins about 80% from the tip of the 10 deg cone, then reattaches on the vent cap and produces fully turbulent flow over most of the model forebody. The hardware disturbs the flow over a much larger area than present TPS application has assumed. A correction to the flow disturbance was experimentally suggested from the results of an additional test run.

Carroll, H. R.

1977-01-01

341

Results of investigations on an 0.015-scale configuration 140A/B space shuttle vehicle orbiter model (49-0) in the NASA/Langley Research Center 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel (OA25)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerodynamic force and moment tests were conducted on an 0.015-scale space shuttle vehicle configuration 140A/B model (49-0) in a transonic pressure tunnel. The test was carried out at Mach numbers 0.35, 0.60, 0.80, 0.90, 0.98, and 1.20, and at Reynolds numbers ranging from 1.90 million per foot to 3.97 million per foot, depending on tunnel total pressure capability and model structural limits. The model attitude was varied in angle-of-attack from minus 2 deg to +22 deg at 0 deg and 5 deg angles of yaw, and in angle-of-sidelip from minus 5 to +10 deg at 0 deg, 7.5 deg, and 15 deg angles of pitch. The purpose of this test was to establish and verify longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics of the 140A/B Configuration Orbiter and to determine the effects of surface deflections on vehicle performance, stability, and control.

Nichols, M. E.

1974-01-01

342

Independent verification and validation for Space Shuttle flight software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Committee for Review of Oversight Mechanisms for Space Shuttle Software was asked by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Office of Space Flight to determine the need to continue independent verification and validation (IV&V) for Space Shuttle flight software. The Committee found that the current IV&V process is necessary to maintain NASA's stringent safety and quality requirements for man-rated vehicles. Therefore, the Committee does not support NASA's plan to eliminate funding for the IV&V effort in fiscal year 1993. The Committee believes that the Space Shuttle software development process is not adequate without IV&V and that elimination of IV&V as currently practiced will adversely affect the overall quality and safety of the software, both now and in the future. Furthermore, the Committee was told that no organization within NASA has the expertise or the manpower to replace the current IV&V function in a timely fashion, nor will building this expertise elsewhere necessarily reduce cost. Thus, the Committee does not recommend moving IV&V functions to other organizations within NASA unless the current IV&V is maintained for as long as it takes to build comparable expertise in the replacing organization.

1992-01-01

343

An assessment of space shuttle flight software development processes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In early 1991, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Office of Space Flight commissioned the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) of the National Research Council (NRC) to investigate the adequacy of the current process by which NASA develops and verifies changes and updates to the Space Shuttle flight software. The Committee for Review of Oversight Mechanisms for Space Shuttle Flight Software Processes was convened in Jan. 1992 to accomplish the following tasks: (1) review the entire flight software development process from the initial requirements definition phase to final implementation, including object code build and final machine loading; (2) review and critique NASA's independent verification and validation process and mechanisms, including NASA's established software development and testing standards; (3) determine the acceptability and adequacy of the complete flight software development process, including the embedded validation and verification processes through comparison with (1) generally accepted industry practices, and (2) generally accepted Department of Defense and/or other government practices (comparing NASA's program with organizations and projects having similar volumes of software development, software maturity, complexity, criticality, lines of code, and national standards); (4) consider whether independent verification and validation should continue. An overview of the study, independent verification and validation of critical software, and the Space Shuttle flight software development process are addressed. Findings and recommendations are presented.

1993-01-01

344

NASA Human Space Flight Realtime Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Wondering when that spacecraft will be cruising over your city during the next ten days? Visit the NASA Human Space Flight Realtime Data page to find out. Satellite sighting information by city is provided by NASA's Johnson Space Center. Visitors to the site can choose a city from the list provided or enter their location using the nifty NASA Skywatch Java applet. Other highlights of the NASA Human Space Flight Realtime Data page include maps of Space Shuttle landing tracks (.gif) and deorbit parameters, and Space Shuttle and Space Station orbital tracking information that includes altitude, location coordinates, speed, and more. Definitions and illustrations of orbital tracking elements and coordinate system terminology make the site accessible to general audiences.

345

Practical Session: Logistic Regression  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An exercise is proposed to illustrate the logistic regression. One investigates the different risk factors in the apparition of coronary heart disease. It has been proposed in Chapter 5 of the book of D.G. Kleinbaum and M. Klein, "Logistic Regression", Statistics for Biology and Health, Springer Science Business Media, LLC (2010) and also by D. Chessel and A.B. Dufour in Lyon 1 (see Sect. 6 of http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/pdf/tdr341.pdf). This example is based on data given in the file evans.txt coming from http://www.sph.emory.edu/dkleinb/logreg3.htm#data.

Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

2014-01-01

346

Understanding logistic regression analysis  

PubMed Central

Logistic regression is used to obtain odds ratio in the presence of more than one explanatory variable. The procedure is quite similar to multiple linear regression, with the exception that the response variable is binomial. The result is the impact of each variable on the odds ratio of the observed event of interest. The main advantage is to avoid confounding effects by analyzing the association of all variables together. In this article, we explain the logistic regression procedure using examples to make it as simple as possible. After definition of the technique, the basic interpretation of the results is highlighted and then some special issues are discussed. PMID:24627710

Sperandei, Sandro

2014-01-01

347

Bayesian logistic regression analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we present a Bayesian logistic regression analysis. It is found that if one wishes to derive the posterior distribution of the probability of some event, then, together with the traditional Bayes Theorem and the integrating out of nuissance parameters, the Jacobian transformation is an essential added ingredient. The application of the product rule gives the posterior of the unknown logistic regression coefficients. The Jacobian transformation then maps the posterior of these regression coefficients to the posterior of the corresponding probability of some event and some nuisance parameters. Finally, by way of the sumrule the nuissance parameters are integrated out.

van Erp, N.; van Gelder, P.

2013-08-01

348

7. YOSEMITE VALLEY SHUTTLE BUS AT SENTINEL BRIDGE SHUTTLE BUS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. YOSEMITE VALLEY SHUTTLE BUS AT SENTINEL BRIDGE SHUTTLE BUS AND PARKING LOT AREA. LOOKING WNW. GIS: N-37 40 36.2 / W-119 44 45.0 - Yosemite National Park Roads & Bridges, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

349

STS-37 Shuttle Crew after Edwards landing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The crew of the Space Shuttle Atlantis gives the 'all's well' thumb's-up sign after leaving the 100-ton orbiter following their landing at 6:55 a.m. (PDT), 11 April 1991, at NASA's Ames Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, to conclude mission STS-37. They are, from left, Kenneth D. Cameron, pilot; Steven R. Nagel, mission commander; and mission specialists Linda M. Godwin, Jerry L. Ross, and Jay Apt. During the mission,which began with launch April 5 at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, the crew deployed the Gamma Ray Observatory. Ross and Jay also carried out two spacewalks, one to deploy an antenna on the Gamma Ray Observatory and the other to test equipment and mobility techniques for the construction of the future Space Station. The planned five-day mission was extended one day because of high winds at Edwards. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shut

1991-01-01

350

New Atmospheric Turbulence Model for Shuttle Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An updated NASA atmospheric turbulence model, from 0 to 200 km altitude, which was developed to be more realistic and less conservative when applied to space shuttle reentry engineering simulation studies involving control system fuel expenditures is presented. The prior model used extreme turbulence (3 sigma) for all altitudes, whereas in reality severe turbulence is patchy within quiescent atmospheric zones. The updated turublence model presented is designed to be more realistic. The prior turbulence statistics (sigma and L) were updated and were modeled accordingly.

Justus, C. G.; Campbell, C. W.; Doubleday, M. K.; Johnson, D. L.

1990-01-01

351

Space Shuttle Orbiter windshield bird impact analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter's windshield employs three glass panes separated by air gaps. The brittleness of the glass offers much less birdstrike energy-absorption capability than the laminated polycarbonate windshields of more conventional aircraft; attention must accordingly be given to the risk of catastrophic bird impact, and to methods of strike prevention that address bird populations around landing sites rather than the modification of the window's design. Bird populations' direct reduction, as well as careful scheduling of Orbiter landing times, are suggested as viable alternatives. The question of birdstrike-resistant glass windshield design for hypersonic aerospacecraft is discussed.

Edelstein, Karen S.; Mccarty, Robert E.

1988-01-01

352

Advanced automation in space shuttle mission control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Real Time Data System (RTDS) Project was undertaken in 1987 to introduce new concepts and technologies for advanced automation into the Mission Control Center environment at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The project's emphasis is on producing advanced near-operational prototype systems that are developed using a rapid, interactive method and are used by flight controllers during actual Shuttle missions. In most cases the prototype applications have been of such quality and utility that they have been converted to production status. A key ingredient has been an integrated team of software engineers and flight controllers working together to quickly evolve the demonstration systems.

Heindel, Troy A.; Rasmussen, Arthur N.; Mcfarland, Robert Z.

1991-01-01

353

Columbia and Challenger: organizational failure at NASA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)—as the global leader in all areas of spaceflight and space science—is a unique organization in terms of size, mission, constraints, complexity and motivations. NASA's flagship endeavor—human spaceflight—is extremely risky and one of the most complicated tasks undertaken by man. It is well accepted that the tragic destruction of the Space Shuttle Challenger on

Joseph Lorenzo Hall

2003-01-01

354

Shielding measurements of the space shuttle (part I - meeting the test challenge)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) at Pax River teamed with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to perform a shielding test of the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter “Endeavour.” Pax River was responsible for testing in the high frequency range up to 18 GHz. NASA imposed some very tight limitations on the time allotted to perform the test

Buzz Brezinski; D. Kempf; R. Scully

2006-01-01

355

Nondestructive Evaluation for the Space Shuttle's Wing Leading Edge  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia highlighted concerns about the integrity of the Shuttle's thermal protection system, which includes Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) on the leading edge. This led NASA to investigate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for certifying the integrity of the Shuttle's wing leading edge. That investigation was performed simultaneously with a large study conducted to understand the impact damage caused by errant debris. Among the many advanced NDE methods investigated for applicability to the RCC material, advanced digital radiography, high resolution computed tomography, thermography, ultrasound, acoustic emission and eddy current systems have demonstrated the maturity and success for application to the Shuttle RCC panels. For the purposes of evaluating the RCC panels while they are installed on the orbiters, thermographic detection incorporating principal component analysis (PCA) and eddy current array scanning systems demonstrated the ability to measure the RCC panels from one side only and to detect several flaw types of concern. These systems were field tested at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and at several locations where impact testing was being conducted. Another advanced method that NASA has been investigating is an automated acoustic based detection system. Such a system would be based in part on methods developed over the years for acoustic emission testing. Impact sensing has been demonstrated through numerous impact tests on both reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) leading edge materials as well as Shuttle tile materials on representative aluminum wing structures. A variety of impact materials and conditions have been evaluated including foam, ice, and ablator materials at ascent velocities as well as simulated hypervelocity micrometeoroid and orbital debris impacts. These tests have successfully demonstrated the capability to detect and localize impact events on Shuttle's wing structures. A first generation impact sensing system has been designed for the next Shuttle flight and is undergoing final evaluation for deployment on the Shuttle's first return to flight. This system will employ wireless accelerometer sensors that were qualified for other applications on previous Shuttle flights. These sensors will be deployed on the wing's leading edge to detect impacts on the RCC leading edge panels. The application of these methods will help to insure the continued integrity of the Shuttle wing's leading edge system as the Shuttle flights resume and until their retirement.

Madaras, Eric I.; Winfree, William P.; Prosser, William H.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Cramer, K. Elliot

2005-01-01

356

The Space Shuttle and Its Operations 53 Shuttle and  

E-print Network

Shuttle Builds the International Space Station #12;The Space Shuttle design was remarkable. The idea's capabilities and contributions is the International Space Station--a massive engineering assembly, and components/modules for the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The shuttle lift capability

357

Logistics development in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accession of the People's Republic of China to the World Trade Organisation should provide greater access to an erstwhile-untapped market. Trade and foreign investments are expected to increase rapidly. Under this setting, an enormous challenge is posed to the logistics industry as it endeavours to meet the increased demands of the market. Based on the secondary data, this paper

Mark Goh; Charlene Ling

2003-01-01

358

Space shuttle auxiliary propulsion system design study. Executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development and characteristics of an auxiliary propulsion system for space shuttle applications are presented. The system design data necessary for selection of preferred system concepts and the requirements for complementing component design and test programs are analyzed. The use of cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen as a propellant combination is explained on the basis of high vehicle impulse requirements, safety factors, reuse, and logistics considerations. The final configurations for the alternate propellant system, with primary emphasis on earth storable propellants is described.

Kelly, P. J.; Schweickert, T. F.

1972-01-01

359

Space shuttle food system study. Volume 1: System design report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data were assembled which define the optimum food system to support the space shuttle program, and which provide sufficient engineering data to support necessary requests for proposals towards final development and installment of the system. The study approach used is outlined, along with technical data and sketches for each functional area. Logistic support analysis, system assurance, and recommendations and conclusions based on the study results are also presented.

1974-01-01

360

Shuttle model tailcone pressure distribution at low subsonic speeds of a 0.03614-scale model in the NASA/LaRC low-turbulence pressure tunnel (LA81), volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted in the NASA/LaRC Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel on a 0.03614-scale orbiter model of a 089B configuration with a 139B configuration nose forward of F.S. 500. The tailcone was the TC sub 4 design and was instrumented with eighty-nine pressure orifices. Control surfaces were deflected and three wind tunnel mounting techniques were investigated over an angle-of-attack range from -2 deg to a maximum of 18 deg. In order to determine the sensitivity of the tailcone to changes in Reynolds number, most of the test was made at a Mach number of 0.20 over a Reynolds number range of 2.0 to 10 million per foot. A few runs were made at a Mach number of 0.30 at Reynolds numbers of 4.0, 6.0, and 8 million per foot.

Ball, J. W.; Lindahl, R. H.

1976-01-01

361

Logistics support economy and efficiency through consolidation and automation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An integrated logistics support system, which would provide routine access to space and be cost-competitive as an operational space transportation system, was planned and implemented to support the NSTS program launch-on-time goal of 95 percent. A decision was made to centralize the Shuttle logistics functions in a modern facility that would provide office and training space and an efficient warehouse area. In this warehouse, the emphasis is on automation of the storage and retrieval function, while utilizing state-of-the-art warehousing and inventory management technology. This consolidation, together with the automation capabilities being provided, will allow for more effective utilization of personnel and improved responsiveness. In addition, this facility will be the prime support for the fully integrated logistics support of the operations era NSTS and reduce the program's management, procurement, transportation, and supply costs in the operations era.

Savage, G. R.; Fontana, C. J.; Custer, J. D.

1985-01-01

362

EA Shuttle Document Retention Effort  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the effort of code EA at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to identify and acquire databases and documents from the space shuttle program that are adjudged important for retention after the retirement of the space shuttle.

Wagner, Howard A.

2010-01-01

363

Space Shuttle Orbiter  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn how orbits are created by a force pulling toward the center in this Moveable Museum unit, in which they build a paper model of a Space Shuttle. This activity simulates an object in orbit. A paper Space Shuttle is swung in a circle on a string. The string provides a pull toward the center of the orbit, simulating the force of gravity. The four-page PDF guide includes suggested background readings for educators, activity notes, and step-by-step directions with suggested discussion questions for older students.

364

Material Issues in Space Shuttle Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) store gases used in four subsystems for NASA's Space Shuttle Fleet. While there are 24 COPV on each Orbiter ranging in size from 19-40", stress rupture failure of a pressurized Orbiter COPV on the ground or in flight is a catastrophic hazard and would likely lead to significant damage/loss of vehicle and/or life and is categorized as a Crit 1 failure. These vessels were manufactured during the late 1970's and into the early 1980's using Titanium liners, Kevlar 49 fiber, epoxy matrix resin, and polyurethane coating. The COPVs are pressurized periodically to 3-5ksi and therefore experience significant strain in the composite overwrap. Similar composite vessels were developed in a variety of DOE Programs (primarily at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories or LLNL), as well as for NASA Space Shuttle Fleet Leader COPV program. The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) formed an Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team whose primary focus was to investigate whether or not enough composite life remained in the Shuttle COPV in order to provide a strategic rationale for continued COPV use aboard the Space Shuttle Fleet with the existing 25-year-old vessels. Several material science issues were examined and will be discussed in this presentation including morphological changes to Kevlar 49 fiber under stress, manufacturing changes in Kevlar 49 and their effect on morphology and tensile strength, epoxy resin strain, composite creep, degradation of polyurethane coatings, and Titanium yield characteristics.

Sutter, James K.; Jensen, Brian J.; Gates, Thomas S.; Morgan, Roger J.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh

2006-01-01

365

NASA Bioreactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Biotechnology Refrigerator (BTR) holds fixed tissue culture bags at 4 degrees C to preserve them for return to Earth and postflight analysis. The cultures are used in research with the NASA Bioreactor cell science program. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

1998-01-01

366

NASA Mission Operations Directorate Preparations for the COTS Visiting Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the retirement of the Space Shuttle looming, a series of new spacecraft is under development to assist in providing for the growing logistical needs of the International Space Station (ISS). Two of these vehicles are being built under a NASA initiative known as the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) program. These visiting vehicles ; Space X s Dragon and Orbital Science Corporation s Cygnus , are to be domestically produced in the United States and designed to add to the capabilities of the Russian Progress and Soyuz workhorses, the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) and the Japanese H-2 Transfer Vehicle (HTV). Most of what is known about the COTS program has focused on the work of Orbital and SpaceX in designing, building, and testing their respective launch and cargo vehicles. However, there is also a team within the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at NASA s Johnson Space Center working with their operational counterparts in these companies to provide operational safety oversight and mission assurance via the development of operational scenarios and products needed for these missions. Ensuring that the operational aspect is addressed for the initial demonstration flights of these vehicles is the topic of this paper. Integrating Dragon and Cygnus into the ISS operational environment has posed a unique challenge to NASA and their partner companies. This is due in part to the short time span of the COTS program, as measured from initial contract award until first launch, as well as other factors that will be explored in the text. Operational scenarios and products developed for each COTS vehicle will be discussed based on the following categories: timelines, on-orbit checkout, ground documentation, crew procedures, software updates and training materials. Also addressed is an outline of the commonalities associated with the operations for each vehicle. It is the intent of the authors to provide their audience with a better understanding of the mission assurance that MOD brings to commercial ventures to the ISS

Shull, Sarah A.; Peek, Kenneth E.

2011-01-01

367

NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

By incorporating rigorous engineering practices, innovative manufacturing processes and test techniques, a unique multi-center government/contractor partnership, and a clean-sheet design developed around the primary requirements for the International Space Station (ISS) and Lunar missions, the Upper Stage Element of NASA's Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), the "Ares I," is a vital part of the Constellation Program's transportation system. Constellation's exploration missions will include Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles required to place crew and cargo in low-Earth orbit (LEO), crew and cargo transportation systems required for human space travel, and transportation systems and scientific equipment required for human exploration of the Moon and Mars. Early Ares I configurations will support ISS re-supply missions. A self-supporting cylindrical structure, the Ares I Upper Stage will be approximately 84' long and 18' in diameter. The Upper Stage Element is being designed for increased supportability and increased reliability to meet human-rating requirements imposed by NASA standards. The design also incorporates state-of-the-art materials, hardware, design, and integrated logistics planning, thus facilitating a supportable, reliable, and operable system. With NASA retiring the Space Shuttle fleet in 2010, the success of the Ares I Project is essential to America's continued leadership in space. The first Ares I test flight, called Ares 1-X, is scheduled for 2009. Subsequent test flights will continue thereafter, with the first crewed flight of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), "Orion," planned for no later than 2015. Crew transportation to the ISS will follow within the same decade, and the first Lunar excursion is scheduled for the 2020 timeframe.

Davis, Daniel J.

2008-01-01

368

Logistics Reduction and Repurposing Beyond Low Earth Orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

All human space missions, regardless of destination, require significant logistical mass and volume that is strongly proportional to mission duration. Anything that can be done to reduce initial mass and volume of supplies or reuse items that have been launched will be very valuable. Often, the logistical items require disposal and represent a trash burden. Logistics contributions to total mission architecture mass can be minimized by considering potential reuse using systems engineering analysis. In NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems "Logistics Reduction and Repurposing Project," various tasks will reduce the intrinsic mass of logistical packaging, enable reuse and repurposing of logistical packaging and carriers for other habitation, life support, crew health, and propulsion functions, and reduce or eliminate the nuisance aspects of trash at the same time. Repurposing reduces the trash burden and eliminates the need for hardware whose function can be provided by use of spent logistical items. However, these reuse functions need to be identified and built into future logical systems to enable them to effectively have a secondary function. These technologies and innovations will help future logistics systems to support multiple exploration missions much more efficiently.

Ewert, Michael K.; Broyan, James L., Jr.

2012-01-01

369

Advanced Health Management System for the Space Shuttle Main Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boeing-Canoga Park (BCP) and NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA-MSFC) are developing an Advanced Health Management System (AHMS) for use on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) that will improve Shuttle safety by reducing the probability of catastrophic engine failures during the powered ascent phase of a Shuttle mission. This is a phased approach that consists of an upgrade to the current Space Shuttle Main Engine Controller (SSMEC) to add turbomachinery synchronous vibration protection and addition of a separate Health Management Computer (HMC) that will utilize advanced algorithms to detect and mitigate predefined engine anomalies. The purpose of the Shuttle AHMS is twofold; one is to increase the probability of successfully placing the Orbiter into the intended orbit, and the other is to increase the probability of being able to safely execute an abort of a Space Transportation System (STS) launch. Both objectives are achieved by increasing the useful work envelope of a Space Shuttle Main Engine after it has developed anomalous performance during launch and the ascent phase of the mission. This increase in work envelope will be the result of two new anomaly mitigation options, in addition to existing engine shutdown, that were previously unavailable. The added anomaly mitigation options include engine throttle-down and performance correction (adjustment of engine oxidizer to fuel ratio), as well as enhanced sensor disqualification capability. The HMC is intended to provide the computing power necessary to diagnose selected anomalous engine behaviors and for making recommendations to the engine controller for anomaly mitigation. Independent auditors have assessed the reduction in Shuttle ascent risk to be on the order of 40% with the combined system and a three times improvement in mission success.

Davidson, Matt; Stephens, John

2004-01-01

370

Lunar Surface Architecture Utilization and Logistics Support Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crew and equipment utilization and logistics support needs for the point of departure lunar outpost as presented by the NASA Lunar Architecture Team (LAT) and alternative surface architectures were assessed for the first ten years of operation. The lunar surface architectures were evaluated and manifests created for each mission. Distances between Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM) landing sites and emplacement

Dallas Bienhoff; William Findiesen; Martin Bayer; Andrew Born; David McCormick

2008-01-01

371

A Mathematical Model for Interplanetary Logistics Ms. Christine Taylor  

E-print Network

to sustain the exploration initiative. Using terrestrial logistics modeling tools that have been extended exploration of Mars thereafter.[1] The President has tasked NASA with the development of a sustainable space to mission cost. In order to develop a sustainable space transportation architecture it is critical

de Weck, Olivier L.

372

Modeling Interplanetary Logistics: A Mathematical Model for Mission Planning  

E-print Network

The President has tasked NASA with the development of a sustainable space transportation system that will enable to develop a sustainable space transportation architecture it is critical that interplanetary supply chainModeling Interplanetary Logistics: A Mathematical Model for Mission Planning Christine Taylor, Miao

de Weck, Olivier L.

373

NASA applications and lessons learned in reliability engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the Shuttle Challenger accident in 1986, communities across National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) have been developing and extensively using quantitative reliability and risk assessment methods in their decision making process. This paper discusses several reliability engineering applications that NASA has used over the years to support the design, development, and operation of critical space flight hardware. Specifically, the

Fayssal M. Safie; Raymond P. Fuller

2012-01-01

374

National Aeronautics and Space Administration www.nasa.gov  

E-print Network

24, 1990, the space shuttle Discovery lifted off from Earth with the Hubble Space Telescope nestled of space. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope recently marked its 24th year in space and to celebrate its 25th of a large school bus. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA

375

Toward a History Space Shuttle  

E-print Network

Shuttle in building and servicing the Hubble Space Telescope and the International Space Station; science CHAPTER 7--THE SPACE SHUTTLE AND THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ............. 34 CHAPTER 8--SCIENCEToward a History of the Space Shuttle An Annotated Bibliography Part 2, 1992­2011 Monographs

376

NASA Administrator Visits Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (second from right) visits the control room of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) in Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)in Troy, NY, during RPI's 175th arniversary. IDGE, flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. Photo credit: RPI

1999-01-01

377

NASA HISTORY DIVISION Office of External Relations  

E-print Network

News from Headquarters and the Centers 6 Space Shuttle Main Engine Testing Comes to a Close 13 Recent recently, Dr. Steven J. Dick retired as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Chief. Lindbergh chair in aerospace history, National Air and Space

378

Future plans for the NASA suborbital program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of more reliable heavy-lift balloons and a fine pointed gondola; the development of the Black Brant-12 rocket for auroral research; and the development of a collaborative Orbiting Payload Using Scout program are outlined. Through 1989 NASA will conduct a comprehensive program of aircraft, balloon, and rocket campaigns in conjunction with Shuttle and satellite measurements on the Supernovae 1987a.

Shawhan, S. D.; Holtz, J. R.

1987-08-01

379

www.nasa.gov Fiscal Year  

E-print Network

achieving the challenging mission of space exploration, scientific discovery, and aeronautics research like to mention a few of our specific accomplishments. We had four successful Space Shuttle launches and Space Administration #12;i Message from the Administrator November 15, 2010 I am pleased to present NASA

380

www.nasa.gov Fiscal Year  

E-print Network

achieving the challenging mission of space exploration, scientific discovery, and aeronautics research like to mention a few of our specific accomplishments. We had four successful Space Shuttle launcheswww.nasa.gov Fiscal Year PERFORMANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT 2010 National Aeronautics and Space

381

www.nasa.gov Fiscal Year  

E-print Network

toward achieving the challenging mission of space exploration, scientific discovery, and aeronautics Space Shuttle launches to the International Space Station (ISS) since last November, to complete itswww.nasa.gov Fiscal Year PERFORMANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT 2010 National Aeronautics and Space

382

NASA Visualization of Remote Sensing Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of visualizations produced by the NASA Laboratory for Atmospheres includes still images, movies, and 3D/VR images. Viewers can select images of hurricanes and other weather phenomena, the Earth from space, fires, ash clouds, and a space shuttle launch. Links to other sources of imagery are also provided.

383

Closeup View of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) 2044 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Close-up View of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) 2044 mounted in a SSME Engine Handler in the SSME processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. This view shows SSME 2044 with its expansion nozzle removed and an Engine Leak-Test Plug is set in the throat of the Main Combustion Chamber in the approximate center of the image, the insulated, High-Pressure Fuel Turbopump sits below that and the Low Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump Discharge Duct sits towards the top of the engine assembly in this view. - Space Transportation System, Space Shuttle Main Engine, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

384

Maturing monitoring agents into model based diagnostic agents for ground processing of the Space Shuttle and future exploration  

Microsoft Academic Search

NASA Kennedy Space Center deploys rule-based software agents to help monitor the Space Shuttle ground telemetry data. The agents recognize predefined measurement patterns and issue notifications to Shuttle Engineers when various events occur. Hundreds of rules for thousands of measurements have been written. Currently, these agents possess only shallow knowledge. They do not lend themselves to more complex tasks, such

G. S. Semmel; L. Boloni

2006-01-01

385

NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 7 | AUGUST 2011 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 587 With the final flight of the space shuttle  

E-print Network

flight of the space shuttle Atlantis last month, US primacy in the race to space is on the wane. Although of the 1960s, and before the Russians could do so. The space shuttle -- chosen as Apollo's successor, although later entrants in the space race, are still keen competitors. NASA's Apollo programme

Loss, Daniel

386

Space Shuttle news reference  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A detailed description of the space shuttle vehicle and associated subsystems is given. Space transportation system propulsion, power generation, environmental control and life support system and avionics are among the topics. Also, orbiter crew accommodations and equipment, mission operations and support, and flight crew complement and crew training are addressed.

1981-01-01

387

Mobile Christian - shuttle flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Erin Whittle, 14, (seated) and Brianna Johnson, 14, look on as Louis Stork, 13, attempts a simulated landing of a space shuttle at StenniSphere. The young people were part of a group from Mobile Christian School in Mobile, Ala., that visited StenniSphere on April 21.

2009-01-01

388

Space shuttle RCS engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design of the space shuttle RCS engine has the primary objective of reusability with minimum servicing. Engine S/N FT-2A has successfully completed all ten environmental (salt water spray, sand and dust, vibration and humidity) and hot fire cycles with no change in engine performance (steady state or pulse mode).

1973-01-01

389

The Shuttle Environment Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of shuttle environmental measurement programs were presented. The implications for plasma, infrared and ultraviolet experiments were discussed. The prelaunch environmental conditions, results of key environmental measurements made during the flights of STS 1, 2, 3, 4, and postlanding environmental conditions were covered.

Lehmann, J.; Tanner, S. G. (editor); Wilkerson, T. (editor)

1983-01-01

390

Aboard the Space Shuttle.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 32-page pamphlet contains color photographs and detailed diagrams which illustrate general descriptive comments about living conditions aboard the space shuttle. Described are details of the launch, the cabin, the condition of weightlessness, food, sleep, exercise, atmosphere, personal hygiene, medicine, going EVA (extra-vehicular activity),…

Steinberg, Florence S.

391

Shuttle Blast-Off!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two articles describe ideas for school library media centers interested in promoting space education. The first article explains how to construct an inexpensive simulation of a space shuttle and suggests associated activities. The second presents steps for identifying resources and organizing them into a resources file; relevant information…

Gage, Marilyn Kay; And Others

1993-01-01

392

Integration and Test of Shuttle Small Payloads  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recommended approaches for space shuttle small payload integration and test (I&T) are presented. The paper is intended for consideration by developers of shuttle small payloads, including I&T managers, project managers, and system engineers. Examples and lessons learned are presented based on the extensive history of NASA's Hitchhiker project. All aspects of I&T are presented, including: (1) I&T team responsibilities, coordination, and communication; (2) Flight hardware handling practices; (3) Documentation and configuration management; (4) I&T considerations for payload development; (5) I&T at the development facility; (6) Prelaunch operations, transfer, orbiter integration and interface testing; (7) Postflight operations. This paper is of special interest to those payload projects that have small budgets and few resources: that is, the truly faster, cheaper, better projects. All shuttle small payload developers are strongly encouraged to apply these guidelines during I&T planning and ground operations to take full advantage of today's limited resources and to help ensure mission success.

Wright, Michael R.

2003-01-01

393

Shuttle/Centaur Upper Stage Capability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A joint project to design, develop, procure, and produce Centaur upper stages for use with the Space Shuttle is discussed. A common Centaur G stage 6 meters (19.5 feet) in length is being jointly developed. A longer version designated Centaur G Prime is being developed by NASA to accomplish the Galileo and International Solar-Polar Mission flights in 1986. The Centaur G and G Prime will have the capability to place, respectively, approximately 4540 kilograms (10,000 pounds) and 5910 kilograms (13,000 pounds) into geosynchronous orbit from a standard Shuttle parking orbit of 278 kilometers (150 nautical miles) and Shuttle performance (lift) capability 29,500 kilograms (65,000 pounds). The advent of high energy upper stage capability in 1986 will permit space users and spacecraft developers to utilize spacecraft growth, stage combination concepts with storage modules, teleoperator systems, and other mission peculiar devices to satisfy complex mission demands. These capabilities should greatly enhance the usefulness of the space environment and stimulate mission planners toward conception of innovative means to meet ever increasing mission requirements.

Clark, H. J.

1984-01-01

394

Lightning protection for shuttle propulsion elements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of lightning protection analyses and tests are weighed against the present set of waivers to the NASA lightning protection specification. The significant analyses and tests are contrasted with the release of a new and more realistic lightning protection specification, in September 1990, that resulted in an inordinate number of waivers. A variety of lightning protection analyses and tests of the Shuttle propulsion elements, the Solid Rocket Booster, the External Tank, and the Space Shuttle Main Engine, were conducted. These tests range from the sensitivity of solid propellant during shipping to penetration of cryogenic tanks during flight. The Shuttle propulsion elements have the capability to survive certain levels of lightning strikes at certain times during transportation, launch site operations, and flight. Changes are being evaluated that may improve the odds of withstanding a major lightning strike. The Solid Rocket Booster is the most likely propulsion element to survive if systems tunnel bond straps are improved. Wiring improvements were already incorporated and major protection tests were conducted. The External Tank remains vulnerable to burn-through penetration of its skin. Proposed design improvements include the use of a composite nose cone and conductive or laminated thermal protection system coatings.

Goodloe, Carolyn C.; Giudici, Robert J.

1991-01-01

395

Developing logistics competencies through third party logistics relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers third party logistics (TPL) from a resource and competence perspective. New competencies are developed in the relationship between the shipper and the TPL provider. A typology of TPL relationships is developed going from market exchanges to joint logistics solutions. Here, the article will concentrate on the highest level – joint logistics solutions. The theoretical grounding of competence

Árni Halldórsson; Tage Skjøtt-Larsen

2004-01-01

396

Logistics management in practice – towards theories of complex logistics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present findings concerning what logistics managers perceive as being difficult and challenging, and what implications this may have for further advances in the logistics discipline. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The point of departure for this study was to reflect on perceived problems, uncertainties, trends, and solutions in logistics, and how they are handled

Fredrik Nilsson

2006-01-01

397

Launch Vehicle Demonstrator Using Shuttle Assets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Marshall Space Flight Center Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) has the leading role for NASA s preliminary conceptual launch vehicle design and performance analysis. Over the past several years the ACO Earth-to-Orbit Team has evaluated thousands of launch vehicle concept variations for a multitude of studies including agency-wide efforts such as the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS), Constellation, Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV), Heavy Lift Propulsion Technology (HLPT), Human Exploration Framework Team (HEFT), and Space Launch System (SLS). NASA plans to continue human space exploration and space station utilization. Launch vehicles used for heavy lift cargo and crew will be needed. One of the current leading concepts for future heavy lift capability is an inline one and a half stage concept using solid rocket boosters (SRB) and based on current Shuttle technology and elements. Potentially, the quickest and most cost-effective path towards an operational vehicle of this configuration is to make use of a demonstrator vehicle fabricated from existing shuttle assets and relying upon the existing STS launch infrastructure. Such a demonstrator would yield valuable proof-of-concept data and would provide a working test platform allowing for validated systems integration. Using shuttle hardware such as existing RS-25D engines and partial MPS, propellant tanks derived from the External Tank (ET) design and tooling, and four-segment SRB s could reduce the associated upfront development costs and schedule when compared to a concept that would rely on new propulsion technology and engine designs. There are potentially several other additional benefits to this demonstrator concept. Since a concept of this type would be based on man-rated flight proven hardware components, this demonstrator has the potential to evolve into the first iteration of heavy lift crew or cargo and serve as a baseline for block upgrades. This vehicle could also serve as a demonstration and test platform for the Orion Program. Critical spacecraft systems, re-entry and recovery systems, and launch abort systems of Orion could also be demonstrated in early test flights of the launch vehicle demo. Furthermore, an early demonstrator of this type would provide a stop-gap for retaining critical human capital and infrastructure while affording the current emerging generation of young engineers opportunity to work with and capture lessons learned from existing STS program offices and personnel, who were integral in the design and development of the Space Shuttle before these resources are no longer available. The objective of this study is to define candidate launch vehicle demonstration concepts that are based on Space Shuttle assets and determine their performance capabilities and how these demonstration vehicles could evolve to a heavy lift capability to low earth orbit.

Threet, Grady E., Jr.; Creech, Dennis M.; Philips, Alan D.; Water, Eric D.

2011-01-01

398

NASA trend analysis procedures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This publication is primarily intended for use by NASA personnel engaged in managing or implementing trend analysis programs. 'Trend analysis' refers to the observation of current activity in the context of the past in order to infer the expected level of future activity. NASA trend analysis was divided into 5 categories: problem, performance, supportability, programmatic, and reliability. Problem trend analysis uncovers multiple occurrences of historical hardware or software problems or failures in order to focus future corrective action. Performance trend analysis observes changing levels of real-time or historical flight vehicle performance parameters such as temperatures, pressures, and flow rates as compared to specification or 'safe' limits. Supportability trend analysis assesses the adequacy of the spaceflight logistics system; example indicators are repair-turn-around time and parts stockage levels. Programmatic trend analysis uses quantitative indicators to evaluate the 'health' of NASA programs of all types. Finally, reliability trend analysis attempts to evaluate the growth of system reliability based on a decreasing rate of occurrence of hardware problems over time. Procedures for conducting all five types of trend analysis are provided in this publication, prepared through the joint efforts of the NASA Trend Analysis Working Group.

1993-01-01

399

Operations analysis (study 2.6). Volume 4: Computer specification; logistics of orbiting vehicle servicing (LOVES)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The logistics of orbital vehicle servicing computer specifications was developed and a number of alternatives to improve utilization of the space shuttle and the tug were investigated. Preliminary results indicate that space servicing offers a potential for reducing future operational and program costs over ground refurbishment of satellites. A computer code which could be developed to simulate space servicing is presented.

1973-01-01

400

Logistics Performance : Definition and Measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concerns the definition and measurement of performance in logistics research. A review of the literature reveals a variety of constraints which make it difficult to draw broad inferences from the literature about the relationship between a given logistics strategy and performance. Discusses low logistics performance has been and could be conceptualized, operationally defined, measured and utilized. The limitations of alternative

Garland Chow; Trevor D. Heaver; Lennart E. Henriksson

1994-01-01

401

NASA Planetary Visualization Tool  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA World Wind allows one to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging the combination of high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience Earth in visually rich 3D, just as if they were really there. NASA World Wind combines LandSat 7 imagery with Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) elevation data, for a dramatic view of the Earth at eye level. Users can literally fly across the world's terrain from any location in any direction. Particular focus was put into the ease of usability so people of all ages can enjoy World Wind. All one needs to control World Wind is a two button mouse. Additional guides and features can be accessed though a simplified menu. Navigation is automated with single clicks of a mouse as well as the ability to type in any location and automatically zoom to it. NASA World Wind was designed to run on recent PC hardware with the same technology used by today's 3D video games. NASA World Wind delivers the NASA Blue Marble, spectacular true-color imagery of the entire Earth at 1-kilometer-per-pixel. Using NASA World Wind, you can continue to zoom past Blue Marble resolution to seamlessly experience the extremely detailed mosaic of LandSat 7 data at an impressive 15-meters-per-pixel resolution. NASA World Wind also delivers other color bands such as the infrared spectrum. The NASA Scientific Visualization Studio at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has produced a set of visually intense animations that demonstrate a variety of subjects such as hurricane dynamics and seasonal changes across the globe. NASA World Wind takes these animations and plays them directly on the world. The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) produces a set of time relevant planetary imagery that's updated every day. MODIS catalogs fires, floods, dust, smoke, storms and volcanic activity. NASA World Wind produces an easily customized view of this information and marks them directly on the globe. When one of these color coded markers are clicked, it downloads the full image and displays it in the full context of its location on Earth. MODIS images are publication quality material at resolutions up to 250-meters-per-pixel. NASA World Wind provides a full catalog of countries, capitals, counties, cities, towns, and even historical references. The names appear dynamically, increasing in number as the user zooms in. World Wind is capable of browsing through and displaying GLOBE data based on any date one wishes planetary data for. That means one can download today's (or any previous day's) temperature across the world, or rainfall, barometric pressure, cloud cover, or even the GLOBE students' global distribution of collected data. This program is free and available for further development via the NASA Open Source Agreement guidelines.

Hogan, P.; Kim, R.

2004-12-01

402

Fuel Cell Research and Development for Future NASA Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has been using fuel cell systems since the early days of space flight. Polymer Exchange Membrane Fuel cells provided the primary power for the Gemini and Apollo missions and more recently, alkaline fuel cells serve as the primary power source for the Space Shuttle. NASA's current investments in fuel cell technology support both Exploration and Aeronautics programs. This presentation provides an overview of NASA's fuel cell development programs.

Manzo, Michelle A.; Hoberecht, Mark; Loyselle, Patricia; Burke, Kenneth; Bents, David; Farmer, Serene; Kohout, Lisa

2006-01-01

403

Shuttle in Mate-Demate Device being Loaded onto SCA-747  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, technicians begin the task of mounting the Space Shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (NASA #911) for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, following its STS-44 flight 24 November - 1 December 1991. Post-flight servicing of the orbiters, and the mating operation, is carried out at Dryden at the Mate-Demate Device (MDD), the large gantry-like structure that hoists the spacecraft to various levels during post-space flight processing and attachment to the 747. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with

1991-01-01

404

Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Takeoff for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, begins the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now

1991-01-01

405

Shuttle in Mate-Demate Device being Loaded onto SCA-747 - Rear View  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evening light begins to fade at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, as technicians begin the task of mounting the Space Shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (NASA 911) for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., following its STS-44 flight 24 November-1 December 1991. Post-flight servicing of the orbiters, and the mating operation is carried out at Dryden at the Mate-Demate Device, the large gantry-like structure that hoists the spacecraft to various levels during post-spaceflight processing and attachment to the 747. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary

1991-01-01

406

Shuttle in Mate-Demate Device being Loaded onto SCA-747 - Side View  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evening light begins to fade at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, as technicians begin the task of mounting the Space Shuttle Atlantis atop NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (NASA #911) for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., following its STS-44 flight 24 November-1 December 1991. Post-flight servicing of the orbiters, and the mating operation, is carried out at Dryden at the Mate-Demate Device (MDD), the large gantry-like structure that hoists the spacecraft to various levels during post-space flight processing and attachment to the 747. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the

1991-01-01

407

NASA marked a historic moment in the life of the nation's largest  

E-print Network

NASA marked a historic moment in the life of the nation's largest rocket engine test complex the end of the Space Shuttle Program in 2010. Volume 1 Issue 10 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis October 2006), Stephanie Wilson, Lisa Nowak and Piers Sellers meet with employees at NASA Stennis Space Center on Sept. 25

408

Using telemetry to measure equipment usable life on the NASA Orion spacecraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NASA Orion manned spacecraft will replace the NASA Space Shuttle for getting astronauts to low earth orbit, moon and Mars and returned to the earth safely. It also serves as a crew escape vehicle at the ISS to increase astronaut safety The NASA integrated, vehicle health management (IVHM) program has been adopted by many segments of the aerospace industry.

Len Losik

2012-01-01

409

Advanced Microbial Check Valve development. [for Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Microbial Check Valve (MCV) is a flight qualified assembly that provides bacteriologically safe drinking water for the Space Shuttle. The 1-lb unit is basically a canister packed with an iodinated ion-exchange resin. The device is used to destroy organisms in a water stream as the water passes through it. It is equally effective for fluid flow in either direction and its primary method of disinfection is killing rather than filtering. The MCV was developed to disinfect the fuel cell water and to prevent back contamination of stored potable water on the Space Shuttle. This paper reports its potential for space applications beyond the basic Shuttle mission. Data are presented that indicate the MCV is suitable for use in advanced systems that NASA has under development for the reclamation of humidity condensate, wash water and human urine.

Colombo, G. V.; Greenley, D. R.; Putnam, D. F.; Sauer, R. L.

1981-01-01

410

NASDA aquatic animal experiment facilities for space shuttle and ISS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has developed aquatic animal experiment facilities for NASA Space Shuttle use. Vestibular Function Experiment Unit (VFEU) was firstly designed and developed for physiological research using carp in Spacelab-J (SL-J, STS-47) mission. It was modified as Aquatic Animal Experiment Unit (AAEU) to accommodate small aquatic animals, such as medaka and newt, for second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2, STS-65) mission. Then, VFEU was improved to accommodate marine fish and to perform neurobiological experiment for Neurolab (STS-90) and STS-95 missions. We have also developed and used water purification system which was adapted to each facility. Based on these experiences of Space Shuttle missions, we are studying to develop advanced aquatic animal experiment facility for both Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS).

Uchida, Satoko; Masukawa, Mitsuyo; Kamigaichi, Shigeki

411

President and Mrs. Clinton watch launch of Space Shuttle Discovery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Watching a successful launch of Space Shuttle Discovery from the roof of the Launch Control Center are (left to right) U.S. President Bill Clinton, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, Astronaut Robert Cabana and NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin. This was the first launch of a Space Shuttle to be viewed by President Clinton, or any President to date. They attended the launch to witness the return to space of American legend John H. Glenn Jr., payload specialist on mission STS-95. Cabana will command the crew of STS-88, the first Space Shuttle mission to carry hardware to space for the assembly of the International Space Station, targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3.

1998-01-01

412

President and Mrs. Clinton watch launch of Space Shuttle Discovery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Watching a successful launch of Space Shuttle Discovery from the roof of the Launch Control Center are (left to right) Astronaut Eileen Collins (in flight suit) with unidentified companions, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, Astronaut Robert Cabana, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, and U.S. President Bill Clinton. This was the first launch of a Space Shuttle to be viewed by President Clinton, or any President to date. They attended the launch to witness the return to space of American legend John H. Glenn Jr., payload specialist on mission STS-95. Collins will command the crew of STS-93, the first woman to hold that position. Cabana will command the crew of STS-88, the first Space Shuttle mission to carry hardware to space for the assembly of the International Space Station, targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3.

1998-01-01

413

Space Shuttle Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA) Iteration 3.2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Shuttle is a very reliable vehicle in comparison with other launch systems. Much of the risk posed by Shuttle operations is related to fundamental aspects of the spacecraft design and the environments in which it operates. It is unlikely that significant design improvements can be implemented to address these risks prior to the end of the Shuttle program. The model will continue to be used to identify possible emerging risk drivers and allow management to make risk-informed decisions on future missions. Potential uses of the SPRA in the future include: - Calculate risk impact of various mission contingencies (e.g. late inspection, crew rescue, etc.). - Assessing the risk impact of various trade studies (e.g. flow control valves). - Support risk analysis on mission specific events, such as in flight anomalies. - Serve as a guiding star and data source for future NASA programs.

Boyer, Roger L.

2010-01-01

414

Wind tunnel test evaluation of a Shuttle derived launch system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Shuttle Derived Vehicle (SDV) is a proposed unmanned launch system configured using Shuttle elements. The SDV incorporates two solid rocket boosters, an external tank and three Space Shuttle main engines identical to those used in the present Space Transportation System. Two new elements, a recoverable propulsion/avionics module housing the main engines and an expendable payload module, complete the SDV configuration. This paper describes the activities and results of wind tunnel tests conducted to validate the aerodynamic and controllability characteristics of SDV configurations. The configuration variables consisted of the payload module diameter, length and nose shape. The tests were conducted in the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel. Aerodynamic force and moment data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.6 to 4.96. The attack and sideslip angles were varied + or - 8.0 deg. Forces and moments were measured by a sting-supported six component strain gage balance.

Tewell, J. R.; Buell, D. N.

1986-01-01

415

NASA shuffle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Samuel W. Keller, an experienced official of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration with a background in engineering, has been named by NASA Administrator Richard Truly to succeed Noel Hinners as Associate Deputy Administrator of NASA, the agency's third-highest position. Most of the duties of Hinners' other job as NASA Chief Scientist will fall to Lennard Fisk, head of the Office of Space Science arid Applications.Keller's responsibilities will include management of NASA field centers, employees, renovating facilities, and other institutional matters. “‘Everything but the program’ is it's usually characterized,” Keller said of the job in an interview.

Maggs, William Ward

416

Shuttle freezer conceptual design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A conceptual design for a kit freezer for operation onboard shuttle was developed. The freezer features a self-contained unit which can be mounted in the orbiter crew compartment and is capable of storing food at launch and returning with medical samples. Packaging schemes were investigated to provide the optimum storage capacity with a minimum weight and volume penalty. Several types of refrigeration systems were evaluated to select one which would offer the most efficient performance and lowest hazard of safety to the crew. Detailed performance data on the selected, Stirling cycle principled refrigeration unit were developed to validate the feasibility of its application to this freezer. Thermal analyses were performed to determine the adequacy of the thermal insulation to maintain the desired storage temperature with the design cooling capacity. Stress analyses were made to insure the design structure integrity could be maintained over the shuttle flight regime. A proposed prototype freezer development plan is presented.

Proctor, B. W.; Russell, D. J.

1975-01-01

417

Volume 2 Issue 9 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis September 2007 The NASA-contractor J-2X engine team  

E-print Network

in diameter, considerably smaller than that needed for accessing the space shuttle main engine when anniversary of the first engine test at SSC, and the 25th anniversary of the space shuttle's first flight at NASA Stennis Space Center is moving forward with preparations to begin engine powerpack testing later

418

Shuttle Mission Math  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This iOS app is a puzzle game that makes algebraic thinking both visual and interactive as equations are represented with balance scales, weights, and little creatures called Zogs. The goal at each of the 24 levels is to find the weight of each space creature and assemble a team for the next shuttle mission. Players must apply ideas such as equality, proportional reasoning, variables, and combining groups of objects.

King, Colleen

2012-04-12

419

Shuttle Radar Topography Mission  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 2000 the Space Shuttle Endeavour was able to conserve enough fuel to complete its mission and create the world's most accurate topographic maps. With this site, users can track the mission and view some samples of the extraordinary images being produced. At the SRTM homepage, users will find news updates, background information, some quick facts, related links, an overview of the mission's equipment, and a list of acronyms used at the site.

420

Shuttle imaging radar experiment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The shuttle imaging radar (SIR-A) acquired images of a variety of the earth's geologic areas covering about 10 million square kilometers. Structural and geomorphic features such as faults, folds, outcrops, and dunes are clearly visible in both tropical and arid regions. The combination of SIR-A and Seasat images provides additional information about the surface physical properties: topography and roughness. Ocean features were also observed, including large internal waves in the Andaman Sea. Copyright ?? 1982 AAAS.

Elachi, C.; Brown, W.E.; Cimino, J.B.; Dixon, T.; Evans, D.L.; Ford, J.P.; Saunders, R.S.; Breed, C.; Masursky, H.; McCauley, J.F.; Schaber, G.; Dellwig, L.; England, A.; MacDonald, H.; Martin-Kaye, P.; Sabins, F.

1982-01-01

421

INCO shuttle communication system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a previous work we have defined a general architectural model for autonomous systems, which can be mapped easily to describe the functions of any automated system (SDAG-86-01). In this note, we use the model to describe the Shuttle communication system. First we briefly review the architecture, then we present the environment of our application, and finally we detail the specific function for each functional block of the architecture for that environment.

Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok K.; Larsen, Ronald L.

1989-01-01

422

Space shuttle lightning protection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technology for lightning protection of even the most advanced spacecraft is available and can be applied through cost-effective hardware designs and design-verification techniques. In this paper, the evolution of the Space Shuttle Lightning Protection Program is discussed, including the general types of protection, testing, and anlayses being performed to assess the lightning-transient-damage susceptibility of solid-state electronics.

Suiter, D. L.; Gadbois, R. D.; Blount, R. L.

1979-01-01

423

NASA's Return to Flight  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Since the Columbia tragedy of two years ago, NASA has spent a great deal of time getting ready for its next mission, and this well-thought-out website provides a host of important information about the next mission, which has a launch window beginning in May. Designed for the general public this site affords interested parties some unique insight into the details of both the enhanced shuttle system, the crew of the mission, and the specific objectives of the upcoming mission. Through the innovative interface design, visitors can view brief overviews of each section of the site, then proceed to learn more detailed materials about each area. The crew section of the site is quite nice as well, as it provides some insight into the work and duties of each crew member. Overall, the layout of the site is quite appealing, as are its various graphic elements.

424

NASA'S Great Observatories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Why are space observatories important? The answer concerns twinkling stars in the night sky. To reach telescopes on Earth, light from distant objects has to penetrate Earth's atmosphere. Although the sky may look clear, the gases that make up our atmosphere cause problems for astronomers. These gases absorb the majority of radiation emanating from celestial bodies so that it never reaches the astronomer's telescope. Radiation that does make it to the surface is distorted by pockets of warm and cool air, causing the twinkling effect. In spite of advanced computer enhancement, the images finally seen by astronomers are incomplete. NASA, in conjunction with other countries' space agencies, commercial companies, and the international community, has built observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope, the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory to find the answers to numerous questions about the universe. With the capabilities the Space Shuttle provides, scientist now have the means for deploying these observatories from the Shuttle's cargo bay directly into orbit.

1998-01-01

425

Maintaining space shuttle safety within an environment of change 1 1 Paper IAA 96-6.1.01 presented at the 47th International Astronautical Congress, October 7–11, 1996, Beijing, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the 10 years since the Challenger accident, NASA has developed a set of stable and capable processes to prepare the Space Shuttle for safe launch and return. Capitalizing on the extensive experience gained from a string of over 50 successful flights, NASA today is changing the way it does business in an effort to reduce cost. A single Shuttle

Michael A Greenfield

1999-01-01

426

Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Taxi to Runway for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, taxies to the runway to begin the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site

1991-01-01

427

Space Shuttle Update Assistant Associate Administrator  

E-print Network

Space Shuttle Update Bill Hill Assistant Associate Administrator for Space Shuttle February 8, 2011 issued by letter to the International Space Station and Space Shuttle Program Managers on December 23 1 #12;Agenda · Shuttle Manifest · STS-135 Decision · Shuttle Transition & Retirement · STS-133

Waliser, Duane E.

428

Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 3, appendix A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A systems requirements analysis for the solid propellant rocket engine to be used with the space shuttle was conducted. The systems analysis was developed to define the physical and functional requirements for the systems and subsystems. The operations analysis was performed to identify the requirements of the various launch operations, mission operations, ground operations, and logistic and flight support concepts.

1972-01-01

429

Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 5: Operations and resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The operations and resources required to support the expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster are analyzed. The subjects discussed are: (1) operations plan, (2) facilities utilization and manufacturing plan, (3) engineering and development plan, (4) test plan, (5) logistics and maintenance plan, and (6) program management plan.

1971-01-01

430

Formal Verification for a Next-Generation Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses the verification and validation (V&2) of advanced software used for integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM), in the context of NASA's next-generation space shuttle. We survey the current VBCV practice and standards used in selected NASA projects, review applicable formal verification techniques, and discuss their integration info existing development practice and standards. We also describe two verification tools, JMPL2SMV and Livingstone PathFinder, that can be used to thoroughly verify diagnosis applications that use model-based reasoning, such as the Livingstone system.

Nelson, Stacy D.; Pecheur, Charles; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

431

Analysis of microgravity space experiments Space Shuttle programmatic safety requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents the results of an analysis of microgravity space experiments space shuttle programmatic safety requirements and recommends the creation of a Safety Compliance Data Package (SCDP) Template for both flight and ground processes. These templates detail the programmatic requirements necessary to produce a complete SCDP. The templates were developed from various NASA centers' requirement documents, previously written guidelines on safety data packages, and from personal experiences. The templates are included in the back as part of this report.

Terlep, Judith A.

1996-01-01

432

Closeup view of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) installed ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Close-up view of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) installed in position number one on the Orbiter Discovery. A ground-support mobile platform is in place below the engine to assist in technicians with the installation of the engine. This Photograph was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

433

Space shuttle transportation system techniques for user/use development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The problem of obtaining new uses for the Shuttle Transportation System (STS) was treated in the same way marketing problems are handled by industrial organizations. Techniques used by industry to obtain new ideas and customers were evaluated and analyzed for their relevance to the STS. Marketing barrier-data were used to develop strategy which called for a middleman organization to assist NASA in achieving its objectives. The importance of prompt initiation of the recommended strategy was established.

Gripshover, P. J.

1974-01-01

434

Aileron roll hysteresis effects on entry of space shuttle orbiter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Six-degree-of-freedom simulations of the space shuttle orbiter entry with control hysteresis were conducted on the NASA Langley Research Center interactive simulator known as the automatic reentry flight dynamics simulator. These simulations revealed that the vehicle can tolerate control hysteresis producing a + or - 50 percent change in the nominal aileron roll characteristics and an offset in the nominal characteristics equivalent to a + or - 5 deg aileron deflection with little increase in the reaction control system's fuel consumption.

Powell, R. W.

1977-01-01

435

TVC actuator model. [for the space shuttle main engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A prototype Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Thrust Vector Control (TVC) Actuator analog model was successfully completed. The prototype, mounted on five printed circuit (PC) boards, was delivered to NASA, checked out and tested using a modular replacement technique on an analog computer. In all cases, the prototype model performed within the recording techniques of the analog computer which is well within the tolerances of the specifications.

Baslock, R. W.

1977-01-01

436

Crewmen of Shuttle Orbiter 101 prior to ingress  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The crewmen of the Space Shuttle Orbiter 101 'Enterprise' pass the guard shack as they prepare to ingress the Orbiter as it sits in piggyback mode atop a NASA 747 carrier aircraft at the Mate-Demate Device (MDD) at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). Astronauts Fred W. Haise Jr., right, commander; and C. Gordon Fullerton, pilot are dressed in flight suits. Suit technician Joe Schmitt is in the background.

1977-01-01

437

Shuttle Discovery Landing at Palmdale, California, Maintenance Facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Dryden Flight Research Center pilot Tom McMurtry lands NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with Space Shuttle Discovery attached at Rockwell Aerospace's Palmdale, California, facility about 1:00 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time (PDT). There for nine months of scheduled maintenance, Discovery and the 747 were completing a two-day flight from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, that began at 7:04 a.m. Eastern Standard Time on 27 September and included an overnight stop at Salt Lake City International Airport, Utah. At the conclusion of this mission, Discovery had flown 21 shuttle missions, totaling more than 142 days in orbit. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dr

1995-01-01

438

Understanding Space Shuttle Structural Dynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle consists of a orbiter, external tank, solid rocket boosters, payload, main engines, mobile launch platform and launch pad (Ground Ops). Structural Dynamics - All structures will vibrate at certain frequencies. The dynamics of the Space Shuttle must be understood in order to make sure it can survive, to control it, to make sure that it can perform its mission, and to keep it from aging prematurely. We understand the structural dynamics of the Space Shuttle by modelling, testing and flying it.

James, George

2004-01-01

439

Status of NASA's Assessment of Satellite Servicing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following recommendations by the National Research Council, NASA's Authorization Act of 2008 (P.I. 110-422) and the Fiscal Year 2009 Omnibus Appropriations Act directed NASA to assess the feasibility of using the planned human spaceflight architecture to service existing and future observatory-class scientific spacecraft. This interest in space servicing, either with astronauts and/or with robots, reflects the decades-long success that NASA has achieved with the Space Shuttle program and the Hubble Space Telescope on behalf of the international astronomical community. This study is led by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and will last about a year, leading to an assessment report to NASA and the science communities. We will report on the status of this study, progress toward goals, workshops, and priorities for the next few months.

Thronson, H. A.; Ahmed, M.; Townsend, J.; Whipple, A. L.; Oegerle, W. R.

2010-01-01

440

A Perspective on Computational Aerothermodynamics at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The evolving role of computational aerothermodynamics (CA) within NASA over the past 20 years is reviewed. The presentation highlights contributions to understanding the Space Shuttle pitching moment anomaly observed in the first shuttle flight, prediction of a static instability for Mars Pathfinder, and the use of CA for damage assessment in post-Columbia mission support. In the view forward, several current challenges in computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics for hypersonic vehicle applications are discussed. Example simulations are presented to illustrate capabilities and limitations. Opportunities to advance the state-of-art in algorithms, grid generation and adaptation, and code validation are identified.

Gnoffo, Peter A.

2007-01-01

441

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA SLR Operational Center is responsible for: 1) NASA SLR network control, sustaining engineering, and logistics; 2) ILRS mission operations; and 3) ILRS and NASA SLR data operations. NASA SLR network control and sustaining engineering tasks include technical support, daily system performance monitoring, system scheduling, operator training, station status reporting, system relocation, logistics and support of the ILRS Networks and Engineering Working Group. These activities ensure the NASA SLR systems are meeting ILRS and NASA mission support requirements. ILRS mission operations tasks include mission planning, mission analysis, mission coordination, development of mission support plans, and support of the ILRS Missions Working Group. These activities ensure than new mission and campaign requirements are coordinated with the ILRS. Global Normal Points (NP) data, NASA SLR FullRate (FR) data, and satellite predictions are managed as part of data operations. Part of this operation includes supporting the ILRS Data Formats and Procedures Working Group. Global NP data operations consist of receipt, format and data integrity verification, archiving and merging. This activity culminates in the daily electronic transmission of NP files to the CDDIS. Currently of all these functions are automated. However, to ensure the timely and accurate flow of data, regular monitoring and maintenance of the operational software systems, computer systems and computer networking are performed. Tracking statistics between the stations and the data centers are compared periodically to eliminate lost data. Future activities in this area include sub-daily (i.e., hourly) NP data management, more stringent data integrity tests, and automatic station notification of format and data integrity issues.

Carter, David; Wetzel, Scott

2000-01-01

442

NASA's Software Safety Standard  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA relies more and more on software to control, monitor, and verify its safety critical systems, facilities and operations. Since the 1960's there has hardly been a spacecraft launched that does not have a computer on board that will provide command and control services. There have been recent incidents where software has played a role in high-profile mission failures and hazardous incidents. For example, the Mars Orbiter, Mars Polar Lander, the DART (Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology), and MER (Mars Exploration Rover) Spirit anomalies were all caused or contributed to by software. The Mission Control Centers for the Shuttle, ISS, and unmanned programs are highly dependant on software for data displays, analysis, and mission planning. Despite this growing dependence on software control and monitoring, there has been little to no consistent application of software safety practices and methodology to NASA's projects with safety critical software. Meanwhile, academia and private industry have been stepping forward with procedures and standards for safety critical systems and software, for example Dr. Nancy Leveson's book Safeware: System Safety and Computers. The NASA Software Safety Standard, originally published in 1997, was widely ignored due to its complexity and poor organization. It also focused on concepts rather than definite procedural requirements organized around a software project lifecycle. Led by NASA Headquarters Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, the NASA Software Safety Standard has recently undergone a significant update. This new standard provides the procedures and guidelines for evaluating a project for safety criticality and then lays out the minimum project lifecycle requirements to assure the software is created, operated, and maintained in the safest possible manner. This update of the standard clearly delineates the minimum set of software safety requirements for a project without detailing the implementation for those requirements. This allows the projects leeway to meet these requirements in many forms that best suit a particular project's needs and safety risk. In other words, it tells the project what to do, not how to do it. This update also incorporated advances in the state of the practice of software safety from academia and private industry. It addresses some of the more common issues now facing software developers in the NASA environment such as the use of Commercial-Off-the-Shelf Software (COTS), Modified OTS (MOTS), Government OTS (GOTS), and reused software. A team from across NASA developed the update and it has had both NASA-wide internal reviews by software engineering, quality, safety, and project management. It has also had expert external review. This presentation and paper will discuss the new NASA Software Safety Standard, its organization, and key features. It will start with a brief discussion of some NASA mission failures and incidents that had software as one of their root causes. It will then give a brief overview of the NASA Software Safety Process. This will include an overview of the key personnel responsibilities and functions that must be performed for safety-critical software.

Ramsay, Christopher M.

2007-01-01

443

Acoustic Emission Detection of Impact Damage on Space Shuttle Structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia as a result of impact damage from foam debris during ascent has led NASA to investigate the feasibility of on-board impact detection technologies. AE sensing has been utilized to monitor a wide variety of impact conditions on Space Shuttle components ranging from insulating foam and ablator materials, and ice at ascent velocities to simulated hypervelocity micrometeoroid and orbital debris impacts. Impact testing has been performed on both reinforced carbon composite leading edge materials as well as Shuttle tile materials on representative aluminum wing structures. Results of these impact tests will be presented with a focus on the acoustic emission sensor responses to these impact conditions. These tests have demonstrated the potential of employing an on-board Shuttle impact detection system. We will describe the present plans for implementation of an initial, very low frequency acoustic impact sensing system using pre-existing flight qualified hardware. The details of an accompanying flight measurement system to assess the Shuttle s acoustic background noise environment as a function of frequency will be described. The background noise assessment is being performed to optimize the frequency range of sensing for a planned future upgrade to the initial impact sensing system.

Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

2004-01-01

444

Stennis certifies final shuttle engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Steam blasts out of the A-2 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center on Oct. 22 as engineers begin a certification test on engine 2061, the last space shuttle main flight engine scheduled to be built. Since 1975, Stennis has tested every space shuttle main engine used in the program - about 50 engines in all. Those engines have powered more than 120 shuttle missions - and no mission has failed as a result of engine malfunction. For the remainder of 2008 and throughout 2009, Stennis will continue testing of various space shuttle main engine components.

2008-01-01

445

Shuttle Risk Progression by Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Understanding the early mission risk and progression of risk as a vehicle gains insights through flight is important: . a) To the Shuttle Program to understand the impact of re-designs and operational changes on risk. . b) To new programs to understand reliability growth and first flight risk. . Estimation of Shuttle Risk Progression by flight: . a) Uses Shuttle Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA) and current knowledge to calculate early vehicle risk. . b) Shows impact of major Shuttle upgrades. . c) Can be used to understand first flight risk for new programs.

Hamlin, Teri; Kahn, Joe; Thigpen, Eric; Zhu, Tony; Lo, Yohon

2011-01-01

446

As the Shuttle "Atlantis" orbits Earth for the last time, questions arise about the future of space exploration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Our Place In Space After the Shuttle Program Wrapshttp://www.npr.org/2011/01/02/132583035/Our-Place-In-Space-After-The-Shuttle-Program-WrapsEnd of space shuttle program launches major challenges for NASAhttp://www.washingtonpost.com/national/on-leadership/end-of-space-shuttle-program-launches-major-challenges-for-nasa/2011/07/12/gIQAWICiAI_story.htmlNASA Chooses Space Shuttles' Retirement Homeshttp://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/13/science/space/13shuttle.htmlDismantling the Space Shuttle Programhttp://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2011/04/dismantling-the-space-shuttle-program/100045/Private Spaceflight Ready to Take Off in 2011http://www.space.com/10548-private-spaceflight-ready-2011.htmlTracking the Space Shuttle in Google Earthhttp://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2011/07/tracking_the_space_shuttle_in_googl.htmlThe Space Shuttle "Atlantis" blasted into space with a beautiful and flawless launch last Friday morning. The moment was bittersweet for many, as this is the last launch for NASA's Space Shuttle program. During this last mission the shuttle crew will be wrapping up construction of the International Space Station, delivering supplies, and performing a multitude of experiments while in space. The ending of the space shuttle program has led to many discussions, including those trying to evaluate the whether the benefits of the space program outweigh the costs, as each launch of the space shuttle costs about $1.5 billion. NASA's Space Shuttles won't be launching into orbit again, but this hardly signals and end to the space program and human spaceflight. It is impossible to say what exactly comes next, but there are already private alternatives brewing including Virgin Galactic and others. The end of an era can be painful, but it can also foster a new and exciting chapter as well. Perhaps Chris Ferguson, commander of the "Atlantis" mission, put it best, The shuttle's always going to be a reflection of what a great nation can do when it commits to be bold and follow through "We're completing a chapter of a journey that will never end. Let's light this fire one more time, and witness this great nation at its best."The first link will take users to a piece from Wired Science about the last space shuttle launch. The second link leads to an interesting piece from NPR about the US's place in space after the shuttle program ends. The third link leads to a roundtable conducted by the Washington Post with four expert contributors discussing the challenges facing NASA now that the shuttle program is ending. Moving along, the fourth link leads to an article from the New York Times discussing the retirement homes of the shuttles, and the fifth link leads to a great pictorial of the "Discovery" as it's inspected, disassembled, and prepared for its new life as a public exhibit. The sixth link will take visitors to a Space.com article discussing the next steps for private spaceflight. The last and final link will take users to the Google Earth blog, which discusses how to track the "Atlantis" shuttle's final voyage via Google Earth and NASA.

Halderman, Chanda

2011-07-15

447

NASA Quest  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NASA Quest provides interactive and hands-on materials intended to bring NASA personnel and science to classrooms through the internet. These materials include Quest Challenges--interactive explorations designed to engage students in scientific and engineering processes related to actual missions. A typical challenge begins with students receiving a mission-related question. They work on preliminary solutions, based on research, as NASA experts provide critique. Final designs, developed after feedback and encouragement, are presented in live webcasts. Other Quest products include online tools and resources such as web-based and printed lesson plans; educator guides and workbooks; interactive features; and software for students at all levels.

2001-02-06

448

NASA Wavelength  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NASA Wavelength is your pathway into a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels - from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. These resources, developed through funding of the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD), have undergone a peer-review process through which educators and scientists ensure the content is accurate and useful in an educational setting. Use NASA Wavelength to quickly and easily locate resources, connect them to other websites using atom feeds, and even share the resources you discover with others through social media and email.

2014-04-07

449

Space shuttle navigation analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A detailed analysis of space shuttle navigation for each of the major mission phases is presented. A covariance analysis program for prelaunch IMU calibration and alignment for the orbital flight tests (OFT) is described, and a partial error budget is presented. The ascent, orbital operations and deorbit maneuver study considered GPS-aided inertial navigation in the Phase III GPS (1984+) time frame. The entry and landing study evaluated navigation performance for the OFT baseline system. Detailed error budgets and sensitivity analyses are provided for both the ascent and entry studies.

Jones, H. L.; Luders, G.; Matchett, G. A.; Sciabarrasi, J. E.

1976-01-01

450

Space shuttle avionics system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle avionics system, which was conceived in the early 1970's and became operational in the 1980's represents a significant advancement of avionics system technology in the areas of systems and redundacy management, digital data base technology, flight software, flight control integration, digital fly-by-wire technology, crew display interface, and operational concepts. The origins and the evolution of the system are traced; the requirements, the constraints, and other factors which led to the final configuration are outlined; and the functional operation of the system is described. An overall system block diagram is included.

Hanaway, John F.; Moorehead, Robert W.

1989-01-01

451

Shuttle Lesson Learned - Toxicology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a script for a video about toxicology and the space shuttle. The first segment is deals with dust in the space vehicle. The next segment will be about archival samples. Then we'll look at real time on-board analyzers that give us a lot of capability in terms of monitoring for combustion products and the ability to monitor volatile organics on the station. Finally we will look at other issues that are about setting limits and dealing with ground based lessons that pertain to toxicology.

James, John T.

2010-01-01

452

MICROBIOLOGY: Malaria's Stealth Shuttle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Sturm et al. report a major twist to this story during the liver stage of malaria infection. Using Plasmodium berghei, a mouse model of malaria, they show that the liver-stage parasite keeps its host hepatocyte alive long enough to complete development but allows it to then commit an unusual form of suicide that helps the parasite evade host defenses and deposit new invasive forms into the bloodstream. Membranous vesicles shuttle malaria parasites from liver to blood cells during infection, ensuring protection against the host's defenses.

Alan F. Cowman (The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research;); Stefan H. I. Kappe (Seattle Biomedical Research Institute;)

2006-09-01

453

The Space Shuttle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. It focuses on the advent of Space Shuttle missions from 1981 to 1986. Students research facts about each of the 25 missions that occurred during this time period, finding out what each mission objective was. They also look at the Challenger incident and what went wrong with that mission. Included are objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, an audio-enhanced vocabulary list, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

454

In-space propellant logistics. Volume 4: Project planning data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The prephase A conceptual project planning data as it pertains to the development of the selected logistics module configuration transported into earth orbit by the space shuttle orbiter. The data represents the test, implementation, and supporting research and technology requirements for attaining the propellant transfer operational capability for early 1985. The plan is based on a propellant module designed to support the space-based tug with cryogenic oxygen-hydrogen propellants. A logical sequence of activities that is required to define, design, develop, fabricate, test, launch, and flight test the propellant logistics module is described. Included are the facility and ground support equipment requirements. The schedule of activities are based on the evolution and relationship between the R and T, the development issues, and the resultant test program.

1972-01-01

455

Space Shuttle utilization characteristics with special emphasis on payload design, economy of operation and effective space exploitation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The reusable manned Space Shuttle has made new and innovative payload planning a reality and opened the door to a variety of payload concepts formerly unavailable in routine space operations. In order to define the payload characteristics and program strategies, current Shuttle-oriented programs are presented: NASA's Space Telescope, the Long Duration Exposure Facility, the West German Shuttle Pallet Satellite, and the Goddard Space Flight Center's Multimission Modular Spacecraft. Commonality of spacecraft design and adaptation for specific mission roles minimizes payload program development and STS integration costs. Commonality of airborne support equipment assures the possibility of multiple program space operations with the Shuttle. On-orbit maintenance and repair was suggested for the module and system levels. Program savings from 13 to over 50% were found obtainable by the Shuttle over expendable launch systems, and savings from 17 to 45% were achievable by introducing reuse into the Shuttle-oriented programs.

Turner, D. N.

1981-01-01

456

NASA's Microgravity Science Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the late 1980s, the NASA Microgravity Science Program has implemented a systematic effort to expand microgravity research. In 1992, 114 new investigators were selected to enter the program and more US microgravity experiments were conducted in space than in all the years combined since Skylab (1973-74). The use of NASA Research Announcements (NRA's) to solicit research proposals has proven to be highly successful in building a strong base of high-quality peer-reviewed science in both the ground-based and flight experiment elements of the program. The ground-based part of the program provides facilities for low gravity experiments including drop towers and aircraft for making parabolic flights. Program policy is that investigations should not proceed to the flight phase until all ground-based investigative capabilities have been exhausted. In the space experiments program, the greatest increase in flight opportunities has been achieved through dedicated or primary payload Shuttle missions. These missions will continue to be augmented by both mid-deck and GAS-Can accommodated experiments. A US-Russian cooperative flight program envisioned for 1995-97 will provide opportunities for more microgravity research as well as technology demonstration and systems validation efforts important for preparing for experiment operations on the Space Station.

Salzman, Jack A.

1994-01-01

457

NASA Headquarters Space Operations Center: Providing Situational Awareness for Spaceflight Contingency Response  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses the NASA Headquarters mishap response process for the Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs, and how the process has evolved based on lessons learned from the Space Shuttle Challenger and Columbia accidents. It also describes the NASA Headquarters Space Operations Center (SOC) and its special role in facilitating senior management's overall situational awareness of critical spaceflight operations, before, during, and after a mishap, to ensure a timely and effective contingency response.

Maxwell, Theresa G.; Bihner, William J.

2010-01-01

458

Space Shuttle Glider. Educational Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Space Shuttle Glider is a scale model of the U.S. Space Shuttle orbiter. The airplane-like orbiter usually remains in Earth orbit for up to two weeks at a time. It normally carries a six- to seven-person crew which includes the mission commander, pilot, and several mission and/or payload specialists who have specialized training associated with…

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

459

1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS), Space Experiment Module (SEM), and Hitchhiker programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

Daelemans, Gerard (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

1999-01-01

460

Shuttle Enterprise Mated to 747 SCA in Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Enterprise, the nation's prototype space shuttle orbiter, departed NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, at 11:00 a.m., 16 May 1983, on the first leg of its trek to the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport, Paris, France. Carried by the huge 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA), the first stop for the Enterprise was Peterson AFB, Colorado Springs, Colorado. Piloting the 747 on the Europe trip were Joe Algranti, Johnson Space Center Chief Pilot, Astronaut Dick Scobee, and NASA Dryden Chief Pilot Tom McMurtry. Flight engineers for that portion of the flight were Dryden's Ray Young and Johnson Space Center's Skip Guidry. The Enterprise, named after the spacecraft of Star Trek fame, was originally carried and launched by the 747 during the Approach and Landing Tests (ALT) at Dryden Flight Research Center. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45

1983-01-01

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