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Sample records for nasal cavity tumors

  1. [Hemangiopericytoma in nasal cavity: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hu, Honghai; Shi, Qifeng; Chen, Jidong

    2015-05-01

    We report a case of a 46 year old female patient with nasal hemangiopericytoma. She complained of left nasal congestion, pus snot for 10 years, sometimes with left nasal bleeding. Physical examination: in the left nasal tract saw red soft neoplasm, roughness surface, easy bleeding when touched. Sinus CT shows: bilateral maxillary sinus, ethmoid sinus, sphenoid sinus and the left posterior nasal cavity lesions, considering inflammation with the formation of polyps, tumor not excluded. The left nasal cavity neoplasm biopsy shows: hemangioma of left nasal cavity. After admission in general anesthesia, we do transnasal endoscopic sinus openning operation and the left nasal cavity neoplasm resection. Postoperative pathological examination shows: the left nasal cavity hemangiopericytoma. Immunohistochemical showed: Vimentin(+), Smooth muscle actin(+), Desmin(-), endothelial cells CD31(-) and CD34(-). No postoperative radiotherapy or chemotherapy, no tumor recurrence. After one year of follow-up, the contact was lost. PMID:26281069

  2. Computed tomography of malignant tumors of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, M.; Horiuchi, M.; Shiga, H.

    1982-07-15

    Staging of malignant tumors of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses by computed tomography (CT) was studied in a total of 49 patients, 33 with squamous cell carcinoma and 16 with tumors of other histologic types. Involved sites by the tumor were studied, and clinical staging was made using CT findings alone according to AJC classification for maxillary sinus tumors. Surgical findings for comparison were available for most cases. Of 33 squamous cell carcinomas and of 16 tumors with other histologic types, the maxillary sinus was the site of origin in 29 and eight, respectively. Of these 37 maxillary sinus tumors, 11 were staged T3, 26 T4, and none was staged T1 or T2. None of these tumors were down staged, and one T3 was upstaged after surgical procedures, although all sinuses were not explored in some cases. Sinusitis due to obstruction was indistinguishable from the tumor without bone destruction. And the determination of the site of origin was difficult in some cases. Despite these, CT should be used for pretreatment evaluation of the tumors of these sites.

  3. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Milena Moreira; Monteiro, Daniela Yasbek; Fernandes, Atilio Maximino; Menegatti, Vanessa; Thomazzi, Emerson; Hubner, Ricardo Arthur; Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis. PMID:25992133

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; Daly, Megan E.; Murphy, James D.; Abelson, Jonathan; Chapman, Chris H.; Chung, Melody; Yu, Yao; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for tumors of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity (PNS/NC). Methods/Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2009, 52 patients with tumors of the PNS/NC underwent postoperative or definitive radiation with IMRT. Twenty-eight (54%) patients had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Twenty-nine patients (56%) received chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 26.6 months (range, 2.9-118.4) for all patients and 30.9 months for living patients. Results: Eighteen patients (35%) developed local-regional failure (LRF) at median time of 7.2 months. Thirteen local failures (25%) were observed, 12 in-field and 1 marginal. Six regional failures were observed, two in-field and four out-of-field. No patients treated with elective nodal radiation had nodal regional failure. Two-year local-regional control (LRC), in-field LRC, freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and overall survival (OS) were 64%, 74%, 71%, and 66% among all patients, respectively, and 43%, 61%, 61%, and 53% among patients with SCC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, SCC and >1 subsite involved had worse LRC (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.046, respectively) and OS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.046, respectively). Cribriform plate invasion (p = 0.005) and residual disease (p = 0.047) also had worse LRC. Acute toxicities included Grade {>=}3 mucositis in 19 patients (37%), and Grade 3 dermatitis in 8 patients (15%). Six patients had Grade {>=}3 late toxicity including one optic toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT for patients with PNS/NC tumors has good outcomes compared with historical series and is well tolerated. Patients with SCC have worse LRC and OS. LRF is the predominant pattern of failure.

  5. The nasal cavity microbiota of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbiota of the nares has been widely studied. However, relatively few studies have investigated the microbiota of the nasal cavity posterior to the nares. This distinct environment has the potential to contain a distinct microbiota and play an important role in health. Results We obtained 35,142 high-quality bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequence reads from the nasal cavity and oral cavity (the dorsum of the tongue and the buccal mucosa) of 12 healthy adult humans and deposited these data in the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) (Bioproject: PRJNA248297). In our initial analysis, we compared the bacterial communities of the nasal cavity and the oral cavity from ten of these subjects. The nasal cavity bacterial communities were dominated by Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria and were statistically distinct from those on the tongue and buccal mucosa. For example, the same Staphylococcaceae operational taxonomic unit (OTU) was present in all of the nasal cavity samples, comprising up to 55% of the community, but Staphylococcaceae was comparatively uncommon in the oral cavity. Conclusions There are clear differences between nasal cavity microbiota and oral cavity microbiota in healthy adults. This study expands our knowledge of the nasal cavity microbiota and the relationship between the microbiota of the nasal and oral cavities. PMID:25143824

  6. Pythiosis in the Nasal Cavity of Horses.

    PubMed

    Souto, E P F; Maia, L A; Olinda, R G; Galiza, G J N; Kommers, G D; Miranda-Neto, E G; Dantas, A F M; Riet-Correa, F

    2016-01-01

    Two cases of nasal pythiosis are reported in horses from the semi-arid region of northeastern Brazil. From January 1986 to December 2015, the Laboratory of Animal Pathology, Federal University of Campina Grande received 830 equine samples, 156 (18.79%) of which were diagnosed with pythiosis. Of these, two horses (1.28%), a male and a female adult cross-breed, had lesions in the nasal cavity. Both horses had access to water reservoirs. Clinically, they had swelling in the rhinofacial region and a serosanguineous nasal discharge. Macroscopically, in case 1, the lesion affected the nasal vestibule, extending to the alar cartilage and nasal septum. In case 2, the lesion extended through the turbinates and the meatuses of the nasal cavity, as well as the ethmoid region. In both cases, the lesions were characterized by having a yellow-grey granular surface with cavitations of different sizes containing coral-like masses of necrotic tissue (kunkers). Histologically, multifocal necrotizing eosinophilic rhinitis associated with hyphae (2-8 μm) similar to Pythium insidiosum were observed. In case 2, the lesions extended to the muscle, cartilage and bone adjacent to the nasal cavity and lungs. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. It is concluded that nasal pythiosis occurs sporadically in horses in the semi-arid region of northeastern Brazil where cutaneous pythiosis is prevalent. PMID:27406311

  7. Pediatric lobular capillary hemangioma of the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Cengiz; Apa, Duygu Düşmez; Görür, Kemal

    2004-09-01

    Lobular capillary hemangioma (LCH), also called pyogenic granuloma, is a benign vascular tumor that is pedunculated on the skin and the mucous membranes of the oral cavity. This disease occurs in all ages, but more often in the 3rd decade, and is seen in females more than males. LCH commonly appears in early childhood and affects males more than females in the pediatric age group. The gingiva, lips, tongue and buccal mucosa are the most common sites of mucosal LCH, but the nasal cavity is rare. Micro-trauma and hormonal factors are the most common etiologic factors. Epistaxis and nasal obstruction are the most marked symptoms. We describe the case of a 6-year-old girl with intra-nasal lobular capillary hemangioma presented with epistaxis and nasal obstruction. This should be considered in the differential diagnosis of childhood endonasal masses with bleeding. Total excision using endoscopic technique is the treatment of choice. PMID:14652770

  8. An acquired tufted angioma of the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ha; Lee, Guen-Ho; Lee, Su Hyun; Cho, Jin Hee

    2013-12-01

    Tufted angiomas are benign vascular tumors that occur mainly in children younger than 5 years, involving the skin with subcutaneous plaques or in a nodular form. We experienced a rare tufted angioma in the nasal cavity. A 35-year-old woman visited our clinic because of frequent epistaxis. A mass was found in the left posterior nasal cavity, adjacent to the middle turbinate, and attached to the nasal septum. The mass was excised using endoscopy, under local anesthesia. The histopathological examination showed a cannon-ball distribution of the vasculature, compatible with a tufted angioma. This is the first tufted angioma in the English literature found in the nasal mucosa, so we report this case with a literature review. PMID:23518006

  9. Investigation on the nasal airflow characteristics of anterior nasal cavity stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T.; Chen, D.; Wang, P.H.; Chen, J.; Deng, J.

    2016-01-01

    We used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to study the inspiratory airflow profiles of patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis who underwent curative surgery, by comparing pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics. Twenty patients with severe anterior nasal cavity stenosis, including one case of bilateral stenosis, underwent computed tomography (CT) scans for CFD modelling. The pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics of the nasal cavity were simulated and analyzed. The narrowest area of the nasal cavity in all 20 patients was located within the nasal valve area, and the mean cross-sectional area increased from 0.39 cm2 preoperative to 0.78 cm2 postoperative (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the mean airflow velocity in the nasal valve area decreased from 6.19 m/s to 2.88 m/s (P<0.01). Surgical restoration of the nasal symmetry in the bilateral nasal cavity reduced nasal resistance in the narrow sides from 0.24 Pa.s/mL to 0.11 Pa.s/mL (P<0.01). Numerical simulation of the nasal cavity in patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis revealed structural changes and the resultant patterns of nasal airflow. Surgery achieved balanced bilateral nasal ventilation and decreased nasal resistance in the narrow region of the nasal cavity. The correction of nasal valve stenosis is not only indispensable for reducing nasal resistance, but also the key to obtain satisfactory curative effect. PMID:27533764

  10. Investigation on the nasal airflow characteristics of anterior nasal cavity stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Chen, D; Wang, P H; Chen, J; Deng, J

    2016-01-01

    We used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to study the inspiratory airflow profiles of patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis who underwent curative surgery, by comparing pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics. Twenty patients with severe anterior nasal cavity stenosis, including one case of bilateral stenosis, underwent computed tomography (CT) scans for CFD modelling. The pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics of the nasal cavity were simulated and analyzed. The narrowest area of the nasal cavity in all 20 patients was located within the nasal valve area, and the mean cross-sectional area increased from 0.39 cm2 preoperative to 0.78 cm2 postoperative (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the mean airflow velocity in the nasal valve area decreased from 6.19 m/s to 2.88 m/s (P<0.01). Surgical restoration of the nasal symmetry in the bilateral nasal cavity reduced nasal resistance in the narrow sides from 0.24 Pa.s/mL to 0.11 Pa.s/mL (P<0.01). Numerical simulation of the nasal cavity in patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis revealed structural changes and the resultant patterns of nasal airflow. Surgery achieved balanced bilateral nasal ventilation and decreased nasal resistance in the narrow region of the nasal cavity. The correction of nasal valve stenosis is not only indispensable for reducing nasal resistance, but also the key to obtain satisfactory curative effect. PMID:27533764

  11. Nasal Cavity Masses Resembling Chondro-osseous Respiratory Epithelial Adenomatoid Hamartomas in 3 Dogs.

    PubMed

    LaDouceur, E E B; Michel, A O; Lindl Bylicki, B J; Cifuentes, F F; Affolter, V K; Murphy, B G

    2016-05-01

    Chondro-osseous respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartomas (COREAHs) are rare tumors in the nasal cavity of people, which have not been described in other species. COREAHs in people are minimally invasive and rarely recur following excision. Histologically, these tumors are composed of disorganized, mature, nasal turbinate tissue that is organized into polypoid growths. These growths are lined by respiratory epithelium, contain glandular elements, and are organized around central cores of chondro-osseous matrix. This report describes 3 cases of dogs with nasal tumors that have histomorphology similar to that of COREAH in people. The tumors were all identified within the nasal cavity and were associated with regional bony lysis of the turbinates and surrounding skull bones, a feature that has not been reported in COREAH in people. There was no evidence of metastasis or extension beyond the nasal cavity in any of the 3 cases. PMID:26253881

  12. [Pituitary neoplasms extending into the nasal cavity and their needle biopsy cytodiagnosis].

    PubMed

    Blagoveshchenskaia, N S; Burgman, G P

    1978-01-01

    In 5.5% of 126 patients treated for hypophyseal tumors at the Burdenko Institute of Neurosurgery, AMS USSR for 12 months, spread of the new growth to the nasal cavity was revealed. The tumor was usually located in the posterosuperior parts of the nose and was discovered on anterior rhinoscopy only after the nasal mucosa had been carefully anemized, particularly with the use of a nasal dilator with a lamp on its end specially designed by us. Spread of a hypophyseal tumor to the nasal cavity was encountered when the tumor was very large and grew regularly in all directions or when it was marked by selective infrasellarg growth in the direction of the sphenoidal sinus. Cytologic examination of the punctate made it possible to determine the presence of the hypophyseal tumor and its character (benign, malignant) and differentiate it from other new growths and from c.s.p. cysts. PMID:654183

  13. [Orbitozygomatic approaches to skull base tumors spreading into the orbit, paranasal sinuses, nasal cavity, and pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossae].

    PubMed

    Cherekaev, V A; Gol'bin, D A; Belov, A I; Radchenkov, N S; Vinokurov, A G; Bekyashev, A Kh; Spallone, A

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyzes application of orbitozygomatic approaches at the Department of Skull Base and Craniofacial Surgery of the Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute for a 14-year period. During this time, 723 patients were operated on using the orbitozygomatic approach, which has become the workhorse of surgery for skull base tumors spreading into the orbit, paranasal sinuses, and pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossae. The authors describe seven major modifications of the orbitozygomatic approach that they have used in their practice. PMID:26528608

  14. [Compression of a nasotracheal tube in the nasal cavity of a patient with craniofacial fibrous dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Tatsushige; Uehara, Keiji; Shiba, Mayuka; Koga, Yoshihisa

    2008-06-01

    A 42-year-old woman with craniofacial fibrous dysplasia underwent osteoplasty of maxillary and mandibular bone. Preoperative CT images showed osteosclerosis and ground glass appearance of the right side of the skull including the orbit, temporal bone, paranasal sinus, and maxillary and mandibular bones, as well as hypertrophy of the nasal septum. Inhalation anesthesia was induced and 8.0-mmID polyvinyl chloride endotracheal tube was inserted via the left nostril with slight resistance. At emergence, a 10-Fr suction catheter could not be passed throgh the tube but an 8-Fr nasogastric tube could be passed. A part of the tube positioned in the nasal cavity was apparently compressed. Preoperative examination of the nasal cavity and nasal septum using CT or MRI may be desirable for nasotracheal intubation in the patients with craniofacial tumor, and the application of a spiral reinforced endotracheal tube may contribute to prevent such cases of airway obstruction in the nasal cavity. PMID:18546906

  15. What's New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancers What’s new in nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer research ... Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research? ...

  16. Molecular Changes in the Nasal Cavity after N, N-dimethyl-p-toluidine Exposure.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, June K; Merrick, B Alex; Brix, Amy; Morgan, Daniel L; Gerrish, Kevin; Wang, Yu; Flake, Gordon; Foley, Julie; Shockley, Keith R

    2016-08-01

    N, N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT; Cas No. 99-97-8), an accelerant for methyl methacrylate monomers in medical devices, is a nasal cavity carcinogen according to a 2-yr cancer study of male and female F344/N rats, with the nasal tumors arising from the transitional cell epithelium. In this study, we exposed male F344/N rats for 5 days to DMPT (0, 1, 6, 20, 60, or 120 mg/kg [oral gavage]) to explore the early changes in the nasal cavity after short-term exposure. Lesions occurred in the nasal cavity including hyperplasia of transitional cell epithelium (60 and 120 mg/kg). Nasal tissue was rapidly removed and preserved for subsequent laser capture microdissection and isolation of the transitional cell epithelium (0 and 120 mg/kg) for transcriptomic studies. DMPT transitional cell epithelium gene transcript patterns were characteristic of an antioxidative damage response (e.g., Akr7a3, Maff, and Mgst3), cell proliferation, and decrease in signals for apoptosis. The transcripts of amino acid transporters were upregulated (e.g., Slc7a11). The DMPT nasal transcript expression pattern was similar to that found in the rat nasal cavity after formaldehyde exposure, with over 1,000 transcripts in common. Molecular changes in the nasal cavity after DMPT exposure suggest that oxidative damage is a mechanism of the DMPT toxic and/or carcinogenic effects. PMID:27099258

  17. Nasal cavity epithelioid hemangioendothelioma invading the anterior skull base

    PubMed Central

    Ogita, Shogo; Endo, Toshiki; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Takenori; Watanabe, Mika; Higashi, Kenjiro; Katori, Yukio; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) is a rare vascular tumor that frequently occurs in soft tissues. Patients suffer from local recurrence and remote metastasis because of its malignant potential. Here, we present a rare case of EHE that originated from nasal cavity and invaded intracranially through the anterior skull base. Case Description: This is a 27-year-old woman who presented a local physician with intermittent epistaxis and a facial pain around her nose. Preoperative studies demonstrated that the tumor invaded into anterior skull base and the dura matter. Therefore, we performed combined skull base and transnasal surgery, which achieved complete resection of the tumor. Postoperative course of the patient was uneventful. No recurrence or distant metastasis was observed in the patient for 2 years following the radical resection. Conclusions: To date, four cases of EHE in the nasal cavity were reported. This is the first case in which EHE demonstrated invasive potentials with intracranial extension. Radical surgical resection plays an important role for better management of invasive paranasal EHE. PMID:27213107

  18. Resident aerobic microbiota of the adult human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, T T; Kirkeby, L P; Poulsen, K; Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M

    2000-10-01

    Recent evidence strongly suggests that the microbiota of the nasal cavity plays a crucial role in determining the reaction patterns of the mucosal and systemic immune system. However, little is known about the normal microbiota of the nasal cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine the microbiota in different parts of the nasal cavity and to develop and evaluate methods for this purpose. Samples were collected from 10 healthy adults by nasal washes and by swabbing of the mucosa through a sterile introduction device. Both methods gave results that were quantitatively and qualitatively reproducible, and revealed significant differences in the density of the nasal microbiota between individuals. The study revealed absence of gram-negative bacteria that are regular members of the commensal microbiota of the pharynx. Likewise, viridans type streptococci were sparsely represented. The nasal microbiota was dominated by species of the genera Corynebacterium, Aureobacterium, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus, including S. epidermis, S. capitis, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis and S. warneri. These studies show that the microbiota of the nasal cavity of adults is strikingly different from that of the pharynx, and that the nasal cavity is a primary habitat for several species of diphtheroids recognized as opportunistic pathogens. Under special circumstances, single species, including IgA1 protease-producing bacteria, may become predominant in a restricted area of the nasal mucosa. PMID:11200821

  19. Surgical Approaches to the Nasal Cavity and Sinuses.

    PubMed

    Weeden, Alyssa Marie; Degner, Daniel Alvin

    2016-07-01

    The nasal cavity and sinuses may be exposed primarily via a dorsal or ventral surgical approach. Surgical planning involves the use of advanced imaging, such as computed tomography or MRI. Surgical treatment of lesions of the nasal cavity usually is limited to benign lesions or can also be used in combination with adjunctive therapy, such as radiation therapy. Extreme caution must be exercised with a dorsal approach to the nasal cavity to avoid complications of inadvertent penetration into the brain case. Gentle tissue handling and careful closure of the mucoperiosteum must be exercised following a ventral approach to minimize the risk of oronasal fistula formation. PMID:27217006

  20. Inverted papillomas and benign nonneoplastic lesions of the nasal cavity

    PubMed Central

    Casiano, Roy R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Benign lesions of the nasal cavity represent a diverse group of pathologies. Furthermore, each of these disorders may present differently in any given patient as pain and discomfort, epistaxis, headaches, vision changes, or nasal obstruction. Although these nasal masses are benign, many of them have a significant capacity for local tissue destruction and symptomatology secondary to this destruction. Advances in office-based endoscopic nasendoscopy have equipped the otolaryngologist with a safe, inexpensive, and rapid means of directly visualizing lesions within the nasal cavity and the initiation of appropriate treatment. Methods: The purpose of this study is to review the diagnosis, management, and controversies of many of the most common benign lesions of the nasal cavity encountered by the primary care physician or otolaryngologist. Results: This includes discussion of inverted papilloma (IP), juvenile angiofibroma, squamous papilloma, pyogenic granuloma, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, schwannoma, benign fibro-osseous lesions, and other benign lesions of the nasal cavity, with particular emphasis on IP and juvenile angiofibroma. Conclusion: A diverse array of benign lesions occur within the nasal cavity and paranasal cavities. Despite their inability to metastasize, many of these lesions have significant capability for local tissue destruction and recurrence. PMID:22487294

  1. How Are Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses Cancer + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » Early Detection, Diagnosis, and ... other structures such as the skin of the cheek, the front part of the eye socket, the ...

  2. Extramedullary plasmacytoma associated with an ectopic tooth in the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Xu, Yong; Xu, Yu; Tao, Zezhang

    2015-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma and tooth eruption into the nasal cavity are both rare events. We report a case of plasmacytoma associated with an ectopic tooth. To the best of our knowledge, such a case has not been previously reported in the literature. A 63-year-old woman presented for evaluation of an 8-month history of a bloody nasal discharge from the posterior naris. Nasal endoscopy detected a slight eminence approximately 0.5 cm in diameter in the right nasal floor. Computed tomography demonstrated a tooth-like, high-attenuation shadow. A biopsy identified chronic inflammation of the mucosa and tissue. A diagnosis of an ectopic tooth in the right nasal cavity was initially considered. The mass and the tooth-like neoplasm were removed via nasal endoscopy. Immunohistochemistry of the excised mucosa showed strong positivity for kappa light chains, positivity for leukocyte common antigen and CD138, and negativity for lambda light chains, epithelial membrane antigen, CD1, and HMB-45. The final diagnosis was an extramedullary plasmacytoma in the right nasal cavity associated with an ectopic tooth. No bone metastasis was observed. Definitive radiotherapy was performed after the operation. During 40 months of follow-up, the patient exhibited no evidence of local recurrence or metastasis. The diagnosis in this case was made difficult by the nonspecific clinical manifestations, the presence of the ectopic tooth, and incorrect interpretation of preoperative histopathology. Physicians should maintain a clinical suspicion for the possibility that an ectopic tooth might be associated with a tumor. PMID:26535832

  3. Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in angioleiomyoma of the nasal cavity of six patients

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, GUOCHEN; XIAO, DAJIANG; SUN, PING

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma of the nasal cavity is extremely rare. There are only a small number of studies in the literature that demonstrate that the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) are expressed in angioleiomyoma, and the results from these studies are inconsistent. The present study identified 6 patients with nasal angioleiomyoma that were treated between 2004 and 2013. All patients underwent endoscopic surgery and were followed-up for 1–10 years. Resected tumors were investigated for the presence of ER and PR using immunoperoxidase staining. Of the 6 patients, 4 were men and 2 were woman. The mean age of the patients was 60.5 years. The tumors of the 6 patients were identified in the nasal septum, middle turbinate, inferior turbinate, lateral wall of the nasal cavity and nasal vestibule. The clinical manifestations reported by the patients consisted of a painless mass, recurrent epistaxis and nasal obstruction. There were no specific features observed in any of the patients using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. All the patients underwent tumor dissection visualized with a nasal endoscope and recovered without recurrence or malignancy of the tumor post-surgery. Hematoxylin and eosin and immunoperoxidase staining confirmed the diagnosis of angioleiomyoma in all patients. In 5 patients the nuclei of the smooth muscle tumor cells markedly expressed ER and PR. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that ER and PR are clearly expressed in nasal angioleiomyoma. The present study suggests that the sex hormones are possibly associated with the growth of angioleiomyoma. PMID:27073480

  4. The morphological interaction between the nasal cavity and maxillary sinuses in living humans.

    PubMed

    Holton, Nathan; Yokley, Todd; Butaric, Lauren

    2013-03-01

    To understand how variation in nasal architecture accommodates the need for effective conditioning of respired air, it is necessary to assess the morphological interaction between the nasal cavity and other aspects of the nasofacial skeleton. Previous studies indicate that the maxillary sinuses may play a key role in accommodating climatically induced nasal variation such that a decrease in nasal cavity volume is associated with a concomitant increase in maxillary sinus volume. However, due to conflicting results in previous studies, the precise interaction of the nasal cavity and maxillary sinuses, in humans, is unclear. This is likely due to the prior emphasis on nasal cavity size, whereas arguably, nasal cavity shape is more important with regard to the interaction with the maxillary sinuses. Using computed tomography scans of living human subjects (N=40), the goal of this study is to assess the interaction between nasal cavity form and maxillary sinus volume in European- and African-derived individuals with differences in nasal cavity morphology. First, we assessed whether there is an inverse relationship between nasal cavity and maxillary sinus volumes. Next, we examined the relationship between maxillary sinus volume and nasal cavity shape using multivariate regression. Our results show that there is a positive relationship between nasal cavity and maxillary sinus volume, indicating that the maxillary sinuses do not accommodate variation in nasal cavity size. However, maxillary sinus volume is significantly correlated with variation in relative internal nasal breadth. Thus, the maxillary sinuses appear to be important for accommodating nasal cavity shape rather than size. PMID:23382025

  5. Assessment of the effect of deviated nasal septum on the structure of nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junguo; Dou, Xin; Liu, Dingding; Song, Panpan; Qian, Xiaoyun; Wang, Shoulin; Gao, Xia

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of DNS on the structure of nasal cavity. The paranasal sinus coronal view CT of 108 patients with DNS and 129 hospitalized patients without DNS was retrospectively analyzed. The transverse diameter of nasal cavity (a), transverse diameter of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (b), angle between maxillary and palatal bone, interalveolar distance, and maxillary rotation distance were measured. The ratio of a/b in experimental group was 0.367 ± 0.006 which was significantly (P = 0.0023) less than that in control group (0.391 ± 0.005). For the angle between maxillary and palatal bone, there was no significant difference found between DNS and control group for both right and left sides. The interalveolar distance was 40.75 mm in experimental group, and 38.8 mm in control (P = 0.0002). For the maxillary rotation distance, findings were considered as significant (P < 0.0001) in experimental group (11.25 mm) compared with control (10.1 mm). The present study demonstrates that long-term DNS affects the development of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus, as well as increases the interalveolar distance and maxillary rotation distance. These influences may be caused by the alteration of airflow inside the nasal cavities. PMID:26370235

  6. Shape of the human nasal cavity promotes retronasal smell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trastour, Sophie; Melchionna, Simone; Mishra, Shruti; Zwicker, David; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Brenner, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Humans are exceptionally good at perceiving the flavor of food. Flavor includes sensory input from taste receptors but is dominated by olfactory (smell) receptors. To smell food while eating, odors must be transported to the nasal cavity during exhalation. Olfactory performance of this retronasal route depends, among other factors, on the position of the olfactory receptors and the shape of the nasal cavity. One biological hypothesis is that the derived configuration of the human nasal cavity has resulted in a greater capacity for retronasal smell, hence enhanced flavor perception. We here study the air flow and resulting odor deposition as a function of the nasal geometry and the parameters of exhalation. We perform computational fluid dynamics simulations in realistic geometries obtained from CT scans of humans. Using the resulting flow fields, we then study the deposition of tracer particles in the nasal cavity. Additionally, we derive scaling laws for the odor deposition rate as a function of flow parameters and geometry using boundary layer theory. These results allow us to assess which changes in the evolution of the human nose led to significant improvements of retronasal smell.

  7. Morphogenesis of nasal tumors in rats exposed to hexamethylphosphoramide by inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.P.; Trochimowicz, H.J.

    1984-02-01

    Hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA) is used as a solvent, polymerization catalyst and, to some extent, as a deicing additive for jet fuels. Nasal tumors have been induced in rats by inhalation exposure to the compound for 6 to 24 months at concentrations of 50, 100, 400, and 4000 parts per billion (ppb), but not in rats exposed at 10 ppb for 24 months. Most nasal tumors were epidermoid carcinomas and developed from the respiratory epithelium or subepithelial nasal gland, both of which revealed squamous metaplasia or dysplasia in the anterior nasal cavity. The glandular cells appear to play an important role in developing epidermoid carcinomas in the nasal cavity. The ultrastructure of epidermoid carcinomas revealed abundant features of glandular differentiation in the neoplastic squamous cells. The morphological expression of glandular cell metamorphosis in the epidermoid carcinoma included intermediate cells showing both glandular and squamous differentiation, inter- or intracellular lumina, secretory vesicles, and mucus droplets in squamous cells and keratin plates.

  8. The effect of xylometazoline spray for expansion of nasal cavity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun-Sung; Park, Sang-Hi; Shin, Young Duck; Kwon, Eunjung; Shim, Woo Sub

    2013-01-01

    Background During nasotracheal intubation it is important to have proper pretreatment for nasal mucosa constriction and nasal cavity expanding. Nasal packing of epinephrine gauze is widely used as well as xylometazoline. The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the efficacy of prophylactic intranasal spray of xylometazoline against epinephrine gauze packing in expanding the nasal cavity. Methods Volunteers (n = 32) in their twenties without nasal disease such as septal deviation or rhinitis were enrolled in the study. The more patent nostril in each subject was measured by acoustic rhinometry as the base value. After intranasal spray of xylometazoline, the same nostril was remeasured by same method. Twenty four hours later, intranasal packing of epinephrine gauze was done and the same treatment was done. Subject preferences about the procedures were asked. Results There were significant difference among treatments (base value: 0.582 ± 0.164 cm2, xylometazoline spray: 0.793 ± 0.165 cm2, epinephrine gauze packing: 0.990 ± 0.290 cm2) in acoustic rhinometry. While the epinephrine gauze packing showed more efficient mucosa constriction, subjects preferred xylometazoline spray. Conclusions Even though xylometazoline spray was less effective than epinephrine gauze packing, the simplicity and convenience compensated. In patients undergoing nasotracheal intubation, xylometazoline spray can be an alternative to epinephrine gauze packing. PMID:24023995

  9. Proton Beam Therapy for Unresectable Malignancies of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Kohno, Ryosuke; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Arahira, Satoko; Nishio, Teiji; Tahara, Makoto; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Kishimoto, Seiji; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The cure rate for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is low. Because irradiation with proton beams, which are characterized by their rapid fall-off at the distal end of the Bragg peak and sharp lateral penumbra, depending on energy, depth, and delivery, provide better dose distribution than X-ray irradiation, proton beam therapy (PBT) might improve treatment outcomes for conditions located in proximity to risk organs. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical profile of PBT for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 39 patients in our database fulfilling the following criteria: unresectable malignant tumors of the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses or skull base; N0M0 disease; and treatment with PBT (>60 GyE) from January 1999 to December 2006. Results: Median patient age was 57 years (range, 22-84 years); 22 of the patients were men and 17 were women. The most frequent primary site was the nasal cavity (n = 26, 67%). The local control rates at 6 months and 1 year were 84.6% and 77.0%, respectively. With a median active follow-up of 45.4 months, 3-year progression-free and overall survival were 49.1% and 59.3%, respectively. The most common acute toxicities were mild dermatitis (Grade 2, 33.3%), but no severe toxicity was observed (Grade 3 or greater, 0%). Five patients (12.8%) experienced Grade 3 to 5 late toxicities, and one treatment-related death was reported, caused by cerebrospinal fluid leakage Grade 5 (2.6%). Conclusion: These findings suggest that the clinical profile of PBT for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses make it is a promising treatment option.

  10. [Arteriovenous anastomosis in nasal cavities using microcorrosion technique].

    PubMed

    Passàli, D; Buccella, M G; Vetuschi, A; Bellussi, L

    1990-01-01

    In the present study the morphology of arteriovenous anastomoses in the nasal area are analyzed using the microcorrosion technique. This technique calls for perfusion of the vascular system, passing through the left ventricle, with Batson's of the vessels. For the first time in the microcorrosion study of the nasal vascular network human fetuses (from the 12th to 24th week of intrauterine life) obtained from spontaneous abortions were used as well as rats weighing from 250 to 300 gr. The animals were anesthetized with sodium thiopental prior to administration of the resin. A specimen containing the facial muscles, the nasal pyramid, the maxillary bone and the palatine bones was excised. Then, from this specimen the nasal septum and the two lateral portions of the nose were obtained. The bony and soft perivascular tissues were removed by placing the casts in an aqueous 20% KOH solution. Finally the corrosion cases were observed under a scanning electron microscope (EM). Within the nasal cavities the microcorrosion technique makes it possible to identify three different vascular layers: superficial, intermediate and deep. In the latter it proved possible to visualize the two types of arteriovenous anastomoses: i.e. simple and complex. On the basis of both vascular course and the impressions left by the endothelial cell nuclei it proved possible to differentiate between the arterial and venous portions of the anastomoses. PMID:2095105

  11. Primary Intestinal-type Adenocarcinoma of the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Belli, S; Taskin, U; Caglar, A; Tetikkurt, US

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report a rare case of sinonasal intestinal-type adenocarcinoma in the nasal cavity. A 31-year old man presented with headache and epistaxis. We identified a malignant tumour, which is a rare pathology, with detailed physical examination, anterior rhinoscopy, computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic examination. Endoscopic excision of the tumour was performed. After three years of follow-up of the patient in our clinic, there was no sign of any recurrence. PMID:25803391

  12. Nasal Cavity or Alveolar Paranasal Sinus Rhabdomyosarcoma with Orbital Extension in Adults: 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Castrillo, Ana I.; Mencía-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Gutiérrez-Díaz, Esperanza; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L.; Bengoa-González, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) has a predilection for the deep soft tissues of the extremities and mainly occurs in children. Although the tumor may originate in other sites, such as the nasal cavity or paranasal sinus, invasion of the orbit is unusual. We describe the clinicopathological features of 2 cases of alveolar RMS of the nasal cavity or paranasal sinus in adult patients with orbital extension. These cases of alveolar RMS of the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses are described in 2 men, both in the third decade of life. These patients were evaluated with radiological studies. The histological diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemical methods. Treatment consisted in a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy following excisional biopsy. Alveolar subtype RMS is an extremely aggressive neoplasm that rarely presents in the orbit or paranasal sinuses of adults but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of tumors with this localization. Myoglobin, Myo D1, and myogenin seem to be the most specific markers for RMS. PMID:26180715

  13. Primary myelolipoma presenting as a nasal cavity polyp: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Myelolipomas are rare, benign tumors comprising mature adipose tissue and hematopoietic elements. The vast majority occur within the adrenal glands, but extra-adrenal myelolipomas have also been reported in the presacral region, retroperitoneum, mesentery, stomach, spleen, liver, mediastinum and lungs. Here, we present a case of primary myelolipoma occurring in an unusual site: the nasal cavity. To the best of our knowledge, we believe that this location for extra-adrenal myelolipoma has not been previously described in the literature. Case presentation We report a case of primary myelolipoma occurring in the nasal cavity of a 48-year-old Asian woman. We describe the etiology, pathology and differential diagnosis of extra-adrenal myelolipomas, and review the literature. Conclusions We chose to present this case because of its unusual location. Although myelolipomas are rare, we conclude that they it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions in this site. PMID:22584001

  14. Stereoscopic PIV measurements of flow in the nasal cavity with high flow therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C. J. T.; Buchmann, N. A.; Jermy, M. C.; Moore, S. M.

    2011-04-01

    Knowledge of the airflow characteristics within the nasal cavity with nasal high flow (NHF) therapy and during unassisted breathing is essential to understand the treatment's efficacy. The distribution and velocity of the airflow in the nasal cavity with and without NHF cannula flow has been investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry at steady peak expiration and inspiration. In vivo breathing flows were measured and dimensionally scaled to reproduce physiological conditions in vitro. A scaled model of the complete nasal cavity was constructed in transparent silicone and airflow simulated with an aqueous glycerine solution. NHF modifies nasal cavity flow patterns significantly, altering the proportion of inspiration and expiration through each passageway and producing jets with in vivo velocities up to 17.0 ms-1 for 30 l/min cannula flow. Velocity magnitudes differed appreciably between the left and right sides of the nasal cavity. The importance of using a three-component measurement technique when investigating nasal flows has been highlighted.

  15. An investigation on airflow in disordered nasal cavity and its corrected models by tomographic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. K.; Chung, S. K.

    2004-06-01

    Knowledge of airflow characteristics in nasal cavities is essential to understand the physiology and pathology aspects of nasal breathing. Several studies have utilized physical models of the healthy nasal cavity to investigate the relationship between nasal anatomy and airflow. Since the final goal of these works is their contribution to the diagnosis and treatment of nasal diseases, therefore, the next step in this topic must be followed by the studies for disordered nasal cavities. In this paper, airflows in normal and abnormal nasal cavities and surgically created models, which simulate surgical treatment, are investigated experimentally by PIV. High-resolution computerized tomogram data and careful manipulation of the model surface by the ear, nose and throat doctor provide more sophisticated nasal cavity models. The correlation based correction PIV algorithm with window offset is used for PIV flow analysis. Average and RMS distributions in sagittal and coronal sections are obtained for inspiratory and expiratory nasal airflows. Comparisons in nasal airflows for both normal and abnormal cases are also examined. Airflow characteristics that are related to the abnormalities in the nasal cavity are proposed. In the case of simulations of surgical operations, velocity and RMS distributions in coronal section change locally, this may cause some difficulties in physiologic functions of noses and may hurt mucosal surface.

  16. Flow through the nasal cavity of the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm-Davis, L. L.; Fish, F. E.

    2015-12-01

    The nasal cavity of spiny dogfish is a blind capsule with no internal connection to the oral cavity. Water is envisioned to flow through the cavity in a smooth, continuous flow pattern; however, this assumption is based on previous descriptions of the morphology of the olfactory cavity. No experimentation on the flow through the internal nasal cavity has been reported. Morphology of the head of the spiny dogfish ( Squalus acanthias) does not suggest a close external connection between the oral and nasal systems. However, dye visualization showed that there was flow through the nasal apparatus and from the excurrent nostril to the mouth when respiratory flows were simulated. The hydrodynamic flow through the nasal cavity was observed from flow tank experiments. The dorsum of the nasal cavity of shark heads from dead animals was exposed by dissection and a glass plate was glued over of the exposed cavity. When the head was placed in a flow, dye was observed to be drawn passively into the cavity showing a complex, three-dimensional hydrodynamic flow. Dye entered the incurrent nostril, flowed through the nasal lamellae, crossed over and under the nasal valve, and circulated around the nasal valve before exiting the excurrent nostril. When the nasal valve was removed, the dye became stagnant and back flowed out through the incurrent nostril. The single nasal valve has a hydrodynamic function that organizes a coherent flow of water through the cavity without disruption. The results suggest that the morphology of the nasal apparatus in concert with respiratory flow and ambient flows from active swimming can be used to draw water through the olfactory cavity of the shark.

  17. RANS and LES simulations of the airflow through nasal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, Giacomo

    2015-11-01

    The prediction of detailed flow patterns in nasal cavities using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can provide essential information on the potential relationship between patient-specific geometrical characteristics and health problems. The long-term goal of the OpenNOSE project is to develop a reliable open-source computational tool based on the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox that can assist surgeons in their daily practice. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the turbulence model and boundary conditions on simulations of the airflow in nasal cavities. The geometry, including paranasal sinuses, was reconstructed from a carefully selected CT scan, and RANS and LES simulations were carried out for steady inspiration and expiration. At a flow rate near 20 l/min, the flow is laminar in most of the domain. During the inspiration phase, turbulence develops in nasopharynx and oropharynx regions; during the expiration phase, another vortical region is observed down the nostrils. A comparison between different boundary conditions suggests the use of a total pressure condition, or alternatively a uniform velocity, at the inlet and outlet. In future work the same geometry will be used for setting up a laboratory experiment, intended to cross-validate the numerical results.

  18. Numerical modeling of odorant uptake in the rat nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Geoffrey C; Scherer, Peter W; Zhao, Kai; Mozell, Maxwell M

    2007-03-01

    An anatomically accurate 3-dimensional numerical model of the right rat nasal cavity was developed and used to compute low, medium, and high flow rate inspiratory and expiratory mucosal odorant uptake (imposed patterning) for 3 odorants with different mucus solubilities. The computed surface mass flux distributions were compared with anatomic receptor gene expression zones identified in the literature. In general, simulations predicted that odorants that were highly soluble in mucus were absorbed dorsally and medially, corresponding roughly to receptors from one of the gene expression zones. Insoluble odorants tended to be absorbed more peripherally in the rat olfactory region corresponding to the other 2 zones. These findings also agreed in general with the electroolfactogram measurements and the voltage-sensitive dye measurements reported in the literature. This numerical approach is the first to predict detailed odorant flux information across the olfactory mucosa in the rat nasal cavity during inspiratory and expiratory flow and to relate it to anatomic olfactory receptor location, physiological function, and biochemical experiment. This numerical technique can allow us to separate the contributions of imposed and inherent patterning mechanisms on the rat olfactory mucosa. PMID:17220517

  19. A Comparative Study of Airflow and Odorant Deposition in the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Joseph; Rumple, Christopher; Ranslow, Allison; Quigley, Andrew; Pang, Benison; Neuberger, Thomas; Krane, Michael; van Valkenburgh, Blaire; Craven, Brent

    2013-11-01

    The complex structure of the mammalian nasal cavity provides a tortuous airflow path and a large surface area for respiratory air conditioning, filtering of inspired contaminants, and olfaction. Due to the small and contorted structure of the nasal turbinals, nasal anatomy and function remains poorly understood in most mammals. Here, we utilize high-resolution MRI scans to reconstruct anatomically-accurate models of the mammalian nasal cavity. These data are used to compare the form and function of the mammalian nose. High-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of nasal airflow and odorant deposition are presented and used to compare olfactory function across species (primate, rodent, canine, feline, ungulate).

  20. [Cylindrical epithelioma of nasal cavities and accessory sinuses. Anatomoclinical study of 26 cases].

    PubMed

    Walter, P; Stebler, S; Schaffer, P; Vetter, J M; Guerbaoui, M

    1976-01-01

    Report of a series of 26 cases of cylindrical epithelioma of the nasal cavities and accessory nasal sinuses. These neoplasms constitute a remarkably homogenous group the main characteristics of which are following: -- uniform histological pattern, similar to that of the epitheliomas of the colon, -- ethmoidal location in almost all cases, -- preferential occurrence in wood-workers, for instance in the Bas-Rhin. The prognosis depends on the extension of the epithelioma verified in 16 patients during the intervention. Recurrences caused death in 13 patients of this series. Ganglionic or distant metastases are rare. Six patients, i.e. 24 p. 100 had a favourable evolution of at least 3 years. Discussion about the therapeutics of the primary tumor and of its recurrences. PMID:1023787

  1. Pure sarcomatoid carcinoma of maxillary sinus and nasal cavity simulating malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    Although a few cases of sinonasal carcinoma with focal sarcomatous differentiation have been reported, pure sarcomatoid carcinoma has not been reported in the English literature. Imaging studies and gross inspection in a 60-year-old man with left-sided face pain revealed a mass in the left maxillary sinus and nasal cavity. A large incisional biopsy specimen from the nasal cavity revealed proliferation of malignant spindle and round cells with a malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) pattern. Tumor giant cells were scattered, and there were areas of a vague storiform pattern. Mitotic figures were numerous. Carcinomatous component was not recognized. The histologic diagnosis was storiform-pleomorphic MFH. Tumor cells were positive for pancytokeratins AE1/3, KL-1, and CAM5.2 and cytokeratin (CK) 18, vimentin, CD68, p53, Ki-67 (labeling, 90%), α₁-antitrypsin, and α₁-antichymotrypsin and negative for pancytokeratin WSS, CK 34βE14, CK7, CK8, CK14, CK19, CK20, epithelial membrane antigen, S-100 protein, desmin, α-smooth muscle actin, CD34, HMB45, chromogranin, synaptophysin, myoglobin, CD45, CD30, and CD15. Because keratins were positive in tumor cells, a diagnosis of sarcomatoid carcinoma simulating MFH was made. The patient was treated with chemoradiation without significant effect and died 9 months after initial examination. PMID:21173134

  2. Pediatric aggressive giant cell granuloma of nasal cavity

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sung Tae; Kwon, Ki Ryun; Rha, Ki-Sang; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Kim, Yong Min

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Giant cell granuloma (GCG) is a non-neoplastic osseous proliferative lesion of unknown etiology. Although a benign disease process, GCG can be locally destructive. It is extremely rare to have a pediatric case of GCG occurring in the nasal cavity with intracranial invasion. Presentation of case We report a case of an aggressive and recurrent giant cell granuloma with intracranial invasion in a 10 years old female patient which was completely excised with endoscopic craniofacial resection. Discussion A literature review on pathogenesis, diagnosis and management is also performed. Conclusion The most common treatment for giant cell granuloma is surgery, ranging from simple curettage to resection. However, it must be completely excised in cases of aggressive and extensive lesion because of the high recurrence rate after incomplete removal. PMID:26433924

  3. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Bucci, M. Kara; El-Sayed, Ivan; Xia Ping; Kaplan, Michael J.; Eisele, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 36 patients with malignancies of the sinonasal region were treated with IMRT. Thirty-two patients (89%) were treated in the postoperative setting after gross total resection. Treatment plans were designed to provide a dose of 70 Gy to 95% or more of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and 60 Gy to 95% or more of the clinical tumor volume (CTV) while sparing neighboring critical structures including the optic chiasm, optic nerves, eyes, and brainstem. The primary sites were: 13 ethmoid sinus, 10 maxillary sinus, 7 nasal cavity, and 6 other. Histology was: 12 squamous cell, 7 esthesioneuroblastoma, 5 adenoid cystic, 5 undifferentiated, 5 adenocarcinoma, and 2 other. Median follow-up was 51 months among surviving patients (range, 9-82 months). Results: The 2-year and 5-year estimates of local control were 62% and 58%, respectively. One patient developed isolated distant metastasis, and none developed isolated regional failure. The 5-year rates of disease-free and overall survival were 55% and 45%, respectively. The incidence of ocular toxicity was minimal with no patients reporting decreased vision. Late complications included xerophthalmia (1 patient), lacrimal stenosis (1 patient), and cataract (1 patient). Conclusion: Although IMRT for malignancies of the sinonasal region does not appear to lead to significant improvements in disease control, the low incidence of complications is encouraging.

  4. Absorption of acetylsalicylic acid from the rat nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Hussain, A A; Iseki, K; Kagoshima, M; Dittert, L W

    1992-04-01

    The fate of salicylate in the plasma of rats was followed after nasal, intravenous, and oral administration of 2.0-mg doses of aspirin. Aspirin was well absorbed following nasal administration of a neutralized, nonirritating solution containing triethanolamine. The rate of absorption was slower than that of other nasally administered drugs, such as propranolol or progesterone. The bioavailability of aspirin following nasal administration was 100%, whereas the oral bioavailability was only 58.8% at the dose studied. PMID:1501071

  5. EVALUATION OF THE CHANGES IN THE NASAL CAVITY DURING THE MIGRAINE ATTACK

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, H. Hüseyin; Tokgöz, Erkan; Yıldızoğlu, Üzeyir; Durmaz, Abdullah; Bek, Semai; Gerek, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There are some subjective symptoms involving the nasal cavity such as nasal congestion during a migraine attack. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the possible changes occuring in the nasal cavity, during headache in migraine patients. Material and Methods Subjects with migraine were studied. The control group was consisted with tension-type headache patients. The severity of the headache and accompanying complaints were assessed by visual analog scale, and nasal mucosa was assessed by anterior rhinoscopy and endoscopy. Resistance of the nasal cavity was evaluated with anterior rhinomanometry. The data obtained during the attack periods and attack free periods were compared. Results 25 migraine patients and 15 tension-type headache patients were enrolled. It was found that 19 subjects (%76) of migraine group and 5 of tension-type headache group were suffering from nasal congestion during the attack, and that the differences between the groups were statistically significant (p<0.05). The average of total nasal resistance in migraine patients was 0,57±0,60 kPa/L/sn during migraine attacks and 0,28±0,14 kPa/L/sn during attack free periods. The average of total nasal resistance in tension-type headache patients was 0,32±0,14 kPa/L/sn during attack periods and 0,31±0,20 kPa/L/sn during attack free periods. In the migraine group, the change of nasal resistance between during the attack and attack free periods was found statistically significant, while there was no statistically significant difference in the tension-type headache group. Conclusion According to the results of this study, complaining of nasal obstruction and nasal airway resistance increases during migraine attacks. Cause and effect relationship between nasal obstruction and pain is not clear and clinical trials are needed to determine the effect of nasal obstruction treatment (mucosal decongestion etc.) on the complaint of pain. PMID:25072974

  6. What Are the Key Statistics about Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and paranasal sinus cancers? What are the key statistics about nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancers? Cancers ... rare in the frontal and sphenoid sinuses. Survival statistics for these cancers are discussed in the section “ ...

  7. What Happens After Treatment For Nasal Cavity or Paranasal Sinus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Comes Back: Cancer Recurrence . Help for trouble swallowing and nutrition problems Cancers of the nasal cavity ... treatments can sometimes cause problems such as trouble swallowing, dry mouth, or even loss of teeth. This ...

  8. Unsteady flow in the nasal cavity with high flow therapy measured by stereoscopic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C. J. T.; Buchmann, N. A.; Jermy, M. C.

    2012-03-01

    Nasal high flow (NHF) cannulae are used to deliver heated and humidified air to patients at steady flows ranging from 5 to 50 l/min. In this study, the flow velocities in the nasal cavity across the complete respiratory cycle during natural breathing and with NHF has been mapped in vitro using time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV). An anatomically accurate silicone resin model of a complete human nasal cavity was constructed using CT scan data and rapid prototyping. Physiological breathing waveforms were reproduced in vitro using Reynolds and Womersley number matching and a piston pump driven by a ball screw and stepper motor. The flow pattern in the nasal cavity with NHF was found to differ significantly from natural breathing. Velocities of 2.4 and 3.3 ms-1 occurred in the nasal valve during natural breathing at peak expiration and inspiration, respectively; however, on expiration, the maximum velocity of 3.8 ms-1 occurred in the nasopharynx. At a cannula flow rate of 30 l/min, maximal velocities of 13.6 and 16.5 ms-1 at peak expiration and inspiration, respectively, were both located in the cannula jet within the nasal valve. Results are presented that suggest the quasi-steady flow assumption is invalid in the nasal cavity during natural breathing; however, it was valid with NHF. Cannula flow has been found to continuously flush the nasopharyngeal dead space, which may enhance carbon dioxide removal and increase oxygen fraction.

  9. Variation in the nasal cavity of baboon hybrids with implications for late Pleistocene hominins.

    PubMed

    Eichel, Kaleigh Anne; Ackermann, Rebecca Rogers

    2016-05-01

    Hybridization is increasingly proving to be an important force shaping human evolution. Comparisons of both ancient and modern genomes have provided support for a complex evolutionary scenario over the past million years, with evidence for multiple incidents of gene exchange. However, to date, genetic evidence is still limited in its ability to pinpoint the precise time and place of ancient admixture. For that we must rely on evidence of admixture from the skeleton. The research presented here builds on previous work on the crania of baboon hybrids, focusing on the nasal cavity of olive baboons, yellow baboons, and first generation (F1) hybrids. The nasal cavity is a particularly important anatomical region for study, given the clear differentiation of this feature in Neanderthals relative to their contemporaries, and therefore it is a feature that will likely differ in a distinctive manner in hybrids of these taxa. Metric data consist of 45 linear, area, and volume measurements taken from CT scans of known-pedigree baboon crania. Results indicate that there is clear evidence for differences among the nasal cavities of the parental taxa and their F1 hybrids, including a greater degree of sexual dimorphism in the hybrids. There is also some evidence for transgressive phenotypes in individual F1 animals. The greatest amount of shape variation occurs in the anterior bony cavity, the choana, and the mid-nasopharynx. Extrapolating our results to the fossil record, we would expect F1 hybrid fossils to have larger nasal cavities, on average, than either parental taxon, with overall nasal cavity shape showing the most profound changes in regions that are distinct between the parental taxa (e.g., anterior nasal cavity). We also expect size and shape differences to be more pronounced in male F1 hybrids than in females. Because of pronounced anterior nasal cavity differences between Neanderthals and their contemporaries, we suggest that this model might be effective for

  10. A new nasal cavity nursing methods application in patients with mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liuqing; Qin, Gang; Yang, Xining; Hu, Meichun; Jiang, Fufu; Lai, Tianwei

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare different nasal cavity nursing methods on mechanically ventilated patients. Methods: According to acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHEII), 615 cases of mechanically ventilated patients were divided into group A, group B and group C by stratified random method. Traditional oral nursing plus aspirating secretions from oral cavity and nasal cavity q6h were done in group A. Based on methods in group A, normal saline was used for cleaning nasal cavity in group B. Besides the methods in group A, atomizing nasal cleansing a6h was also used in group C. Incidence rate of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) and APACHE II scores after administrating were compared. The correlation between APACHE II score and outcomes was analyzed by Spearman-rank correlation. Results: In group A, incidence of VAP was 36.76%, group B was 30.24%, group C was 20.38%, and the difference was statistically significant. APACHE II scores in group C were significantly lower compared with group A and B. APACHE II score was negatively correlated with clinical outcomes. Conclusions: For mechanically ventilated patients, nasal nursing can’t be ignored and the new atomizing nasal cleaning is an effective method for VAP prevention. PMID:24353671

  11. Air-conditioning in the human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Elad, David; Wolf, Michael; Keck, Tilman

    2008-11-30

    Healthy humans normally breathe through their nose even though its complex geometry imposes a significantly higher resistance in comparison with mouth breathing. The major functional roles of nasal breathing are defense against infiltrating particles and conditioning of the inspired air to nearly alveolar conditions in order to maintain the internal milieu of the lung. The state-of-the-art of the existing knowledge on nasal air-conditioning will be discussed in this review, including in vivo measurements in humans and computational studies on nasal air-conditioning capacity. Areas where further studies will improve our understanding and may help medical diagnosis and intervention in pathological states will be introduced. PMID:18565805

  12. Lobular capillary haemangioma of the nasal cavity: observation of three specific cases.

    PubMed

    Kapella, M; Panosetti, E; Rombaux, P; Delos, M; Weynand, B

    2001-01-01

    Lobular Capillary Haemangioma of the nasal cavity: Observation of three specific cases. Lobular Capillary Haemangioma, unproperly called "Pyogenic granuloma", is a benign vascular tumour pedunculated on the skin and on mucous membranes of the oral and nasal cavities. Microtrauma and pregnancy are the most often evocated aetiologic factors. Epistaxis and nasal obstruction are the most marked symptoms of this irregular and friable mass. We report three cases (two adult and one paediatric) of this pathology. Two have as trigger factor a nasal microtrauma, the third an oestro-progestative impregnation. A clinical, radiological and histological description allows us to expose the characteristics of this lesion that remains obscure to many rhinologists. Lobular Capillary Haemangioma has to be evocated in the differential diagnosis of each haemorrhagic endonasal mass. PMID:11685962

  13. Impaired Air Conditioning within the Nasal Cavity in Flat-Faced Homo.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Mori, Futoshi; Hanida, Sho; Kumahata, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Shigeru; Samarat, Kaouthar; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Hayashi, Misato; Tomonaga, Masaki; Suzuki, Juri; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Matsuzawa, Teruo

    2016-03-01

    We are flat-faced hominins with an external nose that protrudes from the face. This feature was derived in the genus Homo, along with facial flattening and reorientation to form a high nasal cavity. The nasal passage conditions the inhaled air in terms of temperature and humidity to match the conditions required in the lung, and its anatomical variation is believed to be evolutionarily sensitive to the ambient atmospheric conditions of a given habitat. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with three-dimensional topology models of the nasal passage under the same simulation conditions, to investigate air-conditioning performance in humans, chimpanzees, and macaques. The CFD simulation showed a horizontal straight flow of inhaled air in chimpanzees and macaques, contrasting with the upward and curved flow in humans. The inhaled air is conditioned poorly in humans compared with nonhuman primates. Virtual modifications to the human external nose topology, in which the nasal vestibule and valve are modified to resemble those of chimpanzees, change the airflow to be horizontal, but have little influence on the air-conditioning performance in humans. These findings suggest that morphological variation of the nasal passage topology was only weakly sensitive to the ambient atmosphere conditions; rather, the high nasal cavity in humans was formed simply by evolutionary facial reorganization in the divergence of Homo from the other hominin lineages, impairing the air-conditioning performance. Even though the inhaled air is not adjusted well within the nasal cavity in humans, it can be fully conditioned subsequently in the pharyngeal cavity, which is lengthened in the flat-faced Homo. Thus, the air-conditioning faculty in the nasal passages was probably impaired in early Homo members, although they have survived successfully under the fluctuating climate of the Plio-Pleistocene, and then they moved "Out of Africa" to explore the more severe climates of

  14. Impaired Air Conditioning within the Nasal Cavity in Flat-Faced Homo

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Mori, Futoshi; Hanida, Sho; Kumahata, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Shigeru; Samarat, Kaouthar; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Hayashi, Misato; Tomonaga, Masaki; Suzuki, Juri; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Matsuzawa, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    We are flat-faced hominins with an external nose that protrudes from the face. This feature was derived in the genus Homo, along with facial flattening and reorientation to form a high nasal cavity. The nasal passage conditions the inhaled air in terms of temperature and humidity to match the conditions required in the lung, and its anatomical variation is believed to be evolutionarily sensitive to the ambient atmospheric conditions of a given habitat. In this study, we used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with three-dimensional topology models of the nasal passage under the same simulation conditions, to investigate air-conditioning performance in humans, chimpanzees, and macaques. The CFD simulation showed a horizontal straight flow of inhaled air in chimpanzees and macaques, contrasting with the upward and curved flow in humans. The inhaled air is conditioned poorly in humans compared with nonhuman primates. Virtual modifications to the human external nose topology, in which the nasal vestibule and valve are modified to resemble those of chimpanzees, change the airflow to be horizontal, but have little influence on the air-conditioning performance in humans. These findings suggest that morphological variation of the nasal passage topology was only weakly sensitive to the ambient atmosphere conditions; rather, the high nasal cavity in humans was formed simply by evolutionary facial reorganization in the divergence of Homo from the other hominin lineages, impairing the air-conditioning performance. Even though the inhaled air is not adjusted well within the nasal cavity in humans, it can be fully conditioned subsequently in the pharyngeal cavity, which is lengthened in the flat-faced Homo. Thus, the air-conditioning faculty in the nasal passages was probably impaired in early Homo members, although they have survived successfully under the fluctuating climate of the Plio-Pleistocene, and then they moved “Out of Africa” to explore the more severe climates of

  15. [Extrahepatic metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma to the nasal cavity manifested as massive epistaxis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sung Jae; Cheon, Jae Hee; Lee, Sang Won; Jung, Yoo Seok; Lee, Sang Hyun; Park, Joong-Won; Hong, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Chang-Min

    2004-09-01

    Extrahepatic metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is not infrequently found during the later stage, regarding that the autopsy report described its prevalence to be up to 50%. The most frequent sites are known to be the abdominal lymph nodes, lung and bone. However, metastasis to the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses has been seldom reported, and to out knowledge, there is no Korean report describing extrahepatic metastasis of HCC to these sites. Recently we experienced a case of extrahepatic metastasis of HCC to the nasal cavity in a 50 year-old man with massive epistaxis refractory to conservative treatment. He was found to have a mass of soft tissue attenuation occupying the right nasal cavity at CT, which was biopsy-proven as metastatic HCC. Epistaxis was successfully treated by transcatheter arterial embolization. PMID:15385718

  16. Effects of the ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Burgos, M A; Sanmiguel-Rojas, E; Martín-Alcántara, A; Hidalgo-Martínez, M

    2014-03-01

    We analyse the effects of the air ambient temperature on the airflow across a Caucasian nasal cavity under different ambient temperatures using CFD simulations. A three-dimensional nasal model was constructed from high-resolution computed tomography images for a nasal cavity from a Caucasian male adult. An exhaustive parametric study was performed to analyse the laminar-compressible flow driven by two different pressure drops between the nostrils and the nasopharynx, which induced calm breathing flow rates ࣈ 5.7 L/min and ࣈ 11.3 L/min. The inlet air temperature covered the range - 10(o) C ⩽ To ⩽50(o) C. We observed that, keeping constant the wall temperature of the nasal cavity at 37(o) C, the ambient temperature affects mainly the airflow velocity into the valve region. Surprisingly, we found an excellent linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the air average temperature reached at different cross sections, independently of the pressure drop applied. Finally, we have also observed that the spatial evolution of the mean temperature data along the nasal cavity can be collapsed for all ambient temperatures analysed with the introduction of suitable dimensionless variables, and this evolution can be modelled with the help of hyperbolic functions, which are based on the heat exchanger theory. PMID:24574201

  17. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in an Anatomically-Accurate Scaled Model of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumple, Christopher; Krane, Michael; Richter, Joseph; Craven, Brent

    2013-11-01

    The mammalian nose is a multi-purpose organ that houses a convoluted airway labyrinth responsible for respiratory air conditioning, filtering of environmental contaminants, and chemical sensing. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of respiratory airflow and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture an anatomically-accurate transparent model for stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Challenges in the design and manufacture of an index-matched anatomical model are addressed. PIV measurements are presented, which are used to validate concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian nasal airflow. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  18. Giant Primary Schwannoma of the Left Nasal Cavity and Ethmoid Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Justin; Oh, Lawrence; Cox, Daniel; Forer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A unilateral tumour in the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses is commonly caused by polyps, cysts, and mucoceles, as well as invasive tumours such as papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Schwannomas, in contrast, are rare lesions in this area (Minhas et al., 2013). We present a case of a 52-year-old female who presented with a 4-year progressive history of mucous hypersecretion, nasal obstruction, pain, and fullness. Imaging of the paranasal sinuses showed complete opacification of the entire left nasal cavity and sinuses by a tumour causing subsequent obstruction of the frontal and maxillary sinuses. The tumour was completely excised endoscopically. Histopathology was consistent with that of a schwannoma. PMID:27379190

  19. Tomographic PIV measurements of flow patterns in a nasal cavity with geometry acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Sunghyuk; Heo, Go Eun; Jeon, Young Jin; Sung, Hyung Jin; Kim, Sung Kyun

    2014-01-01

    The flow patterns inside a scaled transparent model of a nasal cavity were measured by tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) with three-dimensional (3D) geometry acquisition. The model was constructed using transparent silicone. The refractive index of the working fluid was matched to the index of silicone by mixing water and glycerol. Four cameras and a double-pulse laser system were used for tomographic PIV. Red fluorescent particles and long-pass filters were used to obtain a high signal-to-noise ratio. The complex geometry of the 3D nasal model was acquired by accumulating triangulated 3D particle positions, obtained through a least square-based triangulation method. Certain morphological operations, such as the opening and closing of the nasal cavity, were used to improve the quality of acquired nasal geometry data. The geometry information was used to distinguish the fluid from the solid regions during the tomographic reconstruction procedure. The quality of the model geometry acquisition and tomographic reconstruction algorithms was evaluated using a synthetic image test. Synthetic images were generated by fitting a computational model (stereolithography file) to the virtual 3D coordinates and by randomly seeding particles inside the nasal region. A perspective transformation matrix of each camera was used to generate the synthetic images based on the experimental configuration of the camera. The synthetic image test showed that the voxel reconstruction quality could be improved by applying acquired model geometry in the tomographic reconstruction step. The nasal geometry was acquired and a flow velocity field was determined by cross-correlating the reconstructed 3D voxel intensities.

  20. From the Cover: Comparative Numerical Modeling of Inhaled Nanoparticle Deposition in Human and Rat Nasal Cavities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingliang; Shang, Yidan; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan; Chen, Rui; Bai, Ru; Wang, Dongliang; Chen, Chunying

    2016-08-01

    To gain a better understanding of nanoparticle exposure in human nasal cavities, laboratory animals (e.g. rat) are used for in vivo studies. However, due to anatomical differences between human and rodent nasal cavities, direct particle deposition comparisons between species are difficult. This paper presents a comparative nanoparticle (1 nm, 10 nm, and 100 nm) deposition study using anatomically realistic models of a human and rat nasal cavity. The particle deposition fraction was highest consistently in the main nasal passage, for all nanoparticles tested, in the human model; whereas this was only the case for 10 nm, and 100 nm particles for the rodent model, where greater deposition was found in the anterior nose for 1 nm particles. A deposition intensity (DI) term was introduced to represent the accumulated deposition fraction on cross-sectional slices. A common and preferential deposition site in the human model was found for all nanoparticles occurring at a distance of 3.5 cm inside the nasal passage. For the rodent model maximum DI occurred in the vestibule region at a distance of 0.3 cm, indicating that the rodent vestibule produces exceptionally high particle filtration capability. We also introduced a deposition flux which was a ratio of the regional deposition fraction relative to the region's surface area fraction. This value allowed direct comparison of deposition flux between species, and a regional extrapolation scaling factor was found (e.g. 1/10 scale for vestibule region for rat to human comparison). This study bridges the in vitro exposure experiments and in vivo nanomaterials toxicity studies, and can contribute towards improving inter-species exposure extrapolation studies in the future. PMID:27208081

  1. Extraction of an incisor embedded within the nasal cavity in two guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    KIDO, Nobuhide; ONO, Kaori; OMIYA, Tomoko; OGUCHI, Yukio; SETOGAWA, Moemi; MACHIDA, Yuuki

    2015-01-01

    Oral examination of two guinea pigs revealed that the unilateral incisor was absent. On radiographic examination, the incisor was identified within the nasal cavity in both patients. Under anesthesia in both patients, the skin was incised from the nostril to 1.5 cm proximal, and the premaxilla and part of the maxilla were exposed. The bone was removed using a surgical drill, and the incisor was exposed in the nasal cavity. The root was grasped with forceps and carefully extracted as it was degraded and very fragile. Diagnosis was easy using oral and radiographic examination. In guinea pig patients where an incisor is absent on oral examination, this condition should be considered. PMID:26118492

  2. Implantation of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum for elimination of Staphylococcus aureus from the nasal cavity in volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Kiryukhina, Nataliya

    Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is a well-documented risk factor of infection and inflammation of the skin, soft tissues and bacteremia. It is also known that most often etiology of these disorders is associated with autoinfection. The present-day methods of opportunistic pathogens eradication from the nasal cavity are based principally on the use of antiseptic and antibacterial agents. For instance, a local antibiotic mupirocin in the form of nasal ointment is considered to be the gold standard for the treatment of S. aureus carriage. The literature describes investigations showing how mupirocin can strengthen antibiotic resistance in S. aureus strains, including those with methicillin resistance (MRSA). It is also common knowledge that recolonization of the nasal mucous membrane takes place within several months after mupirocin treatment. This circumstance dictates the necessity to look for alternative ways of preventing the S. aureus carriage and methods of elimination. One of the methods of nasal S. aureus elimination is implantation of nonpathogenic microorganisms which will extrude opportunistic pathogens without impinging the symbiotic microbiota. Effectiveness of saline suspension of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum containing spray was assessed in a several chamber experiments with simulation of some spaceflight factors (dry immersion, isolation). Various schemes of application of preparations were applied. In all cases of corynebacteria application the strong inhibiting effect against S. aureus was detected. This fact opens a prospect of using nonpathogenic corynebacteria as a nasal probiotic. Administration of the nasal corynebacteria spray possibly prevented cross-infection by MRSA and appearance of staphylococcal infection. Further pre-clinical and clinical study of this bacterial therapy method is under development.

  3. Olfactory and solitary chemosensory cells: two different chemosensory systems in the nasal cavity of the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Background The nasal cavity of all vertebrates houses multiple chemosensors, either innervated by the Ist (olfactory) or the Vth (trigeminal) cranial nerve. Various types of receptor cells are present, either segregated in different compartments (e.g. in rodents) or mingled in one epithelium (e.g. fish). In addition, solitary chemosensory cells have been reported for several species. Alligators which seek their prey both above and under water have only one nasal compartment. Information about their olfactory epithelium is limited. Since alligators seem to detect both volatile and water-soluble odour cues, I tested whether different sensory cell types are present in the olfactory epithelium. Results Electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry were used to examine the sensory epithelium of the nasal cavity of the American alligator. Almost the entire nasal cavity is lined with olfactory (sensory) epithelium. Two types of olfactory sensory neurons are present. Both types bear cilia as well as microvilli at their apical endings and express the typical markers for olfactory neurons. The density of these olfactory neurons varies along the nasal cavity. In addition, solitary chemosensory cells innervated by trigeminal nerve fibres, are intermingled with olfactory sensory neurons. Solitary chemosensory cells express components of the PLC-transduction cascade found in solitary chemosensory cells in rodents. Conclusion The nasal cavity of the American alligator contains two different chemosensory systems incorporated in the same sensory epithelium: the olfactory system proper and solitary chemosensory cells. The olfactory system contains two morphological distinct types of ciliated olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:17683564

  4. Normal Anatomy, Histology, and Spontaneous Pathology of the Nasal Cavity of the Cynomolgus Monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Chamanza, Ronnie; Taylor, Ian; Gregori, Michela; Hill, Colin; Swan, Mark; Goodchild, Joel; Goodchild, Kane; Schofield, Jane; Aldous, Mark; Mowat, Vasanthi

    2016-07-01

    The evaluation of inhalation studies in monkeys is often hampered by the scarcity of published information on the relevant nasal anatomy and pathology. We examined nasal cavities of 114 control cynomolgus monkeys from 11 inhalation studies evaluated 2008 to 2013, in order to characterize and document the anatomic features and spontaneous pathology. Compared to other laboratory animals, the cynomolgus monkey has a relatively simple nose with 2 unbranched, dorsoventrally stacked turbinates, large maxillary sinuses, and a nasal septum that continues into the nasopharynx. The vomeronasal organ is absent, but nasopalatine ducts are present. Microscopically, the nasal epithelium is thicker than that in rodents, and the respiratory (RE) and transitional epithelium (TE) rest on a thick basal lamina. Generally, squamous epithelia and TE line the vestibule, RE, the main chamber and nasopharynx, olfactory epithelium, a small caudodorsal region, while TE is observed intermittently along the passages. Relatively high incidences of spontaneous pathology findings, some resembling induced lesions, were observed and included inflammation, luminal exudate, scabs, squamous and respiratory metaplasia or hyperplasia, mucous cell hyperplasia/metaplasia, and olfactory degeneration. Regions of epithelial transition were the most affected. This information is considered helpful in the histopathology evaluation and interpretation of inhalation studies in monkeys. PMID:26940715

  5. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in Anatomically-Accurate Models of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumple, C.; Richter, J.; Craven, B. A.; Krane, M.

    2012-11-01

    A summary of the research being carried out by our multidisciplinary team to better understand the form and function of the nose in different mammalian species that include humans, carnivores, ungulates, rodents, and marine animals will be presented. The mammalian nose houses a convoluted airway labyrinth, where two hallmark features of mammals occur, endothermy and olfaction. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of airflow and respiratory and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture transparent, anatomically-accurate models for stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements of nasal airflow. Challenges in the design and manufacture of index-matched anatomical models are addressed and preliminary SPIV measurements are presented. Such measurements will constitute a validation database for concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian respiration and olfaction. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  6. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  7. Rhinometric evaluation of nasal cavity geometry and its relation to the upper arch transverse distance.

    PubMed

    Paiva, João Batista; Alves, Adriana Silva; Ribeiro, Annelise Nazareth Cunha; Rino Neto, José; Fantini, Solange Mongeli de

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate children's respiratory patterns in the mixed dentition, by means of acoustic rhinometry, and its relation to the upper arch width development. Fifty patients were examined, 25 females and 25 males with mean age of eight years and seven months. All of them were submitted to acoustic rhinometry and upper and lower arch impressions to obtain plaster models. The upper arch analysis was accomplished by measuring the interdental transverse distance of the upper teeth, deciduous canines (measurement 1), deciduous first molars (measurement 2), deciduous second molars (measurement 3) and the first molars (measurement 4). The results showed that an increased left nasal cavity area in females means an increased interdental distance of the deciduous first molars and deciduous second molars and an increased interdental distance of the deciduous canines, deciduous first and second molars in males. It was concluded that there is a correlation between the nasal cavity area and the upper arch transverse distance in the anterior and mid maxillary regions for both genders. PMID:20027450

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Appearances of Primary Amelanotic Malign Melanoma in the Nasal Cavity: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Gunbey, Emre; Sayit, Asli Tanrivermis; Aslan, Kerim

    2015-01-01

    Malign melanoma of the nasal cavity that arises at such an unusual location is an exceptional case only occasionally mentioned in the literature. An amelanotic form, which is an uncommon type for this malignancy, also has an unusual radiological appearence from the classic melanotic form. We report here the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 46-year-old man who had a nasal cavity mass diagnosed as an amelanotic malign melanoma and discuss the importance of differential diagnosis with such an unusual radiological manifestation in this location. PMID:25859499

  9. The nasal cavity of the sheep and its olfactory sensory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Arthur William; Sanchez Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-12-01

    Macro and microdissection methods, conventional histology and immunohistochemical procedures were used to investigate the nasal cavity and turbinate complex in fetal and adult sheep, with special attention to the ethmoturbinates, the vestibular mucosa, and the septal mucosa posterior to the vomeronasal organ. The ectoturbinates, which are variable in number and size, emerge and develop later than the endoturbinates. The olfactory sensory epithelium is composed of basal cells, neurons, and sustentacular cells organized in strata, but numerous different types are distinguishable on the basis of their thickness and other properties; all variants are present on the more developed turbinates, endoturbinates II and III. Mature neurons and olfactory nerve bundles express olfactory marker protein. We found no structure with the characteristics that in mouse define the septal organ or the ganglion of Grüneberg. Our results thus suggest that in sheep olfactory sensory neurons are exclusively concentrated in the main olfactory epithelium and (to a lesser extent) in the vomeronasal organ. PMID:25213000

  10. How much does nasal cavity morphology matter? Patterns and rates of olfactory airflow in phyllostomid bats

    PubMed Central

    Eiting, Thomas P.; Perot, J. Blair; Dumont, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of the nasal cavity in mammals with a good sense of smell includes features that are thought to improve olfactory airflow, such as a dorsal conduit that delivers odours quickly to the olfactory mucosa, an enlarged olfactory recess at the back of the airway, and a clear separation of the olfactory and respiratory regions of the nose. The link between these features and having a good sense of smell has been established by functional examinations of a handful of distantly related mammalian species. In this paper, we provide the first detailed examination of olfactory airflow in a group of closely related species that nevertheless vary in their sense of smell. We study six species of phyllostomid bats that have different airway morphologies and foraging ecologies, which have been linked to differences in olfactory ability or reliance. We hypothesize that differences in morphology correlate with differences in the patterns and rates of airflow, which in turn are consistent with dietary differences. To compare species, we make qualitative and quantitative comparisons of the patterns and rates of airflow through the olfactory region during both inhalation and exhalation across the six species. Contrary to our expectations, we find no clear differences among species in either the patterns of airflow through the airway or in rates of flow through the olfactory region. By and large, olfactory airflow seems to be conserved across species, suggesting that morphological differences appear to be driven by other mechanical demands on the snout, such as breathing and feeding. Olfactory ability may depend on other aspects of the system, such as the neurobiological processing of odours that work within the existing morphology imposed by other functional demands on the nasal cavity. PMID:25520358

  11. How much does nasal cavity morphology matter? Patterns and rates of olfactory airflow in phyllostomid bats.

    PubMed

    Eiting, Thomas P; Perot, J Blair; Dumont, Elizabeth R

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of the nasal cavity in mammals with a good sense of smell includes features that are thought to improve olfactory airflow, such as a dorsal conduit that delivers odours quickly to the olfactory mucosa, an enlarged olfactory recess at the back of the airway, and a clear separation of the olfactory and respiratory regions of the nose. The link between these features and having a good sense of smell has been established by functional examinations of a handful of distantly related mammalian species. In this paper, we provide the first detailed examination of olfactory airflow in a group of closely related species that nevertheless vary in their sense of smell. We study six species of phyllostomid bats that have different airway morphologies and foraging ecologies, which have been linked to differences in olfactory ability or reliance. We hypothesize that differences in morphology correlate with differences in the patterns and rates of airflow, which in turn are consistent with dietary differences. To compare species, we make qualitative and quantitative comparisons of the patterns and rates of airflow through the olfactory region during both inhalation and exhalation across the six species. Contrary to our expectations, we find no clear differences among species in either the patterns of airflow through the airway or in rates of flow through the olfactory region. By and large, olfactory airflow seems to be conserved across species, suggesting that morphological differences appear to be driven by other mechanical demands on the snout, such as breathing and feeding. Olfactory ability may depend on other aspects of the system, such as the neurobiological processing of odours that work within the existing morphology imposed by other functional demands on the nasal cavity. PMID:25520358

  12. Pindborg Tumor Presenting as a Nasal Polyp: Immunohistology and Ultrastructural Features of a Rare Case, With Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Kaur, Gurwinder; Nada, Ritambhra; Mohindra, Satyawati

    2016-09-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare benign odontogenic tumor. This tumor predominantly involves the mandible, though the maxilla can also be involved in some cases. The involvement of maxillary sinuses, however, has been previously reported in only 8 case reports English literature. These patients chiefly presented with nasal obstruction along with epistaxis or proptosis in rare cases. However, a primary presentation as nasal polyp is unheard of. We present a rare case of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor presenting as a nasal polyp, posing a diagnostic difficulty. PMID:27098590

  13. Nasal epithelial myoepithelial carcinoma: An unusual cause of epiphora, a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Flam, Juliette O.; Sobel, Rachel; Lee, John C.; Platt, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Epithelial myoepithelial carcinoma (EMC) of the nasal cavity is a rare tumor, and here we describe the first case of EMC of the nasal cavity presenting with epiphora. A case presentation and review of the literature is provided. Methods: A case report is described of a 63-year-old man who presented with unilateral epiphora and was found via a thorough history and physical examination to have a nasal tumor. The physical examination consisted of an ocular examination, including probing and irrigation, and a detailed nasal examination (anterior rhinoscopy, nasal endoscopy). The nasal examination was prompted by the patient's report of concurrent nasal symptoms during history taking. Immunohistochemistry subsequently identified the nasal tumor as EMC. A literature search was performed to gain insights into similar malignancies of the nasal cavity. Results: Eight cases of EMC of the nasal cavity were identified in the literature, none of the patients presented with epiphora. The case presented here resulted in resolution of the patient's symptoms and no evidence of disease after surgical excision. Conclusion: Epithelial myoepithelial is a rare salivary gland malignancy that can arise in the nasal cavity. Unilateral epiphora with concurrent nasal symptoms should prompt nasal cavity examination for the possibility of an obstructive tumor. PMID:26302736

  14. Development of brachytherapy technique for nasal tumors in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.; Walker, M.; Legendre, A.M.; Hoopes, J.; Smith, J.; Horton, S.B. )

    1990-08-01

    Two groups of 4 dogs underwent nasal and ethmoidal turbinectomies followed by irradiation (mean minimal) doses of 5,390 and 6,550 cGy of radiation, respectively from implanted intracavitary sources of iridium 192. Two dogs from each group were euthanatized for histologic evaluation at 3 months after irradiation. The remaining 2 dogs from each group were euthanatized for similar evaluation at 6 months after irradiation. During the course of the study, few clinical complications were encountered. Histologic evaluation of the tissues forming the nasal passages revealed loss of epithelial lining and fibrous tissue replacement of surrounding bone. A direct correlation of pathologic changes could not be associated with the amount of radiation received, but there seemed to be a tendency for greater change in those dogs given higher doses and those kept alive for 6 months.

  15. Treatment of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer with modern radiotherapy techniques in the postoperative setting-the MSKCC experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Stegman, Lauren D.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Patel, Snehal G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Lee, Nancy Y. . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective analysis of patients with paranasal sinus (PNS) cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Between January 1987 and July 2005, 85 patients with PNS and nasal cavity cancer underwent postoperative RT. Most patients had squamous cell carcinoma (49%; n = 42), T4 tumors (52%; n = 36), and the maxillary sinus (53%; n = 45) as the primary disease site. The median radiation dose was 63 Gy. Of the 85 patients, 76 underwent CT simulation and 53 were treated with either three-dimensional conformal RT (27%; n = 23) or intensity-modulated RT (35%; n = 30). Acute and late toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Results: With a median follow-up for surviving patients of 60 months, the 5-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival rates were 62%, 87%, 82%, 55%, and 67%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, squamous cell histology and cribriform plate involvement predicted for an increased likelihood of local recurrence, and squamous cell histologic features predicted for worse overall survival. None of the patients who underwent CT simulation and were treated with modern techniques developed a Grade 3-4 late complication of the eye. Conclusion: Complete surgical resection followed by adjuvant RT is an effective and safe approach in the treatment of PNS cancer. Emerging tools, such as three-dimensional conformal treatment and, in particular, intensity-modulated RT for PNS tumors, may minimize the occurrence of late complications associated with conventional RT techniques. Local recurrence remains a significant problem.

  16. Malignant melanoma of the nasal septum, a rare tumor, occurring in a 54-year-old patient after hereditary retinoblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Djiguimdé, Windinmanégdé Pierre; Diomandé, Ibrahim Abib; Bonnin, Nicolas; Saroul, Nicolas; Touré, Abdoulaye; Sanou, Jérôme; Sankara, Paté; Russier, Marc; Gilain, Laurent; Ahnoux-Zabsonré, Ahgbatouhabéba; Meda, Nonfounikoun; Bacin, Franck

    2016-01-01

    The authors report a case of a malignant melanoma of the nasal cavity that is a rare tumor and very aggressive, constituting 1% of all melanomas. It appeared in a patient 54 years after he was treated for a hereditary retinoblastoma. Its symptoms are nonspecific, and often marked by epistaxis. Its diagnosis is histological, supported by immunohistochemistry. Its prognosis is often unfavorable, and characterized by the occurrence of metastases and recurrences. Because of the risk of secondary cancer that exists in any survivor of hereditary retinoblastoma, we must think of possible mucosal melanoma of the nasal sinus in these patients in cases of chronic epistaxis. The prognosis of this tumor depends on its early diagnosis and surgical treatment. PMID:26929670

  17. Malignant melanoma of the nasal septum, a rare tumor, occurring in a 54-year-old patient after hereditary retinoblastoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Djiguimdé, Windinmanégdé Pierre; Diomandé, Ibrahim Abib; Bonnin, Nicolas; Saroul, Nicolas; Touré, Abdoulaye; Sanou, Jérôme; Sankara, Paté; Russier, Marc; Gilain, Laurent; Ahnoux-Zabsonré, Ahgbatouhabéba; Meda, Nonfounikoun; Bacin, Franck

    2016-01-01

    The authors report a case of a malignant melanoma of the nasal cavity that is a rare tumor and very aggressive, constituting 1% of all melanomas. It appeared in a patient 54 years after he was treated for a hereditary retinoblastoma. Its symptoms are nonspecific, and often marked by epistaxis. Its diagnosis is histological, supported by immunohistochemistry. Its prognosis is often unfavorable, and characterized by the occurrence of metastases and recurrences. Because of the risk of secondary cancer that exists in any survivor of hereditary retinoblastoma, we must think of possible mucosal melanoma of the nasal sinus in these patients in cases of chronic epistaxis. The prognosis of this tumor depends on its early diagnosis and surgical treatment. PMID:26929670

  18. A dosimetric comparative study: Volumetric modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Kham; Cummings, David; Lanza, Vincent C.; Morris, Kathleen; Wang, Congjun; Sutton, Jordan; Garcia, John

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas. The treatment of 10 patients, who had completed IMRT treatment for resected tumors of the nasal cavity, was replanned with the Philips Pinnacle{sup 3} Version 9 treatment-planning system. The IMRT plans used a 9-beam technique whereas the VMAT (known as SmartArc) plans used a 3-arc technique. Both types of plans were optimized using Philips Pinnacle{sup 3} Direct Machine Parameter Optimization algorithm. IMRT and VMAT plans' quality was compared by evaluating the maximum, minimum, and mean doses to the target volumes and organs at risk, monitor units (MUs), and the treatment delivery time. Our results indicate that VMAT is capable of greatly reducing treatment delivery time and MUs compared with IMRT. The reduction of treatment delivery time and MUs can decrease the effects of intrafractional uncertainties that can occur because of patient movement during treatment delivery. VMAT's plans further reduce doses to critical structures that are in close proximity to the target volume.

  19. Computed tomography or rhinoscopy as the first-line procedure for suspected nasal tumor: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Finck, Marlène; Ponce, Frédérique; Guilbaud, Laurent; Chervier, Cindy; Floch, Franck; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Chuzel, Thomas; Hugonnard, Marine

    2015-01-01

    There are no evidence-based guidelines as to whether computed tomography (CT) or endoscopy should be selected as the first-line procedure when a nasal tumor is suspected in a dog or a cat and only one examination can be performed. Computed tomography and rhinoscopic features of 17 dogs and 5 cats with a histopathologically or cytologically confirmed nasal tumor were retrospectively reviewed. The level of suspicion for nasal neoplasia after CT and/or rhinoscopy was compared to the definitive diagnosis. Twelve animals underwent CT, 14 underwent rhinoscopy, and 4 both examinations. Of the 12 CT examinations performed, 11 (92%) resulted in the conclusion that a nasal tumor was the most likely diagnosis compared with 9/14 (64%) for rhinoscopies. Computed tomography appeared to be more reliable than rhinoscopy for detecting nasal tumors and should therefore be considered as the first-line procedure. PMID:25694669

  20. Isolated case of mucosal histoid Hansen's disease of the nasal cavity in a post-global elimination era.

    PubMed

    Swain, Santosh K; Jena, Ajay K; Panda, Maitreyee; Mohapatra, Debahuti; Patro, Nibedita; Sahu, Mahesh C

    2015-01-01

    Histoid Hansen's disease is a rare form of multibacillary leprosy with distinct clinical and histopathological features. This type of leprosy is a variant of lepromatous leprosy with a very high bacterial reserve. Of alarming concern is the discovery of an isolated mucosal histoid leprotic lesion inside the nasal cavity of a patient in the post-global leprosy elimination era. Our case had no history of leprosy or exposure to dapsone/multidrug therapy but had a heavy bacillary index. We are reporting this case to highlight the rarity of mucosal lesions due to histoid leprosy and involvement of the nasal cavity, as well as to create awareness and avoid misdiagnosis. This will help facilitate prompt treatment to minimize the complications and deformities of the patient and prevent its spread throughout the community. PMID:26096583

  1. A population-based case-control study of cancers of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Zheng, W; Blot, W J; Shu, X O; Diamond, E L; Gao, Y T; Ji, B T; Fraumeni, J F

    1992-10-21

    A population-based case-control study of cancer of the nasal cavity and sinuses, involving interviews of 60 incident cases and 414 controls, was conducted in Shanghai. Cigarette smoking was associated with a mild elevation in risk of squamous-cell carcinoma but not cancers of other cell types. Occupational exposures to wood and silica dusts and to petroleum products, and the use of wood and straw as cooking fuel, were linked to moderate increases in risk, while 4-fold or greater increases were associated with a history of chronic nasal diseases, including those occurring 10 or more years prior to cancer diagnosis. Dietary analyses revealed a significant protective effect of consumption of allium vegetables, oranges and tangerines, with a 50% reduced risk of nasal cancer among individuals in the highest intake group of these foods. Consumption of salt-preserved vegetables, meat and fish was associated with a significantly increased risk of nasal cancer in a dose-response fashion, with a 5-fold excess observed for the heaviest intake of these salted foods. These findings suggest that dietary factors may contribute to the development of nasal cancer. PMID:1399136

  2. Accessory Meningeal Arterial Supply to the Posterior Nasal Cavity: Another Reason for Failed Endovascular Treatment of Epistaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, I.C. Santos, C. Dos

    2003-09-15

    A patient with intractable posterior epistaxis was treated with embolization of the ipsilateral sphenopalatine and facial arteries and contralateral sphenopalatine artery. She continued to bleed despite a seemingly adequate embolization procedure. A second angiogram revealed a significant collateral blood supply to the posterior nasal cavity from the accessory meningeal artery not identified during the first procedure. This was then embolized with no further epistaxis encountered. This case demonstrates yet another collateral arterial pathway that might account for a failed embolization.

  3. Nasal Chondromesenchymal Hamartoma in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Finitsis, Stefanos; Giavroglou, Constantinos; Potsi, Stamatia; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Mpaltatzidis, Angelos; Rachovitsas, Dimitrios; Tzioufa, Valentini

    2009-05-15

    Nasal chondromesenchymal hamartoma (NCMH) is a benign tumor that was described in 1998. The occurrence of this lesion in the nasal cavity of infants and children is especially rare, with only 21 cases reported in the international literature. We report a 12-month-old boy with respiratory distress due to nasal obstruction. Computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging examination demonstrated a soft-tissue mass obstructing the left nasal cavity. Digital subtraction angiography and preoperative superselective embolization with microparticles were also performed. The tumor was completely resected surgically. Histopathology and immunohistochemical analyses of the tumor disclosed a NCMH. The imaging characteristics of the tumor are described and the radiology literature is reviewed.

  4. Outcome of T4 (International Union Against Cancer Staging System, 7th edition) or Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma Treated With Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashii, Haruko; Ohkawa, Ayako; Moritake, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Tabuchi, Keiji; Wada, Tetsuro; Hara, Akira; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and toxicity of treatment for unresectable carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (NCPS) treated with proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients (13 men, 4 women) with unresectable carcinomas of the NCPS who underwent PBT at University of Tsukuba between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. The patients' median age was 62 years (range, 30-83 years). The tumors were located in the nasal cavity in 3 patients, the frontal sinus in 1, the ethmoid sinus in 9, and the maxillary sinus in 4. The clinical stage was Stage IVA in 5 cases, IVB in 10, and recurrent in 2. The tumors were deemed unresectable for medical reasons in 16 patients and because of refusal at a previous hospital 4 months earlier in 1 patient. All the patients received PBT irradiation dose of 22-82.5 GyE and a total of 72.4-89.6 GyE over 30-64 fractions (median 78 GyE over 36 fractions) with X-ray, with attention not exceeding the delivery of 50 GyE to the optic chiasm and brainstem. Results: The overall survival rate was 47.1% at 2 years and 15.7% at 5 years, and the local control rate was 35.0% at 2 years and 17.5% at 5 years. Invasion of the frontal or sphenoid sinus was a prognostic factor for overall survival or local control. Late toxicity of more than Grade 3 was found in 2 patients (brain necrosis in 1 and ipsilateral blindness in 1); however, no mortal adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy enabled a reduced irradiation dose to the optic chiasm and brainstem, enabling the safe treatment of unresectable carcinomas in the NCPS. Superior or posterior extension of the tumor influenced patient outcome.

  5. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Your paranasal sinuses are small hollow spaces around the nose. They are lined with cells that make mucus, which keeps your nose from drying out. The nasal cavity is the passageway just behind your ...

  6. Identification and methicillin resistance of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from nasal cavity of healthy horses.

    PubMed

    Karakulska, Jolanta; Fijałkowski, Karol; Nawrotek, Paweł; Pobucewicz, Anna; Poszumski, Filip; Czernomysy-Furowicz, Danuta

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was an analysis of the staphylococcal flora of the nasal cavity of 42 healthy horses from 4 farms, along with species identification of CoNS isolates and determination of resistance to 18 antimicrobial agents, particularly phenotypic and genotypic methicillin resistance. From the 81 swabs, 87 staphylococci were isolated. All isolates possessed the gap gene but the coa gene was not detected in any of these isolates. Using PCR-RFLP of the gap gene, 82.8% of CoNS were identified: S. equorum (14.9%), S. warneri (14.9%), S. sciuri (12.6%), S. vitulinus (12.6%), S. xylosus (11.5%), S. felis (5.7%), S. haemolyticus (3.4%), S. simulans (3.4%), S. capitis (1.1%), S. chromogenes (1.1%), and S. cohnii subsp. urealyticus (1.1%). To our knowledge, this was the first isolation of S. felis from a horse. The species identity of the remaining Staphylococcus spp. isolates (17.2%) could not be determined from the gap gene PCR-RFLP analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing data. Based on 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer PCR, 11 different ITS-PCR profiles were identified for the 87 analyzed isolates. Results of API Staph were consistent with molecular identification of 17 (19.5%) isolates. Resistance was detected to only 1 or 2 of the 18 antimicrobial agents tested in the 17.2% CoNS isolates, including 6.9% MRCoNS. The mecA gene was detected in each of the 5 (5.7%) phenotypically cefoxitin-resistant isolates and in 12 (13.8%) isolates susceptible to cefoxitin. In total, from 12 horses (28.6%), 17 (19.5%) MRCoNS were isolated. The highest percentage of MRCoNS was noted among S. sciuri isolates (100%). PMID:22752908

  7. Customized individual applicators for endocavitary brachytherapy in patients with cancers of the nasal cavity, sinonasal region and nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Kadah, Basel Al; Niewald, Marcus; Papaspyrou, George; Dzierma, Yvonne; Schneider, Mathias; Schick, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Brachytherapy has become an established therapeutic regimen for primary, persistent, recurrent and metastatic tumour disease in the head and neck region. This study presents the authors' preliminary experience with intracavitary brachytherapy by means of an individual silicone applicator in the treatment of patients with nasal, sinonasal, orbital and nasopharyngeal cancer. Between January 2001 and January 2013, twenty patients with cancer of the nasal cavity, the paranasal sinuses and nasopharynx underwent surgery and intracavitary brachytherapy with the aid of an individually manufactured silicone applicator in the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and in the Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology at the Saarland University Medical Center of Homburg, Germany. The tumour was localized in the nasal cavity/paranasal sinuses (15) affecting the orbit twice and the nasopharynx (5). There were 14 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, 2 patients with mixed tumours and one patient with adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, mucosal melanoma or plasmocytoma. The majority of the patients presented with advanced disease (T3 or T4 tumours). In 18/20 patients, brachytherapy was performed as a boost technique, in the remaining two solely because of a previous radiation series. All surgical interventions were performed endonasally. Three to six weeks after surgery, a cast of the nasal cavity was created under general anaesthesia. Subsequently, an individual brachytherapy silicon applicator with two to four plastic tubes was manufactured. The radiation therapy was applied using the Ir-192 high-dose-rate-afterloading method (total dose 10-20 Gy) in two to five sessions, additionally in 18/20 patients a percutaneous radiotherapy with a total dose of 30-60 Gy was applied. After a mean duration of follow-up of 2 years, 7/20 patients experienced a local progression, 5/19 a regional recurrence in the neck nodes and 4/19 distant metastases. The 2-year

  8. Induction chemotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of the paranasal sinus and nasal cavity: a role in organ preservation

    PubMed Central

    Ock, Chan-Young; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Tae Min; Han, Doo Hee; Won, Tae-Bin; Lee, Se-Hoon; Hah, J. Hun; Kwon, Tack-Kyun; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Dong-Young; Rhee, Chae-Seo; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Sung, Myung-Whun; Heo, Dae Seog

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The role of induction chemotherapy (IC) for eyeball preservation has not been established in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) of the paranasal sinus and nasal cavity (PNSNC). Periorbital involvement frequently leads to eyeball exenteration with a margin of safety. We evaluated the treatment outcomes, including survival and eyeball preservation, of patients who received IC for HNSCC of the PNSNC. Methods: We reviewed 21 patients diagnosed with HNSCC of the PNSNC who were treated with IC. We analyzed response, eyeball preservation rate, and overall survival. Results: Tumors were located in the paranasal sinus (n = 14) or nasal cavity (n = 7). Most patients had stage T4a (n = 10) or T4b (n = 7) disease. More than half of the patients received a chemotherapy regimen of docetaxel, fluorouracil, and cisplatin (n = 11). Thirteen patients (61.9%) achieved a partial response after IC and 15 patients (71.4%) achieved T down-staging. Among 17 patients with stage T4 disease, which confers a high risk of orbital exenteration, 14 (82.4%) achieved preservation of the involved eye. The 3-year overall survival (OS) rate of patients who achieved a partial response to IC was 84.6%. The 3-year OS rate of patients with stable disease or disease progression after IC was 25.0% (p = 0.038). Conclusions: IC could be considered for down-staging patients with advanced T-stage disease. It could also be a reasonable option for eyeball preservation in locally advanced HNSCC of the PNSNC. PMID:26976150

  9. Carcinomas of the Paranasal Sinuses and Nasal Cavity Treated With Radiotherapy at a Single Institution Over Five Decades: Are We Making Improvement?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. Daly, Megan E.; Bucci, M. Kara; Xia Ping; Akazawa, Clayton C.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Weinberg, Vivian; Garcia, Joaquin; Lee, Nancy Y.; Kaplan, Michael J.; El-Sayed, Ivan; Eisele, David W.; Fu, Karen K.; Phillips, Theodore L.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To compare clinical outcomes of patients with carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity according to decade of radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2005, 127 patients with sinonasal carcinoma underwent radiotherapy with planning and delivery techniques available at the time of treatment. Fifty-nine patients were treated by conventional radiotherapy; 45 patients by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy; and 23 patients by intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Eighty-two patients (65%) were treated with radiotherapy after gross total tumor resection. Nineteen patients (15%) received chemotherapy. The most common histology was squamous cell carcinoma (83 patients). Results: The 5-year estimates of overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival for the entire patient population were 52%, 62%, and 54%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to decade of treatment or radiotherapy technique (p > 0.05, for all). The 5-year overall survival rate for patients treated in the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s was 46%, 56%, 51%, 53%, and 49%, respectively (p = 0.23). The observed incidence of severe (Grade 3 or 4) late toxicity was 53%, 45%, 39%, 28%, and 16% among patients treated in the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, respectively (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Although we did not detect improvements in disease control or overall survival for patients treated over time, the incidence of complications has significantly declined, thereby resulting in an improved therapeutic ratio for patients with carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity.

  10. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance for the advanced imaging of the normal nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Bercier, Marjorie; Alexander, Kate; Gorow, April; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) for the cross-sectional imaging of the normal anatomy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), to provide reference figures for gross anatomy with corresponding CT and MR images and to compare the features of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the normal koala with that reported in other domestic species. Advanced imaging can be used to aid in diagnosis, to plan surgical intervention, and to monitor therapeutic responses to diseases of the nasal passages in koalas. One clinically normal koala was anesthetized twice for the separate acquisition of dorsal CT scan images and transverse, dorsal, and sagittal MR images of its nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Sagittal and transverse CT planes were reformatted. Three fresh koala skulls were also transected in one of each transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes and photographed. The CT and MR images obtained were matched with corresponding gross anatomic images and the normal bone, tissues and airway passages were identified. All anatomic structures were readily identifiable on CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and gross images. CT and MRI are both valuable diagnostic tools for imaging the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses of koalas. Images obtained from this project can be used as baseline references for future comparison with diseased koalas to help with diagnosis, surgical intervention, and response to therapy. PMID:25632661

  11. Metastatic tumors of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Roopa S; Patil, Shankargouda; Sanketh, Ds; Amrutha, N

    2014-01-01

    The pivotal reason for morbidity and mortality of any type of cancer is due to metastasis that occurs as a result of adaptation of genetically unstable cancer cells, in an ectopic conducive environment. Oral metastasis in spite of being unusual or rare represents around 25% of the first signs of metastatic spread. Literature says there are more number of cases of jaw bone metastasis reported than in the oral soft tissues. The most common primary organs metastasizing to the jaw bones and the oral soft tissues are the breast and the lungs respectively. The issue in diagnosing a metastatic tumor arises either when the patient does not reveal the history of the primary illness he or she may be suffering from or when he or she is unaware of it. Diagnosis in such situations is a challenge to the clinician or pathologist. Diagnosing any lymph node or distant metastasis from oral cancer is very important for the prognosis of the patient. In this review we have made an attempt, to explain some recent concepts of pathophysiology of the metastatic process, the clinical manifestations of metastatic tumors to the oral region and to discuss their diagnostic workup. PMID:25095855

  12. Comprehensive management of head and neck tumors, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Thawley, S.E.; Panje, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 14 parts, each containing several papers. The parts are: General Considerations in the Management of Patients with Head and Neck Tumors, Tumors of the Ear, Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses, Tumors of the Oral Cavity, Tumors of the Pharynx, Tumors of the Larynx, Tumors of the Skin, Dental and Jaw Tumors, Tumors of the Thyroid and Parathyroid Glands, Tumors of the Trachea, Tumors of the Eye, Orbit, and Lacrimal Apparatus, and Special Topics.

  13. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma in the nasal cavity treated with proton beam therapy concurrent with cisplatin: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a rare and aggressive variant of squamous cell carcinoma. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is mostly seen in the upper aerodigestive tract and has a propensity for lymph node spread and systemic metastases. Various treatment modalities have been reported, including surgical excision supplemented with radiotherapy/adjuvant chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge, treatment of nasal basaloid squamous cell carcinoma with proton beam therapy and cisplatin has not been described in the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 56-year-old Japanese man with locally invasive basaloid squamous cell carcinoma in his right nasal cavity with invasion of the orbit, paranasal sinus, and buccal subcutaneous tissue. He underwent proton beam therapy concurrent with cisplatin. Acute and late side effects did not exceed grade 3. At 24-month follow up, he remains in complete remission. Conclusion Proton beam therapy concurrent with cisplatin may be one choice for locally invasive basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:24716457

  14. Resting-state fMRI study of acute migraine treatment with kinetic oscillation stimulation in nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Tie-Qiang; Wang, Yanlu; Hallin, Rolf; Juto, Jan-Erik

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic oscillatory stimulation (KOS) in the nasal cavity is a non-invasive cranial nerve stimulation method with promising efficacy for acute migraine and other inflammatory disorders. For a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of KOS treatment, we conducted a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of 10 acute migraine patients and 10 normal control subjects during KOS treatment in a 3 T clinical MRI scanner. The fMRI data were first processed using a group independent component analysis (ICA) method and then further analyzed with a voxel-wise 3-way ANOVA modeling and region of interest (ROI) of functional connectivity metrics. All migraine participants were relieved from their acute migraine symptoms after 10-20 min KOS treatment and remained migraine free for 3-6 months. The resting-state fMRI result indicates that migraine patients have altered intrinsic functional activity in the anterior cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and middle/superior temporal gyrus. KOS treatment gave rise to up-regulated intrinsic functional activity for migraine patients in a number of brain regions involving the limbic and primary sensory systems, while down regulating temporally the activity for normal controls in a few brain areas, such as the right dorsal posterior insula and inferior frontal gyrus. The result of this study confirms the efficacy of KOS treatment for relieving acute migraine symptoms and reducing attack frequency. Resting-state fMRI measurements demonstrate that migraine is associated with aberrant intrinsic functional activity in the limbic and primary sensory systems. KOS in the nasal cavity gives rise to the adjustment of the intrinsic functional activity in the limbic and primary sensory networks and restores the physiological homeostasis in the autonomic nervous system. PMID:27622142

  15. [Local anesthesia in the children undergoing the fibroendoscopic study of the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, and larynx: are topical anesthetics needed?].

    PubMed

    Soldatsky, Yu L; Denisova, O A; Mazur, E M

    2015-01-01

    This prospective randomized study with double blind control was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of various anesthetic techniques employed prior to fibroendoscopy of the nose, nasopharynx, and larynx of the children. The study included 160 children at the age varying from 3 to 14 (mean 7.4±2.96) years randomly allocated to four statistically comparable groups matched for age and sex. The following preparations were used to treat the children prior to fibroendoscopy: physiological solution (group 1), a 0.05% xylometazoline solution (group 2), a 10% lidocaine solution (group 3), and a mixture of 0.05% xylometazoline and 10% lidocaine solutions (group 4). The evaluation of the tolerance to the pretreatment of the nasal cavity with lidocaine and lidocaine plus xylometazoline (groups 3 and 4) showed that it was significantly (p<0.05) worse than in groups 1 and 2. The subjective tolerance to fibroendoscopy as reported by the patients was on the average similar in the children of all four groups (p>0.05). The doctors found the tolerance of fibroendoscopy to be the worst following pretreatment with the physiological solution (group 1) and the best after pretreatment with a mixture of lidocaine and xylometazoline (group 4) (p=0.03). The children comprising groups 2 and 3 were not significantly different in terms of the tolerance to fibroendoscopy (p>0.05). It is concluded that the pretreatment of the nasal cavity of the children with a 10% lidocaine solution before fibroendoscopy has no advantage over the pretreatment with a 0.05% xylometazoline solution; at the same time, insuflation of lidocaine as an anesthetic induces more pronounced negative emotions compared with the application of 0.05% xylometazoline. PMID:26525473

  16. Effects of nasal CPAP on exhaled SIRT1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Chi; Liaw, Shwu-Fang; Chiu, Chung-Hsin; Chen, Wei-Ji; Lin, Mei-Wei; Chang, Feng-Ting

    2016-07-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been used to examine airway inflammation and oxidative stress. This study aimed to evaluate if there were abnormal Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in EBC and to determine if these levels could be improved after nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Thirty-five patients with moderately severe to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) who wanted nasal CPAP treatment and 20 healthy controls were prospectively enrolled. The EBC SIRT1 protein levels and EBC TNF-α protein levels were assessed by ELISA. All patients underwent sleep studies that were repeated 3 months after nasal CPAP treatment in patients with OSAS. Results showed that in OSAS before nasal CPAP treatment, the EBC SIRT1 protein levels were lower than that in normal subjects, whereas the EBC TNF-α protein levels were higher. After nasal CPAP treatment, the EBC SIRT1 levels increased and EBC TNF-α levels decreased. In conclusion, successful treatment of OSAS by nasal CPAP can normalize the levels of EBC SIRT1 and EBC TNF-α. PMID:26976689

  17. COLONY FORMATION ENHANCEMENT OF RAT TRACHEAL AND NASAL EPITHELIAL CELLS BY POLYACETATE, INDOLE ALKALOID, AND PHORBOL ESTER TUMOR PROMOTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), teleocidin, and two polyacetate tumor promoters (aplysiatoxin and debromoaplysiatoxin) have been tested for their effect on colony forming efficiency (CFE) of rat tracheal and nasal turbinate epithelial cells. In rat t...

  18. Metastatic tumors to the jaws and oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gs; Manjunatha, Bs

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a disease involving complex multiple sequential irreversible dysregulated processes showing metastasis that results in morbidity and mortality. Metastasis is a complex biological course that begins with detachment of tumor cells from the primary tumor, spreading into the distant tissues and/or organs, invading through the lymphovascular structures followed by their survival in the circulation. Metastatic tumors to the oro-facial region are uncommon and may occur in the oral soft tissues or jawbones. The clinical presentation of metastatic tumors can be variable, which may lead to erroneous diagnosis or may create diagnostic dilemma. Therefore, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory and reactive lesions that are common to the oral region. Most of the literature on oral metastases involves either single case reports or reviews of these reported cases from scattered geographical areas. Hence this present article is an attempt to provide a detailed review of pathogenesis, epidemiological details including clinical and radiographic presentations, microscopic features and treatment of metastatic tumors to the jaws and oral cavity. PMID:23798834

  19. Retro-Nasal Aroma Release Is Correlated with Variations in the In-Mouth Air Cavity Volume after Empty Deglutition

    PubMed Central

    Mishellany-Dutour, Anne; Woda, Alain; Labouré, Hélène; Bourdiol, Pierre; Lachaze, Pauline; Guichard, Elisabeth; Feron, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that interindividual differences in motor activities during chewing and/or swallowing were determining factors for the transfer of volatile aroma from the in-mouth air cavity (IMAC) toward the olfactory mucosa. In our first experiment, we looked for changes in IMAC volume after saliva deglutition in 12 healthy subjects. The mean IMAC volume was measured after empty deglutition using an acoustic pharyngometer device. Based on the time course of the IMAC volume after swallowing, we discerned two groups of subjects. The first group displayed a small, constant IMAC volume (2.26 mL ±0.62) that corresponded to a high tongue position. The second group displayed a progressive increase in IMAC (from 6.82 mL ±2.37 to 22.82 mL ±3.04) that corresponded to a progressive lowering of the tongue to its resting position. In our second experiment, we investigated the relationship between IMAC volume changes after deglutition and the level of aroma release at the nostril. For this purpose, the release of menthone was measured at the nostril level in 25 subjects who consumed similar amounts of a mint tablet. The subjects were separated into two groups corresponding to two levels of menthone release: high (H) and low (L). The mean volume of IMAC was measured during and after empty deglutition. Group H displayed a small, constant amplitude of IMAC volume change after deglutition, while Group L displayed a progressive increase in IMAC. It is likely that Group H continuously released the aroma through the veloglossal isthmus as the mint was consumed, while Group L trapped the aroma in the oral cavity and then released it into the nasal cavity upon swallowing. These results show that the in vivo aroma release profile in humans depends closely on the different motor patterns at work during empty deglutition. PMID:22815986

  20. Nasal disease in relation to fitness of a pilot.

    PubMed

    Pickard, B H

    1984-05-01

    The nasal cavity and sinus system is extensive but its examination is limited. Listening to breathing and respiration can afford useful clues to underlying abnormality. Examination of the nasal cavity may reveal the pale swollen mucosa of allergic rhinitis or the overdeveloped lining seen in perennial rhinorrhoea and hypertropic rhinitis. Localised hypertrophy gives rise to the nasal polyp which usually forms in the region of the ethmoid sinus. Atrophic rhinitis is a destructive condition of the nasal lining. Sinusitis may be open or closed, presenting with localised pain and displacement of the eye in the case of frontal or ethmoidal abscess or mucocoele. Deformities of the external nose or nasal septum are often encountered during examination. Epistaxis may be caused by bleeding simply from Kiesselbach's vessels, or may be an early feature of telangiectasia or cardiovascular diseases. Tumors are rarely found but include papillomata and the mucous membrane melanoma. PMID:6732702

  1. Low-dose oxytocin delivered intranasally with Breath Powered device affects social-cognitive behavior: a randomized four-way crossover trial with nasal cavity dimension assessment.

    PubMed

    Quintana, D S; Westlye, L T; Rustan, Ø G; Tesli, N; Poppy, C L; Smevik, H; Tesli, M; Røine, M; Mahmoud, R A; Smerud, K T; Djupesland, P G; Andreassen, O A

    2015-01-01

    Despite the promise of intranasal oxytocin (OT) for modulating social behavior, recent work has provided mixed results. This may relate to suboptimal drug deposition achieved with conventional nasal sprays, inter-individual differences in nasal physiology and a poor understanding of how intranasal OT is delivered to the brain in humans. Delivering OT using a novel 'Breath Powered' nasal device previously shown to enhance deposition in intranasal sites targeted for nose-to-brain transport, we evaluated dose-dependent effects on social cognition, compared response with intravenous (IV) administration of OT, and assessed nasal cavity dimensions using acoustic rhinometry. We adopted a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, crossover design, with 16 healthy male adults completing four single-dose treatments (intranasal 8 IU (international units) or 24 IU OT, 1 IU OT IV and placebo). The primary outcome was social cognition measured by emotional ratings of facial images. Secondary outcomes included the pharmacokinetics of OT, vasopressin and cortisol in blood and the association between nasal cavity dimensions and emotional ratings. Despite the fact that all the treatments produced similar plasma OT increases compared with placebo, there was a main effect of treatment on anger ratings of emotionally ambiguous faces. Pairwise comparisons revealed decreased ratings after 8 IU OT in comparison to both placebo and 24 IU OT. In addition, there was an inverse relationship between nasal valve dimensions and anger ratings of ambiguous faces after 8-IU OT treatment. These findings provide support for a direct nose-to-brain effect, independent of blood absorption, of low-dose OT delivered from a Breath Powered device. PMID:26171983

  2. Potential of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein-Derived Protein Transduction Domains as Antigen Carriers for Nasal Vaccine Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hae-Duck; Lee, Joohyun; Jin, Xing-Hai; Lee, Kyunglim

    2016-09-01

    Nasal vaccination offers a promising alternative to intramuscular (i.m.) vaccination because it can induce both mucosal and systemic immunity. However, its major drawback is poor absorption of large antigens in the nasal epithelium. Protein transduction domains (PTDs), also called cell-penetrating peptides, have been proposed as vehicles for nasal delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins. Here, we evaluated the potential of a mutant PTD derived from translationally controlled tumor protein (designated TCTP-PTD 13) as an antigen carrier for nasal vaccines. We first compared the l- and d-forms of TCTP-PTD 13 isomers (l- or d-TCTP-PTD 13) as antigen carriers. Studies in mice demonstrated that nasally administered mixtures of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) and d-TCTP-PTD 13 induced higher plasma IgG titers and secretory IgA levels in nasal washes than nasally administered OVA alone, OVA/l-TCTP-PTD 13, or i.m.-injected OVA. Plasma IgG subclass responses (IgG1 and IgG2a) of mice nasally administered OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13 showed that the predominant IgG subclass was IgG1, indicating a Th2-biased immune response. We also used synthetic CpG oligonucleotides (CpG) as a Th1 immune response-inducing adjuvant. Nasally administered CpG plus OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13 was superior in eliciting systemic and mucosal immune responses compared to those induced by nasally administered OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13. Furthermore, the OVA/CpG/d-TCTP-PTD 13 combination skewed IgG1 and IgG2a profiles of humoral immune responses toward a Th1 profile. These findings suggest that TCTP-derived PTD is a suitable vehicle to efficiently carry antigens and to induce more powerful antigen-specific immune responses and a more balanced Th1/Th2 response when combined with a DNA adjuvant. PMID:27454469

  3. A Review of the Comparative Anatomy, Histology, Physiology and Pathology of the Nasal Cavity of Rats, Mice, Dogs and Non-human Primates. Relevance to Inhalation Toxicology and Human Health Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Chamanza, R; Wright, J A

    2015-11-01

    There are many significant differences in the structural and functional anatomy of the nasal cavity of man and laboratory animals. Some of the differences may be responsible for the species-specific nasal lesions that are often observed in response to inhaled toxicants. This paper reviews the comparative anatomy, physiology and pathology of the nasal cavity of the rat, mouse, dog, monkey and man, highlighting factors that may influence the distribution of nasal lesions. Gross anatomical variations such as turbinate structure, folds or grooves on nasal walls, or presence or absence of accessory structures, may influence nasal airflow and species-specific uptake and deposition of inhaled material. In addition, interspecies variations in the morphological and biochemical composition and distribution of the nasal epithelium may affect the local tissue susceptibility and play a role in the development of species-specific nasal lesions. It is concluded that, while the nasal cavity of the monkey might be more similar to that of man, each laboratory animal species provides a model that responds in a characteristic and species-specific manner. Therefore for human risk assessment, careful consideration must be given to the anatomical differences between a given animal model and man. PMID:26460093

  4. Clinical Efficacy of a Spray Containing Hyaluronic Acid and Dexpanthenol after Surgery in the Nasal Cavity (Septoplasty, Simple Ethmoid Sinus Surgery, and Turbinate Surgery)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. This prospective, controlled, parallel-group observational study investigated the efficacy of a spray containing hyaluronic acid and dexpanthenol to optimise regular treatment after nasal cavity surgery in 49 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Methods. The control group received standard therapy. Mucosal regeneration was determined using rhinoscopy sum score (RSS). Pre- and postoperative nasal patency was tested using anterior rhinomanometry. The participants were questioned about their symptoms. Results. Regarding all RSS parameters (dryness, dried nasal mucus, fibrin deposition, and obstruction), mucosal regeneration achieved good final results in both groups, tending to a better improvement through the spray application, without statistically significant differences during the whole assessment period, the mean values being 7.04, 5.00, 3.66, and 3.00 (intervention group) and 7.09, 5.14, 4.36, and 3.33 (control group). No statistically significant benefit was identified for nasal breathing, foreign body sensation, and average rhinomanometric volume flow, which improved by 12.31% (control group) and 11.24% (nasal spray group). Conclusion. The investigational product may have additional benefit on postoperative mucosal regeneration compared to standard cleaning procedures alone. However, no statistically significant advantage could be observed in this observational study. Double-blind, controlled studies with larger populations will be necessary to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment modality. PMID:25104962

  5. Nasal Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement CONDITIONS Adult ... Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly ...

  6. Nasal cytochrome P4502A: Identification in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Ding, Xinxin

    1995-12-01

    The nasal mucosa, the first tissue of contact for inhaled xenobiotics, possesses substantial enobiotic-metabolizing capacti. Enzymes of the nasal cavity may metabolize xenobiotics to innocuous, more water-soluble compounds that are eliminated from the body, or they may bioactivate them to toxic metabolites. These toxic metabolites may find to cellular macromolecules in the nasal cavity or be transported to other parts of the body where they may react. Nasal carcinogenesis in rodents often results from bioactivation of xenobiotics. The increased incidences of nasal tumors associated with certain occupations suggest that xenobiotic bioactivation may be important in human nasal cancer etiology, as well. The increasing popularity of the nose as a route of drug administration makes information concerning nasal drug metabolism and disposition vital to accomplish therapeutic goals. For these reasons, the study of xenobiotic-met abolizing capacity of the nasal cavity is an important area of health-related research. In the present study, we have confirmed the presence of CYP2A6 mRNA in human respiratory mucosa.

  7. The acoustic role of tracheal chambers and nasal cavities in the production of sonar pulses by the horseshoe bat, Rhinolophus hildebrandti.

    PubMed

    Suthers, R A; Hartley, D J; Wenstrup, J J

    1988-04-01

    The acoustic role of the enlarged, bony, nasal cavities and rigid tracheal chambers in the horseshoe bat, Rhinolophus hildebrandti (Fig. 2) was investigated by determining the effect of their selective filling on the nasally emitted sonar pulse and on the sound traveling backwards down the trachea. Normal sonar signals of this bat contain a long constant frequency component with most energy in the second harmonic at about 48 kHz. The fundamental is typically suppressed 20 to 30 dB below the level of the second harmonic (Fig. 1). None of the experimental manipulations described affected the frequency of the sonar signal fundamental. Filling the dorsal and both lateral tracheal chambers had little effect on the emitted vocalization, but caused the level of the fundamental component in the trachea to increase 15 to 19 dB in most bats (Table 2). When only the dorsal chamber or only the two lateral chambers were filled, the effect was less striking and more variable (Tables 3 and 4), suggesting that the tracheal fundamental is normally suppressed by acoustic interaction between these three cavities. Filling the enlarged dorsal nasal cavities had no effect on the tracheal sound. The effect of this treatment on the nasally emitted sonar pulse was inconsistent. Sometimes the fundamental increased 10 to 12 dB, other times the intensity of all harmonics decreased; in still other cases the second, third or fourth harmonic increased, but the fundamental remained unchanged (Tables 5, 6, and 7). When bats were forced to vocalize through the mouth, by sealing the nostrils, there was a prominent increase in the level of the emitted fundamental (10 to 21 dB) and in the fourth harmonic (6 to 17 dB). In one instance there was also a significant increase in the level of the third harmonic (Tables 8 and 9). The supraglottal tract thus filters the fundamental from the nasally emitted sonar signal, although the role of the inflated nasal cavities in this process is unclear. We conclude

  8. Intranasal Volume Changes Caused by the Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach and Their Effects on Nasal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Hong, Yong-Kil; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Park, Yong Jin; Kim, Soo Whan; Cho, Jin Hee; Kim, Boo Young; Han, Sungwoo; Lee, Yong Joo; Hwang, Jae Hyung; Kim, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective We evaluated postoperative changes in nasal cavity volume and their effects on nasal function and symptoms after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for antero-central skull base surgery. Study Design Retrospective chart review at a tertiary referral center. Methods We studied 92 patients who underwent binostril, four-hand, endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach surgery using the bilateral modified nasoseptal rescue flap technique. Pre- and postoperative paranasal computed tomography and the Mimics® program were used to assess nasal cavity volume changes at three sections. We also performed several pre- and postoperative tests, including the Connecticut Chemosensory Clinical Research Center test, Cross-Cultural Smell Identification Test, Nasal Obstruction Symptoms Evaluation, and Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-20. In addition, a visual analog scale was used to record subjective symptoms. We compared these data with the pre- and postoperative nasal cavity volumes. Results Three-dimensional, objective increases in nasal passage volumes were evident between the inferior and middle turbinates (p<0.001) and between the superior turbinate and choana (p = 0.006) postoperatively. However, these did not correlate with subjectively assessed symptoms (NOSE, SNOT-20 and VAS; all nasal cavity areas; p≥0.05) or olfactory dysfunction (CCCRC and CCSIT test; all nasal cavity areas; p≥0.05). Conclusion Skull base tumor surgery via an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach altered the patients’ nasal anatomy, but the changes in nasal cavity volumes did not affect nasal function or symptoms. These results will help surgeons to appropriately expose the surgical field during an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. PMID:27010730

  9. Combination of CO2 laser-assisted uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and nasal cavity expansion enhances treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huai, De; Dai, Jun; Xu, Min; Cao, Ying; Song, Hongmao; Wang, Shoufeng; Wang, Haixu; Yin, Min; Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Yalong; Zhou, Xiaojian; Wang, Jianwu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the methods, effects, and application value of a combination of CO2 laser-assisted uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) and selective nasal cavity expansion for the treatment of multiplanar narrowing-induced obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Ninety-three patients with OSAHS and multiplanar stenosis were treated with CO2 laser-assisted modified UPPP and selective surgical expansion of the nasal cavity, with 12 completing the operation in stages. Six months after the operation, 23 patients (24.7%) were effectively cured, 52 (55.9%) had excellent efficacy, and 18 (19.4%) were cured, and the total efficacy was 100%. One year after the surgery, the surgical outcomes of 65 patients were reviewed, and the surgeries were ineffective in four (6.2%), effective in 14 (21.5%), very effective in 36 (55.4%), and curative in 11 (16.9%), and the total efficacy was 93.8%. Another 93 cases were treated with the traditional UPPP method only. At the six-month postoperative review, 18 (19.4%) were effectively cured, 30 (32.3%) had excellent efficacy, and 10 (10.8%) were cured, while the surgery was ineffective in 35 (37.6%). The total efficacy was 62.4%. One year after the surgery, the surgical outcomes of 75 patients were reviewed, and the surgeries were ineffective in 29 (38.7%), effective in 14 (18.7%), very effective in 24 (32.0%), and curative in eight (10.7%), and the total efficacy was 61.3%. Compared to the traditional operative methods, the treatment with one operation involving CO2-laser-assisted UPPP and selective nasal cavity expansion was thoroughly effective on multiple stenosis sites, including nasal, nasopharyngeal, and oropharyngeal airways. However, potential complications must be carefully avoided. PMID:26770642

  10. Diversity of bacterial species in the nasal cavity of sheep in the highlands of Ethiopia and first report of Histophilus somni in the country.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Biruk; Sisay Tessema, Tesfaye; Tefera, Genene

    2013-06-01

    A study was conducted to isolate bacterial species/pathogens from the nasal cavity of apparently healthy and pneumonic sheep. Nasal swabs were collected aseptically, transported in tryptose soya broth and incubated for 24 h. Then, each swab was streaked onto chocolate and blood agar for culture. Bacterial species were identified following standard bacteriological procedures. Accordingly, a total of 1,556 bacteria were isolated from 960 nasal swabs collected from three different highland areas of Ethiopia, namely Debre Berhan, Asella, and Gimba. In Debre Berhan, 140 Mannheimia haemolytica, 81 Histophilus somni, 57 Staphylococcus species, and 52 Bibersteinia trehalosi were isolated. While from Gimba M. haemolytica, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and H. somni were isolated at rates of 25.2, 15.9, 11.4, and 5.9 %, respectively, of the total 647 bacterial species. In Asella from 352 bacterial species isolated, 93 (26.4 %) were M. haemolytica, 48 (13.6 %) were Staphylococcus species, 26 (7.4 %) were B. trehalosi, and 17 (4.8 %) H. somni were recognized. Further identification and characterization using BIOLOG identification system Enterococcus avium and Sphingomonas sanguinis were identified at 100 % probability, while, H. somni and Actinobacillus lignerisii were suggested by the system. The study showed that a variety of bacterial species colonize the nasal cavity of the Ethiopian highland sheep with variable proportion between healthy and pneumonic ones. To our knowledge, this is the first report on isolation of H. somni, an important pathogen in cattle, from the respiratory tract of a ruminant species in the country. PMID:23328945

  11. Use of an image-guided robotic radiosurgery system for the treatment of canine nonlymphomatous nasal tumors.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Seth A; Charney, Sarah; Dervisis, Nikolaos G; Witten, Matthew R; Ettinger, Susan; Berg, Jason; Joseph, Richard

    2014-01-01

    An image-guided robotic stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) system can be used to deliver curative-intent radiation in either single fraction or hypofractionated doses. Medical records for 19 dogs with nonlymphomatous nasal tumors treated with hypofractionated image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), either with or without adjunctive treatment, were retrospectively analyzed for survival and prognostic factors. Median survival time (MST) was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Age, breed, tumor type, stage, tumor size, prescribed radiation dose, and heterogeneity index were analyzed for prognostic significance. Dogs were treated with three consecutive-day, 8-12 gray (Gy) fractions of image-guided robotic SBRT. Overall MST was 399 days. No significant prognostic factors were identified. Acute side effects were rare and mild. Late side effects included one dog with an oronasal fistula and six dogs with seizures. In three of six dogs, seizures were a presenting complaint prior to SBRT. The cause of seizures in the remaining three dogs could not be definitively determined due to lack of follow-up computed tomography (CT) imaging. The seizures could have been related to either progression of disease or late radiation effect. Results indicate that image-guided robotic SBRT, either with or without adjunctive therapy, for canine nonlymphomatous nasal tumors provides comparable survival times (STs) to daily fractionated megavoltage radiation with fewer required fractions and fewer acute side effects. PMID:24446402

  12. In vivo microvascular imaging of human oral and nasal cavities using swept-source optical coherence tomography with a single forward/side viewing probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-03-01

    We report three-dimensional (3D) imaging of microcirculation within human cavity tissues in vivo using a high-speed swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) at 1.3 μm with a modified probe interface. Volumetric structural OCT images of the inner tissues of oral and nasal cavities are acquired with a field of view of 2 mm x 2 mm. Two types of disposable and detachable probe attachments are devised and applied to the port of the imaging probe of OCT system, enabling forward and side imaging scans for selective and easy access to specific cavity tissue sites. Blood perfusion is mapped with OCT-based microangiography from 3D structural OCT images, in which a novel vessel extraction algorithm is used to decouple dynamic light scattering signals, due to moving blood cells, from the background scattering signals due to static tissue elements. Characteristic tissue anatomy and microvessel architectures of various cavity tissue regions of a healthy human volunteer are identified with the 3D OCT images and the corresponding 3D vascular perfusion maps at a level approaching capillary resolution. The initial finding suggests that the proposed method may be engineered into a promising tool for evaluating and monitoring tissue microcirculation and its alteration within a wide-range of cavity tissues in the patients with various pathological conditions.

  13. In vivo imaging of functional microvasculature within tissue beds of oral and nasal cavities by swept-source optical coherence tomography with a forward/side-viewing probe

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    We report three-dimensional (3D) imaging of microcirculation within human cavity tissues in vivo using a high-speed swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) at 1300 nm with a modified probe interface. Volumetric structural OCT images of the inner tissues of oral and nasal cavities are acquired with a field of view of 2 mm × 2 mm. Two types of disposable and detachable probe attachments are devised and applied to the port of the imaging probe of OCT system, enabling forward and side imaging scans for selective and easy access to specific cavity tissue sites. Blood perfusion is mapped with OCT-based microangiography from 3D structural OCT images, in which a novel vessel extraction algorithm is used to decouple dynamic light scattering signals, due to moving blood cells, from the background scattering signals due to static tissue elements. Characteristic tissue anatomy and microvessel architectures of various cavity tissue regions of a healthy human volunteer are identified with the 3D OCT images and the corresponding 3D vascular perfusion maps at a level approaching capillary resolution. The initial finding suggests that the proposed method may be engineered into a promising tool for evaluating and monitoring tissue microcirculation and its alteration within a wide-range of cavity tissues in the patients with various pathological conditions. PMID:25136490

  14. Interstitial radiation therapy for early-stage nasal vestibule cancer: A continuing quest for optimal tumor control and cosmesis

    SciTech Connect

    Levendag, Peter C. . E-mail: p.levendag@erasmusmc.nl; Nijdam, Wideke M.; Moolenburgh, Sanne E. van; Tan, Lisa; Noever, Inge R.T.T.; Rooy, Peter van; Mureau, Marc; Jansen, Peter P.; Munte, Kai; Hofer, Stefan O.P.

    2006-09-01

    Introduction: This article reports on the effectiveness, cosmetic outcome, and costs of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for early-stage cancer of the nasal vestibule (NV) proper and/or columella high-dose-rate (HDR). Methods and Materials: Tumor control, survival, cosmetic outcome, functional results, and costs were established in 64 T1/T2N0 nasal vestibule cancers treated from 1991-2005 by fractionated interstitial radiation therapy (IRT) only. Total dose is 44 Gy: 2 fractions of 3 Gy per day, 6-hour interval, first and last fraction 4 Gy. Cosmesis is noted in the chart by the medical doctor during follow-up, by the patient (visual analog scale), and by a panel. Finally, full hospital costs are computed. Results: A local relapse-free survival rate of 92% at 5 years was obtained. Four local failures were observed; all four patients were salvaged. The neck was not treated electively; no neck recurrence in follow-up was seen. Excellent cosmetic and functional results were observed. With 10 days admission for full treatment, hospital costs amounted to Euro 5772 ($7044). Conclusion: Excellent tumor control, cosmesis, and function of nasal airway passage can be achieved when HDR-IRT for T1/T2N0 NV cancers is used. For the more advanced cancers (Wang classification: T3 tumor stage), we elect to treat by local excision followed by a reconstructive procedure. The costs, admission to hospital inclusive, for treatment by HDR-IRT amounts to Euro 5772 ($7044 US). This contrasts substantially with the full hospital costs when NV cancers are treated by plastic reconstructive surgery, being on average threefold as expensive.

  15. [The influence of an isotonic solution containing benzalkonium chloride and a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium from the nasal cavity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Laberko, E L; Bogomil'sky, M R; Soldatsky, Yu L; Pogosova, I E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of an isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride and of a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium in the nasal cavity in vitro. To this effect, we investigated the cytological material obtained from 35 children presenting with adenoid tissue hypertrophy. The tissue samples were taken from the nasal cavity by the standard method. A cellular biopsy obtained from each patient was distributed between three tubes that contained isotonic saline solution supplemented by benzalconium chloride (0.1 mg/ml), a hypertonic seawater solution, and a standard physiological saline solution. It was shown that the number of the viable cells in both isotonic solutions was statistically comparable and significantly higher than in the hypertonic solution (p<0.05). The ciliary beat frequency of the cells embedded in the two isotonic solutions was not significantly different but considerably exceeded that in the hypertonic seawater solution (p<0.05). Thus, the present study has demonstrated the absence of the ciliotoxic influence of isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml and the strong ciliotoxic effect of the hypertonic seawater solution. This finding gives reason to recommend isotonic solutions for the regular application whereas hypertonic solutions can be prescribed only during infectious and/or inflammatory ENT diseases. PMID:27213656

  16. Extramedullary nasal plasmacytoma: Literature review and a rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Corvo, Marco Antonio dos Anjos; Granato, Lídio; Ikeda, Felipe; de Próspero, José Donato

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Extramedullary plasmacytoma is a plasma cell tumor that grows within any of the soft tissues of the organism. Similar to all plasmacytic dyscrasia, the disease is extremely rare. Aim: This study reports a case of an extramedullary plasmacytoma of the nasal cavity and provides a literature review on the topic. Case report: A 51-year-old woman presented at our tertiary university hospital with a 6-month history of progressive nasal obstruction, predominantly to the right side, and self-limiting epistaxis. Examination revealed a large pale-reddish tumor within the right nasal cavity. Anatomopathological analysis showed features consistent with a plasmacytoma diagnosis, which was subsequently confirmed by immunohistochemical techniques. Further assessment revealed the solitary nature of the condition, consistent with extramedullary plasmacytoma. Radiotherapy was initiated, which led to partial regression of the symptoms. The tumor was surgically removed by using a mid-facial degloving approach. The patient evolved with a naso-oral fistula and underwent 3 corrective surgeries. No evidence of associated systemic disease was found after 5 years of follow-up. Conclusions: This case report, which describes a rare tumor of the nasal cavity, is expected to improve the recognition and referral of this condition by ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialists for multidisciplinary management and long-term follow-up. PMID:25992016

  17. Treatment of nasal hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Simic, R; Vlahovic, A; Subarevic, V

    2009-10-01

    Hemangiomas are the most common soft tissue tumors of infancy. Almost 60% of these tumors develop in the head and neck region. Nasal hemangiomas, distort human physiognomy and leave long lasting psychological sequelae. Conservative approach (intralesional corticosteroids, laser) may accelerate involution. Proponents of an early surgery suggest that aesthetic improvement during a critical period in child development can be achieved. Fourteen patients with nasal hemangioma were treated during 5-year period (2003-2007) with intralesional corticosteroids, lenticular excision, open rhinoplasty excision, and circular excision with "purse string suture". The first line of treatment for large nasal hemangiomas is intralesional corticosteroids. Excision is indicated for small hemangiomas, while subtotal excision is preferable for large nasal hemangiomas. Circular excision and "purse string suture" is appropriate for prominent hemangiomas with predominant deep component. In our opinion surgery with maximal care for nasal architecture is the treatment option for nasal hemangioma. PMID:19656579

  18. Genotypes and enterotoxicity of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the hands and nasal cavities of flight-catering employees.

    PubMed

    Hatakka, M; Björkroth, K J; Asplund, K; Mäki-Petäys, N; Korkeala, H J

    2000-11-01

    Hand and nasal samples of flight-catering staff were collected from 1995 to 1997 to find employees carrying Staphylococcus aureus. Altogether 153 hand samples and 136 nose samples were taken. Nasal sampling showed a higher prevalence of S. aureus among food handlers (29%) than hand sampling (9%). A high proportion of the strains (46%) were enterotoxigenic, and a considerable amount of food handlers carried enterotoxigenic S. aureus, 6% and 12% according to hand and nasal sampling, respectively. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis macrorestriction profiles revealed a total of 32 different types associated with the 35 employees carrying S. aureus. In most cases, the same type colonized both the hand and nose of a person. Despite the wide variety of types found, one strain colonized five persons and the second most common strain was associated with four food handlers. The predominant toxin produced was B, which was produced by the most common strain. The results showed that nasal sampling is a good way to detect S. aureus carriers, whereas hand sampling may fail to reveal carriers. The high proportion of enterotoxigenic strains show that a food handler harboring S. aureus must be considered a potential source of enterotoxigenic strains for airline meals. PMID:11079688

  19. Osteolipoma: a rare tumor in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Omonte, Sheyla Viana; de Andrade, Bruno Augusto Benevenuto; Leal, Rosana Maria; Capistrano, Hermínia Marques; Souza, Paulo Eduardo Alencar; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello

    2016-07-01

    Osteolipoma is a rarely reported histologic variant of lipoma that exhibits bone formation. To the best of our knowledge, only 13 well-documented case reports of osteolipoma in the oral cavity have been published in the English literature. This study presents the clinical, radiographic, and histologic features of an osteolipoma in the oral cavity and reviews the pertinent literature. The patient was a 29-year-old female, who presented with an 8-month history of a painless, progressively enlarging, well-defined, movable submucosal mass in the left posterior buccal mucosa. The lesion had a hard consistency. Imaging findings revealed a spherical radiopacity with an irregular trabecular pattern. The lesion was excised and the diagnosis of osteolipoma was established. No recurrence was observed after a 5-year follow-up. PMID:26652892

  20. alpha-Galactosylceramide can act as a nasal vaccine adjuvant inducing protective immune responses against viral infection and tumor.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sung-Youl; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Chang, Woo-Sung; Park, Se-Ho; Kweon, Mi-Na; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2005-09-01

    alpha-Galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) is a ligand of invariant Valpha14+ NKT cells and is presented by CD1d molecule on APC. NKT cells produce a large amount of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in response to alpha-GalCer-presented APC. In this study, we assessed whether alpha-GalCer could act as an effective nasal vaccine adjuvant for mucosal vaccine that would be capable of inducing systemic as well as mucosal immune responses. When alpha-GalCer was administered with OVA via the intranasal route to C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, significant OVA-specific mucosal secretory IgA, systemic IgG, and CTL responses were induced with mixed Th1 and Th2 cytokine profiles seen in both strains of mice. Interestingly, as BALB/c mice were intranasally immunized with PR8 hemagglutinin Ag isolated from influenza virus A/PR/8/34 together with alpha-GalCer, significant protection was afforded against influenza viral infection. When alpha-GalCer was coimmunized with a replication-deficient live adenovirus to BALB/c mice, it significantly induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. In addition, intranasal administration of OVA with alpha-GalCer showed complete protection against EG7 tumor challenge in C57BL/6. The adjuvant effects induced by intranasal coadministration with alpha-GalCer were blocked in CD1d-/- mice, indicating that the immune responses were exclusively mediated by CD1d molecule on APC. Most interestingly, intranasally coadministered alpha-GalCer activated naive T cells and triggered them to differentiate into functional effector T cells when CFSE-labeled OT-1 cells were adoptively transferred into syngeneic mice. Overall, our results are the first to show that alpha-GalCer can act as a nasal vaccine adjuvant inducing protective immune responses against viral infections and tumors. PMID:16116223

  1. Nasal chondromesenchymal hamartomas arise secondary to germline and somatic mutations of DICER1 in the pleuropulmonary blastoma tumor-predisposition disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Douglas R.; Messinger, Yoav; Williams, Gretchen M.; Yang, Jiandong; Field, Amanda; Schultz, Kris Ann P.; Harney, Laura A.; Doros, Leslie A.; Dehner, Louis P.; Hill, D. Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Background Nasal chondromesenchymal hamartoma (NCMH) is a rare nasal tumor that typically presents in young children. We previously reported on NCMH occurrence in children with pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB), a rare pulmonary dysembryonic sarcoma that is the hallmark neoplasm in the PPB-associated DICER1 tumor predisposition disorder. Methods Original pathologic materials from individuals with a PPB, PPB-associated tumor and/or a DICER1 mutation were centrally reviewed by the International PPB Registry. Paraffin-embedded NCMH tumor tissue was available in three cases. Laser-capture microdissection was used to isolate mesenchymal spindle cells and cartilage in one case for Sanger sequencing of DICER1. Results Nine patients (5F/4M) had PPB and NCMH. NCMH was diagnosed at a median age of 10 years (range 6-21years). NCMH developed 4.5 - 13 years after PPB. Presenting NCMH symptoms included chronic sinusitis and nasal congestion. Five patients had bilateral tumors. Local NCMH recurrences required several surgical resections in two patients, but all nine patients were alive at 0 – 16 years of follow-up. Pathogenic germline DICER1 mutations were found in 6/8 NCMH patients tested. In 2 of the patients with germline DICER1 mutations, somatic DICER1 missense mutations were also identified in their NCMH (E1813D; n=2). Three additional PPB patients developed other nasal lesions seen in the general population (a Schneiderian papilloma, chronic sinusitis with cysts, and allergic nasal polyps with eosinophils). Two of these patients had germline DICER1 mutations. Conclusion Pathogenic germline and somatic mutations of DICER1 in NCMH establishes that the genetic etiology of NCMH is similar to PPB, despite the disparate biological potential of these neoplasms. PMID:25118636

  2. Tumor cell nuclear diameter and CD30 expression as potential prognostic parameter in patients with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Hong, Junshik; Park, Sanghui; Baek, Hae Lim; Jung, Joo Hyun; Kang, Il Gyu; Sym, Sun Jin; Park, Jinny; Ahn, Jeong Yeal; Cho, Eun Kyung; Kim, Seon Tae; Shin, Dong Bok; Lee, Jae Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (nasal ENKTL) is a distinct clinicopathologic entity of lymphoid tumors with variable size and differentiation of tumor cells. Nasal ENKTL is related to infection of the tumor cells with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and virtually all cases contain monoclonal episomal EBV DNA and detectable EBV encoded small nuclear RNAs (EBERs). Several clinical factors are known for their relation to the prognosis, but histopathologic prognostic factors of nasal ENKTL have not yet been well established. We evaluated the prognostic value of the longest nuclear diameter of EBER+ tumor cells (NDTC) along with the result of CD30 expression. Twenty two patients with newly diagnosed nasal ENKTL were evaluated regarding clinicopathologic characteristics. NDTC was measured using a computerized image analysis system. The results were expressed as the mean diameter of ≥ 50 cells in a patient. Median of the mean NDTC of the patients was 7.32 μm (5.15-11.27). Patients with larger mean NDTC (≥ 7.35 μm) had a poorer event-free survival (EFS) than those with smaller mean NDTC (<7.35 μm; p = 0.024) and had a tendency of inferior overall survival (OS) (p = 0.08). Patients with CD30 expression had a inferior EFS (p = 0.018) and OS (p = 0.011) compared those without CD30 expression. The NDTC of EBV infected tumor cell and CD30 expression had relation to survival in the current exploratory analysis. PMID:23119111

  3. A simple classification of cranial-nasal-orbital communicating tumors that facilitate choice of surgical approaches: analysis of a series of 32 cases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yue-Fei; Lei, Bing-Xi; Zheng, Mei-Guang; Zheng, Yi-Qing; Chen, Wei-Liang; Lan, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Cranial-nasal-orbital communicating tumors involving the anterior and middle skull base are among the most challenging to treat surgically, with high rates of incomplete resection and surgical complications. Currently, there is no recognized classification of tumors with regard to the choice of surgical approaches. From January 2004 to January 2014, we classified 32 cranial-nasal-orbital communicating tumors treated in our center into three types according to the tumor body location, scope of extension and direction of invasion: lateral (type I), central (type II) and extensive (type III). This classification considerably facilitated the choice of surgical routes and significantly influenced the surgical time and amount of hemorrhage during operation. In addition, we emphasized the use of transnasal endoscopy for large and extensive tumors, individualized treatment strategies drafted by a group of multidisciplinary collaborators, and careful reconstruction of the skull base defects. Our treatment strategies achieved good surgical outcomes, with a high ratio of total resection (87.5 %, 28/32, including 16 cases of benign tumors and 12 cases of malignant tumors) and a low percentage of surgical complications (18.8 %, 6/32). Original symptoms were alleviated in 29 patients. The average KPS score improved from 81.25 % preoperatively to 91.25 % at 3 months after surgery. No serious perioperative complications occurred. During the follow-up of 3 years on average, four patients with malignant tumors died, including three who had subtotal resections. The 3-year survival rate of patients with malignant tumors was 78.6 %, and the overall 3-year survival rate was 87.5 %. Our data indicate that the simple classification method has practical significance in guiding the choice of surgical approaches for cranial-nasal-orbital communicating tumors and may be extended to other types of skull base tumors. PMID:27016919

  4. TP53, p14ARF, p16INK4a and H-ras gene molecular analysis in intestinal-type adenocarcinoma of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Federica; Oggionni, Maria; Birindelli, Sarah; Suardi, Simona; Tabano, Silvia; Romano, Roberta; Moiraghi, Maria Luisa; Bimbi, Gabriella; Quattrone, Pasquale; Cantu, Giulio; Pierotti, Marco A; Licitra, Lisa; Pilotti, Silvana

    2003-06-10

    Intestinal-type adenocarcinoma (ITAC) of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is an uncommon tumor associated with occupational exposure to dusts of different origin. Few investigations addressed molecular alterations in ITAC mainly focused on TP53, K-ras and H-ras gene mutations. The occurrence of TP53, p14(ARF) and p16(INK4a) deregulation and H-ras mutations was investigated in 21 consecutive and untreated ITACs cases, 17 with known professional exposure. No H-ras mutations were found. In patients with known exposure, cumulative evidence of TP53 or p14(ARF) alterations accounted for 88% and the evidence of p16(INK4a) alterations for 65%, respectively. TP53 mutations were present in 44% of the ITACs, consisted of G:C-->A:T transitions in 86%, and involved the CpG dinucleotides in 50% of the cases. LOH at the locus 17p13 and an uncommon high rate of p53 stabilization were detected in 58% and 59% of the cases, respectively. p14(ARF)and p16(INK4a) promoter methylation accounted for 80% and 67% respectively, and LOH at the locus 9p21 occurred in 45% of the cases. Interestingly, all dust-exposed tumors with p16(INK4a) alterations shared TP53 or p14(ARF) deregulation. The present results show a close association of this occupational tumor with TP53, p14(ARF) and p16(INK4a) gene deregulation. Given the important role that these genes play in cell growth control and apoptosis, the knowledge of ITAC genetic profile may be helpful in selecting more tailored treatments. PMID:12673679

  5. Characteristics of Nasal-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (NALT) and Nasal Absorption Capacity in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Haihong; Yan, Mengfei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    As the main mucosal immune inductive site of nasal cavity, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) plays an important role in both antigen recognition and immune activation after intranasal immunization. However, the efficiency of intranasal vaccines is commonly restricted by the insufficient intake of antigen by the nasal mucosa, resulting from the nasal mucosal barrier and the nasal mucociliary clearance. The distribution of NALT and the characteristic of nasal cavity have already been described in humans and many laboratory rodents, while data about poultry are scarce. For this purpose, histological sections of the chicken nasal cavities were used to examine the anatomical structure and histological characteristics of nasal cavity. Besides, the absorptive capacity of chicken nasal mucosa was also studied using the materials with different particle size. Results showed that the NALT of chicken was located on the bottom of nasal septum and both sides of choanal cleft, which mainly consisted of second lymphoid follicle. A large number of lymphocytes were distributed under the mucosal epithelium of inferior nasal meatus. In addition, there were also diffuse lymphoid tissues located under the epithelium of the concha nasalis media and the walls of nasal cavity. The results of absorption experiment showed that the chicken nasal mucosa was capable to absorb trypan blue, OVA, and fluorescent latex particles. Inactivated avian influenza virus (IAIV) could be taken up by chicken nasal mucosa except for the stratified squamous epithelium sites located on the forepart of nasal cavity. The intake of IAIV by NALT was greater than that of the nasal mucosa covering on non-lymphoid tissue, which could be further enhanced after intranasal inoculation combined with sodium cholate or CpG DNA. The study on NALT and nasal absorptive capacity will be benefit for further understanding of immune mechanisms after nasal vaccination and development of nasal vaccines for poultry. PMID

  6. Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Brain Tumors Delivered via a Novel Intra-Cavity Moldable Polymer Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Cheryl V.; Smith, Stuart J.; Morgan, Paul S.; Langmack, Keith A.; Clarke, Phil A.; Ritchie, Alison A.; Macarthur, Donald C.; Rose, Felicity R.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Grundy, Richard G.; Ruman Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Polymer-based delivery systems offer innovative intra-cavity administration of drugs, with the potential to better target micro-deposits of cancer cells in brain parenchyma beyond the resected cavity. Here we evaluate clinical utility, toxicity and sustained drug release capability of a novel formulation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles. Methods PLGA/PEG microparticle-based matrices were molded around an ex vivo brain pseudo-resection cavity and analyzed using magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography. In vitro toxicity of the polymer was assessed using tumor and endothelial cells and drug release from trichostatin A-, etoposide- and methotrexate-loaded matrices was determined. To verify activity of released agents, tumor cells were seeded onto drug-loaded matrices and viability assessed. Results PLGA/PEG matrices can be molded around a pseudo-resection cavity wall with no polymer-related artifact on clinical scans. The polymer withstands fractionated radiotherapy, with no disruption of microparticle structure. No toxicity was evident when tumor or endothelial cells were grown on control matrices in vitro. Trichostatin A, etoposide and methotrexate were released from the matrices over a 3-4 week period in vitro and etoposide released over 3 days in vivo, with released agents retaining cytotoxic capabilities. PLGA/PEG microparticle-based matrices molded around a resection cavity wall are distinguishable in clinical scanning modalities. Matrices are non-toxic in vitro suggesting good biocompatibility in vivo. Active trichostatin A, etoposide and methotrexate can be incorporated and released gradually from matrices, with radiotherapy unlikely to interfere with release. Conclusion The PLGA/PEG delivery system offers an innovative intra-cavity approach to administer chemotherapeutics for improved local control of malignant brain tumors. PMID:24155955

  7. [Craniosinusonasal tumors].

    PubMed

    Blagoveshchenskaia, N S; Egorova, V K

    1997-01-01

    Tumors extending into the nasal cavity, cranium, and paranasal sinuses have a number of distinctive features to take into consideration. Among them are the communication with an open air, high incidence of associated intracranial infections, specific complications (i.e. suppurative sinusitis, polyps, mucocele, pneumocephalus, nasal CSF leak). The features mentioned make these lesions unique. 50 consecutive patients underwent treatment in Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. The diagnosis was confirmed either by CT, MRI, or at operation. Rhinological and otoneurological signs were also subjected to analysis. Most frequently these tumors (the majority of which were meningiomas (n = 34) extended into the nasal cavity (40 patients) and paranasal sinuses (n = 50). It was noted that the clinical signs vary depending on the histological type of tumor, its location and direction of growth (i.e. medial or lateral). Medially growing tumors usually involved 2-4 sinuses, while laterally growing tumors involved only one sinus. Among the symptoms, disturbances of smell, conductive hearing impairment, deformation of both the soft and hard palate, slowing of the experimental nystagmus due to disturbed extraocular movements. Some light is shed on the differential diagnosis, indications for various surgical approaches (transcranial, transnasal, and facial). The results of surgical treatment and postoperative complications are presented in the paper. The diagnosis and treatment of such patients require an interdisciplinary approach while would involve a team of a neurosurgeon, neuroradiologist, otoneurologist, and a neuro-ophthalmologist. PMID:9424946

  8. Rational design of nasal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Slütter, Bram; Hagenaars, Niels; Jiskoot, Wim

    2008-01-01

    Nasal vaccination is a promising alternative to classical parental vaccination, as it is non-invasive and, in principle, capable of eliciting strong systemic and local immune responses. However, the protective efficacy of nasally administered antigens is often impaired because of delivery problems: free antigens are readily cleared from the nasal cavity, poorly absorbed by nasal epithelial cells and generally have low intrinsic immunogenicity. In this review paper, we describe the main physiological hurdles to nasal vaccine delivery, survey the progress made in technological approaches to overcome these hurdles and discuss emerging opportunities for improving nasal vaccines. According to current insights, encapsulation of the antigen into bioadhesive (nano)particles is a promising approach towards successful nasal vaccine delivery. These antigen-loaded particles can be tailor made by supplying them with targeting ligands, adjuvants or endosomal escape mediators to form the desired vaccine that provides long-lasting protective immunity. PMID:18172815

  9. Encapsulated therapeutic stem cells implanted in the tumor resection cavity induce cell death in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kauer, Timo M; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Hingtgen, Shawn; Shah, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutically engineered stem cells have shown promise for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) therapy; however, key preclinical studies are urgently needed for their clinical translation. In this study, we investigated a new approach to GBM treatment using therapeutic stem cells encapsulated in biodegradable, synthetic extracellular matrix (sECM) in mouse models of human GBM resection. Using multimodal imaging, we first showed quantitative surgical debulking of human GBM tumors in mice, which resulted in increased survival. Next, sECM encapsulation of engineered stem cells increased their retention in the tumor resection cavity, permitted tumor-selective migration and release of diagnostic and therapeutic proteins in vivo. Simulating the clinical scenario of GBM treatment, the release of tumor-selective S-TRAIL (secretable tumor necrosis factor apoptosis inducing ligand) from sECM-encapsulated stem cells in the resection cavity eradicated residual tumor cells by inducing caspase-mediated apoptosis, delayed tumor regrowth and significantly increased survival of mice. This study demonstrates the efficacy of encapsulated therapeutic stem cells in mouse models of GBM resection and may have implications for developing effective therapies for GBM. PMID:22197831

  10. Distribution of Genes Encoding Resistance to Macrolides Among Staphylococci Isolated From the Nasal Cavity of Hospital Employees in Khorramabad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Tahmasbi, Farzad; Anbari, Khatereh; Ghafarzadeh, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data on antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus strains isolated from nasal carriers in each region can be helpful to select appropriate drugs to eradicate carriage states, control nosocomial infections and also treat patients. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the antibiotic resistance profile and the molecular prevalence of the ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA genes among Staphylococcus strains isolated from the anterior nares of hospital employees. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, a total of 100 Staphylococcus isolates, 51 Staphylococcus aureus, 49 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were isolated from the anterior nares of hospital employees in Khorramabad, Iran. Susceptibility pattern to macrolide antibiotics were determined using the disk diffusion method. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was applied to determine the major erythromycin-resistant genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Results Fifty-three (53%) isolates were simultaneously resistant to erythromycin, azithromycin and clarithromycin (cross-resistance); while 8 (8%) isolates had variable macrolide susceptibility pattern. Among the S. aureus isolates, the difference in prevalence of resistance to erythromycin between males and females was significant (P = 0.011). The frequency of ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA genes were 3%, 5%, 33% and 20%, respectively. It was also found that out of 53 isolates resistant to erythromycin, 44 (83%) isolates (eight S. aureus and thirty-six CoNS strains) carried at least one of the four tested genes. Eight (8%) isolates had intermediate phenotype to erythromycin, in which 4 (50%) isolates carried ermB or ermC genes. In addition, out of 39 erythromycin-susceptible isolates, 3 (7.7%) isolates were positive for ermB or ermC genes. Conclusions No entire association was found between genotype and phenotype methods to detect macrolides-resistant isolates. In addition, distribution of genetically erythromycin

  11. Puffed-cheek computed tomography: a dynamic maneuver for imaging oral cavity tumors.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Nezahat; Bulbul, Erdogan; Songu, Murat; Uluc, Engin; Onal, Kazim; Apaydin, Melda; Katilmis, Huseyin

    2012-09-01

    We conducted a prospective study to compare the effectiveness of conventional computed tomography (CT) and puffed-cheek CT in detecting the presence and extension of oral cavity malignant tumors. We enrolled 11 patients--5 men and 6 women, aged 32 to 85 years--who had a primary squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. These tumors were located in the floor of the mouth in 4 patients, in the buccal mucosa in 4, in both the buccal mucosa and retromolar trigone in 2, and in the retromolar trigone only in 1. First, conventional contrast-enhanced axial CT was obtained through the oral cavity and neck in each patient. Next, axial imaging was obtained through the oral cavity while patients inflated their cheeks, pursed their lips, and held their breath. We found that the puffed-cheek CTs provided more information regarding the size and extent of the squamous cell carcinomas than did the conventional CTs. For example, in 8 patients, conventional CT could not differentiate the tumor from the normal mucosal surface, but puffed-cheek images clearly showed the surface of the tumor as distinct from the normal mucosa. More disconcerting was the fact that in the other 3 patients, conventional CTs were evaluated as normal, even though puffed-cheek imaging clearly showed the mass in each case. We conclude that puffed-cheek CT is superior to conventional CT for evaluating the mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity. It provides a clearer and more detailed picture with no downside. PMID:22996710

  12. Molecular Imaging Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Spontaneous Nasal Tumors in Canines

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Tyler J.; Bowen, Stephen R.; Deveau, Michael A.; Kubicek, Lyndsay; White, Pamela; Bentzen, Søren M.; Chappell, Richard J.; Forrest, Lisa J.; Jeraj, Robert

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Imaging biomarkers of resistance to radiation therapy can inform and guide treatment management. Most studies have so far focused on assessing a single imaging biomarker. The goal of this study was to explore a number of different molecular imaging biomarkers as surrogates of resistance to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two canine patients with spontaneous sinonasal tumors were treated with accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy, receiving either 10 fractions of 4.2 Gy each or 10 fractions of 5.0 Gy each to the gross tumor volume. Patients underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-, fluorothymidine (FLT)-, and Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM)-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging before therapy and FLT and Cu-ATSM PET/CT imaging during therapy. In addition to conventional maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}; SUV{sub mean}) measurements, imaging metrics providing response and spatiotemporal information were extracted for each patient. Progression-free survival was assessed according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumor. The prognostic value of each imaging biomarker was evaluated using univariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Multivariable analysis was also performed but was restricted to 2 predictor variables due to the limited number of patients. The best bivariable model was selected according to pseudo-R{sup 2}. Results: The following variables were significantly associated with poor clinical outcome following radiation therapy according to univariable analysis: tumor volume (P=.011), midtreatment FLT SUV{sub mean} (P=.018), and midtreatment FLT SUV{sub max} (P=.006). Large decreases in FLT SUV{sub mean} from pretreatment to midtreatment were associated with worse clinical outcome (P=.013). In the bivariable model, the best 2-variable combination for predicting poor outcome was high midtreatment FLT SUV{sub max} (P=.022) in

  13. Bevacizumab in Reducing CNS Side Effects in Patients Who Have Undergone Radiation Therapy to the Brain for Primary Brain Tumor, Meningioma, or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Malignant Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineocytoma; Malignant Neoplasm; Meningeal Melanocytoma; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  14. Intraoperative brain tumor resection cavity characterization with conoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Amber L.; Burgner, Jessica; Chen, Ishita; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Sun, Kay; Thompson, Reid C.; Webster, Robert J., III; Miga, Michael I.

    2012-02-01

    Brain shift compromises the accuracy of neurosurgical image-guided interventions if not corrected by either intraoperative imaging or computational modeling. The latter requires intraoperative sparse measurements for constraining and driving model-based compensation strategies. Conoscopic holography, an interferometric technique that measures the distance of a laser light illuminated surface point from a fixed laser source, was recently proposed for non-contact surface data acquisition in image-guided surgery and is used here for validation of our modeling strategies. In this contribution, we use this inexpensive, hand-held conoscopic holography device for intraoperative validation of our computational modeling approach to correcting for brain shift. Laser range scan, instrument swabbing, and conoscopic holography data sets were collected from two patients undergoing brain tumor resection therapy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The results of our study indicate that conoscopic holography is a promising method for surface acquisition since it requires no contact with delicate tissues and can characterize the extents of structures within confined spaces. We demonstrate that for two clinical cases, the acquired conoprobe points align with our model-updated images better than the uncorrected images lending further evidence that computational modeling approaches improve the accuracy of image-guided surgical interventions in the presence of soft tissue deformations.

  15. Rhinogenic intracranial complication with postoperative frontal sinus pyocele and inverted papilloma in the nasal cavity: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Michitsugu; Yokoi, Hidenori; Maruyama, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Yuma; Yamanaka, Hidetaka; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Saito, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient who had rhinogenic intracranial complication with postoperative frontal sinus pyocele and inverted papilloma in the nasal cavity. A 72-year-old woman had undergone surgery for frontal sinusitis via external incision at another hospital 13 years previously. Left-sided hemiparesis appeared in the patient and gradually worsened. Five days later, she exhibited disorientation, abnormal behavior, poor articulation, and difficulty in standing. Therefore, she was taken to the neurosurgery department by ambulance. An extensive frontal sinus pyocele was suspected, and a cerebral abscess and edema of the frontal lobe were observed on magnetic resonance imaging. After antibiotics, steroid and glycerol were administered for a few weeks; disorientation and left hemiparesis improved. Next, craniotomy for complete removal of the brain abscess by neurosurgeons and endoscopic endonasal surgery by otolaryngologists were carried out at the same surgery. From the analysis of the pathological mucosa sample taken from the right ethomoidal sinus during surgery, an inverted papilloma was diagnosed. The patient completely recovered and is currently receiving follow-up examination. Regarding rhinogenic intracranial complications, ascertaining clinical condition in order to determine the need for either immediate radical surgery, or for curative surgery after waiting for improvement of the overall body condition by conservative management, is still needed. PMID:27489711

  16. Rhinogenic intracranial complication with postoperative frontal sinus pyocele and inverted papilloma in the nasal cavity: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Michitsugu; Yokoi, Hidenori; Maruyama, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Yuma; Yamanaka, Hidetaka; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Saito, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient who had rhinogenic intracranial complication with postoperative frontal sinus pyocele and inverted papilloma in the nasal cavity. A 72-year-old woman had undergone surgery for frontal sinusitis via external incision at another hospital 13 years previously. Left-sided hemiparesis appeared in the patient and gradually worsened. Five days later, she exhibited disorientation, abnormal behavior, poor articulation, and difficulty in standing. Therefore, she was taken to the neurosurgery department by ambulance. An extensive frontal sinus pyocele was suspected, and a cerebral abscess and edema of the frontal lobe were observed on magnetic resonance imaging. After antibiotics, steroid and glycerol were administered for a few weeks; disorientation and left hemiparesis improved. Next, craniotomy for complete removal of the brain abscess by neurosurgeons and endoscopic endonasal surgery by otolaryngologists were carried out at the same surgery. From the analysis of the pathological mucosa sample taken from the right ethomoidal sinus during surgery, an inverted papilloma was diagnosed. The patient completely recovered and is currently receiving follow-up examination. Regarding rhinogenic intracranial complications, ascertaining clinical condition in order to determine the need for either immediate radical surgery, or for curative surgery after waiting for improvement of the overall body condition by conservative management, is still needed. PMID:27489711

  17. Molecular imaging biomarkers of resistance to radiation therapy for spontaneous nasal tumors in canines

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Tyler J.; Bowen, Stephen R.; Deveau, Michael; Kubicek, Lyndsay; White, Pamela; Bentzen, Søren M.; Chappell, Richard J.; Forrest, Lisa; Jeraj, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) Imaging biomarkers of resistance to radiation therapy can inform and guide treatment management. Most studies so far have focused on assessing a single imaging biomarker. The goal of this study was to explore a number of different molecular imaging biomarkers as surrogates of resistance to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials Twenty-two canine patients with spontaneous sinonasal tumors were treated with accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy, receiving either 10 fractions of 4.2 Gy or 10 fractions of 5.0 Gy to the GTV. Patients underwent FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM PET/CT imaging before therapy, and FLT and Cu-ATSM PET/CT imaging during therapy. In addition to traditional SUV measures (eg, maximum SUV), imaging metrics providing response and spatiotemporal information were extracted for each patient. Progression-free survival was assessed according to RECIST criteria. The prognostic value of each imaging biomarker was evaluated using univariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Multivariable analysis was also performed, but was restricted to two predictor variables due to the limited patient number. The best bivariable model was selected according to Pseudo R2. Results The following variables were significantly associated with poor clinical outcome following radiation therapy according to univariable analysis: tumor volume (P=0.011), midtreatment FLT SUVmean (P=0.018), and midtreatment FLT SUVmax (P=0.006). Large decreases in FLT SUVmean from pretreatment to midtreatment were associated with worse clinical outcome (P=0.013). In the bivariable model, the best two-variable combination for predicting poor outcome was high midtreatment FLT SUVmax (P=0.022) in combination with large FLT response from pretreatment to midtreatment (P=0.041). Conclusions In addition to tumor volume, pronounced tumor proliferative response quantified using FLT PET, especially when associated with high residual FLT PET at midtreatment, is a negative prognostic

  18. Scanning electron microscope observations on the monogenean parasite Paraquadriacanthus nasalis from the nasal cavities of the freshwater fish Clarias gariepinus in Egypt with a note on some surface features of its microhabitat.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Safaa Zaky

    2012-05-01

    Surface features of the monogenean Paraquadriacanthus nasalis Ergens, 1988 (quoted by Kritsky, 1990) inhabiting the nasal cavities of the freshwater fish Clarias gariepinus were studied for the first time using scanning electron microscopy. The anterior adhesive areas possess two slit-like openings. Many small openings were detected on the tegument covering the anterior-most region of the head. Some considerably large openings were also found in the median region between the two slit-like openings of the adhesive sacs. A transverse slit-like mouth opening with two lip-like structures was detected on the ventral surface of the body. Three types of presumed sensory structures were found associated with the tegument of the anterior adhesive area and anterior region of the body. These are surface ciliary sensilla, dome-shaped structures, and many spherical structures. The possible functions of these presumed sensory structures were discussed. The tegument covering the anterior adhesive area lacks microvilli, while the tegument covering the haptor is associated with microvilli. The haptoral sclerites were found in two different positions. Some surface features of the nasal cavities of C. gariepinus (microhabitat of P. nasalis) were also studied using scanning electron microscopy. Many lamellae-like and spine-like structures were recognized. The epithelium lining in some regions of the nasal cavities has small and large openings and covered with mucus. The possible roles of some haptoral sclerites in the attachment of the parasite to the host tissues were discussed. PMID:22015385

  19. Effect of nasal decongestion on voice spectrum of a nasal consonant-vowel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guo-She; Yang, Cheryl C H; Wang, Ching-Ping; Kuo, Terry B J

    2005-03-01

    The nasal cavity and its related structures make significant contributions to human phonation, especially the resonance of voice spectra. The voice spectra of the nasal consonant-vowel (CV), [md:], in the subjects with nasal obstruction were obtained and were compared with the spectra of the same CV vocalized by the same subjects after topical nasal decongestion treatment with 1:1000 epinephrine solution. Results revealed that the intensity damping was more marked in the high-frequency area (>1600 Hz) after the nasal decongestion. Moreover, the intensities of the spectral valleys damped more than the spectral peaks, especially the spectral valley of 1000-2700 Hz. Therefore, a more complex spectral pattern was formed by the resultant uneven damping effect after nasal decongestion. The nasal cavity plays an important role in the formation of spectral peaks and valleys, and such engraved voice spectra may also characterize nasal voices like the nasal CV [md:] demonstrated in our study. PMID:15766851

  20. Novel strategy for orbital tumor resection: surgical "displacement" into the maxillary cavity.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Masaaki; Mizoguchi, Takayuki; Matsunaga, Kazuhide; Fu, Rong; Nakao, Yuzo

    2006-11-01

    Surgical intervention consisting of lateral orbitotomy, the indication of which is extremely wide for orbital tumor surgery, has been applied in cases of large, retrobulbar cavernous hemangioma. However, no method exists involving displacement of the tumor from the crowded orbital contents, with the exception of tumor traction toward the outer side. The impact of traction force on the fragile hemangioma is extremely traumatic and dangerous. The authors examined how a tumor might be "displaced" in the absence of traction force effect, into an appropriate cavity neighboring the orbit. The maxillary sinus may afford the most suitable space to shift the laterally situated orbital tumor. Thus, the osteotomy level was extended to the lateral half of the inferior orbital floor and orbital rim in order to displace the tumor through an "escape window" of sufficient size between the orbit and maxilla. This report describes the treatment of two cases with long histories of progressive proptosis associated with retrobulbar large cavernous hemangiomas. This novel procedure resulted in a successful outcome. The current approach and management, which involves displacement of the tumor into the maxillary sinus through the orbital floor escape window, is a novel procedure for orbital tumor surgery. PMID:17119440

  1. Repeat Brachytherapy for Patients With Residual or Recurrent Tumors of Oral Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Keiji; Nakagawa, Keiko; Toda, Kazuma; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kaida, Atushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze data from patients receiving repeat brachytherapy (re-BT) for the treatment of residual or recurrent tumor in the oral cavity. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 62 patients who had undergone definitive BT as an initial treatment of oral cancer subsequently underwent re-BT for the treatment of residual or recurrent tumors at the diagnostic radiology and oncology department (Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital). Re-BT was performed 0.9-73 months (median, 5.7) after the initial BT. Au-198 grains were used as the re-BT source in all 62 patients, and an area of 0.8-6.3 cm{sup 2} (median, 3.1) was permanently irradiated with 60-110 Gy (median, 83) according to the system of Paterson-Parker. Results: The 2-year local control and overall survival rate was 53% and 66%, respectively, and local control significantly affected overall survival. Both local control and overall survival were affected by the initial tumor characteristics and the macroscopic appearance of the residual or recurrent tumor. Grade 3 or 4 complications were seen in 5 patients. The incidence of mandibular and mucosal complications was significantly related to a biologic effective dose of {alpha}/{beta} of 3 Gy to the surface of the gingiva and mucosa, respectively. Conclusion: Re-BT using Au-198 grains for the treatment of residual or recurrent tumor after definitive BT in the oral cavity is effective and well tolerated.

  2. Mixed exocrine-neuroendocrine carcinoma of the nasal cavity: clinico-pathologic and molecular study of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Furlan, Daniela; Franzi, Francesca; Battaglia, Paolo; Frattini, Milo; Zanellato, Elena; Marando, Alessandro; Sahnane, Nora; Turri-Zanoni, Mario; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Capella, Carlo

    2013-03-01

    Sinonasal intestinal-type adenocarcinomas (ITACs) are rare neoplasms histologically resembling intestinal adenocarcinomas. Although a neuroendocrine differentiation in ITACs has been described, true mixed exocrine-neuroendocrine carcinomas, neoplasms in which each component represents at least 30 % of the lesion, are extremely rare and their molecular alterations are largely unknown. We describe herein the clinico-pathologic features, the methylation profile, chromosomal gains and losses, and mutation analysis of KRAS, BRAF and p53 in a nasal mixed exocrine-neuroendocrine carcinoma resected in a 79-year-old man. The tumor was composed of an ITAC and a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. Both exocrine and neuroendocrine components were CK8, CK20, CDX2 and p53 positive, and CK7 and TTF1 negative. The neuroendocrine component also showed immunoreactivity for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, serotonin and glicentin. Gains and losses were found at following chromosome regions: 17p13 (TP53), 14q24 (MLH3), 19q13 (KLK3), 5q21 (APC), 7q21 (CDK6), 9q34 (DAPK1), 12p13 (TNFRSF 1A, CDKN1B), 13q12 (BRCA2), 17p13.3 (HIC1), 18q21 (BCL2), and 22q12 (TIMP3). Aberrant methylation was detected only in the neuroendocrine component and involved APC and DAPK1 genes. No mutation of KRAS (exons 2-4), BRAF (exon 15), and p53 (exons 4-10) was found in both components. The results suggest a monoclonal origin of the tumor from a pluripotent cell undergoing a biphenotypic differentiation and that the neuroendocrine differentiation may be from an exocrine to an endocrine pathway. We have also reviewed the literature on sinonasal mixed exocrine-neuroendocrine carcinomas to give to the reader a comprehensive overview of these very rare tumor types. PMID:22740238

  3. [Personal experience in the surgery of nasal sinus polyps].

    PubMed

    García Juncal, J; Soto Sánchez, C; Farina Conde, J; Rodríguez Alvarez, E; Estrada Gromaz, J

    1994-01-01

    Personal opinions on surgery of polyps of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, including from simple polypectomy to ethmoid microsurgery and nasal endoscopic surgery. The diagnostic importance of tomodensitometry and the essential postsurgical care are emphasized. The results of 29 patients with polyps of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses treated with intranasal microsurgery and endoscopic surgery are reported. PMID:8068361

  4. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... The tooth may hurt even without stimulation (spontaneous toothache). If irreversible damage to the pulp occurs and ... To detect cavities early, a dentist inquires about pain, examines the teeth, probes the teeth with dental instruments, and may take x-rays. People should ...

  5. Newborn nasal obstruction due to congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Pfeilsticker, Leopoldo; Silva, Vanessa; Hazboun, Igor; Paschoal, Jorge; Maunsell, Rebecca; Sakano, Eulalia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nasal obstruction is an important condition that can lead to severe respiratory distress in newborns. There are several differential diagnoses, and one of them is congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS). CNPAS is a rare case of respiratory distress caused by excessive growth of the nasal process of the maxilla and leads to narrowing of the anterior third of the nasal cavity. Diagnosis, associated anomalies, and treatment strategies are reviewed by the following presentation of two cases. Case Presentation: We report two cases of infants diagnosed with CNPAS. The patients in the first case had no concomitant comorbidities, and the outcome was successful after surgical correction of stenosis. The patient in the second case had an associated holoprosencephaly, and although surgical correction and nasal cavity patency, the patient remains dependent on tracheostomy due to dysphagia and neurologic impairment. Discussion: Airway obstruction affects 1 in 5000 children, and CNPAS is a diagnosis frequently forgotten and even unknown to neonatal and pediatric intensivists. Newborns are obligate nasal breathers, and, nasal obstruction, therefore, can lead to severe respiratory distress. CNPAS is not only rare but, many times, is not easily recognized. It is important to bear in mind the diagnostic criteria when evaluating infants with nasal obstruction. Conservative treatment should be prioritized, but surgical treatment is required in severe cases with failure to thrive and persistent respiratory distress. Respiratory distress and dysphagia may persist to some degree despite correction of the stenotic pyriform aperture due to associated narrowing of the entire nasal cavity and association with other anomalies. Final Comments: CNPAS is a rare condition and may be lethal in newborns. Differential diagnosis of nasal obstruction must be remembered to recognize this anomaly, and the otolaryngologist must be familiarized with this condition and its

  6. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Afrin® Nasal Spray ... Anefrin® Nasal Spray ... Dristan® Nasal Spray ... Mucinex® Nasal Spray ... Nostrilla® Nasal Spray ... Vicks Sinex® Nasal Spray ... Zicam® Nasal Spray ... Oxymetazoline nasal spray is used to relieve nasal discomfort caused by colds, allergies, and hay fever. It is also used to ...

  7. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Oral Cavity: Clinicopathologic and Immunohistochemical Study of 21 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Vanguri, Vijay; Allen, Carl M.; Eversole, Lewis Roy; Wright, John M.; Woo, Sook-Bin

    2009-01-01

    We describe clinical, morphologic, and immunohistochemical features of 21 cases of solitary fibrous tumor presenting in the oral cavity. There were 9 male and 12 female patients with a median age of 51 years (range 37–83). The most common locations included the buccal mucosa (the most common site), lip, maxillary or mandibular vestibule and tongue. Histopathologic examination showed well-circumscribed tumors with two well-defined patterns: the classic pattern with densely cellular areas alternating with hypocellular areas in a variably collagenous, vascular stroma and a more uniformly sclerotic pattern with only subtle classic areas. The spindle-shaped neoplastic cells consistently showed immunoreactivity for antibodies directed against CD34. Five of nineteen cases (26%) were reactive for CD99 and 19 of 19 for Bcl-2. Follow-up information was available in 17 cases and averaged 54 months, with no evidence of recurrence or metastasis in any of these patients. Awareness that solitary fibrous tumor may present in the oral cavity is important so that confusion with other spindle cell neoplasms can be avoided. We also briefly describe the differential diagnosis and compare this series, the largest single series of intraoral SFT, to cases previously reported in the literature. PMID:19644541

  8. Neutrophils and monocytes transport tumor cell antigens from the peritoneal cavity to secondary lymphoid tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Terasawa, Masao; Nagata, Kisaburo; Kobayashi, Yoshiro

    2008-12-12

    Antigen-transporting cells take up pathogens, and then migrate from sites of inflammation to secondary lymphoid tissues to induce an immune response. Among antigen-transporting cells, dendritic cells (DCs) are believed to be the most potent and professional antigen-presenting cells that can stimulate naive T cells. However, the cells that transport antigens, tumor cell antigens in particular, have not been clearly identified. In this study we have analyzed what types of cells transport tumor cell antigens to secondary lymphoid tissues. We show that neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages but not DCs engulf X-irradiated P388 leukemic cells after their injection into the peritoneal cavity, and that neutrophils and monocytes but not macrophages migrate to the parathymic lymph nodes (pLN), the blood, and then the spleen. The monocytes in the pLN comprise Gr-1{sup -} and Gr-1{sup +} ones, and some of these cells express CD11c. Overall, this study demonstrates that neutrophils and monocytes transport tumor cell antigens from the peritoneal cavity to secondary lymphoid tissues.

  9. Nasal trauma: Primary reconstruction with open rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, I; Malliari, H; Metaxas, S

    2011-01-01

    Due to the prominent location of the nose, the most common facial traumas are nasal injuries. Although nasal traumas usually require staged intervention at a later period of time, in selected cases, primary reconstruction can be effective. A 20-year-old man who was referred from the emergency department with nasal trauma is presented. He reported a fall after feeling unsteady, which caused a direct nasal injury. Clinical examination revealed septal fracture with obstruction of the left nasal cavity and deformity of the nasal pyramid (inverted V deformity). The patient also had a complete dissection of the columella skin. Epistaxis was self-limited, and an open rhinoplasty procedure was decided because the trauma occurred 1 h before admission and there was no significant edema. Surgical intervention included septal reconstruction combined with restoration of the nasal pyramid and columella. One month later, the patient had patent nasal airways, and he was satisfied with the aesthetic result. PMID:22942663

  10. Nasal trauma: Primary reconstruction with open rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, I; Malliari, H; Metaxas, S

    2011-01-01

    Due to the prominent location of the nose, the most common facial traumas are nasal injuries. Although nasal traumas usually require staged intervention at a later period of time, in selected cases, primary reconstruction can be effective. A 20-year-old man who was referred from the emergency department with nasal trauma is presented. He reported a fall after feeling unsteady, which caused a direct nasal injury. Clinical examination revealed septal fracture with obstruction of the left nasal cavity and deformity of the nasal pyramid (inverted V deformity). The patient also had a complete dissection of the columella skin. Epistaxis was self-limited, and an open rhinoplasty procedure was decided because the trauma occurred 1 h before admission and there was no significant edema. Surgical intervention included septal reconstruction combined with restoration of the nasal pyramid and columella. One month later, the patient had patent nasal airways, and he was satisfied with the aesthetic result. PMID:22942663

  11. The Dynamic Tumor Bed: Volumetric Changes in the Lumpectomy Cavity During Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prendergast, Brendan; Indelicato, Daniel J. Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Lightsey, Judith L.; Snead, Felicia E.; Morris, Christopher G.; Copeland, Edward M.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude of volume change in the postoperative tumor bed before and during radiotherapy, and to identify any factors associated with large volumetric change. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six consecutive patients with early-stage or preinvasive breast cancer underwent breast-conserving therapy at our institution between June 2006 and October 2007. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the breast were obtained shortly after surgery, before the start of radiotherapy (RT) for treatment planning, and, if applicable, before the tumor bed boost. Postoperative changes, seroma, and surgical clips were used to define the tumor bed through consensus agreement of 3 observers (B.P., D.I., and J.L.). Multiple variables were examined for correlation with volumetric change. Results: Between the first and last scan obtained (median time, 7.2 weeks), the tumor bed volume decreased at least 20% in 86% of patients (n = 31) and at least 50% in 64% of patients (n = 23). From the postoperative scan to the planning scan (median time, 3 weeks), the tumor bed volume decreased by an average of 49.9%, or approximately 2.1% per postoperative day. From planning scan to boost scan (median interval, 7 weeks), the median tumor bed volume decreased by 44.6%, at an average rate of 0.95% per postoperative day. No single factor was significantly associated with a change in tumor bed volume greater than 20%. Conclusions: The average postlumpectomy cavity undergoes dramatic volumetric change after surgery and continues this change during RT. The rate of change is inversely proportional to the duration from surgery. In this study no factors studied predicted large volumetric change.

  12. Postirradiation sarcoma of the head and neck: a report of three late sarcomas following therapeutic irradiation for primary malignancies of the paranasal sinus, nasal cavity, and larynx. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Coia, L.R.; Fazekas, J.T.; Kramer, S.

    1980-11-01

    Sarcoma of the head and neck region following irradiation for primary malignancy other than retinoblastoma has rarely been reported. Three cases of postirradiation sarcoma arising in the head and neck region following definitive radiotherapy for primary malignancies of the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and larynx are presented. The dosage ranged from 6000 to 6400 rads using conventional fractionation on a /sup 60/Cobalt teletherapy unit. Methotrexate was utilized during the initial course of radiation in two of the three patients. The cases conform well to established criteria for the diagnosis of radiation-induced sarcoma.

  13. A new species of Nasicola Yamaguti, 1968 (Monogenea: Capsalidae) from the nasal cavities of Thunnnus obesus and a redescription of N. klawei (Stunkard, 1962) from T. albacares off Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kohn, A; Baptista-Farias, M F; dos Santos, A L; Gibson, D I

    2004-01-01

    Two species of Nasicola Yamaguti, 1968 are described from the nasal cavities of tunas ( Thunnus spp.) from off the coast of Brazil: N. brasiliensis n. sp. from T. obesus (Lowe) and the type-species, N. klawei (Stunkard, 1962), from T. albacares (Bonn.). The new species is differentiated from N. klawei on the basis of the large number of testes and from N. hogansi Wheeler & Beverley-Burton, 1986 by its greater body-size, proportionately smaller haptor and smaller number of marginal spines. The host-specificity of Nasicola spp. is commented upon. PMID:14739675

  14. Nose, Nasal Cavities & Paranasal Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System Review Quiz Endocrine System Characteristics of Hormones Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Pituitary & ... Thyroid & Parathyroid Glands Adrenal Gland Pancreas Gonads Other Endocrine Glands ... Cardiovascular System Heart Structure of the Heart Physiology of the ...

  15. Bradykinin metabolism in rat and sheep nasal secretions.

    PubMed

    Chung, F Y; Donovan, M D

    1995-07-01

    The nasal secretions are the first barrier that nasally administered drugs encounter. Therefore, the characterization of peptide metabolism in the nasal secretions is essential to predict nasal peptide bioavailability. Metabolism of bradykinin was measured in rat and sheep nasal secretions to estimate the extent of degradation of nasally administered peptide compounds. A single-pass, in situ nasal perfusion technique was employed to collect secretions for the investigation of peptide metabolism in rat nasal secretions. The protein content, mucin concentration, and degree of bradykinin metabolism in perfusate aliquots collected over a 2-h period showed that the early perfusate fractions contained most of the active secretory materials. Evidence of continuous mucus secretion and plasma extravasation was found in the nasal perfusate throughout the entire collection period. Sheep nasal secretions were collected with a cotton pledget inserted into the nasal cavity. Bradykinin and its fragments were degraded by carboxypeptidases and endopeptidases present in both rat and sheep nasal secretions. Hydrolysis of Phe5-Ser6 was the major metabolism pathway of bradykinin in the rat nasal perfusate, whereas in sheep nasal secretions, hydrolysis of the Pro7-Phe8 and Phe8-Arg9 bonds also occurred. Evidence of angiotensin converting enzyme, carboxypeptide N, and aminopeptidase activity was identified in the rat nasal perfusate with specific substrates and inhibitors. The activity of these and other enzymes in the nasal secretions may significantly limit the bioavailability of nasally administered peptide drugs prior to their exposure to the nasal mucosal tissues. PMID:7562432

  16. Nasal reconstruction after epithelioma.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Camps, S

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present our procedure for the treatment, histopathological diagnosis, and resection of skin cancer in the nasal pyramid and its subsequent reconstruction. Because we are dealing with the most important anatomical feature of the face our goal is an aesthetic reconstruction [2,4] according to the anatomical subunits criterion of Burget [3]. First, a histopathological diagnosis is made to determine the nature of the tumor. Then, we proceed with the resection according to the Mohs Micrographic Surgery [1,5,7]. Then we begin with the first step of the nasal reconstruction. PMID:11568830

  17. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  18. Comparative pathology of the nasal mucosa in laboratory animals exposed to inhaled irritants

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R. )

    1990-04-01

    The nasal cavity is susceptible to chemically induced injury as a result of exposure to inhaled irritants. Some responses of the nasal mucosa to inhaled toxicants are species specific. These species-related differences in response may be due to variations in structural, physiologic, and biochemical factors, such as gross nasal cavity structure, distribution of luminal epithelial cell populations along the nasal airway, intranasal airflow patterns, nasal mucociliary apparatus, and nasal xenobiotic metabolism among animal species. This paper reviews the comparative anatomy and irritant-induced pathology of the nasal cavity in laboratory animals. The toxicologist, pathologist, and environmental risk assessor must have a good working knowledge of the similarities and differences in normal nasal structure and response to injury among species before they can select animal models for nasal toxicity studies, recognize toxicant-induced lesions in the nasal airway, and extrapolate experimental results to estimate the possible effects of an inhaled toxicant on the human nasal airway.

  19. Experimental transmission of enzootic nasal adenocarcinoma in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Enzootic nasal adenocarcinoma (ENA) is a contagious neoplasm of the secretory epithelial cells of the nasal mucosa of sheep and goats. It is associated with the betaretrovirus, enzootic nasal tumor virus (ENTV), but a causative relationship has yet to be demonstrated. In this study, 14-day-old lambs were experimentally infected via nebulization with cell-free tumor filtrates derived from naturally occurring cases of ENA. At 12 weeks post-infection (wpi), one of the five infected lambs developed clinical signs, including continuous nasal discharge and open mouth breathing, and was euthanized. Necropsy revealed the presence of a large bilateral tumor occupying the nasal cavity. At 45 wpi, when the study was terminated, none of the remaining infected sheep showed evidence of tumors either by computed tomography or post-mortem examination. ENTV-1 proviral DNA was detected in the nose, lung, spleen, liver and kidney of the animal with experimentally induced ENA, however there was no evidence of viral protein expression in tissues other than the nose. Density gradient analysis of virus particles purified from the experimentally induced nasal tumor revealed a peak reverse transcriptase (RT) activity at a buoyant density of 1.22 g/mL which was higher than the 1.18 g/mL density of peak RT activity of virus purified from naturally induced ENA. While the 1.22 g/mL fraction contained primarily immature unprocessed virus particles, mature virus particles with a similar morphology to naturally occurring ENA could be identified by electron microscopy. Full-length sequence analysis of the ENTV-1 genome from the experimentally induced tumor revealed very few nucleotide changes relative to the original inoculum with only one conservative amino acid change. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ENTV-1 is associated with transmissible ENA in sheep and that under experimental conditions, lethal tumors are capable of developing in as little as 12 wpi demonstrating the

  20. Extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma of the palate and paranasal sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaos, Nikitakis; Grigorios, Polyzois; Konstantinos, Katoumas; Savvas, Titsinides; Vassiliki, Zolota; Alexandra, Sklavounou; Theodoros, Papadas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Extranodal nasal-type natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma represents a rare entity, typically originating in the nasal cavity, palate or midfacial region. Signs and symptoms include non-specific rhinitis and/or sinusitis, nasal obstruction, epistaxis, facial swelling and development of deep necrotic ulceration in the midline of the palate, causing an oronasal defect. Differential diagnosis includes fungal infections, Wegener’s granulomatosis, tertiary syphilis, other non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas and malignant epithelial midline tumors. Case Report: We present a case of a 40-year-old man complaining of headache, facial pain, nasal congestion and fever. Examination revealed a large deep necrotic ulcer in the middle of the palate, presenting as an oronasal defect. Endoscopic rhinoscopy revealed crusts in the nasal cavities, moderate perforation of the nasal septum cartilage and contraction of the middle and inferior conchae. Computer tomography showed occupation of the maxillary sinuses, ethmoidal cells and sphenoidal sinus by a hyperdense soft tissue mass. Laboratory investigation revealed increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate. A wide excision of the lesion was performed. Histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation established the diagnosis of extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma. The patient was treated with CHOP chemotherapy, involved-field radiotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation. A removable partial denture with obturator was fabricated and inserted to relieve problems caused by the oronasal defect. Conclusions: Extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma is a very aggressive, rapidly progressing malignant neoplasm with a poor prognosis, which can be improved by early diagnosis and combined treatment. PMID:23569495

  1. Smart Polymers in Nasal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chonkar, Ankita; Nayak, Usha; Udupa, N.

    2015-01-01

    Nasal drug delivery has now been recognized as a promising route for drug delivery due to its capability of transporting a drug to systemic circulation and central nervous system. Though nasal mucosa offers improved bioavailability and quick onset of action of the drug, main disadvantage associated with nasal drug delivery is mucocilliary clearance due to which drug particles get cleared from the nose before complete absorption through nasal mucosa. Therefore, mucoadhesive polymeric approach can be successfully used to enhance the retention of the drug on nasal mucosal surface. Here, some of the aspects of the stimuli responsive polymers have been discussed which possess liquid state at the room temperature and in response to nasal temperature, pH and ions present in mucous, can undergo in situ gelation in nasal cavity. In this review, several temperature responsive, pH responsive and ion responsive polymers used in nasal delivery, their gelling mechanisms have been discussed. Smart polymers not only able to enhance the retention of the drug in nasal cavity but also provide controlled release, ease of administration, enhanced permeation of the drug and protection of the drug from mucosal enzymes. Thus smart polymeric approach can be effectively used for nasal delivery of peptide drugs, central nervous system dugs and hormones. PMID:26664051

  2. Nasal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 43. Becker SS. Surgical management of polyps in the treatment of nasal airway ...

  3. Nasal Physiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose is constantly exposed to inhaled debris and microbes (viruses, bacteria, and fungus). The respiratory system has ... Mucus is designed to trap inhaled particles (including microbes) that are subsequently cleared from the airways. Nasal ...

  4. Septoplasty and decongestant improve distribution of nasal spray.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jiaoping; Fan, Yunping; Feng, Shaoyan; Xia, Wentong; Wang, Jingqing; Li, Huabin

    2011-12-01

    This study prospectively examined the intranasal distribution of nasal spray after nasal septal correction and decongestant administration. A cohort of 20 patients was assessed for the distribution of nasal spray before and after nasal septum surgery. Sprays were dyed and administered one puff per nostril when patients hold their head up in an upright position. Before and after decongestant administration, the intranasal distribution was semi-quantitatively determined by nasal endoscopy. The results showed that the dyed drug was preferentially sprayed onto the nasal vestibule, the head of the inferior turbinate, the anterior part of septum and nasal floor. As far as the anterior-inferior segment of the nasal cavity was concerned, the distribution was found to be influenced neither by the decongestant nor by the surgery (P>0.05). However, both the decongestant and surgery expanded the distribution to the anatomical structures in the superior and posterior nasal cavity such as olfactory fissure, middle turbinate head and middle nasal meatus. No distribution was observed in the sphenoethmoidal recess, posterior septum, tail of inferior turbinate and nasopharynx. It was concluded that nasal septum surgery and decongestant administration significantly improves nasal spray distribution in the nasal cavity. PMID:22173509

  5. Nasal dissemination of a single-clone IgH-rearranged conjunctival MALT lymphoma through the nasolacrimal duct: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chung-Yu; Liao, Yi-Ping; Wu, Chia-Che; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Ho, Jennifer Hui-Chun; Roan, Rachel; Liew, Phui-Ly; Lai, Ming-Tang; Lee, Feipeng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to report a rare case of single-clone, immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH)-rearranged mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in the conjunctiva, with nasal cavity dissemination through the nasolacrimal duct. A 24-year-old female was diagnosed with MALT lymphoma of the nasal cavity at the Department of Otolaryngology, Wan Fang Medical Center, Taipei Medical University (Tapei, Taiwan) in October 2008. A biopsy of the relapsing conjunctival lesion revealed a MALT lymphoma by pathological staining, while a single-clone, IgH-rearranged tumor lesion in the nasal cavity and conjunctiva was confirmed using continuous sinus computed tomography scans and polymerase chain reaction. Tumor lesions were negative for Helicobacter pylori and Chlamydia infection, but exhibited bilateral neck lymph node dissemination. A combination of radiation therapy (a total dosage of 46.8 Gray, in two phases covering the left lacrimal sac, nasal cavity and bilateral neck region) and topical ciprofloxacin plus steroid (0.3% ciprofloxacin 4 times a day and betamethasone eye ointment before sleep for 1 month) was provided as an effective therapeutic strategy, and no recurrence was found in the next 3 years. The nasolacrimal duct serves as a channel for conjunctival tumor spreading and is easily neglected. IgH-involved translocation in MALT lymphoma is a factor in the progression of the disease, and aggressive combination therapy is essential for a high-risk, disseminated IgH-rearranged MALT lymphoma.

  6. Mediastinal Single Nodal Relapse of a Nasal Nk/T cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyoung Hoon; Hong, Seok Chan; An, Jeong Min; Huh, Jooryung; Sook, Ryu Jin; Lee, Jin Seong

    2007-01-01

    A nasal NK/T cell lymphoma is a very aggressive form of lymphoma. Patterns of relapse after treatment have not been systematically evaluated, and mediastinal nodal relapse at a primary site has never been documented. We describe here a 40-year old man who presented with a nasal obstruction caused by a protruding mass that was identified as a nasal NK/T cell lymphoma. The initial work-up, including chest and abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET), showed no regional or distant metastasis. A CT scan performed following three cycles of chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP) showed that the mass had nearly disappeared. Radiation therapy undertaken following chemotherapy was given to the primary site. However, PET performed following radiotherapy revealed a single mediastinal lymphadenopathy, with no evidence of residual tumor in the nasal cavity. A biopsy using video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATS) showed the presence of a recurrent NK/T cell lymphoma with an immunophenotype identical to that of the primary nasal lymphoma. An additional three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy were administered, and the patient remains alive, with no evidence of disease 30 months after the initial relapse. These findings indicate that early detection with PET and prompt surgical excision with the use of VATS can lead to successful treatment of a relapsed nasal NK/T cell lymphoma. PMID:17939339

  7. Mediastinal single nodal relapse of a nasal NK/T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Kyoung Hoon; Hong, Seok Chan; An, Jeong Min; Huh, Jooryung; Sook, Ryu Jin; Lee, Jin Seong; Suh, Cheolwon

    2007-09-01

    A nasal NK/T cell lymphoma is a very aggressive form of lymphoma. Patterns of relapse after treatment have not been systematically evaluated, and mediastinal nodal relapse at a primary site has never been documented. We describe here a 40-year old man who presented with a nasal obstruction caused by a protruding mass that was identified as a nasal NK/T cell lymphoma. The initial work-up, including chest and abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET), showed no regional or distant metastasis. A CT scan performed following three cycles of chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP) showed that the mass had nearly disappeared. Radiation therapy undertaken following chemotherapy was given to the primary site. However, PET performed following radiotherapy revealed a single mediastinal lymphadenopathy, with no evidence of residual tumor in the nasal cavity. A biopsy using video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATS) showed the presence of a recurrent NK/T cell lymphoma with an immunophenotype identical to that of the primary nasal lymphoma. An additional three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy were administered, and the patient remains alive, with no evidence of disease 30 months after the initial relapse. These findings indicate that early detection with PET and prompt surgical excision with the use of VATS can lead to successful treatment of a relapsed nasal NK/T cell lymphoma. PMID:17939339

  8. Alvespimycin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-09

    and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  9. Nasal endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Nasal endoscopy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  10. Giant and high-risk gastrointestinal stromal tumor in the abdomino-pelvic cavity: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUJIAO; PENG, JIE; HUANG, JINBAI

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are benign mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical presentations of patients with GIST are variable and may be non-specific. The current study reports the case of a 66-year-old man that presented with a gradual enlargement of the abdomen, emaciation, hyperhidrosis and frequent and urgent micturition. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed a large, heterogeneous, low density mass that occupied the entire abdomino-pelvic cavity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identified a high signal intensity on the T2 weighted image and an intermediate signal intensity on the T1 weighted image. A contrast enhanced CT scan and MRI demonstrated the uptake of contrast material. A biopsy revealed that the tumor was composed of spindle cells, and immunohistochemical analysis identified the presence of mast/stem cell growth factor receptors. Together, these results lead to a diagnosis of GIST. The clinical findings, imaging modalities and pathological studies suggested that the GIST was a large and high-risk tumor located in the abdomino-pelvic cavity. The final surgical results confirmed these findings. Following conservative treatment with imatnib (400 mg, daily) for 6 months, the tumor became smaller and was suitable for surgery, which the patient received in December 2014. The final surgery confirmed the high-risk GIST. Subsequent to the surgery, the patient was recommended to continue the use of imatnib with regular CT or MRI reexaminations every 3 months, which are planned to continue for 3 years. PMID:26998117

  11. Changes in nasal airflow and heat transfer correlate with symptom improvement after surgery for nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kimbell, J.S.; Frank, D.O.; Laud, Purushottam; Garcia, G.J.M.; Rhee, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Surgeries to correct nasal airway obstruction (NAO) often have less than desirable outcomes, partly due to the absence of an objective tool to select the most appropriate surgical approach for each patient. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can be used to investigate nasal airflow, but variables need to be identified that can detect surgical changes and correlate with patient symptoms. CFD models were constructed from pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans for 10 NAO patients showing no evidence of nasal cycling. Steady-state inspiratory airflow, nasal resistance, wall shear stress, and heat flux were computed for the main nasal cavity from nostrils to posterior nasal septum both bilaterally and unilaterally. Paired t-tests indicated that all CFD variables were significantly changed by surgery when calculated on the most obstructed side, and that airflow, nasal resistance, and heat flux were significantly changed bilaterally as well. Moderate linear correlations with patient-reported symptoms were found for airflow, heat flux, unilateral allocation of airflow, and unilateral nasal resistance as a fraction of bilateral nasal resistance when calculated on the most obstructed nasal side, suggesting that these variables may be useful for evaluating the efficacy of nasal surgery objectively. Similarity in the strengths of these correlations suggests that patient-reported symptoms may represent a constellation of effects and that these variables should be tracked concurrently during future virtual surgery planning. PMID:24063885

  12. NORMAL NASAL GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS USING CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Nasal Gene Expression Levels Using cDNA Array Technology.

    The nasal epithelium is a target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. To detect and analyze genetic events which contribute to nasal tumor development, we first defined the gene expressi...

  13. Nasal T cell lymphoma: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Maliha; Ikram, Mubasher; Junaid, Montasir

    2014-03-01

    Nasal type of Natural Killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma manifests in the nasal cavity. Approximately 95% of them are associated with EBV(Ebstein Barr Virus) with a strong predilection for the Asian population. It has certain systemic and localized symptoms which aid in diagnosis of the condition. However, the histological criteria is pivotal in confirming the diagnosis as well as aiding in confirming the association of EBV. Nasal type of NK/T cell lymphoma has a guarded prognosis. Treatment plan include radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. Despite all this, the 5-year survival rate ranges from 15-75%. A 35 years old male presented with an ulcerative nasal lesion. Diagnosed as nasal type of NK/T cell lymphoma via a tissue biopsy, it was managed by chemo-radiotherapy leading to complete resolution of symptoms and disease free on his follow-up 6 months later. PMID:24718007

  14. An adjustment factor for mode-of-action uncertainty with dual-mode carcinogens: the case of naphthalene-induced nasal tumors in rats.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Kenneth T

    2008-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines for cancer risk assessment recognize that some chemical carcinogens may have a site-specific mode of action (MOA) involving mutation and cell-killing-induced hyperplasia. The guidelines recommend that for such dual MOA (DMOA) carcinogens, judgment should be used to compare and assess results using separate "linear" (genotoxic) versus "nonlinear" (nongenotoxic) approaches to low-level risk extrapolation. Because the guidelines allow this only when evidence supports reliable risk extrapolation using a validated mechanistic model, they effectively prevent addressing MOA uncertainty when data do not fully validate such a model but otherwise clearly support a DMOA. An adjustment-factor approach is proposed to address this gap, analogous to reference-dose procedures used for classic toxicity endpoints. By this method, even when a "nonlinear" toxicokinetic model cannot be fully validated, the effect of DMOA uncertainty on low-dose risk can be addressed. Application of the proposed approach was illustrated for the case of risk extrapolation from bioassay data on rat nasal tumors induced by chronic lifetime exposure to naphthalene. Bioassay data, toxicokinetic data, and pharmacokinetic analyses were determined to indicate that naphthalene is almost certainly a DMOA carcinogen. Plausibility bounds on rat-tumor-type-specific DMOA-related uncertainty were obtained using a mechanistic two-stage cancer risk model adapted to reflect the empirical link between genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the most potent identified genotoxic naphthalene metabolites, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone. Bound-specific adjustment factors were then used to reduce naphthalene risk estimated by linear extrapolation (under the default genotoxic MOA assumption), to account for the DMOA exhibited by this compound. PMID:18564993

  15. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve symptoms of sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose (rhinitis) caused by hay fever, other allergies, or ... nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray ...

  16. Functional nasal morphology of chimaerid fishes.

    PubMed

    Howard, Lauren E; Holmes, William M; Ferrando, Sara; Maclaine, James S; Kelsh, Robert N; Ramsey, Andrew; Abel, Richard L; Cox, Jonathan P L

    2013-09-01

    Holocephalans (chimaeras) are a group of marine fishes comprising three families: the Callorhinchidae (callorhinchid fishes), the Rhinochimaeridae (rhinochimaerid fishes) and the Chimaeridae (chimaerid fishes). We have used X-ray microcomputed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to characterise in detail the nasal anatomy of three species of chimaerid fishes: Chimaera monstrosa, C. phantasma and Hydrolagus colliei. We have shown that the nasal chamber of these three species is linked to the external environment by an incurrent channel and to the oral cavity by an excurrent channel via an oral groove. A protrusion of variable morphology is present on the medial wall of the incurrent channel in all three species, but is absent in members of the two other holocephalan families that we inspected. A third nasal channel, the lateral channel, functionally connects the incurrent nostril to the oral cavity, by-passing the nasal chamber. From anatomical reconstructions, we have proposed a model for the circulation of water, and therefore the transport of odorant, in the chimaerid nasal region. In this model, water could flow through the nasal region via the nasal chamber or the lateral channel. In either case, the direction of flow could be reversed. Circulation through the entire nasal region is likely to be driven primarily by the respiratory pump. We have identified several anatomical features that may segregate, distribute, facilitate and regulate flow in the nasal region and have considered the consequences of flow reversal. The non-sensory cilia lining the olfactory sensory channels appear to be mucus-propelling, suggesting that these cilia have a common protective role in cartilaginous fishes (sharks, rays and chimaeras). The nasal region of chimaerid fishes shows at least two adaptations to a benthic lifestyle, and suggests good olfactory sensitivity, with secondary folding enhancing the hypothetical flat sensory surface area by up to 70%. PMID:23630172

  17. Nasal ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Simonds, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation is likely to have an increasing role in the management of acute ventilatory failure, weaning, and chronic ventilatory problems. Further improvements in ventilator and mask design will be seen. Appropriate application is likely to reduce both mortality and admissions to intensive care, while domiciliary use can improve life expectancy and/or quality of life in chronic ventilatory disorders. As with any new technique, enthusiasm should not outweigh clear outcome information, and possible new indications should always be subject to careful assessment. Images Figure 2 PMID:9799887

  18. Persistence of aroma volatiles in the oral and nasal cavities: real-time monitoring of decay rate in air exhaled through the nose and mouth.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, José Antonio; Ziere, Aldo; Martins, Sara I F S; Zimmermann, Ralf; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of aroma compounds in breath after swallowing is an important attribute of the overall aroma experience during eating and drinking. It is mainly related to the coating of the oral tract with food residues and the interaction between volatile compounds and airway mucosa. We have studied the persistence of eight compounds (2,5-dimethylpyrazine, guaiacol, 4-methylguaiacol, phenylethylalcohol, ethylbutanoate, ethyloctanoate, isoamylacetate and 2-heptanone) both in-nose and in-mouth after administration of volatiles in gas phase (vapor) to five different panelists. By using volatiles in the gas phase, only the interaction with the mucosa is highlighted and the formation of a liquid coating in the oral and tracheal airway is avoided. The physicochemical properties of the compounds, mainly polarity and vapor pressure, determine the interactions of the volatiles with the airway mucosa. The use of different breathing protocols allowed the study of the differences between nasal and oral mucosa in volatile retention, with higher persistence of volatiles obtained in-mouth. Initial concentration also affected persistence, but only for compounds with high volatility and at low concentration. PMID:27380868

  19. Leiomyoma: A rare tumor in the head and neck and oral cavity: Report of 3 cases with review

    PubMed Central

    Veeresh, M; Sudhakara, M; Girish, G; Naik, Charudatta

    2013-01-01

    Leiomyomas are benign tumors arising from smooth muscle, most commonly seen in uterine myometrium, gastrointestinal tract, skin and lower extremities of middle-aged women. Leiomyomas are uncommon in the oral cavity with reported incidence of 0.065%, which accounts for 0.42% of all soft-tissue neoplasms in the oral cavity. Leiomyomas of head and neck region account for less than 1% of all leiomyomas. The most common site of leiomyoma in the head and neck region is the lips (27.46%) followed by tongue (18.30%), cheeks and palate (15.49%), gingiva (8.45%) and mandible (5.63%). The purpose of this article is to present three cases of leiomyoma comprising of an intraoral vascular leiomyoma and two solid leiomyomas in the head and neck region. The clinical features, etiology, differential diagnosis and treatment of leiomyoma are discussed with review of the literature. PMID:24250094

  20. Thermosensitive PLA based nanodispersion for targeting brain tumor via intranasal route.

    PubMed

    Jain, Darshana S; Bajaj, Amrita N; Athawale, Rajani B; Shikhande, Shruti S; Pandey, Abhijeet; Goel, Peeyush N; Gude, Rajiv P; Patil, Satish; Raut, Preeti

    2016-06-01

    Delivery of drugs to the brain via nasal route has been studied by many researchers. However, low residence time, mucociliary clearance and enzymatically active environment of nasal cavity pose many challenges to successful nasal delivery of drugs. We aim to deliver methotrexate by designing thermosensitive nanodispersion exhibiting enhanced residence time in nasal cavity and bypassing the blood brain barrier (BBB). PLA nanoparticles were developed using solvent evaporation technique. The developed nanoparticles were further dispersed in prepared thermosensitive vehicle of poloxamer 188 and Carbopol 934 to impart the property of increased residence time. The formulated nanoparticles demonstrated no interaction with the simulated nasal fluids (SNF), mucin, serum proteins and erythrocytes which demonstrate the safety of developed formulation for nasal administration. The penetration property of nanoparticles though the nasal mucosa was higher than the pure drug due to low mucociliary clearance. The developed nanoparticles diffused though the membrane pores and rapidly distributed into the brain portions compared to the pure drug. There was detectable and quantifiable amount of drug seen in the brain as demonstrated by in vivo brain distribution studies with considerably low amount of drug deposition in the lungs. The pharmacokinetic parameters demonstrated the enhancement in circulation half life, area under curve (AUC) and Cmax of the drug when administered intranasal in encapsulated form. Thus, the thermosensitive nanodispersions are surely promising delivery systems for delivering anticancer agents though the nasal route for potential treatment of brain tumors. PMID:27040235

  1. Proton therapy for tumors of the base of the skull.

    PubMed

    Noel, Georges; Gondi, Vinai

    2016-08-01

    Relative to conventional photon irradiation, proton therapy has distinct advantages in its ability to more precisely target tumor while shielding adjacent normal tissues. In the setting of skull base tumors, proton therapy plays a critical role in the dose-escalation required for optimal tumor control of chordomas, chondrosarcomas, and malignancies of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. For benign tumors such as craniopharyngiomas, pituitary adenomas and meningiomas, proton therapy can limit long-term adverse effects, such as secondary malignancies. This review summarizes published literature to date regarding the role of proton therapy in skull base tumors and introduces emerging proton therapy approaches such as pencil-beam scanning (PBS). PMID:27558252

  2. Numerical study of the effect of the nasal cycle on unilateral nasal resistance.

    PubMed

    Jo, Gyehwan; Chung, Seung-Kyu; Na, Yang

    2015-12-01

    We used computational fluid dynamics to study the effects of the nasal cycle on the modification of unilateral nasal resistance using nasal cavity models from 2 different patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. A steady airflow field with an inspiratory flow rate of 250 mL/s was simulated using ANSYS-FLUENT v14.5. The distribution of local unilateral nasal resistance showed different shapes of variation and magnitudes of resistance depending on the distribution of cross-sectional area in the nasal cavity models. The highest local resistance on the congested side was found near the nasal valve area in the first patient, whereas the highest value was found in the nasal vestibule for the second patient. The relative importance of nasal resistance in the turbinated air passage differed for the 2 patients. The unilateral resistance of the congested state was in the range of 0.0229-0.221 Pas/mL. In the inferior meatus, greater flow rate was allowed during the congested state than during the decongested state if an extensive backflow developed. PMID:26315663

  3. Continuous sensing of tumor-targeted molecular probes with a vertical cavity surface emitting laser-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashurama, Natesh; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; De La Zerda, Adam; El Kalassi, Pascale; Cho, Seongjae; Liu, Hongguang; Teed, Robert; Levy, Hart; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Cheng, Zhen; Levi, Ofer; Harris, James S.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2012-11-01

    Molecular optical imaging is a widespread technique for interrogating molecular events in living subjects. However, current approaches preclude long-term, continuous measurements in awake, mobile subjects, a strategy crucial in several medical conditions. Consequently, we designed a novel, lightweight miniature biosensor for in vivo continuous optical sensing. The biosensor contains an enclosed vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser and an adjacent pair of near-infrared optically filtered detectors. We employed two sensors (dual sensing) to simultaneously interrogate normal and diseased tumor sites. Having established the sensors are precise with phantom and in vivo studies, we performed dual, continuous sensing in tumor (human glioblastoma cells) bearing mice using the targeted molecular probe cRGD-Cy5.5, which targets αVβ3 cell surface integrins in both tumor neovasculature and tumor. The sensors capture the dynamic time-activity curve of the targeted molecular probe. The average tumor to background ratio after signal calibration for cRGD-Cy5.5 injection is approximately 2.43±0.95 at 1 h and 3.64±1.38 at 2 h (N=5 mice), consistent with data obtained with a cooled charge coupled device camera. We conclude that our novel, portable, precise biosensor can be used to evaluate both kinetics and steady state levels of molecular probes in various disease applications.

  4. Continuous sensing of tumor-targeted molecular probes with a vertical cavity surface emitting laser-based biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Parashurama, Natesh; O’Sullivan, Thomas D.; De La Zerda, Adam; El Kalassi, Pascale; Cho, Seongjae; Liu, Hongguang; Teed, Robert; Levy, Hart; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Cheng, Zhen; Levi, Ofer; Harris, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Molecular optical imaging is a widespread technique for interrogating molecular events in living subjects. However, current approaches preclude long-term, continuous measurements in awake, mobile subjects, a strategy crucial in several medical conditions. Consequently, we designed a novel, lightweight miniature biosensor for in vivo continuous optical sensing. The biosensor contains an enclosed vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser and an adjacent pair of near-infrared optically filtered detectors. We employed two sensors (dual sensing) to simultaneously interrogate normal and diseased tumor sites. Having established the sensors are precise with phantom and in vivo studies, we performed dual, continuous sensing in tumor (human glioblastoma cells) bearing mice using the targeted molecular probe cRGD-Cy5.5, which targets αVβ3 cell surface integrins in both tumor neovasculature and tumor. The sensors capture the dynamic time-activity curve of the targeted molecular probe. The average tumor to background ratio after signal calibration for cRGD-Cy5.5 injection is approximately 2.43±0.95 at 1 h and 3.64±1.38 at 2 h (N=5 mice), consistent with data obtained with a cooled charge coupled device camera. We conclude that our novel, portable, precise biosensor can be used to evaluate both kinetics and steady state levels of molecular probes in various disease applications. PMID:23123976

  5. Saline nasal irrigation: Its role as an adjunct treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Papsin, Blake; McTavish, Alison

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review clinical evidence on the efficacy of saline nasal irrigation for treatment of sinonasal conditions and to explore its potential benefits. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Clinical trials, reviews, and treatment guidelines discussing nasal irrigation were obtained through a MEDLINE search from January 1980 to December 2001. Most trials were small and some were not controlled; evidence, therefore, is level II, or fair. MAIN MESSAGE: Flushing the nasal cavity with saline solution promotes mucociliary clearance by moisturizing the nasal cavity and by removing encrusted material. The procedure has been used safely for both adults and children, and has no documented serious adverse effects. Patients treated with nasal irrigation rely less on other medications and make fewer visits to physicians. Treatment guidelines in both Canada and the United States now advocate use of nasal irrigation for all causes of rhinosinusitis and for postoperative cleaning of the nasal cavity. CONCLUSION: Nasal irrigation is a simple, inexpensive treatment that relieves the symptoms of a variety of sinus and nasal conditions, reduces use of medical resources, and could help minimize antibiotic resistance. PMID:12619739

  6. Soft tissue tumors of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Johncilla, Melanie; Jo, Vickie Y

    2016-03-01

    Primary soft tissue tumors arising in the sinonasal tract are rare. While many mesenchymal neoplasms have been reported in the nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx, few are distinctive to this anatomic region. Some tumor types are relatively more common in this area, such as schwannoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and sinonasal hemangiopericytoma are unique entities of the sinonasal tract, as well as the recently characterized biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma. This review discusses the clinical, morphologic, and immunohistochemical features and currently known molecular data of the more frequently encountered soft tissue tumors of the sinonasal tract. PMID:26472693

  7. Hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  8. Hybrid Mesh for Nasal Airflow Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  9. Numerical Analysis of the Relationship between Nasal Structure and Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shen; Sun, Xiu-zhen; Liu, Ying-xi

    2014-01-01

    The functions of the nasal cavity are closely related to its structure. In this study the three-dimensional finite element models were established based on the clinical data of twenty-four volunteers to study the influence of nasal structure on nasal functions of heating the inhaled airflow. Numerical simulations mainly concerning the airflow distribution and the airflow temperature are performed. The character of airflow heating process in these models is gained from the simulation results of these nasal cavities. The parameters describing the geometry of nasal cavity, such as the surface area of nasal airway and the volume of nasal cavity, are considered to be related to the nasal function of heating the inhaled airflow. The approximate function describing the relationship between the geometric parameters of the nasal airway and the nasal functions is gotten. This study can provide a numerical platform for studying some clinical problems and will contribute to the further research on the relationship between nasal structure and nasal functions. PMID:24672336

  10. Immunophenotype Heterogeneity in Nasal Glomangiopericytoma

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y.; Magkou, Christina; Lae, Marick

    2015-01-01

    Nasal glomangiopericytoma is rare. The immunophenotype is heterogeneous, more frequently smooth-muscle-actin and CD34-positive. We report expression patterns for several vascular-related proteins such as CD99, CD146, Bcl2, and WT1 as well as for treatment-related proteins such as mTOR and EGFR in a nasal glomangiopericytoma. The patient (woman, 86 years) presented with a left nasal tumefaction. The resected specimen (1.5-cm) showed a glomangiopericytoma. Tumor cells expressed smooth-muscle-actin, CD31, CD34, and progesterone receptor. They also expressed the vascular-cell-related proteins Bcl2, CD99, CD146, and WT1, as well as mTOR and EGFR. Nasal glomangiopericytomas show immunohistochemical heterogeneity for vascular-related markers, suggesting a possible extensive pericytic differentiation. The expression of potential targets for drug treatments such as mTOR and EGFR may impact on the clinical follow-up of these tumors occurring at advanced ages, which may require complex surgery. PMID:26351605

  11. Primary Tumor Site as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome for Definitive Radiotherapy of Advanced-Stage Oral Cavity Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for oral cavity cancers and to assess prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Definitive RT was performed on 115 patients with oral cavity cancers at Stages III, IVA, and IVB, with a distribution of 6%, 47%, and 47%, respectively. The median dose of RT was 72Gy (range, 62-76Gy). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 95% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent salvage surgery after RT failure. Results: Eight-eight (76.5%) patients responded partially and 23 (20%) completely; of the patients who responded, 18% and 57%, respectively, experienced a durable effect of treatment. The 3-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and progression-free survival were 22%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. The 3-year PFS rates based on the primary tumor sites were as follows: Group I (buccal, mouth floor, and gum) 51%, Group II (retromolar and hard palate) 18%, and Group III (tongue and lip) 6% (p < 0.0001). The 3-year progression-free survival was 41% for N0 patients and 19% for patients with N+ disease (p = 0.012). The T stage and RT technique did not affect survival. The patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated better 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival (53% vs. 19%, p = 0.015 and 53% vs. 24%, p = 0.029, respectively). Subsite group, N+, and salvage surgery were the only significant prognostic factors for survival after multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The primary tumor site and neck stage are prognostic predictors in advanced-stage oral cancer patients who received radical RT. The primary tumor extension and RT technique did not influence survival.

  12. Nonneoplastic nasal lesions in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Monticello, T M; Morgan, K T; Uraih, L

    1990-01-01

    Rodents are commonly used for inhalation toxicology studies, but until recently the nasal passages have often been overlooked or only superficially examined. The rodent nose is a complex organ in which toxicant-induced lesions may vary, depending on the test compound. A working knowledge of rodent nasal anatomy and histology is essential for the proper evaluation of these responses. Lack of a systematic approach for examining rodent nasal tissue has led to a paucity of information regarding nonneoplastic lesions in the rodent nose. Therefore, slides from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) and the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) were examined, and the literature was reviewed to assemble the spectrum of nonneoplastic rodent nasal pathology. Presented are lesions associated with the various types of epithelia lining the rodent nasal cavity plus lesions involving accessory nasal structures. Even though there are anatomic and physiologic differences between the rodent and human nose, both rats and mice provide valuable animal models for the study of nasal epithelial toxicity, following administration of chemical compounds. Images PLATE 1. PLATE 2. PLATE 3. PLATE 4. PLATE 5. PLATE 6. PLATE 7. PLATE 8. PLATE 9. PLATE 10. PLATE 11. PLATE 12. PLATE 13. PLATE 14. PLATE 15. PLATE 16. PLATE 17. PLATE 18. PLATE 19. PLATE 20. PLATE 21. PLATE 22. PLATE 23. PLATE 24. PLATE 25. PLATE 26. PLATE 27. PLATE 28. PLATE 29. PLATE 30. PLATE 31. PLATE 32. PLATE 33. PLATE 34. PLATE 35. PLATE 36. PLATE 37. PLATE 38. PMID:2200665

  13. Nasal leech infestation causing persistent epistaxis

    PubMed Central

    Sarathi, Kalra

    2011-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the nasal cavity are commonly encountered as a cause of epistaxis; however, nasal leech infestation as a cause of unilateral persistent epistaxis is very rare. Examination of nasal cavity revealed fleshy material in the left nostril, which was identified as leech. The leech was removed with the help of an artery forceps following irrigation of the left nostril with normal saline and adopting wait-and-watch policy. In developing countries, leech infestation as a cause of epistaxis should be suspected in patients with lower socioeconomic status or in those living in rural areas who give history of drinking polluted water from, or bathing in, stagnant ponds and puddles. PMID:21887037

  14. Nasal Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis with Orbital Extension.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Mohammad; Dadgarnia, Mohammad Hossein; Moghimi, Mansour; Sharouny, Hadi; Behniafard, Nasim

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis (EAF) is an extremely rare, chronic, benign, idiopathic disorder that mostly affects the upper respiratory tract, particularly the nasal cavity, and features progressive submucosal perivascular fibrosis. To the best of our knowledge, only seven cases of EAF with orbital involvement have been reported. We report a case of sinonasal EAF with orbital extension that presented with left nasolacrimal duct obstruction. A 35-year-old man presented with left epiphora, proptosis, anterolateral globe displacement and nasal obstruction. Endoscopic sinus examination showed a firm, gritty, creamy, yellow, fibrous, adherent mass of maxillary sinus. Diagnosis was established with histopathological examination of excisional biopsy of the lesion. Although EAF is very rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions of upper airway tract, particularly the nasal cavity. Biopsy is necessary for diagnosis and treatment planning. Resecting of the involved tissues completely is essential for prevention of recurrence. PMID:25601283

  15. Nose and Nasal Planum Neoplasia, Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Worley, Deanna R

    2016-07-01

    Most intranasal lesions are best treated with radiation therapy. Computed tomographic imaging with intravenous contrast is critical for treatment planning. Computed tomographic images of the nose will best assess the integrity of the cribriform plate for central nervous system invasion by a nasal tumor. Because of an owner's emotional response to an altered appearance of their dog's face, discussions need to include the entire family before proceeding with nasal planectomy or radical planectomy. With careful case selection, nasal planectomy and radical planectomy surgeries can be locally curative. PMID:26968300

  16. Effects of an external nasal dilator strip (ENDS) compared to xylometazolin nasal spray.

    PubMed

    Høyvoll, L R; Lunde, K; Li, Henrik S; Dahle, S; Wentzel-Larsen, T; Steinsvåg, S K

    2007-11-01

    Nasal blockage is a common complaint in Family Practice. Decongestive nosedrops are frequently employed therapeutic measures. Due to a considerable risk of abuse and side effects, alternatives are wanted. The purpose of this study was to elucidate to what extent ENDS might represent an alternative to decongestive nose sprays (DNS). The effects of DNS (xylometazolin) and ENDS (BreatheRight) on subjective and objective nasal blockage were compared in 89 patients. Main outcome measures were recordings of nasal symptom scores on visual analogue scales (VAS), minimal cross-sectional areas (MCA) and nasal cavity volumes (NCV) as measured by acoustic rhinometry (AR), and peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF). ENDS significantly increased the MCA and the NCV in the anterior 0.0-3.0 cm of the nose compared to DNS, but had no effect on MCA from 3.0 to 5.4 cm behind the nostrils. In contrast to DNS, ENDS had no effect on the posterior NCV. ENDS and DNS gave comparable increase in nasal inspiratory flow as measured by PNIF, and in the subject's own experience of nasal obstruction. ENDS may represent an alternative to DNS as a measure against nasal blockage. PMID:17530269

  17. Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis of the Nasal Septum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunchuan; Liu, Honggang; Zang, Hongrui; Wang, Tong; Hu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis (EAF) is a rare benign condition of unknown aetiology that causes stenosis of the upper respiratory tract. It is most commonly found at the nasal septum and sinus mucosa causing mucosal thickening and nasal obstructive symptoms. The diagnosis is mainly based on characteristic histologic findings. Case Report. A 27-year-old young woman presented with a slow growing mass at her anterior nasal septum for over eight years. She complained of persistent nasal obstruction, epistaxis, sometimes diffused facial pain, and chronic headache. 3 years ago, the tumor was partially resected for ventilation and a nasal septum perforation was left. Imaging findings indicated soft-tissue thickening of the anterior part of septum and adjacent lateral nasal walls. Pathological examination showed numerous inflammatory cells infiltrates containing eosinophils, fibroinflammatory lesion with a whorled appearance fibrosis which typically surrounded vessels. A diagnosis of eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis was made. All laboratory tests were unremarkable. Skin prick test was positive. The tumor-like lesion was totally resected. Conclusions. EAF is a rare benign and progressive disorder causing destruction. Combined with radiological imaging of EAF historical findings contribute to the diagnosis. It is important to prevent tumor from recurrence by total resection of the lesion. PMID:23634315

  18. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone nasal gel is used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the body does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men ...

  19. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve symptoms of sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies. It ... nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose). Mometasone nasal spray should not be used to ...

  20. Nasal Wash Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Make the nasal wash solution. Do not use tap water for the nasal wash (unless boiled or filtered ... water. You may use: Distilled water Sterilized water Tap water that has been boiled for 1 minute (at ...

  1. Nasal corticosteroid sprays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allergic rhinitis symptoms , such as congestion, runny nose, sneezing, itching, or swelling of the nasal passageway Nasal ... Repeat these steps for the other nostril. Avoid sneezing or blowing your nose right after spraying.

  2. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray should not be used ... as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this ...

  3. Nasal fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000554.htm Nasal fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... that gives your nose its shape. A nasal fracture occurs when the bony part of your nose ...

  4. Post-Nasal Drip

    MedlinePlus

    ... guaifenesin (Humibid®, Robitussin®) may also thin secretions. Nasal irrigations may alleviate thickened secretions. These can be performed ... device or a Water Pik® with a nasal irrigation nozzle. Warm water with baking soda or salt ( ...

  5. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  6. Treatment of nostril and nasal stenosis due to facial burn using a self-expandable metallic esophageal stent.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Kuwon; Matsune, Shoji; Shiiba, Kyoko; Kimura, Maki; Okubo, Kimihiro; Kaneshiro, Tadashi; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Masahiro; Kurokawa, Akira

    2015-08-01

    For the treatment of nasal and nostril stenosis caused by facial burn, it is necessary to perform rhinoplasty and nasal vestibuloplasty using various flaps, perform cicatrectomy of the nostrils with a rhinosurgical procedure, and prevent restenosis of the nostrils and nasal cavity for a certain period by methods such as placement of a nasal retainer or transnasal airway and gauze packing of the nasal cavity. With all methods, postoperative placement of a retainer or nasal treatment is necessary for the prevention of postoperative restenosis, and the patient's cooperation is essential. In a patient who did not cooperate in postoperative treatments due to autism and had recurrences of nasal and nostril stenosis after conventional surgical treatments, adequate patency of the nasal cavity and nostrils could be maintained with minimal postoperative treatment by placing a self-expandable metallic esophageal stent. PMID:25748514

  7. Esophageal metastasis secondary to extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MO, ZHENG-YING; WANG, PING; YANG, HONG-WEI; LI, WEN-BIN; LIANG, QING-LE

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of recurrent nasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma in a 21-year-old male patient. The patient presented with an esophageal mass, fever and difficulty in swallowing. There were no other obvious sites of recurrence apart from the esophageal lesion. Metastatic esophageal lesions are extremely rare. The histological analysis demonstrated a highly aggressive tumor with a characteristic angiodestructive growth pattern and nasal cavity necrosis. The lymphoma cells were immunopositive for leukocyte common antigen, T-cell intracytoplasmic antigen 1 and CD68, negative for CD56 and CD3, and positive for Epstein-Barr virus. A computed tomography scan revealed mild thickening of the wall of the lower esophagus. The barium swallow revealed stiffness of the esophageal wall, with limited expansion and mucosal damage. The final diagnosis was primary nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma, with metastasis to the esophagus. Clinically, it is important to distinguish nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma from other types of tumors, as its prognosis and treatment of secondary metastases differ significantly. PMID:27330799

  8. Saline nasal washes

    MedlinePlus

    Salt water washes; Nasal irrigation; Nasal lavage; Sinusitis - nasal wash ... by mixing: 3 teaspoons (tsp) canning or pickling salt (no iodine) 1 tsp baking soda 1 cup warm distilled, filtered, or boiled water To use the wash: Fill the device with ...

  9. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is recommended by a doctor. Children 6 to 12 years of age should use oxymetazoline nasal spray carefully and under adult supervision. Oxymetazoline is in a class of medications called nasal decongestants. It works by narrowing the blood vessels in the nasal passages.

  10. Nasal Harmony in Aguaruna.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Gui-Sun

    A discussion of the nasal harmony of Aguaruna, a language of the Jivaroan family in South America, approaches the subject from the viewpoint of generative phonology. This theory of phonology proposes an underlying nasal consonant, later deleted, that accounts for vowel nasalization. Complex rules that suppose a complex system of vowel and…

  11. Nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis counteracts influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Kuo, Sherwin; Zhang, Xing-Quan; Schooley, Robert T.; Rohde, Holger; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Several microbes, including Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), a Gram-positive bacterium, live inside the human nasal cavity as commensals. The role of these nasal commensals in host innate immunity is largely unknown, although bacterial interference in the nasal microbiome may promote ecological competition between commensal bacteria and pathogenic species. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis culture supernatants significantly suppressed the infectivity of various influenza viruses. Using high-performance liquid chromatography together with mass spectrometry, we identified a giant extracellular matrix-binding protein (Embp) as the major component involved in the anti-influenza effect of S. epidermidis. This anti-influenza activity was abrogated when Embp was mutated, confirming that Embp is essential for S. epidermidis activity against viral infection. We also showed that both S. epidermidis bacterial particles and Embp can directly bind to influenza virus. Furthermore, the injection of a recombinant Embp fragment containing a fibronectin-binding domain into embryonated eggs increased the survival rate of virus-infected chicken embryos. For an in vivo challenge study, prior Embp intranasal inoculation in chickens suppressed the viral titres and induced the expression of antiviral cytokines in the nasal tissues. These results suggest that S. epidermidis in the nasal cavity may serve as a defence mechanism against influenza virus infection. PMID:27306590

  12. Disabling the mitotic spindle and tumor growth by targeting a cavity-induced allosteric site of survivin

    PubMed Central

    Berezov, A; Cai, Z; Freudenberg, JA; Zhang, H; Cheng, X; Thompson, T; Murali, R; Greene, MI; Wang, Q

    2012-01-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family and has an essential role in mitosis. Survivin is overexpressed in a large variety of human cancers and represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Epidermal growth factor receptor and Her/neu-transformed human tumors in particular exhibit high levels of survivin. The survivin protein forms dimers through a conserved region that is critical for subcellular localization and biological functions of the protein. We identified small molecules that target a specific cavity adjacent to the survivin dimerization surfaces. S12, a lead compound identified in the screen, can bind to the survivin protein at the intended target site. Moreover, S12 alters spindle formation, causing mitotic arrest and cell death, and inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Cell death occurs in premetaphase stage following mitotic arrest and is not a consequence of general toxicity. Thus, the study validates a novel therapeutic target site in the survivin protein and provides a promising strategy to develop a new class of therapeutic small molecules for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:21892210

  13. Perception of better nasal patency correlates with increases in mucosal cooling after surgery for nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Corbin D.; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Frank, Dennis O.; Kimbell, Julia S.; Rhee, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives 1. Quantify mucosal cooling (i.e., heat loss) spatially in the nasal passages of nasal airway obstruction (NAO) patients before and after surgery using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). 2. Correlate mucosal cooling with patient-reported symptoms, as measured by the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) and a visual analog scale (VAS) for sensation of nasal airflow. Study Design Prospective Setting Academic tertiary medical center. Subjects and Methods Computed tomography (CT) scans and NOSE and VAS surveys were obtained from 10 patients before and after surgery to relieve NAO. Three-dimensional models of each patient’s nasal anatomy were used to run steady-state CFD simulations of airflow and heat transfer during inspiration. Heat loss across the nasal vestibule and the entire nasal cavity, and the surface area of mucosa exposed to heat fluxes > 50 W/m2 were compared pre- and post-operatively. Results After surgery, heat loss increased significantly on the pre-operative most obstructed side (p values < 0.0002). A larger surface area of nasal mucosa was exposed to heat fluxes > 50 W/m2 after surgery. The best correlation between patient-reported and CFD measures of nasal patency was obtained for NOSE against surface area in which heat fluxes > 50 W/m2 (Pearson r = −0.76). Conclusion A significant post-operative increase in mucosal cooling correlates well with patients’ perception of better nasal patency after NAO surgery. CFD-derived heat fluxes may prove to be a valuable predictor of success in NAO surgery. PMID:24154749

  14. Intranasal coadministration of Cholera toxin with amoeba lysates modulates the secretion of IgA and IgG antibodies, production of cytokines and expression of pIgR in the nasal cavity of mice in the model of Naegleria fowleri meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Yepez, Maricela; Campos-Rodriguez, Rafael; Lopez-Reyes, Israel; Bonilla-Lemus, Patricia; Rodriguez-Cortes, Antonio Yahve; Contis-Montes de Oca, Arturo; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Miliar-Garcia, Angel; Rojas-Hernandez, Saul

    2014-11-01

    The nasal mucosa is the first contact with antigens to induce IgA response. The role of this site has rarely been studied. We have shown than intranasal administration with Naegleria fowleri lysates plus Cholera toxin (CT) increased the protection (survival up to 100%) against N. fowleri infection in mice and apparently antibodies IgA and IgG together with polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells avoid the attachment of N. fowleri to apical side of the nasal epithelium. We also observed that nasal immunization resulted in the induction of antigen-specific IgG subclasses (IgG1 and IgG2a) in nasal washes at days 3 and 9 after the challenge and IgA and IgG in the nasal cavity, compared to healthy and infected mice. We found that immunization with both treatments, N. fowleri lysates plus CT or CT alone, increased the expression of the genes for alpha chain, its receptor (pIgR), and it also increased the expression of the corresponding proteins evidenced by the ∼65 and ∼74kDa bands, respectively. Since the production of pIgR, IgA and IgG antibodies, is up-regulated by some factors, we analyzed the expression of genes for IL-10, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β by using RT-PCR of nasal passages. Immunization resulted in an increased expression of IL-10, IL-6, and IFN-γ cytokines. We also aimed to examine the possible influences of immunization and challenge on the production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β). We observed that the stimulus of immunization inhibits the production of TNF-α compared to the infected group where the infection without immunization causes an increase in it. Thus, it is possible that the coexistence of selected cytokines produced by our immunization model may provide a highly effective immunological environment for the production of IgA, IgG and pIgR as well as a strong activation of the PMN in mucosal effector tissue such as nasal passages. PMID:24731967

  15. Nasal Tip Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cerkes, Nazim

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tip deficiency can be congenital or secondary to previous nasal surgeries. Underdeveloped medial crura usually present with underprojected tip and lack of tip definition. Weakness or malposition of lateral crura causes alar rim retraction and lateral nasal wall weakness. Structural grafting of alar cartilages strengthens the tip framework, reinforces the disrupted support mechanisms, and controls the position of the nasal tip. In secondary cases, anatomic reconstruction of the weakened or interrupted alar cartilages and reconstitution of a stable nasal tip tripod must be the goal for a predictable outcome. PMID:26616702

  16. CT-Based Evaluation of Tumor Volume After Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy of Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Comparison with Clinical Remission Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Stefan Turowski, Bernd; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kovacs, Adorjan F.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To assess the volume of locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity and the oropharynx before and after intra-arterial (i.a.) chemotherapy by means of computed tomography and to compare these data with clinically determined treatment response of the same patient population. Methods. Eighty-eight patients with histologically proven, advanced carcinoma of the oral cavity and/or the oropharynx (local tumor stages T3/4) received neoadjuvant i.a. chemotherapy with cisplatin as part of a multimodal therapeutic regimen, comprising (1) local chemotherapy, (2) surgery, and (3) combined radio-chemotherapy. Three weeks after the intervention, residual disease was evaluated radiologically by measurement of the tumor volume and clinically by inspection and palpation of the primary tumor according to WHO criteria. Results. Comparison of treatment response according to radiological and clinical criteria respectively revealed complete remission in 5% vs. 8% (p < 0.05), partial remission in 30% vs. 31%, stable disease in 61% vs. 58%, and tumor progression in 5% vs. 2%. Conclusion. Radiological volumetry and clinical evaluation found comparable response rates after local chemotherapy. However, in patients with good response after local treatment, volumetric measurement with CT may help to distinguish between partial and complete remission. Thus, radiological tumor volumetry provides precise and differentiated information about tumor response and should be used as an additional tool in treatment monitoring after local chemotherapy.

  17. Asymmetry in reflex responses of nasal muscles in anesthetized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Sekizawa, S I; Ishikawa, T; Sant'Ambrogio, G

    1998-07-01

    Nasal reflexes elicited by mechanical or electrical stimulation of nasal afferents were studied in anesthetized guinea pigs. Probing the nasal cavity of one side evoked a greater activation of the contralateral than the ipsilateral nasal muscles and, occasionally, sneezing. Similarly, electrical stimulation of the ethmoidal nerve often caused sneezing, with a greater activation of the nasal muscles and a greater increase in resistance on the contralateral side. Asymmetrical activation of the nasal muscles in response to mechanical stimuli induces asymmetrical airflows, especially during sneezing, between the two sides of the nasal cavity. Most of the expired air is forcibly blown out through the ipsilateral nostril, thus improving the elimination of irritants from the nose. PMID:9655764

  18. Cytotoxic effects of nasal buserelin on nasal mucosal tissue in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Oghan, Fatih; Apuhan, Tayfun; Terzi, Hakan; Kukner, Aysel; Coksuer, Hakan; Yılmaz, Fahrettin

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the cytotoxic effects of nasal buserelin on rabbit nasal mucosal tissue, twenty-four female rabbits were studied prospectively. The rabbits were divided into 4 groups including 6 rabbits. The rabbits' left noses were included in the all study groups: 150 μg/puff/day of buserelin acetate was administered topically twice daily during 21, 42 and 63 days. Saline was administered topically twice daily to the left nasal cavity in the control group. The nasal septal mucosal stripe tissue was carefully removed from underlaying cartilage after sedation. HE staining, Masson's trichrome, toluidine blue and TUNEL staining were used to evaluate mucosal changes. Each preparation was investigated via apoptotic cells, and they were accounted. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to evaluate nonparametric comparison of apoptotic cells. Mononuclear cells have been raised in the sub-epithelial connective tissue, nucleuses of epithelial cells in the apical region were pyknotic, and apoptotic cells were determined on 21-day group. In the 42-day group, nasal epithelial tissue was similar to 21-day group and epithelial cells including pyknotic nucleus were present in this group, too. In the 63-day group, epithelial cells were light colored. Venous sinuses in the sub-epithelial connective tissue were wide but not congested and not raised collagen filaments. In the intra-epithelial tissue, some of cells were TUNEL (+). Apoptotic cells were fewer in the control group according to 21-day group. In 42- and 63-day groups, these cells were fewer than in 21-day group. Numerical difference was present between the groups, but statistical significance was not found between the groups. We concluded that nasal buserelin cytotoxicity was not potent in the nasal cavity in rabbits. We use nasal buserelin in all indications with confidence. PMID:22160101

  19. Carcinoma of the nasal vestibule

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, N.P.; Parsons, J.T.; Cassisi, N.J.; Million, R.R.

    1984-05-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the nasal vestibule are essentially skin cancers that require special therapeutic considerations because of the regional anatomy. They have sometimes been considered poorly suited for treatment by irradiation because of potential or actual cartilage and/or bone invasion and therefore have been treated by surgical resection, sometimes producing defects that are difficult to reconstruct satisfactorily. From 1966 to April 1980, 13 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal vestibule were treated with radiotherapy at the University of Florida. Eight lesions were de novo; 5 were recurrent after 1 or more surgical procedures. Treatment consisted of radium needle implantation and/or external beam therapy. Neck management was individualized. All de novo and 4 of 5 recurrent lesions were controlled locally. Cosmetic resultes were good in patients with de novo lesions. There were no instances of significant cartilage or soft tissue necrosis despite cartilage involvement by tumor in 6 cases.

  20. The Usefulness of Nasal Packing with Vaseline Gauze and Airway Silicone Splint after Closed Reduction of Nasal Bone Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Young; Kim, Sin Rak; Park, Jin Hyung

    2012-01-01

    Background Packing after closed reduction of a nasal bone fracture causes inconvenient nasal obstruction in patients. We packed the superior meatus with Vaseline gauze to support the nasal bone, and packed the middle nasal meatus with a Doyle Combo Splint consisting of an airway tube, a silastic sheet, and an expandable sponge to reduce the inconvenience. In addition, we aimed to objectively identify whether this method not only enables nasal respiration but also sufficiently supports the reduced nasal bone. Methods Nasal ventilation was measured via spirometry 1 day before surgery and compared to 1 day after surgery. To compare support of the reduced nasal bone by the 2 methods, 2 plastic surgeons assessed the displacementon X-rays taken after the surgery and after removing the packing. The extent of nasal obstruction, dry mouth, sleep disturbance, headache, and swallowing difficulty were compared with visual analog scales (VAS) on a pre-discharge survey. Results In the experimental group, the nasal respiration volume 1 day after surgery remained at 71.3%±6.84% on average compared to 1 day prior to surgery. Support of the reduced bone in the experimental group (2.80±0.4) was not significantly different from the control group (2.88±0.33). The VAS scores for all survey items were lower in the experimental group than in the control group, where a lower score indicated a lower level of inconvenience. Conclusions The nasal cavity packing described here maintained objective measures of nasal respiration and supported the reduced bone similar to conventional methods. Maintaining nasal respiration reduced the inconvenience to patients, which demonstrates that this packing method is useful. PMID:23233886

  1. Angioleiomyoma of the oral cavity extended to submandibular space; an unusual tumor in an unusual deep-seated space: a case report.

    PubMed

    Minni, A; De Carlo, A; Roukos, R; Illuminati, G; Cerbelli, B

    2012-10-01

    Angioleiomyoma (AL) is a benign neoplasia originating from smooth muscle and very uncommon in the oral cavity. The most frequent subtype in the oral cavity is the vascular one. AL usually occurs in the extremities: only around 12% are found in other areas such as head and neck. It presents as an asymptomatic, slow growing nodule lodging in the palate, tongue or lips. The diagnosis is essentially by histological exam and special specific stains are helpful to confirm the origin and to distinguish it from other tumors. We present a case of AL found in unusual site: attached to the submandibular region in a deep-seated space. PMID:23090830

  2. Nasal Carriage of 200 Patients with Nasal Bone Fracture in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Wook; Kim, Young Joon; Kim, Hoon; Nam, Sang Hyun; Shin, Bo Moon

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathogens in the nasal cavity during nasal surgery could lead to a systemic infectious condition, such as bacteremia, nosocomial infection, or toxic shock syndrome. However, there is no research about the prevalence of nasal carriage in patients with nasal bone fracture. Methods This was a prospective, double-blind, randomized study about the rate of nasal carriage in 200 patients with nasal bone fracture in Korea. Nasal secretions were taken from both the middle nasal meatus and colonized. All analyses were carried out using SPSS software. Results Pathogens were identified in 178 of the 200 cases. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were the most cultured bacteria in 127 (66.84%) of the 190 total patients after excluding 10 cases of contaminated samples, and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCNS) were found in 48 (25.26%). Staphylococcus aureus was the second most identified pathogen, found in 36 (18.95%), followed by 7 cases (3.68%) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The prevalence rate of MRSA in the females was higher than that in the males (RR=4.70; 95% CI, 1.09-20.18), but other demographic factors had no effect on the prevalence rate of MRSA and MRCNS. Conclusions The prevalence rate of these pathogens in patients with nasal bone fracture in Korea was similar to other reports. However, few studies have addressed the prevalence rate of CNS and MRCNS in accordance with risk factors or the change in prevalence according to specific prophylaxis against infectious complications. Additional research is needed on the potential connections between clinical factors and microbiological data. PMID:24086806

  3. Computerized rhinomanometry: a study of total nasal resistance normal values.

    PubMed

    Janosević, L; Dotlić, J; Janosević, S; Dudvarski, Z; Milovanović, A; Pendjer, I

    2009-01-01

    Computerized rhinomanometry with the practical software programmes is used widely as a research tool to evaluate objectively nasal air flow and resistance parameters, while the increase of its clinical application may be facilitated by further standardization of the method. The aim of the study was to determine the total nasal resistance normal values in healthy adult population using a method of computerized rhinomanometry. A randomized sample of 108 white healthy adults (216 nasal cavities), both sexs with a mean age of 32 (20-45) years comprised the test group. Nasal patency was measured by active anterior rhinomanometry in non-decongested mucosa ("at rest") during 10 repetitive measurements at inspiratory and expiratory reference pressure of 150 Pa. Nasal resistance was measured and calculated according to the recommendations of the Committee on objective assessment of the nasal airway, International Rhinologic Society. The mean total nasal resistance in the sample was found to be 0.179 Pa/cm3/s with the confidant interval from 0,167 to 0,191 Pa/cm3/s at the probability level of 95%. Total nasal resistance was very significantly influenced by sex (t = -4.614), height (F=11.625) and weight (F=11.529) of the examinees. This paper provides additional information on total nasal resistance normal values in healthy adult population important for computirezed rhinomanometry normative parameters standardization. PMID:20218102

  4. The Differential Imaging Features of Fat-Containing Tumors in the Peritoneal Cavity and Retroperitoneum: the Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Na-young; Chung, Jae-Joon; Chung, Yong-Eun; Choi, Jin-Young; Park, Young-Nyun

    2010-01-01

    There are a variety of fat-containing lesions that can arise in the intraperitoneal cavity and retroperitoneal space. Some of these fat-containing lesions, such as liposarcoma and retroperitoneal teratoma, have to be resected, although resection can be deferred for others, such as adrenal adenoma, myelolipoma, angiomyolipoma, ovarian teratoma, and lipoma, until the lesions become large or symptomatic. The third group tumors (i.e., mesenteric panniculitis and pseudolipoma of Glisson's capsule) require medical treatment or no treatment at all. Identifying factors such as whether the fat is macroscopic or microscopic within the lesion, the origin of the lesions, and the presence of combined calcification is important for narrowing the differential diagnosis. The development and wide-spread use of modern imaging modalities make identification of these factors easier so narrowing the differential diagnosis is possible. At the same time, lesions that do not require immediate treatment are being incidentally found at an increasing rate with these same imaging techniques. Thus, the questions about the treatment methods have become increasingly important. Classifying lesions in terms of the necessity of performing surgical treatment can provide important information to clinicians, and this is the one of a radiologist's key responsibilities. PMID:20461188

  5. Nasal vs oral intubation.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, L

    2003-05-01

    Both nasal and oral route for intubation have advantages and disadvantages. Oral intubation is easier to perform, faster and less painful than nasal intubation under direct laryngoscopy, while blind nasal intubation represents a good alternative in conscious patient, without sedation. In trauma patient, oral route should be preferred, with cervical immobilisation. By the contrary, nasal intubation can cause bleeding, retro-pharyngeal and turbinate bones injury, but it seems preferable in preventing laryngeal complications. Moreover nasal intubation seem to increase risk for sinusitis while, there is no clear advantage for any of the two routes, concerning nosocomial pneumonia, bacteriemia and otitis. Nevertheless nasal route increases comfort for the patient and decreases injury and necrosis of tongue and lips; tube fastening is simpler thus reducing accidental extubation. PMID:12768165

  6. Outcome Prediction After Surgery and Chemoradiation of Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Oral Cavity, Oropharynx, and Hypopharynx: Use of Baseline Perfusion CT Microcirculatory Parameters vs. Tumor Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Nguyen, Shaun A.; Anand, Sharma K.; Glavina, Gordana; Day, Terry; Rumboldt, Zoran

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether pretreatment perfusion computed tomography (PCT) may predict outcome in chemoradiated patients with oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) after surgical excision. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with SCCA were examined before treatment. The primary site was oral cavity in 6, oropharynx in 7, and hypopharynx in 8 patients; there were 11 T2, 6 T3, and 4 T4 tumors. PCT was performed at the level of largest tumor diameter based on standard neck CT. The data were processed to obtain blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability surface area product (PS). Regions of interest were free-hand positioned on the lesions to obtain PCT measurements. Tumor volume was also calculated. Follow-up was performed with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and endoscopy. Pearson correlation coefficient was used for comparison between the subgroups. A regression model was constructed to predict recurrence based on the following predictors: age, gender, tumor (T) and nodal (N) stage, tumor volume, and PCT parameters. Results: BF{sub mean}, BF{sub max}, BV{sub mean}, BV{sub max}, MTT{sub mean}, PS{sub mean}, and PS{sub max} were significantly different between patients with and without tumor recurrence (0.0001, p < 0.04). T stage, tumor volume, N stage, BF{sub max}, BV{sub max}, MTT{sub mean}, and radiation dose (p < 0.001) were independent predictors for recurrence. Cox proportional hazards model for tumor recurrence revealed significantly increased risk with high tumor volume (p = 0.00001, relative risk [RR] 7.4), low PS{sub mean} (p = 0.0001, RR 14.3), and low BF{sub max} (p = 0.002, RR 5.9). Conclusions: Our data suggest that PCT parameters have a prognostic role in patients with SCCA.

  7. Ameloblastoma of the Nasal Septum Origin: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zatoński, Tomasz; Roszkowska, Anna; Kręcicki, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Background. Ameloblastoma is the most common odontogenic tumor. It represents about 1% of all tumors of the jaw. Extragnathic location of the ameloblastoma is typical and extremely rare. Case Report. We report a case of ameloblastoma of the nasal septum origin, causing nasal obstruction. According to our information, this is the first reported case of ameloblastoma coming from the nasal septum as a primary tumor without maxillary sinus involvement. Conclusions. Ameloblastoma can not only locate in the maxilla and mandible, but also in other regions of the craniofacial. Ameloblastoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of tumors causing nasal obstruction. Nonspecific clinical features of sinonasal ameloblastoma make it extremely important to perform accurate diagnostic imaging and histopathological examination. PMID:24171127

  8. Canine and feline nasal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Christine

    2006-05-01

    Dogs and cats of our society have outgrown their status as merely pets and are now considered our close companions and even family members. This shift in their roles has led to pet owners seeking improved preventative medicine for their four-legged friends. Subsequently, dogs and cats are living longer lives than ever before and developing more old-age-related diseases. One of the most devastating diseases of older animals is cancer. Once a veterinarian has detected cancer in a pet, pet owners seek advice on their next course of action. This article is intended to provide concise information regarding the diagnosis and treatment of intranasal tumors of the dog and cat. This article outlines the forms of nasal tumors that are the most common, the recommended imaging and biopsy techniques to diagnose the tumor, and the most appropriate treatments of them. PMID:16711615

  9. [Pharmacological and clinical evalutation of nasal obstruction: application to xylometazoline].

    PubMed

    Pradalier, André

    2006-01-01

    Nasal obstruction, a prominent feature of rhinitis, may be quantified in humans by haemodynamic techniques (measuring local blood flux), static methods (measuring the geometry of nasal cavities) and dynamic methods (assessing the patency of nasal airways through the measure of resistance to air flow). These methods demonstrated the nasal decongestant activity of xylometazoline in healthy volunteers and rhinitis patients. Controlled double-blind studies established the clinical efficacy of xylometazoline in infectious and allergic (seasonal and perennial) rhinitis versus placebo and in comparison with various reference substances. The effects on nasal epithelium ciliary activity which are observed in vitro are modest and even less pronounced in vivo owing to dilution in situ and protective physiological processes. PMID:16792148

  10. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Triple Negative Breast Cancer (Currently Accruing Only Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients Since 6/8/2007)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  11. Complex flow in the nasal region of guitarfishes.

    PubMed

    Agbesi, Mawuli P K; Naylor, Sara; Perkins, Elizabeth; Borsuk, Heather S; Sykes, Dan; Maclaine, James S; Wang, Zhijin; Cox, Jonathan P L

    2016-03-01

    Scent detection in an aquatic environment is dependent on the movement of water. We set out to determine the mechanisms for moving water through the olfactory organ of guitarfishes (Rhinobatidae, Chondrichthyes) with open nasal cavities. We found at least two. In the first mechanism, which we identified by observing dye movement in the nasal region of a life-sized physical model of the head of Rhinobatos lentiginosus mounted in a flume, olfactory flow is generated by the guitarfish's motion relative to water, e.g. when it swims. We suggest that the pressure difference responsible for motion-driven olfactory flow is caused by the guitarfish's nasal flaps, which create a region of high pressure at the incurrent nostril, and a region of low pressure in and behind the nasal cavity. Vortical structures in the nasal region associated with motion-driven flow may encourage passage of water through the nasal cavity and its sensory channels, and may also reduce the cost of swimming. The arrangement of vortical structures is reminiscent of aircraft wing vortices. In the second mechanism, which we identified by observing dye movement in the nasal regions of living specimens of Glaucostegus typus, the guitarfish's respiratory pump draws flow through the olfactory organ in a rhythmic (0.5-2 Hz), but continuous, fashion. Consequently, the respiratory pump will maintain olfactory flow whether the guitarfish is swimming or at rest. Based on our results, we propose a model for olfactory flow in guitarfishes with open nasal cavities, and suggest other neoselachians which this model might apply to. PMID:26780177

  12. A new multilayer reconstruction using nasal septal flap combined with fascia graft dural suturing for high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak after endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kentaro; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Fukuhara, Noriaki; Yamaguchi-Okada, Mitsuo; Yamada, Shozo

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and reliability of a new endoscopic multilayer reconstruction using nasal septal flap (NSF) to prevent high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak after endoscopic endonasal surgery. This study was a retrospective review on 97 patients who underwent multilayer reconstructions using NSF combined with fascia graft dural suturing after endoscopic endonasal surgery between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients were divided into two groups, third ventricle opening group and nonopening group, based on the presence of a direct connection between the third ventricle and the paranasal sinus after tumor removal. Furthermore, we compared this procedure with our previous reconstruction after resection of craniopharyngioma. Finally, we checked the patients who had postoperative prolonged discomfort of the nasal cavity for over a year. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurred in three patients (3.1 %): one from the third ventricle opening group and the remaining two from the nonopening group. External lumbar drain was performed after surgery in only seven patients (7.2 %). The incidence of postoperative CSF leak was similar in both groups, whereas the rate of craniopharyngioma in the third ventricle opening group was significantly higher. The incidence of postoperative CSF leak after resection of craniopharyngioma was not statistically significant but obviously higher in the previous group (12.2 %) compared with that in the present group (2.3 %). Twelve patients (12.4 %) had postoperative nasal discomfort of the nasal cavity for over a year. Multilayer reconstruction using NSF combined with fascia graft dural suturing is a more reliable method for preventing postoperative high-flow CSF leakage after endoscopic endonasal surgery even if there is a direct connection between the third ventricle and the paranasal sinus. However, we should pay close attention especially to prolonged discomfort of the nasal cavity after harvesting NSF

  13. Toxicology of the nasal passages

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this work include: Comparative Anatomy and Function of the Nasal Passages; Light Microscopic Examination of the Rat Nasal Passages: Preparation and Morphologic Features; Histopathology of Acute and Subacute Nasal Toxicity; Pathology of Chronic Nasal Toxic Responses Including Cancer; Responses of the Nasal Mucociliary Apparatus to Airborne Irritants; Effects of Chemical Exposure on Olfaction in Humans, Possible Consequences of Cytochrome P-450-Dependent Monooxygenases in Nasal Tissues.

  14. Nasal mites (Gamasida: Rhinonyssidae) of Paroaria coronata (Miller) (Passeriformes: Emberezidae).

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, C S; Coimbra, M A A; Müller, G; Brum, J G W

    2011-01-01

    With the aim of identifying the species of nasal mites of Paroaria coronata (red-crested cardinal), the nasal cavity of 40 birds were examined. The nasal mites were identified as Ptilonyssus sairae de Castro and Sternostoma pirangae Pence, with 50% and 7.5% of prevalence, respectively. This is the first record of these mite species parasitizing P. coronata. This report also amplifies the area of occurrence of S. pirangae for Brazil and that of P. sairae for Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. PMID:21952970

  15. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors and Liver or Kidney Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Subependymoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Esophageal Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer

  16. Malignant Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses: Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity With Emphasis on Hypothalamic-Pituitary Deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Snyers, An Janssens, Geert; Twickler, Marcel B.; Hermus, Ad R.; Takes, Robert P.; Kappelle, Arnoud C.; Merkx, Matthias A.W.; Dirix, Piet; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome after surgery and radiotherapy for patients with sinonasal cancer and assess late toxicity, with special emphasis on hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 168 patients treated for sinonasal cancer in a single institute between 1986 and 2006. A more detailed analysis was performed on a subgroup of 76 patients with adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma treated with curative intent. Long-term survivors were evaluated for late toxicity by a multidisciplinary team using the late effects of normal tissues (LENT SOMA) scoring system. Additional endocrinologic tests were performed for assessment of hypothalamic-pituitary function. Results: Five-year actuarial local control and overall survival rates were 62% and 35% for all patients and 64% and 42% for the subgroup with squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. In multivariate analysis, T stage was the only significant factor predicting local relapse (79% at 5 years for T1-T3 vs. 53% for T4; p = 0.006). Sinonasal mucosal melanomas had the highest rate of regional failure (33% at 5 years). Thirteen of 21 patients (62%) evaluated at the late morbidity clinic had hormonal disturbances, of whom 5 (24%) had definitive evidence of hypopituitarism with multiple hormonal deficiencies. Conclusion: Local failure is the dominant cause of treatment failure for patients with sinonasal cancer, with T4 stage the only independent predictor. Because of a high rate of radiation-induced hypopituitarism, we recommend endocrinologic surveillance for these patients.

  17. The crooked nasal tip.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jeremy; Adamson, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Successful treatment of the crooked nasal tip includes proper analysis and assessment, employment of the proper techniques, reaching ideal tip dynamics, and close follow-up. Both the caudal septum and the nasal tip cartilages must be addressed. When executed properly, satisfaction should be high for both the patient and the surgeon. PMID:22028009

  18. Chitosan in nasal delivery systems for therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Casettari, Luca; Illum, Lisbeth

    2014-09-28

    There is an obvious need for efficient and safe nasal absorption enhancers for the development of therapeutically efficacious nasal products for small hydrophilic drugs, peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and polysaccharides, which do not easily cross mucosal membranes, including the nasal. Recent years have seen the development of a range of nasal absorption enhancer systems such as CriticalSorb (based on Solutol HS15) (Critical Pharmaceuticals Ltd), Chisys based on chitosan (Archimedes Pharma Ltd) and Intravail based on alkylsaccharides (Aegis Therapeutics Inc.), that is presently being tested in clinical trials for a range of drugs. So far, none of these absorption enhancers have been used in a marketed nasal product. The present review discusses the evaluation of chitosan and chitosan derivatives as nasal absorption enhancers, for a range of drugs and in a range of formulations such as solutions, gels and nanoparticles and finds that chitosan and its derivatives are able to efficiently improve the nasal bioavailability. The revirtew also questions whether chitosan nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery provide any real improvement over simpler chitosan formulations. Furthermore, the review also evaluates the use of chitosan formulations for the improvement of transport of drugs directly from the nasal cavity to the brain, based on its mucoadhesive characteristics and its ability to open tight junctions in the olfactory and respiratory epithelia. It is found that the use of chitosan nanoparticles greatly increases the transport of drugs from nose to brain over and above the effect of simpler chitosan formulations. PMID:24818769

  19. Unexpected nasal changes in rats related to reflux after gavage dosing.

    PubMed

    Damsch, Siegrid; Eichenbaum, Gary; Looszova, Adriana; Lammens, Lieve; Feyen, Bianca; Van den Bulck, Kathleen; Knight, Elaine; Kelley, Michael; Tonelli, Alfred

    2011-02-01

    In a three-week oral gavage toxicity study in rats, a high incidence of respiratory symptoms and high mortality was noted in compound-dosed rats only. Because of audible respiration, an effect in the upper respiratory tract was suspected and the nasal cavity was included for examination. Histology revealed extensive necrosis and purulent inflammation within the nasal passages, indicative of direct irritation. Since posterior nasal regions were most affected, with food material present within the inflammatory exudates, reflux and retrograde aspiration of irritant material (possibly stomach contents with test formulation) into the nasal cavity were suspected. Lowering the dose volume and fasting the rats prior to gavage dosing substantially reduced the respiratory effects and mortality. The current article focuses on the histological changes in the nasal cavity indicative of gavage-related reflux and provides guidance on differentiation between technical gavage error and gavage-related reflux. PMID:21422260

  20. Comparison of Nasal Acceleration and Nasalance across Vowels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorp, Elias B.; Virnik, Boris T.; Stepp, Cara E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of normalized nasal acceleration (NNA) relative to nasalance as estimates of nasalized versus nonnasalized vowel and sentence productions. Method: Participants were 18 healthy speakers of American English. NNA was measured using a custom sensor, and nasalance was measured using…

  1. Similarity and Enhancement: Nasality from Moroccan Arabic Pharyngeals and Nasals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellou, Georgia Eve

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies of the articulation, acoustics, and perception of nasal and pharyngeal consonants and adjacent vowels were conducted to investigate nasality in Moroccan Arabic (MA). The status of nasality in MA is described as coarticulatorily complex, where two phoneme types (pharyngeal segments and nasal segments) yield similar…

  2. A Nasal Epithelial Receptor for Staphylococcus aureus WTA Governs Adhesion to Epithelial Cells and Modulates Nasal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Faulstich, Manuela; Grau, Timo; Severin, Yannik; Unger, Clemens; Hoffmann, Wolfgang H.; Rudel, Thomas; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Weidenmaier, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Nasal colonization is a major risk factor for S. aureus infections. The mechanisms responsible for colonization are still not well understood and involve several factors on the host and the bacterial side. One key factor is the cell wall teichoic acid (WTA) of S. aureus, which governs direct interactions with nasal epithelial surfaces. We report here the first receptor for the cell wall glycopolymer WTA on nasal epithelial cells. In several assay systems this type F-scavenger receptor, termed SREC-I, bound WTA in a charge dependent manner and mediated adhesion to nasal epithelial cells in vitro. The impact of WTA and SREC-I interaction on epithelial adhesion was especially pronounced under shear stress, which resembles the conditions found in the nasal cavity. Most importantly, we demonstrate here a key role of the WTA-receptor interaction in a cotton rat model of nasal colonization. When we inhibited WTA mediated adhesion with a SREC-I antibody, nasal colonization in the animal model was strongly reduced at the early onset of colonization. More importantly, colonization stayed low over an extended period of 6 days. Therefore we propose targeting of this glycopolymer-receptor interaction as a novel strategy to prevent or control S. aureus nasal colonization. PMID:24788600

  3. Pharmacotherapy of nasal disease.

    PubMed

    Mygind, N

    1985-01-01

    Rhinitis may be classified as infectious (purulent), seasonal allergic, perennial allergic, perennial nonallergic (vasomotor) and nasal polyps. Pharmacotherapy can be local or systemic. A variety of compounds are available, including alpha adrenergic agonists, mast cell stabilizing agents, Beta-2 agonists, antihistamines, cholinergic antagonists and corticosteroids. In terms of histamine receptors, H1 receptors predominate in the epithelium and glands but both H1 and H2 receptors are present in nasal blood vessels. Trigeminus-reflex mediated nasal secretions, can be treated by parasympatholytic drugs. PMID:2888012

  4. Drastic initial response and subsequent response to two ALK inhibitors in a patient with a highly aggressive ALK-rearranged inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor arising in the pleural cavity.

    PubMed

    Ono, Akira; Murakami, Haruyasu; Serizawa, Masakuni; Wakuda, Kazushige; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Naito, Tateaki; Taira, Tetsuhiko; Koh, Yasuhiro; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Nakajima, Takashi; Endo, Masahiro; Takahashi, Toshiaki

    2016-09-01

    A 57-year-old male current smoker was diagnosed with an aggressive variant of ALK-rearranged inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) arising in the pleural cavity. First line treatment with ASP3026 was initiated at a dose of 125mg once daily. A follow-up CT scan revealed drastic regression of the pleural lesion. After disease progression with ASP3026 treatment, LDK378 (ceritinib) was initiated at a dose of 750mg once daily. A follow-up CT scan revealed a second drastic regression of the pleural lesion. Furthermore, it is noteworthy that this case represents the use of serum hyaluronan levels to assist in monitoring of treatment efficacy in an IMT. Herein, we present the first case of a patient with a highly aggressive ALK-rearranged IMT arising in the pleural cavity, who showed both initial and subsequent drastic response to two ALK inhibitors while being monitored for serum hyaluronan. PMID:27565932

  5. Nasal mucosal blood flow after intranasal allergen challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, K.; Bake, B.; Pipkorn, U.

    1988-03-01

    The nasal mucosal blood flow in patients with allergic rhinitis was determined at nasal allergen challenges with the /sup 133/Xenon washout method. Determinations were made in 12 subjects before and 15 minutes after challenge with diluent and increasing doses of allergen. The time course was followed in eight subjects by means of repeated measurements during 1 hour after a single allergen dose. Finally, the blood flow was measured after unilateral allergen challenge in the contralateral nasal cavity. A dose-dependent decrease in blood flow was found after nasal challenge with increasing doses of allergens, whereas challenge with diluent alone did not induce any changes. The highest allergen dose, which also induced pronounced nasal symptoms, resulted in a decrease in blood flow of 25% (p less than 0.001). The time-course study demonstrated a maximum decrease in blood flow 10 to 20 minutes after challenge and then a gradual return to baseline. Unilateral allergen challenge resulted in a decrease in blood flow in the contralateral, unchallenged nasal cavity, suggesting that part of the allergen-induced changes in blood flow were reflex mediated.

  6. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneezing, stuffy, runny, itchy nose) caused by the common cold. Mometasone nasal spray is in a class of ... taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  7. Olopatadine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve sneezing and a stuffy, runny or itchy nose caused by allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Olopatadine is ... comes as a liquid to spray in the nose. Olopatadine nasal spray is usually sprayed in each ...

  8. Budesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to relieve sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies (caused ... treat symptoms (e.g., sneezing, stuffy, runny, itchy nose) caused by the common cold. Budesonide nasal spray ...

  9. Olopatadine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... a stuffy, runny or itchy nose caused by allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Olopatadine is in a class of ... Olopatadine nasal spray controls the symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis, but does not cure these condition. Continue to ...

  10. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  11. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  12. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men with low testosterone levels caused by ... is a controlled substance. Prescriptions may be refilled only a limited number of times; ask your pharmacist ...

  13. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat the symptoms of seasonal (occurs only at certain times of the year), and perennial ( ... prescribed by your doctor.Ciclesonide nasal spray is only for use in the nose. Do not swallow ...

  14. Measuring Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Jarrod; Most, Sam P

    2016-08-01

    The nose and the nasal airway is highly complex with intricate 3-dimensional anatomy, with multiple functions in respiration and filtration of the respired air. Nasal airway obstruction (NAO) is a complex problem with no clearly defined "gold-standard" in measurement. There are 3 tools for the measurement of NAO: patient-derived measurements, physician-observed measurements, and objective measurements. We continue to work towards finding a link between subjective and objective nasal obstruction. The field of evaluation and surgical treatment for NAO has grown tremendously in the past 4-5 decades and will continue to grow as we learn more about the pathophysiology and treatment of nasal obstruction. PMID:27400845

  15. Fentanyl Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Fentanyl nasal spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  16. Nasal bots...a fascinating world!

    PubMed

    Angulo-Valadez, Carlos E; Scholl, Philip J; Cepeda-Palacios, Ramón; Jacquiet, Philippe; Dorchies, Philippe

    2010-11-24

    Larvae causing obligatory myiasis are numerous and they may affect cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues, wounds, nasopharyngeal cavities (nasal bots), internal organs and the digestive tract (bots) of domestic and wild animals and humans as well. Nasal bots belong to the Family Oestridae, Subfamily Oestrinae, which includes several important genera: Oestrus, Kirkioestrus, and Gedoelstia infecting Artiodactyla (except Cervidae) in Africa and Eurasia, Cephenemyia and Pharyngomyia infecting Cervidae, Rhinoestrus infecting horses, Cephalopina infecting camels, Pharyngobolus infecting African elephants, and Tracheomyia infecting Australian kangaroos. Nasal bots are widespread in Mediterranean and tropical areas and in affected animals they induce sneezing and nasal discharge which may become caked with dust making breathing very difficult. The aforementioned species of larvae are host-specific but sometimes the may be deposited in human eyes inducing a painful opthalmomyiasis of short duration. The first fascinating trait of these parasites is the very efficient morphological and biological adaptations to parasitism they show either as larvae or as adults, in order to facilitate their survival and search for a suitable host. Nasal bots have reached different degrees of complexity in their life cycles. Indeed, while for some species (e.g., Oestrus ovis, Rhinoestrus usbekistanicus) larvae are injected by flies directly into nostrils and develop in the sinuses before being ejected for external pupation, some other species migrate from eyes to blood before returning to nasal cavities either through the ethmoid bone (Gedoelstia hässleri) or via lungs and bronchi (Gedoelstia cristata). Moreover, larvae are very well-adapted to their environment being able to undergo through hypobiosis either inside or outside the host, according to the climatic environmental conditions and seasonality. The second fascinating trait of nasal bots is related to host behavioural and immune

  17. Stereotactic Radiosurgery of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastases: Prospective Evaluation of Target Margin on Tumor Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Given the neurocognitive toxicity associated with whole-brain irradiation (WBRT), approaches to defer or avoid WBRT after surgical resection of brain metastases are desirable. Our initial experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) targeting the resection cavity showed promising results. We examined the outcomes of postoperative resection cavity SRS to determine the effect of adding a 2-mm margin around the resection cavity on local failure (LF) and toxicity. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 120 cavities in 112 patients treated from 1998-2009. Factors associated with LF and distant brain failure (DF) were analyzed using competing risks analysis, with death as a competing risk. The overall survival (OS) rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method; variables associated with OS were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards and log rank tests. Results: The 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF and DF, with death as a competing risk, were 9.5% and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis, expansion of the cavity with a 2-mm margin was associated with decreased LF; the 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF with and without margin were 3% and 16%, respectively (P=.042). The 12-month toxicity rates with and without margin were 3% and 8%, respectively (P=.27). On multivariate analysis, melanoma histology (P=.038) and number of brain metastases (P=.0097) were associated with higher DF. The median OS time was 17 months (range, 2-114 months), with a 12-month OS rate of 62%. Overall, WBRT was avoided in 72% of the patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant SRS targeting the resection cavity of brain metastases results in excellent local control and allows WBRT to be avoided in a majority of patients. A 2-mm margin around the resection cavity improved local control without increasing toxicity compared with our prior technique with no margin.

  18. Risk factors for nasal malignancies in German men: the South-German Nasal cancer study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are few studies of the effects of nasal snuff and environmental factors on the risk of nasal cancer. This study aimed to investigate the impact of using nasal snuff and of other risk factors on the risk of nasal cancer in German men. Methods A population-based case–control study was conducted in the German Federal States of Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg. Tumor registries and ear, nose and throat departments provided access to patients born in 1926 or later. Results Telephone interviews were conducted with 427 cases (mean age 62.1 years) and 2.401 population-based controls (mean age 60.8 years). Ever-use of nasal snuff was associated with an odds ratio (OR) for nasal cancer of 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88–2.38) in the total study population, whereas OR in smokers was 2.01 (95% CI 1.00-4.02) and in never smokers was 1.10 (95% CI 0.43–2.80). The OR in ever-smokers vs. never-smokers was 1.60 (95% CI 1.24–2.07), with an OR of 1.06 (95% CI 1.05–1.07) per pack-year smoked, and the risk was significantly decreased after quitting smoking. Exposure to hardwood dust for at least 1 year resulted in an OR of 2.33 (95% CI 1.40–3.91) in the total population, which was further increased in never-smokers (OR 4.89, 95% CI 1.92–12.49) in analyses stratified by smoking status. The OR for nasal cancer after exposure to organic solvents for at least 1 year was 1.53 (1.17–2.01). Ever-use of nasal sprays/nasal lavage for at least 1 month rendered an OR of 1.59 (1.04–2.44). The OR after use of insecticides in homes was 1.48 (95% CI 1.04–2.11). Conclusions Smoking and exposure to hardwood dust were confirmed as risk factors for nasal carcinoma. There is evidence that exposure to organic solvents, and in-house use of insecticides could represent novel risk factors. Exposure to asbestos and use of nasal snuff were risk factors in smokers only. PMID:23130889

  19. Exploring the bacterial assemblages along the human nasal passage.

    PubMed

    Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Jáuregui, Ruy; Oxley, Andrew P A; Kaspar, Ursula; Plumeier, Iris; Kahl, Silke; Rudack, Claudia; Becker, Karsten; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2016-07-01

    The human nasal passage, from the anterior nares through the nasal vestibule to the nasal cavities, is an important habitat for opportunistic pathogens and commensals alike. This work sampled four different anatomical regions within the human nasal passage across a large cohort of individuals (n = 79) comprising individuals suffering from chronic nasal inflammation clinically known as chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and individuals not suffering from inflammation (CRS-free). While individuals had their own unique bacterial fingerprint that was consistent across the anatomical regions, these bacterial fingerprints formed into distinct delineated groups comprising core bacterial members, which were consistent across all four swabbed anatomical regions irrespective of health status. The most significant observed pattern was the difference between the global bacterial profiles of swabbed and tissue biopsy samples from the same individuals, being also consistent across different anatomical regions. Importantly, no statistically significant differences could be observed concerning the global bacterial communities, any of the bacterial species or the range of diversity indices used to compare between CRS and CRS-free individuals, and between two CRS phenotypes (without nasal polyps and with nasal polyps). Thus, the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of sinusitis remains uncertain. PMID:27207744

  20. Pretreatment Primary Tumor SUVmax Measured by FDG-PET and Pathologic Tumor Depth Predict for Poor Outcomes in Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Pathologically Positive Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, Joseph T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh, C.; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Chen, I.-H.; Huang, S.-F.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The pathologic tumor depth is an independent prognosticator for local control (LC) and survival in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We sought to investigate the prognostic value of the preoperative maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) at the primary tumor in OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: A total of 109 OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes were investigated. All patients underwent 2-deoxy-2[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose-positron emission tomography within 2 weeks before surgery and neck dissection. All patients were followed for {>=}24 months after surgery or until death. The optimal cutoff value for the primary tumor SUVmax was selected according to the 5-year LC rate. Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 26 months (39 months for surviving patients). A cutoff SUVmax of 19.3 provided the greatest prognostic information for the 5-year LC rate (55% vs. 88%, p = 0.0135). A tumor depth {>=}12 mm appeared to be the most appropriate cutoff for predicting the 5-year LC rate (76% vs. 95%, p = 0.0075). A scoring system using the primary tumor SUVmax and tumor depth was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. Patients with both a SUVmax of {>=}19.3 and tumor depth of {>=}12 mm (n = 8) had significantly poorer 5-year LC, 5-year disease-free, 5-year disease-specific, and 5-year overall survival rates compared with the other patient groups. Conclusion: The combination of the primary tumor SUVmax ({>=}19.3) and pathologic tumor depth ({>=}12 mm) identified a subgroup of OSCC patients at greatest risk of poor LC and death.

  1. TRANSCRIPTOMIC ANALYSIS OF F344 RAT NASAL EPITHELIUM SUGGESTS THAT THE LACK OF CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO GLUTARALDEHYDE IS DUE TO ITS GREATER TOXICITY COMPARED TO FORMALDEHYDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde is cytotoxic and carcinogenic to the rat nasal respiratory epithelium inducing tumors after 12 months. Glutaraldehyde is also cytotoxic but is not carcinogenic to nasal epithelium even after 24 months. Both aldehydes induce similar acute and subchronic histopathology...

  2. [Nasal type natural killer/T cell lymphoma: case series and literature review].

    PubMed

    Düzlü, Mehmet; Ant, Ayça; Tutar, Hakan; Karamert, Recep; Şahin, Melih; Sayar, Erolcan; Cesur, Nesibe

    2016-01-01

    Nasal type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma is a rare type of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma which originates from nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Exact diagnosis of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, which is a rapidly progressive clinical condition, may be established by immunohistochemical analysis on biopsy material after clinical suspicion. In this article, we report four cases of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma who were followed-up in our clinic and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the disease in light of the literature data. PMID:27405082

  3. Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Rare Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Anal Canal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Anal Canal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Appendix Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Cholangiocarcinoma; Chordoma; Colorectal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Esophageal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fibromyxoid Tumor; Gastric Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Giant Cell Carcinoma; Intestinal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Sarcomatoid Carcinoma; Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Malignant Odontogenic Neoplasm; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Malignant Skin Neoplasm; Malignant Testicular Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm of Unknown Primary Origin; Mixed Mesodermal (Mullerian) Tumor; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Adenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Oral Cavity Carcinoma; Oropharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Paraganglioma; Paranasal Sinus Adenocarcinoma; Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma; Parathyroid Gland Carcinoma; Pituitary Gland Carcinoma; Placental Choriocarcinoma; Placental-Site Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Scrotal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Seminal Vesicle Adenocarcinoma; Seminoma; Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Small Intestinal Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestinal Squamous

  4. Mode-of-Action Uncertainty for Dual-Mode Carcinogens: A Bounding Approach for Naphthalene-Induced Nasal Tumors in Rats Based on PBPK and 2-Stage Stochastic Cancer Risk Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K T

    2007-05-11

    A relatively simple, quantitative approach is proposed to address a specific, important gap in the appr approach recommended by the USEPA Guidelines for Cancer Risk Assessment to oach address uncertainty in carcinogenic mode of action of certain chemicals when risk is extrapolated from bioassay data. These Guidelines recognize that some chemical carcinogens may have a site-specific mode of action (MOA) that is dual, involving mutation in addition to cell-killing induced hyperplasia. Although genotoxicity may contribute to increased risk at all doses, the Guidelines imply that for dual MOA (DMOA) carcinogens, judgment be used to compare and assess results obtained using separate 'linear' (genotoxic) vs. 'nonlinear' (nongenotoxic) approaches to low low-level risk extrapolation. However, the Guidelines allow the latter approach to be used only when evidence is sufficient t to parameterize a biologically based model that reliably o extrapolates risk to low levels of concern. The Guidelines thus effectively prevent MOA uncertainty from being characterized and addressed when data are insufficient to parameterize such a model, but otherwise clearly support a DMOA. A bounding factor approach - similar to that used in reference dose procedures for classic toxicity endpoints - can address MOA uncertainty in a way that avoids explicit modeling of low low-dose risk as a function of administere administered or internal dose. Even when a 'nonlinear' toxicokinetic model cannot be fully validated, implications of DMOA uncertainty on low low-dose risk may be bounded with reasonable confidence when target tumor types happen to be extremely rare. This concept was i illustrated llustrated for a likely DMOA rodent carcinogen naphthalene, specifically to the issue of risk extrapolation from bioassay data on naphthalene naphthalene-induced nasal tumors in rats. Bioassay data, supplemental toxicokinetic data, and related physiologically based p pharmacokinetic and 2 harmacokinetic 2-stage

  5. Nasal vaccine innovation.

    PubMed

    Jabbal-Gill, Inderjit

    2010-12-01

    The current vaccine market is gaining momentum in the development of alternative administration routes namely intranasal, oral, topical, pulmonary, vaginal, and rectal; the nasal route offers the most promising opportunity for vaccine administration. It can enhance convenience, safety, elicit both local and systemic immune responses; thus potentially provide protection from pathogens at the site of entry. Nasal vaccine innovation comes with both opportunities and challenges. The innovative strategies used by industry and researchers to overcome the hurdles are discussed in this article: these include live-attenuated vaccines, adjuvants, mucoadhesives, particulate delivery systems, virus-like particles, vaccine manufacture, challenges of regulatory authorities, and the nasal vaccine impact on market potential. Critical issues for effective nasal vaccination are the antigen-retention period that enables its interaction with the lymphatic system and choice of an adjuvant that is nontoxic and induces the required immune response. Co-adjuvanting by means of a mucoadhesive technology addresses some of these issues. ChiSys(®), a natural bioadhesive with proven intranasal safety profile, has already demonstrated efficacy for several nasally delivered vaccines including norovirus. With the looming threat of a pandemic, alternatives such as intranasal vaccination will ultimately facilitate greater public compliance and rapid mass global vaccination. PMID:21047271

  6. Fluence Rate Differences in Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy and Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor after Treatment of the Tumor-Involved Murine Thoracic Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Craig E.; Carter, Shirron L.; Czupryna, Julie; Wang, Le; Putt, Mary E.; Busch, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the thoracic cavity can be performed in conjunction with surgery to treat cancers of the lung and its pleura. However, illumination of the cavity results in tissue exposure to a broad range of fluence rates. In a murine model of intrathoracic PDT, we studied the efficacy of 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH; Photochlor®)-mediated PDT in reducing the burden of non-small cell lung cancer for treatments performed at different incident fluence rates (75 versus 150 mW/cm). To better understand a role for growth factor signaling in disease progression after intrathoracic PDT, the expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was evaluated in areas of post-treatment proliferation. The low fluence rate of 75 mW/cm produced the largest reductions in tumor burden. Bioluminescent imaging and histological staining for cell proliferation (anti-Ki-67) identified areas of disease progression at both fluence rates after PDT. However, increased EGFR activation in proliferative areas was detected only after treatment at the higher fluence rate of 150 mW/cm. These data suggest that fluence rate may affect the activation of survival factors, such as EGFR, and weaker activation at lower fluence rate could contribute to a smaller tumor burden after PDT at 75 mW/cm. PMID:26784170

  7. Rarely Seen Nasal Congenital Problems Causing Neonatal Upper Respiratory Obstruction: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Başal, Yeşim; Akcan, Abdullah Bariş; Polat, Yasemin Durum; Günel, Ceren; Eryilmaz, Aylin; Başak, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Since newborns are obligatory nasal breathers, upper respiratory tract problems may sometimes be life threatening. The most common pathology causing dyspnea and stridor in newborns is laryngomalacia. Nasal cavity pathologies that risk the neonatal airway are more rarely met. These anomalies may be seen either as solitary anomalies or as a part of a syndrome. While choanal atresia is one of the best-known nasal cavity anomalies, choanal stenosis, congenital nasal mid-line masses, congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis, and nasal tip anomalies are more rarely seen structural pathologies. Choanal atresia may be present either as an isolated congenital anomaly or as a part of CHARGE syndrome. Some rare chromosome anomalies may also cause significant problems during nasal respiration in newborns. With this study, we presented a case series of newborns with pathologies that affected nasal respiration. Although the diagnosis and treatment of choanal atresia and congenital dacryocystocele are well known, the information on the diagnosis and treatment of the other two uncommon cases are limited. With this study, we aimed to contribute to the literature by presenting our approach in six cases having congenital pathologies that cause nasal respiratory obstruction. PMID:27114819

  8. The Number of Pathologically Positive Lymph Nodes and Pathological Tumor Depth Predicts Prognosis in Patients With Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Chung-Jan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lee, Li-Yu; Chen, I-How; Huang, Shiang-Fu; and others

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The objective of this retrospective study was twofold: (1) to investigate prognostic factors for clinical outcomes in patients with poorly differentiated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and (2) to identify specific prognostic subgroups that may help to guide treatment decisions. Methods and Materials: We examined 102 patients with poorly differentiated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were followed for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. The 5-year rates of local control, neck control, distant metastasis, disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival served as main outcome measures. Results: The 5-year rates were as follows: local control (79%), neck control (64%), distant metastases (27%), disease-free survival (48%), disease-specific survival (52%), and overall survival (42%). Multivariable analysis showed that the number of pathologically positive nodes ({>=}4 vs. {<=}3) was a significant predictor of neck control, distant metastasis, and disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates. In addition, the presence of tumor depth of {>=}11 mm (vs. <11 mm) was a significant predictor of distant metastasis, disease-specific survival, and overall survival rates. The combination of the two predictors (26.5%, 27/102) was independently associated with poorer neck control (p = 0.0319), distant metastasis (p < 0.0001), and disease-free (p < 0.0001), disease-specific (p < 0.0001), and overall survival (p < 0.0001) rates. Conclusions: In patients with poorly differentiated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, the presence of at least 4 pathologically positive lymph nodes and of a pathological tumor depth {>=}11 mm identifies a subset of subjects with poor clinical outcomes. Patients carrying both risk factors are suitable candidates for the development of novel therapeutic approaches.

  9. Cosmetic and Functional Nasal Deformities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ...

  10. Carbon monoxide absorption through the oral and nasal mucosae of cynomolgus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfisch, W.H.; Hoop, K.A.

    1980-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that blood levels of carbon monoxide increase during cigarette smoking. It has genrally been assumed that increases in blood levels of carbon monoxide could be interpreted as evidence that deep lung penetration of cigarette smoke had occurred. This study was designed to examine whether increased blood levels of carbon monoxide could result from absorption in the nasal and oral cavitites. The nasal and oral cavities of cynomolgus monkeys were exposed, independently of the lungs, to cigarette smoke under rigorous smoking conditions. Pre- and post-exposure blood levels of carbon monoxide were measured. As a positive control, similar volumes of cigarette smoke were passed directly into the lungs, thus bypassing the oral and nasal cavities, and blood levels of carbon monoxide were again measured. The results inidcate that absorption of carbon monoxide in the oral and nasal cavities is negligible under the heavy smoking regimen employed here, and hence, would be negligible under normal smoking conditions.

  11. Nasal Mucociliary Clearance in Adenoid Hypertrophy and Otitis Media with Effusion.

    PubMed

    Yazıcı, Hasmet

    2015-12-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC), which exists in many systems, is the first defensive mechanism of the human body. Nasal MCC has an important role in transporting the secretions of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses along with the trapped inhaled pathogens to the nasopharynx. Physiologic or pathologic situations that effect nasal MCC, such as temperature, humidity, nasal obstruction, allergic rhinitis, chronic infections, etc., lead to impaired MCC and related local or circumjacent system disorders. With this perspective, when a unified airway with a multiple disease principle is considered, investigating the relationship between adenoid hypertrophy (AH), otitis media with effusion (OME) and nasal MCC is logical. In this review, histological and physiologic properties of nasal MCC and its possible role involving pathologic situations such as AH and OME is discussed together with recent literature findings. PMID:26496764

  12. Ion activated in situ gel of gellan gum containing salbutamol sulphate for nasal administration.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Sneha R; Patil, Sanjay B

    2016-06-01

    Nasal delivery is the promising approach for rapid onset of action and avoids the first pass metabolism. The main aim of present study was to develop a novel mucoadhesive in situ gel of salbutamol sulphate using gellan gum and hydroxylpropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) for nasal administration. The formulations were prepared so as to have gelation at physiological ion content after nasal administration. Developed formulations were evaluated for gelation, viscosity, drug content, in vitro mucoadhesion, in vitro drug release study, ex vivo permeation, and histopathology. Formulations showed pH in the range of nasal cavity and optimum viscosity for nasal administration. The mucoadhesive force depends upon concentration of HPMC and drug release was found to be 97.34% in 11h. The histopathology did not detect any damage during ex vivo permeation studies. Hence, in situ gel system of gellan gum may be a promising approach for nasal delivery of salbutamol sulphate for therapeutic improvement. PMID:26899173

  13. A review on mucoadhesive polymer used in nasal drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Mayank; Kumar, Manish; Pathak, Kamla

    2011-01-01

    This update review is on mucoadhesive polymers used in nasal dosage forms. The nasal mucosa provides a potentially good route for systemic drug delivery. One of the most important features of the nasal route is that it avoids first-pass hepatic metabolism, thereby reducing metabolism. The application of mucoadhesive polymers in nasal drug delivery systems has gained to promote dosage form residence time in the nasal cavity as well as improving intimacy of contact with absorptive membranes of the biological system. The various new technology uses in development of nasal drug delivery dosage forms are discussed. The various dosage forms are vesicular carriers (liposome, noisome), nanostructured particles, prodrugs, in situ gelling system with special attention to in vivo studies. PMID:22247888

  14. Nasalance Norms in Greek Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okalidou, Areti; Karathanasi, Asimina; Grigoraki, Eleni

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to derive nasalance norms for monolingual Greek speakers, to examine nasalance scores as a function of gender and to draw cross-linguistic comparisons based on normative data. Participants read aloud a corpus of linguistic material, consisting of (1) a nasal text, an oral text and a balanced text; (2) a set of nasal…

  15. Internal nasal floor configuration in Homo with special reference to the evolution of Neandertal facial form.

    PubMed

    Franciscus, Robert G

    2003-06-01

    The presence of a steeply sloping or depressed nasal floor within the nasal cavity of Neandertals is frequently mentioned as a likely specialization or autapomorphy. The depressed nasal floor has also been seen as contributing to a relatively more capacious nasal cavity in Neandertals, which is tied to cold-climate respiratory adaptation and energetics. These observations have been limited largely to a relatively few intact crania, and the character states associated with this trait have not been as precisely codified or analyzed as those published for Plio-Pleistocene hominins (McCollum et al., 1993, J. Hum. Evol. 24, 87; McCollum, 2000, Am. J. Phys. Anthrop. 112, 275). This study examines the internal nasal floor topography in complete crania and isolated maxillae in European, west Asian, and African fossil Homo (n=158) including 25 Neandertals, and a wide range of recent humans from Europe, the Near East, and Africa (n=522). The configuration of the internal nasal floor relative to the nasal cavity entrance is codified as: 1) level, forming a smooth continuous plane; 2) sloped or mildly stepped; or 3) bilevel with a pronounced vertical depression. The frequency of these nasal floor configurations, and their relationship to both nasal margin cresting patterning and a comprehensive set of nasofacial metrics is examined. Neandertals show a high frequency of the bilevel (depressed) configuration in both adults and subadults (80%), but this configuration is also present in lower frequencies in Middle Pleistocene African, Late Pleistocene non-Neandertal (Skhul, Qafzeh), and European Later Upper Paleolithic samples (15%-50%). The bilevel configuration is also present in lower frequencies (ca. 10%) in all recent human samples, but attains nearly 20% in some sub-Saharan African samples. Across extinct and extant Homo (excluding Neandertals), internal nasal floor configuration is not associated with piriform aperture nasal margin patterning, but the two are strongly

  16. A study on transvelar coupling for non-nasalized sounds.

    PubMed

    Dang, Jianwu; Wei, Jianguo; Honda, Kiyoshi; Nakai, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that the velum in speech production may not only serve as a binary switch with on-off states for nasal and non-nasal sounds, but also partially alter the acoustic characteristics of non-nasalized sounds. The present study investigated the unique functions of the velum in the production of non-nasalized sounds by using morphological, mechanical, and acoustical measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging movies obtained from three Japanese speakers were used to measure the behaviors of the velum and dynamic changes in the pseudo-volume of the pharyngeal cavity during utterances of voiced stops and vowels. The measurements revealed no significant enlargements in the supraglottal cavity as subjects uttered voiced stops. It is found that the velum thickness varied across utterances in a way that depended on vowels, but not on consonants. The mechanical and acoustical observations in the study suggested that the velum is actively controlled to augment the voice bars of voiced stops, and nostril-radiated sound is one of the most important sources for voice bars, just as is laryngeal wall vibration. This study also proposed a two-layer diaphragm model that simulates transvelar coupling during the production of non-nasalized speech sounds. The simulation demonstrated that the model accurately represented the basic velar functions involved in speech production. PMID:26827038

  17. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Ciclesonide nasal spray is used to treat the symptoms of seasonal (occurs only at certain times of the year), and perennial ( ... Ciclesonide comes as a solution (liquid) to spray in the nose. It is usually sprayed in each nostril once daily. Use ciclesonide at around the same time every day. Follow the ...

  18. Fluticasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Follow the directions on your prescription or product label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to ... ingredients in fluticasone nasal spray. Check the package label for a list of the ... and herbal products you are taking, or have recently taken, or ...

  19. Cromolyn Sodium Nasal Solution

    MedlinePlus

    Cromolyn comes as a solution to use with a special nasal applicator. It usually is inhaled three to six times a day to prevent allergy ... first time, read the instructions provided with the solution. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or respiratory therapist to ...

  20. Zolmitriptan Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... diarrhea and stomach pain caused by decreased blood flow to the intestines). Your doctor may tell you not to use zolmitriptan nasal spray.tell your doctor if you smoke or are overweight; if you have or have ever had high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or liver or ...

  1. Naloxone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms, he or she should give you your first naloxone dose and then call 911 immediately. After receiving the naloxone nasal spray, ... the person on their side (recovery position) and call for emergency medical ... after giving the first naloxone dose. If the person does not respond ...

  2. Neandertal nasal structures and upper respiratory tract "specialization".

    PubMed

    Franciscus, R G

    1999-02-16

    Schwartz and Tattersall [Schwartz, J. H. & Tattersall, I. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 10852-10854] have argued for a previously unrecognized suite of autapomorphies in the internal nasal region of Neandertals that make them unique, not only among hominids, but possibly among all other terrestrial mammals. These purported autapomorphies include (i) the development of an internal nasal margin bearing a well developed and vertically oriented medial projection; (ii) a pronounced medial swelling of the lateral nasal wall into the posterior nasal cavity; and (iii) the lack of an ossified roof over the lacrimal groove. In addition, Laitman et al. [Laitman, J. T., Reidenberg, J. S., Marquez, S. & Gannon, P. J. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 10543-10545] pointed to these features as evidence for upper respiratory tract specializations among the Neandertals, indicating potential differences in behavior compared with modern humans. Critically reviewing the anatomical basis for Schwartz and Tattersall's contentions reveals several serious problems with their analysis, including (i) reliance on specimens with damaged, incomplete, or, in some cases, entirely absent relevant anatomy; (ii) failure to consider primary vs. secondary spatial consequences in nasal trait conceptualization; and (iii) failure to consider actual ranges of variation in these traits in both fossil and recent humans. Accordingly, the unique phylogenetic and adaptive "specializations" attributed to Neandertal internal nasal structures are unwarranted. PMID:9990106

  3. Neandertal nasal structures and upper respiratory tract “specialization”

    PubMed Central

    Franciscus, Robert G.

    1999-01-01

    Schwartz and Tattersall [Schwartz, J. H. & Tattersall, I. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 10852–10854] have argued for a previously unrecognized suite of autapomorphies in the internal nasal region of Neandertals that make them unique, not only among hominids, but possibly among all other terrestrial mammals. These purported autapomorphies include (i) the development of an internal nasal margin bearing a well developed and vertically oriented medial projection; (ii) a pronounced medial swelling of the lateral nasal wall into the posterior nasal cavity; and (iii) the lack of an ossified roof over the lacrimal groove. In addition, Laitman et al. [Laitman, J. T., Reidenberg, J. S., Marquez, S. & Gannon, P. J. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 10543–10545] pointed to these features as evidence for upper respiratory tract specializations among the Neandertals, indicating potential differences in behavior compared with modern humans. Critically reviewing the anatomical basis for Schwartz and Tattersall’s contentions reveals several serious problems with their analysis, including (i) reliance on specimens with damaged, incomplete, or, in some cases, entirely absent relevant anatomy; (ii) failure to consider primary vs. secondary spatial consequences in nasal trait conceptualization; and (iii) failure to consider actual ranges of variation in these traits in both fossil and recent humans. Accordingly, the unique phylogenetic and adaptive “specializations” attributed to Neandertal internal nasal structures are unwarranted. PMID:9990106

  4. Concordance of nasal and diabetic foot ulcer staphylococcal colonization

    PubMed Central

    Haleem, Ambar; Schultz, Jonathan S.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Dohrn, Cassie L.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Gardner, Sue E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is an important risk factor for surgical site infections. The goal of this study was to investigate the concordance between nasal and diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) SA carriage. Methods 79 subjects with DFUs were assessed for nasal and DFU colonization with SA, including Methicillin-resistant-SA (MRSA). Results Twenty-five (31.6%) subjects had nares colonization with SA; 29 (36.7%) had DFU colonization with SA. Seven (8.8%) subjects had nares colonization with MRSA and 7 (8.8%) had DFU colonization with MRSA. Ulcer duration was associated with MRSA presence (p=0.01). Sensitivity and specificity of positive nasal SA colonization with positive DFU colonization were 41 and 74%. Conclusions We found substantial discordance between SA strains colonizing DFU and the nasal cavity. The poor positive predictive values for SA isolation in a DFU based on nasal carriage suggests SA colonization of a DFU by endogenous SA strains cannot be assumed. PMID:24560808

  5. Experiment K-315: Studies of the nasal nucosa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    The posterior regions of the olfactory nasal mucosa of rats flown on Cosmos 1129 failed to reveal histopathological changes. These results are at variance with those of the Apollo 12 Biocore experiment in which severe necrotic olfactory mucosal lesions were seen in flight animals only. In the anterior aspect of the nasal cavity of the Cosmos 1129 rats, however, focal lesions of moderate severity and variable extent were seen. These were consistent in character with that of a mild virus infection, which, it is postulated, was self-limiting. The infection was present in all groups of animals: flight, synchronous and vivarium control.

  6. Deformation of Nasal Septal Cartilage During Mastication

    PubMed Central

    Dayeh, Ayman A. Al; Rafferty, Katherine L.; Egbert, Mark; Herring, Susan W.

    2009-01-01

    The cartilaginous nasal septum plays a major role in structural integrity and growth of the face, but its internal location has made physiologic study difficult. By surgically implanting transducers in 10 miniature pigs (Sus scrofa), we recorded in vivo strains generated in the nasal septum during mastication and masseter stimulation. The goals were (1) to determine whether the cartilage should be considered as a vertical strut supporting the nasal cavity and preventing its collapse, or as a damper of stresses generated during mastication and (2) to shed light on the overall pattern of snout deformation during mastication. Strains were recorded simultaneously at the septo-ethmoid junction and nasofrontal suture during mastication. A third location in the anterior part of the cartilage was added during masseter stimulation and manipulation. Contraction of jaw closing muscles during mastication was accompanied by anteroposterior compressive strains (around −1,000 με) in the septo-ethmoid junction. Both the orientation and the magnitude of the strain suggest that the septum does not act as a vertical strut but may act in absorbing loads generated during mastication. The results from masseter stimulation and manipulation further suggest that the masticatory strain pattern arises from a combination of dorsal bending and/or shearing and anteroposterior compression of the snout. J. Morphol. PMID:19434723

  7. A case of nasal septal abscess caused by medication related osteonecrosis in breast cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Mayuka; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Kurioka, Takaomi; Kurita, Akihiro; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2016-02-01

    Antiresorptive drugs have been widely used to treat patients with hypercalcemia caused by malignancy, bone metastasis, multiple myeloma, and osteoporosis. However, it is well known that antiresorptive drugs can cause osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Herein, we report a rare case of nasal septal abscess caused by medication related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) in a breast cancer patient. A 69-year-old woman was referred to our clinic for evaluation of nasal obstruction. Physical examination revealed a cherry-like swelling of the nasal mucosa emanating from the septum that obstructed both nasal cavities and a fistulous tract showing pus discharge after extraction of the bilateral maxillary central incisors (MCI) and the right maxillary lateral incisor (MLI). Computed tomography and panoramic radiography revealed extensive osteonecrosis of the maxilla and swelling of the nasal mucosa. The clinical diagnosis was nasal septal abscess caused by osteonecrosis of the maxilla. Surgical procedure was undertaken for this case. An indwelling drain was placed in the oral cavity, and sequestrectomy was performed with incision and drainage of the anterior portion of left nasal septum. The patient was doing well at the 7-month follow-up. The patient had a medical history of breast cancer with bone, lung, liver metastases, and had received intravenous bisphosphonate, which is one of the antiresorptive medicines, over the past 4 years. We suspect that this history played an important role in MRONJ induced nasal septal abscess. PMID:26775849

  8. Hypercalcemia and parathyroid hormone-related protein in a dog with undifferentiated nasal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G M; Lane, I; Fischer, J; Lopez, A

    1999-01-01

    Hypercalcemia was discovered in a 7-year-old, castrated male basset hound with a suspected nasal tumor. The dog died the day after admission and nasal carcinoma and disseminated intravascular coagulation were diagnosed on postmortem. Detectable levels of serum PTHrP support a diagnosis of hypercalcemia of malignancy. PMID:10340096

  9. Clinical Effect of Surgical Correction for Nasal Pathology on the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Yoon; Hong, Joon Hyeong; Lee, Jae Heon; Lee, Kyu Eun; Cho, Hyun Sang; Lim, Su Jin; Kwak, Jin Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that relief of nasal obstruction in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) would lead to reduce OSA severity and to discuss the available evidence on the clinical efficacy of nasal surgery as a treatment modality for OSA. Study Design Twenty-five subjects who had reduced patency of nasal cavity and narrowing of retroglossal or retropalatal airways were diagnosed with OSA and underwent nasal surgery, such as septoplasty or turbinoplasty to correct nasal pathologies. The effect of the surgery on nasal patency was quantified by measuring minimal cross-sectional area (MCA) using acoustic rhinometry. The watch-PAT-derived respiratory disturbance index (RDI), apnea and hypopnea index (AHI), lowest oxygen saturation, and valid sleep time were measured before and after nasal surgery. Results The present study shows that the AHI and RDI decreased significantly and the lowest oxygen saturation and valid sleep time rose after nasal surgery in 25 OSA subjects. In addition, a reduction in subjective symptoms was observed in subjects and mean MCA increased after nasal surgery. Fourteen subjects were classified as responders and 11 subjects as non-responders. Responders showed considerable improvement of their subjective symptoms and the AHI and RDI were significantly lower after surgery. We found that the changes between pre- and post-operative AHI and RDI values were minimal in 11 non-responders. However, daytime somnolence and REM sleep time improved after nasal surgery in non-responders. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that the surgical treatment of nasal pathology improves nasal airway patency and reduces OSA severity in 56% subjects. Furthermore, correction of nasal pathology appears to result in improved sleep quality in both responder and non-responders OSA subjects. PMID:24896824

  10. EFFECTS OF FLUID AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC TECHNICAL FACTORS ON CONSPICUITY OF CANINE AND FELINE NASAL TURBINATES

    PubMed Central

    Uosyte, Raimonda; Shaw, Darren J; Gunn-Moore, Danielle A; Fraga-Manteiga, Eduardo; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Turbinate destruction is an important diagnostic criterion in canine and feline nasal computed tomography (CT). However decreased turbinate visibility may also be caused by technical CT settings and nasal fluid. The purpose of this experimental, crossover study was to determine whether fluid reduces conspicuity of canine and feline nasal turbinates in CT and if so, whether CT settings can maximize conspicuity. Three canine and three feline cadaver heads were used. Nasal slabs were CT-scanned before and after submerging them in a water bath; using sequential, helical, and ultrahigh resolution modes; with images in low, medium, and high frequency image reconstruction kernels; and with application of additional posterior fossa optimization and high contrast enhancing filters. Visible turbinate length was measured by a single observer using manual tracing. Nasal density heterogeneity was measured using the standard deviation (SD) of mean nasal density from a region of interest in each nasal cavity. Linear mixed-effect models using the R package ‘nlme’, multivariable models and standard post hoc Tukey pair-wise comparisons were performed to investigate the effect of several variables (nasal content, scanning mode, image reconstruction kernel, application of post reconstruction filters) on measured visible total turbinate length and SD of mean nasal density. All canine and feline water-filled nasal slabs showed significantly decreased visibility of nasal turbinates (P < 0.001). High frequency kernels provided the best turbinate visibility and highest SD of aerated nasal slabs, whereas medium frequency kernels were optimal for water-filled nasal slabs. Scanning mode and filter application had no effect on turbinate visibility. PMID:25867935

  11. EFFECTS OF FLUID AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC TECHNICAL FACTORS ON CONSPICUITY OF CANINE AND FELINE NASAL TURBINATES.

    PubMed

    Uosyte, Raimonda; Shaw, Darren J; Gunn-Moore, Danielle A; Fraga-Manteiga, Eduardo; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Turbinate destruction is an important diagnostic criterion in canine and feline nasal computed tomography (CT). However decreased turbinate visibility may also be caused by technical CT settings and nasal fluid. The purpose of this experimental, crossover study was to determine whether fluid reduces conspicuity of canine and feline nasal turbinates in CT and if so, whether CT settings can maximize conspicuity. Three canine and three feline cadaver heads were used. Nasal slabs were CT-scanned before and after submerging them in a water bath; using sequential, helical, and ultrahigh resolution modes; with images in low, medium, and high frequency image reconstruction kernels; and with application of additional posterior fossa optimization and high contrast enhancing filters. Visible turbinate length was measured by a single observer using manual tracing. Nasal density heterogeneity was measured using the standard deviation (SD) of mean nasal density from a region of interest in each nasal cavity. Linear mixed-effect models using the R package 'nlme', multivariable models and standard post hoc Tukey pair-wise comparisons were performed to investigate the effect of several variables (nasal content, scanning mode, image reconstruction kernel, application of post reconstruction filters) on measured visible total turbinate length and SD of mean nasal density. All canine and feline water-filled nasal slabs showed significantly decreased visibility of nasal turbinates (P < 0.001). High frequency kernels provided the best turbinate visibility and highest SD of aerated nasal slabs, whereas medium frequency kernels were optimal for water-filled nasal slabs. Scanning mode and filter application had no effect on turbinate visibility. PMID:25867935

  12. Endoscopic outcomes of resorbable nasal packing after functional endoscopic sinus surgery: a multicenter prospective randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Berlucchi, Marco; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Vincenzi, Andrea; Morra, Bruno; Pasquini, Ernesto

    2009-06-01

    Nasal packings can aid in control of postoperative bleeding and healing following functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS), but traditional non-resorbable stents have several inherent drawbacks. We performed a randomized, controlled, multicenter clinical trial to assess efficacy of resorbable nasal packing in patients undergoing FESS for chronic rhinosinusitis. A total of 66 patients for 88 nasal cavities were randomized to receive either hyaluronan resorbable packing (MeroGel) or standard non-resorbable nasal dressing after FESS. All underwent preoperative rhinoscopy, CT of sinuses, and, after surgery, were reassessed by rhinoscopy at 2, 4, and 12 weeks in blinded fashion. A total of 44 nasal cavities (MeroGel-group) received resorbable packing, whereas the remaining 44 were packed with non-resorbable nasal dressing. At follow-up endoscopic visit, the presence of nasal synechia was evaluated as primary outcome. Moreover, the tolerability and surgical handling properties of MeroGel and its comfort were assessed by surgeons and patients. Preoperative severity of rhinosinusitis was similar in both groups. No significant adverse events were observed in all patients. Follow-up endoscopy showed a lower proportion of nasal adhesions in MeroGel-group at both 4 (P = 0.041) and 12 weeks (P < 0.001). Moreover, an improvement of other endoscopic nasal findings such as re-epithelialization, presence of granulation tissue, and appearance of nasal mucosa of nasal cavities after FESS was observed in the MeroGel-group. Tolerability and surgical handling properties of MeroGel were positively rated by clinicians and the overall patient judged comfort of MeroGel was favorable. In conclusion, MeroGel can be considered a valid alternative to standard non-resorbable nasal dressings. It is safe, well-accepted, well-tolerated, and has significant advantage of being resorbable. Moreover, it may favor improved healing in patients undergoing FESS and reduce formation of adhesions. PMID

  13. Formaldehyde production promoted by rat nasal cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases with nasal decongestants, essences, solvents, air pollutants, nicotine, and cocaine as substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, A.R.; Hadley, W.M.

    1983-02-01

    To identify compounds which might be metabolized to formaldehyde in the nasal cavity, 32 potential substrates for cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases were screened with rat nasal and, for comparison, liver microsomes. Tested substrates included 6 nasal decongestants, cocaine, nicotine, 9 essences, 3 potential air pollutants, and 12 solvents. Each test substrate, with the possible exception of the air pollutants, contained one or more N-methyl, O-methyl, or S-methyl groups. Eighteen of the tested materials were metabolized to produce formaldehyde by nasal microsomes. Five substrates, namely, the solvents HMPA and dimethylaniline, cocaine, and the essences dimethyl anthranilate and p-methoxyacetophenone, were metabolized to produce formaldehyde at rates exceeding 1000 pmol/mg microsomal protein/min by nasal microsomes. Eight substrates, including four nasal decongestants, nicotine, and an extract of diesel exhaust particles, were metabolized to produce formaldehyde at rates of 200 to 1000 pmol/mg microsomal protein/min. Five other substrates were metabolized to formaldehyde at detectable rates. The results indicate that a variety of materials which often come in contact with the nasal mucosa can be metabolized to formaldehyde by nasal enzymes. The released formaldehyde may influence the irritancy of inhaled compounds and has been suggested to play a role in the tumorigenicity of some compounds.

  14. Single-stage osseointegrated implants for nasal prosthodontic rehabilitation: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Bruna M D F; Freitas-Pontes, Karina M; de Negreiros, Wagner A; Verde, Marcus A R L

    2015-08-01

    Malignant tumors in the nasal region may be treated by means of invasive surgical procedures, with large facial losses. Nasal prostheses, retained by osseointegrated facial implants, instead of plastic surgery, will, in most patients, offer good biomechanical and cosmetic results. This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with nasal cancer who had the entire nasal vestibule removed in a single-stage surgical procedure in order to shorten the rehabilitation time. The nasal prosthesis was built on a 3-magnet bar and was made of platinum silicone with intrinsic pigmentation, thereby restoring the patient's appearance and self-esteem. The authors concluded that single-stage implants may reduce the rehabilitation time to as little as 1 month, and the correct use of materials and techniques may significantly improve the nasal prosthesis. PMID:25976710

  15. Does Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improve Outcomes In pT1-3N0 Oral Cavity Cancer With Tumor-Free Margins and Perineural Invasion?

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The criteria for administration of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain controversial, and it is unclear whether patients with pT1-3N0 disease benefit from adjuvant radiation in the presence of free margins and perineural invasion. The goal of this report was to determine whether this group would benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy in terms of 5-year local control rate and overall survival rate. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed our case records from January 1996 to May 2005. In all, 460 pT1-3N0 OSCC patients had tumor-free margins, of whom 68 had perineural invasion. Postoperative adjuvant RT was performed in patients with pT4 tumors, positive lymph nodes, or close margins ({<=}4 mm). In addition, selected OSCC patients with large pT3 tumors or perineural invasion received postoperative adjuvant RT. Local control and overall survival rates were plotted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: There were no significant differences in 5-year local control (p 0.1936) and overall survival (p = 0.5580) rates between patients with perineural invasion compared with those without. Among patients with perineural invasion, the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy did not significantly alter the 5-year local control rate (p = 0.3170) or the overall survival rate (p = 0.0935). Conclusion: Altogether, these data seem to indicate that radical surgical resection alone should be considered a sufficient treatment for OSCC patients with pT1-3N0 disease, even in the presence of perineural invasion.

  16. [The application of the nanostructured bioplastic material for the plastic reconstruction of perforations in the nasal septum].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, M V; Akimov, A V; Bagautdinov, A A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to estimate the effectiveness of the application of the nanostructured bioplastic material for the plastic reconstruction of perforations in the nasal septum. A total of 80 patients were recruited for the study. Half of them underwent plastic reconstruction of perforations in the nasal septum with the application of the nanostructured bioplastic material. Forty patients were treated using no biotransplants. The functional state of nasal cavity mucosa was evaluated before and after surgery. It is concluded that the nanostructured bioplastic material used in the present study ensures efficacious reconstruction of nasal septum integrity after plastic correction of septal perforations. PMID:25588475

  17. Management of the Nasal Valve.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Dane M; Casanueva, Fernando J; Cook, Ted A

    2016-08-01

    The nasal valve is an important consideration in patients presenting with nasal obstruction. Controversy exists regarding the anatomy, terminology, evaluation, and management of the nasal valve. Innumerable techniques with variable effects have been described in the literature. The evidence qualifying these techniques has been plentiful, though often lacking in quality. This article reviews the controversial aspects of nasal valve management applying the best available evidence to help clarify potential areas of confusion. Future research using standardized definitions, consistent methodologies, and validated outcome measures are necessary to improve the quality of evidence and impact surgical decision-making. PMID:27400837

  18. Carboxylesterase-dependent cytotoxicity of dibasic esters (DBE) in rat nasal explants.

    PubMed

    Trela, B A; Bogdanffy, M S

    1991-02-01

    Dibasic esters (DBE) are a solvent mixture of dimethyl adipate (DMA), dimethyl glutarate (DMG), and dimethyl succinate (DMS) used in the paint and coating industry. Subchronic inhalation toxicity studies have demonstrated that DBE induce a mild degeneration of the olfactory, but not the respiratory, epithelium of the rat nasal cavity. Carboxylesterase-mediated hydrolysis of the individual dibasic esters is more efficient in olfactory than in respiratory mucosal homogenates. In the present study, an in vitro system of cultured rat nasal explants was utilized to determine if DBE toxicity is dependent on a metabolic activation by nonspecific carboxylesterase. Explants from both the olfactory and the respiratory regions of the female rat nasal cavity were incubated for 2 hr in Williams' medium E containing 10-100 mM DMA, DMG, or DMS. DBE caused a dose-related increase in nasal explant acid phosphatase release, a biochemical index of cytotoxicity. HPLC analysis demonstrated parallel increases in the carboxylesterase-mediated formation of monomethyl ester metabolites. Diacid metabolite production in the nasal explant system was not entirely concentration-dependent. Metabolite concentrations and acid phosphatase release were generally greater in olfactory than respiratory tissues. DBE-induced cytotoxicity and acid metabolite production were markedly attenuated in nasal tissue excised from rats which were pretreated with bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate, a carboxylesterase inhibitor. This study presents a viable in vitro method for assessing organic ester cytotoxicity in the rat nasal cavity. It was shown that DBE are weak nasal toxicants under the conditions of this system. It was further demonstrated that DBE toxicity is dependent on a carboxylesterase-mediated activation. A similar mechanism was proposed for the nasal toxicity induced by other organic esters following inhalation exposure. PMID:1994511

  19. A new species of Rhinonastes (Monogenoidea, Dactylogyridae), nasal parasite of Prochilodus argenteus (Actinopterygii, Characiformes) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Cassandra M; Brasil-Sato, Marilia C

    2014-09-01

    A new species of Rhinonastes, hitherto monotypic, is described and illustrated from the nasal cavity of 'curimat', Prochilodus argenteus from São Francisco River, Brazil. Rhinonastes curimatae n. sp. presents a male copulatory organ with more than five rings while the type species of the genus is characterized by male copulatory organ with less than two rings. This is the first record of a nasal parasite in P. argenteus. PMID:25119370

  20. [Primary melanoma of the nasal and paranasal sinus mucosa].

    PubMed

    Raĭkov, S; Avramov, T; Despotov, O

    2001-01-01

    The authors make short review on the one of most malignant neoplasms in human pathology--its incidence, ethiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, treatment and prognostic features. We present a clinical case from our practice--a melanoma of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses--a rare localization. Melanocarcinomas of the mucous membranes of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses are almost uniformly fatal. Undoubtedly some of the contributory reasons for their grave prognosis are the delay in detection and in accurate histologic diagnosis, the frequent injudicious therapy, the difficulties in adequate operative removal. Melanomas o mucous membranes may arise in mucosa lined by either normally present, or metaplastic stratified squamous epithelium. PMID:12024680

  1. Comparison between Perceptual Assessments of Nasality and Nasalance Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunnegard, Karin; Lohmander, Anette; van Doorn, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are different reports of the usefulness of the Nasometer[TM] as a complement to listening, often as correlation calculations between listening and nasalance measurements. Differences between findings have been attributed to listener experience and types of speech stimuli. Aims: To compare nasalance scores from the Nasometer with…

  2. Nasal septum injury in preterm infants using nasal prongs 1

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Suely de Fátima Santos Freire; de Vasconcelos, Maria Gorete Lucena; de Sousa, Nayara Francisca Cabral; da Silva, Daiana Vieira Câmara; Leal, Luciana Pedrosa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with nasal septum injury in premature infants using reused and new nasal prongs. METHOD: the study was a cohort from an open therapeutic intervention. The sample included 70 infants with a gestational age inferior to 37 weeks, who used nasal prongs and were hospitalized at the neonatal service of a hospital in Recife-PE, in the Northeast of Brazil. The data were collected in patient files through the assessment of the application of the device and of the nasal septum. Multinomial Logistic Regression and Survival analyses were applied. RESULTS: the incidence of nasal injury corresponded to 62.9%. In the multiple analysis, only the length of the infant's treatment was a determinant factor for the occurrence and severity of the injuries. CONCLUSION: the type of nasal prong does not serve as a risk factor for the nasal injury. The high incidence of nasal injury indicates the need to adapt the nursing care with emphasis on prevention. PMID:25493679

  3. Vorinostat in Combination With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Solid Tumors and HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    HIV Infection; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of nasal avian schistosomes (Trichobilharzia) from aquatic birds in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran.

    PubMed

    Fakhar, Mahdi; Ghobaditara, Maryam; Brant, Sara V; Karamian, Mehdi; Gohardehi, Shaban; Bastani, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Nasal schistosomes are trematodes in the family Schistosomatidae, many members of which are causative agents of human cercarial dermatitis (HCD). Little is known about the species diversity and distribution of nasal dwelling schistosomes of water birds, particularly in countries outside of Europe; even less is known in countries like Iran. Nasal schistosomes are of particular interest since these species migrate via the central nervous system to the nasal cavity once they penetrate their host. Thus, there must be efforts to determine the incidence of HCD due to nasal schistosomes. HCD outbreaks are reported seasonally in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran, an area well known for rice cultivation leading to increased person contact with water and infected snails. Such places include favorable habitat for both domestic ducks year round, and wild migratory ducks in the winter through spring. Recent reports have detected the presence of both nasal and visceral schistosomes in ducks in this area but with little species characterization. In this study, we examine a diversity of aquatic birds to determine the distribution, prevalence and bird host use of nasal schistosomes. We apply for the first time a molecular identification and phylogenetic analysis of these schistosomes. From 2012 to 2014, the nasal cavity of 508 aquatic birds from Mazandaran Province were examined that included species in Anseriformes, Gruiformes, Charadriiformes and Phoenicopteriformes. Nasal schistosomes were found in 45 (8.9%) birds belonging to Anseriformes (Anas platyrhynchos and Anas clypeata). Phylogenetic analysis of the nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 rDNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase1 gene of isolated eggs revealed that all samples grouped in a sister clade to the European Trichobilharzia regenti. However, Trichobilharzia from this study were more similar to a unique haplotype of Trichobilharzia, isolated from the nasals of an A. clypeata in France. The genetic and

  5. Visualization of nasal airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G. J. M.; Mitchell, G.; Bailie, N.; Thornhill, D.; Watterson, J.; Kimbell, J. S.

    2007-10-01

    The relationship between airflow patterns in the nasal cavity and nasal function is poorly understood. This paper reports an experimental study of the interplay between symptoms and airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis. This pathology is characterized by mucosal dryness, fetor, progressive atrophy of anatomical structures, a spacious nasal cavity, and a paradoxical sensation of nasal congestion. A physical replica of the patient's nasal geometry was made and particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to visualize and measure the flow field. The nasal replica was based on computed tomography (CT) scans of the patient and was built in three steps: three-dimensional reconstruction of the CT scans; rapid prototyping of a cast; and sacrificial use of the cast to form a model of the nasal passage in clear silicone. Flow patterns were measured by running a water-glycerol mixture through the replica and evaluating the displacement of particles dispersed in the liquid using PIV. The water-glycerol flow rate used corresponded to an air flow rate representative of a human breathing at rest. The trajectory of the flow observed in the left passage of the nose (more affected by atrophic rhinitis) differed markedly from what is considered normal, and was consistent with patterns of epithelial damage observed in cases of the condition. The data are also useful for validation of computational fluid dynamics predictions.

  6. Nasal septal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Goel, Khushbu

    2014-01-01

    Nasal septal ulceration can have multiple etiologies. Determining the exact cause depends on who the consulting specialist is, who could either be the ENT surgeon or the dermatologist. The common causes are infections (tuberculosis, leprosy, leishmaniasis), vasculitis (Wegener's granulomatosis and Churg-Strauss syndrome), and lupus erythematosus. Traumatic causes and malignancy can also be seen in tertiary referral centers. The diagnosis often requires thorough investigations and multiple tissue specimens from various sites, and in chronic cases, a suspicion of lymphoma should be considered. Apart from disease-specific therapy, a multidisciplinary approach is required in most cases to tackle the cosmetic disfigurement. PMID:25441476

  7. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... be removed because of their location or harmful effect on the surrounding normal brain tissue. If a tumor is cancer , possible treatments may include: Chemotherapy Radiation Surgery Targeted cancer therapy Biologic therapy Other treatment options

  8. Visual exploration of nasal airflow.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Stefan; Muigg, Philipp; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Doleisch, Helmut; Hege, Hans-Christian

    2009-01-01

    Rhinologists are often faced with the challenge of assessing nasal breathing from a functional point of view to derive effective therapeutic interventions. While the complex nasal anatomy can be revealed by visual inspection and medical imaging, only vague information is available regarding the nasal airflow itself: Rhinomanometry delivers rather unspecific integral information on the pressure gradient as well as on total flow and nasal flow resistance. In this article we demonstrate how the understanding of physiological nasal breathing can be improved by simulating and visually analyzing nasal airflow, based on an anatomically correct model of the upper human respiratory tract. In particular we demonstrate how various Information Visualization (InfoVis) techniques, such as a highly scalable implementation of parallel coordinates, time series visualizations, as well as unstructured grid multi-volume rendering, all integrated within a multiple linked views framework, can be utilized to gain a deeper understanding of nasal breathing. Evaluation is accomplished by visual exploration of spatio-temporal airflow characteristics that include not only information on flow features but also on accompanying quantities such as temperature and humidity. To our knowledge, this is the first in-depth visual exploration of the physiological function of the nose over several simulated breathing cycles under consideration of a complete model of the nasal airways, realistic boundary conditions, and all physically relevant time-varying quantities. PMID:19834215

  9. Same Noses, Different Nasalance Scores: Data from Normal Subjects and Cleft Palate Speakers for Three Systems for Nasalance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressmann, Tim; Klaiman, Paula; Fischbach, Simone

    2006-01-01

    Nasalance scores from the Nasometer, the NasalView and the OroNasal System were compared. The data was collected from 50 normal participants and 19 hypernasal patients with cleft palate. The Nasometer had the lowest nasalance scores for the non-nasal Zoo Passage and that the OroNasal System had the lowest nasalance scores for the Nasal Sentences.…

  10. Eliminating paranasal sinus resonance and its effects on acoustic properties of the nasal tract.

    PubMed

    Havel, Miriam; Kornes, Tanja; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O; Sundberg, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The significance of nasal resonance and anti-resonance to voice production is a classical issue in vocal pedagogy and voice research. The complex structure of the nasal tract produces a complex frequency response. This complexity must be heavily influenced by the morphology of the paranasal cavities, but their contributions are far from being entirely understood. Detailed analyses of these cavities are difficult because of their limited accessibility. Here we test different methods aiming at documenting the acoustical properties of the paranasal tract. The first set of experiments was performed under in vivo conditions, where the middle meatus was occluded by means of targeted application of a maltodextrin mass under endoscopic control. The efficiency of this occlusion method was verified by measuring the nasal nitric oxide (NO) output during humming. In another experiment the frequency responses to sine sweep excitation of an epoxy mould of a nasal cavity were measured, with and without elimination of paranasal sinuses. The third experiment was conducted in a cadaveric situs, with and without maltodextrin occlusion of the middle meatus and the sphenoidal ostia. The results show that some nasal tract resonances were unaffected by the manipulation of the paranasal cavities. Providing access to a maxillary sinus resulted in marked dips in the response curve while access to the sphenoidal ostium caused only minor effects. PMID:25327481

  11. Biotransformation enzymes in the rodent nasal mucosa: the value of a histochemical approach.

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanffy, M S

    1990-01-01

    An increasing number of chemicals have been identified as being toxic to the nasal mucosa of rats. While many chemicals exert their effects only after inhalation exposure, others are toxic following systemic administration, suggesting that factors other than direct deposition on the nasal mucosa may be important in mechanisms of nasal toxicity. The mucosal lining of the nasal cavity consists of a heterogeneous population of ciliated and nonciliated cells, secretory cells, sensory cells, and glandular and other cell types. For chemicals that are metabolized in the nasal mucosa, the balance between metabolic activation and detoxication within a cell type may be a key factor in determining whether that cell type will be a target for toxicity. Recent research in the area of xenobiotic metabolism in nasal mucosa has demonstrated the presence of many enzymes previously described in other tissues. In particular, carboxylesterase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, cytochromes P-450, epoxide hydrolase, and glutathione S-transferases have been localized by histochemical techniques. The distribution of these enzymes appears to be cell-type-specific and the presence of the enzyme may predispose particular cell types to enhanced susceptibility or resistance to chemical-induced injury. This paper reviews the distribution of these enzymes within the nasal mucosa in the context of their contribution to xenobiotic metabolism. The localization of the enzymes by histochemical techniques has provided important information on the potential mechanism of action of esters, aldehydes, and cytochrome P-450 substrates known to injure the nasal mucosa. Images PLATE 1. PLATE 2. PLATE 3. PMID:2200661

  12. Nasal high flow clears anatomical dead space in upper airway models.

    PubMed

    Möller, Winfried; Celik, Gülnaz; Feng, Sheng; Bartenstein, Peter; Meyer, Gabriele; Oliver, Eickelberg; Schmid, Otmar; Tatkov, Stanislav

    2015-06-15

    Recent studies showed that nasal high flow (NHF) with or without supplemental oxygen can assist ventilation of patients with chronic respiratory and sleep disorders. The hypothesis of this study was to test whether NHF can clear dead space in two different models of the upper nasal airways. The first was a simple tube model consisting of a nozzle to simulate the nasal valve area, connected to a cylindrical tube to simulate the nasal cavity. The second was a more complex anatomically representative upper airway model, constructed from segmented CT-scan images of a healthy volunteer. After filling the models with tracer gases, NHF was delivered at rates of 15, 30, and 45 l/min. The tracer gas clearance was determined using dynamic infrared CO2 spectroscopy and 81mKr-gas radioactive gamma camera imaging. There was a similar tracer-gas clearance characteristic in the tube model and the upper airway model: clearance half-times were below 1.0 s and decreased with increasing NHF rates. For both models, the anterior compartments demonstrated faster clearance levels (half-times < 0.5 s) and the posterior sections showed slower clearance (half-times < 1.0 s). Both imaging methods showed similar flow-dependent tracer-gas clearance in the models. For the anatomically based model, there was complete tracer-gas removal from the nasal cavities within 1.0 s. The level of clearance in the nasal cavities increased by 1.8 ml/s for every 1.0 l/min increase in the rate of NHF. The study has demonstrated the fast-occurring clearance of nasal cavities by NHF therapy, which is capable of reducing of dead space rebreathing. PMID:25882385

  13. Nasal high flow clears anatomical dead space in upper airway models

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Gülnaz; Feng, Sheng; Bartenstein, Peter; Meyer, Gabriele; Eickelberg, Oliver; Schmid, Otmar; Tatkov, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies showed that nasal high flow (NHF) with or without supplemental oxygen can assist ventilation of patients with chronic respiratory and sleep disorders. The hypothesis of this study was to test whether NHF can clear dead space in two different models of the upper nasal airways. The first was a simple tube model consisting of a nozzle to simulate the nasal valve area, connected to a cylindrical tube to simulate the nasal cavity. The second was a more complex anatomically representative upper airway model, constructed from segmented CT-scan images of a healthy volunteer. After filling the models with tracer gases, NHF was delivered at rates of 15, 30, and 45 l/min. The tracer gas clearance was determined using dynamic infrared CO2 spectroscopy and 81mKr-gas radioactive gamma camera imaging. There was a similar tracer-gas clearance characteristic in the tube model and the upper airway model: clearance half-times were below 1.0 s and decreased with increasing NHF rates. For both models, the anterior compartments demonstrated faster clearance levels (half-times < 0.5 s) and the posterior sections showed slower clearance (half-times < 1.0 s). Both imaging methods showed similar flow-dependent tracer-gas clearance in the models. For the anatomically based model, there was complete tracer-gas removal from the nasal cavities within 1.0 s. The level of clearance in the nasal cavities increased by 1.8 ml/s for every 1.0 l/min increase in the rate of NHF. The study has demonstrated the fast-occurring clearance of nasal cavities by NHF therapy, which is capable of reducing of dead space rebreathing. PMID:25882385

  14. Pathogenesis of nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, K. E.; Stevens, W. W.; Tan, B. K.; Schleimer, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a complex inflammatory condition that affects a large proportion of the population world-wide and is associated with high cost of management and significant morbidity. Yet, there is a lack of population-based epidemiologic studies using current definitions of CRSwNP, and the mechanisms that drive pathogenesis in this disease remain unclear. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the plethora of factors that likely contribute to CRSwNP pathogenesis. Defects in the innate function of the airway epithelial barrier, including diminished expression of antimicrobial products and loss of barrier integrity, combined with colonization by fungi and bacteria likely play a critical role in the development of chronic inflammation in CRSwNP. This chronic inflammation is characterized by elevated expression of many key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-5, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and CCL11, that help to initiate and perpetuate this chronic inflammatory response. Together, these factors likely combine to drive the influx of a variety of immune cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and lymphocytes, which participate in the chronic inflammatory response within the nasal polyps. Importantly, however, future studies are needed to demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of these potential drivers of disease in CRSwNP. In addition to the development of new tools and models to aid mechanistic studies, the field of CRSwNP research also needs the type of robust epidemiologic data that has served the asthma community so well. Given the high prevalence, costs and morbidity, there is a great need for continued research into CRS that could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment for patients who suffer from this disease. PMID:25482020

  15. Pathogenesis of nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Hulse, K E; Stevens, W W; Tan, B K; Schleimer, R P

    2015-02-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a complex inflammatory condition that affects a large proportion of the population world-wide and is associated with high cost of management and significant morbidity. Yet, there is a lack of population-based epidemiologic studies using current definitions of CRSwNP, and the mechanisms that drive pathogenesis in this disease remain unclear. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the plethora of factors that likely contribute to CRSwNP pathogenesis. Defects in the innate function of the airway epithelial barrier, including diminished expression of antimicrobial products and loss of barrier integrity, combined with colonization by fungi and bacteria likely play a critical role in the development of chronic inflammation in CRSwNP. This chronic inflammation is characterized by elevated expression of many key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-5, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and CCL11, that help to initiate and perpetuate this chronic inflammatory response. Together, these factors likely combine to drive the influx of a variety of immune cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and lymphocytes, which participate in the chronic inflammatory response within the nasal polyps. Importantly, however, future studies are needed to demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of these potential drivers of disease in CRSwNP. In addition to the development of new tools and models to aid mechanistic studies, the field of CRSwNP research also needs the type of robust epidemiologic data that has served the asthma community so well. Given the high prevalence, costs and morbidity, there is a great need for continued research into CRS that could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment for patients who suffer from this disease. PMID:25482020

  16. Keratoacanthoma: an unusual nasal mass.

    PubMed

    Sazafi, M S; Salina, H; Asma, A; Masir, N; Primuharsa Putra, S H A

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of keratoacanthoma in a non-sun-exposed nasal vestibule of an 84-year-old man. He presented with a progressively growing left nasal mass that had been present for 8 months. Examination showed a non-tender protruding mass arising from medial vestibular wall of the left nostril. Histopathology indicated it was a keratoacanthoma. In an elderly patient with a history of a progressively growing mass in the nose, a differential diagnosis of malignancy should be ruled out, and histological conformation is essential. To our knowledge, only a very small number of cases of nasal vestibular keratoacanthoma have been reported. PMID:24376301

  17. Fuzzy zoning for feature matching technique in 3D reconstruction of nasal endoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Rattanalappaiboon, Surapong; Bhongmakapat, Thongchai; Ritthipravat, Panrasee

    2015-12-01

    3D reconstruction from nasal endoscopic images greatly supports an otolaryngologist in examining nasal passages, mucosa, polyps, sinuses, and nasopharyx. In general, structure from motion is a popular technique. It consists of four main steps; (1) camera calibration, (2) feature extraction, (3) feature matching, and (4) 3D reconstruction. Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm is normally used for both feature extraction and feature matching. However, SIFT algorithm relatively consumes computational time particularly in the feature matching process because each feature in an image of interest is compared with all features in the subsequent image in order to find the best matched pair. A fuzzy zoning approach is developed for confining feature matching area. Matching between two corresponding features from different images can be efficiently performed. With this approach, it can greatly reduce the matching time. The proposed technique is tested with endoscopic images created from phantoms and compared with the original SIFT technique in terms of the matching time and average errors of the reconstructed models. Finally, original SIFT and the proposed fuzzy-based technique are applied to 3D model reconstruction of real nasal cavity based on images taken from a rigid nasal endoscope. The results showed that the fuzzy-based approach was significantly faster than traditional SIFT technique and provided similar quality of the 3D models. It could be used for creating a nasal cavity taken by a rigid nasal endoscope. PMID:26498516

  18. In situ gel-forming system: an attractive alternative for nasal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Guiyang; Ma, Jianli; Guo, Shaolai; Gao, Lei; Jia, Yanhua; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Qingzhe

    2013-01-01

    Intranasal delivery is one of the most interesting and challenging endeavors facing pharmaceutical scientists. The conventional nasal drug delivery systems including solutions, suspensions, and ointments show drawbacks such as short residence in the nasal cavity, highly variable efficiency, low permeability, and inconvenient administration. In situ gel-forming systems are an interesting polymeric system that exists as flowing aqueous solution before administration and undergoes phase transition to form a viscoelastic gel in a physiologic environment. Benefiting from the merits of both a solution and a gel, an impressive number of in situ gel-forming systems induced by temperature, pH, and ions have been prepared for use in nasal drug delivery in the past few years. In situ gel-forming systems increase the retention of drugs in the nasal cavity, and some of them also show permeation-enhancing capabilities. This article reviews the in situ gel-forming systems used for nasal drug delivery and introduces their gelling mechanisms and other favorable features for intranasal delivery. It also describes the release patterns and drug stability of in situ gels as well as their in vivo performances and local safety following nasal administration. PMID:24099327

  19. A case of recurrent malignant triton tumor successfully treated with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Makoto; Muto, Yoko; Kuremoto, Toshihiro; Murakami, Kentaro; Onisihi, Toshinori; Koida, Atsuhide; Inui, Takaaki; Hisa, Yasuo

    2016-12-01

    A 15-year-old female was previously admitted to another hospital because of painless swelling of the lateral right nasal ala for 2 months. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an expansive enhancing lesion in close proximity to the anterior surface of the right maxillary sinus and lateral wall of the right nasal cavity. Tumor extirpation was performed via the supragingival transantral approach under general anesthesia. Histopathological study revealed a malignant triton tumor (MTT) arising from the nasal vestibule. The patient was referred to our department for consultation regarding additional treatment. Because the surgical margin was positive and MTT has high malignant potential, we recommended expansion re-surgical treatment following immediate free-flap reconstruction and postoperative radiotherapy, but family consent was not obtained. Tumor regrowth was noted 1 month after her first visit to our department. The patient and her family accepted radiotherapy instead of surgical treatment. Complete remission was achieved by radiotherapy alone. No local recurrence or distant metastasis was observed for 30 months after radiotherapy. The conventional mode of treatment for MTT is radical excision followed by high-dose radiotherapy. However, this case is remarkable because our patient experienced complete remission by simple radiotherapy. PMID:27146005

  20. Nasal Foreign Body, Dislodged and Lost - Can the Adenoids Help?

    PubMed

    Jotdar, Arijit; Dutta, Mainak; Mukhopadhyay, Subrataataata

    2015-06-01

    Foreign body in the nasal cavity is one of the most common paediatric otolaryngology emergencies and needs to be promptly addressed. The incidence of nasal foreign body getting dislodged secondary to unsuccessful attempts to take it out is quite high and can be potentially dangerous as it might cause fatal airway compromise. The chances of it getting impacted and retained in the nasopharynx are practical, although such cases are seldom encountered for primarily nasal foreign bodies. Nevertheless, the nasopharynx should always be looked for as a site of impaction of hidden foreign objects. Presence of enlarged adenoids could be of help as it may prevent accidental lodgement of displaced foreign body in the airway, but might also result in difficulty in locating and retrieving the foreign body because it acts as an anchor-pad with its grooves and crevasses. This report presents a rare, interesting case of a child with enlarged adenoids anchoring a metallic ring and describes the clinical presentations and relevant management of a nasal foreign body dislodged and lost in the nasopharynx. PMID:26266143

  1. Effect of marbofloxacin on Haemophilus parasuis nasal carriage.

    PubMed

    Vilalta, Carles; Galofré, Nuria; Aragon, Virginia; Pérez de Rozas, Ana María; Fraile, Lorenzo

    2012-09-14

    Haemophilus parasuis is a colonizer of the upper respiratory tract and the causative agent of Glässer's disease in swine. This study focused on the nasal carriage of H. parasuis after treatment with marbofloxacin. Three marbofloxacin treatments (three doses of 2mg/kg body weight [bw] every 24h, two doses of 4 mg/kg bw every 48 h and 8 mg/kg bw in one single shot) were used and all of them reduce significantly (p<0.05) the nasal carriage of H. parasuis as compared to control animals. Moreover, H. parasuis was not detected in the nasal cavities of piglets after administering the highest dose. The effect of a dose of 8 mg marbofloxacin/kg bw in one shot was further studied in a farm with clinical cases of Glässer's disease using a longitudinal study. Statistically significant reduction of nasal carriage of H. parasuis was detected during the first week after treatment in comparison with the control group. However, a clear relationship between the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the different strains, their putative virulence or the treatment group (antibiotic or control) from which they were isolated was not detected. Finally, the effect induced by the antibiotic treatment on the bacterial strains seemed to be transitory, since diverse H. parasuis strains (with high and low marbofloxacin MICs) were observed 7 days after finishing the treatment. PMID:22487455

  2. The relationship between nasal resistance to airflow and the airspace minimal cross-sectional area.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guilherme J M; Hariri, Benjamin M; Patel, Ruchin G; Rhee, John S

    2016-06-14

    The relationship between nasal resistance (R) and airspace minimal cross-sectional area (mCSA) remains unclear. After the introduction of acoustic rhinometry, many otolaryngologists believed that mCSA measurements would correlate with subjective perception of nasal airway obstruction (NAO), and thus could provide an objective measure of nasal patency to guide therapy. However, multiple studies reported a low correlation between mCSA and subjective nasal patency, and between mCSA and R. This apparent lack of correlation between nasal form and function has been a long-standing enigma in the field of rhinology. Here we propose that nasal resistance is described by the Bernoulli Obstruction Theory. This theory predicts two flow regimes. For mCSA>Acrit, the constriction is not too severe and there is not a tight coupling between R and mCSA. In contrast, when mCSAnasal resistance is dominated by the severe constriction and it is predicted to be inversely proportional to the minimal cross-sectional area (R∝mCSA(-1)). To test this hypothesis, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were run in 3-dimensional models based on computed tomography scans of 15 NAO patients pre- and post-surgery (i.e., 60 unilateral nasal cavities). Airspace cross-sectional areas were quantified perpendicular to airflow streamlines. Our computational results are consistent with the theory. Given that in most people mCSA>Acrit (estimated to be 0.37cm(2)), this theory suggests that airway constrictions are rarely an exclusive contributor to nasal resistance, which may explain the weak correlation between mCSA and subjective nasal patency. PMID:27083059

  3. Nasal reconstruction based on aesthetic subunits in Orientals.

    PubMed

    Yotsuyanagi, T; Yamashita, K; Urushidate, S; Yokoi, K; Sawada, Y

    2000-07-01

    Reconstruction based on the aesthetic subunit principle has yielded good aesthetic outcomes in patients with moderate to severe nasal defects caused by trauma or tumor resection. However, the topographic subunits previously proposed are often unsuitable for Orientals. Compared with the nose in white patients, the nose in Orientals is low, lacks nasal muscle, and has a flat glabella; the structural features of the underlying cartilage and bone are not distinctly reflected in outward appearance. The authors devised aesthetic subunits suitable for Orientals, and they used these units to reconstruct various parts of the nose. The major difference between these units and those presented previously is the lack of soft triangles and the addition of the glabella as an independent unit. The authors divided the nose into the following five topographic units: the glabella, the nasal dorsum, the nasal tip, and the two alae. The border of the nasal dorsum unit was extended to above the maxillonasal suture. The basic reconstruction techniques use a V-Y advancement flap from the forehead to reconstruct the glabella, an island flap from the forehead to reconstruct the nasal dorsum and nasal tip, a nasolabial flap to reconstruct an ala, and a malar flap to reconstruct the cheek. A combination of flaps was used when the defect involved more than one unit. This concept was used for nasal reconstruction in 24 patients. In one patient undergoing reconstruction of the nasal dorsum and in one undergoing reconstruction of the nasal tip, the texture of the forearm flap did not match well, which resulted in a slightly unsatisfactory aesthetic outcome. In one patient in whom the glabella, nasal dorsum, and part of the cheek were reconstructed simultaneously, a web was formed at the medial ocular angle, and a secondary operation was subsequently performed using Z-plasty. In one patient undergoing reconstruction with a forehead flap, defatting was required to reduce the bulk of the

  4. Nasal physiological changes during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Philpott, C M; Conboy, P; Al-Azzawi, F; Murty, G

    2004-08-01

    Rhinitis in pregnancy has been previously investigated with variable results. This study examines all the variables of the nasal airway simultaneously for the first time. Eighteen women were recruited in the first trimester of pregnancy and followed through to the postpartum period to monitor the changes that occurred. Measurements of the nasal airway included anterior rhinoscopy (AnR), peak inspiratory nasal flow, acoustic rhinometry, anterior rhinomanometry (ARM), and the saccharin test with rhinitis questionnaire scores providing a symptomatic measurement. All the tests showed a trend consistent with decreasing nasal patency when expressed as an average for the group as a whole, although only AnR, ARM, mucociliary clearance time and rhinitis questionnaire scores were statistically significant (P < or = 0.05). This confirms the effect of pregnancy on the nasal mucosa and coincides with the rise in the serum concentration of the female sex hormones with gestational age, returning to normal postpartum. Pharmacological antagonism of oestrogens may therefore relieve nasal congestion and is currently under further research. PMID:15270820

  5. ‘Saddle nose’ deformity caused by advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal septum

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Hamish Edward; Connolly, Cara; Pahal, Gurjinderpal S; Stafford, Francis W

    2014-01-01

    Hidden behind their common garden symptoms, malignant tumours of the nasal cavity are typically advanced when detected. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common histological type of these rare tumours which may simply present with epistaxis or a blocked nose. A 79-year-old woman attended our clinic with a 2-year history of progressive nasal collapse resulting in a ‘saddle nose deformity’. Imaging showed a soft tissue mass with absolute destruction of the nasal septum and bones with hard palate and maxillary involvement. Histology confirmed a poorly differentiated SCC. Following discussion at the local head and neck multidisciplinary team meeting, the patient was offered radiotherapy alone due to her advanced presentation. She has had a good response to treatment with no further disease progression. Nasal septal SCC is far more successfully treated in the early stages. A suspicious clinician is the patients best ally. PMID:25096649

  6. Numerical investigation of the flow field in realistic nasal septal perforation geometry.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Mohammad; Baradaranfar, Mohammad Hossein; Abouali, Omid; Atighechi, Saeid; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Farhadi, Pejman; Keshavarzian, Erfan; Behniafard, Nasim; Baradaranfar, Amin

    2014-07-01

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to evaluate the physiological function of the nose. We evaluated the aerodynamics of the nasal cavity in a patient with septal perforation (SP), pre- and postvirtual repair. Three-dimensional nasal models were reconstructed, and then a wide range of the pressure drops and flow rates were analyzed. The airflow velocity is higher in the central region and is lower around the boundary of the SP. The air velocity in the SP increases as the pressure drop increases. Furthermore, at the anterior part of the SP, the shear stress is higher in the upper part. In addition, the repair of SP does not affect the total nasal airflow rate and the velocity contour patterns. The potential usage of the CFD technique as a predictive technique to explore the details and a preoperative assessment tool to help in clinical decision making in nasal surgery is emphasized. PMID:24988523

  7. Numerical investigation of the flow field in realistic nasal septal perforation geometry

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Mohammad; Abouali, Omid; Atighechi, Saeid; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Farhadi, Pejman; Keshavarzian, Erfan; Behniafard, Nasim; Baradaranfar, Amin

    2014-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to evaluate the physiological function of the nose. We evaluated the aerodynamics of the nasal cavity in a patient with septal perforation (SP), pre- and postvirtual repair. Three-dimensional nasal models were reconstructed, and then a wide range of the pressure drops and flow rates were analyzed. The airflow velocity is higher in the central region and is lower around the boundary of the SP. The air velocity in the SP increases as the pressure drop increases. Furthermore, at the anterior part of the SP, the shear stress is higher in the upper part. In addition, the repair of SP does not affect the total nasal airflow rate and the velocity contour patterns. The potential usage of the CFD technique as a predictive technique to explore the details and a preoperative assessment tool to help in clinical decision making in nasal surgery is emphasized. PMID:24988523

  8. Sphenopalatine Ganglion Acupuncture Improves Nasal Ventilation and Modulates Autonomic Nervous Activity in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kuiji; Chen, Luquan; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chengshuo; Zhang, Luo

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effects of Sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) acupuncture on nasal ventilation function and autonomic nervous system in health volunteers. 39 healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either active SPG acupuncture group (AA group) or sham-SPG acupuncture group (SA group). All subjects were assessed for self-reported nasal ventilation, nasal patency (nasal airway resistance (NAR) and nasal cavity volume (NCV), exhaled nasal nitric oxide (nNO), and neuropeptides (substance P(SP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY)) in nasal secretions at baseline, 30 minutes, 2 hours, and 24 hours after acupuncture. Significantly more subjects in AA group reported improvements in nasal ventilation at all time points after acupuncture, compared to SA group. NAR and NCV were also significantly lower in AA group than SA group. The level of nNO in AA group was significantly decreased after 24 hours compared to SA group. The level of NPY was significantly increased in AA group at 30 minutes and 2 hours compared to baseline and SA group. The levels of SP and VIP were not significantly different in the two groups. We concluded that SPG acupuncture could help to improve nasal ventilation by increasing sympathetic nerve excitability in healthy volunteers. PMID:27425415

  9. Sphenopalatine Ganglion Acupuncture Improves Nasal Ventilation and Modulates Autonomic Nervous Activity in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuiji; Chen, Luquan; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chengshuo; Zhang, Luo

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effects of Sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) acupuncture on nasal ventilation function and autonomic nervous system in health volunteers. 39 healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either active SPG acupuncture group (AA group) or sham-SPG acupuncture group (SA group). All subjects were assessed for self-reported nasal ventilation, nasal patency (nasal airway resistance (NAR) and nasal cavity volume (NCV), exhaled nasal nitric oxide (nNO), and neuropeptides (substance P(SP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY)) in nasal secretions at baseline, 30 minutes, 2 hours, and 24 hours after acupuncture. Significantly more subjects in AA group reported improvements in nasal ventilation at all time points after acupuncture, compared to SA group. NAR and NCV were also significantly lower in AA group than SA group. The level of nNO in AA group was significantly decreased after 24 hours compared to SA group. The level of NPY was significantly increased in AA group at 30 minutes and 2 hours compared to baseline and SA group. The levels of SP and VIP were not significantly different in the two groups. We concluded that SPG acupuncture could help to improve nasal ventilation by increasing sympathetic nerve excitability in healthy volunteers. PMID:27425415

  10. Natural mucoadhesive microspheres of Abelmoschus esculentus polysaccharide as a new carrier for nasal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nitin; Kulkarni, Giriraj T; Sharma, Anjana; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Kumar, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the preparation and evaluation of mucoadhesive microspheres, using Abelmoschus esculentus polysaccharide as a novel carrier for safe and effective delivery of rizatriptan benzoate into nasal cavity. The polysaccharide was extracted from the fruit of A. esculentus and mucoadhesive microspheres were prepared by emulsification, followed by crosslinking using epichlorohydrin. Prepared microspheres were evaluated for size, morphology, swelling properties, mucoadhesive strength, encapsulation efficiency and drug release. Microspheres were found to release 50% of drug within 15 min and rest of the drug was released within 60 min. The drug release was found to decrease with increasing concentration of polysaccharide. To determine the retention time of the microspheres in the nasal cavity of rabbits, the microspheres were radiolabelled with (99m)Tc and subjected to gamma scintigraphy. The results showed a significant improvement in the nasal retention of the microspheres as compared to the aqueous solution of radiolabelled free-drug. PMID:23379506

  11. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Ozone-Induced Injury in the Nasal Airways of Monkeys Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Morphometric Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, Stephen A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Trease, Lynn L.; Wagner, James G.; Garcia, Guilherme M.; Ballinger, Carol A.; Kimbell, Julia; Plopper, Charles G.; Corley, Rick A.; Postlewait, Ed; Harkema, Jack R.

    2007-03-01

    ABSTRACT Age-related changes in gross and microscopic structure of the nasal cavity can alter local tissue susceptibility as well as the dose of inhaled toxicant delivered to susceptible sites. This article describes a novel method for the use of magnetic resonance imaging, 3-dimensional airway modeling, and morphometric techniques to characterize the distribution and magnitude of ozone-induced nasal injury in infant monkeys. Using this method, we are able to generate age-specific, 3-dimensional, epithelial maps of the nasal airways of infant Rhesus macaques. The principal nasal lesions observed in this primate model of ozone-induced nasal toxicology were neutrophilic rhinitis, along with necrosis and exfoliation of the epithelium lining the anterior maxilloturbinate. These lesions, induced by acute or cyclic (episodic) exposures, were examined by light microscopy, quantified by morphometric techniques, and mapped on 3-dimensional models of the nasal airways. Here, we describe the histopathologic, imaging, and computational biology methods developed to efficiently characterize, localize, quantify, and map these nasal lesions. By combining these techniques, the location and severity of the nasal epithelial injury were correlated with epithelial type, nasal airway geometry, and local biochemical and molecular changes on an individual animal basis. These correlations are critical for accurate predictive modeling of exposure-dose-response relationships in the nasal airways, and subsequent extrapolation of nasal findings in animals to humans for developing risk assessment.

  12. The Use of Miniature Accelerometer for Detecting Glottal Waveforms and Nasality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Kenneth N.; And Others

    A lightweight accelerometer has been used to produce a waveform related to the glottal acoustic output when attached to the throat of a speaker, and to provide an indication of acoustic coupling to the nasal cavities when attached to the external surface of the nose. Examples of signals produced by the accelerometer are shown, and possible…

  13. Odorant Transport and Deposition in the Canine Nasal Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Michael; Craven, Brent; Settles, Gary; Paterson, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The canine nose functions similar to a chromatograph that imposes odorant-specific deposition patterns upon the thin mucus layer covering the nasal cavity. Here we use an anatomically-correct computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to study airflow and odorant transport from the external environment through the nasal airways to the olfactory receptor layer beneath the mucus. The results show that deposition patterns are primarily influenced by the intricate olfactory flowfield and the odorant solubility in the mucus layer. Highly-soluble odorants are quickly absorbed near the entrance to the olfactory region, and thus do not reach the periphery with significant concentrations. In contrast, insoluble odorants are deposited more evenly and may even exit the olfactory region without being completely absorbed. Predicted odorant deposition patterns correspond with the anatomical organization of olfactory receptors known to occur in keen-scented (macrosmatic) mammals, providing a mechanism that helps explain the excellent olfactory acuity of the dog.

  14. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements Inside the Human Nasal Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, James; Hopkins, Lisa; Sreenivas, K. R.; Wexler, Anthony; Prasad, Ajay

    1998-11-01

    In some applications (such as biological flows) the flow passage exhibits a highly complex geometry. A method is described by which such a flow passage is rendered as a three-dimensional model. A computer model of an adult human nasal cavity was generated from digitized computed tomography (CT) scan images, using the I-DEAS modeling package, and was converted to a stereolithographic file for rapid prototyping. Rapid prototyping yielded a water soluble negative of the airway. Silicone elastomer was poured over the negative, which was washed out after the silicone hardened. This technique can be used to obtain an accurate, transparent, silicone, replicate model of any arbitrary geometry. If the working fluid is refractive-index matched to the silicone, it is possible to obtain PIV measurements in any cross-section. We demonstrate the technique by creating a double-scale model of the human nasal passage, and obtaining PIV measurements.

  15. Pneumocephalus in Child Following Bilateral Otomastoiditis and Nasal Septum Infection.

    PubMed

    Soni, Jai Prakash; Choudhary, Sandeep; Makwana, Mohan; Tripathi, Nikita

    2016-07-01

    Pneumocephalus is collection of gas or air within the cranial cavity, commonly associated with trauma, cranial surgery, air embolism, open meningomyelocele; and rarely as a result of central nervous system infections. Asymptomatic pneumocephalus usually recovers spontaneously within few days. Untreated pneumocephalus can progress to tension pneumocephalus, manifesting as severe headache, dizziness, cranial nerve palsy, mental changes, seizure and disorientation. Herein, we report a rare case of pneumocephalus in a 9-month infant with subdural effusion following infection of nasal septum and otomastoiditis. There was no sign of meningitis but CThead showed communication of intracranial dura mater across widened foramen caecum with pre-nasal space, and bilateral otomastoiditis with erosion of anterior and lateral wall of right mastoid bone. The patient was treated successfully and discharged without sequelae. PMID:27504559

  16. A modified Goldman nasal tip procedure for the drooping nasal tip.

    PubMed

    McLure, T C

    1991-02-01

    A modification of Irving Goldman's nasal tip procedure that borrows from the lateral crus to augment the height of the medial crus is described. Goldman's procedure has been modified by not including the vestibular skin with the segment of the lateral crus that is rolled medially to increase nasal tip projection, by adding a nasal septal cartilage strut between the medial crura for support when the medial crura are weak, and by maintaining a small separation caudally of the repositioned lateral crura at the new nasal dome to simulate a double nasal dome. This modified Goldman nasal tip procedure allows the surgeon to reshape the lower lateral nasal cartilage to increase nasal tip projection as an alternative to the use of a shield-type nasal tip graft, and at the same time it narrows the nasal tip with minimal resection of the lateral crus of the lower lateral nasal cartilage. PMID:1989017

  17. General Information about Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... or head and neck surgeon . Plastic surgeon . Dentist . Nutritionist . Speech and language pathologist. Rehabilitation specialist . Three types ... are taking place in many parts of the country. See the Treatment Options section that follows for ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the following: The back of the eye. The brain. The middle parts of the skull . The nerves in the head ... the following: The back of the eye. The brain. The middle parts of the skull . The nerves in the head ...

  19. Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer (Treatment Options by Stage)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the following: The back of the eye. The brain. The middle parts of the skull . The nerves in the head ... the following: The back of the eye. The brain. The middle parts of the skull . The nerves in the head ...

  20. Stages of Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the following: The back of the eye. The brain. The middle parts of the skull . The nerves in the head ... the following: The back of the eye. The brain. The middle parts of the skull . The nerves in the head ...

  1. [Synovial sarcoma of the nasal cavity. A case report].

    PubMed

    Acosta Díaz, Hander; Trinidad Ruiz, Gabriel; Rejas, Eladio; Pando, Jesús; Cabrera, J J

    2011-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare tumour found in soft tissue; it is a mesenchymal spindle cell tumour that is not related to the synovial membrane. This tumour has a low incidence, the most frequent place of occurrence being the lower extremities in young adults. Synovial sarcoma of the head and neck accounts for 3-5% of sarcomas in this anatomical region. The treatment of choice for synovial sarcoma of the head and neck is complete surgical excision of the tumour mass followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:20466354

  2. Alterations in Maxillary Sinus Volume among Oral and Nasal Breathers

    PubMed Central

    Agacayak, Kamil Serkan; Gulsun, Belgin; Koparal, Mahmut; Atalay, Yusuf; Aksoy, Orhan; Adiguzel, Ozkan

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral breathing causes many changes in the facial anatomical structures in adult patients. In this study we aimed to determine the effects of long-term oral breathing (>5 years) on the maxillary sinus volumes among adult male patients. Material/Methods We accessed medical records of 586 patients who had undergone cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for any reason between September 2013 and April 2014. Patients who had undergone cone-beam dental volumetric tomography scans for any reason and who had answered a questionnaire about breathing were screened retrospectively. Cone beam dental volumetric tomography (I-Cat, Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA, USA) was used to take the images of the maxillo-facial area at a setting of 120 kVp and 3.7 mA. This study involved male patients older than 21 years of age. Results The study included a total of 239 male patients, of which 68 were oral breathers and 171 were nasal breathers. The mean age of the oral breathers was 48.4 years and that of the nasal breathers was 46.7 years and the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05). The mean maxillary sinus volumes of the oral and nasal breathers were 9043.49±1987.90 and 10851.77±2769.37, respectively, and the difference in maxillary sinus volume between the 2 groups was statistically significant (p<0.001). Conclusions The volume of maxillary sinus in oral breathers (>5 years) was significantly lower than in nasal breathers, but it remains unclear whether this is due to malfunctioning of the nasal cavity or due to the underlying pathological condition. PMID:25553770

  3. The Human Nasal Microbiota and Staphylococcus aureus Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Daniel N.; Feazel, Leah M.; Bessesen, Mary T.; Price, Connie S.; Janoff, Edward N.; Pace, Norman R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Colonization of humans with Staphylococcus aureus is a critical prerequisite of subsequent clinical infection of the skin, blood, lung, heart and other deep tissues. S. aureus persistently or intermittently colonizes the nares of ∼50% of healthy adults, whereas ∼50% of the general population is rarely or never colonized by this pathogen. Because microbial consortia within the nasal cavity may be an important determinant of S. aureus colonization we determined the composition and dynamics of the nasal microbiota and correlated specific microorganisms with S. aureus colonization. Methodology/Principal Findings Nasal specimens were collected longitudinally from five healthy adults and a cross-section of hospitalized patients (26 S. aureus carriers and 16 non-carriers). Culture-independent analysis of 16S rRNA sequences revealed that the nasal microbiota of healthy subjects consists primarily of members of the phylum Actinobacteria (e.g., Propionibacterium spp. and Corynebacterium spp.), with proportionally less representation of other phyla, including Firmicutes (e.g., Staphylococcus spp.) and Proteobacteria (e.g. Enterobacter spp). In contrast, inpatient nasal microbiotas were enriched in S. aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis and diminished in several actinobacterial groups, most notably Propionibacterium acnes. Moreover, within the inpatient population S. aureus colonization was negatively correlated with the abundances of several microbial groups, including S. epidermidis (p = 0.004). Conclusions/Significance The nares environment is colonized by a temporally stable microbiota that is distinct from other regions of the integument. Negative association between S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and other groups suggests microbial competition during colonization of the nares, a finding that could be exploited to limit S. aureus colonization. PMID:20498722

  4. Stages of Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  5. Intra And Extra Nasal Laser Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selking, Stuart G.

    1988-06-01

    The author describes his experience with 400 intranasal laser surgical procedures done with the carbon dioxide laser and the surgical microscope. Procedures include excision and vaporization of polyps, turbinates, tumors, telangiectasia, synechia, nasal stenosis, intranasal cysts, papillomata, and septal spurs. The author describes a suction speculum and drape of his own design which provide smoke free access to the internal nose, and protection of the alar rim and the face from laser energy. Relief of obstruction is comparable to that obtained from the more traditional means of intranasal surgery. Intraoperative and early and delayed post operative bleeding is less with laser surgery than with any other means. Avoidance of technical problems is emphasized in this manuscript, since intranasal laser surgery is in some respects difficult to perform. Included are practical suggestions about patient positioning, use of protective devices, and patient selection.

  6. Three-dimensional Evaluation of Nasal Surgery in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dan-Mo; Han, De-Min; Nicolas, Busaba; Hu, Chang-Long; Wu, Jun; Su, Min-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder and is characterized by airway collapse at multiple levels of upper airway. The effectiveness of nasal surgery has been discussed in several studies and shows a promising growing interest. In this study, we intended to evaluate the effects of nasal surgery on the upper airway dimensions in patients with OSA using three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of cone-beam computed tomography (CT). Methods: Twelve patients with moderate to severe OSA who underwent nasal surgery were included in this study. All patients were diagnosed with OSA using polysomnography (PSG) in multi sleep health centers associated with Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and the Partners Health Care from May 31, 2011 to December 14, 2013. The effect of nasal surgery was evaluated by the examination of PSG, subjective complains, and 3D reconstructed CT scan. Cross-sectional area was measured in eleven coronal levels, and nasal cavity volume was evaluated from anterior nasal spine to posterior nasal spine. The thickness of soft tissue in oral pharynx region was also measured. Results: Five out of the 12 patients were successfully treated by nasal surgery, with more than 50% drop of apnea–hypopnea index. All the 12 patients showed significant increase of cross-sectional area and volume postoperatively. The thickness of soft tissue in oral pharynx region revealed significant decrease postoperatively, which decreased from 19.14 ± 2.40 cm2 and 6.11 ± 1.76 cm2 to 17.13 ± 1.91 cm2 and 5.22 ± 1.20 cm2. Conclusions: Nasal surgery improved OSA severity as measured by PSG, subjective complaints, and 3D reconstructed CT scan. 3D assessment of upper airway can play an important role in the evaluation of treatment outcome. PMID:26960367

  7. Nasal Reconstruction: Extending the Limits

    PubMed Central

    Corsten, Marcus; Haack, Sebastian; Gubisch, Wolfgang M.; Fischer, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Reconstructing the 3-dimensional structure of the nose requires the maintenance of its aesthetic form and function. Restoration of the correct dimension, projection, skin quality, symmetrical contour, and function remains problematic. Consequently, modern approaches of nasal reconstruction aim at rebuilding the units rather than just covering the defect. However, revising or redoing a failed or insufficient reconstruction remains very challenging and requires experience and creativity. Here, we present a very particular case with a male patient, who underwent 37 operations elsewhere and presented with a failed nasal reconstruction. We describe and illustrate the complex steps of the nasal rereconstruction, including the reconstruction of the forehead donor site, surgical delay procedures for lining, and the coverage with a third paramedian forehead flap. PMID:27536483

  8. Nasal Reconstruction: Extending the Limits.

    PubMed

    Rezaeian, Farid; Corsten, Marcus; Haack, Sebastian; Gubisch, Wolfgang M; Fischer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Reconstructing the 3-dimensional structure of the nose requires the maintenance of its aesthetic form and function. Restoration of the correct dimension, projection, skin quality, symmetrical contour, and function remains problematic. Consequently, modern approaches of nasal reconstruction aim at rebuilding the units rather than just covering the defect. However, revising or redoing a failed or insufficient reconstruction remains very challenging and requires experience and creativity. Here, we present a very particular case with a male patient, who underwent 37 operations elsewhere and presented with a failed nasal reconstruction. We describe and illustrate the complex steps of the nasal rereconstruction, including the reconstruction of the forehead donor site, surgical delay procedures for lining, and the coverage with a third paramedian forehead flap. PMID:27536483

  9. Surgery of the nasal septum.

    PubMed

    Mlynski, Gunter

    2006-11-01

    Long-term results after septoplasty are not satisfactory. Apart from a recurrence of deviation, there are various reasons for this: false preoperative analysis, complete straightening of the septum, and a disturbed nasal cycle. Preoperative functional diagnostics with a combination of rhinoresistometry, acoustic rhinometry, and long-term rhinoflowmetry are necessary for differentiating between "physiological" and "pathological" septal deviations and recognizing other causes for obstruction. The surgical procedure of septoplasty includes approach, mobilization, resection, reposition, and finally reconstruction of all three layers. The goal of the operation should not be complete straightening of the nasal septum. The space between the septum and turbinates is of utmost importance. It should not be enlarged as much as possible; rather, it must be shaped in such a way as to allow freely congestion and decongestion reciprocal on the two sides during the nasal cycle. PMID:17131264

  10. A Recently Established Murine Model of Nasal Polyps Demonstrates Activation of B Cells, as Occurs in Human Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Sun Hye; Carter, Roderick G; Kato, Atsushi; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2016-08-01

    Animal model systems are invaluable for examining human diseases. Our laboratory recently established a mouse model of nasal polyps (NPs) and investigated similarities and differences between this mouse model and human NPs. We especially focus on the hypothesis that B cell activation occurs during NP generation in the murine model. After induction of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinosinusitis, 6% ovalbumin and Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (10 ng) were instilled into the nasal cavity of mice three times per week for 8 weeks. The development of structures that somewhat resemble NPs (which we will refer to as NPs) was confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The mRNA and protein levels of various inflammatory cell markers and mediators were measured by real-time PCR in nasal tissue and by ELISA in nasal lavage fluid (NLF), respectively. Total Ig isotype levels in NLF were also quantitated using the Mouse Ig Isotyping Multiplex kit (EMD Millipore, Billerica, MA) on a Luminex 200 instrument (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY). Similar to human NPs, there were significant increases in gene expression of inflammatory cell markers, such as CD19, CD138, CD11c, and mast cell protease-6 in nasal tissue samples of the NP group compared with those of the control group. In further investigations of B cell activation, mRNA expressions of B cell activating factor and a proliferation-inducing ligand were found to be significantly increased in mouse NP tissue. B cell-activating factor protein concentration and IgA and IgG1 levels in NLF were significantly higher in the NP group compared with the control group. In this study, the NP mouse model demonstrated enhanced B cell responses, which are reminiscent of B cell responses in human NPs. PMID:27163839

  11. Effect of Nasal Obstruction on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wakayama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Tanuma, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nasal obstruction is a common problem in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea and limits treatment compliance. The purpose of this study is to model the effects of nasal obstruction on airflow parameters under CPAP using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to clarify quantitatively the relation between airflow velocity and pressure loss coefficient in subjects with and without nasal obstruction. Methods We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 16 Japanese adult subjects, of whom 9 had nasal obstruction and 7 did not (control group). Three-dimensional reconstructed models of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx with a CPAP mask fitted to the nostrils were created from each subject’s CT scans. The digital models were meshed with tetrahedral cells and stereolithography formats were created. CPAP airflow simulations were conducted using CFD software. Airflow streamlines and velocity contours in the nasal cavities and nasopharynx were compared between groups. Simulation models were confirmed to agree with actual measurements of nasal flow rate and with pressure and flow rate in the CPAP machine. Results Under 10 cmH2O CPAP, average maximum airflow velocity during inspiration was 17.6 ± 5.6 m/s in the nasal obstruction group but only 11.8 ± 1.4 m/s in the control group. The average pressure drop in the nasopharynx relative to inlet static pressure was 2.44 ± 1.41 cmH2O in the nasal obstruction group but only 1.17 ± 0.29 cmH2O in the control group. The nasal obstruction and control groups were clearly separated by a velocity threshold of 13.5 m/s, and pressure loss coefficient threshold of approximately 10.0. In contrast, there was no significant difference in expiratory pressure in the nasopharynx between the groups. Conclusion This is the first CFD analysis of the effect of nasal obstruction on CPAP treatment. A strong correlation between the inspiratory pressure loss coefficient and maximum airflow

  12. [Nasal endometriosis: apropos of 1 case].

    PubMed

    Laghzaoui, O; Laghzaoui, M

    2001-12-01

    The nasal mucosa is an exceptional localization for endometriosis. We report a case observed in a woman who developed nasal tumefaction associated with epistaxis that had followed a cyclic repetitive pattern since puberty. Surgical excision of the nasal nodule confirmed the diagnosis of endometriosis. Local and general evaluated identified other localizations. Outcome has been favorable at short and mid term. Endometriosis is a frequent condition although extra-pelvic localizations are uncommon. The nasal localization is highly exceptional. PMID:11917731

  13. Correlation between nasal membrane permeability and nasal absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hefei; Lin, Chih-Wei; Donovan, Maureen D

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between in vitro permeability (Papp) values obtained from isolated nasal tissues and the absorption rates (ka) of the same compounds following nasal administration in animals and humans. The Papp of a set of 11 drug compounds was measured using animal nasal explants and plasma time-concentration profiles for each of the same compounds following intravenous (IV) and intranasal (IN) administration were experimentally determined or obtained from literature reports. The plasma clearance was estimated from the IV plasma time-concentration profiles, and ka was determined from the IN plasma time-concentration profiles using a deconvolution approach. The level of correlation between Papp and ka was established using Pearson correlation analysis. A good correlation (r=0.77) representing a point-to-point relationship for each of the compounds was observed. This result indicates that the nasal absorption for many drug candidates can be estimated from a readily measured in vitro Papp value. PMID:23225081

  14. Denervation of nasal mucosa induced by posterior nasal neurectomy suppresses nasal secretion, not hypersensitivity, in an allergic rhinitis rat model.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Hironobu; Kondo, Kenji; Toma-Hirano, Makiko; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Kikuta, Shu; Fujimoto, Chisato; Ueha, Rumi; Kagoya, Ryoji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-09-01

    The posterior nasal nerve is the dominant source of the parasympathetic, sympathetic, and sensory fibers that innervate the nasal respiratory mucosa. Therefore, a posterior nasal neurectomy (PNN) is thought to induce denervation of the nasal mucosa and relieve the nasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis. However, the underlying mechanisms and therapeutic action of PNN remain unknown. To investigate the impact of PNN-induced denervation of the nasal mucosa on allergic rhinitis, we developed a rat model of PNN and examined the effects of PNN on allergic rhinitis in ovalbumin-sensitized rats. This rat model of PNN was characterized by the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides (eg, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and neuropeptide Y) in the nasal respiratory mucosa. These animals exhibited nasal gland and goblet cell hypertrophy in the septal mucosa and atrophy of the submucosal gland in the lateral nasal wall, as well as reduced nasal secretion due to deficient acetylcholine synthesis. In an ovalbumin-sensitized model of allergic rhinitis, PNN also induced the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides in the nasal mucosa and suppressed nasal secretion. However, PNN did not affect mucosal thickening, eosinophil and mast cell infiltration, interleukin-4 and interferon-γ mRNA expression, and allergic symptoms (ie, sneezing and nasal scratching). These results suggest that the peripheral nerves and corresponding neuropeptides regulate nasal secretion, but not hypersensitivity, in allergic rhinitis, and that allergic rhinitis-related mucosal reactions occur in a highly denervated mucosa after PNN. Posterior nasal neurectomy may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of hyperrhinorrhea, but not allergic rhinitis hypersensitivity. PMID:27322954

  15. Radiotherapy Alone With Curative Intent in Patients With Stage I Extranodal Nasal-Type NK/T-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yexiong; Wang Hua; Jin Jing; Wang Weihu; Liu Qingfeng; Song Yongwen; Wang Zhaoyang; Qi Shunan; Wang Shulian; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: This study aims to evaluate the outcome and pattern of failure in a large cohort of patients with Stage I NK/T-cell lymphoma of the upper aerodigestive tract treated with radiotherapy alone. Methods and Materials: The pathological diagnosis was confirmed using standard criteria. All patients were treated with high-dose extended-field radiotherapy alone. The median dose was 50 Gy. The primary tumor was located in the nasal cavity (n = 80), Waldeyer ring (n = 5), or oral cavity (n = 2). Results: The overall response to radiotherapy was achieved in 85 of 87 (97.7%) patients, with a complete response rate of 95.4% and a partial response rate of 2.3%. The 5-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local control rates for all patients were 80%, 69%, and 93%, respectively. Twenty patients (23%) had disease progression or relapse. Of these, 15 patients (17%) developed systemic extranodal disseminations, whereas only 4 (5%) patients had local relapse and 4 (5%) patients had lymph node relapse. Conclusions: Our study suggests that high-dose extended-field radiotherapy alone is a curative therapy and shows favorable clinical outcome in patients with Stage I disease. With the high possibility of local control and primary failure of systemic dissemination, the integration of optimal radiotherapy with more effective systematic therapy is warranted to bring additional improvement to the outcome for these patients.

  16. Photodynamic therapy on spontaneous tumors of dogs and cats: a ten-year study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonda, Diego

    1992-06-01

    Since 1981, more than fifty spontaneous tumors of dogs and cats were treated by photodynamic therapy with hematoporphyrins in the surgery department of the University of Milan. Therapeutic results proved to be successful and promising in certain forms of cancer and will be compared in the future with the effectiveness of other photosensitizer drugs like phatolocyanines derivatives. Applied hematoporphyrins phototherapy methods included: (1) injection of hematoporphyrins derivative (HpD) and irradiation with laser light at 631 nanometers, using a Rhodamine B dye laser; (2) injection of the active component of hematoporphyrin derivative (DHE) and irradiation with a Rhodamine B dye laser; and (3) injection of DHE and irradiation with laser light at 628 nanometers using a gold vapor laser. More frequently treated tumor sites were oral and nasal cavities. Other localizations were mucous membranes of the glans and stomach. Nineteen histological types were diagnosed in treated tumors.

  17. Development and verification of a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics model of canine nasal airflow.

    PubMed

    Craven, Brent A; Paterson, Eric G; Settles, Gary S; Lawson, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    The canine nasal cavity contains a complex airway labyrinth, dedicated to respiratory air conditioning, filtering of inspired contaminants, and olfaction. The small and contorted anatomical structure of the nasal turbinates has, to date, precluded a proper study of nasal airflow in the dog. This study describes the development of a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the canine nasal airway from a three-dimensional reconstruction of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans of the canine anatomy. Unstructured hexahedral grids are generated, with large grid sizes ((10-100) x 10(6) computational cells) required to capture the details of the nasal airways. High-fidelity CFD solutions of the nasal airflow for steady inspiration and expiration are computed over a range of physiological airflow rates. A rigorous grid refinement study is performed, which also illustrates a methodology for verification of CFD calculations on complex unstructured grids in tortuous airways. In general, the qualitative characteristics of the computed solutions for the different grid resolutions are fairly well preserved. However, quantitative results such as the overall pressure drop and even the regional distribution of airflow in the nasal cavity are moderately grid dependent. These quantities tend to converge monotonically with grid refinement. Lastly, transient computations of canine sniffing were carried out as part of a time-step study, demonstrating that high temporal accuracy is achievable using small time steps consisting of 160 steps per sniff period. Here we demonstrate that acceptable numerical accuracy (between approximately 1% and 15%) is achievable with practical levels of grid resolution (approximately 100 x 10(6) computational cells). Given the popularity of CFD as a tool for studying flow in the upper airways of humans and animals, based on this work we recommend the necessity of a grid dependence study and quantification of numerical error when

  18. Induction by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase of hyperresponsiveness in the human nasal airway

    PubMed Central

    Turner, P J; Maggs, J R L; Foreman, J C

    2000-01-01

    The effects of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) on the responsiveness of the human nasal airway were investigated, by measuring the nasal response to histamine and bradykinin. Repeated intranasal administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), 1 μmol per nostril every 30 min for 6 h, increased the nasal obstruction induced by histamine, 50–500 μg, and bradykinin, 200 μg per nostril. A single administration of L-NAME, 1 μmol per nostril did not induce hyperresponsiveness to histamine. Pretreatment with L-arginine, 30 μmol, abolished the hyperresponsiveness to histamine caused by L-NAME, 1 μmol. Pretreatment with NG-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester (D-NAME), 1 μmol, did not induce hyperresponsiveness to histamine. Repeated administration of L-NAME, 1 μmol, caused a significant reduction in the amount of nitric oxide measured in the nasal cavity. Neither L-NMMA, 1 μmol, nor L-arginine, 30 μmol, altered the nasal hyperresponsiveness induced by platelet activating factor (PAF), 60 μg. PAF did not alter the levels of nitric oxide in the nasal cavity. The results suggest that inhibition of nitric oxide synthase induces a hyperresponsiveness in the human nasal airway, and that this occurs by a mechanism different from that involved in PAF-induced hyperresponsiveness. PMID:10991932

  19. Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney W; Schleimer, Robert P; Kern, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is an important clinical entity diagnosed by the presence of both subjective and objective evidence of chronic sinonasal inflammation. Symptoms include anterior or posterior rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, hyposmia, and/or facial pressure or pain that last for a duration of more than 12 weeks. Nasal polyps are inflammatory lesions that project into the nasal airway, are typically bilateral, and originate from the ethmoid sinus. Males are more likely to be affected than females, but no specific genetic or environmental factors have been strongly linked to the development of this disorder to date. CRSwNP is frequently associated with asthma and allergic rhinitis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the clinical symptoms are not fully understood. Defects in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier, increased exposure to pathogenic and colonized bacteria, and dysregulation of the host immune system are all thought to play prominent roles in disease pathogenesis. Additional studies are needed to further explore the clinical and pathophysiological features of CRSwNP so that biomarkers can be identified and novel advances can be made to improve the treatment and management of this disease. PMID:27393770

  20. Nasal drug delivery in humans.

    PubMed

    Bitter, Christoph; Suter-Zimmermann, Katja; Surber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Intranasal administration is an attractive option for local and systemic delivery of many therapeutic agents. The nasal mucosa is--compared to other mucosae--easily accessible. Intranasal drug administration is noninvasive, essentially painless and particularly suited for children. Application can be performed easily by patients or by physicians in emergency settings. Intranasal drug delivery offers a rapid onset of therapeutic effects (local or systemic). Nasal application circumvents gastrointestinal degradation and hepatic first-pass metabolism of the drug. The drug, the vehicle and the application device form an undividable triad. Its selection is therefore essential for the successful development of effective nasal products. This paper discusses the feasibility and potential of intranasal administration. A series of questions regarding (a) the intended use (therapeutic considerations), (b) the drug, (c) the vehicle and (d) the application device (pharmaceutical considerations) are addressed with a view to their impact on the development of products for nasal application. Current and future trends and perspectives are discussed. PMID:21325837

  1. Gamma scintigraphy for testing bioequivalence: a case study on two cromolyn sodium nasal spray preparations.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghananeem, Abeer M; Sandefer, Erik P; Doll, Walter J; Page, Richard C; Chang, Yunik; Digenis, George A

    2008-06-01

    The present work was carried out to study the deposition patterns and clearance of technetium-99m (99mTc) DTPA labeled cromolyn sodium (CS) solutions when administered from two different CS nasal products using gamma scintigraphy. Five healthy volunteers received a single dose with complete crossover design involving treatment A (test formulation) and treatment B (reference formulation). The deposition patterns as well as the changes in distribution of the radiolabeled CS solutions due to the mucociliary transport were monitored by gamma scintigraphy. Primary deposition of the aforementioned nasal solutions occurred in the anterior portion of the nose. After migration into the posterior nasal cavity, the solutions were rapidly cleared by ciliary action into the nasopharynx where it was swallowed. The test product of cromolyn sodium was shown to be equivalent to the reference product with regard to nasal deposition and clearance. The results from this study indicate that external gamma scintigraphy can be used to demonstrate the equivalence of nasal sprays that are intended for local therapeutic action where the drug is not systemically absorbed into the blood circulation. Furthermore, a non-invasive imaging method such as rhinoscintigraphy may prove to be a useful technique to be utilized during the regulatory approval process for local-acting nasal products, and may facilitate the early introduction of these products to the market. PMID:18329197

  2. The structure and distribution of nasal glands in four marsupial species.

    PubMed

    Kratzing, J E

    1984-10-01

    The structure and distribution of nasal glands in four marsupial species were studied by light and electron microscopy. The species studied were the honey possum (Tarsipes rostratus), the bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus), the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and the agile wallaby (Macropus agilis). Glands were grouped and described according to their location. Those of general distribution (goblet cells and olfactory glands) were similar in structures and distribution in all specimens. Glands of the lateral nasal wall include the lateral nasal, maxillary sinus and turbinate glands. The lateral nasal and maxillary sinus glands were absent in the adult koala but occupied large areas in the other species. Turbinate glands were best developed rostrally and ventrally in the nasal cavity. On the nasal septum, Tarsipes and Isoodon had well developed glands associated with vascular 'swell bodies'. These were poorly developed to Macropus though septal glands were abundant. 'Swell bodies' were absent in Phascolarctos and glands were sparse. Tubular vomeronasal glands were present in all species and most extensive in Tarsipes. In Isoodon, there was a posterior ventral septal gland associated with the septal olfactory organ. The fine structural features of secretory cells and ducts are described and their potential role discussed in terms of chemoreception and temperature and humidity control. PMID:6490535

  3. The structure and distribution of nasal glands in four marsupial species.

    PubMed Central

    Kratzing, J E

    1984-01-01

    The structure and distribution of nasal glands in four marsupial species were studied by light and electron microscopy. The species studied were the honey possum (Tarsipes rostratus), the bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus), the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and the agile wallaby (Macropus agilis). Glands were grouped and described according to their location. Those of general distribution (goblet cells and olfactory glands) were similar in structures and distribution in all specimens. Glands of the lateral nasal wall include the lateral nasal, maxillary sinus and turbinate glands. The lateral nasal and maxillary sinus glands were absent in the adult koala but occupied large areas in the other species. Turbinate glands were best developed rostrally and ventrally in the nasal cavity. On the nasal septum, Tarsipes and Isoodon had well developed glands associated with vascular 'swell bodies'. These were poorly developed to Macropus though septal glands were abundant. 'Swell bodies' were absent in Phascolarctos and glands were sparse. Tubular vomeronasal glands were present in all species and most extensive in Tarsipes. In Isoodon, there was a posterior ventral septal gland associated with the septal olfactory organ. The fine structural features of secretory cells and ducts are described and their potential role discussed in terms of chemoreception and temperature and humidity control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6490535

  4. Detection of Allergen Specific Antibodies From Nasal Secretion of Allergic Rhinitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Moon-Gyeong; Seo, Dae-Hong; Kim, Bong-Sun; Ban, Ga-Young; Ye, Young-Min; Shin, Yoo Seob

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common and increasing disease in which Dermatophagoides (D.) farinae is one of the most common causative allergens. The aims of this study were to confirm the presence of locally produced antibodies to D. farinae in nasal secretions between nasal provocation test (NPT)-positive and -negative groups of AR patients, to evaluate their relationships with the levels of inflammatory mediators, and to determine adaptive and innate immune responses in nasal mucosa. Methods Sixty AR patients sensitive to house dust mites confirmed by skin prick test or serum specific IgE to D. farinae underwent NPT for D. farinae. Nasal packs were placed in both nasal cavities of the patients for 5 minutes to obtain nasal secretions after NPT. The levels of total IgE, specific IgE to D. farinae, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and tryptase in nasal secretions were detected by using ImmunoCAP. The levels of specific IgE, IgA, and secretory IgA antibodies to D. farinae in nasal secretions were measured by using ELISA. The levels of IL-8, VEGF, IL-25, and IL-33 were also measured by using ELISA. Results High levels of total IgE, specific IgE, specific IgA, and secretory IgA to D. farinae, as well as inflammatory mediators, such as ECP, IL-8, VEGF and tryptase, were detected in nasal secretions, although the differences were not statistically significant between the NPT-positive and NPT-negative groups. Levels of all immunoglobulins measured in this study significantly correlated with ECP, IL-8, and VEGF (P<0.05), but not with tryptase (P>0.05). IL-33 and IL-25 were also detected, and IL-25 level significantly correlated with IL-8 (r=0.625, P<0.001). Conclusions These findings confirmed the presence of locally produced specific antibodies, including D. farinae-specific IgE and IgA, in nasal secretions collected from D. farinae-sensitive AR patients in both the NPT-positive and NPT-negative groups, and close correlations were noted between antibodies and

  5. Pathogenesis of nasal polyps: an update.

    PubMed

    Pawliczak, Rafal; Lewandowska-Polak, Anna; Kowalski, Marek L

    2005-11-01

    The cause of nasal polyp formation is still unknown. Genetic predisposition has been suggested, but there are scanty data to support such theories. Activated epithelial cells may be the major source of mediators inducing influx of inflammatory cells (mostly eosinophils) and proliferation and activation of fibroblasts leading to nasal polyp formation. Infectious agents (including viruses, bacteria, or fungi) may be potential primary factors activating nasal epithelial cells. Proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors play important roles in the persistence of mucosal inflammation associated with nasal polyps. Arachidonic acid metabolites seem to be particularly important in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps in patients with aspirin hypersensitivity rhinosinusitis/asthma syndrome. PMID:16216171

  6. New therapeutic approach for brain tumors: Intranasal delivery of telomerase inhibitor GRN163

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Rintaro; Ozawa, Tomoko; Gryaznov, Sergei M.; Bollen, Andrew W.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Frey, William H.; Deen, Dennis F.

    2008-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier is a substantial obstacle for delivering anticancer agents to brain tumors, and new strategies for bypassing it are greatly needed for brain-tumor therapy. Intranasal delivery provides a practical, noninvasive method for delivering therapeutic agents to the brain and could provide an alternative to intravenous injection and convection-enhanced delivery. We treated rats bearing intracerebral human tumor xeno-grafts intranasally with GRN163, an oligonucleotide N3′→P5′thio-phosphoramidate telomerase inhibitor. 3′-Fuorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)–labeled GRN163 was administered intranasally every 2 min as 6 μl drops into alternating sides of the nasal cavity over 22 min. FITC-labeled GRN163 was present in tumor cells at all time points studied, and accumulation of GRN163 peaked at 4 h after delivery. Moreover, GRN163 delivered intranasally, daily for 12 days, significantly prolonged the median survival from 35 days in the control group to 75.5 days in the GRN163-treated group. Thus, intranasal delivery of GRN163 readily bypassed the blood-brain barrier, exhibited favorable tumor uptake, and inhibited tumor growth, leading to a prolonged lifespan for treated rats compared to controls. This delivery approach appears to kill tumor cells selectively, and no toxic effects were noted in normal brain tissue. These data support further development of intranasal delivery of tumor-specific therapeutic agents for brain tumor patients. PMID:18287341

  7. New therapeutic approach for brain tumors: Intranasal delivery of telomerase inhibitor GRN163.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Rintaro; Ozawa, Tomoko; Gryaznov, Sergei M; Bollen, Andrew W; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Frey, William H; Deen, Dennis F

    2008-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier is a substantial obstacle for delivering anticancer agents to brain tumors, and new strategies for bypassing it are greatly needed for brain-tumor therapy. Intranasal delivery provides a practical, noninvasive method for delivering therapeutic agents to the brain and could provide an alternative to intravenous injection and convection-enhanced delivery. We treated rats bearing intracerebral human tumor xenografts intranasally with GRN163, an oligonucleotide N3'-->P5'thio-phosphoramidate telomerase inhibitor. 3'-Fuorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled GRN163 was administered intranasally every 2 min as 6 microl drops into alternating sides of the nasal cavity over 22 min. FITC-labeled GRN163 was present in tumor cells at all time points studied, and accumulation of GRN163 peaked at 4 h after delivery. Moreover, GRN163 delivered intranasally, daily for 12 days, significantly prolonged the median survival from 35 days in the control group to 75.5 days in the GRN163-treated group. Thus, intranasal delivery of GRN163 readily bypassed the blood-brain barrier, exhibited favorable tumor uptake, and inhibited tumor growth, leading to a prolonged lifespan for treated rats compared to controls. This delivery approach appears to kill tumor cells selectively, and no toxic effects were noted in normal brain tissue. These data support further development of intranasal delivery of tumor-specific therapeutic agents for brain tumor patients. PMID:18287341

  8. Pharmacological evaluation of selective α2c-adrenergic agonists in experimental animal models of nasal congestion.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanlin; Mingo, Garfield G; Hunter, John C; Lieber, Gissela B; Palamanda, Jairam R; Mei, Hong; Boyce, Christopher W; Koss, Michael C; Yu, Yongxin; Cicmil, Milenko; Hey, John A; McLeod, Robbie L

    2014-04-01

    Nasal congestion is one of the most troublesome symptoms of many upper airways diseases. We characterized the effect of selective α2c-adrenergic agonists in animal models of nasal congestion. In porcine mucosa tissue, compound A and compound B contracted nasal veins with only modest effects on arteries. In in vivo experiments, we examined the nasal decongestant dose-response characteristics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship, duration of action, potential development of tolerance, and topical efficacy of α2c-adrenergic agonists. Acoustic rhinometry was used to determine nasal cavity dimensions following intranasal compound 48/80 (1%, 75 µl). In feline experiments, compound 48/80 decreased nasal cavity volume and minimum cross-sectional areas by 77% and 40%, respectively. Oral administration of compound A (0.1-3.0 mg/kg), compound B (0.3-5.0 mg/kg), and d-pseudoephedrine (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) produced dose-dependent decongestion. Unlike d-pseudoephedrine, compounds A and B did not alter systolic blood pressure. The plasma exposure of compound A to produce a robust decongestion (EC(80)) was 500 nM, which related well to the duration of action of approximately 4.0 hours. No tolerance to the decongestant effect of compound A (1.0 mg/kg p.o.) was observed. To study the topical efficacies of compounds A and B, the drugs were given topically 30 minutes after compound 48/80 (a therapeutic paradigm) where both agents reversed nasal congestion. Finally, nasal-decongestive activity was confirmed in the dog. We demonstrate that α2c-adrenergic agonists behave as nasal decongestants without cardiovascular actions in animal models of upper airway congestion. PMID:24492651

  9. Stable Dry Powder Formulation for Nasal Delivery of Anthrax Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheena H.; Kirwan, Shaun M.; Abraham, Soman N.; Staats, Herman F.; Hickey, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a current biodefense interest in protection against Anthrax. Here we developed a new generation of stable and effective anthrax vaccine. We studied the immune response elicited by rPA delivered intranasally with a novel mucosal adjuvant, a mast cell activator Compound 48/80. The vaccine formulation was prepared in a powder form by spray-freeze-drying (SFD) under optimized conditions to produce particles with a target size of D50=25μm, suitable for delivery to the rabbit nasal cavity. Physicochemical properties of the powder vaccines were characterized to assess their delivery and storage potential. Structural stability of rPA was confirmed by CD and ATR-FTIR, while functional stability of rPA and C48/80 was monitored by cell-based assays. Animal study was performed using a unitdose powder device for direct nasal application. Results showed that C48/80 provided effective mucosal adjuvant activity in rabbits. Freshly prepared SFD powder vaccine formulations or powders stored for over two years at room temperature elicited significantly elevated serum PA-specific and lethal toxin neutralization antibody titers that were comparable to that induced by IM immunization with rPA. Nasal delivery of this vaccine formulation may be a viable alternative to the currently licensed vaccine, or an attractive vaccine platform for other mucosally transmitted diseases. PMID:21905034

  10. Subarachnoid space of the CNS, nasal mucosa, and lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R T; Tigges, J; Arnold, W

    1979-04-01

    We have briefly reviewed the literature pertaining to the movement of tracer molecules and infectious organisms within the olfactory nerve. There is a body of evidence indicating that tracers placed in the CSF will quickly move via the olfactory nerve to the nasal mucosa and then to the cervical lymph nodes. Organic and inorganic tracer materials and organisms as diverse as viruses, a bacillus, and an amoeba, when placed in the nasal cavity, have been shown to move from the nasal mucosa via the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb and the CSF. We think that a portion of the data on tracer movement is due to incorporation of tracer materials and organisms into the axoplasm of the olfactory neurons with subsequent anterograde or retrograde axoplasmic transport. However, some of the movement of tracers may occur within the olfactory perineural space. This space may be continuous with a subarachnoid extension that surrounds the olfactory nerve as it penetrates the cribriform plate. To our knowledge, no one has yet followed the perineural space to determine if it is continuous from olfactory receptor to olfactory bulb. The consideration of this space and its role is the main reason for this review. PMID:85446

  11. Nasal and conjunctival screening prior to refractive surgery: an observational and cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Koji; Sotozono, Chie; Sakamoto, Masako; Sasaki, Miho; Hieda, Osamu; Yamasaki, Toshihide; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate bacterial flora of clinically healthy conjunctiva and nasal cavity among patients prior to refractive surgery, as well as the characteristics of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonisation. Design Observational and cross-sectional study. Setting A single-centre study in Japan. Participants 120 consecutive patients pre-refractive surgery. Primary and secondary outcome measures methods Samples were obtained from the right conjunctival sac and the nasal cavity of 120 consecutive patients prior to refractive surgery and were then measured for the levels of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antibiotics. Patients were interviewed regarding their occupation, family living situation and any personal history of atopic dermatitis, asthma, smoking or contact lens wear. Results Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) (32.5%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (4.2%) were detected from the conjunctival sac. S. epidermidis was the most commonly isolated (68.3%) in the nasal cavity. Of the 30 patients (25.0%) with colonisation by S. aureus, 2 patients, both of whom were healthcare workers with atopic dermatitis, were found to be positive for MRSA in the nasal cavity. A history of contact lens wear, asthma or smoking, as well as patient gender and age, was not associated with MRSA colonisation. Conclusions There were only 2 patients who were colonised with MRSA, both of whom were healthcare workers with atopic dermatitis. P. acnes was predominantly found in the conjunctival sac. Further study is needed to investigate the involvement between nasal and conjunctival flora, and risk factors for infectious complications. PMID:27160843

  12. Computed tomographic features of feline sino-nasal and sino-orbital aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Barrs, V R; Beatty, J A; Dhand, N K; Talbot, J J; Bell, E; Abraham, L A; Chapman, P; Bennett, S; van Doorn, T; Makara, M

    2014-08-01

    Feline upper respiratory tract aspergillosis (URTA) occurs as two distinct anatomical forms, namely, sino-nasal aspergillosis (SNA) and sino-orbital aspergillosis (SOA). An emerging pathogen, Aspergillus felis, is frequently involved. The pathogenesis of URTA, in particular the relationship between the infecting isolate and outcome, is poorly understood. In this study, computed tomography was used to investigate the route of fungal infection and extension in 16 cases (SNA n = 7, SOA n = 9) where the infecting isolate had been identified by molecular testing. All cases had nasal cavity involvement except for one cat with SNA that had unilateral frontal sinus changes. There was a strong association between the infecting species and anatomic form (P = 0.005). A. fumigatus infections remained within the sino-nasal cavity, while cryptic species infections were associated with orbital and paranasal soft-tissue involvement and with orbital lysis. Cryptic species were further associated with a mass in the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses or nasopharynx. Orbital masses showed heterogeneous contrast enhancement, with central coalescing hypoattenuating foci and peripheral rim enhancement. Severe, cavitated turbinate lysis, typical of canine SNA, was present only in cats with SNA. These findings support the hypothesis that the nasal cavity is the portal of entry for fungal spores in feline URTA and that the route of extension to involve the orbit is via direct naso-orbital communication from bone lysis. Additionally, a pathogenic role for A. wyomingensis and a sinolith in a cat with A. udagawae infection are reported for the first time. PMID:24685469

  13. Targeted delivery of antigen to hamster nasal lymphoid tissue with M-cell-directed lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Giannasca, P J; Boden, J A; Monath, T P

    1997-01-01

    The nasal cavity of a rodent is lined by an epithelium organized into distinct regional domains responsible for specific physiological functions. Aggregates of nasal lymphoid tissue (NALT) located at the base of the nasal cavity are believed to be sites of induction of mucosal immune responses to airborne antigens. The epithelium overlying NALT contains M cells which are specialized for the transcytosis of immunogens, as demonstrated in other mucosal tissues. We hypothesized that NALT M cells are characterized by distinct glycoconjugate receptors which influence antigen uptake and immune responses to transcytosed antigens. To identify glycoconjugates that may distinguish NALT M cells from other cells of the respiratory epithelium (RE), we performed lectin histochemistry on sections of the hamster nasal cavity with a panel of lectins. Many classes of glycoconjugates were found on epithelial cells in this region. While most lectins bound to sites on both the RE and M cells, probes capable of recognizing alpha-linked galactose were found to label the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) almost exclusively. By morphological criteria, the FAE contains >90% M cells. To determine if apical glycoconjugates on M cells were accessible from the nasal cavity, an M-cell-selective lectin and a control lectin in parallel were administered intranasally to hamsters. The M-cell-selective lectin was found to specifically target the FAE, while the control lectin did not. Lectin bound to M cells in vivo was efficiently endocytosed, consistent with the role of M cells in antigen transport. Intranasal immunization with lectin-test antigen conjugates without adjuvant stimulated induction of specific serum immunoglobulin G, whereas antigen alone or admixed with lectin did not. The selective recognition of NALT M cells by a lectin in vivo provides a model for microbial adhesin-host cell receptor interactions on M cells and the targeted delivery of immunogens to NALT following intranasal

  14. Effective induction of protective systemic immunity with nasally-administered vaccines adjuvanted with IL-1

    PubMed Central

    Gwinn, William M.; Kirwan, Shaun M.; Wang, Sheena H.; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; Sparks, Neil L.; Doil, Catherine R.; Tlusty, Tom G.; Casey, Leslie S.; Hollingshead, Susan K.; Briles, David E.; Dondero, Richard S.; Hickey, Anthony J.; Foster, W. Michael; Staats, Herman F.

    2010-01-01

    IL-1α and IL-1β were evaluated for their ability to provide adjuvant activity for the induction of serum antibody responses when nasally-administered with protein antigens in mice and rabbits. In mice, intranasal (i.n.) immunization with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) or tetanus toxoid (TT) combined with IL-1β induced protective immunity that was equivalent to that induced by parenteral immunization. Nasal immunization of awake (i.e., not anesthetized) rabbits with IL-1-adjuvanted vaccines induced highly variable serum antibody responses and was not as effective as parenteral immunization for the induction of antigen-specific serum IgG. However, i.n. immunization of deeply anesthetized rabbits with rPA + IL-1α consistently induced rPA-specific serum IgG ELISA titers that were not significantly different than those induced by intramuscular (IM) immunization with rPA + alum although lethal toxin neutralizing titers induced by nasal immunization were lower than those induced by IM immunization. Gamma scintigraphy demonstrated that the enhanced immunogenicity of nasal immunization in anesthetized rabbits correlated with an increased nasal retention of i.n. delivered non-permeable radio-labeled colloidal particles. Our results demonstrate that, in mice, IL-1 is an effective adjuvant for nasally-administered vaccines for the induction of protective systemic immunity and that in non-rodent species, effective induction of systemic immunity with nasally-administered vaccines may require formulations that ensure adequate retention of the vaccine within the nasal cavity. PMID:20723629

  15. Cavity magnomechanics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-03-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  16. Cavity magnomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    2016-01-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  17. Primary Nasal Reconstruction in Self-Inflicted Nasal Injury.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Abizer; John, Jerry R; Gaba, Sunil; Sharma, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Self-inflicted injury of the nose is extremely rare. It may be associated with severe psychopathology and suicidal ideation. The authors report a case of a 24-year-old man, who presented with soft-tissue loss over both the alae of his nose. He had cut off the alar rims with an ordinary razor blade. He was overtly concerned about his nose being excessively broad and fat. A diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder with nonsuicidal self-injury was made. Patient was observed during 72 hours in hospital with psychiatric support and local dressings. The authors undertook primary nasal reconstruction with nasolabial flaps on both sides for coverage. In conclusion, self-inflicted nasal injury mandates a judicious balancing of psychiatric support and surgical reconstruction. This can prevent untoward sequelae including further self-harm and suicide. PMID:26468831

  18. Computed Intranasal Spray Penetration: Comparisons Before and After Nasal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Dennis O.; Kimbell, Julia S.; Cannon, Daniel; Rhee, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Quantitative methods for comparing intranasal drug delivery efficiencies pre- and postoperatively have not been fully utilized. The objective of this study is to use computational fluid dynamics techniques to evaluate aqueous nasal spray penetration efficiencies before and after surgical correction of intranasal anatomic deformities. Methods Ten three-dimensional models of the nasal cavities were created from pre- and postoperative computed tomography scans in five subjects. Spray simulations were conducted using a particle size distribution ranging from 10–110μm, a spray speed of 3m/s, plume angle of 68°, and with steady state, resting inspiratory airflow present. Two different nozzle positions were compared. Statistical analysis was conducted using Student T-test for matched pairs. Results On the obstructed side, posterior particle deposition after surgery increased by 118% and was statistically significant (p-value=0.036), while anterior particle deposition decreased by 13% and was also statistically significant (p-value=0.020). The fraction of particles that by-passed the airways either pre- or post-operatively was less than 5%. Posterior particle deposition differences between obstructed and contralateral sides of the airways were 113% and 30% for pre- and post-surgery, respectively. Results showed that nozzle positions can influence spray delivery. Conclusions Simulations predicted that surgical correction of nasal anatomic deformities can improve spray penetration to areas where medications can have greater effect. Particle deposition patterns between both sides of the airways are more evenly distributed after surgery. These findings suggest that correcting anatomic deformities may improve intranasal medication delivery. For enhanced particle penetration, patients with nasal deformities may explore different nozzle positions. PMID:22927179

  19. Contrastive and contextual vowel nasalization in Ottawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopfenstein, Marie

    2005-09-01

    Ottawa is a Central Algonquian language that possesses the recent innovation of contrastive vowel nasalization. Most phonetic studies done to date on contrastive vowel nasalization have investigated Indo-European languages; therefore, a study of Ottawa could prove to be a valuable addition to the literature. To this end, a percentage of nasalization (nasal airflow/oral + nasal airflow) was measured during target vowels produced by native Ottawa speakers using a Nasometer 6200-3. Nasalized vowels in the target word set were either contrastively or contextually nasalized: candidates for contextual nasalization were either regressive or perserverative in word-initial and word-final syllables. Subjects were asked to read words containing target vowels in a carrier sentence. Mean, minimum, and maximum nasalance were obtained for each target vowel across its full duration. Target vowels were compared across context (regressive or perseverative and word-initial or word-final). In addition, contexts were compared to determine whether a significant difference existed between contrastive and contextual nasalization. Results for Ottawa will be compared with results for vowels in similar contexts in other languages including Hindi, Breton, Bengali, and French.

  20. Local and systemic immunotherapy in nasal allergy.

    PubMed

    Palma-Carlos, A G; Palma-Carlos, M L; Spínola Santos, A; Santos, C; Pedro, E; Pregal, A

    1999-10-01

    Two assays have been done to evaluate the effect of immunotherapy in nasal allergy. First, a trial of nasal immunotherapy and second, the study of mediator release after vaccines. Local immunotherapy, applied directly, triggers different response mechanisms. Specific nasal immunotherapy started before seasonal or perennial symptoms peak, has been done by increasing the doses of allergen three times a week during a 3-month period and a manutention period of a weekly nasal puff of the same allergen. Symptom scores and drug consumption have been registered. The results have been compared with the scores obtained in the same patients over the same period of the same year before immunotherapy. In perennial rhinitis blockage, rhinorrea, sneezing and itching scores all decreased. In seasonal rhinitis, a similar score decrease was obtained for blockage, rhinorrea, sneezing and itching. Pharmacological scores also decreased. These data point to a short-term effect of nasal immunotherapy. Tryptase release has been evaluated in nasal washings after nasal challenge with a Parietaria (Pellitory wall) extract before and after specific systemic immunotherapy, in order to evaluate changes in mast cells reactivity. Eight patients were studied, all allergic to Parietaria. Nasal provocation tests have been done before the season with increasing doses of 10, 100 and 1000 PNU and tryptase assayed in nasal washings at 10, 20 and 30 min after provocation. Immunotherapy decreased tryptase release after nasal challenge. The data point to the effect of systemic specific immunotherapy on mast cell reactivity. PMID:10577807

  1. [Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type developing central nervous system and epididymis involvement immediately after concurrent chemoradiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yuya; Yonezawa, Akihito; Kinoshita, Yoshihiro; Kitagawa, Tomoya; Mori, Minako; Onaka, Takashi; Imada, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    A 66-year-old man showed central nervous system (CNS) and epididymis involvement after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKL). The patient experienced continuous nasal obstruction. CT revealed a mass in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Biopsy of the nasal cavity mass showed it to be ENKL. Based on bone marrow biopsy and 18F-FDG PET/CT findings, the clinical stage was suspected to be IIE. The sites involved were the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and cervical lymph nodes. We performed concurrent chemoradiotherapy consisting of a 67% dose of DeVIC and involved field radiation therapy towards his head and neck. Head and neck CT confirmed a therapeutic response. After receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the patient complained of perineal discomfort. Ultrasonography revealed swelling of the left epididymis. Left epididymis biopsy showed ENKL involvement and lumbar puncture revealed CNS involvement. The findings of this case suggest that evaluation of CNS involvement might be an essential part of the initial workup for some ENKL patients. PMID:26725358

  2. Evidence of bone formation in the nasal floor around polished surface bi-cortical screw implants after indirect nasal lift in an atrophied maxilla: Cone beam computed tomography-based case report.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Mayur; Gaur, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary jaw is restricted superiorly with maxillary sinus in the posterior region and nasal cavity in the anterior region. Augmentation of distal maxilla with recessed maxillary sinus has been documented since, last few decades. Sinus lifts the procedure either through crestal or lateral approach proves to be an effective way for augmenting bone for the placement of dental implants in atrophied posterior maxilla. However, when it comes to vertically deficient anterior maxilla, lifting of the nasal membrane is not considered. Perhaps, recent studies have shown greater success of dental implant placed after augmentation of the nasal floor. This report emphasizes on an observation of significant bone formation after indirect lifting of the nasal membrane with smooth polished surface bi-cortical implants. PMID:26015681

  3. Evidence of bone formation in the nasal floor around polished surface bi-cortical screw implants after indirect nasal lift in an atrophied maxilla: Cone beam computed tomography-based case report

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Mayur; Gaur, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary jaw is restricted superiorly with maxillary sinus in the posterior region and nasal cavity in the anterior region. Augmentation of distal maxilla with recessed maxillary sinus has been documented since, last few decades. Sinus lifts the procedure either through crestal or lateral approach proves to be an effective way for augmenting bone for the placement of dental implants in atrophied posterior maxilla. However, when it comes to vertically deficient anterior maxilla, lifting of the nasal membrane is not considered. Perhaps, recent studies have shown greater success of dental implant placed after augmentation of the nasal floor. This report emphasizes on an observation of significant bone formation after indirect lifting of the nasal membrane with smooth polished surface bi-cortical implants. PMID:26015681

  4. THE ROLE OF TARGET ORGAN DIAGNOSTIC APPROACH IN SEASONAL ALLERGIC RHINITIS: NASAL SMEAR EOSINOPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Nurkic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Mona Al; Arifhodzic, Nermina; Jusufovic, Edin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Allergic rhinitis (AR) related to local weeds pollen sensitization (Chenopodiaceous family) is the most common cause of respiratory allergy in Kuwait. Local nasal accumulation of different cells typical of allergic inflammation is responsible for clinical symptoms of AR. Although nasal smear for Eosinophils (NSE) is one of the earliest included valuable test in diagnosis of AR, with time is underestimated. Aim: Explore possible correlation of natural pollen allergen stimulation with appearance and quantity of Eosinophils in nasal smear. Methods: A group of randomly selected patients with clinical history suggestive for seasonal AR (SAR), who came to Al Rashed Allergy Center in period from October 2014 to October 2015, obtain Nasal Smear for Eosinophils as a screening test before further diagnostic evaluation. Nasal samples were collected by passing a sterile swab, from each nasal cavity, along the medial surface of the inferior turbinate 2 to 3 times and the specimen smeared on a clear glass slide. Nasal smears were examined by light microscopy after staining with hematoxylin and eosin stain. Skin prick test is performed in all symptomatic patients with a battery of inhalant allergens that include local pollens. The control group was recruited, with their voluntary consent, from the medical stuff with a negative history of any allergic nasal symptoms. In this group we performed only nasal smear for Eosinophils. Air Biology Laboratory Kuwait provided us with daily pollen count. Results: From total 158 study participants, 132 had SAR symptoms and are divided in four groups. Fifth, control, group is non symptomatic. For 38.6% of symptomatic patients NSE were positive, while 45% of these patients have negative SPT. From 62.1% NSE negative patients, 37.8% have negative SPT. Our results showed expected positive correlation of NSE positive patients with pollen season in Kuwait, in SPT positive group. However, presence of Eosinophils in nasal smear was moderate

  5. Spectrum of Sinonasal Tumors: A 10-year Experience at a Tertiary Care Hospital in North India

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Nadia; Bist, Sampan S.; Selvi, Thamarai N.; Harsh, Meena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sinonasal tumors are a highly heterogeneous group of tumors that account for less than 1% of all cancers. Precise diagnosis is essential because the natural history, treatment, and prognosis vary for different neoplasms. We reviewed 610 cases of sinonasal lesions to understand this entity better. Methods A total of 610 sinonasal biopsies/specimens were received over a period of 10 years (2004–14). All the samples were processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Special staining for microorganisms and immunohistochemistry were performed where indicated. Results Benign lesions were 72% with nasal polyp being the most common. Malignant lesions made up 21.2% of lesions with nasopharyngeal carcinoma being the most common while 7.7% cases were inflammatory/non-neoplastic. The most common cause for this was fungal sinusitis. The maxillary sinus was the most frequently involved site in all the lesions (62%). The average age of presentation was 40 years old, and the male to female ratio was 3:1 in those with benign tumors. The average age of presentation in the malignant and inflammatory group were 45 and 43 years, respectively, with an almost equal sex ratio in both categories. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans were done in virtually all cases to assess the extent of the tumor as well as bony destruction. Local recurrence was the most frequent cause of treatment failure. Conclusion Tumors of the nasal cavity are often grouped with those in the paranasal sinuses. Benign tumors constituted approximately 75% of tumors in our hospital. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common malignancy of this region. These tumors need to be studied closely and accurately because their proximity to vital structures pose significant challenges for their treatment and may be the source of significant patient morbidity. PMID:26674709

  6. Nasal airway responses to nasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing: An in-vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Bartley, Jim; Shakeel, Muhammad; Nates, Roy J; Hankin, Robin K S

    2016-06-14

    The nasal cycle, through variation in nasal airflow partitioning, allows the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting demands of air conditioning and removal of entrapped air contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) breathing has on both nasal airflow partitioning and nasal geometry. Using a custom-made nasal mask, twenty healthy participants had the airflow in each naris measured during normal nasal breathing followed by nCPAP breathing. Eight participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasal region during spontaneous nasal breathing, and then nCPAP breathing over a range of air pressures. During nCPAP breathing, a simultaneous reduction in airflow through the patent airway together with a corresponding increase in airway flow within the congested nasal airway were observed in sixteen of the twenty participants. Nasal airflow resistance is inversely proportional to airway cross-sectional area. MRI data analysis during nCPAP breathing confirmed airway cross-sectional area reduced along the patent airway while the congested airway experienced an increase in this parameter. During awake breathing, nCPAP disturbs the normal inter-nasal airflow partitioning. This could partially explain the adverse nasal drying symptoms frequently reported by many users of this therapy. PMID:27173595

  7. [Inflammatory mechanisms in nasal polyposis].

    PubMed

    Perić, Aleksandar; Vojvodić, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Nasal polyposis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nasal and paranasal sinuses mucosa, characterized by prolapse of edematous mucosa, most commonly from the area of anterior ethmoid. The mean histological characteristics are proliferation of pseudostratified respiratory epithelium, thickening of the basement membrane, focal fibrosis and eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltration of the lamina propria. Although etiology is unknown, two hypotheses are dominant among the scientists: "hypothesis of staphylococcal superantigens" and "hypothesis of immune barrier dysfunction". Although we have not yet achieved a full understanding of the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this disease, it is known that nasal polyposis is associated with intensive chronic inflammation, followed by dysregulation of chemotaxis, migration, activation and function of eosinophils. A great number of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules are involved in the regulation of these complex mechanisms. After activation, eosinophils produce and release enzymes, which can lead to the damage of mucosa and tissue remodeling. Hyperactive eosinophils release a new amount of chemokines and cytokines, attracting new eosinophils into the site of inflammation, and may cause the persistence of chronic inflammation. PMID:25731009

  8. Nasal Septal Angiofibroma in a Post-Menopausal Woman: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Dayana, Farah; Fadzilah, Fazalina Mohd; Gendeh, Balwant Singh

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile angiofibromas (JAs) are well-characterised in literature, arising typically in the posterolateral wall of the nasal cavity of young males. Numerous theories have been proposed to explain the occurrence of this unique and rare tumour. Angiofibromas originating in other sites within the head and neck have been described but this is exceedingly rare, constituting less than 2% of all diagnosed cases. Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare lesion, and more importantly, controversial. It is not known whether it is actually a relative of the well-known JA that is seen exclusively in adolescent males. We present the case of a post-menopausal woman with unilateral nasal obstruction who was unexpectedly diagnosed as nasal septal angiofibroma. PMID:26816925

  9. Nanogel-based pneumococcal surface protein A nasal vaccine induces microRNA-associated Th17 cell responses with neutralizing antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae in macaques.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Y; Yuki, Y; Katakai, Y; Harada, N; Takahashi, H; Takeda, S; Mejima, M; Joo, S; Kurokawa, S; Sawada, S; Shibata, H; Park, E J; Fujihashi, K; Briles, D E; Yasutomi, Y; Tsukada, H; Akiyoshi, K; Kiyono, H

    2015-09-01

    We previously established a nanosized nasal vaccine delivery system by using a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan nanogel (cCHP nanogel), which is a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free nasal vaccination. In the present study, we examined the central nervous system safety and efficacy of nasal vaccination with our developed cCHP nanogel containing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-nanogel) against pneumococcal infection in nonhuman primates. When [(18)F]-labeled PspA-nanogel was nasally administered to a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), longer-term retention of PspA was noted in the nasal cavity when compared with administration of PspA alone. Of importance, no deposition of [(18)F]-PspA was seen in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination effectively induced PspA-specific serum IgG with protective activity and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) Ab responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nasal PspA-nanogel-induced immune responses were mediated through T-helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cytokine responses concomitantly with marked increases in the levels of miR-181a and miR-326 in the serum and respiratory tract tissues, respectively, of the macaques. These results demonstrate that nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination is a safe and effective strategy for the development of a nasal vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia in humans. PMID:25669148

  10. Nanogel-based pneumococcal surface protein A nasal vaccine induces microRNA-associated Th17 cell responses with neutralizing antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Y; Yuki, Y; Katakai, Y; Harada, N; Takahashi, H; Takeda, S; Mejima, M; Joo, S; Kurokawa, S; Sawada, S; Shibata, H; Park, E J; Fujihashi, K; Briles, D E; Yasutomi, Y; Tsukada, H; Akiyoshi, K; Kiyono, H

    2015-01-01

    We previously established a nanosized nasal vaccine delivery system by using a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan nanogel (cCHP nanogel), which is a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free nasal vaccination. In the present study, we examined the central nervous system safety and efficacy of nasal vaccination with our developed cCHP nanogel containing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-nanogel) against pneumococcal infection in nonhuman primates. When [18F]-labeled PspA-nanogel was nasally administered to a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), longer-term retention of PspA was noted in the nasal cavity when compared with administration of PspA alone. Of importance, no deposition of [18F]-PspA was seen in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination effectively induced PspA-specific serum IgG with protective activity and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) Ab responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nasal PspA-nanogel-induced immune responses were mediated through T-helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cytokine responses concomitantly with marked increases in the levels of miR-181a and miR-326 in the serum and respiratory tract tissues, respectively, of the macaques. These results demonstrate that nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination is a safe and effective strategy for the development of a nasal vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia in humans. PMID:25669148

  11. Preparation of bisoprolol fumarate nasal spray and its nasal delivery in rats.

    PubMed

    Fugen, Gu; Duo, Hao; Gendalai, Meng; Chunzhi, Wu; Yi, Wang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to prepare a nasal spray of bisoprolol fumarate (BF). The Pharmacokinetics and relative bioavailability of the BF nasal formulation were evaluated in Wistar rats. The BF nasal spray after administration exhibited very fast absorption and higher plasma drug concentration. The maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and the time to reach it (T(max)) were 409.5 ng/ml and 3.6 min for the BF nasal spray, 39.4 ng/ml and 26.7 min for the drug solution, respectively. The bioavailability of the BF nasal spray was greater than 1500.0%. Meantime, the effect of the BF nasal spray on nasal mucociliary movement was also studied with a toad palate model. The BF nasal preparation showed minor ciliotoxicity, but the adverse effect was temporary and reversible. PMID:26639509

  12. Does oral prednisolone increase the efficacy of subsequent nasal steroids in treating nasal polyposis?

    PubMed Central

    Wongsritrang, Krongthong; Ruttanaphol, Suwalee

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although combined oral and nasal steroid therapy is widely used in nasal polyposis, a subset of patients show an unfavorable therapeutic outcome. This study aimed to evaluate whether oral prednisolone produces any additive effects on subsequent nasal steroid therapy and to evaluate if any clinical variables can predict therapeutic outcome. Methods: Using a 3:2 randomization ratio, 67 patients with nasal polyposis received 50 mg of prednisolone and 47 patients received placebo daily for 2 weeks, followed by mometasone furoate nasal spray (MFNS) at 200 micrograms twice daily for 10 weeks. Clinical response was evaluated by nasal symptom score (NSS), peak expiratory flow index (PEFI), and total nasal polyps score (TNPS). Potential predictor variables were assessed by clinical history, nasal endoscopy, allergy skin test, and sinus radiography. Results: At the end of the 2-week oral steroid phase, the prednisolone group showed significantly greater improvements in all nasal symptoms, nasal airflow, and polyp size than the placebo group. In the nasal steroid phase, while the MFNS maintained the outcome improvements in the prednisolone group, all outcome variables in the placebo group showed continuing improvements. At the end of the nasal steroid phase, there were no significant differences of most outcome improvements between the two groups, except in hyposmia, PEFI, and TNPS (p = 0.049, p = 0.029, and p = 0.005, respectively). In the prednisolone group, patients with polyps grade 3 and endoscopic signs of meatal discharge showed significantly less improvement in total NSS, PEFI, and TNPS than patients with grade 1–2 size and negative metal discharge. Conclusion: In the 12-week treatment evaluation of nasal polyposis, pretreatment with oral steroids had no significant advantage for most nasal symptoms other than earlier relief; however, combined oral and nasal steroid therapy more effectively improved hyposmia, polyps size, and nasal airflow. Polyps size

  13. [Aerosol deposition in nasal passages of burrowing and ground rodents when breathing dust-laden air].

    PubMed

    Moshkin, M P; Petrovskiĭ, D V; Akulov, A E; Romashchenko, A V; Gerlinskaia, L A; Muchnaia, M I; Ganimedov, V L; Sadovskiĭ, A S; Savelov, A A; Koptiug, I V; Troitskiĭ, S Iu; Bukhtiiarov, V I; Kolchanov, N A; Sagdeev, R Z; Fomin, V M

    2014-01-01

    In subterranean rodents, which dig down the passages with frontal teeth, adaptation to the underground mode of life presumes forming of mechanisms that provide protection against inhaling dust particles of different size when digging. One of such mechanisms can be specific pattern of air flow organization in the nasal cavity. To test this assumption, comparative study of geometry and aerodynamics of nasal passages has been conducted with regard to typical representative of subterranean rodents, the mole vole, and a representative of ground rodents, the house mouse. Numerical modeling of air flows and deposition of micro- and nanoparticle aerosols indicates that sedimentation of model particles over the whole surface of nasal cavity is higher in mole vole than in house mouse. On the contrary, particles deposition on the surface of olfactory epithelium turns out to be substantially less in the burrowing rodent as compared to the ground one. Adaptive significance of the latter observation has been substantiated by experimental study on the uptake ofnanoparticles of hydrated manganese oxide MnO x (H2O)x and Mn ions from nasal cavity into brain. It has been shown with use of magnetic resonance tomography method that there is no difference between studied species with respect to intake of particles or ions by olfactory bulb when they are introduced intranasally. Meanwhile, when inhaling nanoparticle aerosol of MnCl2, deposition of Mn in mouse's olfactory bulbs surpasses markedly that in vole's bulbs. Thereby, the morphology of nasal passages as a factor determining the aerodynamics of upper respiratory tract ensures for burrowing rodents more efficient protection of both lungs and brain against inhaled aerosols than for ground ones. PMID:25771679

  14. Nasal Myiasis in Hinduism and Contemporary Otorhinolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Bosmia, Anand N; Zimmermann, Terence M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Shane Tubbs, R; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2014-01-01

    Various case reports on nasal myiasis written during the 1990s and 2000s state that nasal myiasis, which is known as peenash among South Asian natives, is a form of divine punishment in Hindu mythology, but do not provide citations from Hindu scriptures that would suggest this interpretation. This paper aims to discuss the phenomenon of peenash in a historical context by examining medical literature written during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, to identify Hindu texts contributing to the belief of some Hindus that nasal myiasis is a form of divine punishment, and to provide an overview of contemporary treatment for and management of nasal myiasis. PMID:24385004

  15. [Review: pathophysiology and methodology of nasal packing].

    PubMed

    Beule, A G; Weber, R K; Kaftan, H; Hosemann, W

    2004-08-01

    Nasal packing is a frequent procedure to control spontaneous nasal bleeding or postoperative oozing following different types of nasal surgery. It strives for internal stabilization of the nasal framework and for optimizing wound healing by prevention of stenosis or synechia. A lot of different materials is used and there is no accepted standard concerning the type and application. A review on pathophysiology of the packed nose is given together with a survey on customary packing materials focussing on the specific merits, demerits and side-effects including economical aspects. PMID:15316896

  16. Nasal and Oral Consonant Similarity in Speech Errors: Exploring Parallels with Nasal Consonant Harmony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has found that "similar" sounds interact in phonological nasal consonant harmony, wherein certain consonants become nasals when the word contains a nasal (e.g., Kikongo: /-kun-idi/ [right arrow] [-kun-ini] "planted"). Across languages, stops and approximants are chiefly affected, especially voiced consonants and ones that match…

  17. Immediate effect of benzalkonium chloride in decongestant nasal spray on the human nasal mucosal temperature.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Leiacker, R; Wiesmiller, K; Rettinger, G; Keck, T

    2004-08-01

    Benzalkonium chloride is a preservative commonly used in nasal decongestant sprays. It has been suggested that benzalkonium chloride may be harmful to the nasal mucosa. Decongestion with the vasoconstrictor xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride has been shown to cause a significant reduction of the nasal mucosal temperature. The purpose of the present study was to determine the short-term influence of xylometazoline nasal spray with and without benzalkonium chloride on the nasal mucosal temperature. Healthy volunteers (30) were included in the study. Fifteen volunteers received xylometazoline nasal spray (1.0 mg/mL) containing benzalkonium chloride (0.1 mg/mL) and 15 age-matched subjects, received xylometazoline nasal spray without benzalkonium chloride. Using a miniaturized thermocouple the septal mucosal temperature was continuously measured at defined intranasal detection sites before and after application of the nasal spray. The mucosal temperature values did not significantly differ between the group receiving xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride and the group receiving xylometazoline spray without benzalkonium chloride before and after decongestion (P > 0.05). In both study groups septal mucosal temperatures significantly decreased after decongestion (P < 0.05) because of a reduction of the nasal mucosal blood flow following vasoconstriction. This study indicates that benzalkonium chloride itself does not seem to influence nasal blood flow and nasal mucosal temperature in topical nasal decongestants. PMID:15270822

  18. Perception of Better Nasal Patency Correlates with Increased Mucosal Cooling after Surgery for Nasal Obstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Guilherme; Sullivan, Corbin; Frank-Ito, Dennis; Kimbell, Julia; Rhee, John

    2014-11-01

    Nasal airway obstruction (NAO) is a common health problem with 340,000 patients undergoing surgery annually in the United States. Traditionally, otolaryngologists have focused on airspace cross-sectional areas and nasal resistance to airflow as objective measures of nasal patency, but neither of these variables correlated consistently with patients' symptoms. Given that the sensation of nasal airflow is also associated with mucosal cooling (i.e., heat loss) during inspiration, we investigated the correlation between the sensation of nasal obstruction and mucosal cooling in 10 patients before and after NAO surgery. Three-dimensional models of the nasal anatomy were created based on pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify nasal resistance and mucosal cooling. Patient-reported symptoms were measured by a visual analog scale and the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE), a disease-specific quality of life questionnaire. Our results revealed that the subjective sensation of nasal obstruction correlated with both nasal resistance and heat loss, but the strongest correlation was between the NOSE score and the nasal surface area where heat flux exceeds 50 W /m2 . In conclusion, a significant post-operative increase in mucosal cooling correlates well with patients' perception of better nasal patency after NAO surgery.

  19. Nasal-skin-fold transposition flap for upper lip reconstruction in a French bulldog

    PubMed Central

    Benlloch-Gonzalez, Manuel; Lafarge, Stéphanie; Bouvy, Bernard; Poncet, Cyrill

    2013-01-01

    Upper-lip reconstruction after mast-cell tumor-resection in a French bulldog was achieved by using a transposition flap from the nasal-skin-fold and an oral mucosal flap. The new technique is an alternative for reconstruction of extensive upper-lip defects in brachycephalic dogs and achieves satisfactory functional and cosmetic results. PMID:24155421

  20. Nasal-skin-fold transposition flap for upper lip reconstruction in a French bulldog.

    PubMed

    Benlloch-Gonzalez, Manuel; Lafarge, Stéphanie; Bouvy, Bernard; Poncet, Cyrill

    2013-10-01

    Upper-lip reconstruction after mast-cell tumor-resection in a French bulldog was achieved by using a transposition flap from the nasal-skin-fold and an oral mucosal flap. The new technique is an alternative for reconstruction of extensive upper-lip defects in brachycephalic dogs and achieves satisfactory functional and cosmetic results. PMID:24155421

  1. Orthovoltage radiation of normal canine nasal passages: assessment of depth dose

    SciTech Connect

    Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Williamson, J.F.; Jessen, C.R.

    1983-08-01

    Frozen heads of 9 clinically normal dogs were irradiated with orthovoltage x-rays. Surface doses and nasal cavity depth doses were measured, and the percentage of surface dose (depth dose) was calculated at random depths from the dorsal cutaneous surface in transverse planes through the medial and lateral canthi. Depth dose of 2 orthovoltage x-ray beams having half-value layers of 1.5 mm of Cu (96 keV) and 2.6 mm of Cu (134 keV) were compared with and found to resemble that reported in depth dose tables based on soft tissue equivalent material. Any differences (identified graphically) in depth dose, compared with that described using a uniform (soft tissue equivalent) phantom, were explained by the variations in tissue composition and the presence of air within the normal nasal and paranasal cavities.

  2. Nasal reconstruction in children: a review of 29 patients.

    PubMed

    Pittet, B; Montandon, D

    1998-11-01

    Acquired large nasal defects are much more common in adulthood than in childhood because of the frequency of skin tumors after a certain age. However, from their experience in treating a number of children with sequelae of noma and burns, the authors have collected a series of 17 total and 12 partial nasal reconstructions in children aged 1 to 15 years. After reviewing the various methods used for recreating the lining, the support, and the skin cover in the whole series, three cases are reported in detail. A 1-year-old patient received a tempororetroauricular flap after total amputation of the nose and was observed for 17 years. Another patient, who was burned as a baby, underwent reconstruction at age 10 with a deltopectoral flap and was observed for 7 years. The third patient underwent total nose reconstruction at age 12 with an Indian forehead flap. From their experience, the authors conclude that, for psychosocial reasons, nasal reconstruction should be started early, despite possible reoperation at a later age. The best results are certainly obtained at the end of growth or at least after the age of 12. Adjacent bone or soft tissue defects further enhance the difficult challenge of restoring a satisfactory aesthetic appearance in these children. PMID:10029764

  3. Freeze-dried Xanthan/Guar Gum Nasal Inserts for the Delivery of Metoclopramide Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Mohamed Hassan; Girase, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged residence of drug formulation in the nasal cavity is important for the enhancing intranasal drug delivery. The objective of the present study was to develop a mucoadhesive in-situ gelling nasal insert which would enable the reduced nasal mucociliary clearance in order to improve the bioavailability of metoclopramide hydrochloride. Metoclopramide hydrochloride is a potent antiemetic and effective for preventing emesis induced by cancer chemotherapy, migraine, pregnancy and gastroparesis. It undergoes hepatic first pass metabolism and both the absolute bioavailability and the plasma concentrations are subjected to wide inter-individual variation showing values between 32% and 98%. Oral antiemetic often gets vomited out before the systemic absorption compelling parenteral administration which results in low patient compliance. Adverse effect of metoclopramide HCL on CNS caused by high plasma peaks can be avoided through sustained formulation. A novel combination of xanthan gum and guar gum was used to prepare the nasal inserts and the effect of blend ratio of xanthan gum and guar gum on drug release from in-situ gelling nasal inserts and on other insert properties such as bioadhesion potential and water uptake was studied. PXRD was used to determine the effect of freeze-drying on crystalline nature of formulation. The viscosities of xanthan gum in combination with guar gum were observed to be higher than that of single polymer solutions. This is because of the synergistic rheological interaction between xanthan and guar gum. There is a substantial loss in crystalline nature of the formulation after freeze-drying. The best nasal inserts formulation containing xanthan gum and guar gum ratio 1:5, showed good release (91.83%) as well as bioadhesion which may result in an increase in the nasal residence time. PMID:24250474

  4. Nasal irrigation: From empiricism to evidence-based medicine. A review.

    PubMed

    Bastier, P-L; Lechot, A; Bordenave, L; Durand, M; de Gabory, L

    2015-11-01

    Nasal irrigation plays a non-negligible role in the treatment of numerous sinonasal pathologies and postoperative care. There is, however, a wide variety of protocols. The present review of the evidence-based literature sought objective arguments for optimization and efficacy. It emerged that large-volume low-pressure nasal douche optimizes the distribution and cleansing power of the irrigation solution in the nasal cavity. Ionic composition and pH also influence mucociliary clearance and epithelium trophicity. Seawater is less rich in sodium ions and richer in bicarbonates, potassium, calcium and magnesium than is isotonic normal saline, while alkaline pH and elevated calcium concentration optimized ciliary motility in vitro. Bicarbonates reduce secretion viscosity. Potassium and magnesium promote healing and limit local inflammation. These results show that the efficacy of nasal irrigation is multifactorial. Large-volume low-pressure nasal irrigation using undiluted seawater seems, in the present state of knowledge, to be the most effective protocol. PMID:26344138

  5. An Effective Manual Deboning Method To Prepare Intact Mouse Nasal Tissue With Preserved Anatomical Organization

    PubMed Central

    Dunston, David; Ogura, Tatsuya; Lin, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian nose is a multi-functional organ with intricate internal structures. The nasal cavity is lined with various epithelia such as olfactory, respiratory, and squamous epithelia which differ markedly in anatomical locations, morphology, and functions. In adult mice, the nose is covered with various skull bones, limiting experimental access to internal structures, especially those in the posterior such as the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). Here we describe an effective method for obtaining almost the entire and intact nasal tissues with preserved anatomical organization. Using surgical tools under a dissecting microscope, we sequentially remove the skull bones surrounding the nasal tissue. This procedure can be performed on both paraformaldehyde-fixed and freshly dissected, skinned mouse heads. The entire deboning procedure takes about 20-30 min, which is significantly shorter than the experimental time required for conventional chemical-based decalcification. In addition, we present an easy method to remove air bubbles trapped between turbinates, which is critical for obtaining intact thin horizontal or coronal or sagittal sections from the nasal tissue preparation. Nasal tissue prepared using our method can be used for whole mount observation of the entire epithelia, as well as morphological, immunocytochemical, RNA in situ hybridization, and physiological studies, especially in studies where region-specific examination and comparison are of interest. PMID:23963491

  6. Pancreas Metastasization of Nasal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong; Bu, Xiangzhao; Li, Xiangyang; Liu, Ling; Xie, Xiaomei; Zhuo, Shichao; Yin, Haitao

    2015-09-01

    We report here a case of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma with metastasization into the pancreas. A 43-year-old Chinese female patient presented with right nasal obstruction and purulent rhinorrhea that lasted for the past half year and worsened gradually despite antibiotic medical treatment. Physical examination revealed a mass in the right nasal cavity and an enlarged lymph node in the right submandibular region. A PET/CT scan and immunostaining of the resectate led to a diagnosis of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, clinical stage IIE, and the International Prognostic Index score of 1. The patient received radiotherapy followed by four cycles of the CHOP chemotherapy. A complete remission was achieved, and the patient was disease-free for 9 months. On a subsequent follow-up, abdominal ultrasound scan, enhanced abdominal CT scan, and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy revealed pancreatic metastasis secondary to nasal lymphoma. Radiotherapy (40 Gy) to the whole pancreas was done, followed by two courses of the SMILE regime chemotherapy, leading to a complete remission. At the moment, the patient is undergoing subsequent chemotherapy. PMID:25638348

  7. Nasal Dermoplasty for Recurrent Polyps in a Patient with Churg-Strauss Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rapti, Demetra

    2015-01-01

    Nasal dermoplasty for recurrent polyps (NDRP) is a new technique for the surgical treatment of this condition. Churg-Strauss syndrome is characterized by the presence of nasal polyps with a great tendency for relapse after surgical or pharmaceutical treatment. It is the first time that we use NDRP to treat nasal polyps in a patient with Churg-Strauss syndrome. The patient was a 33-year-old female suffering from Churg-Strauss syndrome having had multiple operations in the past for recurrent polyps. NDRP was performed on the left nostril only. The mucosa of the left nasal vault was replaced by a split-thickness skin graft (modified dermoplasty). On the right nostril, polyps were removed and the ostia of the paranasal sinuses were enlarged as in typical endoscopic sinus surgery. The skin graft had a successful take and eight months after the operation no polyps are detected on the left side while polyps have recurred on the right nasal cavity. Applying the technique to a single nostril has several advantages, namely, the reduction of the operational time and therefore the risks for the patient from a prolonged general anaesthetic and the ability to judge the efficacy of the technique on the same patient. PMID:25692061

  8. In vivo evaluation of alginate microspheres of carvedilol for nasal delivery.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sanjay B; Kaul, Ankur; Babbar, Anil; Mathur, Rashi; Mishra, Anil; Sawant, Krutika K

    2012-01-01

    Mucoadhesive alginate microspheres of carvedilol (CRV) for nasal administration intended to avoid first pass metabolism and to improve bioavailability were prepared and evaluated. The microspheres were prepared by emulsification cross-linking method. Radiolabeling of CRV and its microspheres was performed by direct labeling with reduced technetium-99m ((99m) Tc). In vivo studies were performed on New Zealand white rabbits by administering the microspheres intranasally using monodose nasal insufflator. The radioactivity was measured in a well-type gamma scintillation counter. The noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. The pattern of deposition and clearance of the microspheres were evaluated using a radioactive tracer and the noninvasive technique of gamma scintigraphy. The clearance of alginate microsphere was compared with that of control lactose. The microspheres were nonaggregated, free flowing powders with spherical shape, and smooth surface. Pharmacokinetics study displayed an increase in area under the curve and hence in relative bioavailability when compared with intravenous administration of drug. The nasal bioavailability was 67.87% which indicates that nasal administration results in improved absorption of CRV. The results of gamma scintigraphy showed that the alginate microspheres had significantly reduced rates of clearance from the rabbit nasal cavity when compared with the control lactose. PMID:22113887

  9. Epistaxis and Staphylococcus aureus colonization in the nasal vestibule: is it a cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Seckin; Babaoglu, Gulcin; Catli, Tolgahan; San, Turhan; Cingi, Cemal

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between epistaxis and nasal colonization of Staphylococcus aureus in a population of patients with recurrent epistaxis. A total of 361 men and women were recruited, 245 patients with epistaxis (114 had crusting in the nasal vestibule; 131 did not) and 116 control subjects. A microbiology swab was taken from the anterior nasal cavity of each subject. Staphylococcus aureus was found to be more common in the epistaxis group when compared with the control group with a percentage of 31.8% and 4.3%, respectively (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the prevalence of S. aureus between the crust and non-crust groups (P > 0.05). When positive cultures were grouped and compared according to season, it was observed that the positive culture with epistaxis was much higher (44.82 %) in the autumn period. Staphylococcus aureus colonization in the nasal vestibule is more likely to be observed in individuals who have recurrent epistaxis than in those who do not have. It seems that this colonization may have a role in the etiology of epistaxis. However, with an altered medium of the nasal vestibule after each epistaxis period, it is also possible to speculate that this colonization is may be the consequence of epistaxis itself. PMID:25377978

  10. Apoptosis and Ki-67 as predictive factors for response to radiation therapy in feline nasal lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dah-Renn; Kato, Daiki; Endo, Yoshifumi; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Nasal lymphoma is the most common nasal tumor in cats and is generally a solitary and radiosensitive tumor. We retrospectively evaluated the response to radiation and survival time in relation to apoptosis and Ki-67 indices in feline nasal lymphomas treated with radiation therapy. The apoptotic and Ki-67 indices were evaluated with TUNEL and immunohistochemical staining in 30 biopsy tissues that were taken before any treatment. These two indices were compared, and differences between different treatment response groups were analyzed. The correlation between the median survival times (MST) and the indices was estimated using the Kaplan Meier method, and statistical differences between survival curves were analyzed using a log-rank method. With regard to apoptotic index, a statistical difference was observed between the samples taken from cats with complete response and stable disease (1.22% vs. 0.45%; P=0.045). The Ki-67 index in cats with both complete response and partial response was significantly higher than in cats with stable disease (44.4% and 39.6% vs. 16.3%; P<0.001 and P=0.008, respectively). The cats with a high level of apoptosis (>0.9%) nasal lymphoma were not significantly prolonged MSTs (P=0.202), however, high Ki-67-positive (>40%) cats experienced a statistically significant relationship with longer survival time (P=0.015). Our results indicate that spontaneous apoptotic and Ki-67 indices are strong predictors for response to radiation therapy in feline nasal lymphomas. PMID:27086717

  11. General Information about Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Pituitary Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  13. Numbered nasal discs for waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartonek, J.C.; Dane, C.W.

    1964-01-01

    Numbered nasal discs were successfully used in studies requiring large numbers of individually marked waterfowl. The procedure for constructing these discs is outlined. Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) with 5/8-inch discs, and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) and redhead (A. americana) with 3/4-inch discs can be individually identified up to 50 and 80 yards, respectively, with a gunstock-mounted, 20-power spotting scope. The particular value of these markers is their durability, the number of combinations possible, and the apparent absence of behavioral or mortality influence among such species as the blue-winged teal.

  14. In vivo three-dimensional imaging of normal tissue and tumors in the rabbit pleural cavity using endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography with thoracoscopic guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tuqiang; Liu, Gangjun; Kreuter, Kelly; Mahon, Sari; Colt, Henri; Mukai, David; Peavy, George M.; Chen, Zhongping; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a dynamic tunable focal distance graded-refractive-index lens rod-based high-speed 3-D swept-source (SS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) endoscopic system and demonstrate real-time in vivo, high-resolution (10-μm) imaging of pleural-based malignancies in an animal model. The GRIN lens-based 3-D SS OCT system, which images at 39 fps with 512 A-lines per frame, was able to capture images of and detect abnormalities during thoracoscopy in the thoracic cavity, including the pleura, chest wall, pericardium, and the lungs. The abnormalities were confirmed by histological evaluation and compared to OCT findings. The dynamic tunable focal distance range and rapid speed of the probe and SS prototype OCT system enabled this first-reported application of in vivo 3-D thoracoscopic imaging of pleural-based malignancies. The imaging probe of the system was found to be easily adaptable to various sites within the thoracic cavity and can be readily adapted to other sites, including rigid airway endoscopic examinations.

  15. Immunophenotypic and Clinical Differences Between the Nasal and Extranasal Subtypes of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing-Feng; Wang, Wei-Hu; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Huang, Wen-Ting; Lu, Ning; Zhou, Li-Qiang; Ouyang, Han; Jin, Jing; Li, Ye-Xiong

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate, in a large cohort of patients, the immunophenotypic and clinical differences of nasal and extranasal extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT-NKTCL) and examine the relevance of the immunophenotype on the clinical behavior, prognosis, and treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 231 patients with UADT-NKTCL were recruited. One hundred eighty-one patients had primary location in the nasal cavity (nasal UADT-NKTCL), and 50 patients had primary extranasal UADT-NKTCL. Results: Patients with extranasal UADT-NKTCL had more adverse clinical features, including advanced-stage disease, regional lymph node involvement, B symptoms, and poor performance status, than patients with nasal UADT-NKTCL. In addition, CD56 and granzyme B were less frequently expressed in extranasal UADT-NKTCL. The 5-year overall survival rate was 74.1% for the entire group and 76.0% for early-stage disease. The 5-year overall survival rate for extranasal UADT-NKTCL was similar or superior to that of nasal UADT-NKTCL for all disease stages (76.9% vs 73.4%, P=.465), stage I disease (75.9% vs 79.2%, P=.786), and stage II disease (83.3% vs 50.3%, P=.018). CD56 expression and a Ki-67 proliferation rate ≥50% predicted poorer survival for extranasal UADT-NKTCL but not for nasal UADT-NKTCL. Conclusions: Patients with nasal and extranasal UADT-NKTCL have significantly different clinical features, immunophenotypes, and prognosis. Extranasal UADT-NKTCL should be considered as a distinct subgroup apart from the most commonly diagnosed prototype of nasal UADT-NKTCL.

  16. A rare cause of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, David; Hornibrook, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    We describe a patient with mid-facial pain and nasal obstruction due to a nasal septal abscess (NSA) complicating an occult fungal ball of the sphenoid sinus. We highlight the importance of suspecting unusual pathology in patients with NSA and no trauma history. PMID:23793181

  17. Nasal Airway Resistance: Its Measurement and Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Lyle H.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of regulation of nasal airway resistance (Rn). Describes methods of calculating Rn by measuring pressure-flow relationship. Data are presented on improved methods for measuring Rn and effects for expiratory and inspiratory Rn after topical application of phenylephrine nasal decongestant spray. (Author/SA)

  18. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  19. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  20. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  1. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  2. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  3. Nasal Drug Delivery in Traditional Persian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarshenas, Mohammad Mehdi; Zargaran, Arman; Müller, Johannes; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2013-01-01

    Background Over one hundred different pharmaceutical dosage forms have been recorded in literatures of Traditional Persian Medicine among which nasal forms are considerable. Objectives This study designed to derive the most often applied nasal dosage forms together with those brief clinical administrations. Materials and Methods In the current study remaining pharmaceutical manuscripts of Persia during 9th to 18th century AD have been studied and different dosage forms related to nasal application of herbal medicines and their therapeutic effects were derived. Results By searching through pharmaceutical manuscripts of medieval Persia, different nasal dosage forms involving eleven types related to three main groups are found. These types could be derived from powder, solution or liquid and gaseous forms. Gaseous form were classified into fumigation (Bakhoor), vapor bath (Enkebab), inhalation (Lakhlakheh), aroma agents (Ghalieh) and olfaction or smell (Shomoom). Nasal solutions were as drops (Ghatoor), nasal snuffing drops (Saoot) and liquid snuff formulations (Noshoogh). Powders were as nasal insufflation or snorting agents (Nofookh) and errhine or sternutator medicine (Otoos). Nasal forms were not applied only for local purposes. Rather systemic disorders and specially CNS complications were said to be a target for these dosage forms. Discussion While this novel type of drug delivery is known as a suitable substitute for oral and parenteral administration, it was well accepted and extensively mentioned in Persian medical and pharmaceutical manuscripts and other traditional systems of medicine as well. Accordingly, medieval pharmaceutical standpoints on nasal dosage forms could still be an interesting subject of study. Therefore, the current work can briefly show the pharmaceutical knowledge on nasal formulations in medieval Persia and clarify a part of history of traditional Persian pharmacy. PMID:24624204

  4. Combined chemoradiation for the management of nasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma: elucidating the significance of systemic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ye; Lu, Jiade J; Ma, Xuejun; Wang, Biyun; Hong, Xiaonan; Li, Xiaoqiu; Li, Jin

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and treatment outcome of CHOP and CHOP combined with nitrosourea chemotherapy in natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma of the nasal cavity. Sixty-three patients with NK/T-cell lymphoma of the nasal cavity were treated with CHOP or CHOP combined with oral nitrosourea chemotherapy between January 1997 and June 2005. By the Ann Arbor Lymphoma Staging Classification, 57 patients (90%) had Stage IE or IIE disease and six patients (10%) had Stage III or IV disease. All patients with Stage IE or IIE disease were intended to be treated curatively with combined chemoradiation; and patients who had Stage III or IV disease were treated with chemotherapy alone with curative intention. Chemotherapy consisted of: (1) up to six cycles of the standard CHOP based regimen, or (2) up to six cycles of the standard CHOP based regimen with oral Semustine dosed at 120 mg (or Lomustine dosed at 100mg) on day 1 of each chemotherapy cycle. External beam radiation therapy was delivered by daily conventional fractionation by Co-60 or 6MVx linear accelerator for patients with Stage IE or IIE disease. The radiation dose to the tumor bed was between 36 and 50 Gy with a median dose of 45 Gy. Fifty-three patients received chemotherapy prior to radiation, and four patients were treated with involved field radiation before chemotherapy. The median follow up for all 44 surviving patients was 31 months (range: 6-104 months). The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 60% and 70%, respectively. The PFS and OS of patients who were treated with or without oral nitrosourea in addition to CHOP were 73% vs. 44% (P=0.035) and 75% vs. 64% (P=0.276), respectively. Nine patients with Stage IE or IIE diseases developed disease progression during their planned treatment and died within 10 months after the initiation of treatment; Six patients who achieved complete response (CR) after planned chemoradiation developed

  5. Cholinergic neurotransmission links solitary chemosensory cells to nasal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Cecil J.; Christensen, Michael; Finger, Thomas E.; Tizzano, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) of the nasal cavity are specialized epithelial chemosensors that respond to irritants through the canonical taste transduction cascade involving Gα-gustducin and transient receptor potential melastatin 5. When stimulated, SCCs trigger peptidergic nociceptive (or pain) nerve fibers, causing an alteration of the respiratory rate indicative of trigeminal activation. Direct chemical excitation of trigeminal pain fibers by capsaicin evokes neurogenic inflammation in the surrounding epithelium. In the current study, we test whether activation of nasal SCCs can trigger similar local inflammatory responses, specifically mast cell degranulation and plasma leakage. The prototypical bitter compound, denatonium, a well-established activator of SCCs, caused significant inflammatory responses in WT mice but not mice with a genetic deletion of elements of the canonical taste transduction cascade, showing that activation of taste signaling components is sufficient to trigger local inflammation. Chemical ablation of peptidergic trigeminal fibers prevented the SCC-induced nasal inflammation, indicating that SCCs evoke inflammation only by neural activity and not by release of local inflammatory mediators. Additionally, blocking nicotinic, but not muscarinic, acetylcholine receptors prevents SCC-mediated neurogenic inflammation for both denatonium and the bacterial signaling molecule 3-oxo-C12-homoserine lactone, showing the necessity for cholinergic transmission. Finally, we show that the neurokinin 1 receptor for substance P is required for SCC-mediated inflammation, suggesting that release of substance P from nerve fibers triggers the inflammatory events. Taken together, these results show that SCCs use cholinergic neurotransmission to trigger peptidergic trigeminal nociceptors, which link SCCs to the neurogenic inflammatory pathway. PMID:24711432

  6. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Anthony C.; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A.; Gooch, Karen E.; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J.; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A.; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J.; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J.; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Stewart, James P.; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections. PMID

  7. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Anthony C; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A; Gooch, Karen E; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M; Hiscox, Julian A; Stewart, James P; Carroll, Miles W

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections. PMID

  8. Influence of Pathological Nodal Status and Maximal Standardized Uptake Value of the Primary Tumor and Regional Lymph Nodes on Treatment Plans in Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Wang, H.-M.; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Lin, C.-Y.; Ng, S.-H.; Huang, S.-F.; Chen, I.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: A better understanding of the prognostic factors in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) may optimize the therapeutic approach. In this study, we sought to investigate whether the combination of clinical information, pathologic results, and preoperative maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) at the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes might improve the prognostic stratification in this patient group. Methods and Materials: A total of 347 consecutive OSCC patients were investigated. All participants underwent fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography within 2 weeks before surgery and neck dissection. The duration of follow-up was at least 24 months in all surviving patients. The optimal cutoff values for SUVmax at the primary tumor (SUVtumor-max) and regional lymph nodes (SUVnodal-max) were selected according to the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate. Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results: In multivariate analysis, a cutoff SUVtumor-max of 8.6, a cutoff SUVnodal-max of 5.7, and the presence of pathologic lymph node metastases were found to be significant prognosticators for the 5-year DFS. A scoring system using these three prognostic factors was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. The 5-year rates for patients with a score between 0 and 3 were as follows: neck control, 94%, 86%, 77%, 59% (p < 0.0001); distant metastases, 1%, 7%, 22%, 47% (p < 0.0001); disease-specific survival, 93%, 85%, 61%, 36%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Based on the study findings, the combined evaluation of pathologic node status and SUVmax at the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes may improve prognostic stratification in OSCC patients.

  9. Distribution and clearance of radioactive aerosol on the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    McLean, J A; Bacon, J R; Mathews, K P; Thrall, J H; Banas, J M; Hedden, J; Bayne, N K

    1984-03-01

    The distribution and clearance of aerosolized radioactive technetium 99m pertechnate in physiologic buffered saline was analyzed in four human adult asymptomatic volunteers following delivery into one nostril in the same manner as for nasal challenge testing (i.e., 0.1 ml via a 251 DeVilbiss atomizer powered by a compressor delivering 0.10 +/- 0.01 gm/spray). For comparison, squeeze bottles and spray bottles from commercial sources, a 114 and a 127 DeVilbiss atomizer, and a pipette were employed. Lateral imagery via minicomputer processing was used to determine both distribution and clearance of the radiotracer. The counts after 1 minute were lower following pipette delivery than with the other devices. None yielded discernable , wide-spread distribution of aerosol throughout the nasal cavity. Following delivery from the 251 atomizer, mean clearance at 17 minutes was 60.0%. Similar clearance rates were obtained with the other spraying methods except for lower values with the squeeze bottle. Analysis of six hour clearance studies by linear regression showed a relatively rapid initial phase, which is probably due largely to mucociliary clearance, and a prolonged late phase related to the very slow disappearance of residual material located far anteriorly in the nose. Achieving good initial retention and rapid clearance of material deposited anteriorly in the nose are desirable attributes of devices employed for administering materials intranasally. PMID:6328631

  10. Microarray Determination of the Expression of Drug Transporters in Humans and Animal Species Used for the Investigation of Nasal Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghabeish, Manar; Scheetz, Todd; Assem, Mahfoud; Donovan, Maureen D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mice and rats are commonly used to investigate in vivo nasal drug absorption, yet their small nasal cavities limit their use for in vitro investigations. Bovine tissue explants have been used to investigate drug transport through the nasal respiratory and olfactory mucosae, yet limited information is available regarding the similarities and differences among these animal models compared to humans. The aim of this study was to compare the presence of a number of important drug transporters in the nasal mucosa of these species. Methods DNA microarray results for nasal samples from humans, rats and mice were obtained from GenBank, while DNA microarray and RT-PCR were performed on bovine nasal explants. The drug transporters of interest include multidrug resistance, cation, anion, peptide, and nucleoside transporters. Results Each of the species (mouse, rat, cow and human) shows similar patterns of expression for most of the important drug transporters. Several transporters were highly expressed in all the species, including MRP1, OCTN2, PEPT2 and y+LAT2. Conclusion While some differences in transporter mRNA and protein expression were observed, the transporter expression patterns were quite similar among the species. The differences suggest that it is important to be aware of any specific differences in transporter expression for a given compound being investigated, yet the similarities support the continued use of these animal models during preclinical investigation of intranasally administered therapeutics. PMID:26106909

  11. Microarray Determination of the Expression of Drug Transporters in Humans and Animal Species Used for the Investigation of Nasal Absorption.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghabeish, Manar; Scheetz, Todd; Assem, Mahfoud; Donovan, Maureen D

    2015-08-01

    Mice and rats are commonly used to investigate in vivo nasal drug absorption, yet their small nasal cavities limit their use for in vitro investigations. Bovine tissue explants have been used to investigate drug transport through the nasal respiratory and olfactory mucosae, yet limited information is available regarding the similarities and differences among these animal models compared to humans. The aim of this study was to compare the presence of a number of important drug transporters in the nasal mucosa of these species. DNA microarray results for nasal samples from humans, rats, and mice were obtained from GenBank, while DNA microarray and RT-PCR were performed on bovine nasal explants. The drug transporters of interest include multidrug resistance, cation, anion, peptide, and nucleoside transporters. Each of the species (mouse, rat, cattle, and human) shows similar patterns of expression for most of the important drug transporters. Several transporters were highly expressed in all the species, including MRP1, OCTN2, PEPT2, and y+LAT2. While some differences in transporter mRNA and protein expression were observed, the transporter expression patterns were quite similar among the species. The differences suggest that it is important to be aware of any specific differences in transporter expression for a given compound being investigated, yet the similarities support the continued use of these animal models during preclinical investigation of intranasally administered therapeutics. PMID:26106909

  12. Association of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and asthma: clinical and radiological features, allergy and inflammation markers.

    PubMed

    Staikūniene, Jūrate; Vaitkus, Saulius; Japertiene, Lidija Marija; Ryskiene, Silvija

    2008-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with and without nasal polyps represent different stages of one chronic inflammatory disease of the mucosa of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Coexistence of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and asthma and rather similar characteristics of inflammation support assumption that chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps and asthma may be, at least in part, the same disease process. We therefore aimed to evaluate the differences of sinus radiologic findings, systemic inflammation and allergy markers, pulmonary function of chronic rhinosinusitis associated with nasal polyps and asthma. A total of 121 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis referred to tertiary center were evaluated; 23 healthy persons served as controls. Sinus CT scans and nasal endoscopy were performed. Allergic rhinitis was diagnosed according to history and positive skin prick tests to common inhalant allergens. Asthma was diagnosed according to GINA by history and pulmonary function tests. Aspirin intolerance was assessed by history. Total IgE, Aspergillus fumigatus-specific IgE levels, leukocyte and eosinophil count in the peripheral blood were measured. Nasal polyps were detected in 84 patients (69.4%), asthma diagnosed in 48 patients (39.6%), associated with nasal polyps (91.7%) and allergic rhinitis in 45.5% of patients. Forty-four patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and having nasal polyps and asthma were characterized by older age (P<0.01), greater duration of nasal symptoms (P<0.001), higher number previous surgeries (P<0.01), more severe sinus disease on CT scan (P<0.001), greater blood leukocyte and eosinophil count, total IgE level (P<0.01), bronchial obstruction (P<0.05), incidence of allergic rhinitis (P<0.01), and sensitivity to house dust mite D. pteronyssinus (47.7%, P<0.01) and mold allergens (29.5%, P<0.01) comparing to the patients with isolated chronic rhinosinusitis. The extent of sinus CT changes was greater in asthmatics and correlated

  13. Mode-of-Action Uncertainty for Dual-Mode Carcinogens:Lower Bounds for Naphthalene-Induced Nasal Tumors in Rats Implied byPBPK and 2-Stage Stochastic Cancer Risk Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K T

    2007-01-30

    As reflected in the 2005 USEPA Guidelines for Cancer Risk Assessment, some chemical carcinogens may have a site-specific mode of action (MOA) that is dual, involving mutation in addition to cell-killing induced hyperplasia. Although genotoxicity may contribute to increased risk at all doses, the Guidelines imply that for dual MOA (DMOA) carcinogens, judgment be used to compare and assess results obtained using separate ''linear'' (genotoxic) vs. ''nonlinear'' (nongenotoxic) approaches to low-level risk extrapolation. However, the Guidelines allow the latter approach to be used only when evidence is sufficient to parameterize a biologically based model that reliably extrapolates risk to low levels of concern. The Guidelines thus effectively prevent MOA uncertainty from being characterized and addressed when data are insufficient to parameterize such a model, but otherwise clearly support a DMOA. A bounding factor approach--similar to that used in reference dose procedures for classic toxicity endpoints--can address MOA uncertainty in a way that avoids explicit modeling of low-dose risk as a function of administered or internal dose. Even when a ''nonlinear'' toxicokinetic model cannot be fully validated, implications of DMOA uncertainty on low-dose risk may be bounded with reasonable confidence when target tumor types happen to be extremely rare. This concept was illustrated for the rodent carcinogen naphthalene. Bioassay data, supplemental toxicokinetic data, and related physiologically based pharmacokinetic and 2-stage stochastic carcinogenesis modeling results all clearly indicate that naphthalene is a DMOA carcinogen. Plausibility bounds on rat-tumor-type specific DMOA-related uncertainty were obtained using a 2-stage model adapted to reflect the empirical link between genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the most potent identified genotoxic naphthalene metabolites, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone. Resulting bounds each provided the basis for a corresponding

  14. Carcinoma of the nasal vestibule treated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, N.P.; Parsons, J.T.; Cassisi, N.J.; Million, R.R.

    1987-05-01

    Twenty-two patients with squamous carcinoma of the nasal vestibule were treated at the University of Florida Division of Radiation Therapy with curative intent. Fifteen lesions were de novo and seven recurrent after surgery. By AJCC classification, 7 lesions were Tx or T1, 2 were T2, 2 were T3, and 11 were T4. Management of the primary tumor and regional lymphatic drainage was highly individualized. Local control was achieved in 19 out of 22 lesions. The ultimate regional lymph node control rate was 22 out of 22, although two patients required radical neck dissection after development of lymph node disease in untreated regional lymphatics. Two patients have died of cancer and three of intercurrent disease. Cosmetic results are generally excellent but may be compromised by previous surgery in recurrent lesions or tumor destruction of normal tissues in advanced lesions. Complications of treatment are minimal.

  15. Extensive Chondrosarcoma of the Nasal Septum: Endoscopic Resection and Long-Term Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Alqudah, Mohammad; Odat, Haitham; Issa, Ibrahim; Al-Qudah, Mohannad

    2016-06-01

    Chondrosarcoma of the nasal septum is extremely rare slow growing malignant tumor of nonepithelial origin. Preoperative differentiation between low-grade chondrosarcoma and benign cartilaginous tumors such as chondroma may be difficult. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. Radiotherapy is reserved for residual or recurrent patients. Recent advance in endoscopic sinus surgery has allowed successful, noninvasive excision of many sinonasal tumors with low morbidity.The authors herein report, what we believe, the most extensive case of posterior nasal septal chondrosarcoma with the longest follow-up period that was completely excised endoscopically with no evidence of local or systemic recurrence after 5 years. The authors also discuss its relevant clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management. PMID:27192653

  16. Phenotype and function of nasal dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haekyung; Ruane, Darren; Law, Kenneth; Ho, Yan; Garg, Aakash; Rahman, Adeeb; Esterházy, Daria; Cheong, Cheolho; Goljo, Erden; Sikora, Andrew G.; Mucida, Daniel; Chen, Benjamin; Govindraj, Satish; Breton, Gaëlle; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal vaccination generates immunity across local, regional and distant sites. However, nasal dendritic cells (DC), pivotal for the induction of intranasal vaccine- induced immune responses, have not been studied in detail. Here, using a variety of parameters, we define nasal DCs in mice and humans. Distinct subsets of “classical” DCs, dependent on the transcription factor zbtb46 were identified in the murine nose. The murine nasal DCs were FLT3 ligand-responsive and displayed unique phenotypic and functional characteristics including the ability to present antigen, induce an allogeneic T cell response and migrate in response to LPS or live bacterial pathogens. Importantly, in a cohort of human volunteers, BDCA-1+ DCs were observed to be the dominant nasal DC population at steady state. During chronic inflammation, the frequency of both BDCA-1+ and BDCA-3hi DCs was reduced in the nasal tissue, associating the loss of these immune sentinels with chronic nasal inflammation. The present study is the first detailed description of the phenotypic, ontogenetic and functional properties of nasal DCs and will inform the design of preventative immunization strategies as well as therapeutic modalities against chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25669151

  17. Nasal Septal Deviation and Facial Skeletal Asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Christopher; Holton, Nathan; Miller, Steven; Yokley, Todd; Marshall, Steven; Srinivasan, Sreedevi; Southard, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    During ontogeny, the nasal septum exerts a morphogenetic influence on the surrounding facial skeleton. While the influence of the septum is well established in long snouted animal models, its role in human facial growth is less clear. If the septum is a facial growth center in humans, we would predict that deviated septal growth would be associated with facial skeletal asymmetries. Using computed tomographic (CT) scans of n = 55 adult subjects, the purpose of this study was to test whether there is a correlation between septal deviation and facial asymmetries using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometric techniques. We calculated deviation as a percentage of septal volume relative to the volume of a modeled non-deviated septum. We then recorded skeletal landmarks representing the nasal, palatal, and lateral facial regions. Landmark data were superimposed using Procrustes analysis. First, we examined the correlation between nasal septal deviation and the overall magnitude of asymmetry. Next, we assessed whether there was a relationship between nasal septal deviation and more localized aspects of asymmetry using multivariate regression analysis. Our results indicate that while there was no correlation between septal deviation and the overall magnitude of asymmetry, septal deviation was associated with asymmetry primarily in the nasal floor and the palatal region. Septal deviation was unassociated with asymmetries in the lateral facial skeleton. Though we did not test the causal relationship between nasal septal deviation and facial asymmetry, our results suggest that the nasal septum may have an influence on patterns of adult facial form. PMID:26677010

  18. Disorders of the nasal valve area

    PubMed Central

    Bloching, Marc Boris

    2008-01-01

    The nasal valve area is not a singular structure, but a complex three-dimensional construct consisting of several morphological structures. From the physiologic point of view, it is the place of maximum nasal flow resistance (“flow limiting segment”). Therefore, according to Poiseuille’s law, even minor constrictions of this area result in a clinically relevant impairment of nasal breathing for the patient. This narrow passage, also called “ostium internum nasi”, is formed by the mobile lateral nasal wall, the anterior septum with the swell body, the head of the inferior turbinate and the osseous piriform aperture. Within the framework of aetiology, static and dynamic disorders of the nasal valve area have to be distinguished since they result in different therapeutic measures. In the context of diagnosis, the exploration of the case history for assessing the patient’s extent of suffering and the clinical examination are very important. In addition to the presentation of the basics of disorders of the nasal valves, this paper focuses on the treatment of dynamic disorders that mainly constitute the more important therapeutic issue. In this context, we distinguish between stabilisation techniques through grafts or implants and stabilising suture techniques. Following a thorough analysis, the correction of static nasal valve disorders requires various plastic-reconstructive measures using transposition grafting and skin or composite grafts. PMID:22073083

  19. Clinical course and implications of congenital nasal pyriform stenosis and solitary median maxillary central incisor in a newborn: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis and solitary median maxillary central incisor are uncommon anomalies and are associated with further malformations. Solitary median maxillary central incisor itself has initially no impact on a child’s health, but congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis is a potentially life-threatening condition. Case presentation A Caucasian baby boy showed severe dyspnoea and was intubated orotracheally. Multiple anomalies were detected, including urogenital and craniofacial malformations. Computed tomography scans revealed congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis with a diameter of 4.9mm and a solitary median maxillary central incisor. A 3.0mm tube was inserted in his left nasal cavity, and the baby was able to breathe sufficiently and spontaneously. The nasal tube was removed after seven days, and the baby was discharged under application of decongestant drops. After seven months, the baby was readmitted with respiratory distress, and surgery was carried out using an intraoral sublabial approach. The stenotic area of the pyriform aperture was widened, and 3.0mm tubes were inserted in both nasal cavities for 10 days. Over a period of six months, no further respiratory distress has occurred. Conclusions The decision to perform surgery was delayed since the baby’s nasal breathing was adequate as a result of the insertion of a nasal tube. Since treatment depends on the severity of symptoms, it is appropriate in some cases to take a conservative approach at first, and to keep surgery as a last resort. Once a conservative approach has been selected for congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis, awareness of the life-threatening nature of the condition should be kept in mind, and a surgical approach must still be taken into account. PMID:24950703

  20. Does nasal decongestion improve obstructive sleep apnea?

    PubMed

    Clarenbach, Christian F; Kohler, Malcolm; Senn, Oliver; Thurnheer, Robert; Bloch, Konrad E

    2008-12-01

    Whether nasal congestion promotes obstructive sleep apnea is controversial. Therefore, we performed a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over trial on the effects of topical nasal decongestion in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and nasal congestion. Twelve OSA patients with chronic nasal congestion (mean +/- SD age 49.1 +/- 11.1 years, apnea/hypopnea index 32.6 +/- 24.5/h) were treated with nasal xylometazoline or placebo for 1 week each. At the end of treatment periods, polysomnography including monitoring of nasal conductance by an unobtrusive technique, vigilance by the OSLER test, and symptom scores were assessed. Data from xylometazoline and placebo treatments were compared. Mean nocturnal nasal conductance on xylometazoline was significantly higher than on placebo (8.6 +/- 5.3 versus 6.3 +/- 5.8 mL s(-1)Pa(-1), P < 0.05) but the apnea/hypopnea index was similar (29.3 +/- 32.5/h versus 33.2 +/- 32.8/h, P = NS). However, 30-210 min after application of xylometazoline, at the time of the maximal pharmacologic effect, the apnea/hypopnea index was slightly reduced (27.3 +/- 30.5/h versus 33.2 +/- 33.9/h, P < 0.05). Xylometazoline did not alter sleep quality, sleep resistance time (33.6 +/- 8.8 versus 33.4 +/- 10.1 min, P = NS) and subjective sleepiness (Epworth score 10.5 +/- 3.8 versus 11.8 +/- 4.4, P = NS). The reduced apnea/hypopnea index during maximal nasal decongestion by xylometazoline suggests a pathophysiologic link but the efficacy of nasal decongestion was not sufficient to provide a clinically substantial improvement of OSA. PMID:18710420

  1. Cell-based polymerase chain reaction for canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Setthawongsin, Chanokchon; Techangamsuwan, Somporn; Tangkawattana, Sirikachorn; Rungsipipat, Anudep

    2016-08-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is the only naturally contagious tumor that is transmitted during coitus or social behaviors. Based on the tumor's location, the diagnosis of genital TVT (GTVT) is comparably easier than those in the extragenital area (ETVT) that are more easily incorrectly diagnosed. Fortunately, CTVT cells contain a specific long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE), inserted upstream of the myc gene, allowing a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based detection assay. The objectives of this study were aimed to improve the diagnostic accuracy by applying the diagnostic LINE1-c-myc PCR assay and fine needle aspiration (FNA) collection in direct comparison with standard cytological and histopathological analyses. Seventy-four dogs, comprised of 41 and 31 dogs with tumor masses at their external genitalia and extragenital areas (e.g. skin and nasal cavity), respectively, were included in this study. The signalment of these 65 dogs and clinical history of 20 client-owned dogs were collected. Samples were taken by biopsy for both histopathological examination and FNA for cytological examination and diagnostic PCR. The PCR products from 10 apparently CTVT samples were purified and sequenced. Sixty-one CTVT cases were diagnosed by cytological and histological analyses, but 65 were positive by the PCR assay. Overall, the PCR assay improved the accuracy of diagnostic CTVT results, especially for the more difficult ETVT tumors. Moreover, this PCR-based approach can facilitate the decision as to discontinue chemotherapy by discrimination between residual tumor cell masses and fibrotic tissue. PMID:27075116

  2. Selected Factors of Innate Immunity in Healthy Individuals with S. aureus Nasal Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Karpiński, Tomasz M.; Żaba, Zbigniew; Chudzicka-Strugała, Izabela; Szkaradkiewicz, Anna K.; Jaworska, Agata; Zeidler, Agnieszka; Andrzejewska, Ewa; Szkaradkiewicz, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus represents a well-defined factor of risk involving community and hospital-acquired infections. Recently a significance of several host factors has been pointed out and, in particular, of immune determinants in nasal S. aureus colonization. Therefore, this study aimed at analysis of manifestation involving manifestation in the nasal secretions of important components of the host innate immunity – human beta-defensin-2 (HBD-2), lysozyme (Ly), and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in healthy individuals and in persons with persistent carriage of S. aureus. The studies were conducted in two groups of healthy volunteers, encompassing non-carriers (group 1) or persistent carriers of S. aureus (group 2). Elisa assays were employed to evaluate levels of HBD-2, Ly, and IFN-γ in nasal secretions of the examined donors. In S. aureus carriers a significant variability of HBD-2 levels was detected, corresponding to, respectively, the high (averaging at 1.46 ng/ml) and the low (averaging at 0.13 ng/ml) secretory response of the defensin. The level of Ly in S. aureus carriers averaged at 1.46 μg/ml and it manifested no significant difference as compared to that noted in non-carriers. In turn, concentrations of IFN-γ in nasal secretions in the group of carriers of S. aureus amounted on the average to 81.7 pg/ml and they were 1.3-fold higher that in the group of non-carriers. The obtained results allow to conclude that IFN-γ secretion by the nasal cavity-colonizing S. aureus remains quantitatively insufficient to eliminate the pathogen. Nevertheless, a significant increase in levels of this host factor may be important for restriction of the staphylococcal colonization and protection against development of an invasive infection. In turn, the role of HBD-2 and Ly in inactivation of the colonizing S. aureus remains doubtful. PMID:27065998

  3. Case report: unilateral mydriasis following nasal cautery.

    PubMed

    Koo Ng, Nigel K F; Calder, Nick

    2010-12-01

    We report a case of unilateral mydriasis following nasal electrocautery presumed to be the result of retrograde flow of adrenaline and/or xylometazoline hydrochloride (Otrivine) through the nasolacrimal duct into the eye. We review the literature and highlight the importance of correct interpretation of finding a dilated pupil post-operatively. To our knowledge. we report the first such case involving xylometazoline hydrochloride and also following nasal electrocautery. Unilateral mydriasis is alarming after nasal surgery but must be interpreted with caution. During minimally invasive procedures it is likely to be due to the effects of topical medication to the nose rather than surgical trauma. PMID:21158576

  4. Pharmacology of Nasal Medications: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Martin, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    The author of this article reviews the pharmacology of nasal medication, focusing on the indications and side-effects. The newer group of non-sedating antihistamines proves to be a useful supplement to disodium cromoglycate and the traditional antihistamines in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The topical steroids (flunisolide and beclomethasone dipropionate) did not produce a significant incidence of adrenal suppression, mucosal atrophy, or nasal candidiasis. The anticholinergic ipatropium bromide shows promise in the treatment of rhinorrhea. The author also reviews the use of decongestants and emollients and remarks on the factors that affect patient compliance when nasal medications are prescribed. PMID:20469495

  5. Dynamic Changes in Heart Rate Variability and Nasal Airflow Resistance during Nasal Allergen Provocation Test.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, Tiina M; Alho, Olli-Pekka; Seppänen, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a major chronic respiratory disease and an immunoneuronal disorder. We aimed at providing further knowledge on the function of the neural system in nasal allergic reaction. Here, a method to assess simultaneously the nasal airflow resistance and the underlying function of autonomic nervous system (ANS) is presented and used during the nasal provocation of allergic and nonallergic subjects. Continuous nasal airflow resistance and spectral heart rate variability parameters show in detail the timing and intensity differences in subjects' reactions. After the provocation, the nasal airflow resistance of allergic subjects showed a positive trend, whereas LF/HF (Low Frequency/High Frequency) ratio and LF power showed a negative trend. This could imply a gradual sympathetic withdrawal in allergic subjects after the allergen provocation. The groups differed significantly by these physiological descriptors. The proposed method opens entirely new opportunities to research accurately concomitant changes in nasal breathing function and ANS. PMID:27196870

  6. Cavity magnomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  7. Development of in vitro models to demonstrate the ability of PecSys®, an in situ nasal gelling technology, to reduce nasal run-off and drip

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many of the increasing number of intranasal products available for either local or systemic action can be considered sub-optimal, most notably where nasal drip or run-off give rise to discomfort/tolerability issues or reduced/variable efficacy. PecSys, an in situ gelling technology, contains low methoxy (LM) pectin which gels due to interaction with calcium ions present in nasal fluid. PecSys is designed to spray readily, only forming a gel on contact with the mucosal surface. The present study employed two in vitro models to confirm that gelling translates into a reduced potential for drip/run-off: (i) Using an inclined TLC plate treated with a simulated nasal electrolyte solution (SNES), mean drip length [±SD, n = 10] was consistently much shorter for PecSys (1.5 ± 0.4 cm) than non-gelling control (5.8 ± 1.6 cm); (ii) When PecSys was sprayed into a human nasal cavity cast model coated with a substrate containing a physiologically relevant concentration of calcium, PecSys solution was retained at the site of initial deposition with minimal redistribution, and no evidence of run-off/drip anteriorly or down the throat. In contrast, non-gelling control was significantly more mobile and consistently redistributed with run-off towards the throat. Conclusion In both models PecSys significantly reduced the potential for run-off/drip ensuring that more solution remained at the deposition site. In vivo, this enhancement of retention will provide optimum patient acceptability, modulate drug absorption and maximize the ability of drugs to be absorbed across the nasal mucosa and thus reduce variability in drug delivery. PMID:22803832

  8. Nasal base, maxillary, and infraorbital implants--alloplastic.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, U T

    1991-01-01

    The aesthetic surgery of the facial skeletal contour requires either the performance of ostectomies of excessively prominent segments or the augmentation of retruded segments with organic or synthetic material, in order to achieve balanced tridimensional relations of each segment with regard to the total facial unit. Craniomaxillofacial surgeries are necessary in major malformations or in those combined with malocclusion. In the nasal dorsum or tip, the author prefers the use of cartilage, because synthetic materials need adequate soft-tissue bulk for cover to be inserted without tension and absence of passive mobility of the reception site. For malar augmentation, first proposed by the author and independently by Spadafora in 1971, for chin augmentation up to 8 mm, and for augmentation of the mandibular angle, the author prefers silicone implants because they do not change in shape or volume, may be premanufactured or custom-made, have a similar consistency to that of bone, and do not support bacterial growth. On the other hand, autologous bone grafts adapt less to curved bony surfaces, have an erratic rate of resorption, and need an additional surgical step for removal with the corresponding morbidity and scar. Subperiosteal insertion is preferred because it confers greater stability and the cavity is easier to dissect without soft-tissue damage. Although bone erosion may occur, with over 1200 implants clinically no major change in the soft-tissue contour has been observed, nor has the author been consulted for late complication. In the malar region this may be due to the large surface of the implant and absence of muscular pressure. In the chin, an insertion over the site of the dental roots is avoided. For midface augmentation the following implants are used: (1) The premaxillary lower nasal base implant, proposed in 1971, is indicated to correct a concave midfacial profile, frequent in Asian, black, and Mestizo patients from Latin America and in Caucasian

  9. Dilute suspension flow with nanoparticle deposition in a representative nasal airway model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, H.; Kleinstreuer, C.; Zhang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The human nasal cavities with an effective length of only 10cm feature a wide array of basic flow phenomena because of their complex geometrics. Employing a realistic nasal airway model and demonstrating that laminar, quasisteady airflow can be assumed, dilute nanoparticle suspension flow and nanoparticle deposition are simulated and analyzed for 7.5⩽Q⩽20L/min and 1⩽dp⩽150nm. The understanding and quantitative assessment of mixture flow fields and local nanoparticle wall concentrations in nasal airways with a thin mucus layer are very important for estimating the health risks of inhaled toxic aerosols, determining proper drug-aerosol delivery to target sites such as the olfactory regions and developing algebraic transfer functions for overall nasal dose-response analyses. Employing a commercial software package with user-supplied programs, the validated computer modeling results can be summarized as follows: (i) Most of the air flows through the middle-to-low main passageways. Higher airflow rates result in stronger airflow in the olfactory region and relatively lower flow rates in the meatuses. (ii) Nanoparticle deposition in human nasal airways is significant for tiny nanoparticles, i.e., 1⩽dp⩽2nm, which also represent some vapors. The smaller the nanoparticle size and the lower the flow rate, the higher are the total deposition efficiencies because of stronger diffusion and longer residence times. (iii) Nanoparticles with dp<5nm flow preferentially through the middle-to-low main passageway along with the major portion of the airflow. For relatively large nanoparticles (dp⩾5nm), due to the low diffusivities, fewer particles will deposit onto the wall leaving a much thinner nanoparticle gradient layer near the wall, i.e., such nanoparticles pass through the nasal cavities more uniformly with minor wall deposition. (iv) Secondary flows may enhance nanoparticle transport and deposition, especially in the meatuses by convecting nanoparticles into these

  10. Intranasal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells significantly extends survival of irradiated mice with experimental brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Balyasnikova, Irina V; Prasol, Melanie S; Ferguson, Sherise D; Han, Yu; Ahmed, Atique U; Gutova, Margarita; Tobias, Alex L; Mustafi, Devkumar; Rincón, Esther; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options of glioblastoma multiforme are limited due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we investigated the utility of intranasal (IN) delivery as a means of transporting stem cell-based antiglioma therapeutics. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) delivered via nasal application could impart therapeutic efficacy when expressing TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in a model of human glioma. ¹¹¹In-oxine, histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were utilized to track MSCs within the brain and associated tumor. We demonstrate that MSCs can penetrate the brain from nasal cavity and infiltrate intracranial glioma xenografts in a mouse model. Furthermore, irradiation of tumor-bearing mice tripled the penetration of (¹¹¹In)-oxine-labeled MSCs in the brain with a fivefold increase in cerebellum. Significant increase in CXCL12 expression was observed in irradiated xenograft tissue, implicating a CXCL12-dependent mechanism of MSCs migration towards irradiated glioma xenografts. Finally, MSCs expressing TRAIL improved the median survival of irradiated mice bearing intracranial U87 glioma xenografts in comparison with nonirradiated and irradiated control mice. Cumulatively, our data suggest that IN delivery of stem cell-based therapeutics is a feasible and highly efficacious treatment modality, allowing for repeated application of modified stem cells to target malignant glioma. PMID:24002694

  11. Intranasal Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Significantly Extends Survival of Irradiated Mice with Experimental Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Balyasnikova, Irina V; Prasol, Melanie S; Ferguson, Sherise D; Han, Yu; Ahmed, Atique U; Gutova, Margarita; Tobias, Alex L; Mustafi, Devkumar; Rincón, Esther; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options of glioblastoma multiforme are limited due to the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we investigated the utility of intranasal (IN) delivery as a means of transporting stem cell–based antiglioma therapeutics. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) delivered via nasal application could impart therapeutic efficacy when expressing TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in a model of human glioma. 111In-oxine, histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were utilized to track MSCs within the brain and associated tumor. We demonstrate that MSCs can penetrate the brain from nasal cavity and infiltrate intracranial glioma xenografts in a mouse model. Furthermore, irradiation of tumor-bearing mice tripled the penetration of 111In-oxine–labeled MSCs in the brain with a fivefold increase in cerebellum. Significant increase in CXCL12 expression was observed in irradiated xenograft tissue, implicating a CXCL12-dependent mechanism of MSCs migration towards irradiated glioma xenografts. Finally, MSCs expressing TRAIL improved the median survival of irradiated mice bearing intracranial U87 glioma xenografts in comparison with nonirradiated and irradiated control mice. Cumulatively, our data suggest that IN delivery of stem cell–based therapeutics is a feasible and highly efficacious treatment modality, allowing for repeated application of modified stem cells to target malignant glioma. PMID:24002694

  12. Primary intracranial neuroendocrine tumor with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome: A rare and complicated case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HAILONG; ZHANG, MINGSHAN; WANG, XUAN; QU, YANMING; ZHANG, HONGWEI; YU, CHUNJIANG

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome are frequent in adult patients. However, primary intracranial NETs, exhibiting immunonegativity for ACTH, high serum ACTH level and treated with anterior skull base reconstruction, are rare and complicated. We herein present a case of a primary intracranial NET immunonegative for ACTH, resulting in ectopic ACTH syndrome. A 40-year-old woman presented with intermittent rhinorrhea, rapid weight gain, polydipsia, polyuria, hypertension, dimness, bilateral exophthalmus, diminution of vision in the left eye and pigmentation of the skin of the face and trunk. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a sizeable enhancing tumor in the anterior cranial fossa, which infiltrated the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses bilaterally, the left maxillary sinus and the nasal cavity. Abdominal CT scans revealed bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. The biochemical findings included hypokalemia and high glucose, cortisol, plasma ACTH, 24-h urinary free cortisol and testosterone levels. The neoplasm was exposed through a right frontal craniotomy, while anterior skull base reconstruction was performed during surgery. The intracranial surgery achieved gross removal of the tumor; however, part of the tumor remained in the nasal cavity. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a low-grade small-cell NET, exhibiting immunonegativity for ACTH. A postoperative abdominal CT scan demonstrated bilateral regression of the adrenal gland hyperplasia and the serum ACTH level returned to normal after 16 days. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of primary intracranial NETs, immunohistochemically negative for ACTH, resulting in ectopic ACTH syndrome. PMID:27330775

  13. Effect of bilastine upon nasal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Dávila, I; Sastre, J; Mullol, J; Montoro, J; Jáuregui, I; Ferrer, M; del Cuvillo, A; Bartra, J; Valero, A

    2011-01-01

    H1 antihistamines constitute one of the main references for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Classically, these drugs have been considered effective in controlling sneezing, rhinorrhea and itching, though they have not been regarded as particularly effective in application to nasal obstruction. The most recent studies, involving second-generation H1 antihistamines (desloratadine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine, rupatadine), have shown these drugs to offer effects upon nasal obstruction significantly superior to those of placebo. The present review examines the effect of bilastine, a new, potent and highly specific H1 antihistamine without sedative effects or cardiac toxicity, upon nasal obstruction. The analysis of the data from the different clinical trials indicates that in patients with allergic rhinitis, the effect of bilastine upon nasal obstruction is superior to that of placebo and similar to that of other second-generation H1 antihistamines, manifesting within 24 hours after the start of treatment. PMID:22185044

  14. NASAL cytology: practical aspects and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, M; Iannuzzi, L; Quaranta, N; Landi, M; Passalacqua, G

    2016-06-01

    Nasal cytology is a simple and safe diagnostic procedure that allows to assess the normal and pathological aspects of the nasal mucosa, by identifying and counting the cell types and their morphology. It can be easily performed by a nasal scraping followed by May-Grunwald-Giemsa staining and optical microscopy reading. This procedure allows to identify the normal cells (ciliated and mucinous), the inflammatory cells (lymphocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells), bacteria, or fungal hyphae/spores. Apart from the normal cell population, some specific cytological patterns can be of help in discriminating among various diseases. Viral infections, allergic rhinitis, vasomotor rhinitis and overlapping forms can be easily identified. According to the predominant cell type, various entities can be defined (named as NARES, NARESMA, NARMA). This implies a more detailed knowledge and assessment of the disease that can integrate the standard diagnostic procedures. Nasal cytology also represents a useful research tool for diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27009397

  15. [Diagnostic methods of nasal respiratory function].

    PubMed

    Mlynski, G; Beule, A

    2008-01-01

    Objective assessment of nasal obstruction may help with preoperative planning for rhinosurgery and indicate different aspects of endonasal pathology. To improve quality control, preoperative and postoperative objective assessment is desirable. This review presents objective functional diagnostic tools and explains their appropriate uses, the information obtained, and their limitations. An algorithm is presented for analysing nasal obstruction by means of objective functional assessment. Examples illustrate how to use this information for preoperative planning in rhinosurgery. PMID:18210011

  16. Numerical simulation and nasal air-conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Tilman; Lindemann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Heating and humidification of the respiratory air are the main functions of the nasal airways in addition to cleansing and olfaction. Optimal nasal air conditioning is mandatory for an ideal pulmonary gas exchange in order to avoid desiccation and adhesion of the alveolar capillary bed. The complex three-dimensional anatomical structure of the nose makes it impossible to perform detailed in vivo studies on intranasal heating and humidification within the entire nasal airways applying various technical set-ups. The main problem of in vivo temperature and humidity measurements is a poor spatial and time resolution. Therefore, in vivo measurements are feasible only to a restricted extent, solely providing single temperature values as the complete nose is not entirely accessible. Therefore, data on the overall performance of the nose are only based on one single measurement within each nasal segment. In vivo measurements within the entire nose are not feasible. These serious technical issues concerning in vivo measurements led to a large number of numerical simulation projects in the last few years providing novel information about the complex functions of the nasal airways. In general, numerical simulations merely calculate predictions in a computational model, e.g. a realistic nose model, depending on the setting of the boundary conditions. Therefore, numerical simulations achieve only approximations of a possible real situation. The aim of this review is the synopsis of the technical expertise on the field of in vivo nasal air conditioning, the novel information of numerical simulations and the current state of knowledge on the influence of nasal and sinus surgery on nasal air conditioning. PMID:22073112

  17. Comparative study of the in situ immune response in oral and nasal mucosal leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, M R; Morgado, F N; Valete-Rosalino, C M; Martins, A C; Moreira, J; Quintella, L P; de Oliveira Schubach, A; Conceição-Silva, F

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal Leishmaniasis (ML) may occur in both nasal and oral mucosa. However, despite the impressive tissue destruction, little is known about the oral involvement. To compare some changes underlying inflammation in oral and nasal ML, we performed immunohistochemistry on mucosal tissue of 20 patients with ML (nasal [n = 12]; oral [n = 8] lesions) and 20 healthy donors using antibodies that recognize inflammatory markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD22, CD68, neutrophil elastase, CD1a, CLA, Ki67, Bcl-2, NOS2, CD62E, Fas and FasL). A significantly larger number of cells, mainly T cells and macrophages, were observed in lesions than in healthy tissue. In addition, high nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) expression was associated with a reduced detection of parasites, highlighting the importance of NOS2 for parasite elimination. Oral lesions had higher numbers of neutrophils, parasites, proliferating cells and NOS2 than nasal lesions. These findings, together with the shorter duration of oral lesions and more intense symptoms, suggest a more recent inflammatory process. It could be explained by lesion-induced oral cavity changes that lead to eating difficulties and social stigma. In addition, the frequent poor tooth conservation and gingival inflammation tend to amplify tissue destruction and symptoms and may impair and confuse the correct diagnosis, thus delaying the onset of specific treatment. PMID:22098533

  18. Does amphotericin B nasal douching help prevent polyp recurrence following functional endoscopic sinus surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Sayyed Mostafa; Mokhtarinejad, Farhad; Karim, Maryam; Okhovat, Sayyed Hanif

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recurrence of nasal polyposis following surgical intervention is very common. Antifungal therapy has been an appealing alternative to reduce its recurrence and severity. Early studies showed definite positive response, but recent studies have raised doubts about its efficacy in treatment of polyposis. METHODS: This prospective case-control clinical trial was conducted on 50 patients suffering from nasal polyposis in Isfahan University of medical sciences. All patients underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery. CT scanning of paranasal sinuses was done preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively to stage the disease. Patients were assigned to two groups: amphotericine B group were instructed to irrigate the nasal cavity with a solution of amphotericine B, while the normal saline group used the physiologic normal saline for 6 months. RESULTS: 68% of patients in Normal saline and 84% of cases in amphotericine B group reported history of allergies. In amphotericine B group, stage of the disease improved in 84% of patients and remained unchanged in the rest. In normal saline group, imaging stage improved in 22 patients and remained unchanged in 3. The two cohorts were compared for reduction in imaging stage and no significant difference was found between them. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed no benefits for topical amphotericin B solution over normal saline. It might be better to retreat to the traditional normal saline nasal douching following functional endoscopic sinus surgery in the treatment of polyposis. PMID:21448387

  19. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Divya; Sharma, Sonal; Agarwal, Sarla; Saha, Rumpa; Gupta, Neelima

    2016-09-01

    To detect the presence of Helicobacter pylori in nasal polyps. A case-control study was conducted enrolling 35 patients with nasal polyps (cases) and patients undergoing septoplasty (controls). Fresh tissue samples were used for urea broth test and imprint cytology, while formalin fixed tissue sections were used for morphology, special stains and immunohistochemistry for H. pylori. Fresh stool samples from both groups were tested to correlate the gastrointestinal status. H. pylori was detected in 40.0 % (14/35) of cases and 8.5 % of controls (3/35) (p = 0.004) by immunohistochemistry. Amongst cases, eight were positive with urea broth test, six with imprint cytology (Giemsa stain), three with H & E, and nine with modified McMullen's stain. Hyperplasia of the lining epithelium and lymphoid aggregates were significantly noticed in nasal polyps positive for H. pylori. Stool antigen test was positive in subjects who were positive for H. pylori in the nasal mucosa. There appears to be an association between H. pylori and nasal polyps. Immunohistochemistry is more sensitive and specific method to detect H. pylori. H. pylori induced inflammatory tissue reaction pattern indicates a possible causal association. Further studies are needed to prove the causal relationship between H. pylori and nasal polyps. PMID:26830396

  20. Incidence and Outcomes of Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Fourth Primary Tumors: A Long-term Follow-up Study in a Betel Quid Chewing Endemic Area.

    PubMed

    Adel, Mohamad; Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Fang, Ku-Hao; Wang, Yu-Chien; Chang, Kai-Ping; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Yang, Lan Yan; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the incidence and outcomes of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and fourth primary tumors (PTs) in a betel-chewing endemic area.We retrospectively examined the records of 1836 OSCC patients who underwent radical tumor resection between 1996 and 2014. The outcome measures included the incidence and number of multiple PTs, the main risk factors, and their associations with overall survival (OS).Of the 1836 patients, 1400 (76.3%) had a single PT, 344 (18.7%) a second PT, 67 (3.6%) a third PT, and 25 (1.4%) a fourth PT. Univariate analyses (log-rank test) identified the following factors as significantly associated with a fourth PT: simultaneous first and second PTs, betel quid chewing, buccal subsite, and pT3-4 status. After allowance for the potential confounding effect of other risk factors, all of these factors retained their independent prognostic significance in stepwise multivariate analyses, the only exception being betel chewing. The incidences of second, third, and fourth PTs at 5 and 10 years were 20.2%/34.6%, 4.0%/8.6%, and 1.0%/2.3%, respectively. The 5 and 10-year OS rates (calculated from the diagnosis of each PTs) for patients with a single, second, third, and fourth PTs were 68%/61%, 43%/37%, 45%/39%%, and 30%/30%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Among patients with a fourth PT, those who underwent radical surgery showed a significantly higher 3-year OS than those who did not (57% vs 13%; P = 0.0442).Fourth PTs are rarely observed in OSCC patients in a betel quid-chewing endemic area. Long-term survival rates of patients treated with radical surgery seems acceptable, being 4-fold higher than their counterparts. PMID:27015170

  1. Effects on the nasal mucosa of upper respiratory viruses (common cold).

    PubMed

    Winther, B

    1994-04-01

    might be a direct response to viral infection and/or may reflect the release of a cascade of inflammatory mediators which are responsible in part for the symptoms. Naclerio et al (1988) has since shown that the number of neutrophils in nasal secretions increases early in rhinovirus colds. This increase correlated nicely with the symptoms. In addition, Turner (1988) demonstrated the elaboration of a chemoattractant factor for neutrophils by cell cultures infected with rhinovirus type 39. Chapter 3 focused on the location of rhinovirus replication in the nose and nasopharynx. The entire mucosal lining of the nasal cavities was not infected during the first week of a rhinovirus colds.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8039434

  2. Humoral pathway for transfer of the boar pheromone, androstenol, from the nasal mucosa to the brain and hypophysis of gilts.

    PubMed

    Krzymowski, T; Grzegorzewski, W; Stefańczyk-Krzymowska, S; Skipor, J; Wasowska, B

    1999-11-01

    Signaling and priming pheromones play an important role in intraspecies behavioral and sexual interactions and in the control of reproduction. It is generally accepted that pheromones act by stimulating the dendritic receptors in the mucus-imbedded cilia of olfactory neurons massed in the olfactory epithelium. The boar pheromone androstenol, known to induce sexual behavior in pigs, is 1 of 2 pheromones that have been chemically defined, tritiated and thus made available for use in studies. In Experiment 1, sexually mature cyclic gilts at Days 16 to 21 of the estrous cycle were humanely killed and the heads separated from the bodies. The heads were attached to a perfusion system using heated, oxygenated, heparinized, autologous blood. A total amount of 10(8) dpm (758 ng) of 3H-5 alpha-androstenol (3HA) was either infused into the angularis oculi veins that drain the nasal cavities (n = 7) over a 5-min period or applied through intranasal catheters onto the mucose surface (n = 16) for 2 min. In both groups frequent blood samples were collected from the carotid rete and from venous effluent. Concentration of 3HA in the arterial blood of the carotid rete after direct (into angularis oculi veins) or indirect (onto the nasal mucosa) administration of 3HA into veins draining the nasal cavities was significantly higher than background radioactivity before 3HA administration (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05, respectively). The 3HA was selectively accumulated (compared with the respective control tissue) in the neurohypophysis (P < 0.001), adenohypophysis (P < 0.01), ventromedial hypothalamus (P < 0.05), corpus mammillare (P < 0.01), and perihypophyseal vascular complex (P < 0.001). In a second in vitro experiment, active uptake of 3HA into the nasal mucosa of the proximal, respiratory segment of the nasal cavity was observed. These results demonstrate a humoral pathway for the transfer of pheromones from the nasal cavity to the hypophysis and brain. Androstenol was taken up by the

  3. Determination of baseline human nasal pH and the effect of intranasally administered buffers.

    PubMed

    Washington, N; Steele, R J; Jackson, S J; Bush, D; Mason, J; Gill, D A; Pitt, K; Rawlins, D A

    2000-04-01

    The nose is becoming a common route of drug administration, however, little is known about the pH of the human nasal cavity. Local pH may have a direct effect on the rate and extent of absorption of ionizable compounds and hence this study was performed to investigate normal pH values and whether pH could be manipulated by various buffers. Twelve healthy volunteers participated in a study to measure pH in the anterior and posterior sites of the nasal cavity. Miniature pH electrodes were placed 3 cm apart in the nasal cavity and a baseline was recorded for 30 min once the pH had stabilized. One hundred microlitres of isotonic solution was sprayed into the nostril and the pH was measured for 4 h post-dose. The following five formulations were tested: formulation A--sodium chloride (0.9%) at pH 7.2; formulation B--sodium chloride (0.9%) at pH 5.8; formulation C--Sorensens phosphate buffer (0.06 M) at pH 5. 8; formulation D--Sorensens phosphate buffer (0.13 M) at pH 5.8 and formulation E--formulation as (c) but adjusted to pH 5.0. Each formulation also contained saccharin sodium (0.5%) as a taste marker for nasal clearance. The time at which each subject detected the taste of saccharin was noted. The 30-minute baseline recording prior to administration of the nasal spray formulation demonstrates that there was both considerable intersubject and intrasubject variation in nasal pH. The average pH in the anterior of the nose was 6.40 (+0. 11, -0.15 S.D.) when calculated from H(+) values. The pH in the posterior of the nasal cavity was 6.27 (+0.13, -0.18 S.D.). The overall range in pH was 5.17-8.13 for anterior pH and 5.20-8.00 for posterior pH. Formulation A caused the pH in the anterior part of the nasal cavity to reach a maximum of 7.06 in 11.25 min from the baseline of pH 6.14 (P<0.05). The mean baseline pH was 6.5 for the posterior part of the nose which did not change over the recording period. Formulation B caused the anterior pH to increase from pH 6. 60 to 7

  4. Nasal meatus plasty: a contribution to plastic reconstruction of the nasal valve during midfacial degloving.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Kai J; Maier, Heinz; Wilde, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Midfacial degloving is a proven method for easily accessing the midface, the nasal pyramid, the maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses, the orbits, as well as the anterior skull base. Indications for this method of access mainly include tumour resections in the area of the midface, the septum, the maxillary sinus, the paranasal to the sphenoidal sinus as well as the clivus. In addition, this method of access allows for the exposure of the bony structures of the midface in the event of extensive fractures. In general, this method of access combines an incision in the oral vestibule and circular incisions in the nasal vestibule area in order to release the nasal pyramid. After removing the facial wall of the maxillary sinus, extensive exposure of the surgical site is possible. One disadvantage of this method of access is the difficult reconstruction of the nasal valve area, which often leads to cicatricial stenoses and difficulties with breathing through the nose. Furthermore, wound healing problems and osteoradionecrosis in the area of the lateral margin of the anterior nasal aperture after replantation of the facial wall of the maxillary sinus have been described, because in this area sufficient soft tissue coverage cannot be ensured when a conventional technique is used. We describe a soft tissue flap pedicled in the cranial and caudal directions in the nasal valve area which makes both the reconstruction of the nasal vestibule and sufficient soft tissue coverage of the anterior nasal aperture possible. PMID:26504717

  5. Objective Measures in Aesthetic and Functional Nasal Surgery – Perspectives on Nasal Form and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Sachin S.; Garcia, Guilherme J.M.; Kimbell, Julia S.; Rhee, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The outcomes of aesthetic and functional nasal surgery are difficult to assess objectively due to the intricate balance between nasal form and function. Despite historical emphasis on patient-reported subjective measures, objective measures are gaining importance in both research and the current outcomes-driven healthcare environment. Objective measures presently available have several shortcomings which limit their routine clinical use. In particular, the low correlation between objective and subjective measures poses a major challenge. However, advances in computer, imaging, and bioengineering technology are now setting the stage for the development of innovative objective assessment tools for nasal surgery that can potentially address some of the current limitations. Assessment of nasal form following aesthetic surgery is evolving from two-dimensional analysis to more sophisticated three-dimensional analysis. Similarly, assessment of nasal function is evolving with the introduction of computational fluid dynamics techniques, which allow for a detailed description of the biophysics of nasal airflow. In this paper, we present an overview of objective measures in both aesthetic and functional nasal surgery and discuss future trends and applications that have the potential to change the way we assess nasal form and function. PMID:20665410

  6. Cell-based polymerase chain reaction for canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    SETTHAWONGSIN, Chanokchon; TECHANGAMSUWAN, Somporn; TANGKAWATTANA, Sirikachorn; RUNGSIPIPAT, Anudep

    2016-01-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is the only naturally contagious tumor that is transmitted during coitus or social behaviors. Based on the tumor’s location, the diagnosis of genital TVT (GTVT) is comparably easier than those in the extragenital area (ETVT) that are more easily incorrectly diagnosed. Fortunately, CTVT cells contain a specific long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE), inserted upstream of the myc gene, allowing a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based detection assay. The objectives of this study were aimed to improve the diagnostic accuracy by applying the diagnostic LINE1-c-myc PCR assay and fine needle aspiration (FNA) collection in direct comparison with standard cytological and histopathological analyses. Seventy-four dogs, comprised of 41 and 31 dogs with tumor masses at their external genitalia and extragenital areas (e.g. skin and nasal cavity), respectively, were included in this study. The signalment of these 65 dogs and clinical history of 20 client-owned dogs were collected. Samples were taken by biopsy for both histopathological examination and FNA for cytological examination and diagnostic PCR. The PCR products from 10 apparently CTVT samples were purified and sequenced. Sixty-one CTVT cases were diagnosed by cytological and histological analyses, but 65 were positive by the PCR assay. Overall, the PCR assay improved the accuracy of diagnostic CTVT results, especially for the more difficult ETVT tumors. Moreover, this PCR-based approach can facilitate the decision as to discontinue chemotherapy by discrimination between residual tumor cell masses and fibrotic tissue. PMID:27075116

  7. Cavity magnomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    Mechanical oscillators have been recently widely utilized to couple with optical and microwave photons in a variety of hybrid quantum systems, but they all lack the tunability. The magnetostrictive force provides an alternative mechanism to allow phonon to couple with a different type of information carrier-magnon, the collective excitation of magnetization whose frequency can be tuned by a bias magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate an intriguing hybrid system that consists of a magnonic, a mechanical, and a microwave resonator. The magnon-phonon interaction results in hallmark coherent phenomena such as magnomechanically induced transparency/absorption and magnomechanical parametric amplification. The magnetic field dependence of magnon provides our system with unprecedented tunability. Moreover, the great flexibility of our system allows us to achieve triple resonance among magnon, phonon and photon, which drastically enhances the magnomechanical interaction. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnetomechanics, opening up great opportunities in various applications, such as tunable microwave filter and amplifier, long-lifetime quantum memories, microwave-to-optics conversion.

  8. Effects of nasal allergen challenge on dynamic viscoelasticity of nasal mucus.

    PubMed

    Hattori, M; Majima, Y; Ukai, K; Sakakura, Y

    1993-04-01

    The effects of nasal provocation on the rheologic properties of nasal mucus were investigated in patients with allergic rhinitis provoked by house dust. The elastic modulus (G') and the dynamic viscosity (eta') of nasal mucus were determined by an oscillating sphere magnetic rheometer. Before and after the allergen challenge, G' increased, whereas eta' decreased with increasing oscillatory frequency; these findings indicate that the nasal mucus under these conditions is a non-newtonian fluid and has the cross-linked gel-like nature typical of mucus. Both G' and eta' values after nasal provocation were significantly lower than before. The values of G' and eta' after allergen challenge were in the optimal viscoelasticity range for mucociliary transport. PMID:8476173

  9. [Spontaneous nasal liquorrhea and the Sternberg canal: scientific hypothesis and personal experience].

    PubMed

    Lopatin, A S; Sakhokia, N Z; Gasymov, R M

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous nasal liquorrhea (SNL) is a pathological condition previously regarded as a casuistic one but increasingly frequently described in the current literature. The present review is focused on the causes of SNL, such as the anomalous anatomical structure of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. One of the variants of the anatomical structure is the so-called Sternberg canal. Its anatomical structure and formation in the course of embryonic development are described. The presence of the Sternberg canal in the adult subjects is considered to be the main cause underlying SNL and meningoencephalocele originating from the lateral parts of the sphenoidal sinus. The main variants of the endoscopic endonasal approach for the treatment of the fluid fistulas located in the lateral parts of the sphenoidal sinuses are described. A series of the original authors' observations is reported including 173 patients presenting with SN l who were operated in 1999-2011. PMID:24724202

  10. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as Nasal Mass: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ritesh; Mayappa, Nagaraj; Prashanth, V

    2016-09-01

    Sinonasal neoplasms are rare and exceptional site for metastatic tumours and comprising <3 % of all malignant aerodigestive tumours and <1 % of all malignancies. Renal cell carcinoma is known to metastasise to the most unusual sites, the sinonasal region being one of them. We here by present a case of 60 year old male patient who presented with epistaxis and nasal obstruction. Clinical examination and CT scan revealed a tumour in the right nasal cavity and maxillary sinus. The presence of primary renal cell carcinoma was recognized only after surgical removal of metastatic tumour. Very few reports have been presented in literature of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the sinonasal region. We present this case to document its occurrence; highlight the rarity, presentation and difficulties in diagnosis and treatment along with review of literature. PMID:27508143

  11. Nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma in the paediatric population. Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Zeglaoui, I; Belcadhi, M; Sriha, B; Bouzouita, K

    2009-01-01

    Nasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma is an uncommon disease, and only a few paediatric cases are found in the literature. We report 2 cases of NK/T-cell lymphoma occurring in children. The primary site was the the nasal cavity in the first case (5-year-old girl) and the tonsil in the second case (4-year-old boy). Histological study showed a polymorphic neoplastic infiltrate with an angioinvasive pattern and T-cell phenotype. Ebstein-barr virus infection was established by in situ hybridization. Both underwent an aggressive chemotherapy regimen. The outcome was favorable for the 4-year old boy; however, the 5-year-old girl died two months after diagnosis. PMID:19670600

  12. An exposure system for measuring nasal and lung uptake of vapors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, A.R.; Brookins, L.K.; Gerde, P.

    1995-12-01

    Inhaled gases and vapors often produce biological damage in the nasal cavity and lower respiratory tract. The specific site within the respirator tract at which a gas or vapor is absorbed strongly influences the tissues at risk to potential toxic effects; to predict or to explain tissue or cell specific toxicity of inhaled gases or vapors, the sites at which they are absorbed must be known. The purpose of the work reported here was to develop a system for determining nose and lung absorption of vapors in rats, an animal commonly used in inhalation toxicity studies. In summary, the exposure system described allows us to measure in the rate: (1) nasal absorption and desorption of vapors; (2) net lung uptake of vapors; and (3) the effects of changed breathing parameters on vapor uptake.

  13. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-01-01

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health. PMID:24713325

  14. [The influence of breathing mode on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Surtel, Anna; Klepacz, Robert; Wysokińska-Miszczuk, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Nose breathing is one of the key factors in the proper development and functioning of the oral cavity. The air passing through the nasal cavity is warmed and humidified while dust and other particulate matter is removed. It is also important as far as bone formation is concerned. The obstruction or congestions of the upper respiratory tract may negatively affect the correct and most optimal (nasal) respiratory tract. The switch from nasal to mouth breathing may lead to serious clinical consequences. Children with the clinical diagnosis of mouth breathing are usually pale, apathetic and they lack concentration and often get tired. Disorders resulting from hypoxy may also be the reason from sleep disturbances, such as frequent waking-up, nocturia, difficulties falling aslee. The main clinical manifestations of mouth breathing appear in the craniofacial structures. Mouth breathers frequently suffer from dental malocclusions and craniofacial bone abnormalities. Chronic muscle tension around the oral cavity could result in the widening of cranio-vertebral angle, posterior position of mandibula and narrow maxillary arch. Among dental alterations the most common are class II malocclusion (total or partial) with the protrusion of the anterior teeth, cross bite (unilateral or bilateral), anterior open bite and primary crowded teeth. Apart from malocclusion, chronic gingivitis, periodontitis, candida infections and halitosis are frequently present in mouth--breathing patients. PMID:26802697

  15. Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type, Presenting as a Breast Mass.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Ahmad; Reddy, Pavan S; Alvares, Carmelita

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, is a rare type of non-Hodgkin cell lymphoma endemic to East Asia and parts of Central and South America. In most cases, it is driven by Epstein-Barr virus infections, with a broad range of morphologic appearances, frequent necrosis, and angioinvasion. It is designated as NK/T reflecting uncertainty in its cellular origins. These tumors usually arise in the nasal region, typically presenting with symptoms of nasal obstruction, epistaxis, and/or a destructive mass involving the nose, sinuses, or palate. The treatment of patients with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, is largely determined by the extent of disease. Localized disease is usually treated with radiation and chemotherapy. The disseminated disease requires combination chemotherapy. This report describes the case of a 30-year-old Caucasian female presenting with a left breast mass of two months duration. Excisional biopsy was done, and the pathological exam confirmed the diagnosis of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. Our patient received a systemic combination chemotherapy with steroid (dexamethasone), methotrexate, ifosfamide, L-asparaginase, and etoposide (SMILE) regimen, resulting in a complete clinical and radiological remission. On the basis of our review of the literature, extranodal NK/T non-Hodgkin cell lymphoma, nasal type, presenting as a breast mass is very rare and very uncommon in the United States. Awareness of this occurrence may be valuable as this case may be a forerunner of additional similar cases developing in the future. PMID:26824008

  16. Dosimetry modeling of inhaled formaldehyde: binning nasal flux predictions for quantitative risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Kimbell, J S; Overton, J H; Subramaniam, R P; Schlosser, P M; Morgan, K T; Conolly, R B; Miller, F J

    2001-11-01

    Interspecies extrapolations of tissue dose and tumor response have been a significant source of uncertainty in formaldehyde cancer risk assessment. The ability to account for species-specific variation of dose within the nasal passages would reduce this uncertainty. Three-dimensional, anatomically realistic, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of nasal airflow and formaldehyde gas transport in the F344 rat, rhesus monkey, and human were used to predict local patterns of wall mass flux (pmol/[mm(2)-h-ppm]). The nasal surface of each species was partitioned by flux into smaller regions (flux bins), each characterized by surface area and an average flux value. Rat and monkey flux bins were predicted for steady-state inspiratory airflow rates corresponding to the estimated minute volume for each species. Human flux bins were predicted for steady-state inspiratory airflow at 7.4, 15, 18, 25.8, 31.8, and 37 l/min and were extrapolated to 46 and 50 l/min. Flux values higher than half the maximum flux value (flux median) were predicted for nearly 20% of human nasal surfaces at 15 l/min, whereas only 5% of rat and less than 1% of monkey nasal surfaces were associated with fluxes higher than flux medians at 0.576 l/min and 4.8 l/min, respectively. Human nasal flux patterns shifted distally and uptake percentage decreased as inspiratory flow rate increased. Flux binning captures anatomical effects on flux and is thereby a basis for describing the effects of anatomy and airflow on local tissue disposition and distributions of tissue response. Formaldehyde risk models that incorporate flux binning derived from anatomically realistic CFD models will have significantly reduced uncertainty compared with risk estimates based on default methods. PMID:11606807

  17. Role of the lymphoreticular system in prion neuroinvasion from the oral and nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bessen, Richard A; Martinka, Scott; Kelly, Jessica; Gonzalez, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Prion neuroinvasion from peripheral tissues involves agent replication in the lymphoreticular system (LRS) prior to entry into the nervous system. This study investigated the role of the LRS in prion neuroinvasion from the oral and nasal mucosa in wild-type and immunodeficient mice and in hamsters infected with the HY and DY strains of the transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) agent. Following inoculation at neural sites, all hosts were susceptible to prion disease and had evidence of prion infection in the brain, but infection of the LRS was found only in scrapie-infected wild-type mice and HY TME-infected hamsters. In the LRS replication-deficient models, prion neuroinvasion was not observed following intraperitoneal or oral inoculation. However, immunodeficient mice, which have impaired follicular dendritic cells, were susceptible to scrapie following intratongue and intranasal inoculation despite the absence of PrP(Sc) in the tongue or the nasal cavity. For DY TME, hamsters were susceptible following intratongue but not intranasal inoculation and PrP(Sc) was limited to nerve fibers of the tongue. These findings indicate that neuroinvasion from the tongue and nasal cavity can be independent of LRS infection but neuroinvasion was partially dependent on the strain of the prion agent and/or the host species. The paucity of PrP(Sc) deposition in the oral and nasal mucosa from LRS replication-deficient hosts following neuroinvasion from these tissues suggests an infection of nerve fibers that is below the threshold of PrP(Sc) detection and/or the transport of the prion agent along cranial nerves without agent replication. PMID:19369351

  18. Rationally designed nanocarriers for intranasaltherapy of allergic rhinitis: influence of carrier type on in vivo nasal deposition

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Marwa Ahmed; Helal, Hala Mahmoud; Mortada, Sana Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a locally acting nasal delivery system of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) for the maintenance therapy of allergic rhinitis. The effect of encapsulating TA in different nanocarriers on its mucosal permeation and retention as well as in vivo nasal deposition has been studied. A comparative study was established between polymeric oil core nanocapsules (NCs), lipid nanocarriers such as nanoemulsion (NE), and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). The elaborated nanocarriers were compared with TA suspension and the commercially available suspension “Nasacort®”. The study revealed that NC provided the highest mucosal retention, as 46.14%±0.048% of the TA initial dose was retained after 24 hours, while showing the least permeation through the nasal mucosa. On the other hand, for TA suspension and Nasacort®, the mucosal retention did not exceed 23.5%±0.047% of the initial dose after 24 hours. For NE and NLC, values of mucosal retention were 19.4%±0.041% and 10.97%±0.13%, respectively. NC also showed lower mucosal irritation and superior stability compared with NE. The in vivo nasal deposition study demonstrated that NC maintained drug in its site of action (nasal cavity mucosa) for the longest period of time. The elaborated polymeric oil core NCs are efficient carriers for the administration of nasally acting TA as it produced the least permeation results, thus decreasing systemic absorption of TA. Although NCs have been administered via various routes, this is the first study to implement the polymeric oil core NC as an efficient carrier for localized nasal drug delivery. PMID:27307734

  19. Direct Endoscopic Intratumoral Injection of Onyx for the Preoperative Embolization of a Recurrent Juvenile Nasal Angiofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Hira, A.; Chao, K.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Percutaneous injection of embolization material within head and neck tumors is being described as an alternative or adjunct to transarterial embolization. Access in these reports is by computed tomography (CT) guidance, which is cumbersome given the need to transport the patient from the CT scanner to angiography suite. We describe a case of direct percutaneous onyx embolization of juvenile nasal angiofibroma following endoscopic access in the angiography suite including self-sustained onyx combustion during surgical electrocautery. PMID:22192553

  20. Direct endoscopic intratumoral injection of Onyx for the preoperative embolization of a recurrent juvenile nasal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Hira, A; Chao, K

    2011-12-01

    Percutaneous injection of embolization material within head and neck tumors is being described as an alternative or adjunct to transarterial embolization. Access in these reports is by computed tomography (CT) guidance, which is cumbersome given the need to transport the patient from the CT scanner to angiography suite. We describe a case of direct percutaneous onyx embolization of juvenile nasal angiofibroma following endoscopic access in the angiography suite including self-sustained onyx combustion during surgical electrocautery. PMID:22192553

  1. Interaction of Haemophilus parasuis with nasal and tracheal mucosa following intranasal inoculation of cesarean derived colostrum deprived (CDCD) swine.

    PubMed Central

    Vahle, J L; Haynes, J S; Andrews, J J

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-three cesarean derived, colostrum deprived pigs were obtained at 5 wk of age and inoculated intranasally with either 1.4 x 10(8) colony forming units of Haemophilus parasuis or sterile phosphate buffered saline. Pigs were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 18, 26, or 36 h post-inoculation and tissues from the oropharynx and respiratory tract were obtained for qualitative bacterial culture, immunohistochemistry for H. parasuis antigens, and light and transmission electron microscopy. Haemophilus parasuis was consistently isolated from the nasal cavity (17/17, 100%) and trachea (13/17, 76%) and rarely isolated from the lung (3/17, 18%) and blood stream (1/17, 6%) of infected pigs. Antigens of H. parasuis were sporadically detected on the nasal mucosa (6/17, 35%) and trachea (8/17, 47%). Light microscopic lesions included submucosal and intraepithelial infiltrates of neutrophils and infrequent, patchy loss of cilia. Ultrastructural changes in nasal mucosal epithelial cells included cell protrusion, loss of cilia, and dilation of the cytocavitary network. Bacteria were infrequently identified and were either within an amorphous material at the apical surface of the cilia or were between individual cilia. These results suggest H. parasuis associates with the nasal mucosa and can induce a suppurative rhinitis with nasal mucosal epithelial cell degeneration. This process may represent an initial event in the pathogenesis of H. parasuis infection of swine. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9243000

  2. Enhanced intranasal delivery of mRNA vaccine by overcoming the nasal epithelial barrier via intra- and paracellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Zhao, Mengnan; Fu, Yao; Li, You; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong; Sun, Xun

    2016-04-28

    Facing the threat of highly variable virus infection, versatile vaccination systems are urgently needed. Intranasal mRNA vaccination provides a flexible and convenient approach. However, the nasal epithelium remains a major biological barrier to deliver antigens to nasal associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). To address this issue, a potent polymer-based intranasal mRNA vaccination system for HIV-1 treatment was synthesized using cationic cyclodextrin-polyethylenimine 2k conjugate (CP 2k) complexed with anionic mRNA encoding HIV gp120. The delivery vehicle containing CP 2k and mRNA overcame the epithelial barrier by reversibly opening the tight junctions, enhanced the paracellular delivery of mRNA and consequently minimized absorption of toxins in the nasal cavity. Together with the excellent intracellular delivery and prolonged nasal residence time, strong system and mucosal anti-HIV immune responses as well as cytokine productions were achieved with a balanced Th1/Th2/Th17 type. Our study provided the first proof of evidence that cationic polymers can be used as safe and potent intranasal mRNA vaccine carriers to overcome the nasal epithelial barrier. The safe and versatile polymeric delivery system represents a promising vaccination platform for infectious diseases. PMID:26941035

  3. Numerical simulation of airflow and micro-particle deposition in human nasal airway pre- and post-virtual sphenoidotomy surgery.

    PubMed

    Bahmanzadeh, Hojat; Abouali, Omid; Faramarzi, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, the effects of endoscopic sphenoidotomy surgery on the flow patterns and deposition of micro-particles in the human nasal airway and sphenoid sinus were investigated. A realistic model of a human nasal passage including nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses was constructed using a series of CT scan images of a healthy subject. Then, a virtual sphenoidotomy by endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in the left nasal passage and sphenoid sinus. Transient airflow patterns pre- and post-surgery during a full breathing cycle (inhalation and exhalation) were simulated numerically under cyclic flow condition. The Lagrangian approach was used for evaluating the transport and deposition of inhaled micro-particles. An unsteady particle tracking was performed for the inhalation phase of the breathing cycle for the case that particles were continuously entering into the nasal airway. The total deposition pattern and sphenoid deposition fraction of micro-particles were evaluated and compared for pre- and post-surgery cases. The presented results show that sphenoidotomy increased the airflow into the sphenoid sinus, which led to increased deposition of micro-particles in this region. Particles up to 25 μm were able to penetrate into the sphenoid in the post-operation case, and the highest deposition in the sphenoid for the resting breathing rate occurred for 10 μm particles at about 1.5%. PMID:25862997

  4. Nasal peak inspiratory flow at altitude.

    PubMed

    Barry, P W; Mason, N P; Richalet, J P

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigated whether there are changes in nasal peak inspiratory flow (NPIF) during hypobaric hypoxia under controlled environmental conditions. During operation Everest III (COMEX '97), eight subjects ascended to a simulated altitude of 8,848 m in a hypobaric chamber. NPIF was recorded at simulated altitudes of 0 m, 5,000 m and 8,000 m. Oral peak inspiratory and expiratory flow (OPIF, OPEF) were also measured. Ambient air temperature and humidity were controlled. NPIF increased by a mean +/- SD of 16 +/- 12% from sea level to 8,000 m, whereas OPIF increased by 47 +/- 14%. NPIF rose by 0.085 +/- 0.03 L x s(-1) per kilometre of ascent (p<0.05), significantly less than the rise in OPIF and OPEF of 0.35 +/- 0.10 and 0.33 +/- 0.04 L x s(-1) per kilometre (p<0.0005). Nasal peak inspiratory flow rises with ascent to altitude. The rise in nasal peak inspiratory flow with altitude was far less than oral peak inspiratory flow and less than the predicted rise according to changes in air density. This suggests flow limitation at the nose, and occurs under controlled environmental conditions, refuting the hypothesis that nasal blockage at altitude is due to the inhalation of cold, dry air. Further work is needed to determine if nasal blockage limits activity at altitude. PMID:11843316

  5. Facial Artery Musculomucosal (FAMM) flap for nasal lining in reconstruction of large full thickness lateral nasal defects

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Obviously, restoring the nasal lining is a great challenge in the reconstruction of nasal defects. Full thickness nasal defects usually require special flaps for reconstructing the nasal lining. Intranasal mucosal flaps, hinge over flaps, perinasal second flaps, folded or second forehead flaps and finally free flaps are examples that can be used for this purpose. Moreover, the case presented in this article expresses a new role for the superiorly based Facial Artery Musculomucosal (FAMM) flap in this topic. Furthermore, mucosal island variant of this flap is presented to reduce the tension on this flap while restoring the nasal lining in large full thickness nasal defect. PMID:26566439

  6. Characterization of Stability and Nasal Delivery Systems for Immunization with Nanoemulsion-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nigavekar, Shraddha S.; Bielinska, Anna U.; Mank, Nicholas; Shetty, Abhishek M.; Suman, Julie; Knowlton, Jessica; Myc, Andrzej; Rook, Trent; Baker, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Many infectious diseases that cause significant morbidity and mortality, especially in the developing world, could be preventable through vaccination. The effort to produce safe, thermally stable, and needle-free mucosal vaccines has become increasingly important for global health considerations. We have previously demonstrated that a thermally stable nanoemulsion, a mucosal adjuvant for needle-free nasal immunization, is safe and induces protective immunity with a variety of antigens, including recombinant protein. The successful use of nanoemulsion-based vaccines, however, poses numerous challenges. Among the challenges is optimization of the formulation to maintain thermal stability and potency and another is accuracy and efficiency of dispensing the vaccines to the nasal mucosa in the anterior and turbinate region of the nasal cavity or potentially to the nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue. Methods We have examined the effects of different diluents [phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and 0.9% NaCl] on the stability and potency of nanoemulsion-based vaccines. In addition, we have determined the efficiency of delivering them using commercially available nasal spray devices (Pfeiffer SAP-62602 multidose pump and the BD Hypak SCF 0.5 ml unit dose AccusprayTM). Results We report the stability and potency of PBS–diluted ovalbumin–nanomeulsion mixtures for up to 8 months and NaCl-diluted mixtures up to 6 months when stored at room temperature. Significant differences in spray characteristics including droplet size, spray angle, plume width, and ovality ratios were observed between the two pumps. Further, we have demonstrated that the nanoemulsion-based vaccines are not physically or chemically altered and retain potency following actuation with nasal spray devices. Using either device, the measured spray characteristics suggest deposition of nanoemulsion-based vaccines in inductive tissues located in the anterior region of the nasal cavity

  7. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  8. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  9. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-01

    A cavity excitation circuit is described for rapidly building up and maintaining high-level oscillations in a resonant cavity. The circuit overcomes oscillation buildup slowing effects such as ion locking in the cavity by providing for the selective application of an amplified accelerating drive signal to the main cavity exciting oscillator during oscillation buildup and a direct drive signal to the oscillator thereafter.

  10. Surgical Approaches to the Oral Cavity Primary and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Jatin P.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: A variety of surgical approaches used to treat primary oral cavity tumors are described to delineate the technique and rationale behind each treatment choice. Methods and Materials: Size, location, proximity to bone, lymph node status, histology, and prior treatment considerations are employed to determine the most appropriate surgical approach for primary oral cavity tumors. Results: Oncologic outcomes and physical function show the best results from surgical treatment of many primary oral cavity, but necessitates careful selection of surgical approach. Conclusion: Each surgical approach must be selected based upon relevant tumor, patient and physician factors.

  11. The relationship between nasal index and nasal airway resistance, and response to a topical decongestant.

    PubMed

    Doddi, N M; Eccles, R

    2011-12-01

    The differences in the shape and size of the nose have been proposed to be an adaptation to climate with broad noses (platyrrhine) evolving in a warm humid environment where there was little need for air conditioning and narrow noses (leptorrhine) evolving in colder climates where the air needed more warming. The main aim of this research was to determine if there was any relationship between the shape of the nose as expressed in terms of nasal height and width (nasal index) and total nasal airway resistance (NAR), as one would predict that the narrower leptorrhine noses would have a greater resistance to air flow than the broader platyrrhine noses. It was also proposed that the narrow leptorrhine nose would have better developed vascular tissue than the broad platyrrhine nose in order to condition cold air, and would exhibit a greater response to nasal decongestion. No correlation was found between nasal index and NAR (r = -0.09) and similarly no correlation was found between nasal index and response to a topical nasal decongestant (r = 0.02). The absence of any physiological differences between the different nose types may be due to acclimatisation of participants to the area of recruitment. PMID:22125790

  12. In vitro evaluation of nasal mucociliary clearance using excised rat nasal septum.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Kimura, Toshikiro; Higaki, Kazutaka; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira; Higashi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Mucus on the nasal mucosa is translocated to the pharynx by ciliary beating, which is an important nonspecific defense mechanism called mucociliary clearance (MC). MC is one of the important factors determining the rate and extent of drug absorption after nasal application. The purpose of this study is to evaluate MC using rat nasal septum under physiological condition in an in vitro system. The nasal septum was excised from rats anesthetized with urethane and the movement of fluorescent microspheres (FMS) applied on the nasal septum was observed with a fluorescence microscope. FMS were transported at a constant velocity in the same direction for a few minutes, but addition of 4% mucin solution on the nasal septum maintained MC for at least 90 min after excision. With our evaluation system established by modifying the method of Saldiva, MC was determined to be around 1 mm/min. Furthermore, the ciliostatic effect of benzalkonium chloride was observed, and it was confirmed that β-adrenergic antagonists and a cholinergic antagonist decreased MC, and that β-adrenergic agonists and a cholinergic agonist tended to increase MC, indicating that our system is valid and useful for evaluating MC function and the effect of drugs and pharmaceutical additives for nasal application on MC. PMID:22687480

  13. Paediatric nasal polyps in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mohd Slim, Mohd Afiq; Dick, David; Trimble, Keith; McKee, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at increased risk of nasal polyps. We present the case of a 17-month-old Caucasian patient with CF who presented with hypertelorism causing cycloplegic astigmatism, right-sided mucoid discharge, snoring and noisy breathing. Imaging suggested bilateral mucoceles in the ethmoid sinuses. Intraoperatively, bilateral soft tissue masses were noted, and both posterior choanae were patent. Polypectomy and bilateral mega-antrostomies were performed. Histological examination revealed inflammatory nasal polyposis typical of CF. The role of early functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) in children with CF nasal polyposis remains questionable as the recurrence rate is higher, and no improvement in pulmonary function has been shown. Our case, however, clearly demonstrates the beneficial upper airway symptom relief and normalisation of facial appearance following FESS in a child with this condition. PMID:27329094

  14. Nasal lift-nasal valve lift and nasal tip lift-preliminary results of a new technique using noninvasive self-retaining unidirectional nasal suspension with threads.

    PubMed

    Saban, Yves; Javier, De Benito; Massa, Michela

    2014-12-01

    In the context of nasal obstruction treatment, an alternative, no invasive technique is described. It consists in the suspension of the nasal valve or in the association of the suspension of the valve and rotation of the tip, through the placement of one or two absorbable threads, already known in aesthetic medicine. This technique allows to open the nasal valve and to correct the moderate closure of the nasolabial angle obtaining an immediate benefit of breathing. Functional improvement has been evaluated at regular intervals, that is, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then provided for every 6 months, through the use of a visual scale of 0/10 to 10/10. In our experience, the technique allows to obtain satisfactory results, avoiding more invasive techniques and postoperative recovery days. PMID:25536134

  15. Photon storage cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.M.

    1991-08-01

    A general analysis is presented of a photon storage cavity, coupled to free-electron laser (FEL) cavity. It is shown that if the coupling between the FEL cavity and the storage cavity is unidirectional (for example, a ring resonator storage cavity) then storage is possible, but that if the coupling is bi-directional then storage is not possible. Parameters are presented for an infra-red FEL storage cavity giving an order of magnitude increase in the instantaneous photon power within the storage cavity. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  16. CDC Panel Says FluMist Nasal Flu Vaccine Ineffective

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159535.html CDC Panel Says FluMist Nasal Flu Vaccine Ineffective Agency advisors say the product has ... do without the easier, nasal spray form of flu vaccine next flu season, a panel of experts ...

  17. Pediatricians' Group Advises Against Nasal Spray Flu Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Pediatricians' Group Advises Against Nasal Spray Flu Vaccine Shot far more effective against current influenza strains, ... 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The nasal spray flu vaccine is ineffective and should not be used in ...

  18. CDC Panel Says FluMist Nasal Flu Vaccine Ineffective

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159535.html CDC Panel Says FluMist Nasal Flu Vaccine Ineffective Agency advisors say the product has lost ... without the easier, nasal spray form of flu vaccine next flu season, a panel of experts decided ...

  19. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  20. Photodynamic therapy and the treatment of neoplastic diseases of the larynx, pharynx, oral cavity, and tracheobronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.

    1994-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has the potential to treat and cure early carcinomas of the head and neck while preserving normal tissue. Fifty-three patients with neoplasia of the head and neck have been treated with PDT with follow-up to 40 months. Eight patients with T2-T4 carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract had a partial response. Eighteen patients with CIS and T1 carcinomas of the larynx obtained a complete response and are disease free. Eleven patients with T1 carcinomas of the tongue, floor of mouth, and nasal cavity obtained a complete response. Three patients with mucosal melanomas of the nasopharynx obtained a complete response and remain disease free. Two patients with Kaposi's sarcoma or the oral cavity were treated, one obtained a complete response. Five patients with juvenile laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis obtained a complete response, but all recurred within six months of treatment. PDT is a promising therapy for treatment of early neoplasia of the head and neck. There are, however limitations to this treatment based on tumor size and site. Methodology, clinical response, limitations and complications are discussed.