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Sample records for nasa shuttle logistics

  1. NASA Shuttle Logistics Depot (NSLD) - The application of ATE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkins, Lorenz G.; Jenkins, Henry C.; Mauceri, A. Jack

    1990-01-01

    The concept of the NASA Shuttle Logistics Depot (NSLD) developed for the Space Shuttle Orbiter Program is described. The function of the NSLD at Cape Canaveral is to perform the acceptance and diagnostic testing of the Shuttle's space-rated line-replaceable units and shop-replaceable units (SRUs). The NSLD includes a comprehensive electronic automatic test station, program development stations, and assorted manufacturing support equipment (including thermal and vibration test equipment, special test equipment, and a card SRU test system). The depot activities also include the establishment of the functions for manufacturing of mechanical parts, soldering, welding, painting, clean room operation, procurement, and subcontract management.

  2. Space Shuttle operational logistics plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botts, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center plan for logistics to support Space Shuttle Operations and to establish the related policies, requirements, and responsibilities are described. The Directorate of Shuttle Management and Operations logistics responsibilities required by the Kennedy Organizational Manual, and the self-sufficiency contracting concept are implemented. The Space Shuttle Program Level 1 and Level 2 logistics policies and requirements applicable to KSC that are presented in HQ NASA and Johnson Space Center directives are also implemented.

  3. Continual Improvement in Shuttle Logistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, Jean; Schafer, Loraine

    1995-01-01

    It has been said that Continual Improvement (CI) is difficult to apply to service oriented functions, especially in a government agency such as NASA. However, a constrained budget and increasing requirements are a way of life at NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), making it a natural environment for the application of CI tools and techniques. This paper describes how KSC, and specifically the Space Shuttle Logistics Project, a key contributor to KSC's mission, has embraced the CI management approach as a means of achieving its strategic goals and objectives. An overview of how the KSC Space Shuttle Logistics Project has structured its CI effort and examples of some of the initiatives are provided.

  4. NASA Facts, Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    This newsletter from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contains a description of the purposes and potentials of the Space Shuttle craft. The illustrated document explains some of the uses for which the shuttle is designed; how the shuttle will be launched from earth, carry out its mission, and land again on earth; and what a…

  5. A Probabilistic Tool that Aids Logistics Engineers in the Establishment of High Confidence Repair Need-Dates at the NASA Shuttle Logistics Depot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullington, J. V.; Winkler, J. C.; Linton, D. G.; Khajenoori, S.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Shuttle Logistics Depot (NSLD) is tasked with the responsibility for repair and manufacture of Line Replaceable Unit (LRU) hardware and components to support the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Due to shrinking budgets, cost effective repair of LRU's becomes a primary objective. To achieve this objective, is imperative that resources be assigned to those LRU's which have the greatest expectation of being needed as a spare. Forecasting the times at which spares are needed requires consideration of many significant factors including: failure rate, flight rate, spares availability, and desired level of support, among others. This paper summarizes the results of the research and development work that has been accomplished in producing an automated tool that assists in the assignment of effective repair start-times for LRU's at the NSLD. This system, called the Repair Start-time Assessment System (RSAS), uses probabilistic modeling technology to calculate a need date for a repair that considers the current repair pipeline status, as well as, serviceable spares and projections of future demands. The output from the system is a date for beginning the repair that has significantly greater confidence (in the sense that a desired probability of support is ensured) than times produced using other techniques. Since an important output of RSAS is the longest repair turn-around time that will ensure a desired probability of support, RSAS has the potential for being applied to operations at any repair depot where spares are on-hand and repair start-times are of interest. In addition, RSAS incorporates tenants of Just-in-Time (JIT) techniques in that the latest repair start-time (i.e., the latest time at which repair resources must be committed) may be calculated for every failed unit This could reduce the spares inventory for certain items, without significantly increasing the risk of unsatisfied demand.

  6. NASA revises shuttle schedule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainger, Lisa A.

    The new schedule for Space Shuttle missions and expendable launch vehicles (ELV's) calls for a 7-month delay in sending up the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA was forced to put off launching the telescope until February 1990 to keep the Magellan and Galileo missions within their narrow launch windows. The first post-Challenger shuttle launch is now scheduled for late this month. Discovery's most recent delays were due to a hydrogen leak discovered July 29 that has still not been corrected and an engine valve malfunction during an August 4 test fire.

  7. Replacing NASA's Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Donald F.

    1990-02-01

    The latest NASA Shuttle II proposal for an Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS) is reviewed. It could achieve total reusability, with a glide-back booster stage and no solid rockets. The propellant load would be divided between the booster and orbiter stages. The AMLS payload of just over nine tons will be limited to crew and 'high-value' cargo, carried in the dorsal pod. Bulky freight and satellites will rely on expendable launchers. AMLS will be a Space Station ferry only and would not be used for on-orbit experiments. The operational history of the Space Shuttle program is shown, as well as its programmed future undertakings. Beyond the proposed Shuttle II, some insight is offered on the conceptual vehicle named Shuttle Z that could be the mainstay of Lunar-Base or Mars expeditions. Needed technologies and key features of a proposed AMLS orbiter are also mentioned. In addition, NASA proposals for a rescue vehicle for Space Station Freedom that will serve to return stranded or injured astronauts to earth is presented. One such proposed crew rescue vehicle would carry four people plus 450 kg of supplies, for a gross mass of 7146 kg.

  8. NASA Now: Shuttle Engineering Challenge

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this installment of NASA Now, you’ll meet Guidance, Navigation and Flight Controls engineer George Hatcher, who talks about the complex system needed to fly the space shuttle at extreme speeds...

  9. NASA space shuttle lightweight seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Chris; Jermstad, Wayne; Lewis, James; Colangelo, Todd

    1996-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Lightweight Seat-Mission Specialist (LWS-MS) is a crew seat for the mission specialists who fly aboard the Space Shuttle. The LWS-MS is a lightweight replacement for the mission specialist seats currently flown on the Shuttle. Using state-of-the-art analysis techniques, a team of NASA and Lockheed engineers from the Johnson Space Center (JSC) designed a seat that met the most stringent requirements demanded of the new seats by the Shuttle program, and reduced the weight of the seats by 52%.

  10. NASA Space Rocket Logistics Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bramon, Chris; Neeley, James R.; Jones, James V.; Watson, Michael D.; Inman, Sharon K.; Tuttle, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is the new NASA heavy lift launch vehicle in development and is scheduled for its first mission in 2017. SLS has many of the same logistics challenges as any other large scale program. However, SLS also faces unique challenges. This presentation will address the SLS challenges, along with the analysis and decisions to mitigate the threats posed by each.

  11. NASA Space Rocket Logistics Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neeley, James R.; Jones, James V.; Watson, Michael D.; Bramon, Christopher J.; Inman, Sharon K.; Tuttle, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is the new NASA heavy lift launch vehicle and is scheduled for its first mission in 2017. The goal of the first mission, which will be uncrewed, is to demonstrate the integrated system performance of the SLS rocket and spacecraft before a crewed flight in 2021. SLS has many of the same logistics challenges as any other large scale program. Common logistics concerns for SLS include integration of discreet programs geographically separated, multiple prime contractors with distinct and different goals, schedule pressures and funding constraints. However, SLS also faces unique challenges. The new program is a confluence of new hardware and heritage, with heritage hardware constituting seventy-five percent of the program. This unique approach to design makes logistics concerns such as commonality especially problematic. Additionally, a very low manifest rate of one flight every four years makes logistics comparatively expensive. That, along with the SLS architecture being developed using a block upgrade evolutionary approach, exacerbates long-range planning for supportability considerations. These common and unique logistics challenges must be clearly identified and tackled to allow SLS to have a successful program. This paper will address the common and unique challenges facing the SLS programs, along with the analysis and decisions the NASA Logistics engineers are making to mitigate the threats posed by each.

  12. Logistics Lessons Learned in NASA Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, William A.; DeWeck, Olivier; Laufer, Deanna; Shull, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration sets out a number of goals, involving both strategic and tactical objectives. These include returning the Space Shuttle to flight, completing the International Space Station, and conducting human expeditions to the Moon by 2020. Each of these goals has profound logistics implications. In the consideration of these objectives,a need for a study on NASA logistics lessons learned was recognized. The study endeavors to identify both needs for space exploration and challenges in the development of past logistics architectures, as well as in the design of space systems. This study may also be appropriately applied as guidance in the development of an integrated logistics architecture for future human missions to the Moon and Mars. This report first summarizes current logistics practices for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and the International Space Station (ISS) and examines the practices of manifesting, stowage, inventory tracking, waste disposal, and return logistics. The key findings of this examination are that while the current practices do have many positive aspects, there are also several shortcomings. These shortcomings include a high-level of excess complexity, redundancy of information/lack of a common database, and a large human-in-the-loop component. Later sections of this report describe the methodology and results of our work to systematically gather logistics lessons learned from past and current human spaceflight programs as well as validating these lessons through a survey of the opinions of current space logisticians. To consider the perspectives on logistics lessons, we searched several sources within NASA, including organizations with direct and indirect connections with the system flow in mission planning. We utilized crew debriefs, the John Commonsense lessons repository for the JSC Mission Operations Directorate, and the Skylab Lessons Learned. Additionally, we searched the public version of the Lessons Learned

  13. NASA's Original Shuttle Carrier Departs Dryden

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Space Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) No. 905, departed NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Oct. 24, 2012 for the final time, ending a 38-year association with the NASA field center at Ed...

  14. NASA Space Exploration Logistics Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deWeek, Oliver; Evans, William A.; Parrish, Joe; James, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    As NASA has embarked on a new Vision for Space Exploration, there is new energy and focus around the area of manned space exploration. These activities encompass the design of new vehicles such as the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and the identification of commercial opportunities for space transportation services, as well as continued operations of the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. Reaching the Moon and eventually Mars with a mix of both robotic and human explorers for short term missions is a formidable challenge in itself. How to achieve this in a safe, efficient and long-term sustainable way is yet another question. The challenge is not only one of vehicle design, launch, and operations but also one of space logistics. Oftentimes, logistical issues are not given enough consideration upfront, in relation to the large share of operating budgets they consume. In this context, a group of 54 experts in space logistics met for a two-day workshop to discuss the following key questions: 1. What is the current state-of the art in space logistics, in terms of architectures, concepts, technologies as well as enabling processes? 2. What are the main challenges for space logistics for future human exploration of the Moon and Mars, at the intersection of engineering and space operations? 3. What lessons can be drawn from past successes and failures in human space flight logistics? 4. What lessons and connections do we see from terrestrial analogies as well as activities in other areas, such as U.S. military logistics? 5. What key advances are required to enable long-term success in the context of a future interplanetary supply chain? These proceedings summarize the outcomes of the workshop, reference particular presentations, panels and breakout sessions, and record specific observations that should help guide future efforts.

  15. Space Shuttle Orbiter logistics - Managing in a dynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renfroe, Michael B.; Bradshaw, Kimberly

    1990-01-01

    The importance and methods of monitoring logistics vital signs, logistics data sources and acquisition, and converting data into useful management information are presented. With the launch and landing site for the Shuttle Orbiter project at the Kennedy Space Center now totally responsible for its own supportability posture, it is imperative that logistics resource requirements and management be continually monitored and reassessed. Detailed graphs and data concerning various aspects of logistics activities including objectives, inventory operating levels, customer environment, and data sources are provided. Finally, some lessons learned from the Shuttle Orbiter project and logistics options which should be considered by other space programs are discussed.

  16. NASA nixes Centaur launches from shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    James C. Fletcher, the administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announced on June 19, 1986, that because of safety considerations, the space shuttle will not be used to launch the Centaur Upper Stage. The Ulysses and Galileo missions, which were originally to have been launched in May 1986, would have been launched from the shuttle with the Centaur rocket (Eos, November 19, 1985, p. 1183; February 4, 1986, p. 57). The Galileo craft is to explore Jupiter; Ulysses is a joint mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA that is to orbit the sun around its poles, outside of the “ecliptic plane” where the planets lie. The decision seems likely to delay further the two missions, which were already delayed by the suspension of shuttle launches after the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger on January 28, 1986.

  17. NESTA: NASA Engineering Shuttle Telemetry Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmel, Glenn S.; Davis, Steven R.; Leucht, Kurt W.; Rowe, Dan A.; Smith, Kevin E.; Boloni, Ladislau

    2005-01-01

    The Spaceport Processing Systems Branch at NASA Kennedy Space Center has developed and deployed an agent based tool to monitor the Space Shuttle's ground processing telemetry stream. The application, the NASA Engineering Shuttle Telemetry Agent, increases situational awareness for system and hardware engineers during ground processing of the Shuttle's subsystems. The agent provides autonomous monitoring of the telemetry stream and automatically alerts system engineers when predefined criteria have been met. Efficiency and safety are improved through increased automation. Sandia National Labs' Java Expert System Shell is employed as the rule engine. The shell's predicate logic lends itself well to capturing the heuristics and specifying the engineering rules of this spaceport domain. The declarative paradigm of the rule-based agent yields a highly modular and scalable design spanning multiple subsystems of the Shuttle. Several hundred monitoring rules have been written thus far with corresponding notifications sent to Shuttle engineers. This paper discusses the rule-based telemetry agent used for Space Shuttle ground processing and explains the problem domain, development of the agent software, benefits of AT technology, and deployment and sustaining engineering of the product.

  18. Holography on the NASA Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuerker, R. F.; Heflinger, L. O.; Flannery, J. V.; Kassel, A.; Rollauer, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The SL-3 flight on the Space Shuttle will carry a 25 mW He-Ne laser holographic recorder for recording the solution growth of triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals under low-zero gravity conditions. Three hundred holograms (two orthogonal views) will be taken (on SO-253 film) of each growth experiment. Processing and analysis (i.e., reconstructed imagery, holographic schlieren, reverse reference beam microscopy, and stored beam interferometry) of the holographic records will be done at NASA/MSFC. Other uses of the recorder on the Shuttle have been proposed.

  19. Space shuttle program: Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory. Volume 7: Logistics management plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The logistics management plan for the shuttle avionics integration laboratory defines the organization, disciplines, and methodology for managing and controlling logistics support. Those elements requiring management include maintainability and reliability, maintenance planning, support and test equipment, supply support, transportation and handling, technical data, facilities, personnel and training, funding, and management data.

  20. NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft 911's Final Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA 911, one of NASA's two modified Boeing 747 space shuttle carrier aircraft, flew its final flight Feb. 8, a short hop from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base to the ...

  1. NASA newsletters for the Weber Student Shuttle Involvement Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, E. R.; Sebesta, P. D.; Ladwig, A. M.; Jackson, J. T.; Knott, W. M., III

    1988-01-01

    Biweekly reports generated for the Weber Student Shuttle Involvement Project (SSIP) are discussed. The reports document the evolution of science, hardware, and logistics for this Shuttle project aboard the eleventh flight of the Space Transportation System (STS-41B), launched from Kennedy Space Center on February 3, 1984, and returned to KSC 8 days later. The reports were intended to keep all members of the team aware of progress in the project and to avoid redundancy and misunderstanding. Since the Weber SSIP was NASA's first orbital rat project, documentation of all actions was essential to assure the success of this complex project. Eleven reports were generated: October 3, 17 and 31; November 14 and 28; and December 12 and 17, 1983; and January 3, 16, and 23; and May 1, 1984. A subject index of the reports is included. The final report of the project is included as an appendix.

  2. NASA Space Shuttle Program: Shuttle Environmental Assurance (SEA) Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Steve E.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first Space Shuttle flight was in 1981 and the fleet was originally expected to be replaced with a new generation vehicle in the early 21st century. Space Shuttle Program (SSP) elements proactively address environmental and obsolescence concerns and continue to improve safety and supportability. The SSP manager created the Shuttle Environmental Assurance (SEA) Initiative in 2000. SEA is to provide an integrated approach for the SSP to promote environmental excellence, proactively manage materials obsolescence, and optimize associated resources.

  3. NASA Contingency Shuttle Crew Support (CSCS) Medical Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Adrien

    2010-01-01

    The genesis of the space shuttle began in the 1930's when Eugene Sanger came up with the idea of a recyclable rocket plane that could carry a crew of people. The very first Shuttle to enter space was the Shuttle "Columbia" which launched on April 12 of 1981. Not only was "Columbia" the first Shuttle to be launched, but was also the first to utilize solid fuel rockets for U.S. manned flight. The primary objectives given to "Columbia" were to check out the overall Shuttle system, accomplish a safe ascent into orbit, and to return back to earth for a safe landing. Subsequent to its first flight Columbia flew 27 more missions but on February 1st, 2003 after a highly successful 16 day mission, the Columbia, STS-107 mission, ended in tragedy. With all Shuttle flight successes come failures such as the fatal in-flight accident of STS 107. As a result of the STS 107 accident, and other close-calls, the NASA Space Shuttle Program developed contingency procedures for a rescue mission by another Shuttle if an on-orbit repair was not possible. A rescue mission would be considered for a situation where a Shuttle and the crew were not in immediate danger, but, was unable to return to Earth or land safely. For Shuttle missions to the International Space Station (ISS), plans were developed so the Shuttle crew would remain on board ISS for an extended period of time until rescued by a "rescue" Shuttle. The damaged Shuttle would subsequently be de-orbited unmanned. During the period when the ISS Crew and Shuttle crew are on board simultaneously multiple issues would need to be worked including, but not limited to: crew diet, exercise, psychological support, workload, and ground contingency support

  4. Cryogenic spin testing of NASA's shuttle engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillar, Kenneth M.; Enos, Anthony; Gauthier, Robert

    1992-12-01

    Spin testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high-pressure turbopump rotors is described focusing on the SSME cryogenic spin test facility. Testing at full operating speed is predicated on achieving and maintaining a cryogenic rotor temperature. Rotors are driven to operational speeds after being chilled to - 195 C.

  5. Oshkosh Logistic Management and Public Relations Responsibilities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Danielle

    1995-01-01

    The central focus of my study for the summer of 1995 was to provide logistical support to Margaret Hunt, the logistics manager of the OSHKOSH airshow. In this capacity responsibilities included making arrangements for participants from NASA centers and SBIR companies for their stay in Wisconsin, while visiting the airshow, and managing staff for exhibits and the aerospace theater. A secondary purpose was to serve in other public service capacities by writing news releases, fact sheets, announcements, and articles for the Researcher News.

  6. Monitoring Agents for Assisting NASA Engineers with Shuttle Ground Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmel, Glenn S.; Davis, Steven R.; Leucht, Kurt W.; Rowe, Danil A.; Smith, Kevin E.; Boeloeni, Ladislau

    2005-01-01

    The Spaceport Processing Systems Branch at NASA Kennedy Space Center has designed, developed, and deployed a rule-based agent to monitor the Space Shuttle's ground processing telemetry stream. The NASA Engineering Shuttle Telemetry Agent increases situational awareness for system and hardware engineers during ground processing of the Shuttle's subsystems. The agent provides autonomous monitoring of the telemetry stream and automatically alerts system engineers when user defined conditions are satisfied. Efficiency and safety are improved through increased automation. Sandia National Labs' Java Expert System Shell is employed as the agent's rule engine. The shell's predicate logic lends itself well to capturing the heuristics and specifying the engineering rules within this domain. The declarative paradigm of the rule-based agent yields a highly modular and scalable design spanning multiple subsystems of the Shuttle. Several hundred monitoring rules have been written thus far with corresponding notifications sent to Shuttle engineers. This chapter discusses the rule-based telemetry agent used for Space Shuttle ground processing. We present the problem domain along with design and development considerations such as information modeling, knowledge capture, and the deployment of the product. We also present ongoing work with other condition monitoring agents.

  7. NASA management of the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, F.

    1975-01-01

    The management system and management technology described have been developed to meet stringent cost and schedule constraints of the Space Shuttle Program. Management of resources available to this program requires control and motivation of a large number of efficient creative personnel trained in various technical specialties. This must be done while keeping track of numerous parallel, yet interdependent activities involving different functions, organizations, and products all moving together in accordance with intricate plans for budgets, schedules, performance, and interaction. Some techniques developed to identify problems at an early stage and seek immediate solutions are examined.

  8. International aerospace engineering: NASA shuttle and European Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilstein, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    NASA negotiations and contractual arrangements involving European space research organizations' participation in manned space operations and efforts in building Spacelab for the U.S. Reusable Space Shuttle are discussed. Some of the diplomatic and technical collaboration involved in the international effort is reviewed.

  9. NASA Experience with the Shuttle External Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickley, Fred; Schwinghamer, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a presentation reviewing the external tanks which are used to provide the propellants for the space shuttle engines. The design of the external tank, and its lift capability improvements are reviewed. The configuration, materials, and key technologies of the super lightweight tank (SLWT) are also described. Among the key technologies which allow the SLWT project to succeed, are the successful development of an appropriate alloy. The reasons for choosing the alloy, Aluminum-Lithium 2195, and issues involved in welding are reviewed. Tests of the weld procedures, and pictures of the test results are shown. The External Tank Project has successfully made the transition from the LWT design to the SLWT design. The SLWT Provides two thirds of the weight savings required to place the Space Station in a 51.6 Degree Orbit.

  10. New antenna feed revitalizes Space Shuttle tracker at NASA Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrin, J. W.; Sullivan, A.

    1984-01-01

    An account is given of the upgrading of a 12-ft-diameter single-channel monopulse tracking system, which had been relegated to slaved backup status at NASA Edwards, to support research flights for Ames Dryden Research Center and for tracking orbital passes of the Space Shuttle and Shuttle landings both at Edwards and at White Sands. The improved system is now a stand-alone telemetry tracking system. A new conical scanning feed (known as Radscan) replaces the single channel monopulse feed in the upgraded system. Where previously the system would not autotrack at elevation angles below 5 degrees, it now automatically acquires the Space Shuttle when it appears on the horizon and autotracks from approximately 2 degrees in elevation to touchdown, and does so virtually unattended.

  11. NASA Advanced Explorations Systems: Concepts for Logistics to Living

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Sarah A.; Howe, A. Scott; Flynn, Michael T.; Howard, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project strives to enable a largely mission-independent cradle-to-grave-to-cradle approach to minimize logistics contributions to total mission architecture mass. The goals are to engineer logistics materials, common crew consumables, and container configurations to meet the following five basic goals: 1. Minimize intrinsic logistics mass and improve ground logistics flexibility. 2. Allow logistics components to be directly repurposed for on-orbit non-logistics functions (e.g., crew cabin outfitting) thereby indirectly reducing mass/volume. 3. Compact and process logistics that have not been directly repurposed to generate useful on-orbit components and/or compounds (e.g., radiation shielding, propellant, other usable chemical constituents). 4. Enable long-term stable storage and disposal of logistics end products that cannot be reused or repurposed (e.g., compaction for volume reduction, odor control, and maintenance of crew cabin hygienic conditions). 5. Allow vehicles in different mission phases to share logistics resources. This paper addresses the work being done to meet the second goal, the direct repurposing of logistics components to meet other on-orbit needs, through a strategy termed Logistics to Living (L2L). L2L has several areas but can be defined as repurposing or converting logistical items (bags, containers, foam, components, etc.) into useful crew items or life support augmentation on-orbit after they have provided their primary logistics function. The intent is that by repurposing items, dedicated crew items do not have to be launched and overall launch mass is decreased. For non-LEO missions, the vehicle interior volume will be relatively fixed so L2L will enable this volume to be used more effectively through reuse and rearrangement of logistical components. Past work in the area of L2L has already conceptually developed several potential technologies [Howe

  12. Developing a Logistics Data Process for Support Equipment for NASA Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, Suman

    2010-01-01

    The United States NASA Space Shuttle has long been considered an extremely capable yet relatively expensive rocket. A great part of the roughly US $500 million per launch expense was the support footprint: refurbishment and maintenance of the space shuttle system, together with the long list of resources required to support it, including personnel, tools, facilities, transport and support equipment. NASA determined to make its next rocket system with a smaller logistics footprint, and thereby more cost-effective and quicker turnaround. The logical solution was to adopt a standard Logistics Support Analysis (LSA) process based on GEIA-STD-0007 http://www.logisticsengineers.org/may09pres/GEIASTD0007DEXShortIntro.pdf which is the successor of MIL-STD-1388-2B widely used by U.S., NATO, and other world military services and industries. This approach is unprecedented at NASA: it is the first time a major program of programs, Project Constellation, is factoring logistics and supportability into design at many levels. This paper will focus on one of those levels NASA ground support equipment for the next generation of NASA rockets and on building a Logistics Support Analysis Record (LSAR) for developing and documenting a support solution and inventory of resources for. This LSAR is actually a standards-based database, containing analyses of the time and tools, personnel, facilities and support equipment required to assemble and integrate the stages and umbilicals of a rocket. This paper will cover building this database from scratch: including creating and importing a hierarchical bill of materials (BOM) from legacy data; identifying line-replaceable units (LRUs) of a given piece of equipment; analyzing reliability and maintainability of said LRUs; and therefore making an assessment back to design whether the support solution for a piece of equipment is too much work, i.e., too resource-intensive. If one must replace or inspect an LRU too much, perhaps a modification of

  13. Formalizing New Navigation Requirements for NASA's Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiVito, Ben L.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a recent NASA-sponsored pilot project intended to gauge the effectiveness of using formal methods in Space Shuttle software requirements analysis. Several Change Requests (CRs) were selected as promising targets to demonstrate the utility of formal methods in this demanding application domain. A CR to add new navigation capabilities to the Shuttle, based on Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, is the focus of this industrial usage report. Portions of the GPS CR were modeled using the language of SRI's Prototype Verification System (PVS). During a limited analysis conducted on the formal specifications, numerous requirements issues were discovered. We present a summary of these encouraging results and conclusions we have drawn from the pilot project.

  14. NASA Flight Planning Branch Space Shuttle Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenger, Jennifer D.; Bristol, Douglas J.; Whitney, Gregory R.; Blanton, Mark R.; Reynolds, F. Fisher, III

    2011-01-01

    Planning products and procedures that allowed the mission Flight Control Teams and the Astronaut crews to plan, train and fly every Space Shuttle mission were developed by the Flight Planning Branch at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. As the Space Shuttle Program came to a close, lessons learned were collected from each phase of the successful execution of these Space Shuttle missions. Specific examples of how roles and responsibilities of console positions that develop the crew and vehicle attitude timelines have been analyzed and will be discussed. Additionally, the relationships and procedural hurdles experienced through international collaboration have molded operations. These facets will be explored and related to current and future operations with the International Space Station and future vehicles. Along with these important aspects, the evolution of technology and continual improvement of data transfer tools between the Space Shuttle and ground team has also defined specific lessons used in improving the control team s effectiveness. Methodologies to communicate and transmit messages, images, and files from the Mission Control Center to the Orbiter evolved over several years. These lessons were vital in shaping the effectiveness of safe and successful mission planning and have been applied to current mission planning work in addition to being incorporated into future space flight planning. The critical lessons from all aspects of previous plan, train, and fly phases of Space Shuttle flight missions are not only documented in this paper, but are also discussed regarding how they pertain to changes in process and consideration for future space flight planning.

  15. Perspectives on NASA flight software development - Apollo, Shuttle, Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garman, John R.

    1990-01-01

    Flight data systems' software development is chronicled for the period encompassing NASA's Apollo, Space Shuttle, and (ongoing) Space Station Freedom programs, with attention to the methodologies and 'development tools' employed in each case and their mutual relationships. A dominant concern in all three programs has been the accommodation of software change; it has also been noted that any such long-term program carries the additional challenge of identifying which elements of its software-related 'institutional memory' are most critical, in order to preclude their loss through the retirement, promotion, or transfer of its 'last expert'.

  16. Software Architecture of the NASA Shuttle Ground Operations Simulator - SGOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Robert P.; Lostroscio, Charles T.

    2005-01-01

    The SGOS executive and its subsystems have been an integral component of the Shuttle Launch Safety Program for almost thirty years. It is usable (via the LAN) by over 2000 NASA employees at the Kennedy Space Center and 11,000 contractors. SGOS supports over 800 models comprised of several hundred thousand lines of code and over 1,000 MCP procedures. Yet neither language has a for loop!! The simulation software described in this paper is used to train ground controllers and to certify launch countdown readiness.

  17. Status of thermal NDT of space shuttle materials at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Winfree, William P.; Hodges, Kenneth; Koshti, Ajay; Ryan, Daniel; Reinhardt, Walter W.

    2006-04-01

    Since the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, NASA has focused on improving advanced NDE techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels that comprise the orbiter's wing leading edge and nose cap. Various nondestructive inspection techniques have been used in the examination of the RCC, but thermography has emerged as an effective inspection alternative to more traditional methods. Thermography is a non-contact inspection method as compared to ultrasonic techniques which typically require the use of a coupling medium between the transducer and material. Like radiographic techniques, thermography can inspect large areas, but has the advantage of minimal safety concerns and the ability for single-sided measurements. Details of the analysis technique that has been developed to allow in situ inspection of a majority of shuttle RCC components is discussed. Additionally, validation testing, performed to quantify the performance of the system, will be discussed. Finally, the results of applying this technology to the Space Shuttle Discovery after its return from the STS-114 mission in July 2005 are discussed.

  18. Status of Thermal NDT of Space Shuttle Materials at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Winfree, William P.; Hodges, Kenneth; Koshti, Ajay; Ryan, Daniel; Reinhardt, Walter W.

    2007-01-01

    Since the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, NASA has focused on improving advanced NDE techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels that comprise the orbiter s wing leading edge and nose cap. Various nondestructive inspection techniques have been used in the examination of the RCC, but thermography has emerged as an effective inspection alternative to more traditional methods. Thermography is a non-contact inspection method as compared to ultrasonic techniques which typically require the use of a coupling medium between the transducer and material. Like radiographic techniques, thermography can inspect large areas, but has the advantage of minimal safety concerns and the ability for single-sided measurements. Details of the analysis technique that has been developed to allow insitu inspection of a majority of shuttle RCC components is discussed. Additionally, validation testing, performed to quantify the performance of the system, will be discussed. Finally, the results of applying this technology to the Space Shuttle Discovery after its return from the STS-114 mission in July 2005 are discussed.

  19. Status of Thermal NDT of Space Shuttle Materials at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Winfree, William P.; Hodges, Kenneth; Koshti, Ajay; Ryan, Daniel; Rweinhardt, Walter W.

    2006-01-01

    Since the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, NASA has focused on improving advanced NDE techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels that comprise the orbiter's wing leading edge and nose cap. Various nondestructive inspection techniques have been used in the examination of the RCC, but thermography has emerged as an effective inspection alternative to more traditional methods. Thermography is a non-contact inspection method as compared to ultrasonic techniques which typically require the use of a coupling medium between the transducer and material. Like radiographic techniques, thermography can inspect large areas, but has the advantage of minimal safety concerns and the ability for single-sided measurements. Details of the analysis technique that has been developed to allow insitu inspection of a majority of shuttle RCC components is discussed. Additionally, validation testing, performed to quantify the performance of the system, will be discussed. Finally, the results of applying this technology to the Space Shuttle Discovery after its return from the STS-114 mission in July 2005 are discussed.

  20. Status of Thermal NDT of Space Shuttle Materials at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Winfree, William P.; Hodges, Kenneth; Koshti, Ajay; Ryan, Daniel; Reinhardt, Walter W.

    2006-01-01

    Since the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, NASA has focused on improving advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels that comprise the orbiter's wing leading edge and nose cap. Various nondestructive inspection techniques have been used in the examination of the RCC, but thermography has emerged as an effective inspection alternative to more traditional methods. Thermography is a non-contact inspection method as compared to ultrasonic techniques which typically require the use of a coupling medium between the transducer and material. Like radiographic techniques, thermography can inspect large areas, but has the advantage of minimal safety concerns and the ability for single-sided measurements. Details of the analysis technique that has been developed to allow insitu inspection of a majority of shuttle RCC components is discussed. Additionally, validation testing, performed to quantify the performance of the system, will be discussed. Finally, the results of applying this technology to the Space Shuttle Discovery after its return from the STS-114 mission in July 2005 are discussed.

  1. Simulation of Range Safety for the NASA Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabelo, Luis; Sepulveda, Jose; Compton, Jeppie; Turner, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a simulation environment that seamlessly combines a number of safety and environmental models for the launch phase of a NASA Space Shuttle mission. The components of this simulation environment represent the different systems that must interact in order to determine the Expectation of casualties (E(sub c)) resulting from the toxic effects of the gas dispersion that occurs after a disaster affecting a Space Shuttle within 120 seconds of lift-off. The utilization of the Space Shuttle reliability models, trajectory models, weather dissemination systems, population models, amount and type of toxicants, gas dispersion models, human response functions to toxicants, and a geographical information system are all integrated to create this environment. This simulation environment can help safety managers estimate the population at risk in order to plan evacuation, make sheltering decisions, determine the resources required to provide aid and comfort, and mitigate damages in case of a disaster. This simulation environment may also be modified and used for the landing phase of a space vehicle but will not be discussed in this paper.

  2. Techniques and Tools of NASA's Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDanels, Steve J.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia accident investigation was a fusion of many disciplines into a single effort. From the recovery and reconstruction of the debris, Figure 1, to the analysis, both destructive and nondestructive, of chemical and metallurgical samples, Figure 2, a multitude of analytical techniques and tools were employed. Destructive and non-destructive testing were utilized in tandem to determine if a breach in the left wing of the Orbiter had occurred, and if so, the path of the resultant high temperature plasma flow. Nondestructive analysis included topometric scanning, laser mapping, and real-time radiography. These techniques were useful in constructing a three dimensional virtual representation of the reconstruction project, specifically the left wing leading edge reinforced carbon/carbon heat protectant panels. Similarly, they were beneficial in determining where sampling should be performed on the debris. Analytic testing included such techniques as Energy Dispersive Electron Microprobe Analysis (EMPA), Electron Spectroscopy Chemical Analysis (ESCA), and X-Ray dot mapping; these techniques related the characteristics of intermetallics deposited on the leading edge of the left wing adjacent to the location of a suspected plasma breach during reentry. The methods and results of the various analyses, along with their implications into the accident, are discussed, along with the findings and recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. Likewise, NASA's Return To Flight efforts are highlighted.

  3. The Space Shuttle Decision: NASA's Search for a Reusable Space Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppenheimer, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    This significant new study of the decision to build the Space Shuttle explains the Shuttle's origins and early development. In addition to internal NASA discussions, this work details the debates in the late 1960s and early 1970s among policymakers in Congress, the Air Force, and the Office of Management and Budget over the roles and technical designs of the Shuttle. Examining the interplay of these organizations with sometimes conflicting goals, the author not only explains how the world's premier space launch vehicle came into being, but also how politics can interact with science, technology, national security, and economics in national government. The weighty policy decision to build the Shuttle represents the first component of the broader story: future NASA volumes will cover the Shuttle's development and operational histories.

  4. Environmentally-driven Materials Obsolescence: Material Replacements and Lessons Learned from NASA's Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinhold, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program was terminated in 2011 with the last flight of the Shuttle Endeavour. During the 30 years of its operating history, the number of domestic and international environmental regulations increased rapidly and resulted in materials obsolescence risks to the program. Initial replacement efforts focused on ozone depleting substances. As pressure from environmental regulations increased, Shuttle worked on the replacement of heavy metals. volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Near the end of the program. Shuttle identified potential material obsolescence driven by international regulations and the potential for suppliers to reformulate materials. During the Shuttle Program a team focused on environmentally-driven materials obsolescence worked to identify and mitigate these risks. Lessons learned from the Shuttle experience can be applied to new NASA Programs as well as other high reliability applications.

  5. Space Shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) testing at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlowski, J. F.; Quinn, M.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the significance of the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for the Space Shuttle. On the basis of a study regarding the use of the GPS on the Space Shuttle, it was decided that such a system would greatly benefit Space Shuttle navigation. Studies with GPS user equipment were, therefore, conducted to obtain data and information which would provide a base for the formulation and the further refinement of NASA requirements with respect to the type of set the Shuttle would need. Attention is given to orbit determination, satellite numbers, background information concerning the GPS, the currently available GPS sets, the conducted studies, Shuttle sonic boom recording sites, tests performed with the aid of the Kuiper airborne observatory, and questions regarding the test applicability to Shuttle GPS.

  6. Managing NASA's International Space Station Logistics and Maintenance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butina, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station's Logistics and Maintenance program has had to develop new technologies and a management approach for both space and ground operations. The ISS will be a permanently manned orbiting vehicle that has no landing gear, no international borders, and no organizational lines - it is one Station that must be supported by one crew, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. It flies partially assembled for a number of years before it is finally completed in 2006. It has over 6,000 orbital replaceable units (ORU), and spare parts which number into the hundreds of thousands, from 127 major US vendors and 70 major international vendors. From conception to operation, the ISS requires a unique approach in all aspects of development and operations. Today the dream is coming true; hardware is flying and hardware is failing. The system has been put into place to support the Station for both space and ground operations. It started with the basic support concept developed for Department of Defense systems, and then it was tailored for the unique requirements of a manned space vehicle. Space logistics is a new concept that has wide reaching consequences for both space travel and life on Earth. This paper discusses what type of organization has been put into place to support both space and ground operations and discusses each element of that organization. In addition, some of the unique operations approaches this organization has had to develop is discussed.

  7. International Space Station (ISS) Gas Logistics Planning in the Post Shuttle Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Daniel J.; Cook, Anthony J.; Lehman, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Over its life the International Space Station (ISS) has received gas (nitrogen, oxygen, and air) from various sources. Nitrogen and oxygen are used in the cabin to maintain total pressure and oxygen partial pressures within the cabin. Plumbed nitrogen is also required to support on-board experiments and medical equipment. Additionally, plumbed oxygen is required to support medical equipment as well as emergency masks and most importantly EVA support. Gas are supplied to ISS with various methods and vehicles. Vehicles like the Progress and ATV deliver nitrogen (both as a pure gas and as air) and oxygen via direct releases into the cabin. An additional source of nitrogen and oxygen is via tanks on the ISS Airlock. The Airlock nitrogen and oxygen tanks can deliver to various users via pressurized systems that run throughout the ISS except for the Russian segment. Metabolic oxygen is mainly supplied via cabin release from the Elektron and Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA), which are water electrolyzers. As a backup system, oxygen candles (Solid Fuel Oxygen Generators-SFOGs) supply oxygen to the cabin as well. In the past, a major source of nitrogen and oxygen has come from the Shuttle via both direct delivery to the cabin as well as to recharge the ISS Airlock tanks. To replace the Shuttle capability to recharge the ISS Airlock tanks, a new system was developed called Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS). NIORS consists of high pressure (7000 psi) tanks which recharge the ISS Airlock tanks via a blowdown fill for both nitrogen and oxygen. NORS tanks can be brought up on most logistics vehicles such as the HTV, COTS, and ATV. A proper balance must be maintained to insure sufficient gas resources are available on-orbit so that all users have the required gases via the proper delivery method (cabin and/or plumbed).

  8. NASA's management concept for the Space Shuttle Program.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the Shuttle Program organization and management concepts suggests the necessity of careful measurements of contractor schedules, cost and technical performance, and program modification control to keep both the development and operating cost of the Program at the lowest possible level. Maximum use of the contractors' own management systems and the utilization of new technologies, procedures and materials during space operations are also envisaged as contributors to the reduction of costs per flight to acceptable limits.

  9. NASA/MOD Operations Impacts from Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Michael; Mattes, Gregory; Grabois, Michael; Griffith, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Operations plays a pivotal role in the success of any human spaceflight program. This paper will highlight some of the core tenets of spaceflight operations from a systems perspective and use several examples from the Space Shuttle Program to highlight where the success and safety of a mission can hinge upon the preparedness and competency of the operations team. Further, awareness of the types of operations scenarios and impacts that can arise during human crewed space missions can help inform design and mission planning decisions long before a vehicle gets into orbit. A strong operations team is crucial to the development of future programs; capturing the lessons learned from the successes and failures of a past program will allow for safer, more efficient, and better designed programs in the future. No matter how well a vehicle is designed and constructed, there are always unexpected events or failures that occur during space flight missions. Preparation, training, real-time execution, and troubleshooting are skills and values of the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) flight controller; these operational standards have proven invaluable to the Space Shuttle Program. Understanding and mastery of these same skills will be required of any operations team as technology advances and new vehicles are developed. This paper will focus on individual Space Shuttle mission case studies where specific operational skills, techniques, and preparedness allowed for mission safety and success. It will detail the events leading up to the scenario or failure, how the operations team identified and dealt with the failure and its downstream impacts. The various options for real-time troubleshooting will be discussed along with the operations team final recommendation, execution, and outcome. Finally, the lessons learned will be summarized along with an explanation of how these lessons were used to improve the operational preparedness of future flight control teams.

  10. The NASA Life Sciences experiment program for Shuttle/Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, D.

    1978-01-01

    The Life Sciences experiment program for the Shuttle/Spacelab has basically two scientific objectives. The first objective is related to an understanding and interpretation of the medical data from Skylab. The second objective is concerned with a utilization of the space environment, notably the very low g field, as an experimental variable in a broad range of fundamental studies. The program considered will use the pressurized module, almost exclusively, and will aim toward the greatest investigator participation in flight that is possible. Facilities must be provided to support such requirements as tissue biopses, blood, urine and tissue collections, and microbial and plant manipulations.

  11. NASA selects 40 investigations for Spacelab/shuttle flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Seven experiments proposed by scientists in Belgium, Canada, France, and Japan were chosen, along with 33 investigations from the United States, to be studied and developed for a series of shuttle flights planned for the period between 1983 and 1985. The cost of the U.S. effort is expected to total about $100 million over the next five-year period. The foreign countries will fund their own investigations. The disciplines involved are astronomy, upper atmospheric physics, solar physics, and high energy astrophysics. A list of the investigators, the organizations they represent, and the names of the experiments is included.

  12. Report on cost/pricing relationships for the space shuttle. [NASA/STS Operations Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The operations cost for the shuttle is the basis for developing the user charge policy for the system. The policy contains several elements that are significant to the user and to NASA. It will encourage the full use of the system to the benefits of the U.S. The charge policy will encourage early transition from the expendable launch vehicles to the shuttle and this will result in lower user costs for government as well as commercial users. The relationship between the charge policy and the utilization of the shuttle is critical to the economic efficiency of the system. NASA recognizes the challenging a relationship between pricing the cost of using a reusable space system, and the need to make sure it is re-used often.

  13. Legal Issues inherent in space shuttle operations. [reviewed by NASA Deputy General Counsel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The legal issues inherent in NASA's proceeding into the day-to-day operations of the space shuttle and other elements of the Space Transportation System are considered in light of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958. Based on this review, it was concluded that there is no immediate need for substantive amendments to that legislation.

  14. NASA payload data book: Payload analysis for space shuttle applications, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Data describing the individual NASA payloads for the space shuttle are presented. The document represents a complete issue of the original payload data book. The subjects discussed are: (1) astronomy, (2) space physics, (3) planetary exploration, (4) earth observations (earth and ocean physics), (5) communications and navigation, (6) life sciences, (7) international rendezvous and docking, and (8) lunar exploration.

  15. From Ship to Shuttle: NASA Orbiter Naming Program, September 1988 - May 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    By congressional action in 1987, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was authorized to provide an opportunity for American school students to name the new Space Shuttle orbiter being built to replace the Challenger. The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), an education organization representing the chief education officials of the nation, was asked by NASA to assist in the development and administration of this exciting and important educational activity. A selection of interdisciplinary activities related to the Space Shuttle that were designed by students for the NASA Orbiter-Naming Program are presented. The national winner's project is first followed by other projects listed in alphabetical order by state, and a bibliography compiled from suggestions by the state-level winning teams.

  16. From Ship to Shuttle: NASA Orbiter Naming Program, September 1988 - May 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-10-01

    By congressional action in 1987, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was authorized to provide an opportunity for American school students to name the new Space Shuttle orbiter being built to replace the Challenger. The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), an education organization representing the chief education officials of the nation, was asked by NASA to assist in the development and administration of this exciting and important educational activity. A selection of interdisciplinary activities related to the Space Shuttle that were designed by students for the NASA Orbiter-Naming Program are presented. The national winner's project is first followed by other projects listed in alphabetical order by state, and a bibliography compiled from suggestions by the state-level winning teams.

  17. NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking convened on May 24 and 25, 1994. Based on the meetings, the Task Force made the following recommendations: at a minimum, the mission commander and payload commander for all subsequent Shuttle-Mir missions should be named at least 18 months in advance of the scheduled launch date; in order to derive early operational experience in advance of the first Mir docking mission, the primary objective of STS-63 should be Mir rendezvous and proximity operations; and if at all possible, the launch date for STS-63 should be moved forward.

  18. Five NASA astronauts and two international payload specialists take a break from a Shuttle duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 ONBOARD VIEW --- Five NASA astronauts and two international payload specialists take a break from a Shuttle duration record-breaker flight to pose for the traditional inflight crew portrait. The photograph should be oriented with payload commander Susan J. Helms at bottom center. Others, clockwise, are French payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier, Canadian payload specialist Robert B. Thirsk; and astronauts Kevin R. Kregel, pilot; and Charles J. (Chuck) Brady and Richard M. Linnehan, both mission specialists, and Terence T. (Tom) Henricks, mission commander. The crew chose the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS-1) Science Module, situated in the Space Shuttle Columbias cargo bay, for the portrait setting.

  19. Pricing of NASA Space Shuttle transportation system cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    A two-part pricing policy is investigated as the most feasible method of pricing the transportation services to be provided by NASA's SSTS. Engineering cost estimates and a deterministic operating cost model generate a data base and develop a procedure for pricing the services of the SSTS. It is expected that the SSTS will have a monopoly on space material processing in areas of crystal growth, glass processing, metallurgical space applications, and biomedical processes using electrophoresis which will require efficient pricing. Pricing problems, the SSTS operating costs based on orbit elevation, number of launch sites, and number of flights, capital costs of the SSTS, research and development costs, allocation of joint transportation costs of the SSTS to a particular space processing activity, and rates for the SSTS are discussed. It is concluded that joint costs for commercial cargoes carried in the SSTS can be most usefully handled by making cost allocations based on proportionate capacity utilization.

  20. Second Shuttle Join NASA's STS Fleet: Challenger Launches First New Tracking Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASA made a major stride in readying a second delivery vehicle for its Space Transportation System (STS) fleet with the perfect landing of Shuttle Orbiter Challenger at Edwards Air Force Base, California, April 9, 1983. Besides being the first flight test of Challenger's performance, the mission marked the orbiting of the first spacecraft in NASA's new Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The new family of orbiting space communications platforms is essential to serve future Shuttle missions. Although the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) second stage engine firing failed to place TDRS in its final 35,888 kilometer (22,300 mile) geosynchronous orbit, its release from the orbiter cargo bay went as planned. Launch officials were confident they can achieve its planned orbit in a matter of weeks.

  1. NASA's Space Shuttle Columbia: Synopsis of the Report of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marcia S.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's space shuttle Columbia broke apart on February 1, 2003 as it returned to Earth from a 16-day science mission. All seven astronauts aboard were killed. NASA created the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB), chaired by Adm. (Ret.) Harold Gehman, to investigate the accident. The Board released its report (available at [http://www.caib.us]) on August 26, 2003, concluding that the tragedy was caused by technical and organizational failures. The CAIB report included 29 recommendations, 15 of which the Board specified must be completed before the shuttle returns to flight status. This report provides a brief synopsis of the Board's conclusions, recommendations, and observations. Further information on Columbia and issues for Congress are available in CRS Report RS21408. This report will not be updated.

  2. NASA Shuttle Orbiter Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) Crack Repair Arc-Jet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, ShawnDella; Larin, Max; Rochelle, Bill

    2007-01-01

    This NASA study demonstrates the capability for testing NOAX-repaired RCC crack models in high temperature environments representative of Shuttle Orbiter during reentry. Analysis methods have provided correlation of test data with flight predictions. NOAX repair material for RCC is flown on every STS flight in the event such a repair is needed. Two final test reports are being generated on arc-jet results (both calibration model runs and repaired models runs).

  3. The epistemic integrity of NASA practices in the Space Shuttle Program.

    PubMed

    De Winter, Jan; Kosolosky, Laszlo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an account of epistemic integrity and uses it to demonstrate that the epistemic integrity of different kinds of practices in NASA's Space Shuttle Program was limited. We focus on the following kinds of practices: (1) research by working engineers, (2) review by middle-level managers, and (3) communication with the public. We argue that the epistemic integrity of these practices was undermined by production pressure at NASA, i.e., the pressure to launch an unreasonable amount of flights per year. Finally, our findings are used to develop some potential strategies to protect epistemic integrity in aerospace science. PMID:23432770

  4. Griffin Lifts Off at NASA With Calls for Speeding Shuttle Replacement, Reopening Hubble Decision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Michael D. Griffin launched his tenure as NASA's 11th administrator on a fast track, using his "emergency" confiimation by the U.S. Senate to plug himself into space shuttle return-to-flight decision-making and urging faster development of the shuttle replacement. He also deftly sidestepped the treacherous issue of letting the aging Hubble Space Telescope die that was left behind by former Administrator Sean O'Keefe. Griffin told the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee that he would take another look at a shuttle mission to service the telescope, but not until the redesigned shuttle system makes a couple of test flights. Griffin made clear at his confirmation hearing Apr. 12 that he has long supported the ideas embodied in President Bush s push to move human exploration out of low Earth orbit, while finishing the International Space Station and retiring the space shuttle as soon as possible. And he showed right out of the blocks that his technical training and management background should serve him well in implementing Bush's directives.

  5. The NASA fuel cell upgrade program for the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    SciTech Connect

    Warshay, M.; Prokopius, P.; Le, M.; Voecks, G.

    1997-12-31

    As part of NASA`s overall efforts to improve the Space Shuttle operations, a program to upgrade the existing fuel cell powerplant has begun. The upgrade will involve replacing the alkaline fuel cell (AFC) system with a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system, resulting in a much lower life cycle cost of the powerplant. The program is being implemented by a team comprised of NASA/JSC, NASA/LeRC, and JPL personnel, with support from NASA/KSC. With extremely high annual maintenance costs and subsystem replacement costs, the need for a lower cost Orbiter fuel cell powerplant is obvious. Earlier NASA plant to upgrade the shuttle fuel cell were not adequately funded and only focused upon upgrading the existing AFC. For the current program, the PEM fuel cell system will be implemented because the projected long life (10,000 hrs. vs. 2,000 hrs. for AFC), high power density (PEM projected to produce 50% more power), and enhanced system reliability and safety all lead to significantly lower life cycle powerplant costs. And in addition to the Orbiter application, PEM fuel cell development would support a number of important space applications that the AFC would not, such as Lunar/Mars transportation, the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), Space Station emergency power and/or future energy storage applications, and various portable applications. NASA is also leveraging all of the large scale PEM fuel cell development activities that are ongoing for DOE, DOD, and commercial applications. There is no activity in the AFC area. The Shuttle Fuel Cell Upgrade plan of the JSC/LeRC/JPL team includes the following key elements: (1) Systems Analyses to assure compatibility/maximum utilization by shuttle of the best PEM fuel cell characteristics; (2) Short Stack Testing of the leading PEM fuel cell contractors` hardware; (3) Detailed Task Objective (DTO) Flight Experiment to verify PEM system water management and thermal management under zero-g operation; (4) A Downselect to the best

  6. Neutron Diffraction Characterization of Residual Strain in Welded Inconel 718 for NASA Space Shuttle Flow Liners

    SciTech Connect

    Rathod, C.R.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Livescu, V.; Clausen, B.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Notardonato, W.U.; Femminineo, M.

    2004-06-28

    This work quantitatively assesses residual strains and stresses associated with the weld repair process used to repair cracks on NASA's space shuttle flow liners. The coupons used in this investigation were made of the same INCONEL 718 alloy used for the flow liners. They were subjected to identical welding and certification procedures that were carried out on the space shuttle. Neutron diffraction measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory determined residual strains at selected locations in a welded coupon at 293 K and 135 K. The weld repair process introduced Mises effective residual stresses of up to 555 MPa. On comparing the measurements at 293 K and 135 K, no significant change to the residual strain profile was noted at the low temperature. This indicated minimal mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the base metal and the weld.

  7. NSTA-NASA Shuttle Student Involvement Project. Experiment Results: Insect Flight Observation at Zero Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, T. E.; Peterson, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The flight responses of common houseflies, velvetbean caterpillar moths, and worker honeybees were observed and filmed for a period of about 25 minutes in a zero-g environment during the third flight of the Space Shuttle Vehicle (flight number STS-3; March 22-30, 1982). Twelve fly puparia, 24 adult moths, 24 moth pupae, and 14 adult bees were loaded into an insect flight box, which was then stowed aboard the Shuttle Orbiter, the night before the STS-3 launch at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The main purpose of the experiment was to observe and compare the flight responses of the three species of insects, which have somewhat different flight control mechanisms, under zero-g conditions.

  8. Anomaly Analysis: NASA's Engineering and Safety Center Checks Recurring Shuttle Glitches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), set up in the wake of the Columbia accident to backstop engineers in the space shuttle program, is reviewing hundreds of recurring anomalies that the program had determined don't affect flight safety to see if in fact they might. The NESC is expanding its support to other programs across the agency, as well. The effort, which will later extend to the International Space Station (ISS), is a principal part of the attempt to overcome the normalization of deviance--a situation in which organizations proceeded as if nothing was wrong in the face of evidence that something was wrong--cited by sociologist Diane Vaughn as contributing to both space shuttle disasters.

  9. Ventilation Loss in the NASA Space Shuttle Crew Protective Garments: Potential for Heat Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, Gregory K.; Kaufman, Jonathan W.

    1991-01-01

    The potential of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) S1035 Launch/Entry suit (LES) for producing heat stress in a simulated Space Shuttle cabin environment has been studied. The testing was designed to determine if the NASA S1035 poses a greater threat of inducing heat stress than the NASA S1032. Conditions were designed to simulate an extreme prelaunch situation, with chamber temperatures maintained at dry bulb temperature 27.2 +/- 0.1 C, globe temperature - 27.3 +/- 0.1 C, and wet bulb temperature 21.1 +/- 0.3 C. Four males, aged 28-48, were employed in this study, with three subjects having exposures in all four conditions and the fourth subject exposed to 3 conditions. Test durations in the ventilated (V) and unventilated (UV) conditions were designed for 480 minutes, which all subjects achieved. No significant differences related to experimental conditions were noted in rectal temperatures, heart rates or sweat rates. The results indicate that the S1032 and S1035 garments, in either the V or UV state, poses no danger of inducing unacceptable heat stress under the conditions expected within the Shuttle cabin during launch or re-entry.

  10. The Role and Training of NASA Astronauts in the Post-Shuttle Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    In May 2010 the National Research Council (NRC) was asked by NASA to address several questions related to the Astronaut Corps. The NRC's Committee on Human Spaceflight Crew Operations was tasked to: 1. How should the role and size of the activities managed by the Johnson Space Center Flight Crew Operations Directorate change following space shuttle retirement and completion of the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS)? 2. What are the requirements for crew-related ground-based facilities after the Space Shuttle program ends? 3. Is the fleet of aircraft used for training the Astronaut Corps a cost-effective means of preparing astronauts to meet the requirements of NASA's human spaceflight program? Are there more cost-effective means of meeting these training requirements? Although the future of NASA's human spaceflight program has garnered considerable discussion in recent years, and there is considerable uncertainty about what that program will involve in the coming years, the committee was not tasked to address whether or not human spaceflight should continue, or what form it should take. The committee's task restricted it to studying those activities managed by the Flight Crew Operations Directorate, or those closely related to its activities, such as crew-related ground-based facilities and the training aircraft.

  11. Fifth Report of the NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking missions examine a number of specific issues related to the Shuttle-Mir program. Three teams composed of Task Force members and technical advisors were formed to address the follow issues: preliminary results from STS-71 and the status of preparations for STS-74; NASA's presence in Russia; and NASA's automated data processing and telecommunications (ADP/T) infrastructure in Russia. The three review team reports have been included in the fifth report of the Task Force.

  12. Software Architecture of the NASA Shuttle Ground Operations Simulator--SGOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook Robert P.; Lostroscio, Charles T.

    2005-01-01

    The SGOS executive and its subsystems have been an integral component of the Shuttle Launch Safety Program for almost thirty years. it is usable (via the LAN) by over 2000 NASA employees at the Kennedy Space Center and 11,000 contractors. SGOS supports over 800 models comprised of several hundred thousand lines of code and over 1,00 MCP procedures. Yet neither language has a for loop!! The simulation software described in this paper is used to train ground controllers and to certify launch countdown readiness.

  13. The five crew members of the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-98 mission depart NASA Dryden to retu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The five crew members of the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-98 mission depart NASA Dryden to return to the Johnson Space Center at Houston. They briefly extended greetings to Dryden staff members on the ramp area behind Dryden's Main Building at a crew ceremony on February 21, 2001. Space Shuttle Atlantis landed at 12:33 p.m. February 20, 2001, on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, where NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center is located. The mission, which began February 7, logged 5.3 million miles as the shuttle orbited earth while delivering the Destiny science laboratory to the International Space Station. Inclement weather conditions in Florida prompted the decision to land Atlantis at Edwards. The last time a space shuttle landed at Edwards was Oct. 24, 2000.

  14. Development of NASA's Accident Precursor Analysis Process Through Application on the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maggio, Gaspare; Groen, Frank; Hamlin, Teri; Youngblood, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Accident Precursor Analysis (APA) serves as the bridge between existing risk modeling activities, which are often based on historical or generic failure statistics, and system anomalies, which provide crucial information about the failure mechanisms that are actually operative in the system. APA docs more than simply track experience: it systematically evaluates experience, looking for under-appreciated risks that may warrant changes to design or operational practice. This paper presents the pilot application of the NASA APA process to Space Shuttle Orbiter systems. In this effort, the working sessions conducted at Johnson Space Center (JSC) piloted the APA process developed by Information Systems Laboratories (ISL) over the last two years under the auspices of NASA's Office of Safety & Mission Assurance, with the assistance of the Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) Shuttle & Exploration Analysis Branch. This process is built around facilitated working sessions involving diverse system experts. One important aspect of this particular APA process is its focus on understanding the physical mechanism responsible for an operational anomaly, followed by evaluation of the risk significance of the observed anomaly as well as consideration of generalizations of the underlying mechanism to other contexts. Model completeness will probably always be an issue, but this process tries to leverage operating experience to the extent possible in order to address completeness issues before a catastrophe occurs.

  15. Integrated tracking of components by engineering and logistics utilizing logistics asset tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renfroe, Michael B.; Mcdonald, Edward J.; Bradshaw, Kimberly

    1988-01-01

    The Logistics Asset Tracking System (LATS) devised by NASA contains data on Space Shuttle LRUs that are daily updated to reflect such LRU status changes as repair due to failure or modification due to changing engineering requirements. The implementation of LATS has substantially increased personnel responsiveness, preventing costly delays in Space Shuttle processing and obviating hardware cannibalization. An evaluation is presented of LATS achievements in the direction of an integrated logistical support posture.

  16. Space shuttle operations at the NASA Kennedy Space Center: the role of emergency medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodenberg, H.; Myers, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Division of Emergency Medicine at the University of Florida coordinates a unique program with the NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to provide emergency medical support (EMS) for the United States Space Transportation System. This report outlines the organization of the KSC EMS system, training received by physicians providing medical support, logistic and operational aspects of the mission, and experiences of team members. The participation of emergency physicians in support of manned space flight represents another way that emergency physicians provide leadership in prehospital care and disaster management.

  17. Concepts and embodiment design of a reentry recumbent seating system for the NASA Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Scott; Looby, Brent; Devany, Chris; Chudej, Chris; Brooks, Barry

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the generation of a recumbent seating system which will be used by NASA to shuttle astronauts from the Russian space station Mir. We begin by examining the necessity for designing a special couch for the returning astronauts. Next, we discuss the operating conditions and constraints of the recumbent seating system and provide a detailed function structure. After working through the conceptual design process, we came up with ten alternative designs which are presented in the appendices. These designs were evaluated and weighted to systematically determine the best choice for embodiment design. A detailed discussion of all components of the selected system follows with design calculations for the seat presented in the appendices. The report concludes with an evaluation of the resulting design and recommendations for further development.

  18. Actinide Sub-Actinide Flux Ratio Estimated from NASA Challenger Space Shuttle Borne Passive Detector Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Basudhara; Bhattacharyya, D. P.; Biswas, S.; O'Sullivan, D.; Thompson, A.

    A video trace analysis of 117 ultra heavy cosmic nuclei detected by NASA space shuttle borne lexan detectors has been presented here. The major axes of the elliptical track etch pits in the long hour etched detectors have been measured using a Hund microscope computerized for the measurements using a Pentium. The major axes distribution exhibits the existence of ultra heavy nuclei of charges of Z ranging from 72 to 96 compatible with the expected results from restricted energy loss calculations. The estimated actinide sub-actinide flux ratio has been found to be 0.0636±0.0248 which is comparable to the earlier observations by Fowler et al., Thompson et al. and O'Sullivan.

  19. A portable hypergolic oxidizer vapor sensor for NASA's Space Shuttle program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    The design and performance characteristics of an electrochemical NO2 sensor selected by NASA for the space shuttle program is described. The instrument consists of a sample pump, an electrochemical cell, and control and display electronics. The pump pushes the sample through the electrochemical cell where the vapors are analyzed and an output proportional to the NO2 concentration is produced. The output is displayed on a panel meter, and is also available at a recorder jack. The electrochemical cell is made up of a polypropylene chamber covered with teflon membrane faceplates. Plantinum electrodes are bonded to the faceplates, and the sensing and counter electrodes are potentiostatically controlled at -200 mV with respect to the reference electrode. The cell is filled with electrolyte, consisting of 13.5 cc of 23% solution of KOH.

  20. NASA Research Center Contributions to Space Shuttle Return to Flight (SSRTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Barnes, Robert S.; Belvin, Harry L.; Allmen, John; Otero, Angel

    2005-01-01

    Contributions provided by the NASA Research Centers to key Space Shuttle return-to-flight milestones, with an emphasis on debris and Thermal Protection System (TPS) damage characterization, are described herein. Several CAIB recommendations and Space Shuttle Program directives deal with the mitigation of external tank foam insulation as a debris source, including material characterization as well as potential design changes, and an understanding of Orbiter TPS material characteristics, damage scenarios, and repair options. Ames, Glenn, and Langley Research Centers have performed analytic studies, conducted experimental testing, and developed new technologies, analysis tools, and hardware to contribute to each of these recommendations. For the External Tank (ET), these include studies of spray-on foam insulation (SOFI), investigations of potential design changes, and applications of advanced non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technologies to understand ET TPS shedding during liftoff and ascent. The end-to-end debris assessment included transport analysis to determine the probabilities of impact for various debris sources. For the Orbiter, methods were developed, and validated through experimental testing, to determine thresholds for potential damage of Orbiter TPS components. Analysis tools were developed and validated for on-orbit TPS damage assessments, especially in the area of aerothermal environments. Advanced NDE technologies were also applied to the Orbiter TPS components, including sensor technologies to detect wing leading edge impacts during liftoff and ascent. Work is continuing to develop certified TPS repair options and to develop improved methodologies for reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) damage progression to assist in on-orbit repair decision philosophy.

  1. Vibro-Acoustic Analysis of NASA's Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A Flame Trench Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margasahayam, Ravi N.

    2009-01-01

    A vital element to NASA's manned space flight launch operations is the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39's launch pads A and B. Originally designed and constructed In the 1960s for the Saturn V rockets used for the Apollo missions, these pads were modified above grade to support Space Shuttle missions. But below grade, each of the pad's original walls (including a 42 feet deep, 58 feet wide, and 450 feet long tunnel designed to deflect flames and exhaust gases, the flame trench) remained unchanged. On May 31, 2008 during the launch of STS-124, over 3500 of the. 22000 interlocking refractory bricks that lined east wall of the flame trench, protecting the pad structure were liberated from pad 39A. The STS-124 launch anomaly spawned an agency-wide initiative to determine the failure root cause, to assess the impact of debris on vehicle and ground support equipment safety, and to prescribe corrective action. The investigation encompassed radar imaging, infrared video review, debris transport mechanism analysis using computational fluid dynamics, destructive testing, and non-destructive evaluation, including vibroacoustic analysis, in order to validate the corrective action. The primary focus of this paper is on the analytic approach, including static, modal, and vibro-acoustic analysis, required to certify the corrective action, and ensure Integrity and operational reliability for future launches. Due to the absence of instrumentation (including pressure transducers, acoustic pressure sensors, and accelerometers) in the flame trench, defining an accurate acoustic signature of the launch environment during shuttle main engine/solid rocket booster Ignition and vehicle ascent posed a significant challenge. Details of the analysis, including the derivation of launch environments, the finite element approach taken, and analysistest/ launch data correlation are discussed. Data obtained from the recent launch of STS-126 from Pad 39A was instrumental in validating the

  2. KOVEC studies of radioisotope thermoelectric generator response (In connection with possible NASA space shuttle accident explosion scenarios)

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.; Weston, A.; Lee, E.

    1984-06-26

    The Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a study leading to a final report (NUS-4543, Report of the Shuttle Transportation System (STS) Explosion Working Group (EWG), June 8, 1984), concerned with PuO/sub 2/ dispersal should the NASA space shuttle explode during the proposed Galileo and ISPN launches planned for 1986. At DOE's request, LLNL furnished appendices that describe hydrocode KOVEC calculations of potential damage to the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators, fueled by PuO/sub 2/, should certain explosion scenarios occur. These appendices are contained in this report.

  3. Simulation of Shuttle launch G forces and acoustic loads using the NASA Ames Research Center 20G centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, T. L.; Corliss, J. M.; Gundo, D. P.; Mulenburg, G. M.; Breit, G. A.; Griffith, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The high cost and long times required to develop research packages for space flight can often be offset by using ground test techniques. This paper describes a space shuttle launch and reentry simulating using the NASA Ames Research Center's 20G centrifuge facility. The combined G-forces and acoustic environment during shuttle launch and landing were simulated to evaluate the effect on a payload of laboratory rates. The launch G force and acoustic profiles are matched to actual shuttle launch data to produce the required G-forces and acoustic spectrum in the centrifuge test cab where the rats were caged on a free-swinging platform. For reentry, only G force is simulated as the aero-acoustic noise is insignificant compared to that during launch. The shuttle G-force profiles of launch and landing are achieved by programming the centrifuge drive computer to continuously adjust centrifuge rotational speed to obtain the correct launch and landing G forces. The shuttle launch acoustic environment is simulated using a high-power, low-frequency audio system. Accelerometer data from STS-56 and microphone data from STS-1 through STS-5 are used as baselines for the simulations. This paper provides a description of the test setup and the results of the simulation with recommendations for follow-on simulations.

  4. Space Shuttle Program Tin Whisker Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimi, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of tin whiskers (TW) on space shuttle hardware led to a program to investigate and removal and mitigation of the source of the tin whiskers. A Flight Control System (FCS) avionics box failed during vehicle testing, and was routed to the NASA Shuttle Logistics Depot for testing and disassembly. The internal inspection of the box revealed TW growth visible without magnification. The results of the Tiger Team that was assembled to investigate and develop recommendations are reviewed in this viewgraph presentation.

  5. Shuttle Astronauts Visit NASA's X-Ray Observatory Operations Control Center in Cambridge to Coordinate Plans for Launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    CAMBRIDGE, MASS.-- June 25, 1998 Eileen Collins, the first U.S. woman commanderof a Space Shuttle mission and her fellow astronauts for NASA s STS-93 mission toured the Operations Control Center (OCC) for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) today. AXAF is scheduled for launch on January 26, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. They met with the staff of the OCC and discussed how the status of the observatory will be monitored while in the shuttle bay and during deployment. "We are honored to have this historic shuttle crew visit us and familiarize themselves with the OCC," said Harvey Tananbaum, director of the AXAF Science Center, which operates the OCC for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory through a contract with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. "It is appropriate that a pathbreaking shuttle mission will deploy the premier X-ray observatory of this century." AXAF is the third of NASA s Great Observatories along with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. It will observe in greater detail than ever before the hot, violent regions of the universe that cannot be seen with optical telescopes. Exploding stars, black holes and vast clouds of gas in galaxy clusters are among the fascinating objects that AXAF is designed to study. The satellite is currently in the final stages of testing at TRW Space and Electronics Group,the prime contractor, in Redondo Beach, California. In late August it will be flown aboard a specially-outfitted Air Force C-5 aircraft to Kennedy Space Center in Florida where it will be integrated with a Boeing booster and then installed in the Shuttle bay. The shuttle crew that will take AXAF into space includes Collins (Col., USAF), Jeffrey Ashby (Cmdr., USN), pilot; Steven Hawley, Ph.D., mission specialist; Catherine Cady Coleman, Ph.D. (Major, USAF), mission specialist; and Michel Tognini (Col., French Air Force), mission specialist. While visiting the OCC the crew learned how critical data

  6. Supporting flight data analysis for Space Shuttle Orbiter Experiments at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Budnick, M. P.; Yang, L.; Chiasson, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Experiments program in responsible for collecting flight data to extend the research and technology base for future aerospace vehicle design. The Infrared Imagery of Shuttle (IRIS), Catalytic Surface Effects, and Tile Gap Heating experiments sponsored by Ames Research Center are part of this program. The paper describes the software required to process the flight data which support these experiments. In addition, data analysis techniques, developed in support of the IRIS experiment, are discussed. Using the flight data base, the techniques have provided information useful in analyzing and correcting problems with the experiment, and in interpreting the IRIS image obtained during the entry of the third Shuttle mission.

  7. Supporting flight data analysis for Space Shuttle Orbiter experiments at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Budnick, M. P.; Yang, L.; Chiasson, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter experiments program is responsible for collecting flight data to extend the research and technology base for future aerospace vehicle design. The infrared imagery of shuttle (IRIS), catalytic surface effects, and tile gap heating experiments sponsored by Ames Research Center are part of this program. The software required to process the flight data which support these experiments is described. In addition, data analysis techniques, developed in support of the IRIS experiment, are discussed. Using the flight data base, the techniques provide information useful in analyzing and correcting problems with the experiment, and in interpreting the IRIS image obtained during the entry of the third shuttle mission.

  8. An analysis of Space Shuttle countdown activities: Preliminaries to a computational model of the NASA Test Director

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, Bonnie E.; Remington, Roger W.; Steier, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Before all systems are go just prior to the launch of a space shuttle, thousands of operations and tests have been performed to ensure that all shuttle and support subsystems are operational and ready for launch. These steps, which range from activating the orbiter's flight computers to removing the launch pad from the itinerary of the NASA tour buses, are carried out by launch team members at various locations and with highly specialized fields of expertise. The liability for coordinating these diverse activities rests with the NASA Test Director (NTD) at NASA-Kennedy. The behavior is being studied of the NTD with the goal of building a detailed computational model of that behavior; the results of that analysis to date are given. The NTD's performance is described in detail, as a team member who must coordinate a complex task through efficient audio communication, as well as an individual taking notes and consulting manuals. A model of the routine cognitive skill used by the NTD to follow the launch countdown procedure manual was implemented using the Soar cognitive architecture. Several examples are given of how such a model could aid in evaluating proposed computer support systems.

  9. Preparing for the High Frontier: The Role and Training of NASA Astronauts in the Post- Space Shuttle Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    In May 2010, the National Research Council (NRC) was asked by NASA to address several questions related to the Astronaut Corps. The NRC s Committee on Human Spaceflight Crew Operations was tasked to answer several questions: 1. How should the role and size of the activities managed by the Johnson Space Center Flight Crew Operations Directorate change after space shuttle retirement and completion of the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS)? 2. What are the requirements for crew-related ground-based facilities after the Space Shuttle program ends? 3. Is the fleet of aircraft used for training the Astronaut Corps a cost-effective means of preparing astronauts to meet the requirements of NASA s human spaceflight program? Are there more cost-effective means of meeting these training requirements? Although the future of NASA s human spaceflight program has garnered considerable discussion in recent years and there is considerable uncertainty about what the program will involve in the coming years, the committee was not tasked to address whether human spaceflight should continue or what form it should take. The committee s task restricted it to studying activities managed by the Flight Crew Operations Directorate or those closely related to its activities, such as crew-related ground-based facilities and the training aircraft.

  10. Space shuttle utilization. [and Fly-Before-Buy Analysis Ground Rules from NASA/STS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The information and rationale required to assess the level and pattern of space shuttle utilization that best serves the national interest are provided. Comparisons are given for civil program, national total program and Dept. of Defense total program costs.

  11. Joint NASA/USAF study on space shuttle orbiter procurement and related issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The comprehensive data and analyses are provided for decision on the procurement of additional space shuttle orbiters. The decision required is the number of orbiters needed for the national operational fleet, and how additional orbiters should be funded.

  12. User benefits and funding strategies. [technology assessment and economic analysis of the space shuttles and NASA Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, J. L.; Beauchamp, N. A.; Day, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    The justification, economic and technological benefits of NASA Space Programs (aside from pure scientific objectives), in improving the quality of life in the United States is discussed and outlined. Specifically, a three-step, systematic method is described for selecting relevant and highly beneficial payloads and instruments for the Interim Upper Stage (IUS) that will be used with the space shuttle until the space tug becomes available. Viable Government and private industry cost-sharing strategies which would maximize the number of IUS payloads, and the benefits obtainable under a limited NASA budget were also determined. Charts are shown which list the payload instruments, and their relevance in contributing to such areas as earth resources management, agriculture, weather forecasting, and many others.

  13. Range Systems Simulation for the NASA Shuttle: Emphasis on Disaster and Prevention Management During Lift-Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabelo, Lisa; Sepulveda, Jose; Moraga, Reinaldo; Compton, Jeppie; Turner, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a decision-making system composed of a number of safety and environmental models for the launch phase of a NASA Space Shuttle mission. The components of this distributed simulation environment represent the different systems that must collaborate to establish the Expectation of Casualties (E(sub c)) caused by a failed Space Shuttle launch and subsequent explosion (accidental or instructed) of the spacecraft shortly after liftoff. This decision-making tool employs Space Shuttle reliability models, trajectory models, a blast model, weather dissemination systems, population models, amount and type of toxicants, gas dispersion models, human response functions to toxicants, and a geographical information system. Since one of the important features of this proposed simulation environment is to measure blast, toxic, and debris effects, the clear benefits is that it can help safety managers not only estimate the population at risk, but also to help plan evacuations, make sheltering decisions, establish the resources required to provide aid and comfort, and mitigate damages in case of a disaster.

  14. Design of the software development and verification system (SWDVS) for shuttle NASA study task 35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drane, L. W.; Mccoy, B. J.; Silver, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    An overview of the Software Development and Verification System (SWDVS) for the space shuttle is presented. The design considerations, goals, assumptions, and major features of the design are examined. A scenario that shows three persons involved in flight software development using the SWDVS in response to a program change request is developed. The SWDVS is described from the standpoint of different groups of people with different responsibilities in the shuttle program to show the functional requirements that influenced the SWDVS design. The software elements of the SWDVS that satisfy the requirements of the different groups are identified.

  15. Update on NASA Space Shuttle Earth Observations Photography on the laser videodisc for rapid image access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lulla, Kamlesh

    1994-01-01

    There have been many significant improvements in the public access to the Space Shuttle Earth Observations Photography Database. New information is provided for the user community on the recently released videodisc of this database. Topics covered included the following: earlier attempts; our first laser videodisc in 1992; the new laser videodisc in 1994; and electronic database access.

  16. Research pressure instrumentation for NASA Space Shuttle main engine, modification no. 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. J.; Nussbaum, P.; Gustafson, G.

    1984-01-01

    Research concerning the development of pressure instrumentation for the space shuttle main engine is reported. The following specific topics were addressed: (1) transducer design and materials, (2) silicon piezoresistor characterization at cryogenic temperatures, (3) chip mounting characterization, and (4) frequency response optimization.

  17. Shared visions: Partnership of Rockwell International and NASA Cost Effectiveness Enhancements (CEE) for the space shuttle system integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejmuk, Bohdan I.; Williams, Larry

    1992-01-01

    As a result of limited resources and tight fiscal constraints over the past several years, the defense and aerospace industries have experienced a downturn in business activity. The impact of fewer contracts being awarded has placed a greater emphasis for effectiveness and efficiency on industry contractors. It is clear that a reallocation of resources is required for America to continue to lead the world in space and technology. The key to technological and economic survival is the transforming of existing programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program, into more cost efficient programs so as to divert the savings to other NASA programs. The partnership between Rockwell International and NASA and their joint improvement efforts that resulted in significant streamlining and cost reduction measures to Rockwell International Space System Division's work on the Space Shuttle System Integration Contract is described. This work was a result of an established Cost Effectiveness Enhancement (CEE) Team formed initially in Fiscal Year 1991, and more recently expanded to a larger scale CEE Initiative in 1992. By working closely with the customer in agreeing to contract content, obtaining management endorsement and commitment, and involving the employees in total quality management (TQM) and continuous improvement 'teams,' the initial annual cost reduction target was exceeded significantly. The CEE Initiative helped reduce the cost of the Shuttle Systems Integration contract while establishing a stronger program based upon customer needs, teamwork, quality enhancements, and cost effectiveness. This was accomplished by systematically analyzing, challenging, and changing the established processes, practices, and systems. This examination, in nature, was work intensive due to the depth and breadth of the activity. The CEE Initiative has provided opportunities to make a difference in the way Rockwell and NASA work together - to update the methods and processes of the organizations

  18. Shared visions: Partnership of Rockwell International and NASA Cost Effectiveness Enhancements (CEE) for the space shuttle system integration program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejmuk, Bohdan I.; Williams, Larry

    As a result of limited resources and tight fiscal constraints over the past several years, the defense and aerospace industries have experienced a downturn in business activity. The impact of fewer contracts being awarded has placed a greater emphasis for effectiveness and efficiency on industry contractors. It is clear that a reallocation of resources is required for America to continue to lead the world in space and technology. The key to technological and economic survival is the transforming of existing programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program, into more cost efficient programs so as to divert the savings to other NASA programs. The partnership between Rockwell International and NASA and their joint improvement efforts that resulted in significant streamlining and cost reduction measures to Rockwell International Space System Division's work on the Space Shuttle System Integration Contract is described. This work was a result of an established Cost Effectiveness Enhancement (CEE) Team formed initially in Fiscal Year 1991, and more recently expanded to a larger scale CEE Initiative in 1992. By working closely with the customer in agreeing to contract content, obtaining management endorsement and commitment, and involving the employees in total quality management (TQM) and continuous improvement 'teams,' the initial annual cost reduction target was exceeded significantly. The CEE Initiative helped reduce the cost of the Shuttle Systems Integration contract while establishing a stronger program based upon customer needs, teamwork, quality enhancements, and cost effectiveness. This was accomplished by systematically analyzing, challenging, and changing the established processes, practices, and systems. This examination, in nature, was work intensive due to the depth and breadth of the activity. The CEE Initiative has provided opportunities to make a difference in the way Rockwell and NASA work together - to update the methods and processes of the organizations

  19. Autonomy, Interdependence, and Social Control: NASA and the Space Shuttle "Challenger."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Diane

    1990-01-01

    Shows that the organizations responsible for regulating safety at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) failed to identify flaws in management procedures and technical design that, if corrected, might have prevented the "Challenger" tragedy. Regulatory effectiveness was inhibited by the autonomy and interdependence of NASA and…

  20. Space Shuttle main engine. NASA has not evaluated the alternate fuel turbopump costs and benefits. Report to the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    NASA's plans to develop an alternate high pressure fuel turbopump for the Space Shuttle's main engines were assessed by the General Accounting Office as a part of the evaluation of the Space Shuttle Safety and Obsolescence Upgrade program. The objective was to determine whether NASA has adequately analyzed cost, performance, and benefits that are expected to result from this program in comparison to other alternatives before resuming development of the alternate pump, which was suspended in 1992. The alternate fuel pump is one of five improvements being developed or planned to significantly enhance safety margins of the engines.

  1. Texture Modification of the Shuttle Landing Facility Runway at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Yager, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the test procedures and the selection criteria used in selecting the best runway surface texture modification at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to reduce Orbiter tire wear. The new runway surface may ultimately result in an increase of allowable crosswinds for launch and landing operations. The modification allows launch and landing operations in 20-kt crosswinds if desired. This 5-kt increase over the previous 15-kt limit drastically increases landing safety and the ability to make on-time launches to support missions where space station rendezvous is planned.

  2. Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator Bearing Testing For NASA Return to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Timothy R.; Thom, Robert L.; Moore, Lewis E.; Gibson, Howard G.; Hall, Phillip B.; Predmore, Roamer E.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Shuttle body flap is located beneath the main engine nozzles and is required for proper aerodynamic control during orbital descent. Routine inspection of one of four body flap actuatols found one of the actuator bearings had degraded and blackened balls. A test program was initiated to demonstrate that it is acceptable to operate bearings which are degraded from operation over several flights. This test exposed the bearing to predicted flight axial loads, speeds and temperatures. Testing has been completed, and results indicate the previously flown bearings are acceptable for up to 12 additional missions.

  3. NASA's New Educator Astronauts Face Long Wait for Their Shuttle Missions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    When the U.S. space agency pinned badges on the 11 newest members of its astronaut corps this winter, it also increased by three its cadre of educator astronauts. Three former teachers-Dorothy M. Metcalf-Lindenburger, Richard R. Arnold II, and Joseph M. Acaba-graduated from NASA's grueling training program. The gauntlet of fitness test, survival…

  4. NASA Lewis Thermal Barrier Feasibility Investigated for Use in Space Shuttle Solid-Rocket Motor Nozzle-to-Case Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Assembly joints of modern solid-rocket motor cases are usually sealed with conventional O-ring seals. The 5500 F combustion gases produced by rocket motors are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation and by special compounds that fill assembly split-lines in the insulation. On limited occasions, NASA has observed charring of the primary O-rings of the space shuttle solid-rocket nozzle-assembly joints due to parasitic leakage paths opening up in the gap-fill compounds during rocket operation. Thus, solid-rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol approached the NASA Lewis Research Center about the possibility of applying Lewis braided-fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. This thermal barrier would be placed upstream of the primary O-rings in the nozzle-to-case joints to prevent hot gases from impinging on the O-ring seals (see the following illustration). The illustration also shows joints 1 through 5, which are potential sites where the thermal barrier could be used.

  5. An experimental investigation of the NASA space shuttle external tank at hypersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittliff, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Pressure and heat transfer tests were conducted simulating flight conditions which the space shuttle external tank will experience prior to break-up. The tests were conducted in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel and simulated entry conditions for nominal, abort-once-around (AOA), and return to launch site (RTLS) launch occurrences. Surface pressure and heat-transfer-rate distributions were obtained with and without various protuberences (or exterior hardware) on the model at Mach numbers from 15.2 to 17.7 at angles of attack from -15 deg to -180 deg and at several roll angles. The tests were conducted over a Reynolds number range from 1300 to 58,000, based on model length.

  6. Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator Bearing Testing for NASA Return to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Timothy R.; Predmore, Roamer E.; Dube, Michael J.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle body flap is located beneath the main engine nozzles and is required for proper aerodynamic control during orbital descent. Routine inspection of one of four body flap actuators found one of the actuator bearings had degraded and blackened balls. A test program was initiated to demonstrate that it is acceptable to operate bearings which are degraded from operation over several flights. This test exposed the bearing to predicted flight axial loads, speeds and temperatures. Testing at 140 F has been completed, and results indicate the previously flown bearings are acceptable for up to 12 additional missions. Additional testing is underway to determine the lubricant life at various temperatures and stresses and to further understand the mechanism that caused the blacken balls. Initial results of this testing indicates that bearing life is shorten at room temperature possibly due fact that higher temperature (140 F) accelerates the flow of grease and oil into the wear surface

  7. Assessment of the NASA Space Shuttle Program's Problem Reporting and Corrective Action System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsmeryer, D. J.; Schreiner, J. A.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper documents the general findings and recommendations of the Design for Safety Programs Study of the Space Shuttle Programs (SSP) Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA) System. The goals of this Study were: to evaluate and quantify the technical aspects of the SSP's PRACA systems, and to recommend enhancements addressing specific deficiencies in preparation for future system upgrades. The Study determined that the extant SSP PRACA systems accomplished a project level support capability through the use of a large pool of domain experts and a variety of distributed formal and informal database systems. This operational model is vulnerable to staff turnover and loss of the vast corporate knowledge that is not currently being captured by the PRACA system. A need for a Program-level PRACA system providing improved insight, unification, knowledge capture, and collaborative tools was defined in this study.

  8. The NASA Environment Remote Sensing Analysis Facility (ERSAF) support for Space Shuttle earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, David R.; Jaklitch, Patricia A.; Chambers, Mark A.; Whitehead, Victor S.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that dedicated premission, real-time, and postmission support for planning, acquiring, and interpreting remotely sensed data of specific sites in terms of illumination geometry, atmospheric transmissivity, and preferred viewing is required in order to acquire the best possible earth-viewing photography for each Shuttle mission. Mission support has resulted in significant advances for the earth observation activities and other experiments carried out by astronauts. Scientific and mission support are described and equipment and capabilities are reviewed. Future advances listed include improvement of existing data bases, expanding access to climatological databases of atmospheric constituents and aerosols, and expanding access to image data such as the DMSP, while Space Station Freedom will require 24-hour operational support.

  9. Shuttle Landing Facility

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida marked the finish line for space shuttle missions since 1984. It is also staffed by a group of air traffic controllers who wor...

  10. Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator Bearing Testing for NASA Return to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jet, Timothy R.; Predmore, Roamer E.; Dube, Michael; Jones, William R., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle body flap (BF) is located beneath the main engine nozzles and is required for proper aerodynamic control during orbital descent. The body flap is controlled by four actuators connected by a common shaft and driven by the hydraulic power drive unit. Inspection of the actuators during refurbishment revealed three shaft bearings with unexpected damage. One was coated with black oxide on the balls and race wear surfaces, a second contained a relatively deep wear scar, and the third with scratches and an aluminum particle in the wear track. A shaft bearing life test program was initiated to measure the wear life and explain the 5.08-micrometer wear scar. A tribological analysis was conducted to demonstrate that the black oxide coated wear surfaces did not damage the bearing, interfere with the lubrication, or cause severe bearing wear. Pre-damaged (equivalent of 30 missions), commercial equivalent bearings and previously flown shaft bearings were tested at axial loads, speeds, and temperatures seen during flight operations. These bearing were successfully life tested at 60 C for 24 hours or 90 flights. With a safety factor of 4X, the bearings were qualified for 22 flights when only a maximum of 12 flights are expected. Additional testing at 23 C was performed to determine the lubricant life and to further understand the mechanism that caused the blackened balls. Test results indicating bearing life was shortened at a lower temperature surprised the investigators. Start\\Stop bearing testing that closely simulates mission profile was conducted at 23 C. Results of this testing showed lubricant life of 12 flights including a safety factor of four. Additional testing with bearings that have the equivalent of 30 missions of damage is being tested at 23 C. These tests are being performed over the Shuttle load profile to demonstrate the residual bearing life in the actuators exceeds 12 missions. Testing showed that the end of the shaft bearing life was

  11. Spaceflight Effects and Molecular Responses in the Mouse Eye: Observations after NASA Shuttle Mission STS-133

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ProsperoPonce, Claudia Maria; Zanello, Susana B.; Theriot, Corey A.; Chevez-Barrios, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Human space exploration implies a combination of stressors including microgravityinduced cephalad fluid shift and radiation exposure. Ocular changes in astronauts leading to visual impairment are of occupational health relevance. The effect of this complex environment on ocular morphology and function is poorly understood. Material and Methods: Mice were assigned to a Flight (FLT) group flown on shuttle mission STS133, Animal Enclosure Module (AEM), or vivarium (VIV) ground controls. Eyes were collected at 1, 5 and 7 days after landing, and were fixed for histological sectioning. The contralateral eye was used for gene expression profiling by qRT-PCR. Routine histology and immunohistochemistry using 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), caspase-3, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and beta-amyloid were used to study the eyes. Results and Conclusions: 8-OHdG and caspase-3 immunoreactivity was increased in the retina in FLT samples at return from flight (R+1) compared to ground controls, and decreased at day 7 (R+7), suggesting an increase in oxidative stress and cell apoptosis. FLT mice showed evidence of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) apoptosis possibly secondary to oxidative damage. Although attenuation of RPE has been related to retinal choroidal folds in astronauts, it is yet to be determined whether or not increased RPE apoptosis may contribute to the formation of choroidal folds or may increase the risk for other retinal pathologies, such as AMD. beta-amyloid was seen in the nerve fibers at the post-laminar region of the optic nerve in the flight samples (R+7). Deposition of beta-amyloid has a strong correlation with mechanical trauma. The coexpression of GFAP in astrocytes and oligodentrocytes in these same areas supports the possible mechanical origin probably secondary to intracranial pressure that is transmitted into the nerve, as a result of an increase in venous pressure associated to microgravity-induced cephalic fluid shift. However

  12. Results of a space shuttle pulme impingement investigation at stage separation in the NASA-MSFC impulse base flow facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccanna, R. W.; Sims, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental space shuttle stage separation plume impingement program conducted in the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center's impulse base flow facility (IBFF). Major objectives of the investigation were to: (1)determine the degree of dual engine exhaust plume simulation obtained using the equivalent engine; (2) determine the applicability of the analytical techniques; and (3) obtain data applicable for use in full-scale studies. The IBFF tests determined the orbiter rocket motor plume impingement loads, both pressure and heating, on a 3 percent General Dynamics B-15B booster configuration in a quiescent environment simulating a nominal staging altitude of 73.2 km (240,00 ft). The data included plume surveys of two 3 percent scale orbiter nozzles, and a 4.242 percent scaled equivalent nozzle - equivalent in the sense that it was designed to have the same nozzle-throat-to-area ratio as the two 3 percent nozzles and, within the tolerances assigned for machining the hardware, this was accomplished.

  13. Heat transfer tests of the NASA-MSC space shuttle configuration at the Langley Research Center Mach 8 Variable Density Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, L. E.; Sparks, V. W.; Bhadsavle, A. G.

    1971-01-01

    The experimental investigations performed on the NASA-Manned Spacecraft Center Space Shuttle orbiter and booster configurations at a Mach 8 variable density facility are presented. The test program was a series of aerothermodynamic wind tunnel tests that were run over a range of angles of attack, yaw angles, and Reynolds numbers. Objectives of the test program were to obtain heat transfer data over the NASA-Manned Spacecraft Center Space Shuttle orbiter, booster, and launch configurations for a range of angles of attack from - 20 to + 30 deg, yaw angles of 0 and + or - 6 deg, and Reynolds numbers of 0.6, 2.0, and 3.7 x one million. The phase-change coating technique was used to obtain heat transfer data. Information received from these tests will be instrumental in performing thermal protection systems studies and vehicle aerodynamic design.

  14. Annual report to the NASA Administrator by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. Part 2: Space shuttle program. Section 1: Observations and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The NASA and contractor management systems, including policies, practices, and procedures for the development of critical systems, subsystems and integration of the program elements, were investigated. The technical development status of critical systems, subsystems, and interfaces is presented. Space shuttle elements were qualified as to potential risks and hazards. The elements included the orbiter, external tanks, main engine, solid rocket boosters, and the ground support facilities.

  15. Mini pressurized logistics module (MPLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerani, E.; Brondolo, D.; Basile, L.

    1996-06-01

    The MPLM Program was initiated through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the United States' National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Italy's ASI, the Italian Space Agency, that was signed on 6 December 1991. The MPLM is a pressurized logistics module that will be used to transport supplies and materials (up to 20,000 lb), including user experiments, between Earth and International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) using the Shuttle, to support active and passive storage, and to provide a habitable environment for two people when docked to the Station. The Italian Space Agency has selected Alenia Spazio to develop MPLM modules that have always been considered a key element for the new International Space Station taking benefit from its design flexibility and consequent possible cost saving based on the maximum utilization of the Shuttle launch capability for any mission. In the frame of the very recent agreement between the U.S. and Russia for cooperation in space, that foresees the utilization of MIR 1 hardware, the Italian MPLM will remain an important element of the logistics system, being the only pressurized module designed for re-entry. Within the new scenario of anticipated Shuttle flights to MIR 1 during Space Station phase 1, MPLM remains a candidate for one or more missions to provide MIR 1 resupply capabilities and advanced ISSA hardware/procedures verification. Based on the concept of Flexible Carriers, Alenia Spazio is providing NASA with three MPLM flight units that can be configured according to the requirements of the Human-Tended Capability (HTC) and Permanent Human Capability (PHC) of the Space Station. Configurability will allow transportation of passive cargo only, or a combination of passive and cold cargo accommodated in R/F racks. Having developed and qualified the baseline configuration with respect to the worst enveloping condition, each unit could be easily configured to the passive or active version depending upon the

  16. Rocket Noise and Vibration Shuttle/Payload Processing and ISS: Launch Pad Vibroacoustics Research at NASA/KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margasayam, Ravi; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the effects of noise of the SSME Space Shuttle Main Engine upon liftoff from Kennedy Space Center. It covers both effects experienced by astronauts within the Shuttles, and effects on the surrounding environment. The presentation then makes recommendations for design methods which take into account vibroacoustics.

  17. Organizational Learning Post Catastrophic Events: A Descriptive Case Study Exploring NASA's Learning over Time Following Two Catastrophic Shuttle Accidents Using the Schwandt's Organizational Learning System Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Edgar Oscar

    2013-01-01

    A 30-year contribution of the Space Shuttle Program is the evolution of NASA's social actions through organizational learning. This study investigated how NASA learned over time following two catastrophic accidents. Schwandt's (1997) organizational Learning System Model (OLSM) characterized the learning in this High Reliability…

  18. Proceedings of the NASA/Florida Institute of Technology Environmental Engineering Conference on Nitrogen Tetroxide. [with emphasis on space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of reducing the user hazards of nitrogen tetroxide, a hypergolic oxidizer are discussed. Kennedy Space Center developments in N2O4 control for the space shuttle are featured. Other areas covered are life support equipment and transportation.

  19. Ranger telerobotic shuttle experiment: a status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gefke, Gardell; Carignan, Craig R.; Roberts, Brian E.; Lane, J. Corde

    2002-02-01

    This paper presents an update on the Ranger Telerobotic Shuttle Experiment (RTSX) and associated key robotics technologies within the Ranger program. Ranger TSX will operate from a Spacelab logistics pallet inside the cargo bay of the shuttle and will demonstrate space station and on-orbit servicing operations including extravehicular (EVA) worksite setup, an orbital replacement unit (ORU) exchange, and various task board experiments. The flight system will be teleoperated from the middeck inside the shuttle as well as from a ground control station at NASA Johnson Space Center. This paper addresses the technical and programmatic status of the flight experiment and describes progress on the engineering test unit, Ranger Neutral Buoyancy Vehicle II (RNBVII), currently in fabrication. Also described are associated technologies, which support this effort. These include a flight robot mockup built to practice EVA stowage and Ranger NBV I, a free-flight prototype vehicle.

  20. Engineering report. Part 3: NASA lightweight wheel and brake sub-system. Lightweight brake development. [for application to space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    The development of light weight wheel and brake systems designed to meet the space shuttle type requirements was investigated. The study includes the use of carbon graphite composite and beryllium as heat sink materials and the compatibility of these heat sink materials with the other structural components of the wheel and brake.

  1. Logistics: An integral part of cost efficient space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Ann D.

    1996-01-01

    The logistics of space programs and its history within NASA are discussed, with emphasis on manned space flight and the Space Shuttle program. The lessons learned and the experience gained during these programs are reported on. Key elements of logistics are highlighted, and the problems and issues that can be expected to arise in relation to the support of long-term space operations and future space programs, are discussed. Such missions include the International Space Station program and the reusable launch vehicle. Possible solutions to the problems identified are outlined.

  2. A waning of technocratic faith - NASA and the politics of the Space Shuttle decision, 1967-1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Launius, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper analyzes the decision to build the Space Shuttle as part of a broader public policy trend away from a deference to technical experts and toward greater politicization of traditionally apolitical issues. At the beginning of the 1960s U.S. leaders had a strong faith in the ability of technology to solve most problems. By 1970 this commitment to technological answers had waned and a resurgence of the right of elected officials to control technical matters was gaining currency. The lengthy and bitter Shuttle decision-making process was part of a much broader shift in the formation of public policy, played out in other arenas as well, aimed at the reemergence of direct political management of technological and scientific affairs by politicians.

  3. A Model for Space Shuttle Orbiter Tire Side Forces Based on NASA Landing Systems Research Aircraft Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, John F.; Nagy, Christopher J.; Barnicki, Joseph S.

    1997-01-01

    Forces generated by the Space Shuttle orbiter tire under varying vertical load, slip angle, speed, and surface conditions were measured using the Landing System Research Aircraft (LSRA). Resulting data were used to calculate a mathematical model for predicting tire forces in orbiter simulations. Tire side and drag forces experienced by an orbiter tire are cataloged as a function of vertical load and slip angle. The mathematical model is compared to existing tire force models for the Space Shuttle orbiter. This report describes the LSRA and a typical test sequence. Testing methods, data reduction, and error analysis are presented. The LSRA testing was conducted on concrete and lakebed runways at the Edwards Air Force Flight Test Center and on concrete runways at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Wet runway tire force tests were performed on test strips made at the KSC using different surfacing techniques. Data were corrected for ply steer forces and conicity.

  4. Stennis tests shuttle valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Flames burst from the E-1 Test Stand as Stennis Space Center engineers perform one of dozens of shuttle flow valve tests in early February. Stennis engineers teamed with Innovative Partnership Program partners to perform the tests after NASA officials delayed the launch of the STS-119 mission because of concerns with the shuttle part.

  5. Potential Future Shuttle Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Edward

    2001-01-01

    NASA has just recently completed the 104th flight of the Space Shuttle. Each of the four Orbiters in the Shuttle fleet have a design life of 100 flights each. Thus the fleet is capable of almost 300 more flights, and at current flight rates could potentially operate well past 2020 if necessary. This paper addresses some of the potential Shuttle system improvements that could be considered if the decision is made to continue operations of this vehicle for such an extended period. The national space transportation policy envisions a decision around 2005-2006 concerning readiness to start development of a Shuttle replacement system. Leading up to that decision point NASA is investing in the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) to reduce the development risks associated with key technologies needed for the next generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The Shuttle replacement could be a new design RLV or could be based on a Shuttle derived design: i.e., a vehicle based on the current Shuttle but with major design changes. The technology investment strategy of SLI is supportive of either approach. However, if NASA and industry are not ready to develop a replacement vehicle in the 2006-2012 timeframe, then another option would be to continue to make important, but evolutionary changes, to the existing Shuttle fleet. The overall strategy for next generation RLV planning, including possible Shuttle evolution, is captured in Figure 1.

  6. Development of forward and aft separation bolts for the NASA Space Shuttle solid rocket booster separation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nein, H.; Williams, V.

    1979-01-01

    A program is underway to design, develop, fabricate, and qualify large high-load forward and aft separation bolts for the Space Shuttle; the bolts will serve as attachment between two solid rocket boosters and the external tank. This paper reviews bolt development, with emphasis on the scaling of components, the use of high strength maraging steel for the internal components, and the use of lead as a hydraulic fluid.

  7. Engineering report. Part 2: NASA wheel and brake material tradeoff study for space shuttle type environmental requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    The study included material selection and trade-off for the structural components of the wheel and brake optimizing weight vs cost and feasibility for the space shuttle type application. Analytical methods were used to determine section thickness for various materials, and a table was constructed showing weight vs. cost trade-off. The wheel and brake were further optimized by considering design philosophies that deviate from standard aircraft specifications, and designs that best utilize the materials being considered.

  8. Flow-field surveys on the windward side of the NASA 040A space shuttle orbiter at 31 deg angle of attack and Mach 20 in helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, G. C., Jr.; Helms, V. T., III

    1977-01-01

    Pitot pressure and flow angle distributions in the windward flow field of the NASA 040A space shuttle orbiter configuration and surface pressures were measured, at a Mach number of 20 and an angle of attack of 31 deg. The free stream Reynolds number, based on model length, was 5.39 x 10 to the 6th power. Results show that cores of high pitot pressure, which are related to the body-shock-wing-shock intersections, occur on the windward plane of symmetry in the vicinity of the wing-body junction and near midspan on the wing. Theoretical estimates of the flow field pitot pressures show that conical flow values for the windward plane of symmetry surface are representative of the average level over the entire lower surface.

  9. Space Shuttle Projects Overview to Columbia Air Forces War College

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Jody; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents, in viewgraph form, a general overview of space shuttle projects. Some of the topics include: 1) Space Shuttle Projects; 2) Marshall Space Flight Center Space Shuttle Projects Office; 3) Space Shuttle Propulsion systems; 4) Space Shuttle Program Major Sites; 5) NASA Office of Space flight (OSF) Center Roles in Space Shuttle Program; 6) Space Shuttle Hardware Flow; and 7) Shuttle Flights To Date.

  10. A Compendium of Wind Statistics and Models for the NASA Space Shuttle and Other Aerospace Vehicle Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, O. E.; Adelfang, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    The wind profile with all of its variations with respect to altitude has been, is now, and will continue to be important for aerospace vehicle design and operations. Wind profile databases and models are used for the vehicle ascent flight design for structural wind loading, flight control systems, performance analysis, and launch operations. This report presents the evolution of wind statistics and wind models from the empirical scalar wind profile model established for the Saturn Program through the development of the vector wind profile model used for the Space Shuttle design to the variations of this wind modeling concept for the X-33 program. Because wind is a vector quantity, the vector wind models use the rigorous mathematical probability properties of the multivariate normal probability distribution. When the vehicle ascent steering commands (ascent guidance) are wind biased to the wind profile measured on the day-of-launch, ascent structural wind loads are reduced and launch probability is increased. This wind load alleviation technique is recommended in the initial phase of vehicle development. The vehicle must fly through the largest load allowable versus altitude to achieve its mission. The Gumbel extreme value probability distribution is used to obtain the probability of exceeding (or not exceeding) the load allowable. The time conditional probability function is derived from the Gumbel bivariate extreme value distribution. This time conditional function is used for calculation of wind loads persistence increments using 3.5-hour Jimsphere wind pairs. These increments are used to protect the commit-to-launch decision. Other topics presented include the Shuttle Shuttle load-response to smoothed wind profiles, a new gust model, and advancements in wind profile measuring systems. From the lessons learned and knowledge gained from past vehicle programs, the development of future launch vehicles can be accelerated. However, new vehicle programs by their very

  11. Air cargo market outlook and impact via the NASA CLASS project. [Cargo/Logistics Airlift Systems Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winston, M. M.; Conner, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is given of the Cargo/Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS) project which was a 10 man-year effort carried out by two contractor teams, aimed at defining factors impacting future system growth and obtaining market requirements and design guidelines for future air freighters. Growth projection was estimated by two approaches: one, an optimal systems approach with a more efficient and cost effective system considered as being available in 1990; and the other, an evolutionary approach with an econometric behavior model used to predict long term evolution from the present system. Both approaches predict significant growth in demand for international air freighter services and less growth for U.S. domestic services. Economic analysis of air freighter fleet options indicate very strong market appeal of derivative widebody transports in 1990 with little incentive to develop all new dedicated air freighters utilizing the 1990's technology until sometime beyond the year 2000. Advanced air freighters would be economically attractive for a wide range of payload sizes (to 500 metric tons), however, if a government would share in the RD and T costs by virtue of its needs for a slightly modified version of a civil air freighter design (a.g. military airlifter).

  12. On the flight derived/aerodynamic data base performance comparisons for the NASA Space Shuttle entries during the hypersonic regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Findlay, J. T.; Compton, H. R.

    1983-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance data from the first four Shuttle reentry flights are compared with preflight predictions covering hypersonic longitudinal mode down to Mach 2. The extraction of the flight coefficients, as measured by the spacecraft angular rates and the linear accelerations, derived from the inertial measurement unit, the best estimate trajectory, and the remotely measured atmosphere are discussed. The ground predictions were developed from 30,000 hr of wind tunnel testing. Actual flight data are presented for 80-260 kft, from Mach 2-26, comprising the dynamic pressure, the vehicle air relative attitude angles, control surface deflections, reaction jet activity, and body axis rates and accelerations. The second and fourth flights gave results which deviated from predictions between 230-260 kft. The accuracy limits of the derived atmospheric densities are considered, together with potential data base updates in the light of limitations imposed on the corrections by available flight data.

  13. Autonomous Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siders, Jeffrey A.; Smith, Robert H.

    2004-01-01

    The continued assembly and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) is the cornerstone within NASA's overall Strategic P an. As indicated in NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP), the International Space Station requires Shuttle to fly through at least the middle of the next decade to complete assembly of the Station, provide crew transport, and to provide heavy lift up and down mass capability. The ISTP reflects a tight coupling among the Station, Shuttle, and OSP programs to support our Nation's space goal . While the Shuttle is a critical component of this ISTP, there is a new emphasis for the need to achieve greater efficiency and safety in transporting crews to and from the Space Station. This need is being addressed through the Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program. However, the OSP is being designed to "complement" the Shuttle as the primary means for crew transfer, and will not replace all the Shuttle's capabilities. The unique heavy lift capabilities of the Space Shuttle is essential for both ISS, as well as other potential missions extending beyond low Earth orbit. One concept under discussion to better fulfill this role of a heavy lift carrier, is the transformation of the Shuttle to an "un-piloted" autonomous system. This concept would eliminate the loss of crew risk, while providing a substantial increase in payload to orbit capability. Using the guidelines reflected in the NASA ISTP, the autonomous Shuttle a simplified concept of operations can be described as; "a re-supply of cargo to the ISS through the use of an un-piloted Shuttle vehicle from launch through landing". Although this is the primary mission profile, the other major consideration in developing an autonomous Shuttle is maintaining a crew transportation capability to ISS as an assured human access to space capability.

  14. Shuttle Endeavour Flyover of Los Angeles Landmarks

    NASA Video Gallery

    Space shuttle Endeavour atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft flew over many Los Angeles area landmarks on its final ferry flight Sept. 21, 2012, including the Coliseum, the Hollywood Sign, Griffith...

  15. Space Shuttle Payload Information Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griswold, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Payload Information Source Compact Disk (CD) is a joint NASA and USA project to introduce Space Shuttle capabilities, payload services and accommodations, and the payload integration process. The CD will be given to new payload customers or to organizations outside of NASA considering using the Space Shuttle as a launch vehicle. The information is high-level in a visually attractive format with a voice over. The format is in a presentation style plus 360 degree views, videos, and animation. Hyperlinks are provided to connect to the Internet for updates and more detailed information on how payloads are integrated into the Space Shuttle.

  16. Post-Shuttle EVA Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Witt, Vincent; Chullen, Cinda

    2010-01-01

    The expected retirement of the NASA Space Transportation System (also known as the Space Shuttle ) by 2011 will pose a significant challenge to Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The EVA hardware currently used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed assuming that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for refurbishment, or if necessary for failure investigation. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support hardware and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2015, and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, the EVA 2010 Project was jointly initiated by NASA and the One EVA contractor team. The challenges addressed were to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, to secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, to protect for EMU hardware operability on-orbit, and to determine the source of high water purity to support recharge of PLSSs (no longer available via Shuttle). EVA 2010 Project includes the following tasks: the development of a launch fixture that would allow the EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to be launched on-board alternate vehicles; extension of the EMU hardware maintenance interval from 3 years (current certification) to a minimum of 6 years (to extend to 2015); testing of recycled ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) water for use in the EMU cooling system in lieu of water resupplied by International Partner (IP) vehicles; development of techniques to remove & replace critical components in the PLSS on-orbit (not routine); extension of on-orbit certification of EVA tools; and development of an EVA hardware logistical plan to support the ISS without the Space Shuttle. Assumptions for the EVA 2010 Project included no more

  17. Space Shuttle redesign status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, Vance D.

    1986-01-01

    NASA has conducted an extensive redesign effort for the Space Shutle in the aftermath of the STS 51-L Challenger accident, encompassing not only Shuttle vehicle and booster design but also such system-wide factors as organizational structure, management procedures, flight safety, flight operations, sustainable flight rate, and maintenance safeguards. Attention is presently given to Solid Rocket Booster redesign features, the Shuttle Main Engine's redesigned high pressure fuel and oxidizer turbopumps, the Shuttle Orbiter's braking and rollout (landing gear) system, the entry control mode of the flight control system, a 'split-S' abort maneuver for the Orbiter, and crew escape capsule proposals.

  18. Results of heat transfer tests of an 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle model 22 OTS in the NASA-Ames 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH3), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Heat transfer data for the 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle 3 are presented. Interference heating effects were investigated by a model build-up technique of orbiter alone, tank alone, second, and first stage configurations. The test program was conducted in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 5.3 for nominal free stream Reynolds number per foot values of 1.5, and 5.0 million.

  19. NASA #801 and NASA 7 on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA N801NA and NASA 7 together on the NASA Dryden ramp. The Beechcraft Beech 200 Super KingAir aircraft N7NA, known as NASA 7, has been a support aircraft for many years, flying 'shuttle' missions to Ames Research Center. It once flew from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and back each day but now (2001) flies between the Dryden Flight Research Center and Ames. A second Beechcraft Beech 200 Super King Air, N701NA, redesignated N801NA, transferred to Dryden on 3 Oct. 1997 and is used for research missions but substitutes for NASA 7 on shuttle missions when NASA 7 is not available.

  20. Shuttle mission plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visentine, J. T.; Lee, C. M.

    1978-01-01

    Shuttle mission plans recently developed by NASA for the time period 1980-1991 are presented. Standard and optional services, which will be available to users of the Space Transportation System (STS) when it becomes operational in the 1980's, are described. Pricing policies established by NASA to encourage use of the STS by commercial, foreign and other U.S. Government users are explained. The small Self-Contained Payload Program, which will make space flight opportunities available to private citizens and individual experimenters who wish to use the Space Shuttle for investigative research, is discussed.

  1. Space shuttle operational risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragola, Joseph R.; Maggio, Gaspare

    1996-03-01

    A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Space Shuttle system has recently been completed. This year-long effort represents a development resulting from seven years of application of risk technology to the Space Shuttle. These applications were initiated by NASA shortly after the Challenger accident as recommended by the Rogers and Slay Commission reports. The current effort is the first integrated quantitative assessment of the risk of the loss of the shuttle vehicle from 3 seconds prior to liftoff to wheel-stop at mission end. The study which was conducted under the direction of NASA's Shuttle Safety and Mission Assurance office at Johnson Spaceflight Center focused on shuttle operational risk but included consideration of all the shuttle flight and test history since the beginning of the program through Mission 67 in July of 1994.

  2. STS-114 Space Shuttle Discovery Performs Back Flip For Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. Discovery was over Switzerland, about 600 feet from the ISS, when Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft as it performed a back flip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 Commander, guided the shuttle through the flip. The photographs were analyzed by engineers on the ground to evaluate the condition of Discovery's heat shield. The crew safely returned to Earth on August 9, 2005. The mission historically marked the Return to Flight after nearly a two and one half year delay in flight after the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy in February 2003.

  3. Underside View of STS-114 Space Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. Discovery was over Switzerland, about 600 feet from the ISS, when Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the under side of the spacecraft as it performed a back flip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 Commander, guided the shuttle through the flip. The photographs were analyzed by engineers on the ground to evaluate the condition of Discovery's heat shield. The crew safely returned to Earth on August 9, 2005. The mission historically marked the Return to Flight after nearly a two and one half year delay in flight after the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy in February 2003.

  4. Underside View of STS-114 Space Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26, 2005, from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. Discovery was over Switzerland, about 600 feet from the ISS, when Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the under side of the spacecraft as it performed a back flip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 Commander, guided the shuttle through the flip. The photographs were analyzed by engineers on the ground to evaluate the condition of Discovery's heat shield. The crew safely returned to Earth on August 9, 2005. The mission historically marked the Return to Flight after nearly a two and one half year delay in flight after the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy in February 2003.

  5. NASA: what now?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    This month marks 50 years since Yuri Gagarin first ventured into space in the Vostok 1 mission, and 30 years since NASA's first shuttle flight. As the shuttle Endeavour prepares for its final flight, seven experts outline what NASA's priorities need to be.

  6. Space Shuttle Familiarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellett, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation visualizes the NASA space center and research facility sites, as well as the geography, launching sites, launching pads, rocket launching, pre-flight activities, and space shuttle ground operations located at NASA Kennedy Space Center. Additionally, highlights the international involvement behind the International Space Station and the space station mobile servicing system. Extraterrestrial landings, surface habitats and habitation systems, outposts, extravehicular activity, and spacecraft rendezvous with the Earth return vehicle are also covered.

  7. NASA Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, Mary (Editor); Wood, Jennifer (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This newsletter contains several articles, primarily on International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers and their activities, as well as the activities of NASA administrators. Other subjects covered in the articles include the investigation of the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, activities at NASA centers, Mars exploration, a collision avoidance test on a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The ISS articles cover landing in a Soyuz capsule, photography from the ISS, and the Expedition Seven crew.

  8. Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The plans for utilizing reusable space shuttles which could replace almost all present expendable launch vehicles are briefly described. Many illustrations are included showing the artists' concepts of various configurations proposed for space shuttles. (PR)

  9. Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The space shuttle flight system and mission profile are briefly described. Emphasis is placed on the economic and social benefits of the space transportation system. The space shuttle vehicle is described in detail.

  10. Space Shuttle mission: STS-67

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavor, scheduled to launch March 2, 1995 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center, will conduct NASA's longest Shuttle flight prior to date. The mission, designated STS-67, has a number of experiments and payloads, which the crew, commanded by Stephen S. Oswald, will have to oversee. This NASA press kit for the mission contains a general background (general press release, media services information, quick-look facts page, shuttle abort modes, summary timeline, payload and vehicle weights, orbital summary, and crew responsibilities); cargo bay payloads and activities (Astro 2, Get Away Special Experiments); in-cabin payloads (Commercial Minimum Descent Altitude Instrumentation Technology Associates Experiments, protein crystal growth experiments, Middeck Active Control Experiment, and Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment); and the STS-67 crew biographies. The payloads and experiments are described and summarized to give an overview of the goals, objectives, apparatuses, procedures, sponsoring parties, and the assigned crew members to carry out the tasks.

  11. Results of heat transfer tests of an 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle model 22 OTS in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH3), volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Heat-transfer data for the 0.0175-scale Space Shuttle Vehicle 3 are presented. Interference heating effects were investigated by a model build-up technique of Orbiter alone, tank alone, second, and first stage configurations. The test program was conducted in the NASA-Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at Mach 5.3 for nominal free-stream Reynolds number per foot values of 1.5 x 1,000,000 and 5.0 x 1,000,000.

  12. Logistics support of space facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, William C.

    1988-01-01

    The logistic support of space facilities is described, with special attention given to the problem of sizing the inventory of ready spares kept at the space facility. Where possible, data from the Space Shuttle Orbiter is extrapolated to provide numerical estimates for space facilities. Attention is also given to repair effort estimation and long duration missions.

  13. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  14. NASA replanning efforts continue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    A task force of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is producing new launch schedules for NASA's three remaining space shuttle orbiters, possibly supplemented by expendable launch vehicles. In the wake of the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger on January 28, 1986, the task force is assuming a delay of 12-18 months before resumption of shuttle flights.NASA's Headquarters Replanning Task Force, which meets daily, is separate from the agency's Data and Design Analysis Task Force, which collects and analyzes information about the accident for the use of the investigative commission appointed by President Ronald Reagan.

  15. Aerial views of construction on the RLV hangar at the Shuttle Landing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This aerial view shows the construction of a multi-purpose hangar, which is part of the $8 million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex at Kennedy Space Center. In the background is the Shuttle Landing Facility, with (left) a C-5 air cargo plane, the offloaded canister in front of it containing the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, and (right) the mate/demate tower that is used when an orbiter is transported to and from KSC atop a modified Boeing 747. The RLV complex will also include facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/ technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle; the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator; the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34; and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000.

  16. The Shuttle Cost and Price model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leary, Katherine; Stone, Barbara

    1983-01-01

    The Shuttle Cost and Price (SCP) model was developed as a tool to assist in evaluating major aspects of Shuttle operations that have direct and indirect economic consequences. It incorporates the major aspects of NASA Pricing Policy and corresponds to the NASA definition of STS operating costs. An overview of the SCP model is presented and the cost model portion of SCP is described in detail. Selected recent applications of the SCP model to NASA Pricing Policy issues are presented.

  17. Space Shuttle Endeavour Heads West - Duration: 111 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, a modified 747, flew retired shuttle Endeavour from Kennedy Space Center in Florida to Houston on Sept. 19, 2012, to complete the first leg of Endeavour's trip to L...

  18. Shuttle: forever young?

    PubMed

    Sietzen, Frank

    2002-01-01

    NASA has started a 4-phase program of upgrades designed to increase safety and extend use of the space shuttles through the year 2020. Phase I is aimed at improving vehicle safety and supporting the space station. Phase II is aimed at combating obsolescence and includes a checkout launch and control system and protection from micrometeoroids and orbital debris. Phase III is designed to expand or enhance the capabilities of the shuttle and includes development of an auxiliary power unit, avionics, a channel-wall nozzle, extended nose landing gear, long-life fuel cells, a nontoxic orbital maneuvering system/reaction control system, and a water membrane evaporator. Phase IV is aimed at design of system changes that would alter the shuttle mold line and configuration; projects include a five-segment solid rocket booster, liquid flyback boosters, and a crew escape module. PMID:11794337

  19. Space Shuttle Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Threat Assessment Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, J.; Christiansen, E.

    Prior to each shuttle mission, Meteoroid and orbital Debris (M/OD) threat assessments are performed to determine the critical penetration risk for the orbiter vehicle, the radiator tube leak risk &the window replacement risk. Mission parameters, such as vehicle attitude, exposure time and altitude are used as inputs for the assessment. The assessments are performed using the BUMPER computer code at the NASA/JSC Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HITF). An M/OD risk analysis is typically performed in support of orbiter Cargo Integration Reviews (CIR) and Flight Readiness Reviews (FRR). Three types of M/OD risk are assessed. The most important involves the calculation of "critical" penetration risk, defined as penetrations that may result in the catastrophic loss of vehicle and crew. Critical failure criteria have been established though detailed engineering evaluations by NASA and Boeing. The radiator assessment is concerned with premature end-of- mission due to loss of a coolant loop. The window assessment is a postflight maintenance and logistics issue. The result s are provided to the Space Shuttle Vehicle Engineering Office (MV) the Space and Life Science Directorate (SA) at JSC. This paper will document the inputs used in the critical penetration analysis for CIR, FRR, and post-flight assessments, it will also serve as a reference for the Space Shuttle Orbiter finite element model (FEM) surface property definitions that are used in M/OD threat assessments.

  20. Space Shuttle Main Engine Public Test Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A new NASA Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) roars to the approval of more than 2,000 people who came to John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., on July 25 for a flight-certification test of the SSME Block II configuration. The engine, a new and significantly upgraded shuttle engine, was delivered to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida for use on future shuttle missions. Spectators were able to experience the 'shake, rattle and roar' of the engine, which ran for 520 seconds - the length of time it takes a shuttle to reach orbit.

  1. New shuttle schedule released

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-10-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has a tentative launch date of November 17, 1988, according to an announcement made October 3, 1986, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The plan calls for the first shuttle launch to take place on February 18, 1988, when Discovery is slated to launch a second Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS). A TDRS satellite was aboard Challenger when it exploded on January 28, 1986.The $1.3 billion telescope would be launched aboard the fifth shuttle mission in 1988. After launching the TDRS satellite, NASA plans to send Atlantis and then Columbia spacebound with military payloads. In September 1988, Discovery would be launched again with a third TDRS satellite.

  2. Buying a Shuttle ticket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. F.; Forsythe, C.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary draft policy for reimbursement for Space Shuttle flights has been developed by NASA in the form of pricing criteria for Space Transportation System (STS) users in domestic and foreign government and industry. The reimbursement policy, the transition from expendable launch vehicles to STS, the new user services, and the interaction of the economics of new user services and STS cost to fly are discussed in the present paper. Current efforts to develop new users are noted.

  3. The Shuttle Enterprise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Shuttle Enterprise rolls out of the Palmdale manufacturing facilities with Star Trek television cast members. From left to right they are: Dr. James D. Fletcher, NASA Administrator, DeForest Kelley (Dr. 'Bones' McCoy), George Takei (Mr. Sulu), Nichelle Nichols (Lt. Uhura), Leonard Nimoy (the indefatigable Mr. Spock), Gene Rodenberry (The Great Bird of the Galaxy), and Walter Koenig (Ensign Pavel Checkov).

  4. NASA Technology Applications Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The contributions of NASA to the advancement of the level of the technology base of the United States are highlighted. Technological transfer from preflight programs, the Viking program, the Apollo program, and the Shuttle and Skylab programs is reported.

  5. Human Factor Investigation of Waste Processing System During the HI-SEAS 4-month Mars Analog Mission in Support of NASA's Logistic Reduction and Repurposing Project: Trash to Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccio, Anne; Hintze, Paul E.; Miles, John D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project is a collaborative effort in which NASA is tasked with reducing total logistical mass through reduction, reuse and recycling of various wastes and components of long duration space missions and habitats. Trash to Gas (TtG) is a sub task to LRR with efforts focused on development of a technology that converts wastes generated during long duration space missions into high-value products such as methane, water for life support, raw material production feedstocks, and other energy sources. The reuse of discarded materials is a critical component to reducing overall mission mass. The 120 day Hawaii Space Exploration and Analog Simulation provides a unique opportunity to answer questions regarding crew interface and system analysis for designing and developing future flight-like versions of a TtG system. This paper will discuss the human factors that would affect the design of a TtG or other waste processing systems. An overview of the habitat, utility usage, and waste storage and generation is given. Crew time spent preparing trash for TtG processing was recorded. Gas concentrations were measured near the waste storage locations and at other locations in the habitat. In parallel with the analog mission, experimental processing of waste materials in a TtG reactor was performed in order to evaluate performance with realistic waste materials.

  6. Human Factor Investigation of Waste Processing System During the HI-SEAS 4 Month Mars Analog Mission in Support of NASA's Logistic Reduction and Repurposing Project: Trash to Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccio, Anne; Hintze, Paul; Miles, John D.

    2014-01-01

    NASAs Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project is a collaborative effort in which NASA is tasked with reducing total logistical mass through reduction, reuse and recycling of various wastes and components of long duration space missions and habitats. Trash to Gas (TtG) is a sub task to LRR with efforts focused on development of a technology that converts wastes generated during long duration space missions into high-value products such as methane, water for life support, raw material production feedstocks, and other energy sources. The reuse of discarded materials is a critical component to reducing overall mission mass. The 120 day Hawaii Space Exploration and Analog Simulation provides a unique opportunity to answer questions regarding crew interface and system analysis for designing and developing future flight-like versions of a TtG system. This paper will discuss the human factors that would affect the design of a TtG or other waste processing systems. An overview of the habitat, utility usage, and waste storage and generation is given. Crew time spent preparing trash for TtG processing was recorded. Gas concentrations were measured near the waste storage locations and at other locations in the habitat. In parallel with the analog mission, experimental processing of waste materials in a TtG reactor was performed in order to evaluate performance with realistic waste materials.

  7. Space Logistics: Launch Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furnas, Randall B.

    1989-01-01

    The current maximum launch capability for the United States are shown. The predicted Earth-to-orbit requirements for the United States are presented. Contrasting the two indicates the strong National need for a major increase in Earth-to-orbit lift capability. Approximate weights for planned payloads are shown. NASA is studying the following options to meet the need for a new heavy-lift capability by mid to late 1990's: (1) Shuttle-C for near term (include growth versions); and (2) the Advanced Lauching System (ALS) for the long term. The current baseline two-engine Shuttle-C has a 15 x 82 ft payload bay and an expected lift capability of 82,000 lb to Low Earth Orbit. Several options are being considered which have expanded diameter payload bays. A three-engine Shuttle-C with an expected lift of 145,000 lb to LEO is being evaluated as well. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a potential joint development between the Air Force and NASA. This program is focused toward long-term launch requirements, specifically beyond the year 2000. The basic approach is to develop a family of vehicles with the same high reliability as the Shuttle system, yet offering a much greater lift capability at a greatly reduced cost (per pound of payload). The ALS unmanned family of vehicles will provide a low end lift capability equivalent to Titan IV, and a high end lift capability greater than the Soviet Energia if requirements for such a high-end vehicle are defined.In conclusion, the planning of the next generation space telescope should not be constrained to the current launch vehicles. New vehicle designs will be driven by the needs of anticipated heavy users.

  8. Space Shuttle Strategic Planning Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbraten, Gordon L.; Henderson, Edward M.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program is aggressively flying the Space Shuttle manifest for assembling the International Space Station and servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Completing this flight manifest while concurrently transitioning to the Exploration architecture creates formidable challenges; the most notable of which is retaining critical skills within the Shuttle Program workforce. The Program must define a strategy that will allow safe and efficient fly-out of the Shuttle, while smoothly transitioning Shuttle assets (both human and facility) to support early flight demonstrations required in the development of NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (Orion) and Crew and Cargo Launch Vehicles (Ares I). The Program must accomplish all of this while maintaining the current level of resources. Therefore, it will be necessary to initiate major changes in operations and contracting. Overcoming these challenges will be essential for NASA to fly the Shuttle safely, accomplish the Vision for Space Exploration, and ultimately meet the national goal of maintaining a robust space program. This paper will address the Space Shuttle Program s strategy and its current status in meeting these challenges.

  9. Space Shuttle Strategic Planning Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Edward M.; Norbraten, Gordon L.

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program is aggressively planning the Space Shuttle manifest for assembling the International Space Station and servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Implementing this flight manifest while concurrently transitioning to the Exploration architecture creates formidable challenges; the most notable of which is retaining critical skills within the Shuttle Program workforce. The Program must define a strategy that will allow safe and efficient fly-out of the Shuttle, while smoothly transitioning Shuttle assets (both human and facility) to support early flight demonstrations required in the development of NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Crew and Cargo Launch Vehicles (CLV). The Program must accomplish all of this while maintaining the current level of resources. Therefore, it will be necessary to initiate major changes in operations and contracting. Overcoming these challenges will be essential for NASA to fly the Shuttle safely, accomplish the President s "Vision for Space Exploration," and ultimately meet the national goal of maintaining a robust space program. This paper will address the Space Shuttle Program s strategy and its current status in meeting these challenges.

  10. Report to the NASA Administrator by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel on the Space Shuttle Program. Part 1: Observations and Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Each system was chosen on the basis of its importance with respect to crew safety and mission success. An overview of the systems management is presented. The space shuttle main engine, orbiter thermal protection system, avionics, external tanks and solid rocket boosters were examined. The ground test and ground support equipment programs were studied. Program management was found to have an adequate understanding of the significant ground and flight risks involved.

  11. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  12. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  13. NASA: Data on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galica, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of selected NASA Web sites for K-12 math and science teachers: the NASA Lewis Research Center Learning Technologies K-12 Home Page, Spacelink, NASA Quest, Basic Aircraft Design Page, International Space Station, NASA Shuttle Web Site, LIFTOFF to Space Education, Telescopes in Education, and Space Educator's…

  14. The Space Shuttle in perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosenball, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    Commercial aspects of the Space Shuttle are examined, with attention given to charges to users, schedule of launches and reimbursement, kinds of payload and their selection, NASA authority, space allocation, and risk, liability, and insurance. It is concluded that insurance to reduce the risk, incentives that NASA is willing to make available to U.S. industry, and the demonstrated willingness of industry and the financial community to invest their funds in space ventures indicate that the new Shuttle capabilities will exponentially increase commercial activities in space during the 1980s.

  15. Endeavour Leaves NASA Dryden for LAX

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, carrying space shuttle Endeavour, departed Edwards Air Force Base at 8:17 a.m. PDT on Sept. 21 to begin a four-and-a-half hour flyover of northern California an...

  16. Multipurpose Logistics Module, Leonardo, Rests in Discovery's Payload Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This in-orbit close up shows the Italian Space Agency-built multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM), Leonardo, the primary cargo of the STS-102 mission, resting in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station's (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. The eighth station assembly flight and NASA's 103rd overall flight, STS-102 launched March 8, 2001 for an almost 13 day mission.

  17. Investigations of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS Integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle Jet-Plume Model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 by11-Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (IA80). Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results are documented of jet plume effects wind tunnel test of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS launch configuration space shuttle vehicle model in the 11 x 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This test involved cold gas main propulsion system (MPS) and solid rocket motor (SRB) plume simulations at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4. Integrated vehicle surface pressure distributions, elevon and rudder hinge moments, and wing and vertical tail root bending and torsional moments due to MPS and SRB plume interactions were determined. Nozzle power conditions were controlled per pretest nozzle calibrations. Model angle of attack was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg; model angle of sideslip was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg. Reynolds number was varied for certain test conditions and configurations, with the nominal freestream total pressure being 14.69 psia. Plotted force and pressure data are presented.

  18. Transition heating rates obtained on a matted and isolated 0.006 scale model (41-OT) space shuttle orbiter and external tank in the NASA/LaRC variable density hypersonic tunnel (IH17)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, J.

    1976-01-01

    Model information and data obtained from wind tunnel tests performed on a 0.006 scale model of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter and external tank in the 18 inch Variable Density Hypersonic Wind Tunnel (VDHT) at NASA Langley Research Center are presented. Tests were performed at a Mach number of 8.0 over a Reynolds Number range from 0.1 to 10.0 million per foot at 0 deg and -5 deg angle of attack and 0 deg sideslip angle. Transition heating rates were determined using thin skin thermocouples located at various locations on the orbiter and ET. The test was conducted in three stages: orbiter plus external tank (mated configuration); orbiter alone, and external tank alone. The effects of boundary layer trips were also included in the test sequence. The plotted results presented show the effect of configuration interference on the orbiter lower surface and on the ET. Tabulated data are given.

  19. Hypersonic aeroheating test of space shuttle vehicle: Configuration 3 (model 22 OTS) in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH20), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsland, R. B.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    The model tested was an 0.0175-scale version of the vehicle 3 space shuttle configuration. Temperature measurements were made on the launch configuration, orbiter plus tank, orbiter alone, tank alone, and solid rocket booster (SRB) alone to provide heat transfer data. The test was conducted at free stream Mach numbers of 5.3 and 7.3 and at free stream Reynolds numbers of 1.5, 3.7, 5.0, and 7.0 million per foot. The model was tested at angles of attack from -5 deg to 20 deg and side slip angles of -5 deg and 0 deg.

  20. Astronauts Train for Final Shuttle Mission

    NASA Video Gallery

    The crew of STS-135, the final space shuttle mission, rehearsed their launch day process at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida during a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test that took place Jun...

  1. Student Experiments Fly with the Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Walter; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes various experiments which high school students are preparing, to be carried on NASA's 500 or more Space Shuttle flights in the 1980s. The project is intended to stimulate superior secondary school students. (SA)

  2. Behind the Scenes: Under the Shuttle

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this episode of "NASA Behind the Scenes," astronaut Mike Massimino takes you up to - and under - the space shuttle as it waits on launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center for the start of a re...

  3. Launch of STS-66 Space Shuttle Atlantis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis returns to work after a refurbishing and a two-year layoff, as liftoff for NASA's STS-66 occurs at noon (EDT), November 3, 1994. A 'fish-eye' lens was used to record the image.

  4. Space Shuttle Documentary (Narrated by William Shatner)

    NASA Video Gallery

    This feature-length documentary looks at the history of the most complex machine ever built. For 30 years, NASA's space shuttle carried humans to and from space, launched amazing observatories, and...

  5. A Celebration of the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Video Gallery

    On September 23, 2011, NASA Langley hosted a Shuttle Celebration at the Virginia Air & Space Center in Hampton, Va. More than 650 guests attended, including STS-135 Commander Chris Ferguson and NAS...

  6. Report of the Shuttle Processing Review Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this report is to summarize the assessment of the shuttle processing operations at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as requested by the NASA Administrator. He requested a team reaffirmation that safety is the number one priority and review operations to ensure confidence in the shuttle processing procedures at KSC.

  7. Launch of STS-67 Space Shuttle Endeavour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Carrying a crew of seven and a complement of astronomic experiments, the Space Shuttle Endeavour embarks on NASA's longest shuttle flight to date. Endeavour's liftoff from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 1:38:13 a.m. (EST), March 2, 1995. In this view the fence line near the launch pad is evident in the foreground.

  8. Liftoff of STS-67 Space Shuttle Endeavour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Carrying a crew of seven and a complement of astronomic experiments, the Space Shuttle Endeavour embarks on NASA's longest Shuttle flight to date. Endeavour's liftoff from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 1:38:13 a.m. (EST), March 2, 1995.

  9. Liftoff of STS-67 Space Shuttle Endeavour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Carrying a crew of seven and a compliment of astronomic experiments, the Space Shuttle Endeavour embarks on NASA's longest Shuttle flight to date. Endeavour's liftoff from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 1:38:13 a.m. (EST), March 2, 1995.

  10. Logistic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    The logistic regression originally is intended to explain the relationship between the probability of an event and a set of covariables. The model's coefficients can be interpreted via the odds and odds ratio, which are presented in introduction of the chapter. The observations are possibly got individually, then we speak of binary logistic regression. When they are grouped, the logistic regression is said binomial. In our presentation we mainly focus on the binary case. For statistical inference the main tool is the maximum likelihood methodology: we present the Wald, Rao and likelihoods ratio results and their use to compare nested models. The problems we intend to deal with are essentially the same as in multiple linear regression: testing global effect, individual effect, selection of variables to build a model, measure of the fitness of the model, prediction of new values… . The methods are demonstrated on data sets using R. Finally we briefly consider the binomial case and the situation where we are interested in several events, that is the polytomous (multinomial) logistic regression and the particular case of ordinal logistic regression.

  11. Shuttle Rocket Motor Program: NASA should delay awarding some construction contracts. Report to the Chair, Subcommittee on Government Activities and Transportation, Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Even though the executive branch has proposed terminating the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) program, NASA is proceeding with all construction activity planned for FY 1992 to avoid schedule slippage if the program is reinstated by Congress. However, NASA could delay some construction activities for at least a few months without affecting the current launch data schedule. For example, NASA could delay Yellow Creek's motor storage and dock projects, Stennis' dock project, and Kennedy's rotation processing and surge facility and dock projects. Starting all construction activities as originally planned could result in unnecessarily incurring additional costs and termination liability if the funding for FY 1993 is not provided. If Congress decides to continue the program, construction could still be completed in time to avoid schedule slippage.

  12. A comparison of in-cloud HCl concentrations from the NASA/MSFC MDM to measurements for the space shuttle launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasser, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The Multilevel Diffusion Model (MDM) Version 5 was modified to include features of more recent versions. The MDM was used to predict in-cloud HCl concentrations for the April 12 launch of the space Shuttle (STS-1). The maximum centerline predictions were compared with measurements of maximum gaseous HCl obtained from aircraft passes through two segments of the fragmented shuttle ground cloud. The model over-predicted the maximum values for gaseous HCl in the lower cloud segment and portrayed the same rate of decay with time as the observed values. However, the decay with time of HCl maximum predicted by the MDM was more rapid than the observed decay for the higher cloud segment, causing the model to under-predict concentrations which were measured late in the life of the cloud. The causes of the tendency for the MDM to be conservative in over-estimating the HCl concentrations in the one case while tending to under-predict concentrations in the other case are discussed.

  13. ]Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Shuttle program is one of the most complex engineering activities undertaken anywhere in the world at the present time. The Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team (SIAT) was chartered in September 1999 by NASA to provide an independent review of the Space Shuttle sub-systems and maintenance practices. During the period from October through December 1999, the team led by Dr. McDonald and comprised of NASA, contractor, and DOD experts reviewed NASA practices, Space Shuffle anomalies, as well as civilian and military aerospace experience. In performing the review, much of a very positive nature was observed by the SIAT, not the least of which was the skill and dedication of the workforce. It is in the unfortunate nature of this type of review that the very positive elements are either not mentioned or dwelt upon. This very complex program has undergone a massive change in structure in the last few years with the transition to a slimmed down, contractor-run operation, the Shuttle Flight Operations Contract (SFOC). This has been accomplished with significant cost savings and without a major incident. This report has identified significant problems that must be addressed to maintain an effective program. These problems are described in each of the Issues, Findings or Observations summarized, and unless noted, appear to be systemic in nature and not confined to any one Shuttle sub-system or element. Specifics are given in the body of the report, along with recommendations to improve the present systems.

  14. Shuttle Reference Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    This collection of shuttle reference data contains the following information: shuttle abort history, shuttle abort modes, abort decisions, space shuttle rendezvous maneuvers, space shuttle main engines, space shuttle solid rocket boosters, hold-down posts, SRB (solid rocket boosters) ignition, electrical power distribution, hydraulic power units, thrust vector control, SBR rate gyro assemblies, SBR separation and Space Shuttle Super Super Light Weight Tank (SLWT).

  15. Shuttle accident stalls science plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Plans to make 1986 a uniquely productive year for U.S. space science activities ended in one horrible moment with the January 28, 1986, explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. The joyless scene at Cape Canaveral, Fla., stood in sharp contrast to the overwhelming success of Voyager 2 in its encounter with Uranus 4 days earlier. (Scientific details of that encounter will follow in upcoming issues of Eos.)Of the 15 space shuttle flights planned for fiscal year 1986, beginning October 1, 1985, a total of seven were to have carried scientific payloads for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The remaining eight flights were evenly divided between missions for the U.S. Department of Defense and commercial missions for NASA's paying customers. The explosion caused NASA to put its entire space shuttle program on hold to allow time for engineers to find the cause of the accident and for NASA to implement corrective measures. As Eos went to press, NASA acting administrator William R. Graham had not yet released the names of those who would serve on the formal investigative panel. “I think everybody's agreed that it will take weeks to months to unravel,” said Alexander Dessler, director of the space science laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center near Huntsville, Ala. Dessler speculated that investigators would begin with a list of hundreds of possible causes for the explosion.

  16. NASA's Getaway Special.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1978-01-01

    The "Getaway Special" is NASA's semiofficial program for low-budget researchers, who can arrange bookings for their own space experiments on regular flights of the space shuttle. Information about arranging for NASA to take individual experiment packages is presented. (LBH)

  17. NASA Information Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mar, May 1987, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This document consists of 11 "NASA Information Summaries" grouped together: (1) "Our Planets at a Glance" (PMS-010); (2) "Space Shuttle Mission Summary: 1985-1986" (PMS-005); (3) "Astronaut Selection and Training" (PMS-019); (4) "Space Station" (PMS-008); (5) "Materials Processing in Space" (PMS-026); (6) "Countdown!: NASA Launch Vehicles and…

  18. Shuttle Net, Tuna Net

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Rockwell International, NASA's prime contractor for the Space Shuttle, asked West Coast Netting (WCN) to develop a safety net for personnel working on the Shuttle Orbiter. This could not be an ordinary net, it had to be relatively small, yet have extraordinary tensile strength. It also had to be fire resistant and resistant to ultraviolet (UV) light. After six months, WCN found the requisite fiber, a polyester-like material called NOMEX. The company was forced to invent a more sophisticated twisting process since conventional methods did not approach specified breaking strength. The resulting product, the Hyperester net, sinks faster and fishes deeper, making it attractive to fishing fleets. A patented treatment for UV protection and greater abrasion resistance make Hyperester nets last longer, and the no-shrink feature is an economic bonus.

  19. Space Shuttle Launch: STS-129

    NASA Video Gallery

    STS-129. Space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member crew began an 11-day delivery flight to the International Space Station on Monday, Nov 16, 2009, with a 2:28 p.m. EST launch from NASA's Kennedy S...

  20. Hypersonic aeroheating test of space shuttle vehicle configuration 3 (model 22-OTS) in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH20), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsland, R. B.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    The results of hypersonic wind tunnel testing of an 0.0175 scale version of the vehicle 3 space shuttle configuration are presented. Temperature measurements were made on the launch configuration, orbiter plus tank, orbiter alone, tank alone, and solid rocket booster alone to provide heat transfer data. The test was conducted at free-stream Mach numbers of 5.3 and 7.3 and at free-stream Reynolds numbers of 1.5 million, 3.7 million, 5.0 million, and 7.0 million per foot. The model was tested at angles of attack from -5 deg to 20 deg and side slip angles of -5 deg and 0 deg.

  1. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This booklet of pocket statistics includes the 1996 NASA Major Launch Record, NASA Procurement, Financial, and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Luanch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  2. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA administrative and organizational information is presented along with summaries of space flight activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA procurement, financial and manpower data. The Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  3. Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A general description of the space shuttle program is presented, with emphasis on its application to the use of space for commercial, scientific, and defense needs. The following aspects of the program are discussed: description of the flight system (orbiter, external tank, solid rocket boosters) and mission profile, direct benefits related to life on earth (both present and expected), description of the space shuttle vehicle and its associated supporting systems, economic impacts (including indirect benefits such as lower inflation rates), listing of participating organizations.

  4. NASA's approach to commercial cargo and crew transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Dennis; Lindenmoyer, Alan; French, George; Musk, Elon; Gump, David; Kathuria, Chirinjeev; Miller, Charles; Sirangelo, Mark; Pickens, Tom

    2008-07-01

    To stimulate the commercial space industry and potentially serve the logistics needs of the International Space Station (ISS) in the post-Space Shuttle era, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in 2006 began the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) initiative. NASA entered into agreements with two U.S. firms, Rocketplane Kistler and Space Exploration Technologies to share up to 485,000,000 USD to demonstrate cargo transportation services to and from Low Earth orbit (LEO), with an option for additional funds to demonstrate human transportation services. Subsequently, NASA also entered into unfunded agreements with five companies to develop innovative space transportation capabilities. This paper reviews this unique initiative, describes the concepts of these seven companies, and discusses the potential of this emerging industry to make LEO more accessible.

  5. Streamlining shuttle ground operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimbold, R. L.; Reichert, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    To meet NASA Space Transportation System goals the Shuttle Processing Contractors have to reduce Space Transportation System ground processing time and ground processing costs. These objectives must be met without compromising safety of flight or safety during assembly, test, and service operations. Ground processing requirements are analyzed to determine critical serial flow paths and costly labor-intensive tasks. Processing improvements are realized by improvements in processing methodology, by application of computer-aided technology, and by modernization of KSC facilities. Ongoing improvement efforts are outlined and progress-to-date is described.

  6. Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation summarizes changes to the Space Shuttle Propulsions Systems made for the Return to Flight in response to the recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB). The presentation also includes an overivew of the Columbia debris recovery effort.

  7. Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Cargo Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zampiceni, John J.; Harper, Lon T.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the New Shuttle Orbiter's Multi- Purpose Logistics Modulo (MPLM) Cargo Heat Exchanger (HX) and associated MPLM cooling system. This paper presents Heat Exchanger (HX) design and performance characteristics of the system.

  8. Success Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program: Changes in Shuttle Post Challenger and Columbia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrell, George

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the legacy of successes in the space shuttle program particularly with regards to the changes in the culture of NASA's organization after the Challenger and Columbia accidents and some of the changes to the shuttles that were made manifest as a result of the accidents..

  9. Space Shuttle Program Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Bruce Buckingham, from NASA Public Affairs, introduces Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Manager, and Mike Leinbach, NASA launch Director. Wayne Hale begins discussing the Flight Readiness Review (FRR) that has just occurred to see if they were ready to fly. He points out that the review was a debris verification review (DVR). This review was done to ascertain how well they have done to eliminate the potential for debris to come off of the External Tank (ET), or any other part of the launch vehicle. He expresses that they have made significant improvements to the ET. He gives a description of the ET that is presently on the launch pad. Mike Leinbach discusses hardware processing and the condition of the launch vehicle. Questions from the news media about possible modifications to the ice frost ramp, Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) electrical problems, ET foam loss, amount of debris loss expectation during ascent, and return to flight costs are all addressed.

  10. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter lands in the rain at the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver its cargo, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM, named Raffaello, is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  11. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter is reflected in the rain puddles as it taxis toward the mate/demate tower at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Beluga is carrying the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  12. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter is reflected in the rain puddles as it comes to a stop at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Beluga is carrying the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  13. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter touches down at the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver its cargo, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM, named Raffaello, is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  14. Space Shuttle Atlantis has liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off at 6:11:10 a.m. EDT, challenging dawn as it lights up the sky on the fourth attempt to keep a rendezvous with the International Space Station. The mission is taking the crew of seven to the Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies as well as to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk and will reboost the space station from 230 statute miles to 250 statute miles. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. After a 10-day mission, landing is targeted for May 29 at 2:19 a.m. EDT. This is the 98th Shuttle flight and the 21st flight for Shuttle Atlantis.

  15. Annual report to the NASA Administrator by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. Part 2: Space shuttle program. Section 2: Summary of information developed in the Panel's fact-finding activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The management areas and the individual elements of the shuttle system were investigated. The basic management or design approach including the most obvious limits or hazards that are significant to crew safety was reviewed. Shuttle program elements that were studied included the orbiter, the space shuttle main engine, the external tank project, solid rocket boosters, and the launch and landing elements.

  16. Shuttle Propulsion Overview to NATO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightfoot, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In the early morning on Saturday, February 1, 2003, the Space Shuttle Columbia broke up during entry. After extensive investigation of the accident and recommendations made by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, President Bush gave the vision for space exploration for NASA, which include return the Space Shuttle to flight as soon as practical, complete assembly of the ISS by the end of the decade, initiate robotic missions to the moon no later than 2008, develop a new Crew Exploration Vehicle, conduct first robotic, then human missions to Mars and extend human exploration across the solar system.

  17. Shuttle extravehicular life support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    A Shuttle EVA/IVA Requirements Study was conducted by Hamilton Standard for NASA. The objectives of this study were to establish a baseline EVA approach for Shuttle and to prepare requirements for the EVA equipment required to support these operations. This paper presents the results of the EVA life support requirements definition effort and defines candidate configurations which meet these requirements. Various subsystem and system concepts were identified and evaluated to determine the most desirable approaches. Both independent and umbilical configurations are considered. Because certain EVA missions could involve contamination-sensitive payloads, the impact of integrating noncontaminating equipment is also considered.

  18. Payload Flight Assignments: NASA Mixed Fleet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert A. R.

    1997-01-01

    This manifest summarizes the missions planned by NASA for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELV's) as of the date of publication. Space Shuttle and ELV missions are shown through calendar year 2003. Space Shuttle missions for calendar years 2002-2003 are under review pending the resolution of details in the assembly sequence of the International Space Station (ISS).

  19. Shuttle Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, Jack L.; Harding, David J.; Garvin, James B.

    1999-01-01

    The Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) is a Hitchhiker experiment that has flown twice; first on STS-72 in January 1996 and then on STS-85 in August 1997. Both missions produced successful laser altimetry and surface lidar data products from approximately 80 hours per mission of SLA data operations. A total of four Shuttle missions are planned for the SLA series. This paper documents SLA mission results and explains SLA pathfinder accomplishments at the mid-point in this series of Hitchhiker missions. The overall objective of the SLA mission series is the transition of the Goddard Space Flight Center airborne laser altimeter and lidar technology to low Earth orbit as a pathfinder for NASA operational space-based laser remote sensing devices. Future laser altimeter sensors will utilize systems and approaches being tested with SLA, including the Multi-Beam Laser Altimeter (MBLA) and the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). MBLA is the land and vegetation laser sensor for the NASA Earth System Sciences Pathfinder Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) Mission, and GLAS is the Earth Observing System facility instrument on the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). The Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter, now well into a multi-year mapping mission at the red planet, is also directly benefiting from SLA data analysis methods, just as SLA benefited from MOLA spare parts and instrument technology experience [5] during SLA construction in the early 1990s.

  20. Shuttle Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guodace, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation details shuttle processing flow which starts with wheel stop and ends with launching. The flow is from landing the orbiter is rolled into the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), where processing is performed, it is then rolled over to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) where it is mated with the propellant tanks, and payloads are installed. A different flow is detailed if the weather at Kennedy Space Center requires a landing at Dryden.

  1. Subsonic stability and control characteristics of a 0.015-scale (remotely controlled elevon) model 44-0 of the space shuttle orbiter tested in the NASA/ARC 12-foot pressure tunnel (LA66)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. M.; Parrell, H.

    1976-01-01

    The investigation was conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 12-foot Pressure Tunnel. The model was a Langley-built 0.015-scale SSV orbiter model with remote independently operated left and right elevon surfaces. The objective of the test was to generate a detailed aerodynamic data base for the current shuttle orbiter configuration. Special attention was directed to definition of nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics by taking data at small increments in angle of attack, angle of sideslip, and elevon position. Six-component aerodynamic force and moment and elevon position data were recorded over an angle of attack range from -4 deg to 24 deg at angles of sideslip of 0 deg and + or - 4 deg. Additional tests were made over an angle of sideslip range from -6 deg to 6 deg at selected angles of attack. The test Mach numbers were 0.22 and 0.29 and the Reynolds number was varied from 2.0 to 8.5 million per foot.

  2. Results of investigations of an 0.010-scale 140A/B configuration (model 72-OTS) of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter in the NASA/Langley Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrozzi, M. T.; Milam, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the NASA/Langley unitary plan wind tunnel on a sting mounted 0.010-scale outer mold line model of the 140A/B configuration of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle. The primary test objectives were to obtain: (1) six component force and moment data for the mated vehicle at subsonic and transonic conditions, (2) effects of configuration build-up, (3) effects of protuberances, ET/orbiter fairings and attach structures, and (4) elevon deflection effects on wing bending moment. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data and base and balance cavity pressures were recorded over Mach numbers of 1.6, 2.0, 2.5, 2.86, 3.9, and 4.63 at a nominal Reynolds number of 20 to the 6th power per foot. Selected configurations were tested at angles of attack and sideslip from -10 deg to +10 deg. For all configurations involving the orbiter, wing bending, and torsion coefficients were measured on the right wing.

  3. Wind tunnel tests of the 0.010-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle (model 52-QT) in the NASA/Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IA18)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.; Chee, E.; Stone, J.; Mellenthin, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel on an 0.010-scale model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle consisting of an orbiter and external tank. The basic hypersonic stability characteristics of the orbiter attached rigidly to the external tank and the basic hypersonic stability characteristics of external tank alone simulating RTLS abort conditions were evaluated. The integrated vehicle was tested at angles of attack from- 8 deg through +30 deg and angles of sideslip of- 8 deg through +8 deg at fixed angles of attack of -4 deg, 0 deg, and +4 deg. A maximum angle of attack range of +15 deg through +40 deg was obtained for this configuration, at Mach number 7.3, for one run only. External tank alone testing was conducted at angles of attack from +8 deg through -30 deg and angles of sideslip of -8 deg at fixed angles of attack of -4 deg, 0 deg and +4 deg. Six-component force data and static base pressures were recorded during the test.

  4. NASA launch vehicles - The next twenty years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.; Reese, Terrence G.

    1988-01-01

    Future space activities call for robust, reliable, cost-effective access to space, together with greater launch capacity. Attention is presently given to prospective developments in the field of cargo launch vehicle design, whose near-term goal for NASA is the Shuttle-C Space Shuttle-development unmanned vehicle. In the longer term, the Advanced Launch System will be developed jointly by NASA and the DOD for LEO placement of payloads of as much as 200,000 lb. NASA is studying ways of developing the current manned Space Shuttle Orbiter through incorporation of emerging technologies; eventually, a 'Shuttle-II' vehicle will be developed.

  5. Photographer: KSC The 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, carrying the Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Photographer: KSC The 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, carrying the Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise piggyback, lifts off from the Shuttle Landing Facility's 15,000-foot-long runway at 11:03, August 10. Enterprise flown to KSC on April 10 for use in checking out assembly, test and launch facilities which will be used for the launch of its sister ship Columbia on the first Space Shuttle flight, will make a five-stop flight to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California.

  6. Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierly, Ken; Dalheim, Mary

    1981-01-01

    Presents an elementary teaching unit on NASA's space program, including teacher background information, suggested student activities, and a list of resources. Appended is a transcript of an interview conducted by elementary children with astronaut candidate Sherwood (Woody) Spring. (SJL)

  7. Results of a jet plume effects test on Rockwell International integrated space shuttle vehicle using a vehicle 5 configuration 0.02-scale model (88-OTS) in the 11 by 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (IA19), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of jet plume effects test IA19 using a vehicle 5 configuration integrated space shuttle vehicle 0.02-scale model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 x 11-foot leg of the unitary plan wind tunnel. The jet plume power effects on the integrated vehicle static pressure distribution were determined along with elevon, main propulsion system nozzle, and solid rocket booster nozzle effectiveness and elevon hinge moments.

  8. NASA Pocket Statistics: 1997 Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    POCKET STATISTICS is published by the NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA). Included in each edition is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, Aeronautics and Space Transportation and NASA Procurement, Financial and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. All Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  9. Space shuttle and life sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    During the 1980's, some 200 Spacelab missions will be flown on space shuttle in earth-orbit. Within these 200 missions, it is planned that at least 20 will be dedicated to life sciences research, projects which are yet to be outlined by the life sciences community. Objectives of the Life Sciences Shuttle/Spacelab Payloads Program are presented. Also discussed are major space life sciences programs including space medicine and physiology, clinical medicine, life support technology, and a variety of space biology topics. The shuttle, spacelab, and other life sciences payload carriers are described. Concepts for carry-on experiment packages, mini-labs, shared and dedicated spacelabs, as well as common operational research equipment (CORE) are reviewed. Current NASA planning and development includes Spacelab Mission Simulations, an Announcement of Planning Opportunity for Life Sciences, and a forthcoming Announcement of Opportunity for Flight Experiments which will together assist in forging a Life Science Program in space.

  10. Liquid lift for the Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeis, Richard

    1989-02-01

    After the operational failure of a Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) led to the Space Shuttle Challenger accident, NASA reexamined the use of liquid-fueled units in place of the SRBs in order to ascertain whether they could improve safety and payload. In view of favorable study results obtained, the posibility has arisen of employing a common liquid rocket booster for the Space Shuttle, its cargo version ('Shuttle-C'), and the next-generation Advanced Launch System. The system envisioned would involve two booster units, whose four engines/unit would be fed by integral LOX and kerosene tanks. Mission aborts with one-booster unit and two-unit failures would not be catastrophic, and would respectively allow LEO or an emergency landing in Africa.

  11. NASA Agency Overview Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The briefing opened with Dean Acosta (NASA Press Secretary) introducing Michael Griffin (NASA Administrator) and Bill Gerstenmaier (Associate Administrator for Space Operations). Bill Griffin stated that they would resume the Shuttle Fight to Return process, that the vehicle was remarkably clean and if the weather was good, the Shuttle would be ready to launch as scheduled. Bill Gerstenmaier stated that the preparations and processing of the vehicle went extremely well and they are looking forward to increasing the crew size to three. Then the floor was open to questions from the press.

  12. Sensitivity of Space Shuttle Weight and Cost to Structure Subsystem Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedge, T. E.; Williamson, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    Quantitative relationships between changes in space shuttle weights and costs with changes in weight of various portions of space shuttle structural subsystems are investigated. These sensitivity relationships, as they apply at each of three points in the development program (preliminary design phase, detail design phase, and test/operational phase) have been established for five typical space shuttle designs, each of which was responsive to the missions in the NASA Shuttle RFP, and one design was that selected by NASA.

  13. The Representative Shuttle Environmental Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brose, H. F.; Greenwood, F. H.; Thompson, C. D.; Willis, N. C.

    1974-01-01

    The Representative Shuttle Environmental Control System (RSECS) program was conceived to provide NASA with a prototype system representative of the Shuttle Environmental Control System (ECS). Discussed are the RSECS program objectives, predicated on updating and adding to the early system as required to retain its usefulness during the Shuttle ECS development and qualification effort. Ultimately, RSECS will be replaced with a flight-designed system using either refurbished development or qualification equipment to provide NASA with a flight simulation capability during the Shuttle missions. The RSECS air revitalization subsystem and the waste management support subsystem are being tested. A water coolant subsystem and a freon coolant subsystem are in the development and planning phases.

  14. Shuttle Hitchhiker Experiment Launcher System (SHELS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daelemans, Gerry

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Shuttle Small Payloads Project (SSPP), in partnership with the United States Air Force and NASA's Explorer Program, is developing a Shuttle based launch system called SHELS (Shuttle Hitchhiker Experiment Launcher System), which shall be capable of launching up to a 400 pound spacecraft from the Shuttle cargo bay. SHELS consists of a Marman band clamp push-plate ejection system mounted to a launch structure; the launch structure is mounted to one Orbiter sidewall adapter beam. Avionics mounted to the adapter beam will interface with Orbiter electrical services and provide optional umbilical services and ejection circuitry. SHELS provides an array of manifesting possibilities to a wide range of satellites.

  15. Biomass Logistics

    SciTech Connect

    J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Ian Bonner; David J. Muth

    2015-04-01

    Equipment manufacturers have made rapid improvements in biomass harvesting and handling equipment. These improvements have increased transportation and handling efficiencies due to higher biomass densities and reduced losses. Improvements in grinder efficiencies and capacity have reduced biomass grinding costs. Biomass collection efficiencies (the ratio of biomass collected to the amount available in the field) as high as 75% for crop residues and greater than 90% for perennial energy crops have also been demonstrated. However, as collection rates increase, the fraction of entrained soil in the biomass increases, and high biomass residue removal rates can violate agronomic sustainability limits. Advancements in quantifying multi-factor sustainability limits to increase removal rate as guided by sustainable residue removal plans, and mitigating soil contamination through targeted removal rates based on soil type and residue type/fraction is allowing the use of new high efficiency harvesting equipment and methods. As another consideration, single pass harvesting and other technologies that improve harvesting costs cause biomass storage moisture management challenges, which challenges are further perturbed by annual variability in biomass moisture content. Monitoring, sampling, simulation, and analysis provide basis for moisture, time, and quality relationships in storage, which has allowed the development of moisture tolerant storage systems and best management processes that combine moisture content and time to accommodate baled storage of wet material based upon “shelf-life.” The key to improving biomass supply logistics costs has been developing the associated agronomic sustainability and biomass quality technologies and processes that allow the implementation of equipment engineering solutions.

  16. SESAC statement on shuttle accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Space and Earth Science Advisory Committee (SESAC) of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC) shares NASA's and the nation's grief in the loss of the Challenger crew—seven exceptional individuals whose lives were dedicated to some of our country's loftiest goals. Over the years, these dedicated individuals and their fellow astronauts have worked closely with the scientific community to ensure that the scientific aspects of the United States space program would be productive in the era of the space shuttle. Through their efforts, the value of manned space flight for accomplishing important research in several areas of space science has been unambiguously demonstrated. Further, as space science has become increasingly an international enterprise, the capabilities of the space shuttle have become central to much scientific planning worldwide.

  17. EVA 2010: Preparing for International Space Station EVA Operations Post-Space Shuttle Retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; West, William W.

    2010-01-01

    The expected retirement of the NASA Space Transportation System (also known as the Space Shuttle ) by 2011 will pose a significant challenge to Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The EVA hardware currently used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed assuming that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for refurbishment, or if necessary for failure investigation. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support hardware and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2015, and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, the EVA 2010 Project was jointly initiated by NASA and the OneEVA contractor team. The challenges addressed were to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, to secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, to protect for EMU hardware operability on-orbit, and to determine the source of high water purity to support recharge of PLSSs (no longer available via Shuttle). EVA 2010 Project includes the following tasks: the development of a launch fixture that would allow the EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to be launched on-board alternate vehicles; extension of the EMU hardware maintenance interval from 3 years (current certification) to a minimum of 6 years (to extend to 2015); testing of recycled ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) water for use in the EMU cooling system in lieu of water resupplied by International Partner (IP) vehicles; development of techniques to remove & replace critical components in the PLSS on-orbit (not routine); extension of on-orbit certification of EVA tools; and development of an EVA hardware logistical plan to support the ISS without the Space Shuttle. Assumptions for the EVA 2010 Project included no more than

  18. Formalizing Space Shuttle Software Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, Judith; DiVito, Ben L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes two case studies in which requirements for new flight-software subsystems on NASA's Space Shuttle were analyzed, one using standard formal specification techniques, the other using state exploration. These applications serve to illustrate three main theses: (1) formal methods can complement conventional requirements analysis processes effectively, (2) formal methods confer benefits regardless of how extensively they are adopted and applied, and (3) formal methods are most effective when they are judiciously tailored to the application.

  19. The Shuttle Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An overview of the Space Shuttle Program is presented. The missions of the space shuttle orbiters, the boosters and main engine, and experimental equipment are described. Crew and passenger accommodations are discussed as well as the shuttle management teams.

  20. Shuttle Era: Launch Directors

    NASA Video Gallery

    A space shuttle launch director is the leader of the complex choreography that goes into a shuttle liftoff. Ten people have served as shuttle launch directors, making the final decision whether the...

  1. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2003-01-01

    Under an agreement with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense's National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is now distributing elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The SRTM is a joint project between NASA and NIMA to map the Earth's land surface in three dimensions at a level of detail unprecedented for such a large area. Flown aboard the NASA Space Shuttle Endeavour February 11-22, 2000, the SRTM successfully collected data over 80 percent of the Earth's land surface, for most of the area between 60? N. and 56? S. latitude. The SRTM hardware included the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (X-SAR) systems that had flown twice previously on other space shuttle missions. The SRTM data were collected specifically with a technique known as interferometry that allows image data from dual radar antennas to be processed for the extraction of ground heights.

  2. Shuttle inspection team recognized for 'eagle eyes.'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (left) applauds the Space Shuttle ice and debris inspection team who were recognized for their keen safety observations prior to the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. Standing next to Goldin are (left to right) D. Scott Otto, with Lockheed Martin Space Services Company; John B. Blue, Thomas F. Ford and Michael Barber, with United Space Alliance; Gregory N. Katnik and Jorge E. Rivera, with NASA. Katnick and Rivera received the agency's Exceptional Achievement Medal; Barber, Blue, Ford and Otto received the NASA Public Service Medal. While scanning the launch pad before launch, the team found a stray 4-inch pin near the Shuttle's external fuel tank that could have caused damage during launch. Discovery was safely launched the next day, on Oct. 11.

  3. Results of experimental investigations to determine external tank protuberance loads using a 0.03-scale model of the Space Shuttle launch configuration (model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC unitary plan wind tunnel, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA190A/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA190A) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA190B). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline, (2) GO2 pressure line, (3) LO2 antigeyser line, (4) GH2 pressure line, (5) LH2 tank cable tray, (6) LO2 tank cable tray, (7) Bipod, (8) ET/SRB cable tray, and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: (1) Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above. (2) 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements. (3) Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures. (4) Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  4. Results of Experimental Investigations to Determine External Tank Protuberance Loads Using a 0.03-Scale Model of the Space Shuttle Launch Configuration (Model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA19OA/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA19OA) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA19OB). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline; (2) GO2 pressure line; (3) LO2 antigeyser line; (4) GH2 pressure line; (5) LH2 tank cable tray; (6) LO2 tank cable tray; (7) Bipod; (8) ET/SRB cable tray; and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above; 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements; Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures; and Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  5. Expendable launch vehicles in Space Station Freedom logistics resupply operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. Steven; Courtney, Roy L.; Brunt, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The projected Space Station Freedom (SSF) annual logistics resupply requirements were predicted to exceed the 1988 baseline Shuttle resupply system capability. This paper examines the implications of employing a 'mixed fleet' of Shuttles and ELVs to provide postassembly, steady-state logistics resupply. The study concluded that ELVs supported by the OMV could provide the additional required resupply capability with one to three launches per annum. However, the study determined that such a capability would require significant programmatic commitments, including baseline SSF OMV accommodations, on-orbit OMV monoprop replenishment capability, and substantial economics investments. The study also found the need for a half-size pressurized logistics module for the increase in the efficiency of logistics manifesting on the Shuttle as well as ELVs.

  6. STS-109 Shuttle Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This is the insignia of the STS-109 Space Shuttle mission. Carrying a crew of seven, the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia was launched with goals of maintenance and upgrades to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The Marshall Space Flight Center had the responsibility for the design, development, and construction of the HST, which is the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than is visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. During the STS-109 mission, the telescope was captured and secured on a work stand in Columbia's payload bay using Columbia's robotic arm where four members of the crew performed five spacewalks completing system upgrades to the HST. Included in those upgrades were: The replacement of the solar array panels; replacement of the power control unit (PCU); replacement of the Faint Object Camera (FOC) with a new advanced camera for Surveys (ACS); and installation of the experimental cooling system for the Hubble's Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-object Spectrometer (NICMOS), which had been dormant since January 1999 when it original coolant ran out. Lasting 10 days, 22 hours, and 11 minutes, the STS-109 mission was the 27th flight of the Orbiter Columbia and the 108th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle Program.

  7. Shuttle Atlantis Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis touches down at 3:35 p.m. PST on 6 December 1988 at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility at the conclusion of the STS-27 Department of Defense mission. Landing took place on runway 17 of the Rogers Dry Lake, concluding the 4-day, 9-hour, 6-minute mission. The five-man crew was led by Commander Robert L. Gibson and included Pilot Guy S. Gardner; Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, William M. Sheperd, and Richard M. Mullane. Atlantis was launched on December 2 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab

  8. Annual report to the NASA Administrator by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel on the space shuttle program. Part 2: Summary of information developed in the panel's fact-finding activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Safety management areas of concern include the space shuttle main engine, shuttle avionics, orbiter thermal protection system, the external tank program, and the solid rocket booster program. The ground test program and ground support equipment system were reviewed. Systems integration and technical 'conscience' were of major priorities for the investigating teams.

  9. NASA launch schedule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a record-setting launch schedule for 1984—10 space shuttle flights (see Table 1), 10 satellite deployments from the space shuttle in orbit and 12 unmanned missions using expendable launch vehicles. Also scheduled is the launch on March 1 for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of Landsat D‧, the nation's second earth resources satellite.The launch activity will begin February 3 with the launch of shuttle mission 41-B using the orbiter Challenger. Two communications satellites will be deployed from 41-B: Westar-VI, for Western Union, and Palapa B-2 for the government of Indonesia. The 8-day mission will feature the first shuttle landing at Kennedy Space Center in Florida; and the first flight of the Manned Maneuvering Unit, a self-contained, propulsive backpack that will allow astronauts to move about in space without being tethered to the spacecraft.

  10. Shuttle Discovery Mated to 747 SCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery rides atop '905,' NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, on its delivery flight from California to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, where it was prepared for its first orbital mission for 30 August to 5 September 1984. The NASA 747, obtained in 1974, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the additional weight of the orbiters. Small vertical fins have also been added to the tips of the horizontal stabilizers for additional stability due to air turbulence on the control surfaces caused by the orbiters. A second modified 747, no. 911, went in to service in November 1990 and is also used to ferry orbiters to destinations where ground transportation is not practical. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the