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Sample records for national dementia strategy

  1. Prisons must develop dementia strategy.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    'The prison service badly needs a properly resourced national strategy for its rapidly growing population of older prisoners, to guide its staff in their management of age-related conditions, such as dementia'. PMID:27573969

  2. Developing a national strategy to prevent dementia: Leon Thal Symposium 2009

    PubMed Central

    Khachaturian, Zaven S.; Barnes, Deborah; Einstein, Richard; Johnson, Sterling; Lee, Virginia; Roses, Allen; Sager, Mark A.; Shankle, William R.; Snyder, Peter J.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Schellenberg, Gerard; Trojanowski, John; Aisen, Paul; Albert, Marilyn S.; Breitner, John C. S.; Buckholtz, Neil; Carrillo, Maria; Ferris, Steven; Greenberg, Barry D.; Grundman, Michael; Khachaturian, Ara S.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Maruff, Paul; Mohs, Richard C.; Morrison-Bogorad, Marcelle; Phelps, Creighton; Reiman, Eric; Sabbagh, Marwan; Sano, Mary; Schneider, Lon S.; Siemers, Eric; Tariot, Pierre; Touchon, Jacques; Vellas, Bruno; Bain, Lisa J.

    2015-01-01

    Among the major impediments to the design of clinical trials for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most critical is the lack of validated biomarkers, assessment tools, and algorithms that would facilitate identification of asymptomatic individuals with elevated risk who might be recruited as study volunteers. Thus, the Leon Thal Symposium 2009 (LTS'09), on October 27–28, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada, was convened to explore strategies to surmount the barriers in designing a multisite, comparative study to evaluate and validate various approaches for detecting and selecting asymptomatic people at risk for cognitive disorders/dementia. The deliberations of LTS'09 included presentations and reviews of different approaches (algorithms, biomarkers, or measures) for identifying asymptomatic individuals at elevated risk for AD who would be candidates for longitudinal or prevention studies. The key nested recommendations of LTS'09 included: (1) establishment of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies as a shared research core resource; (2) launch of a large collaborative study that will compare multiple screening approaches and biomarkers to determine the best method for identifying asymptomatic people at risk for AD; (3) initiation of a Global Database that extends the concept of the National Database for Longitudinal Studies for longitudinal studies beyond the United States; and (4) development of an educational campaign that will address public misconceptions about AD and promote healthy brain aging. PMID:20298968

  3. The Italian Dementia National Plan. Commentary.

    PubMed

    Di Fiandra, Teresa; Canevelli, Marco; Di Pucchio, Alessandra; Vanacore, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The Italian Dementia National Plan was formulated in October 2014 by the Italian Ministry of Health in close cooperation with the regions, the National Institute of Health and the three major national associations of patients and carers. The main purpose of this strategy was to provide directive indications for promoting and improving interventions in the dementia field, not limiting to specialist and therapeutic actions, but particularly focusing on the support of patients and families throughout the pathways of care. Four main objectives are indicated: 1) promote health- and social-care interventions and policies; 2) create/strengthen the integrated network of services for dementia based on an integrated approach; 3) implement strategies for promoting appropriateness and quality of care; and 4) improve the quality of life of persons with dementia and their families by supporting empowerment and stigma reduction. These objectives and the pertaining actions are described in the present paper. PMID:26783209

  4. Formal dementia care among first nations in southwestern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Sara A; Forbes, Dorothy A; Richmond, Chantelle A M

    2012-09-01

    This article explores how dementia care is provided to First Nations communities in southwestern Ontario. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with health care providers and analysed using a constructivist grounded-theory methodology. Two interrelated frameworks for understanding dementia care were identified: a care delivery framework and a knowledge framework. The care delivery framework identified care goals, care elements being provided, care barriers, and strategies and solutions to deliver care and overcome barriers. The knowledge framework defined four groups of knowledge stakeholders: persons with dementia, informal care providers, formal care providers, and the First Nations community. It identified the knowledge each stakeholder held or needed and processes of sharing - or failing to share - knowledge in dementia care. Several barriers, many created by a lack of knowledge, negatively impacted dementia care. However, health care professionals had effective strategies for providing care, designed to overcome barriers and which encompassed elements of knowledge sharing. PMID:22828489

  5. Communication Strategies to Assist Comprehension in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Communication with individuals with dementia requires use of conversational strategies from health care providers. Strategies are provided for issues pertaining to poor comprehension. The strategies promote more successful comprehension and compliance, offset mood disorder, and create ease in the way that health information may be accepted by the patient. PMID:20397508

  6. Articulating the strategies for maximising the inclusion of people with dementia in qualitative research studies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kathy; Jordan, Fionnuala; Hunter, Andrew; Cooney, Adeline; Casey, Dympna

    2015-11-01

    It is essential to understand the experience of living with dementia from the perspective of the person with dementia so that services can be appropriately constructed. This review paper, drawing on prior work, identifies key strategies for the meaningful inclusion of persons with dementia within qualitative research studies, it examines the articulation of these strategies and shares how these strategies were operationalised within one national research study in Ireland. Strategies within the literature were categorised and then synthesized into a guide consisting of four main areas; gaining COnsent, maximizing Responses, Telling the story, and Ending on a high (CORTE). The CORTE guideline was used to as a tool for analysing relevant research reports. CORTE is a synthesized account of grouped strategies that could be used to maximize the meaningful involvement of persons with dementia and can also provide a guide for reporting the strategies used so that researchers can learn from each other. PMID:24403314

  7. Commentary on "Developing a national strategy to prevent dementia: Leon Thal Symposium 2009." The rationale for a National Institutional Review Board for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Peter J

    2010-03-01

    The published proceedings of the second Annual Leon Thal Symposium (Alzheimers Dement 2009;5:85-92) have added to the open discussion among leaders in this field, with respect to the development of a national strategy for accelerating the discovery of preventative interventions for Alzheimer's disease. One of the recommended "action steps" detailed in that report centers on the establishment of a National Institutional Review Board for neurodegenerative diseases. The purpose of this new ethical oversight panel would be to increase the efficiency with which large-scale multi-site trials are conducted. This essay expands on this recommendation, and two potential organizational models are briefly considered. A well-designed, highly-qualified, and responsive National Institutional Review Board for neurodegenerative diseases would serve the direct interest of protecting the rights, welfare, and safety of our older citizens, who so generously contribute their time, energy, and comfort to advance research to discover new treatments for this devastating disease. PMID:20298974

  8. Methodological issues in a cost-of-dementia study in Belgium: the NAtional Dementia Economic Study (NADES).

    PubMed

    Kurz, X; Broers, M; Scuvée-Moreau, J; Salmon, E; Ventura, M; Pepin, J L; Dom, R; Franck, G; Dresse, A

    1999-09-01

    The NAtional Dementia Economic Study (NADES) is an on-going prospective, one-year cohort study developed in Belgium to assess the socio-economic consequences of dementia in a group of patients and their caregivers (n = 400). Comparison is made with a group of subjects with cognitive impairment and no dementia (n = 100) and a group of subjects without any cognitive impairment (n = 100). Recruitment of subjects is based on screening of warning signs of dementia by general practitioners, followed by a Cambridge Mental Disorders of the Elderly Examination (CAMDEX) performed at home. This paper presents an overview of the study protocol and the rationale for basic design options, such as the choice of study population, screening strategy, and methods used for the case validation. It also presents preliminary results on the prevalence of dementia in general practice, the sensitivity and specificity of the warning signs as a screening test of dementia, and the validity of a computerised case ascertainment algorithm based on DSM-III-R criteria. PMID:10544724

  9. Palliative Care for Patients with Dementia: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Torke, Alexia M.; Holtz, Laura R.; Hui, Siu; Castelluccio, Peter; Connor, Stephen; Eaton, Matthew A.; Sachs, Greg A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine the extent to which hospice and nonhospice palliative care (PC) programs provide services to patients with dementia and to describe barriers and facilitators to providing nonhospice PC. DESIGN Telephone and Web-based surveys. SETTING U.S. hospice and PC programs from the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s program list. PARTICIPANTS Executive directors of 240 hospice programs, 173 programs providing hospice and nonhospice PC, and 13 programs providing nonhospice PC. MEASUREMENTS A telephone survey of hospice and PC providers followed by an online survey of programs providing nonhospice PC. RESULTS Ninety-four percent of hospices and 72% of PC programs had served at least one patient with a primary diagnosis of dementia within the past year. Based on 80 responses to the online survey, the most highly rated barriers to providing PC were lack of awareness of PC by families and referring providers, need for respite services, and reimbursement policies. Highly rated needs were family information, assistance with caregiver burden, and behavioral symptoms. Strategies critical for success were an interdisciplinary team, collaboration with community organizations, and alternatives to aggressive end-of-life care. CONCLUSION Almost all hospices and a majority of nonhospice PC programs serve patients with dementia. Education and policy efforts should focus on education for families and providers, support for caregivers, and reforming reimbursement structures to provide coverage for interdisciplinary PC earlier in the disease, when patients have high needs but are not hospice eligible. PMID:21054292

  10. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    PATIENT / FAMILY TEACHING SHEET Dementia What is dementia? Dementia is a result of diseases that affect how the brain works. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia. Symptoms occur ...

  11. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Dementia Information Page Condensed from Dementia: Hope Through Research ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Dementia? Dementia is not a specific disease. It is ...

  12. Strategies for molecular imaging dementia and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Bernhard J

    2008-01-01

    Dementia represents a heterogeneous term that has evolved to describe the behavioral syndromes associated with a variety of clinical and neuropathological changes during continuing degenerative disease of the brain. As such, there lacks a clear consensus regarding the neuropsychological and other constituent characteristics associated with various cerebrovascular changes in this disease process. But increasing this knowledge has given more insights into memory deterioration in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and other subtypes of dementia. The author reviews current knowledge of the physiological coupling between cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the light of state-of-the-art-imaging methods and its changes in dementia with special reference to Alzheimer’s disease. Different imaging techniques are discussed with respect to their visualizing effect of biochemical, cellular, and/or structural changes in dementia. The pathophysiology of dementia in advanced age is becoming increasingly understood by revealing the underlying basis of neuropsychological changes with current imaging techniques, genetic and pathological features, which suggests that alterations of (neuro) vascular regulatory mechanisms may lead to brain dysfunction and disease. The current view is that cerebrovascular deregulation is seen as a contributor to cerebrovascular pathologies, such as stroke, but also to neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease. The better understanding of these (patho) physiological mechanisms may open an approach to new interventional strategies in dementia to enhance neurovascular repair and to protect neurovascular coupling. PMID:18830391

  13. Dementia and cognitive impairment in ESRD: diagnostic and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Manjula Kurella; Yaffe, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive impairment, including dementia, is a common but poorly recognized problem among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), affecting 16–38% of patients. Dementia is associated with high risks of death, dialysis withdrawal, hospitalization, and disability among patients with ESRD; thus, recognizing and effectively managing cognitive impairment may improve clinical care. Dementia screening strategies should take into account patient factors, the time available, the timing of assessments relative to dialysis treatments, and the implications of a positive screen for subsequent management (for example, transplantation). Additional diagnostic testing in patients with cognitive impairment, including neuroimaging, is largely based on the clinical evaluation. There is limited data on the efficacy and safety of pharmacotherapy for dementia in the setting of ESRD; therefore, decisions about the use of these medications should be individualized. Management of behavioral symptoms, evaluation of patient safety, and advance care planning are important components of dementia management. Prevention strategies targeting vascular risk factor modification, and physical and cognitive activity have shown promise in the general population and may be reasonably extrapolated to the ESRD population. Modification of ESRD-associated factors such as anemia and dialysis dose or frequency require further study before they can be recommended for treatment or prevention of cognitive impairment. PMID:20861818

  14. Management strategies for problem behaviors in the patient with dementia.

    PubMed

    Lehninger, F W; Ravindran, V L; Stewart, J T

    1998-04-01

    Psychiatric and behavioral problems are present in most patients with dementia and are usually the clinician's main focus of management. Differential diagnosis of these problems can be challenging, but the effort is essential for planning appropriate therapy. Pharmacologic interventions are available for treatment of depression, agitation, aggression, psychotic symptoms, wandering, and sleep disorders. Given the less than favorable risk-benefit ratio of most psychotropic drugs in the population of older patients with dementia, the importance of nonpharmacologic strategies and limiting treatment goals should not be overlooked. PMID:9559028

  15. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dementia may also cause changes in mood and personality. Early on, lapses in memory and clear thinking ... to tears to anger in a few minutes. Personality changes. People who have dementia may have drastic ...

  16. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... dementia have serious problems with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. Although dementia is common in very elderly people, it is not part of normal aging. Many ... dementia or repair brain damage, they may improve symptoms or slow down ...

  17. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... agitated or see things that are not there. Memory loss is a common symptom of dementia. However, memory loss by itself does not mean you have ... with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. Although dementia is common in very ...

  18. Comprehensive national energy strategy

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This Comprehensive National Energy Strategy sets forth a set of five common sense goals for national energy policy: (1) improve the efficiency of the energy system, (2) ensure against energy disruptions, (3) promote energy production and use in ways that respect health and environmental values, (4) expand future energy choices, and (5) cooperate internationally on global issues. These goals are further elaborated by a series of objectives and strategies to illustrate how the goals will be achieved. Taken together, the goals, objectives, and strategies form a blueprint for the specific programs, projects, initiatives, investments, and other actions that will be developed and undertaken by the Federal Government, with significant emphasis on the importance of the scientific and technological advancements that will allow implementation of this Comprehensive National Energy Strategy. Moreover, the statutory requirement of regular submissions of national energy policy plans ensures that this framework can be modified to reflect evolving conditions, such as better knowledge of our surroundings, changes in energy markets, and advances in technology. This Strategy, then, should be thought of as a living document. Finally, this plan benefited from the comments and suggestions of numerous individuals and organizations, both inside and outside of government. The Summary of Public Comments, located at the end of this document, describes the public participation process and summarizes the comments that were received. 8 figs.

  19. Prevalence of Dementia and Its Correlates among Participants in the National Early Dementia Detection Program during 2006-2009

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon-Hyuk; Lee, Chang-In; Kang, Na-Ri; Ryu, Jae-Sung; Jeon, Bong-Hee; Kim, Ki-Woong; Bahk, Won-Myong; Yoon, Bo-Hyun; Won, Seunghee; Lee, Jun Hwa; Kim, Duk-Soo; Hong, Seong-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of dementia and its correlates among people with poor socioeconomic status, poor social support systems, and poor performance on the Korean version of the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE-KC). Methods We used 2006-2009 data of the National Early Dementia Detection Program (NEDDP) conducted on Jeju Island. This program included all residents >65 years old who were receiving financial assistance. We examined those who performed poorly (standard deviation from the norm of <-1.5) on the MMSE-KC administered as part of the NEDDP, using age-, gender-, and education-adjusted norms for Korean elders. A total of 1708 people were included in this category. Results The prevalence of dementia in this group was 20.5%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the following factors were statistically significantly associated with dementia: age of 80 or older, no education, nursing home residence, and depression. Conclusion The prevalence of dementia is very high among those with lower MMSE-KC scores, and significant correlates include older age, no education, living in a nursing home, and depression. Enhancing lifetime education to improve individuals' cognitive reserves by providing intellectually challenging activities, encouraging living at home rather than in a nursing home, and preventing and treating depression in its early phase could reduce the prevalence of dementia in this population. PMID:22707963

  20. Dementia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Dementia is characterised by chronic, global, non-reversible deterioration in memory, executive function, and personality. Speech and motor function may also be impaired. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments on cognitive symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? What are the effects of treatments on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 49 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine), antidepressants (clomipramine, fluoxetine, imipramine, sertraline), antipsychotics (haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone), aromatherapy, benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive stimulation, exercise, ginkgo biloba, memantine, mood stabilisers (carbamazepine, sodium valproate/valproic acid), music therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), omega 3 (fish oil), reminiscence therapy, and statins. PMID:23870856

  1. Dementia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Dementia is characterised by chronic, global, non-reversible deterioration in memory, executive function, and personality. Speech and motor function may also be impaired. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments on cognitive symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? What are the effects of treatments on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine), antidepressants (clomipramine, fluoxetine, imipramine, sertraline), antipsychotics (haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone), aromatherapy, benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive stimulation, exercise, ginkgo biloba, memantine, mood stabilisers (carbamazepine, sodium valproate/valproic acid), music therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), omega 3 (fish oil), reminiscence therapy, and statins. PMID:21726471

  2. Other Dementias

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Institute on Aging) Vascular Dementia fact sheet (University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center) ... Library of Medicine) Lewy Body Dementias fact sheet (University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center) ...

  3. Testing the psychometric properties of a Chinese version of Dementia Management Strategies Scale

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wai Tong

    2015-01-01

    Caregiving stress and burden are universal phenomena among family caregivers of people with dementia. Family caregivers who adopted adaptive management strategies in dementia care could alleviate their own distress and the progression of neuropsychiatric symptoms in people with dementia. An understanding about the management strategies used by these caregivers in caring for their relatives with dementia would be crucial to family services in dementia care. This study aimed to validate a Chinese version of Dementia Management Strategies Scale (DMSS) in family caregivers of Hong Kong Chinese people with dementia. Face and content validity, semantic equivalence, and test–retest reliability of the translated Chinese version of 34-item DMSS were examined. A random sample of 211 family caregivers and their relatives with dementia were then recruited to identify the factor structure of the Chinese version by exploratory factor analysis followed by varimax rotation and assess its internal consistency. Reproductibility and responsiveness of the scale to changes in neuropsychiatric symptoms were also examined over a 6-month interval. Results indicated that the Chinese version of DMSS indicated very satisfactory content validity, semantic equivalence with the original English version, and test–retest reliability. Factor analysis showed that 32 items of the Chinese version had substantial loadings on one of the three identified factors (“Criticism toward older relative”, “Showing encouragement”, and “Active management strategies”), explaining 72.4% of the total variance. The three-factor Chinese version also indicated good internal consistency of its three subscales (Cronbach’s α=0.86–0.90) and satisfactory reproducibility over 6 months (intraclass correlation coefficients =0.85–0.89). Furthermore, the Chinese version demonstrated moderate effect sizes for detecting changes in symptom severity of dementia (Cohen’s d=0.50–0.60). This study provides

  4. Adapting to conversation with semantic dementia: using enactment as a compensatory strategy in everyday social interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kindell, Jacqueline; Sage, Karen; Keady, John; Wilkinson, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies to date in semantic dementia have examined communication in clinical or experimental settings. There is a paucity of research describing the everyday interactional skills and difficulties seen in this condition. Aims To examine the everyday conversation, at home, of an individual with semantic dementia. Methods & Procedures A 71-year-old man with semantic dementia and his wife were given a video camera and asked to record natural conversation in the home situation with no researcher present. Recordings were also made in the home environment, with the individual with semantic dementia in conversation with a member of the research team. Conversation analysis was used to transcribe and analyse the data. Recurring features were noted to identify conversational patterns. Outcomes & Results Analysis demonstrated a repeated practice by the speaker with semantic dementia of acting out a diversity of scenes (enactment). As such, the speaker regularly used direct reported speech along with paralinguistic features (such as pitch and loudness) and non-vocal communication (such as body posture, pointing and facial expression) as an adaptive strategy to communicate with others in conversation. Conclusions & Implications This case shows that while severe difficulties may be present on neuropsychological assessment, relatively effective communicative strategies may be evident in conversation. A repeated practice of enactment in conversation allowed this individual to act out, or perform what he wanted to say, allowing him to generate a greater level of meaningful communication than his limited vocabulary alone could achieve through describing the events concerned. Such spontaneously acquired adaptive strategies require further attention in both research and clinical settings in semantic dementia and analysis of interaction in this condition, using conversation analysis, may be helpful. PMID:24033649

  5. Strategies for managing behavioural symptomatology associated with dementia of the Alzheimer type: a systematic overview.

    PubMed

    Forbes, D A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic overview was to summarize research findings on strategies for managing the behavioural symptomatology associated with dementia of the Alzheimer type. A search of the published and unpublished literature resulted in 265 articles, 45 of which were judged to be relevant. Using validity criteria, 1 article was judged to be strong, 6 moderate, 20 weak, and 18 poor. Strategies such as planned walking, pet therapy, an attention-focusing program, functional skills training, music, and visual barriers demonstrated promising results in improving: (a) aggressive, agitated, and disruptive behaviours, (b) social interaction, (c) self-care ability, (d) day-night disturbances, or (e) wandering. The findings indicate that there is existing research, although in its infancy, to support the use of strategies for managing the behavioural symptomatology associated with dementia of the Alzheimer type. PMID:9807289

  6. Transcultural nursing strategies for carers of people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Melissa; Jenkins, Catharine

    2016-04-01

    Caring for a family member with dementia is stressful, and carers from all backgrounds often feel overwhelmed and under-supported. Professional and family carers' perceptions of the challenges and satisfactions of caring are influenced by culturally derived expectations. However, experiences of caring often differ from stereotypical norms. Experiences of carer stress and beliefs about the nature and extent of support that can be expected from social networks and statutory services may differ between cultural groups in the UK, but sensitive advice, information, and emotional and practical support are universally required. Transcultural comparisons reveal similarities between carers' needs and enable identification of values-based culturally congruent recommendations that nurses can use to promote black and Asian minority ethnic carers' confidence and wellbeing. This article, based on practice experience and a literature review, explores the effect of caring among different cultural groups and offers recommendations for culturally congruent interventions to support carers. It provides evidence-based guidance to enable nurses to meet their responsibilities for transcultural working, as laid out in the Care Act 2014. A scenario illustrates recommendations for practice. PMID:27029989

  7. Transitions in Care among Older Adults with Dementia in a Nationally Representative Sample of Older Americans

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Christopher M.; Tu, Wanzhu; Unroe, Kathleen T.; LaMantia, Michael A.; Stump, Timothy E.; Clark, Daniel O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Older adults with dementia experience frequent transitions in care Objectives To describe transitions in care among older adults with dementia identified from a nationally representative cohort and to describe transition rates among subjects with more severe levels of cognitive and functional impairment Design Longitudinal cohort study Setting Health and Retirement Study (HRS) Participants 16,186 HRS respondents aged 65 years or over whose survey data were linked with Medicare claims from 1999-2008 Measurements Transitions in care between home, home with formal services, hospital, and nursing facility care, as well as cognitive function, activities of daily living, and mortality. Results The 3,447 (21.3%) HRS subjects who were ever diagnosed with dementia experienced frequent transitions. Among subjects transitioning from a hospital stay, 52.2% returned home without home care services while 33.8% transitioned to a nursing facility. Among subjects transitioning from a nursing facility, 59.2% transitioned to the hospital while 25.3% returned home without services. There were 2,139 transitions to death and 58.7% of HRS subjects with dementia died at home. Even among persons with moderate to severe dementia, we documented multiple transitions in care, including transitions from the hospital to home and back to the hospital. Conclusion In this nationally representative sample of older adults, subjects diagnosed with dementia experience frequent transitions. Those persons with dementia who are cared for at home and who transition back to home often have moderate to severe impairments in both function and cognition. PMID:26200764

  8. National Drug Control Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    This report presents a comprehensive blueprint for new direction and effort in the national fight against illegal drug use. It is the result of an intensive review of federal anti-drug efforts to date and incorporates advice and recommendations from hundreds of interested and involved anti-drug leaders outside the federal government. The…

  9. National Drug Control Strategy, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In May of 2010, President Obama released the Administration's inaugural "National Drug Control Strategy". Based on the premise that drug use and its consequences pose a threat not just to public safety, but also to public health, the 2010 "Strategy" represented the first comprehensive rebalancing of Federal drug control policy in the nearly 40…

  10. Technological Strategies and National Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Robert

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the international and domestic implications of technological growth. Defines three basic national strategies: a broad front approach, scientific and technological specialization and importation. Analyzes the strategies followed by form countries - France, the United States, Sweden, and Japan- to illustrate the alternatives and the…

  11. National Drug Control Strategy. Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The first National Drug Control Strategy set ambitious two and five-year performance based goals: (1) to lower the rate of drug use by 10 percent over 2 years among both youth and adults; and (2) to lower the rate by 25 percent over 5 years. The chapters in this updated version are keyed to the strategies three priorities: (1) Stopping Use Before…

  12. National Drug Control Strategy. Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    President Bush's new National Drug Control Strategy for 2003 focuses on three core priorities: stopping drug use before it starts; healing America's drug users; and disrupting the market. The 2003 strategy reports progress toward meeting the President's goals of reducing drug use by 10 percent over 2 years, and 25 percent over 5 years. With regard…

  13. Associations of Special Care Units and Outcomes of Residents with Dementia: 2004 National Nursing Home Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Huabin; Fang, Xiangming; Liao, Youlian; Elliott, Amanda; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We compared the rates of specialized care for residents with Alzheimer's disease or dementia in special care units (SCUs) and other nursing home (NH) units and examined the associations of SCU residence with process of care and resident outcomes. Design and Methods: Data came from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. The indicators of…

  14. Baby boomer caregiver and dementia caregiving: findings from the National Study of Caregiving

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Heehyul; Dilworth-Anderson, Peggye

    2015-01-01

    Background: previous studies have well documented the characteristics of baby boomers but less is known about the experiences of boomer caregivers (CGs) of people with dementia. Objective: the purpose of this study was to compare the characteristics of boomer CGs of people with dementia with those of boomer CGs for people without dementia and to ascertain factors associated with outcomes. Design: we selected baby boomer CGs from the National Study of Caregiving (NSOC) with 650 primary boomer CGs (138 CGs of people with dementia and 512 CGs of people without dementia). Methods: the Stress Process Model (SPM) was used to examine the effects of resources (the use of paid help and informal support) and stressors (primary: level of CG care activities and interrupted sleep; secondary: strain of caregiving on work, other care and social activities) on CGs' down, depressed or hopeless feelings and self-perceived general health. T-tests and chi-square tests were used to compare SPM domain differences and ordinary least-square multiple regression analysis was used to investigate predictors of CGs' outcomes. Results: high blood pressure and arthritis were the most prevalent chronic diseases in both groups. Boomer CGs of people with dementia reported providing more help with daily activities, higher level of caregiving and social activity conflict, experiencing more interrupted sleep and more down, depressed or hopeless feelings than CGs of people without dementia. Different factors predicted boomer CGs' outcomes. Conclusion: the current results yield important information about the considerable differences between two baby boomer CG groups within the caregiving experiences. The findings highlight the need to provide tailored interventions to boomer CGs to help them cope with caregiving stress to improve their physical and mental health. PMID:25359299

  15. National Drug Control Strategy, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The White House, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the Fiscal Year 2007 Budget for the National Drug Control Strategy within the three key priority areas; education and community action, treatment and intervention, and disruption in the illegal drug market. The first chapter, "Stopping Drug Use Before It Starts," outlines the Administration's work to prevent the…

  16. The CARE pathway model for dementia: psychosocial and rehabilitative strategies for care in young-onset dementias.

    PubMed

    Morhardt, Darby; Weintraub, Sandra; Khayum, Becky; Robinson, Jaimie; Medina, Jennifer; O'Hara, Mary; Mesulam, Marsel; Rogalski, Emily J

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the Care Pathway Model for Dementia (CARE-D) is to improve quality of life and daily functioning both for individuals diagnosed with dementia and for their families or other caregivers. This is accomplished by developing individualized recommendations focused on a person's strengths and weaknesses as determined by formal neurocognitive and psychosocial evaluations. Careful attention is given to the stage of illness and an individual's stage in life, to connecting families with services that target an individual's cognitive and behavioral symptoms, and to providing education and emotional support specific to symptoms, clinical diagnosis, and prognosis. PMID:25998120

  17. Research on treating neuropsychiatric symptoms of advanced dementia with non-pharmacological strategies, 1998–2008: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kverno, Karan S.; Black, Betty S.; Nolan, Marie T.; Rabins, Peter V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Advanced dementia is characterized by severe cognitive and functional impairments that lead to almost total dependency in self-care. Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are common in advanced dementia, diminishing quality of life and increasing the care burden. The challenge for health care providers is to find safe and effective treatments. Non-pharmacological interventions offer the potential for safer alternatives to pharmacotherapy, but little is known about their efficacy. This review evaluates the published literature on non-pharmacological interventions for treating NPS in advanced dementia. Methods A literature search was undertaken to find non-pharmacological intervention studies published between 1998 and 2008 that measured NPS outcomes in individuals diagnosed with advanced dementia. Strict inclusion criteria initially required that all study participants have severe or very severe dementia, but this range was later broadened to include moderately severe to very severe stages. Results Out of 215 intervention studies, 21 (9.8%) specifically focused on treatments for individuals with moderately severe to very severe dementia. The studies provide limited moderate to high quality evidence for the use of sensory-focused strategies, including aroma, preferred or live music, and multi-sensory stimulation. Emotion-oriented approaches, such as simulated presence may be more effective for individuals with preserved verbal interactive capacity. Conclusions Most studies of interventions for dementia-related NPS have focused on individuals with mild to moderate cognitive impairment. Individuals with severe cognitive impairment do not necessarily respond to NPS treatments in the same manner. Future studies should be specifically designed to further explore the stage-specific efficacy of non-pharmacological therapies for patients with advanced dementia. Areas of particular need for further research include movement-based therapies, hands-on (touch) therapies

  18. A Systematic Review of Strategies to Foster Activity Engagement in Persons with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trahan, Maranda A.; Kuo, Julie; Carlson, Michelle C.; Gitlin, Laura N.

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is a growing public health issue. Activity, a positive therapeutic modality, has potential to enhance quality of life and reduce behavioral symptoms in persons with dementia--outcomes eluding pharmacological treatments. However, it is unclear how to effectively engage persons with dementia in activities for them to derive desired…

  19. Handling the Dilemma of Self-Determination and Dementia: A Study of Case Managers' Discursive Strategies in Assessment Meetings.

    PubMed

    Österholm, Johannes H; Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika; Olaison, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In assessment meetings concerning care services for people with dementia, Swedish case managers face a dilemma. On the one hand, according to the law, the right to self-determination of every adult citizen must be respected, but on the other hand cognitive disabilities make it difficult to fulfill obligations of being a full-fledged citizen. In this article, we examine 15 assessment meetings to identify discursive strategies used by case managers to handle this dilemma. We also examine how these affect the participation of persons with dementia, and indicate implications of our study for social work practice and research. PMID:26207822

  20. Being Dementia Smart (BDS): A Dementia Nurse Education Journey in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Macaden, Leah

    2016-01-01

    There is a global demographic transition secondary to population ageing. The number of older people living with multimorbidities including dementia has been significantly rising both in developed and developing countries. It is estimated that there would be 74.7 million people living with dementia by 2030 that would escalate to 135.46 million by 2050. 62 % of people with dementia currently live in low and middle income countries that are very poorly resourced to cope with this epidemic. Dementia is now duly recognised as a national priority within the UK and a global priority at the 2013 G8 Summit. Management and care of an individual with dementia requires a multidisciplinary approach with expertise and a competent skill base. Nurses are central to the delivery of dementia care delivery in hospitals, community and residential care settings. It is against this background that this pre-registration integrated dementia curriculum was developed to build capacity and capability with dementia expertise among the future nursing workforce in Scotland in line with the National Dementia Strategy. PMID:27341566

  1. Adapting to Conversation with Semantic Dementia: Using Enactment as a Compensatory Strategy in Everyday Social Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindell, Jacqueline; Sage, Karen; Keady, John; Wilkinson, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies to date in semantic dementia have examined communication in clinical or experimental settings. There is a paucity of research describing the everyday interactional skills and difficulties seen in this condition. Aims: To examine the everyday conversation, at home, of an individual with semantic dementia. Methods &…

  2. National Drug Control Strategy. 2008 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the 2008 National Drug Control Strategy of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. The overarching goal of the President's Strategy is to reduce drug use in America through a balanced approach that focuses on stopping use before it starts, healing America's drug users, and disrupting the market for illegal…

  3. Factors Associated with Caregiver Readiness to Use Nonpharmacologic Strategies to Manage Dementia-related Behavioral Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonpharmacologic strategies to manage dementia-related behavioral symptoms depend upon caregiver implementation. Caregivers may vary in readiness to use strategies. We examined characteristics associated with readiness, extent readiness changed during intervention, and predictors of change in readiness. Methods Data from a randomized trial involving 119 caregivers in a nonpharmacologic intervention for managing behavioral symptoms. Baseline measures included caregiver, patient, and treatment-related factors. At initial (2 weeks from baseline) and final (16-weeks) intervention sessions, interventionists rated caregiver readiness as pre-action (precontemplation=1; contemplation=2; preparation=3) or action (=4). Ordinal logistic regression identified baseline characteristics associated with initial readiness. Mc Nemar-Bowker test of symmetry described change in readiness; binary logistic regression identified baseline predictors of change in readiness (initial-to-final session). One-way MANOVA identified treatment factors (dose/intensity, number of strategies used, perceived benefits, therapeutic engagement) associated with change in readiness. Results At initial intervention session, 67.2% (N=80) of caregivers were in pre-action, 32.8% (N=39) in action. Initial high readiness was associated with better caregiver mood, less financial difficulty, lower patient cognition and more behavioral symptoms. By final session, 72% (N=79) were in action, 28% (N=31) in pre-action; caregivers with less financial difficulty improved in readiness (B =−.70, p=.017); those in action were more therapeutically engaged (F (2,107)=3.61, p=.030) and perceived greater intervention benefits (F (2, 88)=6.06, p=.003). Conclusion Whereas patient and caregiver-related factors were associated with initial readiness, financial stability, therapeutic engagement and perceived benefits enhanced probability of change. Understanding caregiver readiness and factors associated with its change

  4. 2011 National Drug Control Strategy. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In May of 2010, President Obama released the Administration's inaugural "National Drug Control Strategy", a comprehensive approach to combat the public health and safety consequences posed by drug use. Now, a year later, the Administration is releasing its update building upon that initial "Strategy". The "Strategy" establishes ambitious goals to…

  5. Comorbidity profile in dementia with Lewy bodies versus Alzheimer’s disease: a linkage study between the Swedish Dementia Registry and the Swedish National Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Compared to Alzheimer’s disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is usually associated with a more complex clinical picture and higher burden of care. Yet, few investigations have been performed on comorbidities and risk factors of DLB. Therefore, we aimed to compare clinical risk factors and comorbidity profile in DLB and AD patients using two nationwide registries. Methods This is a linkage study between the Swedish dementia registry (SveDem) and the Swedish National Patient Registry conducted on 634 subjects with DLB and 9161 individuals with AD registered during the years 2007–2012. Comorbidity profile has been coded according to the International Classification of Diseases version 10 (ICD 10) in addition to the date of each event. The main chapters of the ICD-10, the Charlson score of comorbidities and a selected number of neuropsychiatric diseases were compared between the DLB and AD groups. Comorbidity was registered before and after the dementia diagnosis. Results “Mental and behavioral disorders”, “diseases of the nervous system”, “diseases of the eye and adnexa”, diseases of the “circulatory”, “respiratory”, and “genitourinary” systems, “diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue” and “diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue” occurred more frequently in the DLB group after multivariate adjustment. Depression [adjusted OR = 2.12 (95%CI 1.49 to 3.03)] and migraine [adjusted OR = 3.65 (95%CI 1.48 to 9.0)] were more commonly recorded before the diagnosis of dementia in the DLB group. Following dementia diagnosis, ischemic stroke [adjusted OR = 1.89 (95%CI 1.21 to 2.96)] was more likely to happen among the DLB patients compared to the AD population. Conclusions Our study indicated a worse comorbidity profile in DLB patients with higher occurrence of depression, stroke and migraine compared with the AD group. Deeper knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of these

  6. BLM Environmental Education National Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Land Management (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This environmental education strategy was developed by a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Washington Office Task Group in collaboration with staff at all levels of the BLM. The strategy calls for the BLM to expand its efforts in educating citizens about ecosystems and ecosystem management, and to establish environmental education as an integral…

  7. Key Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Common Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Sadak, Tatiana I.; Katon, Jodie; Beck, Cornelia; Cochrane, Barbara B.; Borson, Soo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) among people with common dementias and equip interdisciplinary clinicians and health services planners with large-sample data necessary to plan care for patients and families. We analyzed selected variables from baseline assessments of older adults with dementia of one or more etiologies (N = 3,768) from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center data repository. Dementias included Alzheimer's disease (AD), Lewy body dementia (DLB), behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and vascular dementia (VaD). We compared the prevalence of four NPS clusters (agitation/aggression, depression/dysphoria, anxiety, irritability/lability) across dementia etiologies and stages using logistic regression and AD as the reference group. NPS profiles differed significantly across dementia types and stages. Compared with primary AD, DLB was associated with greater odds of depression/dysphoria (OR = 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28, 2.20) and anxiety (OR = 1.80, 95% CI 1.37, 2.36), with similar findings when DLB was diagnosed in combination with AD (depression/dysphoria: OR = 1.79, 95% CI 1.11, 2.89; anxiety: OR = 1.88, 95% CI 1.17, 3.02). Primary bvFTD was associated with greater odds of agitation/aggression (OR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.17, 2.18). The prevalence of anxiety and irritability/lability was highest in moderate stages of dementia, and agitation/aggression was most prevalent in severe dementia. Differential diagnosis and staging of dementias and inclusion of single and overlapping etiologies is important for planning and implementing appropriate strategies to anticipate, report, and intervene with key NPS that complicate home and health care. PMID:24079749

  8. Pain in Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Dementia: Results from the National Health and Aging Trends Study

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Lauren J.; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Yaffe, Kristine; Stephens, Caroline E.; Miao, Yinghui; Boscardin, W. John; Smith, Alex K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To report prevalence, correlates, and medication management of pain in community-dwelling older adults with dementia. DESIGN Cross-sectional. SETTING In-person interviews with self- or proxy respondents living in private residences or non-nursing home residential care settings. PARTICIPANTS Nationally representative sample of community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older enrolled in the National Health and Aging Trends Study 2011 wave. MEASUREMENTS Dementia status was determined using a modified previously validated algorithm. Participants were asked whether they had had bothersome and activity-limiting pain over the past month. A multivariable Poisson regression model was used to determine the relationship between bothersome pain and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. RESULTS Of the 7,609 participants with complete data on cognitive function, 802 had dementia (67.2% aged ≥80, 65.0% female, 67.9% white, 49.7% proxy response, 32.0% lived alone, 18.8% lived in residential care); 670 (63.5%) participants with dementia experienced bothersome pain, and 347 (43.3%) had pain that limited activities. These rates were significantly higher than in a propensity score–matched cohort without dementia (54.5% bothersome pain, P < .001, 27.2% pain that limited activity, P < .001). Proxies reported slightly higher rates of pain than self-respondents, but differences were statistically significant only for activity-limiting pain (46.6% proxy vs 40.1% self, P = .03). Correlates of bothersome pain included arthritis, heart and lung disease, less than high school education, activity of daily living disability, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and low energy. Of those reporting pain, 30.3% stated that they rarely or never took any medications for pain. CONCLUSION Community-living older adults with dementia are at high risk of having pain. Creative interventions and programs are needed to manage pain adequately in this vulnerable population. PMID

  9. A National Strategy for Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffield, Frank, Ed.

    The first paper of this set of 12 conference papers, "Nine Learning Fallacies and Their Replacement by a National Strategy for Lifelong Learning," by Frank Coffield, synthesizes the opinions of other participants, and goes beyond them to set forth an outline of a strategy for lifelong learning in the United Kingdom. Following this introductory…

  10. Crafting citizen(ship) for people with dementia: How policy narratives at national level in Sweden informed politics of time from 1975 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte; Nordh, Jonas

    2015-08-01

    This article explores how policy narratives in national policy documents in Sweden inform associated politics on people with dementia. This is disentangled in terms of how people with dementia have been defined, what the problems and their imminent solutions have been, and if and how these have differed over time. Based on a textual analysis of policy documents at national level in Sweden, covering nearly 40 years the study shows how divergent policy narratives shape the construction of citizens with dementia as policy target groups. This study shows the temporal character of people with dementia as a political problem, the implications of policy narratives on people with dementia as a citizen group, and policy narratives as something being crafted rather than shaped by fixed pre-existing "facts". Dementia, and further citizens living with dementia, does not have a once and for all stabilised meaning. Instead, the meanings behind the categories continue to evolve and to be crafted, which affects the construction of citizens living with dementia, the space in which to exercise their citizenship and further belonging to the society. PMID:26162732

  11. A systematic review of strategies to foster activity engagement in persons with dementia.

    PubMed

    Trahan, Maranda A; Kuo, Julie; Carlson, Michelle C; Gitlin, Laura N

    2014-10-01

    Dementia is a growing public health issue. Activity, a positive therapeutic modality, has potential to enhance quality of life and reduce behavioral symptoms in persons with dementia--outcomes eluding pharmacological treatments. However, it is unclear how to effectively engage persons with dementia in activities for them to derive desired benefits. We present a systematic review of 28 studies involving 50 tests of different ways of modifying activities to enhance engagement and reduce behavioral and psychological symptoms for this group. Of 50 tests, 22 (44%) evaluated changes to objects and properties (e.g., introducing activities with intrinsic interest), 6 (12%) evaluated changes to space demands (e.g., lighting, noise levels), 8 (16%) evaluated changes to social demands (e.g., prompts, praise), and 14 (28%) combined two or more activity modifications. No modifications were made to the sequence and timing of activities. Although modifications to objects and properties were the most common, outcomes for engagement and behaviors were mixed. Modifications to space and social demands were less frequently tested, but consistently yielded positive outcomes. No modifications resulted in negative behavioral outcomes or decreased engagement. Methodological strengths of studies included direct observation of outcomes and fidelity assessments. Few studies however involved persons with dementia at home. Our review revealed a growing evidentiary base for different modifications to foster engagement in activities and reduce behavioral and psychological symptoms. Future studies should evaluate how contextual factors (e.g., physical environment, activity type) and caregiver ability to employ activity modifications affect engagement. PMID:25274714

  12. Observational cohort study: deprivation and access to anti-dementia drugs in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Claudia; Lodwick, Rebecca; Walters, Kate; Raine, Rosalind; Manthorpe, Jill; Iliffe, Steve; Petersen, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Background: UK National Dementia Strategies prioritise fair access to dementia treatments for the whole population. We investigated for the first time inequalities in NHS national dementia prescribing and how they have varied between UK countries and over time. Method: we investigated the association between Townsend deprivation score and anti-dementia drug prescribing in 77,045 dementia patients from UK primary care records from 2002 to 2013. Results: we included 77,045 patients with recorded dementia diagnosis or anti-dementia drug prescription. Least deprived patients were 25% more likely to be initiated on anti-dementia drugs than the most deprived (adjusted incidence rate ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.19–1.31). This was driven by data from English practices where prescribing rates were consistently lower in more deprived patients compared with Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, where prescribing was not related to deprivation quintile. Compared with English practices, anti-dementia medication was prescribed more often in Northern Irish (1.81, 1.41–2.34) and less in Welsh practices (0.68, 0.55–0.82), with a trend towards more prescribing in Scottish practices (1.14, 0.98–1.32). Drug initiation rates were also higher in younger people and men. Conclusion: four years after the English National Dementia Strategy, there is no evidence that the Strategy's key objective of reducing treatment inequalities is being achieved. Higher overall anti-dementia drug prescribing in Scottish and Northern Irish practices, and differing clinical guidelines in Scotland from other UK countries might explain greater equality in prescribing in these countries. Strategies to offer treatment to more deprived people with dementia in England are needed. PMID:26582758

  13. The National Literacy Strategy and Individual Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stainthorp, Rhona

    2000-01-01

    Presents a discussion paper reflecting on the National Literacy Strategy (NLS) after one year of operation. Argues that once the NLS becomes established it will be necessary for all teachers to engage with the research literature so that they teach from a position of professional understanding of the processes involved in reading and writing…

  14. Improvisations around the National Literacy Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanke, Veronica

    2002-01-01

    Describes how five and six year olds responded to and appropriated aspects of the National Literacy Strategy (NLS). Outlines how the children displayed increasing literacy and collaborative skills while working with consonant blends, alphabetical order, and spelling. Concludes NLS is not the whole story in regards to learning about literacy. (PM)

  15. A Systematic Review of Strategies to Foster Activity Engagement in Persons With Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Trahan, Maranda A.; Kuo, Julie; Carlson, Michelle C.; Gitlin, Laura N.

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a growing public health issue. Activity, a positive therapeutic modality, has potential to enhance quality of life and reduce behavioral symptoms in persons with dementia—outcomes eluding pharmacological treatments. However, it is unclear how to effectively engage persons with dementia in activities for them to derive desired benefits. We present a systematic review of 28 studies involving 50 tests of different ways of modifying activities to enhance engagement and reduce behavioral and psychological symptoms for this group. Of 50 tests, 22 (44%) evaluated changes to objects and properties (e.g., introducing activities with intrinsic interest), 6 (12%) evaluated changes to space demands (e.g., lighting, noise levels), 8 (16%) evaluated changes to social demands (e.g., prompts, praise), and 14 (28%) combined two or more activity modifications. No modifications were made to the sequence and timing of activities. Although modifications to objects and properties were the most common, outcomes for engagement and behaviors were mixed. Modifications to space and social demands were less frequently tested, but consistently yielded positive outcomes. No modifications resulted in negative behavioral outcomes or decreased engagement. Methodological strengths of studies included direct observation of outcomes and fidelity assessments. Few studies however involved persons with dementia at home. Our review revealed a growing evidentiary base for different modifications to foster engagement in activities and reduce behavioral and psychological symptoms. Future studies should evaluate how contextual factors (e.g., physical environment, activity type) and caregiver ability to employ activity modifications affect engagement. PMID:25274714

  16. Late-Life Risk Factors for All-Cause Dementia and Differential Dementia Diagnoses in Women

    PubMed Central

    Neergaard, Jesper Skov; Dragsbæk, Katrine; Hansen, Henrik Bo; Henriksen, Kim; Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten Asser

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Since the first evidence of a decline in dementia incidence was reported in 2011, the focus on modifiable risk factors has increased. The possibility of risk factor intervention as a prevention strategy has been widely discussed; however, further evidence in relation to risk factors is still needed. The Prospective Epidemiologic Risk Factor (PERF I) study was an observational prospective study of postmenopausal Danish women who were initially examined between 1999 and 2001 (n = 5855). Follow-up data on diagnosis and survival as of December 31, 2014 was retrieved from the National Danish Patient Registry and the National Danish Causes of Death Registry. Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for selected risk factors for dementia. Of 5512 eligible subjects, 592 developed dementia within the follow-up period of maximum 15 years. The independent factors associated with increased risk of all-cause dementia were depression (HR = 1.75 [95% CI 1.32–2.34]) and impaired fasting glucose levels. A dose–response relationship was observed between fasting glucose level and risk of dementia with HRs of 1.25 [1.05–1.49] and 1.45 [1.03–2.06] for impaired (5.6–6.9 mmol/L) and hyperglycemic (≥7.0 mmol/L) glucose levels, respectively. The factors associated with a decreased risk of dementia were overweight in late-life (HR = 0.75 [0. 62–0.89]) and physical activity at least once weekly (HR = 0.77 [0.61–0.96]). The identified risk factors for dementia in women in late-life are all considered modifiable. This supports the notion that prevention strategies may improve the poor future prospects for dementias in the ageing population. PMID:26986157

  17. Trends in use of antipsychotics in elderly patients with dementia: impact of national safety warnings

    PubMed Central

    Gallini, Adeline; Andrieu, Sandrine; Donohue, Julie M; Oumouhou, Naïma; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Gardette, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Based on evidence of an increased risk of death, drug agencies issued safety warnings about the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) in the elderly with dementia in 2004. This warning was extended to all antipsychotics in 2008. Little is known about the impact of these warnings on use. We conducted a quasi-experimental study (interrupted time-series) in France, for 2003–2011, including subjects aged ≥65 with dementia and subjects aged ≥65 without dementia in the EGB database (1/97th representative random sample of claims from the main Health Insurance scheme). Outcomes were monthly rates of use of antipsychotics (by class and agent) and of 5 comparison drug classes (antidepressants, benzodiazepines, dermatologicals, antidiabetics, antiasthmatics). Trends were analyzed by joinpoint regression, impact of warnings by linear segmented regression. In patients with dementia (n=7169), there was a 40% reduction in antipsychotic use from 14.2% in 2003 to 10.2% in 2011. The reduction began before 2004 and was unaffected by the warnings. Use of first generation antipsychotics declined over the period, while use of SGAs increased and leveled off from 2007. Use of the 5 comparison drug classes increased on the period. In subjects without dementia (n=91942), rates of overall antipsychotic use decreased from 2.3% in 2003 to 1.8% in 2011 with no effect of the warnings. Meanwhile, use of SGAs continuously increased from 0.37% to 0.64%. Antipsychotic use decreased in the elderly between 2003 and 2011, especially in dementia. The timing of the decrease, however, did not coincide with safety warnings. PMID:24126116

  18. A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

    2012-12-04

    Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nation's capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committee's report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nation's climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

  19. Dementia friendly, dementia capable, and dementia positive: concepts to prepare for the future.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Lewis, Frances Marcus

    2015-04-01

    With an aging global population, the number of dementia cases is growing exponentially. To address the upcoming dementia crisis, the World Health Organization and Alzheimer's Disease International (2012) collaborated on an extensive report, Dementia: A Public Health Priority. In the United Kingdom, Prime Minster David Cameron initiated a national challenge on dementia, forming 3 dementia challenge champion groups aimed at improving health and care, creating dementia-friendly communities, and promoting dementia research. In the U.S., President Obama signed the National Alzheimer's Project Act, which led to the formation of the Advisory Council on Alzheimer's Research, Care, and Services and the launch of the first National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease. The term "dementia capable" was introduced in the 2012 Recommendations of the Public Members of the Advisory Council and has since been adopted in both the recommendations and annual updates of the national plan. This paper will first compare and contrast government usage of the concepts dementia friendly and dementia capable, along with another valuable concept, dementia positive, that was added after reviewing the literature. Finally, a new vision statement for the U.S.' national plan will be proposed and recommendations incorporating these 3 concepts in policy, research, and practice will be made. PMID:26035599

  20. Dementia Friendly, Dementia Capable, and Dementia Positive: Concepts to Prepare for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Lewis, Frances Marcus

    2015-01-01

    With an aging global population, the number of dementia cases is growing exponentially. To address the upcoming dementia crisis, the World Health Organization and Alzheimer’s Disease International (2012) collaborated on an extensive report, Dementia: A Public Health Priority. In the United Kingdom, Prime Minster David Cameron initiated a national challenge on dementia, forming 3 dementia challenge champion groups aimed at improving health and care, creating dementia-friendly communities, and promoting dementia research. In the U.S., President Obama signed the National Alzheimer’s Project Act, which led to the formation of the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care, and Services and the launch of the first National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease. The term “dementia capable” was introduced in the 2012 Recommendations of the Public Members of the Advisory Council and has since been adopted in both the recommendations and annual updates of the national plan. This paper will first compare and contrast government usage of the concepts dementia friendly and dementia capable, along with another valuable concept, dementia positive, that was added after reviewing the literature. Finally, a new vision statement for the U.S.’ national plan will be proposed and recommendations incorporating these 3 concepts in policy, research, and practice will be made. PMID:26035599

  1. A Bayesian Approach to Identifying New Risk Factors for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yen-Hsia; Wu, Shihn-Sheng; Lin, Chun-Hung Richard; Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Yang, Pinchen; Chang, Yang-Pei; Tseng, Kuan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dementia is one of the most disabling and burdensome health conditions worldwide. In this study, we identified new potential risk factors for dementia from nationwide longitudinal population-based data by using Bayesian statistics. We first tested the consistency of the results obtained using Bayesian statistics with those obtained using classical frequentist probability for 4 recognized risk factors for dementia, namely severe head injury, depression, diabetes mellitus, and vascular diseases. Then, we used Bayesian statistics to verify 2 new potential risk factors for dementia, namely hearing loss and senile cataract, determined from the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We included a total of 6546 (6.0%) patients diagnosed with dementia. We observed older age, female sex, and lower income as independent risk factors for dementia. Moreover, we verified the 4 recognized risk factors for dementia in the older Taiwanese population; their odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 3.469 to 1.207. Furthermore, we observed that hearing loss (OR = 1.577) and senile cataract (OR = 1.549) were associated with an increased risk of dementia. We found that the results obtained using Bayesian statistics for assessing risk factors for dementia, such as head injury, depression, DM, and vascular diseases, were consistent with those obtained using classical frequentist probability. Moreover, hearing loss and senile cataract were found to be potential risk factors for dementia in the older Taiwanese population. Bayesian statistics could help clinicians explore other potential risk factors for dementia and for developing appropriate treatment strategies for these patients. PMID:27227925

  2. Treatable Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Michael E.; Cummings, Jeffrey L.; Benson, D. Frank

    1987-01-01

    Dementia is an acquired impairment of intellect produced by brain dysfunction. In the past, dementia was regarded as inevitably chronic, progressive and irreversible. More recently dementia has been viewed as a clinical syndrome that may be produced by both irreversible and reversible conditions. Recognition of the presence of a dementia syndrome should be followed by an evaluation for potentially treatable causes of the intellectual deterioration. Dementia treatment includes therapy for reversible or curable dementias and nonspecific interventions that may improve the condition of patients with progressive dementia syndromes. PMID:3617715

  3. People with dementia and carers' experiences of dementia care and services: Outcomes of a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Caroline L; Roe, Brenda; Jasper, Rowan; Jolley, David; Challis, David J

    2015-11-01

    An ageing population and an associated increase in the prevalence of dementia are of increasing concern in the United Kingdom and worldwide. Recently, the United Kingdom and other European countries implemented national dementia strategies to address this. This paper reports on the outcomes of a focus group study involving people with dementia and carers on their experiences of dementia care and support services in relation to government and third sector agencies' objectives and recommendations. Three focus groups comprising carers and people with dementia (n = 27) were undertaken covering topics related to experiences, service receipt, information sharing and service development. Some participants experienced difficulties or delays in receiving a dementia diagnosis and in accessing appropriate care. The provision of training, timeliness of information, access to appropriate advice, and consistent and flexible services were deemed important. The findings suggest that some issues raised by participants were highlighted in earlier policy objectives and recommendations but remain of central concern. The projected growth in the number of people with dementia coupled with reduced availability of informal care and increased demand for services emphasises the need to transform dementia care in the United Kingdom. PMID:24381211

  4. Healthcare Providers' Knowledge of Disordered Sleep, Sleep Assessment Tools, and Nonpharmacological Sleep Interventions for Persons Living with Dementia: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Cary A.; Jones, Allyson; Crick, Katelyn

    2014-01-01

    A large proportion of persons with dementia will also experience disordered sleep. Disordered sleep in dementia is a common reason for institutionalization and affects cognition, fall risk, agitation, self-care ability, and overall health and quality of life. This report presents findings of a survey of healthcare providers' awareness of sleep issues, assessment practices, and nonpharmacological sleep interventions for persons with dementia. There were 1846 participants, with the majority being from nursing and rehabilitation. One-third worked in long-term care settings and one-third in acute care. Few reported working in the community. Findings revealed that participants understated the incidence of sleep deficiencies in persons with dementia and generally lacked awareness of the relationship between disordered sleep and dementia. Their knowledge of sleep assessment tools was limited to caregiver reports, self-reports, and sleep diaries, with few using standardized tools or other assessment methods. The relationship between disordered sleep and comorbid conditions was not well understood. The three most common nonpharmacological sleep interventions participants identified using were a regular bedtime routine, increased daytime activity, and restricted caffeine. Awareness of other evidence-based interventions was low. These findings will guide evidence-informed research to develop and test more targeted and contextualized sleep and dementia knowledge translation strategies. PMID:24851185

  5. Creativity and dementia: a review.

    PubMed

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Di Giacomo, Dina; Passafiume, Domenico

    2012-08-01

    In these last years, creativity was found to play an important role for dementia patients in terms of diagnosis and rehabilitation strategies. This led us to explore the relationships between dementia and creativity. At the aim, artistic creativity and divergent thinking are considered both in non-artists and artists affected by different types of dementia. In general, artistic creativity can be expressed in exceptional cases both in Alzheimer's disease and Frontotemporal dementia, whereas divergent thinking decreases in dementia. The creation of paintings or music is anyway important for expressing emotions and well-being. Yet, creativity seems to emerge when the right prefrontal cortex, posterior temporal, and parietal areas are relatively intact, whereas it declines when these areas are damaged. However, enhanced creativity in dementia is not confirmed by controlled studies conducted in non-artists, and whether artists with dementia can show creativity has to be fully addressed. Future research directions are suggested. PMID:22438178

  6. Greater Sage-Grouse National Research Strategy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanser, Steven E.; Manier, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The condition of the sagebrush ecosystem has been declining in the Western United States, and greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a sagebrush-obligate species, has experienced concurrent decreases in distribution and population numbers. This has prompted substantial research and management over the past two decades to improve the understanding of sage-grouse and its habitats and to address the observed decreases in distribution and population numbers. The amount of research and management has increased as the year 2015 approaches, which is when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is expected to make a final decision about whether or not to protect the species under the Endangered Species Act. In 2012, the Sage-Grouse Executive Oversight Committee (EOC) of the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) lead the development of a Greater Sage-Grouse National Research Strategy (hereafter Research Strategy). This request was motivated by a practical need to systematically connect existing research and conservation plans with persisting or emerging information needs. Managers and researchers also wanted to reduce redundancy and help focus limited funds on the highest priority research and management issues. The USGS undertook the development of this Research Strategy, which addresses information and science relating to the greater sage-grouse and its habitat across portions of 11 Western States. This Research Strategy provides an outline of important research topics to ensure that science information gaps are identified and documented in a comprehensive manner. Further, by identifying priority topics and critical information needed for planning, research, and resource management, it provides a structure to help coordinate members of an expansive research and management community in their efforts to conduct priority research.

  7. An Example of National Literacy Strategy Medium-Term Planning. The National Literacy Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    These medium-term plans have been produced to support, but not prescribe, teachers' planning. They exemplify ways in which England's National Literacy Strategy (NLS) Framework objectives (and the Early Learning Goals) can be clustered. The Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 medium term plans cluster the NLS text, sentence and word level objectives into…

  8. National launch strategy vehicle data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, David

    1990-01-01

    The national launch strategy vehicle data management system (NLS/VDMS) was developed as part of the 1990 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. The system was developed under the guidance of the Engineering Systems Branch of the Information Systems Office, and is intended for use within the Program Development Branch PD34. The NLS/VDMS is an on-line database system that permits the tracking of various launch vehicle configurations within the program development office. The system is designed to permit the definition of new launch vehicles, as well as the ability to display and edit existing launch vehicles. Vehicles can be grouped in logical architectures within the system. Reports generated from this package include vehicle data sheets, architecture data sheets, and vehicle flight rate reports. The topics covered include: (1) system overview; (2) initial system development; (3) supercard hypermedia authoring system; (4) the ORACLE database; and (5) system evaluation.

  9. Doing dementia better: anthropological insights.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Elizabeth Herskovits

    2011-05-01

    Dementia, or neurodegenerative disease, is a disease category, and yet it is widely described in popular and professional media as a horror story. Patients with dementia and their families frequently report that they are less than pleased with their clinical encounters. This article reveals the deleterious impact that cultural assumptions about dementia have on the care provided, and, through an exploration of anthropological theories of personhood, suggests strategies for seeking improved quality of life through personhood-centered care. PMID:21641511

  10. Lack of strategy holding: a new pattern of learning deficit in cortical dementias.

    PubMed

    Benedet, María J; Lauro-Grotto, Rosapia; Giotti, Chiara

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate, by means of systematic research and qualitative data analysis, the presence, among a group of patients with fronto-temporal lobar degeneration of a subgroup that, at variance with the standard pattern, is able to devise and implement learning strategies, but appear impaired at carrying them on from a trial to the next. In order to provide evidence of the existence of a group of patients showing this type of learning disability, that we refer to as lack of strategy holding, we performed a stepwise hierarchical cluster analysis of a set of variables whose scores were selected from the subject's performance at the Test de Aprendizaje Verbal España-Complutense. Results substantiate the segregation of three groups of subjects characterized by the following patterns of performance: normal elderly individuals, who show a quite preserved ability to discover a semantic strategy along the learning trials and to carry it from a trial to the next, patients presenting with a deficit in implementing semantic learning strategies and possibly use of serial and/or phonological strategies to perform the task, and to patients who, although able to generate and implement appropriate learning strategies, appear unable to carry them over the learning trials. The presence of this new pattern raises a few questions that seem worth trying to address. PMID:19338728

  11. Medical Management of Frontotemporal Dementias: The Importance of the Caregiver in Symptom Assessment and Guidance of Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There are no currently Food and Drug Administration-approved or proven off-label treatments for the frontotemporal dementias (FTD). Clinicians, care-givers, and patients struggle regularly to find therapeutic regimens that can alleviate the problematic behavioral and cognitive symptoms associated with these devastating conditions. Success is “hit or miss” and the lessons learned are largely anecdotal to date. Drug discovery in this area has been largely hampered by the heterogeneous clinical presentations and pathological phenotypes of disease that represent significant obstacles to progress in this area. Biologically, plausible treatment strategies include the use of antidepressants (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor and monoamine oxidase inhibitors), acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonists, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, stimulants, antihypertensives, and agents that may ameliorate the symptoms of parkinsonism, pseudobulbar affect, and motor neuron disease that can often coexist with FTD. These medications all carry potential risks as well as possible benefits for the person suffering from FTD, and a clear understanding of these factors is critical in selecting an appropriate therapeutic regimen to maximize cognition and daily functions, reduce behavioral symptoms, and alleviate caregiver burden in an individual patient. The role of the caregiver in tracking and reporting of symptoms and the effects of individual therapeutic interventions is pivotal in this process. This manuscript highlights the importance of establishing an effective therapeutic partnership between the physician and caregiver in the medical management of the person suffering from FTD. PMID:21647712

  12. Late-Life Risk Factors for All-Cause Dementia and Differential Dementia Diagnoses in Women: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Neergaard, Jesper Skov; Dragsbæk, Katrine; Hansen, Henrik Bo; Henriksen, Kim; Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten Asser

    2016-03-01

    Since the first evidence of a decline in dementia incidence was reported in 2011, the focus on modifiable risk factors has increased. The possibility of risk factor intervention as a prevention strategy has been widely discussed; however, further evidence in relation to risk factors is still needed. The Prospective Epidemiologic Risk Factor (PERF I) study was an observational prospective study of postmenopausal Danish women who were initially examined between 1999 and 2001 (n = 5855). Follow-up data on diagnosis and survival as of December 31, 2014 was retrieved from the National Danish Patient Registry and the National Danish Causes of Death Registry. Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for selected risk factors for dementia. Of 5512 eligible subjects, 592 developed dementia within the follow-up period of maximum 15 years. The independent factors associated with increased risk of all-cause dementia were depression (HR = 1.75 [95% CI 1.32-2.34]) and impaired fasting glucose levels. A dose-response relationship was observed between fasting glucose level and risk of dementia with HRs of 1.25 [1.05-1.49] and 1.45 [1.03-2.06] for impaired (5.6-6.9 mmol/L) and hyperglycemic (≥7.0 mmol/L) glucose levels, respectively. The factors associated with a decreased risk of dementia were overweight in late-life (HR = 0.75 [0. 62-0.89]) and physical activity at least once weekly (HR = 0.77 [0.61-0.96]). The identified risk factors for dementia in women in late-life are all considered modifiable. This supports the notion that prevention strategies may improve the poor future prospects for dementias in the ageing population. PMID:26986157

  13. The National Literacy Strategy--Framework for Teaching: Additional Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    England's National Literacy Strategy is intended to raise standards of literacy for every student. Teachers should aim to include each student in the Literacy Hour. Evidence from the National Literacy Project (NLP), on which the national strategy is based, shows that students with widely varying needs can expect to improve their literacy skills in…

  14. Young-Onset Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kuruppu, Dulanji K; Matthews, Brandy R

    2014-01-01

    Young-onset dementia (YOD) is an neurological syndrome that affects behavior and cognition of patients younger than 65 years of age. Although frequently misdiagnosed, a systematic approach, reliant upon attainment of detailed medical history, collateral history from an informant, neuropsychological testing, laboratory studies, and neuroimaging, may facilitate earlier and more accurate diagnosis with subsequent intervention. The differential diagnosis of YOD is extensive and includes early-onset forms of adult neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, Lewy body dementias, Huntington's disease, and prion disease. Late-onset forms of childhood neurodegenerative conditions may also present as YOD and include mitochondrial disorders, lysosomal storage disorders, and leukodystrophies. Potentially reversible etiologies including inflammatory disorders, infectious diseases, toxic/metabolic abnormalities, transient epileptic amnesia, obstructive sleep apnea, and normal pressure hydrocephalus also represent important differential diagnostic considerations in YOD. This review will present etiologies, diagnostic strategies, and options for management of YOD with comprehensive summary tables for clinical reference. PMID:24234358

  15. The diagnosis of dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease: Recommendations from the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer’s Association workgroups on diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    McKhann, Guy M.; Knopman, David S.; Chertkow, Howard; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jack, Clifford R.; Kawas, Claudia H.; Klunk, William E.; Koroshetz, Walter J.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Mayeux, Richard; Mohs, Richard C.; Morris, John C.; Rossor, Martin N.; Scheltens, Philip; Carrillo, Maria C.; Thies, Bill; Weintraub, Sandra; Phelps, Creighton H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer’s Association charged a workgroup with the task of revising the 1984 criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia. The workgroup sought to ensure that the revised criteria would be flexible enough to be used by both general healthcare providers without access to neuropsychological testing, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid measures, and specialized investigators involved in research or in clinical trial studies who would have these tools available. We present criteria for all-cause dementia and for AD dementia. We retained the general framework of probable AD dementia from the 1984 criteria. On the basis of the past 27 years of experience, we made several changes in the clinical criteria for the diagnosis. We also retained the term possible AD dementia, but redefined it in a manner more focused than before. Bio-marker evidence was also integrated into the diagnostic formulations for probable and possible AD dementia for use in research settings. The core clinical criteria for AD dementia will continue to be the cornerstone of the diagnosis in clinical practice, but biomarker evidence is expected to enhance the pathophysiological specificity of the diagnosis of AD dementia. Much work lies ahead for validating the biomarker diagnosis of AD dementia. PMID:21514250

  16. Exploring the community nurse role in family-centred care for patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Dening, Karen Harrison; Hibberd, Penny

    2016-04-01

    A diagnosis of dementia can have a significant effect, not only on the person diagnosed, but also on the person's family. Drivers within national policy and strategy to raise awareness and promote education have improved the understanding of dementia across professional groups, as well as within the wider population. However, families living with dementia still struggle to find information and support. This paper explores the common issues faced by families, and focuses on a relationship approach to care. The role of the community nurse can be central to supporting people with dementia and their families to live well in their own communities. The paper uses a case-study approach to discuss three scenarios commonly raised by family carers and people with dementia: (1) seeking help and support at point of seeking diagnosis, (2) knowing the 'right time' to seek help and advice, and (3) when symptomatic changes affect wellbeing and relationships. PMID:27282506

  17. National Drug Control Strategy. FY 2009 Budget Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The White House, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The National Drug Control Budget Summary identifies resources and performance indicators for programs within the Executive Branch that are integral to the President's National Drug Control Strategy. The Strategy, which is the Administration's plan for reducing drug use and availability, is based on three pillars: (1) Stopping Use Before It Starts,…

  18. National Indigenous English Literacy and Numeracy Strategy, 2000-2004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Dept. of Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Canberra.

    Australia's National Indigenous Literacy and Numeracy Strategy acknowledges that extra effort and resources will be required for Indigenous Australian children to achieve the recently enacted national educational goals. The principal objective of the strategy is to achieve English literacy and numeracy for Indigenous students at levels comparable…

  19. Response to the National Career Development Strategy Green Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Journal of Career Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Career Development Strategy Green Paper paper proposes a strategy that is committed to these principles: (1) quality through Career Industry Council of Australia (CICA) benchmarking, quality frameworks and processes and as a risk management strategy; (2) lifetime access to career development services; (3) development of career…

  20. Developing and testing a strategy to enhance a palliative approach and care continuity for people who have dementia: study overview and protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Typically, dementia involves progressive cognitive and functional deterioration, leading to death. A palliative approach recognizes the inevitable health decline, focusing on quality of life. The approach is holistic, proactive, supports the client and the family, and can be provided by the client's usual care team. In the last months of life, distressing symptoms, support needs, and care transitions may escalate. This project trialed a strategy intended to support a consistent, high quality, palliative approach for people with dementia drawing close to death. The strategy was to implement two communities of practice, drawn primarily from service provider organizations across care sectors, supporting them to address practice change. Communities comprised practitioners and other health professionals with a passionate commitment to dementia palliative care and the capacity to drive practice enhancement within partnering organizations. Project aims were to document: (i) changes driven by the communities of practice; (ii) changes in staff/practitioner characteristics during the study (knowledge of a palliative approach and dementia; confidence delivering palliative care; views on death and dying, palliative care, and a palliative approach for dementia); (iii) outcomes from perspectives of family carers, care providers, and community of practice members; (iv) the extent to which changes enhanced practice and care continuity; and (v) barriers to and facilitators of successful community of practice implementation. Methods/design This action research project was implemented over 14 months in 2010/11 in metropolitan Perth, Western Australia and regional Launceston, Tasmania. Each state based community of practice worked with the researchers to scope existing practice and its outcomes. The research team compiled a report of existing practice recommendations and resources. Findings of these two steps informed community of practice action plans and development of

  1. Multisensory Stimulation as an Intervention Strategy for Elderly Patients With Severe Dementia: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alba; Marante-Moar, M Pilar; Sarabia, Carmen; de Labra, Carmen; Lorenzo, Trinidad; Maseda, Ana; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of multisensory stimulation environment (MSSE) and one-to-one activity sessions in the symptomatology of elderly individuals with severe dementia. Thirty-two participants were randomly assigned to the following 3 groups: MSSE, activity, and control group. The MSSE and activity groups participated in two 30-minute weekly sessions over 16 weeks. Pre-, mid-, and posttrial; 8-week follow-up behavior; mood; cognitive status; and dementia severity were registered. Patients in the MSSE group demonstrated a significant improvement in the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and Bedford Alzheimer Nursing Severity Scale scores compared with the activity group. Both MSSE and activity groups showed an improvement during the intervention in the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory aggressive behavior factor and total score, with no significant differences between groups. The MSSE may have better effects on neuropsychiatric symptoms and dementia severity in comparison with one-to-one activity sessions in patients with severe dementia. PMID:26631687

  2. The National Drug Control Strategy, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    This federal document offers a comprehensive approach to reduce demand for illegal drugs and decrease their availability. Supported by statistical tables and graphs, the summary is divided into six sections. "The Purpose and Nature of the Strategy" outlines a 10-year plan for drug interdiction and reduction and identifies the elements of that…

  3. [Dementia and oral health].

    PubMed

    Wierink, C D; de Baat, C

    2009-02-01

    The first part of this article is a translation of an editorial which appeared in the journal Gerodontology. The author warns that a great increase is expected in the number of dementia patients in the United Kingdom and he argues that care for these patients be given a high place on the national agenda. Dementia was also a major issue at the meeting of the International Association for Dental Research in March 2007. Several international studies presented there indicated that elderly people with dementia constitute a group at risk with respect to oral health. In the evaluation of the editorial, the situation in The Netherlands is described. There is also serious concern in The Netherlands about the statistics with respect to dementia. Due to the growing number of frail elderly people having a natural dentition, the need for professional oral care will increase. General practitioners have the important task of providing adequate oral health care for elderly people suffering from dementia who are still living at home. Guidelines for Oral Care, having to do with the improvement of oral care in institutions, appeared recently. With the guidelines, a good basis for developing adequate oral health care of frail elderly people is available. However, the implementation of these guidelines will require some attention. PMID:19280891

  4. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from the first ... disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive assessments followed by ...

  5. Vascular dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alzheimer's Disease, and Dementia . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 6. Gorelick PB, Scuteri A, Black ... eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 402. Peterson R, Graff-Radford ...

  6. Forging a National Strategy for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Jack

    2009-01-01

    At the National Staff Development Council's (NSDC's) 40th Annual Conference in December 2008, former NSDC Board President Karen Dyer and Executive Director Stephanie Hirsh presented the first Policy Maker of the Year Award to Senator Jack Reed (D-RI) in recognition of his dedicated work on behalf of legislation that promotes effective professional…

  7. 3 CFR - Implementation of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Implementation of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy... HIV/AIDS Strategy Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies As we approach 30 years from the onset of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States, new actions are needed to...

  8. National mass care strategy: a national integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Mintz, Amy; Gonzalez, Waddy

    2013-01-01

    Mass care refers to a wide range of humanitarian activities that collectively provide life- sustaining services, such as emergency sheltering, feeding, reunification, distribution of emergency supplies and recovery information, before or in the aftermath of an emergency or disaster. Most services are coordinated and provided by non-governmental organisations and/or local government. Based on the lessons learned in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, the American Red Cross, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters joined efforts to expand national mass care capabilities in order to support survivors in the wake of catastrophic events, as well as to enhance the integration of volunteers and non-governmental organisations into the broader national effort. These efforts resulted in the creation of the National Mass Care Council in 2010, with representatives of Federal and State agencies, voluntary organisations and the private sector working together to develop a unified approach to mass care and to ensure the provision of consistent and uniform services across the USA, regardless of the magnitude of the event. PMID:24113635

  9. The WHO-ITU national eHealth strategy toolkit as an effective approach to national strategy development and implementation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Clayton

    2013-01-01

    With few exceptions, national eHealth strategies are the pivotal tools upon which the launch or refocusing of national eHealth programmes is hinged. The process of their development obviates cross-sector ministerial commitment led by the Ministry of Health. Yet countries often grapple with the task of strategy development and best efforts frequently fail to address strategic components of eHealth key to ensure successful implementation and stakeholder engagement. This can result in strategies that are narrowly focused, with an overemphasis placed on achieving technical outcomes. Without a clear link to a broader vision of health system development and a firm commitment from partners, the ability of a strategy to shape development of a national eHealth framework will be undermined and crucial momentum for implementation will be lost. WHO and ITU have sought to address this issue through the development of the National eHealth Strategy Toolkit that provides a basis for the components and processes to be considered in a strategy development or refocusing exercise. We look at this toolkit and highlight those areas which the countries should consider in formulating their national eHealth strategy. PMID:23920691

  10. Social commitment robots and dementia.

    PubMed

    Roger, Kerstin; Guse, Lorna; Mordoch, Elaine; Osterreicher, Angela

    2012-03-01

    In 2010, approximately 500,000 Canadians suffered from a dementia-related illness. The number of sufferers is estimated to double in about 25 years. Due to this growing demographic, dementia (most frequently caused by Alzheimer's disease) will increasingly have a significant impact on our aging community and their caregivers. Dementia is associated with challenging behaviours such as agitation, wandering, and aggression. Care providers must find innovative strategies that facilitate the quality of life for this population; moreover, such strategies must value the individual person. Social commitment robots - designed specifically with communication and therapeutic purposes - provide one means towards attaining this goal. This paper describes a study in which Paro (a robotic baby harp seal) was used as part of a summer training program for students. Preliminary conclusions suggest that the integration of social commitment robots may be clinically valuable for older, agitated persons living with dementia in long-term care settings. PMID:22336517

  11. Toward a digital library strategy for a National Information Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, Robert A.; Hulen, Harry

    1993-01-01

    Bills currently before the House and Senate would give support to the development of a National Information Infrastructure, in which digital libraries and storage systems would be an important part. A simple model is offered to show the relationship of storage systems, software, and standards to the overall information infrastructure. Some elements of a national strategy for digital libraries are proposed, based on the mission of the nonprofit National Storage System Foundation.

  12. A perfect match: Nuclear energy and the National Energy Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    In the course of developing the National Energy Strategy, the Department of Energy held 15 public hearings, heard from more than 375 witnesses and received more than 1000 written comments. In April 1990, the Department published an Interim Report on the National Energy Strategy, which compiles those public comments. The National Energy Strategy must be based on actual experience and factual analysis of our energy, economic and environmental situation. This report by the Nuclear Power Oversight committee, which represents electric utilities and other organizations involved in supplying electricity from nuclear energy to the American people, provides such an analysis. The conclusions here are based on hard facts and actual worldwide experience. This analysis of all the available data supports -- indeed, dictates -- expanded reliance on nuclear energy in this nation's energy supply to achieve the President's goals. 33 figs.

  13. Diabetes and dementia in older people: a Best Clinical Practice Statement by a multidisciplinary National Expert Working Group.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A J; Hillson, R; Bayer, A J

    2014-09-01

    Both dementia and diabetes mellitus are long-term disabling conditions and each may be a co-morbidity of the other. Type 2 diabetes is associated with a 1.5- to 2-fold higher risk of dementia. Diabetes also may occur for the first time in many individuals with mental ill health, including cognitive impairment and dementia, and this may complicate management and lead to difficulties in self-care. Case finding is often poor for cognitive impairment in medical settings and for diabetes in mental health settings and this needs to be addressed in the development of care pathways for both conditions. Many other deficiencies in quality care (both for dementia and diabetes) currently exist, but we hope that this Best Clinical Practice Statement will provide a platform for further work in this area. We have outlined the key steps in an integrated care pathway for both elements of this clinical relationship, produced guidance on identifying each condition, dealt with the potentially hazardous issue of hypoglycaemia, and have outlined important competencies required of healthcare workers in both medical/diabetes and mental health settings to enhance clinical care. PMID:25131194

  14. Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Roger E; El-Khoury, Ramy

    2016-02-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a not-uncommon explanation for progressive cognitive deficit in patients who often have a genetic susceptibility for such a neurodegenerative process. However, FTD does not seem to identify one particular pathogenetic mechanism but rather a spectrum of pathologies with particular predilection for the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. There have been various subcategorizations of this form of dementia that have a tendency to be of earlier onset than typical Alzheimer disease and heralded by behavioral or communication manifestations. There is a behavioral variant and a language variant, referred to as primary progressive aphasia. PMID:26613998

  15. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  16. Healthy cognitive aging and dementia prevention.

    PubMed

    Smith, Glenn E

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral prevention strategies can help maintain high levels of cognition and functional integrity, and can reduce the social, medical, and economic burden associated with cognitive aging and age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Interventions involving physical exercise and cognitive training have consistently shown positive effects on cognition in older adults. "Brain fitness" interventions have now been shown to have sustained effects lasting 10 years or more. A meta-analysis suggests these physical exercise and brain fitness exercises produce nearly identical impact on formal measures of cognitive function. Behavioral interventions developed and deployed by psychologists are key in supporting healthy cognitive aging. The National Institutes of Health should expand research on cognitive health and behavioral and social science to promote healthy aging and to develop and refine ways to prevent and treat dementia. Funding for adequately powered, large-scale trials is needed. Congress must maintain support for crucial dementia-related initiatives like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthy Brain Initiative and fund training programs to insure there is a work force with skills to provide high quality care for older adults. Insurers must provide better coverage for behavioral interventions. Better coverage is needed so there can be increased access to evidence-based disease prevention and health promotion services with the potential for reducing dementia risk. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27159433

  17. Apraxias in Neurodegenerative Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Abbas, Mirza Masoom

    2015-01-01

    Background: Apraxia is a state of inability to carry out a learned motor act in the absence of motor, sensory or cerebellar defect on command processed through the Praxis circuit. Breakdown in default networking is one of the early dysfunction in cortical dementias and result in perplexity, awkwardness, omission, substitution errors, toying behavior and unrecognizable gestures in response to command with voluntary reflex dissociation where, when unobserved patient will carry out reflex movements normally. Awareness into the organicity of these phenomenas will help in early diagnosis, which will help in initiating appropriate treatment and slowing down the progression of the disease. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to look for the various kinds of apraxias in patients with dementia using appropriate simple tests. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients satisfying Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for dementia were evaluated in detail with mandatory investigations for dementia followed by testing for ideational, ideomotor, limb-kinetic, buccopharyngeal, dressing apraxia, constructional apraxia and gait apraxias in addition to recording of rare apraxias when present. Results: Alzheimer's disease showed maximum association with apraxias in all the phases of the disease ideational, ideomotor, dressing and constructional apraxias early and buccopharyngeal and gait apraxia late. Frontotemporal lobe dementia showed buccopharyngeal and gait apraxias late into the disease. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration showed limb apraxias and diffuse Lewy body disease showed more agnosias and less apraxias common apraxias seen was Ideational and Ideomotor. Conclusion: Recognition of the apraxias help in establishing organicity, categorization, caregiver education, early strategies for treatment, avoiding anti-psychotics and introducing disease modifying pharmacotherapeutic agents and also prognosticating. PMID:25722511

  18. Year 5 Booster Units. The National Literacy Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England).

    The eight units of work in this document are designed to complement existing literacy booster units. Each unit is based on teaching objectives from the National Literacy Strategy Framework. They have been produced with the help of Year 5 teachers and have been trialled with pupils in a range of schools. The units support teachers' work with Year 5…

  19. Teacher Stress and Coping Strategies: A National Snapshot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This national survey of 1,201 kindergarten through Grade-12-U.S. teachers focused on three related areas: (1) sources of teacher stress, (2) manifestations of stress, and (3) suggested coping strategies. The survey instrument was adapted from the Teacher Stress Inventory and the Coping Scale for Adults. Results indicated that teachers nationwide…

  20. Easter School Guidance. The National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    This booklet explains the goals of Easter Schools, part of England's National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies. Easter Schools should be planned to cover four half-days and include four literacy and four mathematics lessons each covering the equivalent of at least an hour. The booklet addresses the following issues: why funding has been made…

  1. Response to the National Career Development Strategy Green Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Journal of Career Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Career Development Association of Australia (CDAA) congratulates the Commonwealth Government on the development of the National Career Development Strategy Green Paper. This is a timely and important document that provides a framework to demonstrate the central contribution that career development services play in supporting individuals,…

  2. Strand Tracker: Non-Fiction Objectives. The National Literacy Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    These materials aim to help teachers make explicit links between teaching in the Literacy Hour and in the rest of the curriculum. The materials map teaching objectives from England's National Literacy Strategy's (NLS) Framework for Teaching to various text types and lists NLS resources which can be used to support teaching and learning. Text types…

  3. Long Overdue? Another Look at the National Literacy Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the teaching approaches which English primary schools are encouraged to use as part of the National Literacy Strategy (NLS) and the ways in which the case for their increased use is supported by research and inspection evidence. Outlines the studies which have influenced the NLS in promoting greater direct interactive teaching of…

  4. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Raj N; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25-30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood-brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  5. Spatial strategies for managing visitor impacts in National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leung, Y.-F.; Marion, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Resource and social impacts caused by recreationists and tourists have become a management concern in national parks and equivalent protected areas. The need to contain visitor impacts within acceptable limits has prompted park and protected area managers to implement a wide variety of strategies and actions, many of which are spatial in nature. This paper classifies and illustrates the basic spatial strategies for managing visitor impacts in parks and protected areas. A typology of four spatial strategies was proposed based on the recreation and park management literature. Spatial segregation is a common strategy for shielding sensitive resources from visitor impacts or for separating potentially conflicting types of use. Two forms of spatial segregation are zoning and closure. A spatial containment strategy is intended to minimize the aggregate extent of visitor impacts by confining use to limited designated or established Iocations. In contrast, a spatial dispersal strategy seeks to spread visitor use, reducing the frequency of use to levels that avoid or minimize permanent resource impacts or visitor crowding and conflict. Finally, a spatial configuration strategy minimizes impacting visitor behavior though the judicious spatial arrangement of facilities. These four spatial strategics can be implemented separately or in combination at varying spatial scales within a single park. A survey of national park managers provides an empirical example of the diversity of implemented spatial strategies in managing visitor impacts. Spatial segregation is frequently applied in the form of camping restrictions or closures to protect sensitive natural or cultural resources and to separate incompatible visitor activities. Spatial containment is the most widely applied strategy for minimizing the areal extent of resource impacts. Spatial dispersal is commonly applied to reduce visitor crowding or conflicts in popular destination areas but is less frequently applied or

  6. Expanding Expectations for Narrative Styles in the Context of Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guendouzi, Jackie; Davis, Boyd H.; Maclagan, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This article uses discourse analyses to examine the narrative styles produced by 2 women with a diagnosis of dementia. Because of constrained cognitive resources, people with dementia (PWD) often use alternative strategies to weave their stories into conversations. People with dementia have difficulty in initiating and maintaining a canonical…

  7. Understanding dementia: effective information access from the Deaf community's perspective.

    PubMed

    Young, Alys; Ferguson-Coleman, Emma; Keady, John

    2016-01-01

    This study concerns older Deaf sign language users in the UK. Its aim was to explore how to enable effective information access and promote awareness and understanding of dementia from a culturally Deaf perspective. A purposive sample of 26 Deaf people without dementia participated in one of three focus groups facilitated directly in British Sign Language (BSL) without an intermediate interpreter. The sample was differentiated by age, role in the Deaf community, and diversity of educational attainment and professional experience. A phenomenological approach underpinned the thematic analysis of data. The findings demonstrate: (i) translation into (BSL) is a necessary but not sufficient condition to support understanding. Attention to culturally preferred means of engagement with information is vital; (ii) the content of information is best presented utilising structures and formats which cohere with Deaf people's visual cognitive strengths; and (iii) the importance of cultural values and cultural practices in raising awareness and building understanding of dementia. These include collective rather than individual responsibility for knowledge transfer and the pan-national nature of knowledge transfer among Deaf people(s). The discussion demonstrates how these specific features of effective information access and awareness building have universal implications relevant to public engagement and the promotion of general knowledge consistent with the National Dementia Strategy (England). PMID:25469427

  8. The neuropathology and cerebrovascular mechanisms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Raz, Limor; Knoefel, Janice; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia is increasing in our aging population at an alarming rate. Because of the heterogeneity of clinical presentation and complexity of disease neuropathology, dementia classifications remain controversial. Recently, the National Plan to address Alzheimer’s Disease prioritized Alzheimer’s disease-related dementias to include: Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and mixed dementias. While each of these dementing conditions has their unique pathologic signature, one common etiology shared among all these conditions is cerebrovascular dysfunction at some point during the disease process. The goal of this comprehensive review is to summarize the current findings in the field and address the important contributions of cerebrovascular, physiologic, and cellular alterations to cognitive impairment in these human dementias. Specifically, evidence will be presented in support of small-vessel disease as an underlying neuropathologic hallmark of various dementias, while controversial findings will also be highlighted. Finally, the molecular mechanisms shared among all dementia types including hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial bioenergetics, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and blood–brain barrier permeability responsible for disease etiology and progression will be discussed. PMID:26174330

  9. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Dementia Types of Dementia Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies Down ... Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher Study Name 2015 Jesse Mez ...

  10. Types of Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Dementia Types of Dementia Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies Down ... Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher Study Name 2015 Jesse Mez ...

  11. What to Ask: Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... What to Ask: Dementia Tools and Tips The memory loss and other changes seen in dementia can ... can ask your healthcare proffesional about dementia. Is memory loss a normal part of aging? If so, ...

  12. National symbols and distinctiveness: rhetorical strategies in creating distinct national identities.

    PubMed

    Finell, Eerika; Liebkind, Karmela

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine qualitatively how respondents create national distinctiveness using rhetorical identity strategies in the context of four Finnish national symbols. The data consist of 127 essays written by Finnish secondary school students. Analysis revealed five different strategies used to distinguish between the in-group and the out-group. These strategies differ on two dimensions: the level of polarization, and the extent to which the in-group-out-group relationship is depicted as being active versus passive. Furthermore, the analysis showed that the two dimensions of nationalism, particularism and universalism, have an important role in the differentiation processes and therefore highlighted the importance of taking into consideration ideological issues while studying social identities. The meaning of the contents of national identity in the differentiation processes is also discussed. PMID:19558753

  13. Impact on the PACOM regional command strategy of the evolving national security strategy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, M.H.

    1994-02-08

    This paper deals with the conclusions and recommendations of the impact the evolving United States national security strategy may have on the PACOM regional command strategy. The conclusions and recommendations are based on a survey of the January 1993 National Security Strategy of the United States presented by the outgoing Administration and the impact that the evolving strategy of the Clinton Administration is having. These conclusions and recommendations are also influenced by current events surrounding the activities and policy debate centered on the Peoples Democratic Republic of Korea. The conclusions drawn are that the objectives of national security are timeless and consistent from Administration to Administration, even when the party changes. The divergence occurs in emphasis and priority. Several impacts on the PACOM regional command strategy are identified as a result. To break the reliance on the strategy of deterrence requires refocusing of the priority from the global-international level to the regional level. The recommendation is made that the Administration should de-link the military considerations on the Korean peninsula from the international debate over the DPRK nuclear program.

  14. 76 FR 30193 - National Fish, Wildlife, and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy; Notice of Intent: Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service National Fish, Wildlife, and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy; Notice of... National Fish, Wildlife, and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy (Strategy). The Strategy will provide a... to the Office of the Science Advisor, Attn: National Fish, Wildlife, and Plants Climate...

  15. Bridge to a sustainable future: National environmental technology strategy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    For the past two years the Administration has sought the views of Congress, the states, communities, industry, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and interested citizens on ways to spur the development and use of a new generation of environmental technologies. This document represents the views of thousands of individuals who participated in events around the country to help craft a national environmental technology strategy that will put us on the path to sustainable development.

  16. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    PubMed Central

    Grand, Jacob HG; Caspar, Sienna; MacDonald, Stuart WS

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer’s disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by

  17. [Falls in patients with dementia].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi

    2008-11-01

    People with cognitive impairment are at about 2 to 3 times higher risk of falling compared with cognitively intact elderly. Incidence of falls among patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is high, nevertheless the clinical feature common in patients with mild to moderate AD is the absence of motor impairment. Recent studies suggest that the divided attention markedly impairs the ability of patients with AD to regulate the gait. Falls are particularly common in Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) patients and may aid diagnosis, and the falls are associated with parkinsonism and other unclear factors. Treatment studies evaluating fall reduction strategies in dementia patients are a priority. PMID:18974447

  18. Climate Change Education Roundtable: A Coherent National Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storksdieck, M.; Feder, M.; Climate Change Education Roundtable

    2010-12-01

    The Climate Change Education (CCE) Roundtable fosters ongoing discussion of the challenges to and strategies for improving public understanding of climate science and climate change among federal agencies, the business community, non-profit, and academic sectors. The CCE Roundtable is provides a critical mechanism for developing a coherent, national strategy to advance climate change education guided by the best available research evidence. Through its meetings and workshops, the roundtable brings together 30 federal and state policymakers, educators, communications and media experts, and members from the business and scientific community. The roundtable includes a number of ex officio members from federal agencies with dedicated interests in climate change education, including officials from the National Science Foundation’s EHR Directorate and its collaborating partner divisions, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Interior, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Education. The issues that are addressed by the roundtable include: - ways to incorporate knowledge about learning and understanding in developing informative programs and materials for decision-makers who must cope with climate change - the design of educational programs for professionals such as local planners, water managers, and the like, to enable them to better understand the implications of climate change for their decisions - development of training programs for scientists to help them become better communicators to decision-makers about implications of, and solutions to climate change - coordinated and collaborative efforts at the national level between federal agencies and other stakeholders This presenation will describe how the roundtable is fostering a coherent direction for climate change education.

  19. Senile dementia.

    PubMed

    Terry, R D

    1978-12-01

    The Alzheimer type of senile dementia (SDAT) accounts for more than 50% of such cases, and is a very common disorder as well as being very costly in emotional, economic, and medical terms. It carries a markedly shortened life expectancy. Gray-to-white-matter ratios change and the brain shrinks slightly in the course of normal aging, but SDAT brains may not be significantly more atrophic than are normal controls. Cortical neurons are diminished in number in normal aging, but counts from frontal and midtemporal regions of SDAT specimens are not different from age-matched controls. There is loss of dendrites and of dendritic spines in both normal and abnormal aged specimens. Neurofibrillary tangles are made up of paired helical filaments that appear to be chemically and immunologically related to normal neurofibers. Neuritic plaques are made up of an amyloid core surrounded by abnormal axonal endings. Both plaques and tangles are to be correlated with the presence of senile dementia. There is some evidence for an infectious etiology of SDAT. Choline acetyltransferase is markedly reduced in cortical tissue of these patients, but the muscarinic receptors of acetylcholine are normal. PMID:720637

  20. [Indonesia draws up plans for a national strategy].

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    Dr. Sumedha Khanna, the World Health Organization representative in Indonesia, has reported that Indonesia is about to undertake a national level evaluation of maternal health care and training of midwives with the help of a UN subsidy. The results will be presented at a high level seminar planned for July 1992. The main elements of the national strategy and plan of action will also be developed at the meeting and integrated into the National Health Plan. The goal is to reduce maternal mortality to half its current level of 4500/100,000 live births by the year 2000. Part of the strategy will be to remedy the shortage of qualified midwives and of emergency services. Priority will be given to providing each village or health center with a qualified nurse-midwife. The Indonesian government expects to train 33,000 nurse-midwives within 5 years. The World Bank has agreed to subsidize training of 15,000. Physicians in district hospitals will be trained in essential obstetrical functions with the collaboration of the Indonesian Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. UNICEF is reportedly prepared to help. The Indonesian Association of Midwives has supported the initiative by using surveys of maternal mortality in different parts of the country to analyze the need to improve the health of Indonesian women. PMID:12284954

  1. Validation of a Computerized, Game-based Assessment Strategy to Measure Training Effects on Motor-Cognitive Functions in People With Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Nele; Werner, Christian; Hauer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    cognitive tests and simple (rs=−.22 to .68, P ≤.001-.03), moderate (rs=−.33 to .71, P ≤.001-.004), and complex motor-cognitive Physiomat tasks (rs=−.22 to .83, P ≤.001-.30) indicating a good construct validity. Moderate-to-high correlations between test and retest assessments were found for simple, moderate, and complex motor-cognitive tasks (ICC=.47-.83, P ≤.001) indicating good test–retest reliability. Sensitivity to change was good to excellent for Physiomat assessment as it reproduced significant improvements (P ≤.001) with mostly moderate-to-large effect sizes (SRM=0.5-2.0) regarding all trained tasks. Completion time averaged 25.8 minutes. Completion rate was high for initial Physiomat measures. No adverse events occurred during assessment. Conclusions Overall, Physiomat proved to have good psychometric qualities in people with mild-to-moderate dementia representing a reliable, valid, responsive, and feasible assessment strategy for multimorbid older adults with or without cognitive impairment, which relates to identical and integrated performances trained by using the game. PMID:27432746

  2. Hypnotics and the Occurrence of Bone Fractures in Hospitalized Dementia Patients: A Matched Case-Control Study Using a National Inpatient Database

    PubMed Central

    Tamiya, Hiroyuki; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matusi, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Ogawa, Sumito; Akishita, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventing falls and bone fractures in hospital care is an important issue in geriatric medicine. Use of hypnotics is a potential risk factor for falls and bone fractures in older patients. However, data are lacking on the association between use of hypnotics and the occurrence of bone fracture. Methods We used a national inpatient database including 1,057 hospitals in Japan and included dementia patients aged 50 years or older who were hospitalized during a period of 12 months between April 2012 and March 2013. The primary outcome was the occurrence of bone fracture during hospitalization. Use of hypnotics was compared between patients with and without bone fracture in this matched case-control study. Results Of 140,494 patients, 830 patients suffered from in-hospital fracture. A 1:4 matching with age, sex and hospital created 817 cases with fracture and 3,158 matched patients without fracture. With adjustment for the Charlson comorbidity index, emergent admission, activities of daily living, and scores for level walking, a higher occurrence of fractures were seen with short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics (odds ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.19–1.73; P<0.001), ultrashort-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (1.66; 1.37–2.01; P<0.001), hydroxyzine (1.45; 1.15–1.82, P=0.001), risperidone and perospirone (1.37; 1.08–1.73; P=0.010). Other drug groups were not significantly associated with the occurrence of in-hospital fracture. Conclusions Short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics and ultrashort-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotics may increase risk of bone fracture in hospitalized dementia patients. PMID:26061231

  3. Flavonoids and dementia: an update.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I E; Daglia, M; Nabavi, S F; Loizzo, M R; Sobarzo-Sánchez, E; Nabavi, S M

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a strongly age-related syndrome due to cognitive decline that can be considered a typical example of the combination of physiological and pathological aging-associated changes occurring in old people; it ranges from intact cognition to mild cognitive impairment, which is an intermediate stage of cognitive deterioration, and dementia. The spread of this syndrome has induced to study and try to reduce dementia modifiable risk factors. They include insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, depression, cognitive inactivity or low educational attainment as well as physical inactivity and incorrect diet, which can be considered one of the most important factors. One emerging strategy to decrease the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment and dementia may be the use of nutritional interventions. In the last decade, prospective data have suggested that high fruit and vegetable intakes are related to improved cognitive functions and reduced risks of developing a neurodegenerative process. The protective effects against neurodegeneration could be in part due to the intake of flavonoids that have been associated with several health benefits such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, increased neuronal signaling, and improved metabolic functions. The present article is aimed at reviewing scientific studies that show the protective effects of flavonoid intake against mild cognitive impairment and dementia. PMID:25515512

  4. Strategy for a transparent, accessible, and sustainable national claims database.

    PubMed

    Gelburd, Robin

    2015-03-01

    The article outlines the strategy employed by FAIR Health, Inc, an independent nonprofit, to maintain a national database of over 18 billion private health insurance claims to support consumer education, payer and provider operations, policy makers, and researchers with standard and customized data sets on an economically self-sufficient basis. It explains how FAIR Health conducts all operations in-house, including data collection, security, validation, information organization, product creation, and transmission, with a commitment to objectivity and reliability in data and data products. It also describes the data elements available to researchers and the diverse studies that FAIR Health data facilitate. PMID:26014305

  5. [Normative-legal support for implementation of national strategy of glaucoma control in Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Vitovs'ka, O P; Tymchenko, O I

    2009-01-01

    The review of normative legal database for implementation of national strategy of glaucoma control has demonstrated that there are all terms and conditions for implementation of national strategy on the national level. There is no necessity to change present normative legal database in the field of public health for the purpose of strategy implementation. PMID:20455458

  6. 76 FR 29195 - National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC) Governance Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace...: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: NIST announces the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in... with the Strategy. The goals of this workshop are to provide a venue for discussion and...

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory accelerated tru waste workoff strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Kosiewicz, S.T.; Triay, I.R.; Rogers, P.Z.; Christensen, D.V.

    1997-03-01

    During 1996, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed two transuranic (TRU) waste workoff strategies that were estimated to save $270 - 340M through accelerated waste workoff and the elimination of a facility. The planning effort included a strategy to assure that LANL would have a significant quantity (3000+ drums) of TRU waste certified for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) beginning in April of 1998, when WIPP was projected to open. One of the accelerated strategies can be completed in less than ten years through a Total Optimization of Parameters Scenario ({open_quotes}TOPS{close_quotes}). {open_quotes}TOPS{close_quotes} fully utilizes existing LANL facilities and capabilities. For this scenario, funding was estimated to be unconstrained at $23M annually to certify and ship the legacy inventory of TRU waste at LANL. With {open_quotes}TOPS{close_quotes} the inventory is worked off in about 8.5 years while shipping 5,000 drums per year at a total cost of $196M. This workoff includes retrieval from earthen cover and interim storage costs. The other scenario envisioned funding at the current level with some increase for TRUPACT II loading costs, which total $16M annually. At this funding level, LANL estimates it will require about 17 years to work off the LANL TRU legacy waste while shipping 2,500 drums per year to WIPP. The total cost will be $277M. This latter scenario decreases the time for workoff by about 19 years from previous estimates and saves an estimated $190M. In addition, the planning showed that a $70M facility for TRU waste characterization was not needed. After the first draft of the LANL strategies was written, Congress amended the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) to accelerate the opening of WIPP to November 1997. Further, the No Migration Variance requirement for the WIPP was removed. This paper discusses the LANL strategies as they were originally developed. 1 ref., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Personality and dementia.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Borin, Gemma; Del Debbio, Alessandro; Di Fiorino, Mario

    2015-03-01

    Personality describes persistent human behavioral responses to broad classes of environmental stimuli. Change in personality may be an early sign of dementia. Our goal was to review scientific literature on the association between personality and dementia. Medline and Google Scholar searches were conducted for relevant articles, chapters, and books published since 1980. Search terms used included personality, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies. People with dementia commonly exhibit changes in personality that sometimes precede the other early clinical manifestations of the condition, such as cognitive impairment. Premorbid personality might be a determining factor so that caricature or exaggeration of original personality emerges as dementia progresses. Although it is generally accepted that these personality changes reflect the impact of progressive brain damage, there are several possible patterns of personality alterations with dementia. Early identification of personality modifications might assist with the timely diagnosis of dementia. PMID:25714255

  9. 75 FR 43528 - Seeking Public Comment on Draft National Health Security Strategy Biennial Implementation Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The National Health Security Strategy (2009) can be found at: http://www.phe.gov... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Seeking Public Comment on Draft National Health Security Strategy... achieve national health security and to implement the first quadrennial National Health Security...

  10. Dementia in older people: an update.

    PubMed

    LoGiudice, D; Watson, R

    2014-11-01

    Dementia is a common condition of the elderly characterised by multiple cognitive deficits resulting in a decline from previous level of function. In the older person, multiple pathologies contribute, including changes commonly seen in Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies in addition to vascular changes. Comorbid factors, such as depression, delirium and polypharmacy can contribute to cognitive decline. Novel biomarkers and neuroimaging techniques may assist in the near future to improve accuracy of diagnosis. To date, pharmacological therapies have been largely unsuccessful and provide symptomatic relief only. The timely diagnosis of dementia can facilitate important discussions regarding personal and financial planning and introduce education and supports to the person with dementia and their carers. The person with dementia commonly experiences behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia that may cause much distress, including to families and carers. Clinical guidelines indicate non-pharmacological approaches as first line measures, including attention to pain, nutrition and the environment. Dementia is recognised as a National Health Priority in Australia, and efforts to target risk factors as preventative measures to delay onset of dementia require further urgent consideration. PMID:25367725

  11. Dementia diagnosis and management: a narrative review of changing practice

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Tamar; Iliffe, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Background Early detection and management of dementia in primary care are difficult problems for practitioners. England's National Dementia Strategy 2009 seeks to improve these areas but there is limited evidence on how to achieve this most effectively. Aim This review aims to identify and appraise empirical studies of interventions designed to improve the performance of primary care practitioners in these areas. Design A narrative review of primary-care based studies. Method Publications up to February 2010 were identified by searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO, and bibliographies. The criterion for inclusion was that studies had to be of interventions aimed at improving detection or management of dementia in primary care. Exclusion criteria included studies in non-English publications, pharmacological interventions, and screening instrument studies. Quality was assessed using the PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) scale. Results Fifteen studies were identified, of which 11 were randomised controlled trials. Eight reported educational interventions, and seven trialled service redesign, either by changing the service pathway or by introducing case management. Educationally, only facilitated sessions and decision-support software improved GPs' diagnosis of dementia, as did trials of service-pathway modification. Some of the case-management trials showed improved stakeholder satisfaction, decreased symptoms, and care that was more concordant with guidelines. Conclusion The quality of the studies varied considerably. Educational interventions are effective when learners are able to set their own educational agenda. Although modifying the service pathway and using case management can assist in several aspects of dementia care, these would require the provision of extra resources, and their value is yet to be tested in different health systems. PMID:21801564

  12. Dietary Patterns, Cognitive Decline, and Dementia: A Systematic Review12

    PubMed Central

    van de Rest, Ondine; Berendsen, Agnes AM; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; de Groot, Lisette CPGM

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition is an important modifiable risk factor that plays a role in the strategy to prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Research on nutritional effects has until now mainly focused on the role of individual nutrients and bioactive components. However, the evidence for combined effects, such as multinutrient approaches, or a healthy dietary pattern, such as the Mediterranean diet, is growing. These approaches incorporate the complexity of the diet and possible interaction and synergy between nutrients. Over the past few years, dietary patterns have increasingly been investigated to better understand the link between diet, cognitive decline, and dementia. In this systematic review we provide an overview of the literature on human studies up to May 2014 that examined the role of dietary patterns (derived both a priori as well as a posteriori) in relation to cognitive decline or dementia. The results suggest that better adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with less cognitive decline, dementia, or Alzheimer disease, as shown by 4 of 6 cross-sectional studies, 6 of 12 longitudinal studies, 1 trial, and 3 meta-analyses. Other healthy dietary patterns, derived both a priori (e.g., Healthy Diet Indicator, Healthy Eating Index, and Program National Nutrition Santé guideline score) and a posteriori (e.g., factor analysis, cluster analysis, and reduced rank regression), were shown to be associated with reduced cognitive decline and/or a reduced risk of dementia as shown by all 6 cross-sectional studies and 6 of 8 longitudinal studies. More conclusive evidence is needed to reach more targeted and detailed guidelines to prevent or postpone cognitive decline. PMID:25770254

  13. Dietary patterns, cognitive decline, and dementia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van de Rest, Ondine; Berendsen, Agnes Am; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; de Groot, Lisette Cpgm

    2015-03-01

    Nutrition is an important modifiable risk factor that plays a role in the strategy to prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Research on nutritional effects has until now mainly focused on the role of individual nutrients and bioactive components. However, the evidence for combined effects, such as multinutrient approaches, or a healthy dietary pattern, such as the Mediterranean diet, is growing. These approaches incorporate the complexity of the diet and possible interaction and synergy between nutrients. Over the past few years, dietary patterns have increasingly been investigated to better understand the link between diet, cognitive decline, and dementia. In this systematic review we provide an overview of the literature on human studies up to May 2014 that examined the role of dietary patterns (derived both a priori as well as a posteriori) in relation to cognitive decline or dementia. The results suggest that better adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with less cognitive decline, dementia, or Alzheimer disease, as shown by 4 of 6 cross-sectional studies, 6 of 12 longitudinal studies, 1 trial, and 3 meta-analyses. Other healthy dietary patterns, derived both a priori (e.g., Healthy Diet Indicator, Healthy Eating Index, and Program National Nutrition Santé guideline score) and a posteriori (e.g., factor analysis, cluster analysis, and reduced rank regression), were shown to be associated with reduced cognitive decline and/or a reduced risk of dementia as shown by all 6 cross-sectional studies and 6 of 8 longitudinal studies. More conclusive evidence is needed to reach more targeted and detailed guidelines to prevent or postpone cognitive decline. PMID:25770254

  14. Diabetes, Dementia and Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Meneilly, Graydon S; Tessier, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    We are experiencing an epidemic of both diabetes and dementia among older adults in this country. The risk for dementia appears to be increased in patients with diabetes, and patients with dementia and diabetes appear to be at greater risk for severe hypoglycemia. In addition, there may be an increased risk for developing dementia by older patients with diabetes who have had episodes of severe hypoglycemia, although this issue is controversial. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to the increased risk for dementia in older adults with diabetes and outline the complex relationships between hypoglycemia and dementia. PMID:26778684

  15. Anosognosia in Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert S; Sytsma, Joel; Barnes, Lisa L; Boyle, Patricia A

    2016-09-01

    Progressive decline in memory (and other functions) is the defining feature of late-life dementia but affected individuals are often unaware of this impairment. This article reviews recent research on anosognosia in dementia, including methods of assessing anosognosia, its prevalence and developmental course in dementia, its occurrence in different forms of dementia, neuroimaging findings, and hypothesized component mechanisms. The results suggest that anosognosia is eventually exhibited by nearly all persons with dementia. Its occurrence is robustly associated with common dementia-related pathologies and damage to memory and self-referential brain networks and their interconnections. PMID:27438597

  16. Evaluating the Association between Diabetes, Cognitive Decline and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Omorogieva; Brooke, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the association between diabetes mellitus, cognitive decline and dementia, including the effects of cognitive decline and dementia on self management of diabetes. This is a literature review of primary research articles. A number of contemporary research articles that met the inclusion criteria were selected for this review paper. These articles were selected using a number of search strategies and electronic databases, such as EBSCOhost Research and SwetsWise databases. The duration of diabetes, glycated haemoglobin levels and glycaemic fluctuations were associated with cognitive decline and dementia. Similarly, hypoglycaemia was significantly related to increased risk of developing cognitive decline and dementia. Furthermore, cognitive decline and dementia were associated with poorer diabetes management. There is evidence of the association between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia including the shared pathogenesis between diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the self management of diabetes is affected by dementia and cognitive decline. It could be suggested that the association between diabetes and dementia is bidirectional with the potential to proceed to a vicious cycle. Further studies are needed in order to fully establish the relationship between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia. Patients who have diabetes and dementia could benefit from structured education strategies, which should involve empowerment programmes and lifestyle changes. The detection of cognitive decline should highlight the need for education strategies. PMID:26193295

  17. 77 FR 2996 - National Fish, Wildlife, and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... the Strategy in a May 24, 2011, notice of intent in the Federal Register (76 FR 30193). After we... Fish and Wildlife Service National Fish, Wildlife, and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy AGENCY: Fish..., Wildlife, and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy (Strategy). The purpose of the Strategy will be to...

  18. Local Solutions for National Challenges? Exploring Local Solutions through the Case of a National Succession Planning Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The notion of localism and decentralization in national policy has come increasingly to the fore in recent years. The national succession planning strategy for headteachers in England introduced by the National College for School Leadership promoted "local solutions for a national challenge". This article deals with some aspects of the…

  19. [What is dementia? 2. A fuzzy construct].

    PubMed

    Derouesné, Christian

    2003-03-01

    Since the publication of the third edition of the classification of mental disorders by the American Psychiatric Association, APA (DSM-III) in 1980, a large international consensus has been reached to define dementia as a multiple cognitive deficit centered by memory disturbances, interfering with the daily life activities and related to organic brain lesions. The DSM-III defined a diagnostic strategy in two steps. First to make the diagnosis of dementia according to the clinical criteria and then to specify its etiology. The more recent editions of the APA classification did not significantly modify these recommendations. The use of the DSM criteria has allowed important advances in epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic research. However, several criticisms should be addressed to the clinical diagnostic criteria as well as to the current concept of dementia. First, from a theoretical point of view, dementia is not a disease, not even a disorder. It only corresponds to a conventional collection of symptoms. Actually, clinical symptoms of dementia basically depend of the localization of brain lesions. Therefore, there could not be one single dementia syndrome. Similarly, the basis of the search for one "antidementia drug" should be questioned. From a clinical point of view, the DSM-IV criteria present some inaccuracies regarding the description of deficits in memory and executive functions as well as in the assessment of the interference of the cognitive decline with the activities of daily living. The definition of dementia as a purely cognitive deficit results in neglecting its psychological and relational manifestations which play a large part in the detection of dementia and its acceptance by the family. A major criticism concerns the definition of dementia as a sincle clinical entity with memory deficits as the core symptom. This definition is well adapted to Alzheimer's disease but results in delayed diagnosis or misclassification of dementias such as

  20. Implementing a national strategy for patient safety: lessons from the National Health Service in England.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R Q; Fletcher, M

    2005-04-01

    Improving patient safety has become a core issue for many modern healthcare systems. However, knowledge of the best ways for government initiated efforts to improve patient safety is still evolving, although there is considerable commonality in the challenges faced by countries. Actions to improve patient safety must operate at multiple levels of the healthcare system simultaneously. Using the example of the NHS in England, this article highlights the importance of a strategic analysis of the policy process and the prevailing policy context in the design of the national patient safety strategy. The paper identifies a range of policy "levers" (forces for change) that can be used to support the implementation of the national safety initiative and, in particular, discusses the strengths and limitations of the "business case" approach that has attracted recent interest. The paper offers insights into the implementation of national patient safety goals that should provide learning for other countries. PMID:15805460

  1. Dementia: Diagnosis and Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Dementia Diagnosis & Tests If you or someone you care ... To determine whether an older adult might have dementia, a healthcare professional will: Ask about the person’s ...

  2. Lewy Body Dementia Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... individuals, it may also be due to the natural course of the disease. All Rights Reserved Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. 912 Killian Hill Road S.W., Lilburn, GA 30047 © 2016 Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. Connect ...

  3. Developing a national salt reduction strategy for Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Enkhtungalag, Batsaikhan; Batjargal, Jamayan; Chimedsuren, Ochir; Tsogzolmaa, Bayandorj; Anderson, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The increase in prevalence of risk factors such as hypertension has contributed to an incremental rise in non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Mongolia over recent decades, such that they now account for 80% of all deaths in the country. Salt reduction is one of the most cost-effective interventions to reduce the burden of NCDs. Methods In 2011, the Ministry of Health (MOH) instigated the development of a national salt reduction strategy for Mongolia. As part of a 2-week national consultation and training program on salt reduction, it established an inter-sectoral working party and organized a series of bilateral meetings and visits to factories. Actions arising included a baseline survey of population salt consumption patterns and the implementation of a series of pilot salt reduction initiatives. Results The results of the baseline assessment revealed that average daily intake of salt, based on 24 hour urine samples from a representative national sample (n=1,027), was 11.06±5.99 g in 2011, more than double the World Health Organization (WHO) five grams recommendation. Moreover, while most participants knew that salt was bad for health, few were taking efforts to reduce intake, and many were consuming highly salty meals and tea; salt in tea alone was estimated to contribute 30% of daily salt intake. A pilot Pinch Salt intervention to reduce salt consumption of factory workers was undertaken in Ulaanbaatar (UB) city between 2012 and 2013, and was associated with a reduction of 2.8 g of salt intake. Ongoing food industry initiatives have led to significant reductions in salt levels in bread, and companies producing processed meat have indicated a willingness to reduce salt. Relevant stakeholders have also supported the campaign by participating in annual World Salt Awareness Week events. The activities to date have demonstrated the potential for action and there is now a need scale these up to a national level to ensure that Mongolia is in a strong

  4. Collaborative transdisciplinary team approach for dementia care

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, James E; Valois, Licet; Zweig, Yael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Alzheimer's disease (AD) has high economic impact and places significant burden on patients, caregivers, providers and healthcare delivery systems, fostering the need for an evaluation of alternative approaches to healthcare delivery for dementia. Collaborative care models are team-based, multicomponent interventions that provide a pragmatic strategy to deliver integrated healthcare to patients and families across a wide range of populations and clinical settings. Healthcare reform and national plans for AD goals to integrate quality care, health promotion and preventive services, and reduce the impact of disease on patients and families reinforcing the need for a system-level evaluation of how to best meet the needs of patients and families. We review collaborative care models for AD and offer evidence for improved patient- and family-centered outcomes, quality indicators of care and potential cost savings. PMID:25531688

  5. [Personality and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Masui, Yukie

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have looked into the relationships between personality and dementia from three hypothetical points of views: 1) that personality type is a risk factor for dementia, 2) that personality changes occur before receiving a diagnosis of dementia, and 3) that premorbid personality traits define behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) after receiving a diagnosis. This article overviews all three perspectives of the studies, after explaining the character and characteristic attributes of each perspective. PMID:27395463

  6. National Space Weather Program Releases Strategy for the New Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Samuel P.; Babcock, Michael R.; Bonadonna, Michael F.

    2010-12-01

    The National Space Weather Program (NSWP; http://www.nswp.gov) is a U.S. federal government interagency program established by the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology (OFCM) in 1995 to coordinate, collaborate, and leverage capabilities across stakeholder agencies, including space weather researchers, service providers, users, policy makers, and funding agencies, to improve the performance of the space weather enterprise for the United States and its international partners. Two important documents released in recent months have established a framework and the vision, goals, and strategy to move the enterprise forward in the next decade. The U.S. federal agency members of the NSWP include the departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, Interior, State, and Transportation, plus NASA, the National Science Foundation, and observers from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The OFCM is also working with the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency to formally join the program.

  7. 77 FR 76034 - National Water Program 2012 Strategy: Response to Climate Change

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... AGENCY National Water Program 2012 Strategy: Response to Climate Change AGENCY: Environmental Protection... publishing the final ``National Water Program 2012 Strategy: Response to Climate Change'' (2012 Strategy... light of climate change and charts key strategic actions to be taken to achieve the goals in 2012...

  8. How a Dead Butler Was Killed: The Way English National Strategies Maim Grammatical Parts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cajkler, Wasyl

    2004-01-01

    This article analyzes the way English grammar is described in documents issued between 1998 and 2002 in England for the National Literacy Strategy (NLS) and for the lower secondary Key Stage 3 (KS3) National Strategy. The analysis reveals that the NLS and KS3 Strategy do not consistently follow a recognised approach to grammatical description, and…

  9. Ageing, dementia and society - an epistemological perspective.

    PubMed

    Heese, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Recent data show that as populations age, the number of people affected by neurodegenerative dementia is growing at an epidemic pace in various regions of the world. This cross-cultural study examined the relationships among age, gender, ethnicity, religion, and education as well as the attitudes and perceptions related to ageing and dementia. A random sample of 980 participants was selected to represent the multicultural population of Singapore. Data were collected using standardised questionnaires through online portals and by conducting interviews. These data were ultimately analysed by comparing percentage responses and correlation coefficients and by conducting a multiple regression analysis. The results indicate that the perceptions and attitudes of individuals toward ageing and dementia differ among different age groups. Moreover, the level of education attained was significantly correlated with understanding dementia; regardless of education level, Christians had the most positive mindset toward dementia, although most religious individuals did not believe in divine healing. In this study, it was determined that attitudes and perceptions about ageing and dementia are influenced by multiple factors, such as education, age, and religion, and that it is imperative that younger generations develop coping strategies, including healthy lifestyles and social and/or religious communities to provide quality care to the elderly, in general, and to dementia patients, in particular. PMID:26069868

  10. 75 FR 31818 - National Science Board; Committee on Strategy and Budget; Sunshine Act Meetings; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ... National Science Board; Committee on Strategy and Budget; Sunshine Act Meetings; Notice The National Science Board's Committee on Strategy and Budget, pursuant to NSF regulations (45 CFR part 614), the... the National Science Board Web site ( http://www.nsf.gov/nsb ) for information or schedule updates,...

  11. The burden of dementia.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Valerie T

    2007-12-01

    Dementia care is a significant and growing healthcare need that will have major economic and medical impact as the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias continues to increase in the United States during the next 50 years. The ability to differentiate the signs and symptoms of the most common dementing illnesses - AD, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies - is essential to dementia care and management. Additionally, dementia patients in longterm care (LTC) facilities are prone to significantly greater risk of negative outcomes compared with nondemented residents as a result of a decline in activities of daily living, physical capacities, and behavioral manifestations. Careful and active assessment of risk factors and their management provides opportunities for improving outcomes. These include behavioral manifestations of pain, wandering, and risks of malnutrition, falls and injuries, and restraint use. Specific nonpharmacologic interventions to promote restraint- and pain-free care in LTC are highlighted. PMID:18095782

  12. A national strategy for the export of US geothermal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This document presents a proposal for an explicit US strategy to focus this still diffuse interest into a coordinated effort by the public and private sectors to increase exports of US geothermal goods and services over the next five to ten years. This document summarizes the background and need for an explicit US strategy, the factors influencing the development of this strategy, strategy options, and a recommended strategy.

  13. Dementia beyond 2025: Knowledge and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, Paul-Ariel; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Bérard, Alain; Gzil, Fabrice; Andrieu, Sandrine; Banerjee, Sube; Brémond, François; Buée, Luc; Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Mangialasche, Francesca; Platel, Hervé; Salmon, Eric; Robert, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Given that there may well be no significant advances in drug development before 2025, prevention of dementia-Alzheimer's disease through the management of vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors may be a more realistic goal than treatment. Level of education and cognitive reserve assessment in neuropsychological testing deserve attention, as well as cultural, social, and economic aspects of caregiving. Assistive technologies for dementia care remain complex. Serious games are emerging as virtual educational and pleasurable tools, designed for individual and cooperative skill building. Public policies are likely to pursue improving awareness and understanding of dementia; providing good quality early diagnosis and intervention for all; improving quality of care from diagnosis to the end of life, using clinical and economic end points; delivering dementia strategies quicker, with an impact on more people. Dementia should remain presented as a stand-alone concept, distinct from frailty or loss of autonomy. The basic science of sensory impairment and social engagement in people with dementia needs to be developed. E-learning and serious games programs may enhance public and professional education. Faced with funding shortage, new professional dynamics and economic models may emerge through coordinated, flexible research networks. Psychosocial research could be viewed as an investment in quality of care, rather than an academic achievement in a few centers of excellence. This would help provide a competitive advantage to the best operators. Stemming from care needs, a logical, systems approach to dementia care environment through organizational, architectural, and psychosocial interventions may be developed, to help reduce symptoms in people with dementia and enhance quality of life. Dementia-friendly environments, culture, and domesticity are key factors for such interventions. PMID:25740575

  14. Prevalence and Incidence Rates of Dementia and Cognitive Impairment No Dementia in the Mexican Population

    PubMed Central

    Mejia-Arango, Silvia; Gutierrez, Luis Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence and incidence of dementia and cognitive impairment without dementia (CIND) in the Mexican population. Methods The MHAS study is a prospective panel study of health and aging in Mexico with 7,000 elders that represent 8 million subjects nationally. Using measurements of cognition and activities of daily living of dementia cases and CIND were identified at baseline and follow up. Overall incidence rates and specific rates for sex, age and education were calculated. Results Prevalence was 6.1% and 28.7% for dementia and CIND, respectively. Incidence rates were 27.3 per 1,000 person-years for dementia and 223 per 1,000 persons-year for CIND. Rates of dementia and CIND increased with advancing age and decreased with higher educational level; sex had a differential effect depending on the age strata. Hypertension, diabetes and depression were risk factors for dementia but not for CIND. Discussion These data provide estimates of prevalence and incidence of dementia and cognitive impairment in the Mexican population for projection of future burden. PMID:21948770

  15. National Energy Strategy: A compilation of public comments; Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This Report presents a compilation of what the American people themselves had to say about problems, prospects, and preferences in energy. The Report draws on the National Energy Strategy public hearing record and accompanying documents. In all, 379 witnesses appeared at the hearings to exchange views with the Secretary, Deputy Secretary, and Deputy Under Secretary of Energy, and Cabinet officers of other Federal agencies. Written submissions came from more than 1,000 individuals and organizations. Transcripts of the oral testimony and question-and-answer (Q-and-A) sessions, as well as prepared statements submitted for the record and all other written submissions, form the basis for this compilation. Citations of these sources in this document use a system of identifying symbols explained below and in the accompanying box. The Report is organized into four general subject areas concerning: (1) efficiency in energy use, (2) the various forms of energy supply, (3) energy and the environment, and (4) the underlying foundations of science, education, and technology transfer. Each of these, in turn, is subdivided into sections addressing specific topics --- such as (in the case of energy efficiency) energy use in the transportation, residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, respectively. 416 refs., 44 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Economic Impact of Dementia by Disease Severity: Exploring the Relationship between Stage of Dementia and Cost of Care in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Li-Jung Elizabeth; Pai, Ming-Chyi; Shih, Pei-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Given the shortage of cost-of-illness studies in dementia outside of the Western population, the current study estimated the annual cost of dementia in Taiwan and assessed whether different categories of care costs vary by severity using multiple disease-severity measures. Methods This study included 231 dementia patient–caregiver dyads in a dementia clinic at a national university hospital in southern Taiwan. Three disease measures including cognitive, functional, and behavioral disturbances were obtained from patients based on medical history. A societal perspective was used to estimate the total costs of dementia according to three cost sub-categories. The association between dementia severity and cost of care was examined through bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Total costs of care for moderate dementia patient were 1.4 times the costs for mild dementia and doubled from mild to severe dementia among our community-dwelling dementia sample. Multivariate analysis indicated that functional declines had a greater impact on all cost outcomes as compared to behavioral disturbance, which showed no impact on any costs. Informal care costs accounted for the greatest share in total cost of care for both mild (42%) and severe (43%) dementia patients. Conclusions Since the total costs of dementia increased with severity, providing care to delay disease progression, with a focus on maintaining patient physical function, may reduce the overall cost of dementia. The greater contribution of informal care to total costs as opposed to social care also suggests a need for more publicly-funded long-term care services to assist family caregivers of dementia patients in Taiwan. PMID:26859891

  17. Strategies for Overcoming Key Barriers to Development of a National Security Workforce

    SciTech Connect

    2008-06-30

    This report documents the strategies for overcoming identified key barriers to development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP) being performed under a Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. Many barriers currently exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of properly trained national security personnel. The identified strategies to address the barriers will focus on both short-term and long-term efforts, as well as strategies to capture legacy knowledge of retiring national security workforce personnel.

  18. Music and dementia.

    PubMed

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of dementia in our aging population, and consequently an urgent need to develop treatments and activities that may alleviate the symptoms of dementia. Accumulating evidence shows that persons with dementia enjoy music, and their ability to respond to music is potentially preserved even in the late or severe stages of dementia when verbal communication may have ceased. Media interest in this topic has contributed to the public perception that music abilities are an "island of preservation" in an otherwise cognitively impaired person with dementia. In this chapter, we review the current literature on music cognition in dementia and show that there has been very scarce rigorous scientific investigation of this issue, and that various types of music memory exist and are differentially impaired in the different types of dementia. Furthermore, we discuss the recent development of music activities as a nonpharmacological treatment for dementia and highlight the methodological limitations of the current literature on this topic. While it has been reported that music activities can improve behavior, (particularly agitation), mood, and cognition in persons with dementia, recent large-scale randomized control studies have questioned the specificity of the effect of music and found that it is no more beneficial than other pleasant activities. Nevertheless, music is unique in its powerful ability to elicit both memories and emotions. This can provide an important link to individual's past and a means of nonverbal communication with carers, which make it an ideal stimulus for persons with dementia. PMID:25725917

  19. Forecasting the Incidence of Dementia and Dementia-Related Outpatient Visits With Google Trends: Evidence From Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Google Trends has demonstrated the capability to both monitor and predict epidemic outbreaks. The connection between Internet searches for dementia information and dementia incidence and dementia-related outpatient visits remains unknown. Objective This study aimed to determine whether Google Trends could provide insight into trends in dementia incidence and related outpatient visits in Taiwan. We investigated and validated the local search terms that would be the best predictors of new dementia cases and outpatient visits. We further evaluated the nowcasting (ie, forecasting the present) and forecasting effects of Google Trends search trends for new dementia cases and outpatient visits. The long-term goal is to develop a surveillance system to help early detection and interventions for dementia in Taiwan. Methods This study collected (1) dementia data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database and (2) local Internet search data from Google Trends, both from January 2009 to December 2011. We investigated and validated search terms that would be the best predictors of new dementia cases and outpatient visits. We then evaluated both the nowcasting and the forecasting effects of Google Trends search trends through cross-correlation analysis of the dementia incidence and outpatient visit data with the Google Trends data. Results The search term “dementia + Alzheimer’s disease” demonstrated a 3-month lead effect for new dementia cases and a 6-month lead effect for outpatient visits (r=.503, P=.002; r=.431, P=.009, respectively). When gender was included in the analysis, the search term “dementia” showed 6-month predictive power for new female dementia cases (r=.520, P=.001), but only a nowcasting effect for male cases (r=.430, P=.009). The search term “neurology” demonstrated a 3-month leading effect for new dementia cases (r=.433, P=.008), for new male dementia cases (r=.434, P=.008), and for outpatient visits (r=.613, P<.001

  20. Projecting Burden of Dementia in Spain, 2010-2050: Impact of Modifying Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Soto-Gordoa, Myriam; Arrospide, Arantzazu; Moreno-Izco, Fermín; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Castilla, Iván; Mar, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Risk and protective factors such as obesity, hypercholesterolemia, physical activity, and hypertension can play a role in the development of dementia. Our objective was to measure the effect of modification of risk and protective factors on the prevalence and economic burden of dementia in the aging Spanish population during 2010-2050. A discrete event simulation model including risk and protective factors according to CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Incidence of Dementia) Risk Score was built to represent the natural history of dementia. Prevalence of dementia was calculated from 2010 to 2050 according to different scenarios of risk factor prevalence to assess the annual social and health care costs of dementia. The model also supplied hazard ratios for dementia. Aging will increase between 49% and 16% each decade in the number of subjects with dementia. The number of working-age individuals per person with dementia will decrease to a quarter by 2050. An intervention leading to a 20% change in risk and protective factors would reduce dementia by 9% , prevent over 100,000 cases, and save nearly 4,900 million euros in 2050. Switching individuals from a group with a specific risk factor to one without it nearly halved the risk of the development of dementia. Dementia prevalence will grow unmanageable if effective prevention strategies are not developed. Interventions aiming to reduce modifiable risk factor prevalence represent valid and effective alternatives to reduce dementia burden. However, further research is needed to identify causal relationships between dementia and risk factors. PMID:26402090

  1. [Carotid atherosclerosis and dementia].

    PubMed

    Harlé, Louise-Marine; Plichart, Matthieu

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decade a growing interest has been devoted to exploring the role of atherosclerosis in the development of dementia. Despite a well-known association between atherosclerosis risk factors in middle-life with later cognitive decline, the pathophysiological pathways underlying this association remain unclear. The current hypothesis is that neurodegenerative and vascular lesions coexist and have a synergistic role in the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Carotid atherosclerosis (e.g. carotid plaques and intima-media thickness as measured by carotid ultrasonography) has been associated with cognitive decline and dementia and may help to better understand the complex interaction between the vascular and neurodegenerative processes. Furthermore, carotid atherosclerosis has been used in the recent field for dementia risk prediction. In this review, we discuss the physiopathological implications from the current available data on the relationship between carotid atherosclerosis and dementia as well as the interest of carotid biomarkers for individual dementia risk prediction. PMID:26395304

  2. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR RADON REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper provides an historical summary of the evolution of the U.S. EPA's national strategy for indoor radon remediation, recent developments, and anticipated future directions. uring the past 10 years, EPA has pursued a national strategy to address radon remediation in buildin...

  3. 78 FR 79071 - National Maritime Strategy Symposium: Cargo Opportunities and Sealift Capacity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... listen-only information January 10, 2014. distributed to registrants. National Maritime Strategy... additional information, insights and experience to assist in the development of a National Maritime Strategy..., 2000 (65 FR 19476, 04/11/2011) or at http://www.dot.gov/privacy.html . Authority: 5 U.S.C. 610;...

  4. Reviving the Dead Butler? Towards a Review of Aspects of National Literacy Strategy Grammar Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wales, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    In his 2004 article "How was a dead butler killed: The way English national strategies maim grammatical parts" published in "Language and Education" 18, no. 1, Wasyl Cajkler calls for a review of grammar advice to teachers in the UK National Literacy Strategy (NLS) materials. His evidence demonstrates clearly that NLS grammar advice is "a…

  5. Vascular aspects of cognitive impairment and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Claassen, Jurgen AHR

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension and stroke are highly prevalent risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia. Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common forms of dementia, and both conditions are preceded by a stage of cognitive impairment. Stroke is a major risk factor for the development of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and VaD; however, stroke may also predispose to AD. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, thus linking hypertension to VCI and VaD, but hypertension is also an important risk factor for AD. Reducing these two major, but modifiable, risk factors—hypertension and stroke—could be a successful strategy for reducing the public health burden of cognitive impairment and dementia. Intake of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-n3-FA) and the manipulation of factors involved in the renin–angiotensin system (e.g. angiotensin II or angiotensin-converting enzyme) have been shown to reduce the risk of developing hypertension and stroke, thereby reducing dementia risk. This paper will review the research conducted on the relationship between hypertension, stroke, and dementia and also on the impact of LC-n3-FA or antihypertensive treatments on risk factors for VCI, VaD, and AD. PMID:24022624

  6. Forget me not: dementia in prison.

    PubMed

    Maschi, Tina; Kwak, Jung; Ko, Eunjeong; Morrissey, Mary B

    2012-08-01

    The number of older adults with dementia in U.S. prisons is rapidly rising. Yet, the vast majority of this marginalized subgroup of the aging population is left neglected behind bars without access to adequate medical and mental health care services. We assert that proactive, interdisciplinary collaborative efforts to improve practice, policy, and research and to develop a high-quality evidence-based continuum of care for this aging population are urgently needed. The overarching goals of this paper are to raise awareness of the life and experiences of persons with dementia in prison and to stimulate discussion, research, and advocacy efforts for this forgotten subgroup of older Americans. We describe the growing number of older adults with dementia in U.S. prisons, high-risk factors for dementia present in the prison population, and the life and experience of persons with dementia in the culture and environment of prison that is primarily not designed for them. We review the current state of services and programs for dementia in prison. We conclude by proposing practice, policy, and research-related priority areas and strategies for interdisciplinary gerontological responses. PMID:22230493

  7. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Joe

    2016-01-01

    The future competitiveness of the United States in an increasingly interconnected global economy depends on the nation fostering a workforce with strong capabilities and skills in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). STEM knowledge and skills enable both individual opportunity and national competitiveness, and the nation needs…

  8. Immunologically Mediated Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Michael H.; Smith, Sallie; Akdal, Gulden; Geschwind, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Although most dementias are due to neurodegenerative or vascular disease, it is important to diagnose immunologically mediated dementias quickly because they can be both rapidly progressive and readily treatable. They usually affect function of limbic and cortical structures, but subcortical involvement can also occur. Because of the variety of symptoms and the rapid course, these dementias present a particular challenge to the clinician and may require evaluation and intervention in the inpatient setting. Diagnostic workup typically reveals evidence of an autoimmune process and, in some cases, cancer. In contrast to the neurodegenerative processes, many of the immunologically mediated dementias respond to immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:19664365

  9. Sexual disinhibition and dementia.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Ulivi, Martina; Danti, Sabrina; Lucetti, Claudio; Nuti, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    To describe inappropriate sexual behaviour (ISB) observed in patients with dementia, we conducted searches using the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Web of Science to find relevant articles, chapters, and books published from 1950 to 2014. Search terms used included 'hypersexuality', 'inappropriate sexual behaviors', and 'dementia'. Publications found through this indexed search were reviewed for further relevant references. Sexuality is a human's need to express intimacy, but persons with dementia may not know how to appropriately meet their needs for closeness and intimacy due to their decline in cognition. Generally, the interaction among brain, physical, psychological, and environmental factors can create what we call ISB. The most likely change in the sexual behaviour of a person with dementia is indifference. However, ISB in dementia appear to be of two types--intimacy-seeking and disinhibited--that differ in their association with dementia type, dementia severity and, possibly, other concurrent behavioural disorder. Tensions develop from uncertainties regarding which, or when, behaviours are to be considered 'inappropriate' (i.e. improper) or abnormal. While most ISB occur in the moderate to severe stages of Alzheimer's dementia, they may also be seen in early stages of frontotemporal dementia because of the lack of insight and disinhibition. ISB are often better managed by non-pharmacological means, as patients may be less responsive to psychoactive therapies, but non-pharmacological interventions do not always stop the behaviour. PMID:26215977

  10. Dementia Resulting From Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shively, Sharon; Scher, Ann I.; Perl, Daniel P.; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the earliest illnesses described in human history and remains a major source of morbidity and mortality in the modern era. It is estimated that 2% of the US population lives with long-term disabilities due to a prior TBI, and incidence and prevalence rates are even higher in developing countries. One of the most feared long-term consequences of TBIs is dementia, as multiple epidemiologic studies show that experiencing a TBI in early or midlife is associated with an increased risk of dementia in late life. The best data indicate that moderate and severe TBIs increase risk of dementia between 2-and 4-fold. It is less clear whether mild TBIs such as brief concussions result in increased dementia risk, in part because mild head injuries are often not well documented and retrospective studies have recall bias. However, it has been observed for many years that multiple mild TBIs as experienced by professional boxers are associated with a high risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a type of dementia with distinctive clinical and pathologic features. The recent recognition that CTE is common in retired professional football and hockey players has rekindled interest in this condition, as has the recognition that military personnel also experience high rates of mild TBIs and may have a similar syndrome. It is presently unknown whether dementia in TBI survivors is pathophysiologically similar to Alzheimer disease, CTE, or some other entity. Such information is critical for developing preventive and treatment strategies for a common cause of acquired dementia. Herein, we will review the epidemiologic data linking TBI and dementia, existing clinical and pathologic data, and will identify areas where future research is needed. PMID:22776913

  11. Raising Standards in Reading and Writing: Insights from England's National Literacy Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiel, Gerry

    2003-01-01

    Describes how the purpose of the National Literacy Strategy (NLS) is to provide "a steady and consistent strategy" for raising standards in literacy over a 5- to 10-year period. Discusses reading and writing in the Literacy Hour and evaluation of the strategy. Notes that the NLS in England has been successful to a point. (SG)

  12. [National health strategies in the world and its enlightenment to build healthy China].

    PubMed

    Shi, X M

    2016-08-01

    The national health strategy is a reflection of a country on overall value and development vision of national health, and conducting this strategy will enhance and promote national development and people's welfare. In the current situation of building Healthy China during the 13th Five-Year Plan, it is important to learn experiences in this area from developed countries. This article mainly presents detailed introduction of the formulation, the implementation and the characteristics of National Health Strategies from the United States, United Kingdom and Japan, and also presents suggestions for the construction of Healthy China. PMID:27539518

  13. Dance for Individuals With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Lapum, Jennifer L; Bar, Rachel J

    2016-03-01

    The movement and music associated with dance plays an important role in many individuals' lives and can become imprinted upon the body and mind. Dance is thus closely associated with memory because of these deep connections. Without conscious thought, dance has the potential to be initiated as individuals age. In the current article, the authors share narrative reflections about their experiences with, and the potential of, dance as an intervention for aging populations diagnosed with dementia-related diseases. They draw upon their experiences in working with the aging population and a dance program currently being developed by Canada's National Ballet School and Baycrest Health Sciences for individuals with dementia-related diseases in long-term care. The current article is structured as dialogue between the authors because it mimics dance as a dialogical encounter between movement and music, and/or between individuals. PMID:26935188

  14. User Perceptions of a Dementia Risk Reduction Website and Its Promotion of Behavior Change

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several modifiable health and lifestyle factors are consistently associated with dementia risk and it is estimated that significantly fewer people would develop dementia if the incidence of risk factors could be reduced. Despite this, Australians’ awareness of the health and lifestyle factors associated with dementia risk is low. Within a national community education campaign, Alzheimer’s Australia developed a dementia risk reduction website providing information about modifiable risk or protective factors for dementia. Objective This study aimed to assess the usefulness of the website content in improving knowledge and enabling adoption of recommended strategies, and to examine what additional resources consumers need. Methods Visitors to the website over a 3 month period were invited to complete an online survey, which asked them to rate their knowledge of dementia risk reduction before and after visiting the site, how important monitoring their health related behavior was to them before and after visiting the site, their current behavior related to health and lifestyle factors associated with dementia risk, their intentions to change behavior, and the usefulness of potential additional resources to help them do so. Results For this study, 123 Australian adults responded to the survey. 44.7% (55/122) were aged over 60 and 82.1% (98/119) were female. Respondents’ ratings and comments indicated they generally found the content interesting, informative, and helpful to them. Respondents’ ratings of their knowledge about the links between health and lifestyle factors and dementia risk significantly increased after visiting the website (P<.001). Their ratings of how important monitoring what they do in relation to their health and lifestyle factors were also significantly increased after visiting the website (P<.001). Average ratings for how well respondents felt they were doing at the time in relation to specific risk or protective factors were

  15. Dementia severity and the longitudinal costs of informal care in the Cache County Population

    PubMed Central

    Rattinger, Gail B.; Schwartz, Sarah; Mullins, C. Daniel; Corcoran, Chris; Zuckerman, Ilene H.; Sanders, Chelsea; Norton, Maria C.; Fauth, Elizabeth B.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Tschanz, JoAnn T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dementia costs are critical for influencing healthcare policy, but limited longitudinal information exists. We examined longitudinal informal care costs of dementia in a population-based sample. Methods Data from the Cache County Study included dementia onset, duration and severity assessed by the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Informal cost of daily care (COC) was estimated based on median Utah wages. Mixed models estimated the relationship between severity and longitudinal COC in separate models for MMSE and CDR. Results 287 subjects [53% female, mean (sd) age was 82.3(5.9) years] participated. Overall COC increased by 18%/year. COC was 6% lower per MMSE-point increase and compared with very mild dementia, COC increased over 2-fold for mild, 5-fold for moderate and 6-fold for severe dementia on the CDR. Conclusions Greater dementia severity predicted higher costs. Disease management strategies addressing dementia progression may curb costs. PMID:25614127

  16. Strategies for Preventing Behavioral Incidents in the Nation's Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis, Johnny; Leonard, Rex

    1985-01-01

    Discusses strategies that can be used to prevent the five most common behavioral problems in secondary schools: (1) failure to complete assigned work, (2) tardiness, (3) inattentiveness, (4) littering, and (5) failure to bring materials to class. (FL)

  17. Lewy body dementias.

    PubMed

    Walker, Zuzana; Possin, Katherine L; Boeve, Bradley F; Aarsland, Dag

    2015-10-24

    The broad importance of dementia is undisputed, with Alzheimer's disease justifiably getting the most attention. However, dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia, now called Lewy body dementias, are the second most common type of degenerative dementia in patients older than 65 years. Despite this, Lewy body dementias receive little attention and patients are often misdiagnosed, leading to less than ideal management. Over the past 10 years, considerable effort has gone into improving diagnostic accuracy by refining diagnostic criteria and using imaging and other biomarkers. Dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia share the same pathophysiology, and effective treatments will depend not only on successful treatment of symptoms but also on targeting the pathological mechanisms of disease, ideally before symptoms and clinical signs develop. We summarise the most pertinent progress from the past 10 years, outlining some of the challenges for the future, which will require refinement of diagnosis and clarification of the pathogenesis, leading to disease-modifying treatments. PMID:26595642

  18. [Speech changes in dementia].

    PubMed

    Benke, T; Andree, B; Hittmair, M; Gerstenbrand, F

    1990-06-01

    This review analyzes the spectrum of language deficits commonly encountered in dementia. A specific communication profile is found in dementia of the "cortical" type, such as Alzheimer's disease. With advancing disease lexical, comprehension and pragmatic functions deteriorate, whereas syntax and phonology tend to be preserved. This pattern bears some resemblance to aphasia types like transcortical and Wernicke's aphasia, however, a much broader range of communicative functions is impaired in Alzheimer's disease than in aphasia. Differentiation of dementia and aphasia, especially in elderly patients requires careful neuropsychological assessment of language, memory and other psychological functions. "Subcortical" dementia commonly presents with dysarthria as the leading symptom and linguistic impairment is rarely of crucial importance until late stages. Thus, the interetiologic dissociation of language and speech impairment can be used for dementia differentiation. Aphasia batteries are not sufficient to comprehend the range of language deficits in demented patients. Testing the communication impairment in dementia requires specific tasks for spontaneous speech, naming, comprehension, reading, writing, repetition and motor speech functions. Tasks for verbal learning and metalinguistic abilities should also be performed. Language deficits are frequent initial symptoms of dementia, thus language assessment may be of diagnostic relevance. Many data support the concept that the communication deficit in dementia results from a particular impairment of semantic memory. PMID:1695887

  19. Dealing with Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an NIH-supported Alzheimer’s disease center at the University of Wisconsin. “Symptoms of dementia can include problems with memory, thinking, and language, along with impairments to social skills and some behavioral symptoms.” Several factors can raise your risk for developing dementia. These ...

  20. Nationalism and Rights in the New Europe. Teaching Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Adrian

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan designed to teach upper grade level secondary students about nationalism and civil rights in post-Cold War Europe. Examines the rise of nationalism and discrimination against ethnic minorities in eastern Europe since the end of Communist rule. Includes a map of Europe, suggested teaching procedures, and follow-up activities.…

  1. Poststroke dementia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak-Cordoliani, Marie-Anne; Bombois, Stéphanie; Memin, Armelle; Hénon, Hilde; Pasquier, Florence

    2005-01-01

    Risk of dementia increases after stroke, and poststroke dementia (PSD) is an important cause of disability in the elderly. The prevalence rates of PSD vary from 12.2% to 31.8% within 3 months to 1 year after stroke, depending on patient populations and the diagnostic criteria used in the numerous studies. Incidence rates of PSD increase with time after the stroke. Although vascular lesions and white matter changes can explain the cognitive disorders seen in stroke patients, an underlying neurodegenerative disorder may contribute to the development of PSD. Cognitive decline may pre-date the stroke and follow a progressive course after the stroke. The vascular and degenerative processes involved share common environmental and genetic risk factors. This review explains the mechanisms of dementia in stroke patients and identifies predictive factors for PSD. The following points are successively considered: (i) demographic characteristics of the patients, including age and level of education; (ii) prestroke cognitive decline; (iii) vascular risk factors, including diabetes mellitus and prior strokes; (iv) stroke characteristics, including severity and location of the vascular lesion; (v) co-morbid disorders; and (vi) abnormalities on brain imaging, including location, size and number of vascular lesions, white matter changes and cerebral atrophy. Older age, prestroke cognitive decline, stroke recurrence, hypoxic-ischaemic disorders, left-side infarcts, strategic infarcts and white matter lesions appear to be the main predictive factors of PSD. Prevention of stroke should reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with PSD. In addition, management of PSD with secondary prevention treatments could reduce occurrence of further strokes. Cholinesterase inhibitors may be beneficial not only in Alzheimer's disease associated with cerebrovascular lesions, but also for the treatment of cholinergic dysfunction arising from pure vascular dementia. Better knowledge of the risk

  2. Living With Semantic Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Karen; Wilkinson, Ray; Keady, John

    2014-01-01

    Semantic dementia is a variant of frontotemporal dementia and is a recently recognized diagnostic condition. There has been some research quantitatively examining care partner stress and burden in frontotemporal dementia. There are, however, few studies exploring the subjective experiences of family members caring for those with frontotemporal dementia. Increased knowledge of such experiences would allow service providers to tailor intervention, support, and information better. We used a case study design, with thematic narrative analysis applied to interview data, to describe the experiences of a wife and son caring for a husband/father with semantic dementia. Using this approach, we identified four themes: (a) living with routines, (b) policing and protecting, (c) making connections, and (d) being adaptive and flexible. Each of these themes were shared and extended, with the importance of routines in everyday life highlighted. The implications for policy, practice, and research are discussed. PMID:24532121

  3. What can imaging tell us about cognitive impairment and dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Leela; Murray, Alison Dorothy

    2016-01-01

    Dementia is a contemporary global health issue with far reaching consequences, not only for affected individuals and their families, but for national and global socio-economic conditions. The hallmark feature of dementia is that of irreversible cognitive decline, usually affecting memory, and impaired activities of daily living. Advances in healthcare worldwide have facilitated longer life spans, increasing the risks of developing cognitive decline and dementia in late life. Dementia remains a clinical diagnosis. The role of structural and molecular neuroimaging in patients with dementia is primarily supportive role rather than diagnostic, American and European guidelines recommending imaging to exclude treatable causes of dementia, such as tumor, hydrocephalus or intracranial haemorrhage, but also to distinguish between different dementia subtypes, the commonest of which is Alzheimer’s disease. However, this depends on the availability of these imaging techniques at individual centres. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as functional connectivity MRI, diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular imaging techniques, such as 18F fluoro-deoxy glucose positron emission tomography (PET), amyloid PET, tau PET, are currently within the realm of dementia research but are available for clinical use. Increasingly the research focus is on earlier identification of at risk preclinical individuals, for example due to family history. Intervention at the preclinical stages before irreversible brain damage occurs is currently the best hope of reducing the impact of dementia. PMID:27029053

  4. What can imaging tell us about cognitive impairment and dementia?

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Leela; Murray, Alison Dorothy

    2016-03-28

    Dementia is a contemporary global health issue with far reaching consequences, not only for affected individuals and their families, but for national and global socio-economic conditions. The hallmark feature of dementia is that of irreversible cognitive decline, usually affecting memory, and impaired activities of daily living. Advances in healthcare worldwide have facilitated longer life spans, increasing the risks of developing cognitive decline and dementia in late life. Dementia remains a clinical diagnosis. The role of structural and molecular neuroimaging in patients with dementia is primarily supportive role rather than diagnostic, American and European guidelines recommending imaging to exclude treatable causes of dementia, such as tumor, hydrocephalus or intracranial haemorrhage, but also to distinguish between different dementia subtypes, the commonest of which is Alzheimer's disease. However, this depends on the availability of these imaging techniques at individual centres. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as functional connectivity MRI, diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular imaging techniques, such as 18F fluoro-deoxy glucose positron emission tomography (PET), amyloid PET, tau PET, are currently within the realm of dementia research but are available for clinical use. Increasingly the research focus is on earlier identification of at risk preclinical individuals, for example due to family history. Intervention at the preclinical stages before irreversible brain damage occurs is currently the best hope of reducing the impact of dementia. PMID:27029053

  5. Depression, Dementia, and Social Supports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esser, Sally R.; Vitaliano, Peter P.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews recent literature on the relationships among dementia, depression, and social support, emphasizing the diagnostic differentiation of dementia and depression, and the role of these three entities in elderly with cognitive impairment. Discusses dementia-like symptoms arising in depression and the coexistence of dementia and depression.…

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Exploration Systems Interim Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate within NASA. Enabling the Vision for Space Exploration. The Role of the Directorate. 2. Strategic Context and Approach. Corporate Focus. Focused, Prioritized Requirements. Spiral Transformation. Management Rigor. 3. Achieving Directorate Objectives. Strategy to Task Process. Capability Development. Research and Technology Development. 4. Beyond the Horizon. Appendices.

  7. The Folkeskole Year 2000: A National Strategy for Enhanced Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovsgaard, Joern

    This paper describes the Danish program, Folkeskole year 2000, an educational change strategy that involves an agreement between the teachers' union, the Association of Municipalities, and the Ministry of Education to improve education. The Folkeskole stipulates that the municipal council has the overall responsibility for the municipal school…

  8. 77 FR 19661 - Draft National Water Program 2012 Strategy: Response to Climate Change

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... AGENCY Draft National Water Program 2012 Strategy: Response to Climate Change AGENCY: Environmental... of water resource management, including how to: address risks to drinking water, wastewater and storm water infrastructure; protect quality of surface water, ground water and drinking water;...

  9. Functionalizing Conflict: Jesse Jackson's Rhetorical Strategy at the 1984 Democratic National Convention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Mare, Lesley A.

    1987-01-01

    Examines Jesse Jackson's rhetorical strategy of functionalizing conflict among divisive Democrats during the 1984 national convention. Applies conflict theory to Jackson's convention address, which serves as the basis for this rhetorical analysis. (JD)

  10. Dementia and amputation

    PubMed Central

    Schuch, Vera; Moysidis, Theodoros; Weiland, Dorothea; Santosa, Frans

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To our experience dementia seems to play an increasing role for major amputation in patients suffering from peripheral arterial disease (PAD). To confirm our impression, we analysed the rate of dementia associated with different surgical procedures using the information of the federal statistics in Germany. Patients and Methods Detailed lists of cases hospitalized with the principal diagnosis (PAD), abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), myocardial infarction (MI) and hip fracture (HF), and of the procedures minor or major amputation, endovascular aortic repair (EVAR), total endoprosthesis for hip replacement (THR) and coronary aortic bypass graft (CABG) in Germany in the years 2008 to 2010 were provided by the Federal Statistical Office. Results Dementia is documented as additional diagnosis in approximately one fourth of cases having the principal diagnosis HF, 5% to 6% of cases with the principal diagnosis MI and PAD, but only in approximately 2% of AAA cases. Dementia is documented as principal or additional diagnosis in one fourth of amputation procedures (major amputation approximately 18% and minor amputation approximately 8%), in approximately 5% THR, 2% of EVAR and only 0.3% of CABG. The rate of documentation of dementia is higher in patients treated by major amputation than in the hospitalized PAD population. Vice versa, the rate of documentation of dementia is lower in patients getting THR than in the hospitalized HF population. Conclusion The presented analysis supports the assumption that dementia plays a relevant role in older patients suffering from PAD receiving major amputation in Germany. PMID:24265873

  11. Prevention of Dementia: Focus on Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Polidori, Maria Cristina; Nelles, Gereon; Pientka, Ludger

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to summarize current knowledge on the possible advantages of lifestyle interventions, with particular attention to physical fitness, cognitive activity, leisure and social activity as well as nutrition. There is a large amount of published papers providing partial evidence and asserting the need for immediate, appropriate preventive lifestyle measures against dementia and AD development. Nevertheless, there are currently great difficulties in drafting effective guidelines in this field. This depends mainly upon lack of randomized controlled trials assessing benefits versus risks of particular lifestyle interventions strategies. However, due to the rapid increase of dementia burden, lifestyle factors and their amelioration should be already made part of decision making in light of their health-maintaining effects while awaiting for results of well-designed large prospective cohort studies in dementia. PMID:20721289

  12. Cannabinoids and Dementia: A Review of Clinical and Preclinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Sebastian; Halpern, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has been shown to be associated with neurodegenerative diseases and dementia. We review the preclinical and clinical data on cannabinoids and four neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Huntington’s disease (HD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and vascular dementia (VD). Numerous studies have demonstrated an involvement of the cannabinoid system in neurotransmission, neuropathology and neurobiology of dementias. In addition, several candidate compounds have demonstrated efficacy in vitro. However, some of the substances produced inconclusive results in vivo. Therefore, only few trials have aimed to replicate the effects seen in animal studies in patients. Indeed, the literature on cannabinoid administration in patients is scarce. While preclinical findings suggest causal treatment strategies involving cannabinoids, clinical trials have only assessed the suitability of cannabinoid receptor agonists, antagonists and cannabidiol for the symptomatic treatment of dementia. Further research is needed, including in vivo models of dementia and human studies.

  13. Treatment of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) encompasses a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases with heterogeneous clinical presentations and two predominant types of underlying neuropathology. FTD typically comprises three distinct clinical syndromes: behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), and nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA). FTD also frequently overlaps both clinically and neuropathologically with three other neurodegenerative syndromes: corticobasal syndrome (CBS), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Each syndrome can be associated with one or more underlying neuropathological diagnoses and are referred to as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Although the various FTD syndromes can substantially differ in terms of clinical symptoms and underlying pathology, the symptoms can be broadly categorized into behavioral, cognitive and motor domains. Currently there are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved therapies for the above syndromes except riluzole for ALS. FTD treatment strategies generally rely on off-label use of medications for symptomatic management, and most therapies lack quality evidence from randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. For behavioral symptoms, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be effective, while case reports hint at possible efficacy with antipsychotics or antiepileptics, but use of these latter agents is limited due to concerns regarding side effects. There are no effective therapies for cognitive complaints in FTD, which frequently involve executive function, memory, and language. Motor difficulties associated with FTD may present with parkinsonian symptoms or motor neuron disease, for which riluzole is indicated as therapy. Compared to idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, FTD-related atypical parkinsonism is generally not responsive to dopamine replacement therapies, but a

  14. [Dementia: management and prevention].

    PubMed

    Daher, Oscar; Nguyen, Sylvain; Smith, Cindi; Büla, Christophe; Démonet, Jean-François

    2016-04-20

    Dementia represents a great challenge for health care providers. Detection of cognitive impairment is critical for early diagnosis of dementia. Early diagnosis allows to initiate individualized management that focuses on maintaining patient's autonomy and supporting their caregivers. Proposed multimodal interventions include physical activity, cognitive training, mediterranean diet, and management of cardiovascular risk factors. Before the initiation of pro-cognitive therapy, medication review is essential to evaluate current treament and determine specific therapeutic objectives, based on patient's overall health and preferences. Overall risk reduction for dementia revolves around similar measures that target physical activity, cognition, diet and management of cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:27276724

  15. Dementia with lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Posner, H; Chin, S; Marder, K

    2001-10-17

    In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a man with dementia with Lewy bodies. Dementia with Lewy bodies might be the second most common form of degenerative dementia in the elderly. Progressive cognitive decline, well-formed visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism are core features of this disease. This case was marked by preserved verbal expression despite impairment in memory, visuospatial skills, and attention span. Development of visual symptoms and parkinsonism occurred very early in the course of the disease. PMID:14602963

  16. A national research & development strategy for biomass crop feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.

    1997-07-01

    Planning was initiated in 1996 with the objective of reevaluating current biomass feedstock research and development strategies to: (1) assure that by 2005, one or more commercial lignocellulosic to ethanol projects will be able to acquire a dependable supply of biomass crop feedstocks; (2) assure that recently initiated demonstrations of crops to electricity will be successful and; (3) assure that the research base needed to support future biomass industry expansion is being developed. Multiple trends and analyses indicate that biomass energy research and development strategies must take into account the fact that competition for land will define the upper limits of available biomass energy crop supplies and will largely dictate the price of those supplies. Only crop production and utilization strategies which contribute profit to the farmer or landowner and to energy producers will be used commercially for biomass energy production. Strategies for developing biomass {open_quotes}energy{close_quotes} crop supplies must take into consideration all of the methods by which biomass crops will enter biomass energy markets. The lignocellulosic materials derived from crops can be available as primary residues or crop by-products; secondary residues or processing by-products; co-products (at both the crop production and processing stages); or, as dedicated energy crops. Basic research and development (R&D) leading to yield improvement continues to be recommended as a major long-term focus for dedicated energy crops. Many additional near term topics need attention, some of which are also applicable to by-products and co-products. Switchgrass R&D should be expanded and developed with greater collaboration of USDA and state extension groups. Woody crop research should continue with significant cost-share from industries developing the crops for other commercial products. Co-product options need more investigation.

  17. A Communications Strategy for the National Children's Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The National Children's Study is the largest long term study of children's health and development ever to be conducted in the United States, involving 100,000 children from before birth to age 21. The Study aims to better understand the link between the environments in which children are raised and their physical and mental health and development.…

  18. 75 FR 41685 - Implementation of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ....) THE WHITE HOUSE, WASHINGTON, July 13, 2010 [FR Doc. 2010-17620 Filed 7-15-10; 11:15 am] Billing code... Memorandum of July 13, 2010--Implementation of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy #0; #0; #0; Presidential... HIV/AIDS Strategy Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies As we approach...

  19. Interactive Whole Class Teaching in the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Fay; Hardman, Frank; Wall, Kate; Mroz, Maria

    2004-01-01

    The study set out to investigate the impact of the official endorsement of 'interactive whole class teaching' on the interaction and discourse styles of primary teachers while teaching the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies. In both strategies, interactive whole class teaching is seen as an 'active teaching' model promoting high quality…

  20. Guidance for Year 6 Pupils. 2001 Revision. The National Literacy Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    England's National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies are designed to raise standards for all pupils. Though the skills they address are basic and need to be built up throughout the primary years, at the early stage of implementing the strategies, many older pupils will not have reached the standards expected of Year 6 pupils in future years. This…

  1. A Bridge to the Future. Australia's National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training 1998-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian National Training Authority, Brisbane.

    The National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training 1998-2003 expresses the collective commitment by Australian governments, in partnership with Australian industry, to vocational education and training. The strategy includes the following mission: to ensure that the skills of the Australian labor force are sufficient to support…

  2. A Career Practitioner's Response to the National Career Development Strategy Green Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athanasou, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Career Development Strategy Green Paper is a discussion paper issued by the Department of Employment, Education and Workplace Relations. It is aimed at the formulation of a coherent and structured career development strategy throughout Australia. The Green Paper seeks to lay the foundation for policy change through establishing the…

  3. A Strategy for Designing Instruction for Educational Television in Developing Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awotua-Efebo, Ebi Bio

    1987-01-01

    Explains a strategy for the design and development of instructional programs for educational television in developing nations using a modified version of the Shannon-Weaver Communication Model. Highlights include design strategy, manner of presentation, and stages of program development. The importance of making materials realistic and culturally…

  4. National Strategy for Violence Prevention in the Austrian Public School System: Development and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiel, Christiane; Strohmeier, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    As a result of a quick succession of several spectacular events in schools, and the ensuing public discussion on the high rates of bullying in Austria, a national strategy for violence prevention in schools and preschools has been developed. In formulating the strategy, a systematic procedure involving international experts and a number of local…

  5. Breaking the Cycle of Drug Abuse. 1993 Interim National Drug Control Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    This Interim Drug Strategy is intended to give a new sense of direction and to reinvigorate the nation's efforts against drug trafficking and abuse. The preface to the report lists eight new strategies that the Administration will implement: (1) make drug policy a cornerstone of domestic and social policy; (2) target pregnant women, children, and…

  6. Changing Practice: The National Literacy Strategy and the Politics of Literacy Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Gemma

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on a recent ESRC-funded research project, this paper will explore some of the contradictory structural features of the National Literacy Strategy (NLS), which have helped shape its evolution over time, and reflect on some of the tension points which have arisen at different levels of implementation as the Strategy unfolds. In the process,…

  7. Considering the senses in the diagnosis and management of dementia.

    PubMed

    Behrman, Sophie; Chouliaras, Leonidas; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2014-04-01

    Associations between dementia and impairments in hearing, vision, olfaction and (to a lesser degree) taste have been identified. Hearing impairment has been shown to precede cognitive decline, but it is not clear if the hearing loss is an early marker of dementia or a modifiable risk factor. Olfactory impairment is seen in many neurodegenerative conditions, but it has been shown that those with dementia have particular difficulties with the recognition and identification of odours rather than the detection, suggesting a link to impairment of higher cognitive function. Olfactory impairment has been shown to be predictive of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease with 85.2% sensitivity. As cognitive function deteriorates, the world is experienced at a sensory level, with reduced ability to integrate the sensory experiences to understand the context. Thus, people with dementia are very sensitive to sensory experiences and their environment needs to be managed carefully to make it understandable, comfortable, and (if possible) therapeutic. Light can be used to stabilise the circadian rhythm, which may be disturbed in dementia. Music therapy, aromatherapy, massage and multisensory stimulation are recommended by NICE for the management of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), although the mechanisms behind such interventions are poorly understood and evidence is limited. Sensory considerations are likely to play a greater role in dementia care in the future, with the development of purpose-built dementia care facilities and the focus on non-pharmacological management strategies for BPSD. PMID:24495787

  8. Clinical practice guidelines for dementia in Australia.

    PubMed

    Laver, Kate; Cumming, Robert G; Dyer, Suzanne M; Agar, Meera R; Anstey, Kaarin J; Beattie, Elizabeth; Brodaty, Henry; Broe, Tony; Clemson, Lindy; Crotty, Maria; Dietz, Margaret; Draper, Brian M; Flicker, Leon; Friel, Margeret; Heuzenroeder, Louise Mary; Koch, Susan; Kurrle, Susan; Nay, Rhonda; Pond, C Dimity; Thompson, Jane; Santalucia, Yvonne; Whitehead, Craig; Yates, Mark W

    2016-03-21

    About 9% of Australians aged 65 years and over have a diagnosis of dementia. Clinical practice guidelines aim to enhance research translation by synthesising recent evidence for health and aged care professionals. New clinical practice guidelines and principles of care for people with dementia detail the optimal diagnosis and management in community, residential and hospital settings. The guidelines have been approved by the National Health and Medical Research Council. The guidelines emphasise timely diagnosis; living well with dementia and delaying functional decline; managing symptoms through training staff in how to provide person-centred care and using non-pharmacological approaches in the first instance; and training and supporting families and carers to provide care. PMID:26985848

  9. Writing Organisation. Literacy Progress Unit (Adapted for Whole Class Use). Key Stage 3: National Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    Adapted for whole class use, this unit focuses on developing the writing skills pupils need if they are to progress from Level 3 to Level 4 of England's National Curriculum. It is meant to supplement, but not to replace, the English curriculum for Year 7 pupils. The unit builds on the successful approaches of the National Literacy Strategy in…

  10. Changing Classroom Practice through the English National Literacy Strategy: A Micro-Interactional Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefstein, Adam

    2008-01-01

    How and why is national policy translated into interactions between teachers and pupils? This article examines the enactment of the English National Literacy Strategy (NLS) in a case study of two literacy lessons, which are drawn from a yearlong ethnographic study of the NLS in one school. Although the teacher taught directly from and adhered…

  11. Burden of Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us FAQs Stay Connected You are here Home Global Health and Aging The Burden of Dementia The ... this total in less developed countries ( Figure 9 ). Global efforts are underway to understand and find cures ...

  12. Dementia - home care

    MedlinePlus

    ... help improve communication skills and prevent wandering. Calming music may reduce wandering and restlessness, ease anxiety, and ... prevent falls Ways to improve bathroom safety The Alzheimer's Association's Safe Return Program requires people with dementia ...

  13. Preventing and diagnosing dementia.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Bernie; Jenkins, Catharine; Ginesi, Laura

    While dementia is an umbrella term for a range of degenerative brain disorders, many share similar presentations. Nurses are ideally placed to identify those at risk and empower them to access treatment and plan and prepare for their future needs--as such, they need up-to-date knowledge of the signs and symptoms of the different types of dementia to identify risk factors and make an informed diagnosis. This article, the third in a four-part series on dementia, examines the risk factors, signs, symptoms and diagnosis of dementia, as well as outlining lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise that may help to prevent the development of the condition. PMID:27544960

  14. Multi-Infarct Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multi-Infarct Dementia ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  15. 76 FR 18552 - Seeking Public Comment on Two Draft Chapters of the National Health Security Strategy Biennial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ...To help the Nation achieve national health security and to implement the first quadrennial National Health Security Strategy (NHSS) of the United States of America (2009) and build upon the NHSS Interim Implementation Guide for the National Health Security Strategy of the United States of America (2009) the U.S. Government has drafted a NHSS Biennial Implementation Plan (BIP). This document is......

  16. The National Drug Control Strategy: the first-line approach to decreasing violence in our communities.

    PubMed

    Garcia, F

    1995-01-01

    The National Drug Control Strategy is designed to address all aspects of drug abuse: drug use, drug trafficking, and drug-related crimes. The nine-pronged program encompasses efforts at the federal, state, and local levels, forming a partnership between government and the private and public sectors. The strategy includes prevention initiatives that reduce the demand for drugs; individualized treatment programs for high-risk groups; greater community policing efforts to reduce violent crimes by drug users and pushers; and education aimed at children and adults. It is a national strategy that strives to find solutions at the local level. PMID:7795031

  17. Young onset dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, E; Warren, J; Rossor, M

    2004-01-01

    Young onset dementia is a challenging clinical problem with potentially devastating medical and social consequences. The differential diagnosis is wide, and includes a number of rare sporadic and hereditary diseases. However, accurate diagnosis is often possible, and all patients should be thoroughly investigated to identify treatable processes. This review presents an approach to the diagnosis, investigation, and management of patients with young onset dementia, with particular reference to common and treatable causes. PMID:15016933

  18. Neuroimaging and dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.F.

    1986-05-01

    The tremendous increase in dementia has created a need for improved diagnostic techniques, and each of the newly established brain imaging techniques has been applied to this problem. Several, particularly computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and isotope emission tomography, have proved valuable. Each procedure has strengths--specific disorders that can be diagnosed--and weaknesses--types of dementia that cannot be demonstrated.

  19. [Apathy and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-07-01

    Apathy, which has been attracting attention since Marin's report in 1990, is ubiquitous among neuropsychiatric diseases. It has a major impact on the quality of life in both patients and their caregivers and impairs rehabilitation and outcome. Furthermore, apathy is important as a prodromal syndrome in the development of dementia in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We reviewed the neurobiological basis, prevalence and assessment of potential benefits of non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions for apathy in MCI and dementia. PMID:27395461

  20. Autophagy in dementias.

    PubMed

    Kragh, Christine Lund; Ubhi, Kiren; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Wyss-Corey, Tony; Masliah, Eliezer

    2012-01-01

    Dementias are a varied group of disorders typically associated with memory loss, impaired judgment and/or language and by symptoms affecting other cognitive and social abilities to a degree that interferes with daily functioning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of a progressive dementia, followed by dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), (VaD) and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The pathogenesis of this group of disorders has been linked to the abnormal accumulation of proteins in the brains of affected individuals, which in turn has been related to deficits in protein clearance. Autophagy is a key cellular protein clearance pathway with proteolytic cleavage and degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway representing another important clearance mechanism. Alterations in the levels of autophagy and the proteins associated with the autophagocytic pathway have been reported in various types of dementias. This review will examine recent literature across these disorders and highlight a common theme of altered autophagy across the spectrum of the dementias. PMID:22150925

  1. Early Dementia Screening.

    PubMed

    Panegyres, Peter K; Berry, Renee; Burchell, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the world increases, there will be larger numbers of people with dementia and an emerging need for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Early dementia screening is the process by which a patient who might be in the prodromal phases of a dementing illness is determined as having, or not having, the hallmarks of a neurodegenerative condition. The concepts of mild cognitive impairment, or mild neurocognitive disorder, are useful in analyzing the patient in the prodromal phase of a dementing disease; however, the transformation to dementia may be as low as 10% per annum. The search for early dementia requires a comprehensive clinical evaluation, cognitive assessment, determination of functional status, corroborative history and imaging (including MRI, FDG-PET and maybe amyloid PET), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination assaying Aβ1-42, T-τ and P-τ might also be helpful. Primary care physicians are fundamental in the screening process and are vital in initiating specialist investigation and treatment. Early dementia screening is especially important in an age where there is a search for disease modifying therapies, where there is mounting evidence that treatment, if given early, might influence the natural history-hence the need for cost-effective screening measures for early dementia. PMID:26838803

  2. [Post Stroke Dementia].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Post-stroke dementia (PSD) is a clinical entity that encompasses all types of dementia following an index stroke. Current evidence suggests that 25-30% of ischemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment or vascular dementia. The type of stroke can be either ischemic, hemorrhagic or hypoperfusive. There are multiple risk factors for PSD including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Pre-stroke dementia refers to the occurrence of cognitive impairment before the index stroke, which may be caused by a vascular burden as well as insidious neurodegenerative changes. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke include silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Published clinical trials have not been promising and there is little information on whether PSD can be prevented using pharmacological agents. Control of vascular disease risk and prevention of recurrent strokes are key to reducing the burden of cognitive decline and post-stroke dementia. Modern imaging and analysis techniques will help to elucidate the mechanism of PSD and establish better treatment. PMID:27395459

  3. Early Dementia Screening

    PubMed Central

    Panegyres, Peter K.; Berry, Renee; Burchell, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the world increases, there will be larger numbers of people with dementia and an emerging need for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Early dementia screening is the process by which a patient who might be in the prodromal phases of a dementing illness is determined as having, or not having, the hallmarks of a neurodegenerative condition. The concepts of mild cognitive impairment, or mild neurocognitive disorder, are useful in analyzing the patient in the prodromal phase of a dementing disease; however, the transformation to dementia may be as low as 10% per annum. The search for early dementia requires a comprehensive clinical evaluation, cognitive assessment, determination of functional status, corroborative history and imaging (including MRI, FDG-PET and maybe amyloid PET), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination assaying Aβ1–42, T-τ and P-τ might also be helpful. Primary care physicians are fundamental in the screening process and are vital in initiating specialist investigation and treatment. Early dementia screening is especially important in an age where there is a search for disease modifying therapies, where there is mounting evidence that treatment, if given early, might influence the natural history—hence the need for cost-effective screening measures for early dementia. PMID:26838803

  4. Young onset dementia.

    PubMed

    Draper, B; Withall, A

    2016-07-01

    Young onset dementia (YOD), where symptoms of dementia have an onset before the age of 65, has become more prominent due to the population increase from the Baby Boomer generation. This clinical perspective examines key issues in the assessment, diagnosis and management of YOD. Challenges in the assessment and diagnosis of YOD are partly due to the diverse range of types of YOD, where degenerative dementias are less common and secondary dementias more common than in late onset dementia. Early symptoms are broad and include depression, behavioural change, neurological disorders, systemic disorders and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Perceived diagnostic delay may result in frustration and distress in people with YOD and their families. Chronic depression and MCI are associated with longer time to diagnosis, and in these situations, clinicians need to establish appropriate review processes and communicate clearly. A diagnosis of YOD may have marked consequences for a younger person, including early retirement, financial impacts and the psychological challenge of coming to grips with cognitive decline. Partners, children and other supporters often have unmet needs, feel burdened by care and are at high risk of physical and emotional consequences. Concerns about the heritability of dementia may add to family distress. Recent community service developments in Australia for YOD are outlined and the challenges of residential care described. PMID:27405890

  5. Depression associated with dementia.

    PubMed

    Gutzmann, H; Qazi, A

    2015-06-01

    Depression and cognitive disorders, including dementia and mild cognitive impairment, are common disorders in old age. Depression is frequent in dementia, causing distress, reducing the quality of life, exacerbating cognitive and functional impairment and increasing caregiver stress. Even mild levels of depression can significantly add to the functional impairment of dementia patients and the severity of psychopathological and neurological impairments increases with increasing severity of depression. Depressive symptoms may be both a risk factor for, as well as a prodrome of dementia. Major depressive syndrome of Alzheimer's disease may be among the most common mood disorders of older adults. Treating depression is therefore a key clinical priority to improve the quality of life both of people with dementia as well as their carergivers. Nonpharmacological approaches and watchful waiting should be attempted first in patients who present with mild to moderate depression and dementia. In cases of severe depression or depression not able to be managed through nonpharmacological means, antidepressant therapy should be considered. PMID:25962363

  6. Evolving National Strategy Driving Nursing Informatics in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Honey, Michelle; Westbrooke, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    An update to the New Zealand Health Strategy identifying direction and priorities for health services is underway. Three specific areas have implications for nursing informatics and link to education and practice: best use of technology and information, fostering and spreading innovation and quality improvements, and building leaders and capability for the future. An emphasis on prevention and wellness means nursing needs to focus on health promotion and the role of consumers is changing with access to their on-line information a major focus. As the modes of delivery for services such as telehealth and telenursing changes, nurses are increasingly working independently and utilizing information and communication technologies to collaborate with the health team. New Zealand, and other countries, need strong nursing leadership to sustain the nursing voice in policy and planning and ensure nurses develop the required informatics skills. PMID:27332187

  7. A National Strategy for Promoting Physical Activity in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Mabry, Ruth; Owen, Neville; Eakin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic disease in Oman is a public health challenge. Available evidence in Oman on physical inactivity, the fourth leading risk factor for chronic disease, calls for urgent action to reduce physical inactivity as part of a key strategy to address chronic disease in Oman. The public health implications of this evidence for Oman are considered in light of recommendations outlined in the Toronto Charter for Physical Activity. The charter provides a systematic approach of physical activity and outlines an action plan that could be adapted to the Omani context. Urgent intersectoral action focusing on a shared goal and a more deliberate public health response addressing physical inactivity is required. Further research is needed on the determinants of physical inactivity and culturally appropriate interventions in order to guide future public health actions. PMID:24790738

  8. Risk of suicide in patients with dementia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Linda

    Evidence indicates that the risk of attempted suicide is a significant issue among people with dementia, however there is a lack of information to guide professional practice. This article uses a case study to reflect on the risk management strategies and ethics of suicide and assisted suicide in relation to a specific patient with dementia. It analyses recommendations aimed at improving the lived experience of people with dementia and those involved in their care, including providing patients with a formal diagnosis as early as possible. PMID:24219483

  9. Family physicians and dementia in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Pimlott, Nicholas J.G.; Persaud, Malini; Drummond, Neil; Cohen, Carole A.; Silvius, James L.; Seigel, Karen; Hollingworth, Gary R.; Dalziel, William B.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess Canadian family physicians’ awareness of, attitudes toward, and use of the 1999 Canadian Consensus Conference on Dementia (CCCD) clinical practice guidelines (CPGs); to explore the barriers and enablers to implementing dementia CPGs in clinical practice; and to identify more effective strategies for future dementia guideline development and dissemination. DESIGN Qualitative study using focus groups. SETTING Academic family practice clinics in Calgary, Alta, Ottawa, Ont, and Toronto, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Eighteen family physicians. METHODS Using a semistructured interview guide, we conducted 4 qualitative focus groups of 4 to 6 family physicians whose practices we had audited in a previous study. Transcripts were coded using an inductive data analytic strategy, and categories and themes were identified and described using the principles of thematic analysis. MAIN FINDINGS Four major themes emerged from the focus group discussions. Family physicians 1) were minimally aware of the existence and the detailed contents of the CCCD guidelines; 2) had strong views about the purposes of guidelines in general; 3) expressed strong concerns about the role of the pharmaceutical industry in the development of such guidelines; and 4) had many ideas to improve future dementia guidelines and CPGs in general. CONCLUSION Family physicians were minimally aware of the 1999 CCCD CPGs. They acknowledged, however, the potential of future CPGs to assist them in patient care and offered many strategies to improve the development and dissemination of future dementia guidelines. Future guidelines should more accurately reflect the day-to-day practice experiences and challenges of family physicians, and guideline developers should also be cognizant of family physicians’ perceptions that pharmaceutical companies’ funding of CPGs undermines the objectivity and credibility of those guidelines. PMID:19439707

  10. National Prehospital Evidence-Based Guidelines Strategy: A Summary for EMS Stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gill, Christian; Gaither, Joshua B; Bigham, Blair L; Myers, J Brent; Kupas, Douglas F; Spaite, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Multiple national organizations have recommended and supported a national investment to increase the scientific evidence available to guide patient care delivered by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and incorporate that evidence directly into EMS systems. Ongoing efforts seek to develop, implement, and evaluate prehospital evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) using the National Model Process created by a multidisciplinary panel of experts convened by the Federal Interagency Committee on EMS (FICEMS) and the National EMS Advisory Council (NEMSAC). Yet, these and other EBG efforts have occurred in relative isolation, with limited direct collaboration between national projects, and have experienced challenges in implementation of individual guidelines. There is a need to develop sustainable relationships among stakeholders that facilitate a common vision that facilitates EBG efforts. Herein, we summarize a National Strategy on EBGs developed by the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) with involvement of 57 stakeholder organizations, and with the financial support of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the EMS for Children program. The Strategy proposes seven action items that support collaborative efforts in advancing prehospital EBGs. The first proposed action is creation of a Prehospital Guidelines Consortium (PGC) representing national medical and EMS organizations that have an interest in prehospital EBGs and their benefits to patient outcomes. Other action items include promoting research that supports creation and evaluates the impact of EBGs, promoting the development of new EBGs through improved stakeholder collaboration, and improving education on evidence-based medicine for all prehospital providers. The Strategy intends to facilitate implementation of EBGs by improving guideline dissemination and incorporation into protocols, and seeks to establish standardized evaluation methods for prehospital EBGs. Finally, the Strategy

  11. Prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Sato, Kiyoshi; Iseki, Eizo

    2015-07-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementing disorder after Alzheimer's disease (AD), but there is limited information regarding the prodromal DLB state compared with that of AD. Parkinson's disease (PD) and DLB share common prodromal symptoms with Lewy body disease (LBD), allowing us to use a common strategy for identifying the individuals with an underlying pathophysiology of LBD. Dysautonomia, olfactory dysfunction, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and psychiatric symptoms antedate the onset of dementia by years or even decades in patients with DLB. Although RBD is the most potentially accurate prodromal predictor of DLB, disease progression before the onset of dementia could differ between the prodromal DLB state with and without RBD. Experts who specialize in idiopathic RBD and DLB might need communication in order to clarify the clinical relevance of RBD with the disease progression of DLB. The presence of prodromal LBD symptoms or findings of occipital hypoperfusion/hypometabolism helps us to predict the possible pathophysiological process of LBD in non-demented patients. This approach might provide the opportunity for additional neuroimaging, including cardiac (123) I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and dopamine transporter imaging. Although limited radiological findings in patients with prodromal DLB states have been reported, there is now a need for larger clinical multisite studies with pathological verification. The long prodromal phase of DLB provides a critical opportunity for potential intervention with disease-modifying therapy, but only if we are able to clearly identify the diversity in the clinical courses of DLB. In the present article, we reviewed the limited literature regarding the clinical profiles of prodromal DLB. PMID:25690399

  12. Implementation of Strategies to Leverage Public and Private Resources for National Security Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This report documents implementation strategies to leverage public and private resources for the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), being performed under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. There are numerous efforts across the United States to develop a properly skilled and trained national security workforce. Some of these efforts are the result of the leveraging of public and private dollars. As budget dollars decrease and the demand for a properly skilled and trained national security workforce increases, it will become even more important to leverage every education and training dollar. This report details some of the efforts that have been implemented to leverage public and private resources, as well as implementation strategies to further leverage public and private resources.

  13. The LANDFIRE Refresh strategy: updating the national dataset

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Kurtis J.; Connot, Joel A.; Peterson, Birgit; Martin, Charley

    2013-01-01

    The LANDFIRE Program provides comprehensive vegetation and fuel datasets for the entire United States. As with many large-scale ecological datasets, vegetation and landscape conditions must be updated periodically to account for disturbances, growth, and natural succession. The LANDFIRE Refresh effort was the first attempt to consistently update these products nationwide. It incorporated a combination of specific systematic improvements to the original LANDFIRE National data, remote sensing based disturbance detection methods, field collected disturbance information, vegetation growth and succession modeling, and vegetation transition processes. This resulted in the creation of two complete datasets for all 50 states: LANDFIRE Refresh 2001, which includes the systematic improvements, and LANDFIRE Refresh 2008, which includes the disturbance and succession updates to the vegetation and fuel data. The new datasets are comparable for studying landscape changes in vegetation type and structure over a decadal period, and provide the most recent characterization of fuel conditions across the country. The applicability of the new layers is discussed and the effects of using the new fuel datasets are demonstrated through a fire behavior modeling exercise using the 2011 Wallow Fire in eastern Arizona as an example.

  14. Engagement and disarmament: A US National Security Strategy for biological weapons of mass destruction. Strategy research project

    SciTech Connect

    Moilanen, J.H.; McIntyre, A.J.; Johnson, D.V.

    1995-04-18

    The specter of biological weapons -- one of the three weapons of mass destruction (WMD) -- is an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security of the United States. Since the U.S. unilaterally renounced biological warfare in 1969, biotechnology advances, aggressive nation-states, and terrorism have complicated a precarious balance of world and regional stability. U.S. shortfalls in biological warfare preparedness during the Persian Gulf War may convince potential adversaries that the U.S. is incapable of protecting its vital interests from biological assault. This paper examines the menace of biological weapons and global challenges to nonproliferation and counterproliferation. Analysis concludes that the United States can dissuade, deter, and defend against biological warfare and terrorism with an integrated national security strategy for Biological Weapons Engagement and Disarmament.

  15. Dementia due to metabolic causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alzheimer Disease, and Dementia . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 14. Douglas VC, Josephson SA. Dementia ... Neurology and General Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2014:chap 61. Knopman DS. Alzheimer disease and ...

  16. Symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the environment or personal interactions, and the natural progression of the disease. All Rights Reserved Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. 912 Killian Hill Road S.W., Lilburn, GA 30047 © 2016 Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. Connect ...

  17. Increased Risk of Dementia in Patients With Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Ming; Shen, Yuan-Chi; Weng, Shih-Feng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Tien, Kai-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a well-known predictor for future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. However, the relationship between ED and dementia has rarely been examined. This study investigates the longitudinal risk for Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer dementia in patients with ED. We collected a random sample of 1,000,000 individuals from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. From this sample, we identified 4153 patients with newly diagnosed ED between 2000 and 2009 and compared them with a matched cohort of 20,765 patients without ED. All patients were tracked for 7 years from the index date to identify which of them subsequently developed dementia. During the 7-year follow-up period, the incidence rate of dementia in the ED cohort was 35.33 per 10,000 person-years. In the comparison groups, it was 21.67 per 10,000 person-years. After adjustment for patients characteristics and comorbidities, patients with ED were 1.68-times more likely to develop dementia than patients without ED (95% CI = 1.34–2.10, P < 0.0001). In addition, older patients and those with diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, stroke, depression, and anxiety were found to be at increased risk for dementia. Analyzing the data by dementia type, we found the hazard risk for Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer dementia to be greater in patients with ED (adjusted HR 1.68, 95% CI = 1.31–2.16, P < 0.0001 and 1.63, 95% CI = 1.02–2.62, P = 0.0429, respectively). Log-rank test revealed that patients with ED had significantly higher cumulative incidence rates of dementia than those without (P < 0.0001). Patients with ED are at an increased risk for dementia later in life.

  18. Increased Risk of Dementia in Patients With Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Ming; Shen, Yuan-Chi; Weng, Shih-Feng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Tien, Kai-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a well-known predictor for future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. However, the relationship between ED and dementia has rarely been examined. This study investigates the longitudinal risk for Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer dementia in patients with ED. We collected a random sample of 1,000,000 individuals from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. From this sample, we identified 4153 patients with newly diagnosed ED between 2000 and 2009 and compared them with a matched cohort of 20,765 patients without ED. All patients were tracked for 7 years from the index date to identify which of them subsequently developed dementia. During the 7-year follow-up period, the incidence rate of dementia in the ED cohort was 35.33 per 10,000 person-years. In the comparison groups, it was 21.67 per 10,000 person-years. After adjustment for patients characteristics and comorbidities, patients with ED were 1.68-times more likely to develop dementia than patients without ED (95% CI = 1.34–2.10, P < 0.0001). In addition, older patients and those with diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, stroke, depression, and anxiety were found to be at increased risk for dementia. Analyzing the data by dementia type, we found the hazard risk for Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer dementia to be greater in patients with ED (adjusted HR 1.68, 95% CI = 1.31–2.16, P < 0.0001 and 1.63, 95% CI = 1.02–2.62, P = 0.0429, respectively). Log-rank test revealed that patients with ED had significantly higher cumulative incidence rates of dementia than those without (P < 0.0001). Patients with ED are at an increased risk for dementia later in life. PMID:26091478

  19. Frontotemporal Dementias: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Weder, Natalie D; Aziz, Rehan; Wilkins, Kirsten; Tampi, Rajesh R

    2007-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical state characterized by loss of function in multiple cognitive domains. It is a costly disease in terms of both personal suffering and economic loss. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the term now preferred over Picks disease to describe the spectrum of non-Alzheimers dementias characterized by focal atrophy of the frontal and anterior temporal regions of the brain. The prevalence of FTD is considerable, though specific figures vary among different studies. It occurs usually in an age range of 35–75 and it is more common in individuals with a positive family history of dementia. The risk factors associated with this disorder include head injury and family history of FTD. Although there is some controversy regarding the further syndromatic subdivision of the different types of FTD, the three major clinical presentations of FTD include: 1) a frontal or behavioral variant (FvFTD), 2) a temporal, aphasic variant, also called Semantic dementia (SD), and 3) a progressive aphasia (PA). These different variants differ in their clinical presentation, cognitive deficits, and affected brain regions. Patients with FTD should have a neuropsychiatric assessment, neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging studies to confirm and clarify the diagnosis. Treatment for this entity consists of behavioral and pharmacological approaches. Medications such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antipsychotics, mood stabilizer and other novel treatments have been used in FTD with different rates of success. Further research should be directed at understanding and developing new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities to improve the patients' prognosis and quality of life. PMID:17565679

  20. 76 FR 50719 - Models for a Governance Structure for the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Models for a Governance Structure for the National Strategy... extending the deadline for submitting comments regarding the governance structure for the National Strategy....gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ross J. Micheals via e-mail at ross.micheals@nist.gov...

  1. The Community College and the Human Resources Development Council: Toward a National Training Strategy for the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eskow, Seymour

    The key to economic renewal in the United States is a national human resources development strategy in which community colleges assume the national training role. This national strategy must recognize changes in the American economy and workforce, such as a more educated labor force, the demographics of developing countries, the increased…

  2. Association Between Glaucoma and the Risk of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Su, Cheng-Wen; Lin, Che-Chen; Kao, Chia-Hung; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the association of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) with the risk of dementia by evaluating their clinical and epidemiological similarities by using a nationally representative sample in Taiwan. Data were collected from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. In total, 6509 patients with glaucoma (3304 with POAG and 3205 with PACG) were enrolled, and a comparison cohort of 26,036 individuals without glaucoma was established after matching for age and sex. The cumulative incidence curve of overall dementia for each cohort was evaluated. The risk of dementia was analyzed using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models after adjustment for demographic characteristics and comorbidities. The patients with glaucoma exhibited a significantly higher risk of dementia than the individuals without glaucoma did (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–1.27). The patients with POAG exhibited a 1.21-fold increased risk of dementia compared with the individuals without glaucoma (HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.02–1.43). However, the patients with PACG were not significantly associated with an increased risk of dementia compared with the individuals without glaucoma (HR = 1.09, 95% CI = 0.95–1.26). Patients with POAG aged ≥65 years were significantly associated with an increased risk of dementia compared with the individuals without glaucoma (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.07–1.54). Females with POAG exhibited a 1.34-fold increased risk of dementia compared with females without glaucoma (95% CI = 1.06–1.69). This study demonstrated that patients with POAG but not those with PACG were associated with an increased risk of dementia compared with the general population. PMID:26886642

  3. [Artistic creativity and dementia].

    PubMed

    Sellal, François; Musacchio, Mariano

    2008-03-01

    Artistic creativity can be defined as the ability to produce both innovative and esthetic works. Though most dementias result in a loss of instrumental functions and a deterioration in artistic production, for some established artists, dementia, most often Alzheimer's disease, changed their style and technique but preserved their creativity and prolific artistic drive. Moreover, in some cases, mainly frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, and very occasionally strokes, the disease may favour the emergence of de novo artistic talent. This phenomenon has been conceptualized as a paradoxical facilitation, a disinhibition of brain areas devoted to visuospatial processing, greater freedom in a patient who becomes less bound by social conventions, enhancement of motivation and pleasure, etc. These neurological cases provide an opportunity to shed some light on the roots of artistic creation. PMID:18364297

  4. Dementia in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Clive; Mobley, William; Hardy, John; Williams, Gareth; Corbett, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Down's syndrome is the most common genetic cause of learning difficulties, and individuals with this condition represent the largest group of people with dementia under the age of 50 years. Genetic drivers result in a high frequency of Alzheimer's pathology in these individuals, evident from neuroimaging, biomarker, and neuropathological findings, and a high incidence of cognitive decline and dementia. However, cognitive assessment is challenging, and diagnostic methods have not been fully validated for use in these patients; hence, early diagnosis remains difficult. Evidence regarding the benefits of cholinesterase inhibitors and other therapeutic options to treat or delay progressive cognitive decline or dementia is very scarce. Despite close similarities with late-onset Alzheimer's disease, individuals with Down's syndrome respond differently to treatment, and a targeted approach to drug development is thus necessary. Genetic and preclinical studies offer opportunities for treatment development, and potential therapies have been identified using these approaches. PMID:27302127

  5. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Anxiety in Patients With Dementia

    PubMed Central

    KRAUS, CYNTHIA A.; SEIGNOUREL, PAUL; BALASUBRAMANYAM, VALLI; SNOW, A. LYNN; WILSON, NANCY L.; KUNIK, MARK E.; SCHULZ, PAUL E.; STANLEY, MELINDA A.

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety is common in dementia and is associated with decreased independence and increased risk of nursing home placement. However, little is known about the treatment of anxiety in dementia. This article reports results from two patients who were treated with a modified version of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in dementia (CBT-AD). Modifications were made in the content, structure, and learning strategies of CBT to adapt skills to the cognitive limitations of these patients and include collaterals (i.e., family members, friends, or other caregivers) in the treatment process. The patients received education and awareness training and were taught the skills of diaphragmatic breathing, coping self-statements, exposure, and behavioral activation. The Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale was used to characterize dementia severity and determine eligibility for treatment (a CDR score of 0.5 to 2.0 was required for participation). Other measures included the Rating Anxiety in Dementia scale, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Anxiety subscale, and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Outcome data showed improvement in anxiety as measured by standardized rating scales. We conclude that CBT-AD is potentially useful in treating anxiety in dementia patients and that this technique merits further study. PMID:18520790

  6. Prevalence and Clinical Features of Dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David; Meiland, Franka; Passmore, Peter; Dröes, Rose-Marie

    Progressive intellectual deterioration is the hallmark of dementia. Decline is normally centred around memory failure initially but virtually all cognitive capabilities are susceptible. Rapid progress in the understanding of the underlying neurobiology is currently taking place. In most instances, prevention strategies remain unclear and treatment methods are based around social and personal support as pharmacological modalities produce only modest effects. Technological means of home assistance offer a potential route towards relief of suffering and minimisation of healthcare costs.

  7. Dementia and elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Hansberry, Maria R; Chen, Elaine; Gorbien, Martin J

    2005-05-01

    Dementia and elder abuse are relatively common and under-diagnosed geriatric syndromes. A unique relationship is observed when the two entities coexist. Special issues can confound the care of the dementia patient suspected of being abused. Impaired language or motor abilities to communicate abusive situations to a third party, lack of decisional capacity to address the abusive situation, disinhibited behavior that contributes to a cycle of violence, and coincident depression of the abused elder complicate the diagnosis and management of elder abuse. Education of the caregiver and attention to caregiver stress, including depression, may prevent onset and perpetuation of abuse. PMID:15804553

  8. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.; Shu, Huidy; Haman, Aissa; Sejvar, James J.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with more common dementing conditions that typically develop over years, rapidly progressive dementias can develop subacutely over months, weeks, or even days and be quickly fatal. Because many rapidly progressive dementias are treatable, it is paramount to evaluate and diagnose these patients quickly. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the major categories of RPD and outlines efficient approaches to the diagnosis of the various neurodegenerative, toxic-metabolic, infectious, autoimmune, neoplastic, and other conditions that may progress rapidly. PMID:18668637

  9. Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Kramberger, Milica G

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis. PMID:27502301

  10. Delirium Superimposed on Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Nina M.; Fick, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    Delirium remains a significant risk for hospitalized older adults and has been shown to be a persistent risk posthospitalization as well. Dementia is a risk factor for delirium. The prevalence of delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) ranges from 22% to 89% in hospitalized and community-dwelling individuals 65 and older. Individuals with DSD have been found to have accelerated decline in cognitive and functional abilities, greater need for institutionalization, greater rehospitalization risk, and increased mortality. The purpose of this article is to define and describe DSD, outline assessment tools for its identification, and provide appropriate nursing interventions. PMID:21544961

  11. [Psychosocial interventions in dementia].

    PubMed

    Kurz, A

    2013-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions improve cognitive abilities (cognitive stimulation, cognitive training), enhance emotional well-being (activity planning, reminiscence), reduce behavioral symptoms (aromatherapy, music therapy) and promote everyday functioning (occupational therapy). Through these effects they reinforce and augment pharmacological treatments for dementia. In addition, psychosocial interventions complement the treatment of patients by supporting family caregivers (educational groups, support programs). The potential of psychosocial interventions in dementia needs to be explored further in studies using improved methodology to determine effective components, clinical relevance and duration of effects, predictors of individual treatment response and health-economic implications. PMID:23306213

  12. Caregiver- and Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Executive Summary In early August 2007, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began work on the Aging in the Community project, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding healthy aging in the community. The Health System Strategy Division at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care subsequently asked the secretariat to provide an evidentiary platform for the ministry’s newly released Aging at Home Strategy. After a broad literature review and consultation with experts, the secretariat identified 4 key areas that strongly predict an elderly person’s transition from independent community living to a long-term care home. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these 4 areas: falls and fall-related injuries, urinary incontinence, dementia, and social isolation. For the first area, falls and fall-related injuries, an economic model is described in a separate report. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html, to review these titles within the Aging in the Community series. Aging in the Community: Summary of Evidence-Based Analyses Prevention of Falls and Fall-Related Injuries in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis Behavioural Interventions for Urinary Incontinence in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis Caregiver- and Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia: An Evidence-Based Analysis Social Isolation in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis The Falls/Fractures Economic Model in Ontario Residents Aged 65 Years and Over (FEMOR) This report features the evidence-based analysis on caregiver- and patient-directed interventions for dementia and is broken down into 4 sections: Introduction Caregiver-Directed Interventions for Dementia Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia Economic Analysis of Caregiver- and Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia Caregiver-Directed Interventions for Dementia

  13. Montessori-based dementia care.

    PubMed

    Cline, Janet

    2006-10-01

    Montessori-based Dementia Care is an approach used in Alzheimer's care that does not involve chemical or physical restraints. This program works by giving the elder with Alzheimer/Dementia a purpose by getting them involved. When staff/families care for a confused Alzheimer/Dementia patient, who is having behaviors, the Montessori program teaches them to look at what is causing the behavior. When assessing the elder to determine what is causing the behavior, the goal is to find the answer, but the answer cannot be dementia. The goal of the program is to bring meaning to the life of an Alzheimer/Dementia elder. PMID:17111647

  14. [How Treatable is Vascular Dementia?].

    PubMed

    Mori, Etsuro

    2016-04-01

    Vascular dementia is an umbrella term, encompassing the pathological changes in the brain due to cerebrovascular disease that result in dementia. Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia, after Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, I outline the concept of vascular dementia, the key aspects of the disease that are yet to be clarified, and the current status of clinical trials. Assessing these factors, I discuss how treatable vascular dementia presently is. Use of the term'vascular dementia'is riddled with uncertainties regarding disease classification, and non-standardized diagnostic criteria. There are difficulties in determining the exact relationship between cerebrovascular pathology and cognitive impairment. The comorbid effects of Alzheimer's pathology in some individuals also present an obstacle to reliable clinical diagnosis, and hinder research into effective management approaches. Vascular dementia is preventable and treatable, as there are established primary and secondary prevention measures for the causative cerebrovascular diseases, such as vascular risk factor intervention, antiplatelet therapy, and anticoagulation, amongst others. However, unlike Alzheimer's disease, there are no established symptomatic treatments for vascular dementia. Clinical trials of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine indicate that they produce small cognitive benefits in patients with vascular dementia, though the exact clinical significance of these is uncertain. Data are insufficient to support the widespread use of these drugs in vascular dementia. Rehabilitation and physical and cognitive exercise may be beneficial, but evidence of cognitive benefit and relief of neuropsychiatric symptoms due to exercise is lacking. PMID:27056862

  15. COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF MCI and DEMENTIA TREATMENTS IN A COMMUNITY-BASED DEMENTIA PRACTICE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-04

    Mild Cognitive Impairment; Dementia; Hypoxia; Hyperhomocysteinemia; Vitamin B 12 Deficiency; Iron Deficiency; Anemia; TBI; Neurodegenerative Disorders; Alzheimer's Disease; Vascular Dementia; Brain Injuries; Tauopathies; Parkinson's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Frontotemporal Dementia; TDP-43 Proteinopathies

  16. A Critical Review of the National Skills Development Strategy in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraak, Andre

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an update on the Special Edition of the "Journal of Vocational Education and Training" 57, no. 3, 2005, which focused on the launch of the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) in South Africa. The analysis here evaluates the impact of the first phase of the NSDS, which ran between 1 April 2001 and 31 March 2005. The…

  17. Adult Learning in the Queer Nation: A Foucauldian Analysis of Educational Strategies for Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Wayland

    2009-01-01

    Adult education for social change can occur within social movements, and the fight for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered and Queer (LGBTQ) rights has included educational strategies designed to challenge heterosexist and homophobic systems of power. This article explores how the Queer Nation movement of the early 1990s deployed a Foucauldian…

  18. 78 FR 19514 - National Fish, Wildlife, and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... May 24, 2011, notice of intent in the Federal Register (76 FR 30193). After this initial input was... 20, 2012 (77 FR 2996), for a 45-day public comment period. Comments received during the public... Fish and Wildlife Service National Fish, Wildlife, and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy AGENCY:...

  19. Roots and Research. Key Stage 3 English. Key Stage 3: National Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Colin

    In 1998, Roger Beard of the University of Leeds wrote an account of the research underpinning the emerging National Literacy Strategy (NLS). Since Beard published his review, there have been developments both in terms of age groups covered and within the field of literacy research. This document attempts a fresh review of the relationship between…

  20. Investigating Learning English Strategies and English Needs of Undergraduate Students at the National University of Laos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souriyavongsa, Thongma; Abidin, Mohamad Jafre Zainol; Sam, Rany; Mei, Leong Lai; Aloysius, Ithayaraj Britto

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate learning English strategies and the requirement of English needs of the undergraduate students at the National University of Laos (NUOL). The study employed a survey design which involved in administering questionnaires of rating scales, and adapting the items from (Barakat, 2010; Chengbin, 2008; Kathleen A, 2010;…

  1. Building a National Strategy for Digital Preservation: Issues in Digital Media Archiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Library and Information Resources, Washington, DC.

    The United States Congress in December 2000 appropriated funds to the Library of Congress (LC) to spearhead an effort to develop a national strategy for the preservation of digital information. LC staff scheduled a series of conversations with representatives from the technology, business, entertainment, academic, legal, archival, and library…

  2. Strategic Leadership for Large-Scale Reform: The Case of England's National Literacy and Numeracy Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Jantzi, Doris; Earl, Lorna; Watson, Nancy; Levin, Benjamin; Fullan, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Both 'strategic' and 'distributed' forms of leadership are considered promising responses to the demands placed on school systems by large-scale reform initiatives. Using observation, interview and survey data collected as part of a larger evaluation of England's National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies, this study inquired about sources of…

  3. Not the Whole Story of the National Literacy Strategy: A Response to Dominic Wyse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Roger

    2003-01-01

    There is evidence that the National Literacy Strategy (NLS) has led to a sustained increase in literacy attainment, especially in reading, although recent international comparisons also suggest some additional issues regarding pupil performance in England. The relative success of the NLS may at least partly lie in the policy application of several…

  4. The National Literacy Strategy and Setting: An Investigation in One School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kate

    2004-01-01

    This article investigates the policy of setting that is commonly being seen as an organizational tool for effective delivery of the National Literacy Strategy (NLS). It is suggested that teachers are finding the increased amount of whole-class teaching to a diverse range of abilities, as prescribed by the NLS, problematic. This case-study…

  5. Pedagogical Dilemmas in the National Literacy Strategy: Primary Teachers' Perceptions, Reflections and Classroom Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Eve; Hargreaves, Linda; Hislam, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Argues that the British National Literacy Strategy (NLS) offers teachers contradictory pedagogical advice on interactive teaching. Uses case study evidence and observations of classroom interaction to show that, while teachers vary in sensitivity to dilemmas posed by NLS demands, their Literacy Hour discourse is quantitatively and qualitatively…

  6. "Nice Things Get Said": Corpus Evidence and the National Literacy Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sealey, Alison; Thompson, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The article compares evidence from an electronic corpus of texts written for a child audience with specifications in the National Literacy Strategy. The concepts and terminology associated with corpus linguistics are introduced and explained, and the research study from which the findings derive is summarised. Results of the analysis are presented…

  7. Creating relationships with persons with moderate to severe dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kjellström, Sofia; Hellström, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The study describes how relationships are created with persons with moderate to severe dementia. The material comprises 24 video sequences of Relational Time (RT) sessions, 24 interviews with persons with dementia and eight interviews with professional caregivers. The study method was Constructivist Grounded Theory. The categories of ‘Assigning time’, ‘Establishing security and trust’ and ‘Communicating equality’ were strategies for arriving at the core category, ‘Opening up’, which was the process that led to creating relationships. Both parties had to contribute to create a relationship; the professional caregiver controlled the process, but the person with dementia permitted the caregiver's overtures and opened up, thus making the relationship possible. Interpersonal relationships are significant to enhancing the well-being of persons with dementia. Small measures like RT that do not require major resources can open paths to creating relationships. PMID:24336663

  8. Creating relationships with persons with moderate to severe dementia.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Iréne; Kjellström, Sofia; Hellström, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The study describes how relationships are created with persons with moderate to severe dementia. The material comprises 24 video sequences of Relational Time (RT) sessions, 24 interviews with persons with dementia and eight interviews with professional caregivers. The study method was Constructivist Grounded Theory. The categories of 'Assigning time', 'Establishing security and trust' and 'Communicating equality' were strategies for arriving at the core category, 'Opening up', which was the process that led to creating relationships. Both parties had to contribute to create a relationship; the professional caregiver controlled the process, but the person with dementia permitted the caregiver's overtures and opened up, thus making the relationship possible. Interpersonal relationships are significant to enhancing the well-being of persons with dementia. Small measures like RT that do not require major resources can open paths to creating relationships. PMID:24336663

  9. Why Wait for Dementia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watchman, Karen

    2003-01-01

    This article offers guidelines for the modification of the living environment of adults with Down syndrome before they develop dementia in order to allow them to remain in familiar surroundings for as long as possible. These include maintaining the person's individuality; aiding his/her communication; changing supports with the course of the…

  10. Diet and dementia.

    PubMed

    Whalley, Lawrence J; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J

    2004-09-01

    The ageing brain adapts to the accumulation of damage caused by oxidative stress and inflammation. Adaptive processes include neuroprotective and neurorestorative mechanisms. Individual differences in susceptibility to dementia arise when these mechanisms are impaired or are overwhelmed by the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Neuroprotection relies upon extrinsic and intrinsic defences. An adequate intake of antioxidant micronutrients (eg, vitamin C and vitamin E) and anti-inflammatory macronutrients (eg, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) forms an essential component of extrinsic defences against brain ageing. There are many epidemiological data to support an association between an inadequate intake of antioxidants and/or fish oils (an important source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) and a greater than expected incidence of late onset dementia. These associations are confounded by established links between poverty, poor diet and failing health, especially in old age. Such links may be sufficient to explain some of the effects of an inadequate diet on the retention of cognitive function and increased risk of dementia in old age. More compelling is the association between increased plasma homocysteine concentration and later increased risk of dementia. This association is possibly caused by an inadequate intake of vitamin B(12)/folate. PMID:15494103

  11. Dementia and Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Joan; Perez, Rosa; Forester, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This article presents an overview of what is known about dementia services in assisted living settings and suggests areas for future research. Design and Methods: We undertook a search of Medline, the "Journals of Gerontology," and "The Gerontologist." We then organized publications dealing with the target subject into 10 topic areas and…

  12. Factors Associated with Toileting Disability in Older Adults without Dementia Living in Residential Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Kristine M.C.; Wyman, Jean F.; Bronas, Ulf G.; Olson-Kellogg, Becky J.; McCarthy, Teresa C.; Zhao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background Older adults without dementia living in residential care facilities with toileting disability have increased care costs and dependency. Understanding associated factors could guide prevention and management strategies. Objective To identify the prevalence of and factors associated with toileting disability in this population. Methods This was a cross-sectional analysis of the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. A subsample (N = 2,395) of adults aged 65 years or older, without dementia, and with the potential to implement behavioral interventions was examined. Associated factors were classified according to the disablement process as pathologies, impairments, functional limitations, coexisting disabilities, intra- and extra-individual factors. Logistic regression models accounting for the stratified two-stage probability sampling design were used to identify factors associated with toileting disability. Results Residents were mostly White women, aged 85 years and older. Prevalence of toileting disability was 15%. Associated factors included: reporting fair or poor health, living in a facility with four or less residents, living in a for-profit facility; having bowel incontinence, urinary incontinence, an increased number of physical impairments, visual and hearing impairments; and needing assistance with bathing, dressing, and transferring. Discussion Multicomponent and multidisciplinary prevention and management efforts should be designed for residents without dementia. Future studies testing the efficacy of prevention efforts are needed and should include treatments for incontinence, physical activity programs targeting impairments with walking, standing, sitting, stooping, reaching, and grasping, and therapy to improve dressing, bathing, and transferring skills. PMID:24589646

  13. Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Cerejeira, J.; Lagarto, L.; Mukaetova-Ladinska, E. B.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), also known as neuropsychiatric symptoms, represent a heterogeneous group of non-cognitive symptoms and behaviors occurring in subjects with dementia. BPSD constitute a major component of the dementia syndrome irrespective of its subtype. They are as clinically relevant as cognitive symptoms as they strongly correlate with the degree of functional and cognitive impairment. BPSD include agitation, aberrant motor behavior, anxiety, elation, irritability, depression, apathy, disinhibition, delusions, hallucinations, and sleep or appetite changes. It is estimated that BPSD affect up to 90% of all dementia subjects over the course of their illness, and is independently associated with poor outcomes, including distress among patients and caregivers, long-term hospitalization, misuse of medication, and increased health care costs. Although these symptoms can be present individually it is more common that various psychopathological features co-occur simultaneously in the same patient. Thus, categorization of BPSD in clusters taking into account their natural course, prognosis, and treatment response may be useful in the clinical practice. The pathogenesis of BPSD has not been clearly delineated but it is probably the result of a complex interplay of psychological, social, and biological factors. Recent studies have emphasized the role of neurochemical, neuropathological, and genetic factors underlying the clinical manifestations of BPSD. A high degree of clinical expertise is crucial to appropriately recognize and manage the neuropsychiatric symptoms in a patient with dementia. Combination of non-pharmacological and careful use of pharmacological interventions is the recommended therapeutic for managing BPSD. Given the modest efficacy of current strategies, there is an urgent need to identify novel pharmacological targets and develop new non-pharmacological approaches to improve the adverse outcomes associated with

  14. Impact of Dementia-Derived Nonpharmacological Intervention Procedures on Cognition and Behavior in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A 3-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vreese, Luc P.; Mantesso, Ulrico; De Bastiani, Elisa; Weger, Elisabeth; Marangoni, Annachiara C.; Gomiero, Tiziano

    2012-01-01

    Dementia appears at a higher rate among some adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) and this potentially poses a greater risk of nursing home admission. Yet, to date, there is no evidence on the efficacy of general dementia-derived environment-, personnel-, and patient-oriented intervention strategies in delaying onset of dementia or in…

  15. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia including Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Heather M; Corriveau, Roderick A; Craft, Suzanne; Faber, James E; Greenberg, Steven M; Knopman, David; Lamb, Bruce T; Montine, Thomas J; Nedergaard, Maiken; Schaffer, Chris B; Schneider, Julie A; Wellington, Cheryl; Wilcock, Donna M; Zipfel, Gregory J; Zlokovic, Berislav; Bain, Lisa J; Bosetti, Francesca; Galis, Zorina S; Koroshetz, Walter; Carrillo, Maria C

    2015-06-01

    Scientific evidence continues to demonstrate the linkage of vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia such as Alzheimer's disease. In December, 2013, the Alzheimer's Association, with scientific input from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute from the National Institutes of Health, convened scientific experts to discuss the research gaps in our understanding of how vascular factors contribute to Alzheimer's disease and related dementia. This manuscript summarizes the meeting and the resultant discussion, including an outline of next steps needed to move this area of research forward. PMID:25510382

  16. [Application of music therapy for managing agitated behavior in older people with dementia].

    PubMed

    Sung, Huei-Chuan; Chang, Anne M; Abbey, Jennifer

    2006-10-01

    Older people with dementia may display negative emotions, memory problems, sleep disturbance, and agitated behavior. Among these symptoms, agitated behavior has been identified by families and nursing staff as the care problem that presents the greatest challenge. Several studies have found that music therapy reduced agitated behaviors in those with dementia and recommended use of music as an effective strategy in managing this behavioral problem. Music therapy represents a lower cost, effective care approach that nursing staff can easily learn and apply to those with dementia. Furthermore, reductions in agitated behavior in dementia patients that result from music therapy can also alleviate caregiver stress and burden of care, leading to improvements in the health and quality of life of both dementia patients and their caregivers. This paper aims to introduce the principles and application of music therapy in the management of agitated behavior in those with dementia. PMID:17004208

  17. A Better Prescription: Advice for a National Strategy on Pharmaceutical Policy in Canada.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Steven G; Gagnon, Marc-André; Mintzes, Barbara; Lexchin, Joel

    2016-08-01

    Canada needs a national strategy to fulfill its obligation to ensure universal access to necessary healthcare, including prescription drugs. A 2004 attempt at a national strategy for pharmaceutical policy failed because it lacked clear vision, logical planning and commitment from federal and provincial governments. The result of uncoordinated pharmaceutical policies in Canada has been more than a decade of poor system performance. In this essay, we present a framework for a renewed national strategy for pharmaceutical policy. Building on published research and international frameworks, we propose that pharmaceutical policies of federal, provincial and territorial governments be coordinated around a core health-focused goal. We strongly suggest policy actions be taken on four core objectives that are necessary to support the overarching health goal. If implemented, the proposed strategy would offer clear benefits to all Canadians who use medicines, federal and provincial governments and to the economy as a whole. We therefore argue that political leadership is now needed to articulate and implement such a plan on behalf of Canadians. PMID:27585023

  18. National climate policies across Europe and their impacts on cities strategies.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, O; Reckien, D; Olazabal, M; Foley, A; Salvia, M; de Gregorio Hurtado, S; Orru, H; Flacke, J; Geneletti, D; Pietrapertosa, F; Hamann, J J-P; Tiwary, A; Feliu, E; Dawson, R J

    2016-03-01

    Globally, efforts are underway to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt to climate change impacts at the local level. However, there is a poor understanding of the relationship between city strategies on climate change mitigation and adaptation and the relevant policies at national and European level. This paper describes a comparative study and evaluation of cross-national policy. It reports the findings of studying the climate change strategies or plans from 200 European cities from Austria, Belgium, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Spain and the United Kingdom. The study highlights the shared responsibility of global, European, national, regional and city policies. An interpretation and illustration of the influences from international and national networks and policy makers in stimulating the development of local strategies and actions is proposed. It was found that there is no archetypical way of planning for climate change, and multiple interests and motivations are inevitable. Our research warrants the need for a multi-scale approach to climate policy in the future, mainly ensuring sufficient capacity and resource to enable local authorities to plan and respond to their specific climate change agenda for maximising the management potentials for translating environmental challenges into opportunities. PMID:26696604

  19. Chicago partners in the American dream: A local effort within the national homeownership strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, E.; Cavallo, J.; Peterson, N.; Nelson, M.

    1997-03-01

    President Clinton and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) have set a goal of increasing homeownership in America. Currently the rate of homeownership is approximately 64 percent of the population. The goal is to raise that rate to 67.5 percent by the year 2000, a higher rate than ever recorded in U.S. history. Achieving the goal will require about 8 million families to acquire homes of their own. HUD has developed a plan for reaching the national homeownership goal. The plan is known as the National Homeownership Strategy. It was formulated with input from more than 50 public- and private-sector groups and consists of 100 objectives designed to make homeownership easier and affordable for American families. Among the objectives are expanded use of energy conservation and new construction technologies. The groups participating in the formulation of the National Homeownership Strategy formed a collaboration that was named the National Partners in Homeownership. Chicago Partners in the American Dream is a collaboration of Chicago organizations implementing the National Homeownership Strategy on a local level. It has made achieving the objectives of the Strategy the foundation for its local partnership. The Chicago Partners in the American Dream is a grassroots collaboration, combining the experience, resources, and expertise of a variety of local organizations. The fundamental goal of the Chicago Partners in the American Dream is to create 5,000 homeownership opportunities in nine to twelve focused areas within Empowerment Zone/Enterprise Communities in the Chicagoland market by the end of the year 2000.

  20. Proposed national strategies for the prevention of leading work-related diseases and injuries. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary strategies developed at the National Symposium on the Prevention of Leading Work Related Diseases and Injuries, held in Atlanta, Georgia on May 1 to 3, 1985 were revised, elaborated, and further developed. Strategies were developed for the prevention of occupational lung diseases, musculoskeletal injuries, occupational cancers, severe occupational traumatic injuries, and occupational cardiovascular diseases. Lung diseases considered included silicosis, asbestosis, lung cancer mesothelioma, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, asphyxiation, irritation, pulmonary edema, brucellosis, psitticosis, anthrax, mycobacterioses, histoplasmosis, aspergillosis, and coccidioidomycosis. Occupational cancers were discussed as they occur in the lung, pleura, peritoneum, bladder, kidneys, blood, nasal cavity, skin, nasal sinuses, and liver.

  1. Identification of Strategies to Leverage Public and Private Resources for National Security Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This report documents the identification of strategies to leverage public and private resources for the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP).There are numerous efforts across the United States to develop a properly skilled and trained national security workforce. Some of these efforts are the result of the leveraging of public and private dollars. As budget dollars decrease and the demand for a properly skilled and trained national security workforce increases, it will become even more important to leverage every education and training dollar. The leveraging of dollars serves many purposes. These include increasing the amount of training that can be delivered and therefore increasing the number of people reached, increasing the number and quality of public/private partnerships, and increasing the number of businesses that are involved in the training of their future workforce.

  2. Creating the laboratory`s future; A strategy for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    ``Creating The Laboratory`s Future`` describes Livermore`s roles and responsibilities as a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory and sets the foundation for decisions about the Laboratory`s programs and operations. It summarizes Livermore`s near-term strategy, which builds on recent Lab achievements and world events affecting their future. It also discusses their programmatic and operational emphases and highlights program areas that the authors believe can grow through application of Lab science and technology. Creating the Laboratory`s Future reflects their very strong focus on national security, important changes in the character of their national security work, major efforts are under way to overhaul their administrative and operational systems, and the continuing challenge of achieving national consensus on the role of the government in energy, environment, and the biosciences.

  3. Improving person-centred care in nursing homes through dementia-care mapping: design of a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    -centred approach to dementia care in nursing homes. The major strengths of the study design are the large sample size, the cluster-randomisation, and the one-year follow-up. The generalisability of the implementation strategies may be questionable because the motivation for person-centred care in both the intervention and control nursing homes is above average. The results of this study may be useful in improving the quality of care and are relevant for policymakers. Trial registration The trial is registered in the Netherlands National Trial Register: NTR2314. PMID:22214264

  4. Appropriation and dementia in India.

    PubMed

    Brijnath, Bianca; Manderson, Lenore

    2011-12-01

    Biomedical technologies like MRI scans offer a way for carers and people with dementia to 'see' pathology, as a means to reorient their perceptions of the body and functionality. Through interpretive and syncretic processes, the MRI and the diagnosis of dementia facilitate the incorporation of the clinical category 'dementia' into social understandings of illness and care in India. Complex shifts occur as families and providers move from socio-cultural explanations of disruption to bio-social etiologies of the disease 'dementia' and then to socio-ecological frameworks of causality. Both the biomedicalisation of illness and the localisation of illness occur as the clinical category 'dementia' is folded into local understandings of illness and care. Through elucidating how the dialectic between biomedical and local knowledge is operationalized, we offer insights into how dementia is absorbed and appropriated into Indian cultural contexts. PMID:21837538

  5. Role Expectations in Dementia Care Among Family Physicians and Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Hum, Susan; Cohen, Carole; Persaud, Malini; Lee, Joyce; Drummond, Neil; Dalziel, William; Pimlott, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Background The assessment and ongoing management of dementia falls largely on family physicians. This pilot study explored perceived roles and attitudes towards the provision of dementia care from the perspectives of family physicians and specialists. Methods Semi-structured, one-to-one interviews were conducted with six family physicians and six specialists (three geriatric psychiatrists, two geriatricians, and one neurologist) from University of Toronto-affiliated hospitals. Transcripts were subjected to thematic content analysis. Results Physicians’ clinical experience averaged 16 years. Both physician groups acknowledged that family physicians are more confident in diagnosing/treating uncomplicated dementia than a decade ago. They agreed on care management issues that warranted specialist involvement. Driving competency was contentious, and specialists willingly played the “bad cop” to resolve disputes and preserve long-standing therapeutic relationships. While patient/caregiver education and support were deemed essential, most physicians commented that community resources were fragmented and difficult to access. Improving collaboration and communication between physician groups, and clarifying the roles of other multi-disciplinary team members in dementia care were also discussed. Conclusions Future research could further explore physicians’ and other multi-disciplinary members’ perceived roles and responsibilities in dementia care, given that different health-care system-wide dementia care strategies and initiatives are being developed and implemented across Ontario. PMID:25232368

  6. Drug development in dementia.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Emma L; Passmore, Anthony P

    2013-11-01

    Dementia is a progressive, irreversible decline in cognition that, by definition, impacts on a patient's pre-existing level of functioning. The clinical syndrome of dementia has several aetiologies of which Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common. Drug development in AD is based on evolving pathophysiological theory. Disease modifying approaches include the targeting of amyloid processing, aggregation of tau, insulin signalling, neuroinflammation and neurotransmitter dysfunction, with efforts thus far yielding abandoned hopes and ongoing promise. Reflecting its dominance on the pathophysiological stage the amyloid cascade is central to many of the emerging drug therapies. The long preclinical phase of the disease requires robust biomarker means of identifying those at risk if timely intervention is to be possible. PMID:23707728

  7. Brain imaging in dementia.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Guendalina; Zamboni, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging has contributed significantly to the understanding of different dementia syndromes. Over the past 20 years these imaging techniques have been increasingly used for clinical characterisation and differential diagnosis, and to provide insight into the effects on functional capacity of the brain, patterns of spatial distribution of different dementia syndromes and their natural history and evolution over time. Brain imaging is also increasingly used in clinical trials, as part of inclusion criteria and/or as a surrogate outcome measure. Here we review all the relatively specific findings that can be identified with different MRI and PET techniques in each of the most frequent dementing disorders. PMID:26933232

  8. [Dementia with Lewy bodies].

    PubMed

    Orimo, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    It is important to differentiate dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and other dementia, especially Alzheimer disease (AD), because the medical treatment, management, and the prognosis of these diseases are different. In regard to clinical features, DLB patients have relatively mild memory disturbance, fluctuating cognition, more severe disturbances of attention, executive function, visuospacial function, visual hallucination, depression, autonomic symptoms, REM sleep behavior disorder, and idiopathic parkinsonism compared to AD patients. In regard to imaging tools, DLB patients have milder atrophy of medial temporal lobe by brain MRI, reduced occipital activity by SPECT or PET, reduced MIBG uptake by MIBG cardiac scintigraphy, and low dopamine transporter activity in the basal ganglia by SPECT or PET. PMID:27025091

  9. [Treatment of dementia].

    PubMed

    Bredthauer, D

    2006-12-14

    Some 80% of patients with advanced dementia develop such symptoms as aggression, a tendency to wander away, agitation or shouting and screaming. Often, these symptoms are a reaction to day-to-day problems or to the care-related situation. For this reason, psychopharmaceuticals should be employed only when external causes, additional health disorders or drug-related side effects have been excluded. Therapeutic drug options include modern antidepressants and neuroleptics. PMID:17619344

  10. Palliative care in advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Merel, Susan E; Merel, Susan; DeMers, Shaune; Vig, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Because neurodegenerative dementias are progressive and ultimately fatal, a palliative approach focusing on comfort, quality of life, and family support can have benefits for patients, families, and the health system. Elements of a palliative approach include discussion of prognosis and goals of care, completion of advance directives, and a thoughtful approach to common complications of advanced dementia. Physicians caring for patients with dementia should formulate a plan for end-of-life care in partnership with patients, families, and caregivers, and be prepared to manage common symptoms at the end of life in dementia, including pain and delirium. PMID:25037291

  11. Dementia resulting from traumatic brain injury: what is the pathology?

    PubMed

    Shively, Sharon; Scher, Ann I; Perl, Daniel P; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2012-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the earliest illnesses described in human history and remains a major source of morbidity and mortality in the modern era. It is estimated that 2% of the US population lives with long-term disabilities due to a prior TBI, and incidence and prevalence rates are even higher in developing countries. One of the most feared long-term consequences of TBIs is dementia, as multiple epidemiologic studies show that experiencing a TBI in early or midlife is associated with an increased risk of dementia in late life. The best data indicate that moderate and severe TBIs increase risk of dementia between 2- and 4-fold. It is less clear whether mild TBIs such as brief concussions result in increased dementia risk, in part because mild head injuries are often not well documented and retrospective studies have recall bias. However, it has been observed for many years that multiple mild TBIs as experienced by professional boxers are associated with a high risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a type of dementia with distinctive clinical and pathologic features. The recent recognition that CTE is common in retired professional football and hockey players has rekindled interest in this condition, as has the recognition that military personnel also experience high rates of mild TBIs and may have a similar syndrome. It is presently unknown whether dementia in TBI survivors is pathophysiologically similar to Alzheimer disease, CTE, or some other entity. Such information is critical for developing preventive and treatment strategies for a common cause of acquired dementia. Herein, we will review the epidemiologic data linking TBI and dementia, existing clinical and pathologic data, and will identify areas where future research is needed. PMID:22776913

  12. Strategies for International Cooperation in Support of Energy Development in Pacific Island Nations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.; Voss, P.; Warren, A.; Baring-Gould, I.; Conrad, M.

    2012-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been partnering with island communities around the world to address the technical, policy, social, and economic hurdles to deploying energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies (RETs) on small, islanded systems. The lessons learned from these partnerships are briefly summarized in this document with the goal of supporting the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in the development of specific near-term and longer-term strategies for island RET deployment.

  13. Applying change management metaphors to a national e-Health strategy.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Chad; Scott, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Recent attempts at a collective understanding of how to develop an e-Health strategy have addressed the individual organisation, collection of organisations, and national levels. At the national level the World Health Organisation's National eHealth Strategy Toolkit serves as an exemplar that consolidates knowledge in this area, guides practical implementations, and identifies areas for future research. A key implication of this toolkit is the considerable number of organisational changes required to successfully apply their ideas in practice. This study looks critically at the confluence of change management and e-Health strategy using metaphors that underpin established models of change management. Several of Morgan's organisational metaphors are presented (highlighting varied beliefs and assumptions regarding how change is enacted, who is responsible for the change, and guiding principles for that change), and used to provide a framework. Attention is then directed to several prominent models of change management that exemplify one or more of these metaphors, and these theoretical insights are applied to evaluate the World Health Organisation's National eHealth Strategy Toolkit. The paper presents areas for consideration when using the WHO/ITU toolkit, and suggestions on how to improve its use in practice. The goal is to seek insight regarding the optimal sequence of steps needed to ensure successful implementation and integration of e-health into health systems using change management models. No single model, toolkit, or guideline will offer all the needed answers, but clarity around the underlying metaphors informing the change management models being used provides valuable insight so potentially challenging areas can be avoided or mitigated. PMID:25365672

  14. Update on Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayesha; Kalaria, Raj N; Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a major contributor to the dementia syndrome and is described as having problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, and memory caused by impaired blood flow to the brain and damage to the blood vessels resulting from events such as stroke. There are a variety of etiologies that contribute to the development of vascular cognitive impairment and VaD, and these are often associated with other dementia-related pathologies such as Alzheimer disease. The diagnosis of VaD is difficult due to the number and types of lesions and their locations in the brain. Factors that increase the risk of vascular diseases such as stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking also raise the risk of VaD. Therefore, controlling these risk factors can help lower the chances of developing VaD. This update describes the subtypes of VaD, with details of their complex presentation, associated pathological lesions, and issues with diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:27502303

  15. Sleep, Cognition and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Porter, Verna R; Buxton, William G; Avidan, Alon Y

    2015-12-01

    The older patient population is growing rapidly around the world and in the USA. Almost half of seniors over age 65 who live at home are dissatisfied with their sleep, and nearly two-thirds of those residing in nursing home facilities suffer from sleep disorders. Chronic and pervasive sleep complaints and disturbances are frequently associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and may result in impaired cognition, diminished intellect, poor memory, confusion, and psychomotor retardation all of which may be misinterpreted as dementia. The key sleep disorders impacting patients with dementia include insomnia, hypersomnolence, circadian rhythm misalignment, sleep disordered breathing, motor disturbances of sleep such as periodic leg movement disorder of sleep and restless leg syndrome, and parasomnias, mostly in the form of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is a pre-clinical marker for a class of neurodegenerative diseases, the "synucleinopathies", and requires formal polysomnographic evaluation. Untreated sleep disorders may exacerbate cognitive and behavioral symptoms in patients with dementia and are a source of considerable stress for bed partners and family members. When left untreated, sleep disturbances may also increase the risk of injury at night, compromise health-related quality of life, and precipitate and accelerate social and economic burdens for caregivers. PMID:26478197

  16. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article presents a practical and informative approach to the evaluation of a patient with a rapidly progressive dementia (RPD). Recent Findings Prion diseases are the prototypical causes of RPD, but reversible causes of RPD might mimic prion disease and should always be considered in a differential diagnosis. Aside from prion diseases, the most common causes of RPD are atypical presentations of other neurodegenerative disorders, curable disorders including autoimmune encephalopathies, as well as some infections, and neoplasms. Numerous recent case reports suggest dural arterial venous fistulas sometimes cause RPDs. Summary RPDs, in which patients typically develop dementia over weeks to months, require an alternative differential than the slowly progressive dementias that occur over a few years. Because of their rapid decline, patients with RPDs necessitate urgent evaluation and often require an extensive workup, typically with multiple tests being sent or performed concurrently. Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, perhaps the prototypical RPD, is often the first diagnosis many neurologists consider when treating a patient with rapid cognitive decline. Many conditions other than prion disease, however, including numerous reversible or curable conditions, can present as an RPD. This chapter discusses some of the major etiologies for RPDs and offers an algorithm for diagnosis. PMID:27042906

  17. [Dementia and music].

    PubMed

    Kerer, Manuela; Marksteiner, Josef; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Mazzola, Guerino; Steinberg, Reinhard; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2009-01-01

    Patients suffering from dementia are nevertheless still able to render exceptional musical performances. For example, they can recognize music from childhood and reproduce lyrics and melodies of songs with four verses. Furthermore, behavioural symptoms such as psycho- motor agitation and crying, but also aggressive behaviour can be positively influenced by music and motivation and positive emotions can be increased. A variety of physiological and psychological changes occur when patients are listening to music. Previous research could show that music activated different parts of the brain especially in the temporal cortex, but also motoric areas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and cerebellum were essential for rhythm, melody and harmony perception and processing. Music therapy is an interpersonal process in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address physical, emotional, cognitive, and social needs of individuals with various psychiatric or medical conditions. However, until now only little research has been directed towards non-pharmacological treatments like music therapy in dementia patients. Further research is warranted to investigate the long term influence of music therapy on patients suffering from dementia. PMID:19272287

  18. [Dyslipidemia and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Tamaoka, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Several lines of evidences support a possible involvement of serum cholesterol in the development of dementia/Alzheimer's disease (AD), with hypercholesterolemia as one of the risk factors that can be targeted by therapeutic interventions. It has also been suggested that statins, prescribed as lipid-lowering drugs to patients at risk for cardiovascular conditions, may be useful in both the prevention and treatment of AD. Currently, conflicting evidences from epidemiological studies indicate a controversial association between dyslipidemia and dementia/AD risk. In randomized clinical trials, virtually no beneficial effect of statin therapy has been observed. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo animal experiments have revealed that statins suppress amyloid β protein (Aβ) generation. All these findings suggest that statins can be potentially used as preventive or therapeutic agents for AD. In addition, currently the pathophysiological process of AD is thought to begin many years before the diagnosis of AD dementia. Then, statin treatment as well as some disease-modifying therapies may be more efficacious at an early stage of AD including preclinical AD or mild cognitive impairment due to AD. PMID:27395458

  19. The Swedish strategy and method for development of a national healthcare information architecture.

    PubMed

    Rosenälv, Jessica; Lundell, Karl-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    "We need a precise framework of regulations in order to maintain appropriate and structured health care documentation that ensures that the information maintains a sufficient level of quality to be used in treatment, in research and by the actual patient. The users shall be aided by clearly and uniformly defined terms and concepts, and there should be an information structure that clarifies what to document and how to make the information more useful. Most of all, we need to standardize the information, not just the technical systems." (eHälsa - nytta och näring, Riksdag report 2011/12:RFR5, p. 37). In 2010, the Swedish Government adopted the National e-Health - the national strategy for accessible and secure information in healthcare. The strategy is a revision and extension of the previous strategy from 2006, which was used as input for the most recent efforts to develop a national information structure utilizing business-oriented generic models. A national decision on healthcare informatics standards was made by the Swedish County Councils, which decided to follow and use EN/ISO 13606 as a standard for the development of a universally applicable information structure, including archetypes and templates. The overall aim of the Swedish strategy for development of National Healthcare Information Architecture is to achieve high level semantic interoperability for clinical content and clinical contexts. High level semantic interoperability requires consistently structured clinical data and other types of data with coherent traceability to be mapped to reference clinical models. Archetypes that are formal definitions of the clinical and demographic concepts and some administrative data were developed. Each archetype describes the information structure and content of overarching core clinical concepts. Information that is defined in archetypes should be used for different purposes. Generic clinical process model was made concrete and analyzed. For each decision

  20. Prescribing patterns in dementia: a multicentre observational study in a German network of CAM physicians

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dementia is a major and increasing health problem worldwide. This study aims to investigate dementia treatment strategies among physicians specialised in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by analysing prescribing patterns and comparing them to current treatment guidelines in Germany. Methods Twenty-two primary care physicians in Germany participated in this prospective, multicentre observational study. Prescriptions and diagnoses were reported for each consecutive patient. Data were included if patients had at least one diagnosis of dementia according to the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases during the study period. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with a prescription of any anti-dementia drug including Ginkgo biloba. Results During the 5-year study period (2004-2008), 577 patients with dementia were included (median age: 81 years (IQR: 74-87); 69% female). Dementia was classified as unspecified dementia (57.2%), vascular dementia (25.1%), dementia in Alzheimer's disease (10.4%), and dementia in Parkinson's disease (7.3%). The prevalence of anti-dementia drugs was 25.6%. The phytopharmaceutical Ginkgo biloba was the most frequently prescribed anti-dementia drug overall (67.6% of all) followed by cholinesterase inhibitors (17.6%). The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for receiving any anti-dementia drug was greater than 1 for neurologists (AOR = 2.34; CI: 1.59-3.47), the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AOR = 3.28; CI: 1.96-5.50), neuroleptic therapy (AOR = 1.87; CI: 1.22-2.88), co-morbidities hypertension (AOR = 2.03; CI: 1.41-2.90), and heart failure (AOR = 4.85; CI: 3.42-6.88). The chance for a prescription of any anti-dementia drug decreased with the diagnosis of vascular dementia (AOR = 0.64; CI: 0.43-0.95) and diabetes mellitus (AOR = 0.55; CI: 0.36-0.86). The prescription of Ginkgo biloba was associated with sex (female: AOR = 0.41; CI: 0.19-0.89), patient age (AOR = 1.06; CI: 1

  1. A recipe for mealtime resilience for families living with dementia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fiona; Keller, Heather H; Schindel Martin, Lori; Sutherland, Olga

    2015-09-01

    To date, research delving into the narratives of persons living with dementia is limited. Taking part in usual mealtime activities such as preparing food can sustain the identity of persons living with dementia. Yet if capacity for mealtime activities changes, this can put a strain or demand on the family, which must adjust and adapt to these changes. The aim of this study was to develop an in-depth story of resilience in one family living with dementia that was experiencing mealtime changes. Thematic narrative analysis following the elements of Clandinin and Connelly's (2000) 3D narrative inquiry space was used. One family's dementia journey was highlighted using the metaphor of a baking recipe to reflect their story of resilience. Developing positive strategies and continuing to learn and adapt were the two approaches used by this resilient family. Reminiscing, incorporating humour, having hope and optimism, and establishing social support were specific strategies. This family continued to learn and adapt by focusing on their positive gains and personal growth, accumulating life experiences, and balancing past pleasures while adapting to the new normal. Future work needs to further conceptualise resilience and how it can be supported in families living with dementia. PMID:25250901

  2. Natural Phytochemicals in the Treatment and Prevention of Dementia: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Libro, Rosaliana; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Soundara Rajan, Thangavelu; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    The word dementia describes a class of heterogeneous diseases which etiopathogenetic mechanisms are not well understood. There are different types of dementia, among which, Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are the more common. Currently approved pharmacological treatments for most forms of dementia seem to act only on symptoms without having profound disease-modifying effects. Thus, alternative strategies capable of preventing the progressive loss of specific neuronal populations are urgently required. In particular, the attention of researchers has been focused on phytochemical compounds that have shown antioxidative, anti-amyloidogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties and that could represent important resources in the discovery of drug candidates against dementia. In this review, we summarize the neuroprotective effects of the main phytochemicals belonging to the polyphenol, isothiocyanate, alkaloid and cannabinoid families in the prevention and treatment of the most common kinds of dementia. We believe that natural phytochemicals may represent a promising sources of alternative medicine, at least in association with therapies approved to date for dementia. PMID:27110749

  3. Burnout and Coping Strategies in Male Staff from National Police in Valparaíso, Chile

    PubMed Central

    BRIONES MELLA, Daniel; KINKEAD BOUTIN, Ana P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the relationship between several dimensions of the burnout syndrome with certain stress-coping strategies, seniority level and marital status in male staff from National Police in Vaparaíso, Chile. Methods The sample collected in 2010 was composed of 338 male officers coming from various special units of a National Police in Valparaíso. Burnout and Coping Strategies were assessed and classified according Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and COPE Inventory, respectively. Data was analyzed using Pearson product-moment correlation, t-test for independent measures and Multiple Linear Regression to generate a predictive model. Results The prevalence of the burnout syndrome disaggregated by grouping criteria, the dimensions concentrated in middle levels for emotional exhaustion with a 52.1%, a 51.8% for depersonalization and finally, personal achievement with a 48.8%. Only 28% of participants showed more exacerbated dimensions of the burnout syndrome. There was a weak and direct yet statistically significant relationship between personal achievement and active coping. Mental disconnection had a weak direct relationship between both coping strategies and emotional exhaustion also existed. Certain correlations between burnout dimensions and coping strategies focused on emotion as predictor variables over the criterion variable corresponding to emotional exhaustion were mental disconnection in first place, secondly, focusing on emotions, and emotional social support. Conclusions Burnout dimensions scored medium values ​​focusing mainly on emotional exhaustion and reduced personal accomplishment. Coping strategies are used in parallel and in general are not mutually exclusive. Finally, there were not any relationship between variables seniority level and marital status. PMID:26060656

  4. [Automobile driving capacity in dementia].

    PubMed

    Seeger, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Dementia influences at an early stage the driving aptitude of motor vehicle steering persons. Every year in Switzerland, around 16'000 driving permit holders suffer newly from dementia; therefore the driving aptitude is questioned, especially because of possibly limited executive functions. Individuals with early-stage dementia often may show a dangerous driving stile. However, a mild dementia does not a priori exclude the driving aptitude, and less than half of these drivers can continue driving for another 1 - 3 years. In contrast, there is no further driving aptitude in presence of moderate dementia. In the assessment of driving aptitude, the underlying cause of dementia is always taken into account. Cognitive short tests such as the Mini-Mental Status Exam, Clock Drawing Test and Trail-Making Test are not suitable to make reliable statements about the aptitude to drive, but these tests are very important for the initial diagnosis of dementia in primary care practice and can lead the way for further examination concerning driving aptitude. The legally prescribed regular check-up for motorists aged over 70 years in Switzerland provides an ideal opportunity for early detection of incipient dementia. The practical procedure for the assessment of aptitude to drive in the primary care practice is presented. The physician-guided on-road driving test represents a meaningful, practical and relatively cost-effective tool for the evaluation of driving aptitude in cases of doubt. PMID:25791047

  5. [Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome with Dementia].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Keiko

    2016-04-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome with limbic encephalopathy tends to progress rapidly, presenting with physical symptoms such as ataxia or sensory disturbance. However, some affected patients demonstrate amnesia, inactivity, or abnormal behavior, which lead to the diagnosis of dementia. It is important to perform an extensive differential diagnosis with autoantibody-examination and tumor survey, so as not to overlook potentially treatable dementia. PMID:27056857

  6. [Dementia due to Endocrine Diseases].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Akiko; Yoneda, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine diseases affecting various organs, such as the pituitary gland, the thyroid, the parathyroid, the adrenal glands and the pancreas, occasionally cause dementia. While Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the main cause of dementia in the elderly and is untreatable, dementia caused by endocrine diseases is treatable in most cases. However, patients with dementia associated with endocrine diseases show memory impairments similar to those found in AD, often leading to misdiagnoses. Patients with endocrine diseases often present with other characteristic systemic and neuropsychiatric symptoms caused by altered hormone levels. Such neuropsychiatric symptoms include involuntary movements, depression, seizures, and muscle weakness. In these cases, abnormalities in imaging and blood or urine tests are helpful in making a differential diagnosis. As delays in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients may cause irreversible brain damage, it is imperative for clinicians to carefully exclude the possibility of latent endocrine diseases when treating patients with dementia. PMID:27056858

  7. Dementia-friendly design resource.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2014-02-01

    Although estimates suggest that, on average, some 30 per cent of all patients in general acute medical wards may have some form of dementia, Stirling University's Dementia Services Development Centre (DSDC), one of the leading international knowledge centres working to improve the lives of dementia sufferers, says progress in designing healthcare facilities that address such patients' needs has been 'patchy at best'. With the number of individuals living with dementia expected to double in the next 25 years, the DSDC has recently worked with Edinburgh-based architects, Burnett Pollock Associates, to develop an online resource that clearly illustrates, via 15 simulated 'dementia-friendly' healthcare 'spaces', some of the key principles to consider when designing effectively for this fast-growing group. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, attended the launch of the so-called 'Virtual Hospital'. PMID:24620491

  8. "We're all thrown in the same boat … ": A qualitative analysis of peer support in dementia care.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Sarah E; Clarke, Charlotte L; Wilkinson, Heather; Alexjuk, Eva Joanna; Wilcockson, Jane; Robinson, Louise; Reynolds, Joanna; McClelland, Siobhan; Corner, Lynne; Cattan, Mima

    2016-07-01

    Peer support is well established in fields such as the disability movement and mental health and is increasingly recognised as one way of enabling support by and for people with a diagnosis of dementia and their immediate carers. It was central to the implementation of the National Dementia Strategy (NDS) for England, when 40 demonstration sites were established. This mixed-methods study included in-depth qualitative interviews with people living with dementia (n = 101) and staff/stakeholders (n = 82) at 8 of the 40 sites. Data analysis was a five-stage process: coding framework developed (using 25 transcripts); further development of the framework (using a further 70 transcripts); development of emerging themes; modelling of themes and verification of models based on the entire data set. Peer support had positive emotional and social impact that was rooted in identification with others, a commonality of experience and reciprocity of support. There was also a contrast between the quality of peer support and support from professionals. This emphasises the significance of lived experience and promoting a strength-based approach to interpersonal support that is enabling and challenges a deficit approach to understanding dementia. PMID:24742876

  9. Personality and Coping among Caregivers of Spouses with Dementia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Karen; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined personality factors and coping strategies among 50 spouse caregivers of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or related dementia. Results showed that personality traits explained 60% of variance in emotion-focused coping, 30% of variance in problem-focused coping, and 15% of variance associated with social support coping.…

  10. [Snoezelen and animal-assisted therapy in dementia patients].

    PubMed

    Javelot, Hervé; Antoine-Bernard, Emilie; Garat, Jennifer; Javelot, Thierry; Weiner, Luisa; Mervelay, Véroníque

    2012-01-01

    A number of non medication-based methods of nursing care for geriatric patients have been developed over recent decades to treat non cognitive symptoms associated with dementia. Among these, Snoezelen rooms for multisensory behavioural therapy and animal-assisted therapy emerge as innovative strategies which could potentially complement other more frequently developed methods such as physical activity. PMID:22611886

  11. Dementia and the Power of Music Therapy.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Dementia is now a leading cause of both mortality and morbidity, particularly in western nations, and current projections for rates of dementia suggest this will worsen. More than ever, cost effective and creative non-pharmacological therapies are needed to ensure we have an adequate system of care and supervision. Music therapy is one such measure, yet to date statements of what music therapy is supposed to bring about in ethical terms have been limited to fairly vague and under-developed claims about an improvement in well-being. This article identifies the relevant sense of wellbeing at stake in the question of dementia therapies of this type. In broad terms the idea is that this kind of therapy has a restorative effect on social agency. To the extent that music arouses a person through its rhythms and memory-inducing effects, particularly in communal settings, it may give rise to the recovery of one's narrative agency, and in turn allow for both carer and patient to participate in a more meaningful and mutually engaging social connection. PMID:25655812

  12. Great Apes and Biodiversity Offset Projects in Africa: The Case for National Offset Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kormos, Rebecca; Kormos, Cyril F.; Humle, Tatyana; Lanjouw, Annette; Rainer, Helga; Victurine, Ray; Mittermeier, Russell A.; Diallo, Mamadou S.; Rylands, Anthony B.; Williamson, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    The development and private sectors are increasingly considering “biodiversity offsets” as a strategy to compensate for their negative impacts on biodiversity, including impacts on great apes and their habitats in Africa. In the absence of national offset policies in sub-Saharan Africa, offset design and implementation are guided by company internal standards, lending bank standards or international best practice principles. We examine four projects in Africa that are seeking to compensate for their negative impacts on great ape populations. Our assessment of these projects reveals that not all apply or implement best practices, and that there is little standardization in the methods used to measure losses and gains in species numbers. Even if they were to follow currently accepted best-practice principles, we find that these actions may still fail to contribute to conservation objectives over the long term. We advocate for an alternative approach in which biodiversity offset and compensation projects are designed and implemented as part of a National Offset Strategy that (1) takes into account the cumulative impacts of development in individual countries, (2) identifies priority offset sites, (3) promotes aggregated offsets, and (4) integrates biodiversity offset and compensation projects with national biodiversity conservation objectives. We also propose supplementary principles necessary for biodiversity offsets to contribute to great ape conservation in Africa. Caution should still be exercised, however, with regard to offsets until further field-based evidence of their effectiveness is available. PMID:25372894

  13. Great apes and biodiversity offset projects in Africa: the case for national offset strategies.

    PubMed

    Kormos, Rebecca; Kormos, Cyril F; Humle, Tatyana; Lanjouw, Annette; Rainer, Helga; Victurine, Ray; Mittermeier, Russell A; Diallo, Mamadou S; Rylands, Anthony B; Williamson, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    The development and private sectors are increasingly considering "biodiversity offsets" as a strategy to compensate for their negative impacts on biodiversity, including impacts on great apes and their habitats in Africa. In the absence of national offset policies in sub-Saharan Africa, offset design and implementation are guided by company internal standards, lending bank standards or international best practice principles. We examine four projects in Africa that are seeking to compensate for their negative impacts on great ape populations. Our assessment of these projects reveals that not all apply or implement best practices, and that there is little standardization in the methods used to measure losses and gains in species numbers. Even if they were to follow currently accepted best-practice principles, we find that these actions may still fail to contribute to conservation objectives over the long term. We advocate for an alternative approach in which biodiversity offset and compensation projects are designed and implemented as part of a National Offset Strategy that (1) takes into account the cumulative impacts of development in individual countries, (2) identifies priority offset sites, (3) promotes aggregated offsets, and (4) integrates biodiversity offset and compensation projects with national biodiversity conservation objectives. We also propose supplementary principles necessary for biodiversity offsets to contribute to great ape conservation in Africa. Caution should still be exercised, however, with regard to offsets until further field-based evidence of their effectiveness is available. PMID:25372894

  14. [Neurosyphilis and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroko; Ando, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of neurosyphilis has declined dramatically because of the availability of penicillin. However, in recent years there has been an increase in the occurence of neurosyphilis. General paresis, a form of parenchymatous neurosyphilis, causes dementia. Some of the symptoms include loss of memory, poor understanding and judgment, and behavioral changes. It is important to distinguish general paresis from neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, because with precise diagnosis and treatment, complete recovery is possible We describe epidemiological data, diagnosis and treatment of neurosyphilis as well as present our cases. PMID:27056849

  15. Priorities in national space strategies and governance of the member states of the European Space Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriaensen, Maarten; Giannopapa, Christina; Sagath, Daniel; Papastefanou, Anastasia

    2015-12-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has twenty Member States with a variety of strategic priorities and governance structures regarding their space activities. A number of countries engage in space activities exclusively though ESA, while others have also their own national space programme. Some consider ESA as their prime space agency and others have additionally their own national agency with respective programmes. The main objective of this paper is to provide an up-to date overview and a holistic assessment of strategic priorities and the national space governance structures in 20 ESA Member States. This analysis and assessment has been conducted by analysing the Member States public documents, information provided at ESA workshop on this topic and though unstructured interviews. The paper is structured to include two main elements: priorities and trends in national space strategies and space governance in ESA Member States. The first part of this paper focuses on the content and analysis of the national space strategies and indicates the main priorities and trends in Member States. The priorities are categorised with regards to technology domains, the role of space in the areas of sustainability and the motivators that boost engagement in space. These vary from one Member State to another and include with different levels of engagement in technology domains amongst others: science and exploration, navigation, Earth observation, human space flight, launchers, telecommunications, and integrated applications. Member States allocate a different role of space as enabling tool adding to the advancement of sustainability areas including: security, resources, environment and climate change, transport and communication, energy, and knowledge and education. The motivators motivating reasoning which enhances or hinders space engagement also differs. The motivators identified are industrial competitiveness, job creation, technology development and transfer, social benefits

  16. 'The living death of Alzheimer's' versus 'Take a walk to keep dementia at bay': representations of dementia in print media and carer discourse.

    PubMed

    Peel, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    Understanding dementia is a pressing social challenge. This article draws on the 'Dementia talking: care conversation and communication' project which aims to understand how talk about, and to people living with dementia is constructed. In this article I draw on the construction of dementia manifest in two data sets - a corpus of 350 recent UK national newspaper articles and qualitative data derived from in-depth interviews with informal carers. These data were analysed using a thematic discursive approach. A 'panic-blame' framework was evident in much of the print media coverage. Dementia was represented in catastrophic terms as a 'tsunami' and 'worse than death', juxtaposed with coverage of individualistic behavioural change and lifestyle recommendations to 'stave off' the condition. Contrary to this media discourse, in carers' talk there was scant use of hyperbolic metaphor or reference to individual responsibility for dementia, and any corresponding blame and accountability. I argue that the presence of individualistic dementia 'preventative' behaviour in media discourse is problematic, especially in comparison to other more 'controllable' and treatable chronic conditions. Engagement with, and critique of, the nascent panic-blame cultural context may be fruitful in enhancing positive social change for people diagnosed with dementia and their carers. PMID:24935028

  17. Teaching Mands to Older Adults with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleson, Chelsey R.; Baker, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Millions of Americans are diagnosed with dementia, and that number is only expected to rise. The diagnosis of dementia comes with impairments, especially in language. Furthermore, dementia-related functional declines appear to be moderated by environmental variables (Alzheimer's Association, "Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the…

  18. Announced Strategy Types in Multiagent RL for Conflict-Avoidance in the National Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebhuhn, Carrie; Knudson, Matthew D.; Tumer, Kagan

    2014-01-01

    The use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) in the national airspace is of growing interest to the research community. Safety and scalability of control algorithms are key to the successful integration of autonomous system into a human-populated airspace. In order to ensure safety while still maintaining efficient paths of travel, these algorithms must also accommodate heterogeneity of path strategies of its neighbors. We show that, using multiagent RL, we can improve the speed with which conflicts are resolved in cases with up to 80 aircraft within a section of the airspace. In addition, we show that the introduction of abstract agent strategy types to partition the state space is helpful in resolving conflicts, particularly in high congestion.

  19. Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a national capital region nuclear detonation scenario.

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2011-12-01

    Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kT detonation in the National Capital Region. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at one exemplary point. For most Washington, DC neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

  20. Development of year 2020 goals for the National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States.

    PubMed

    Holtgrave, David R

    2014-04-01

    In July, 2010, President Barack Obama released the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS). The NHAS set forth ambitious goals for the year 2015. These goals were potentially achievable had the appropriate level of resources been invested; however, investment at the necessary scale has not been made and the 2015 goals now may well be out of reach. Therefore, we propose that an updated NHAS be developed with goals for the year 2020 clearly articulated. For the purposes of fostering discussion on this important topic, we propose bold yet achievable quantitative 2020 goals based on previously published economic and mathematical modeling analyses. PMID:23934340

  1. Basic science and energy research sector profile: Background for the National Energy Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    March, F.; Ashton, W.B.; Kinzey, B.R.; McDonald, S.C.; Lee, V.E.

    1990-11-01

    This Profile report provides a general perspective on the role of basic science in the spectrum of research and development in the United States, and basic research's contributions to the goals of the National Energy Strategy (NES). It includes selected facts, figures, and analysis of strategic issues affecting the future of science in the United States. It is provided as background for people from government, the private sector, academia, and the public, who will be reviewing the NES in the coming months; and it is intended to serve as the basis for discussion of basic science issues within the context of the developing NES.

  2. Strategies to Address Identified Education Gaps in the Preparation of a National Security Workforce

    SciTech Connect

    2008-06-30

    This report will discuss strategies available to address identified gaps and weaknesses in education efforts aimed at the preparation of a skilled and properly trained national security workforce.The need to adequately train and educate a national security workforce is at a critical juncture. Even though there are an increasing number of college graduates in the appropriate fields, many of these graduates choose to work in the private sector because of more desirable salary and benefit packages. This is contributing to an inability to fill vacant positions at NNSA resulting from high personnel turnover from the large number of retirements. Further, many of the retirees are practically irreplaceable because they are Cold War scientists that have experience and expertise with nuclear weapons.

  3. Dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Murray, Melissa E.; Lowe, Val J.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Smith, Glenn E.; Knopman, David S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate clinical, imaging, and pathologic associations of the cingulate island sign (CIS) in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Methods: We retrospectively identified and compared patients with a clinical diagnosis of DLB (n = 39); patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) matched by age, sex, and education (n = 39); and cognitively normal controls (n = 78) who underwent 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and C11 Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET scans. Among these patients, we studied those who came to autopsy and underwent Braak neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) staging (n = 10). Results: Patients with a clinical diagnosis of DLB had a higher ratio of posterior cingulate to precuneus plus cuneus metabolism, cingulate island sign (CIS), on FDG-PET than patients with AD (p < 0.001), a finding independent of β-amyloid load on PiB-PET (p = 0.56). Patients with CIS positivity on visual assessment of FDG-PET fit into the group of high- or intermediate-probability DLB pathology and received clinical diagnosis of DLB, not AD. Higher CIS ratio correlated with lower Braak NFT stage (r = −0.96; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study found that CIS on FDG-PET is not associated with fibrillar β-amyloid deposition but indicates lower Braak NFT stage in patients with DLB. Identifying biomarkers that measure relative contributions of underlying pathologies to dementia is critical as neurotherapeutics move toward targeted treatments. PMID:25056580

  4. Interrogating personhood and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Paul; Gilleard, Chris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To interrogate the concept of personhood and its application to care practices for people with dementia. Method: We outline the work of Tom Kitwood on personhood and relate this to conceptualisations of personhood in metaphysics and in moral philosophy. Results: The philosophical concept of personhood has a long history. The metaphysical tradition examines the necessary and sufficient qualities that make up personhood such as agency, consciousness, identity, rationality and second-order reflexivity. Alternative viewpoints treat personhood as a matter of degree rather than as a superordinate category. Within moral philosophy personhood is treated as a moral status applicable to some or to all human beings. Conclusion: In the light of the multiple meanings attached to the term in both metaphysics and moral philosophy, personhood is a relatively unhelpful concept to act as the foundation for developing models and standards of care for people with dementia. Care, we suggest, should concentrate less on ambiguous and somewhat abstract terms such as personhood and focus instead on supporting people's existing capabilities, while minimising the harmful consequences of their incapacities. PMID:26708149

  5. Oxytocin for frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    MacKinley, Julia; Blair, Mervin; Oliver, Lindsay D.; Jesso, Sarah; Tartaglia, Maria C.; Borrie, Michael; Wells, Jennie; Dziobek, Isabel; Pasternak, Stephen; Mitchell, Derek G.V.; Rankin, Katherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Boxer, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the safety and tolerability of 3 doses of intranasal oxytocin (Syntocinon; Novartis, Bern, Switzerland) administered to patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods: We conducted a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using a dose-escalation design to test 3 clinically feasible doses of intranasal oxytocin (24, 48, or 72 IU) administered twice daily for 1 week to 23 patients with behavioral variant FTD or semantic dementia (clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT01386333). Primary outcome measures were safety and tolerability at each dose. Secondary measures explored efficacy across the combined oxytocin vs placebo groups and examined potential dose-related effects. Results: All 3 doses of intranasal oxytocin were safe and well tolerated. Conclusions: A multicenter trial is warranted to determine the therapeutic efficacy of long-term intranasal oxytocin for behavioral symptoms in FTD. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with FTD, intranasal oxytocin is not significantly associated with adverse events or significant changes in the overall neuropsychiatric inventory. PMID:25503617

  6. What is frontotemporal dementia?

    PubMed

    Kurz, Alexander; Kurz, Carolin; Ellis, Kathryn; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2014-10-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the clinical manifestation of progressive nerve cell loss in the frontal and anterior temporal lobes. It represents the second most frequent form of early-onset dementia. The two major types of FTD are determined by the localisation of the underlying pathology. The behaviour variant is characterised by disinhibition, socially inappropriate manners, loss of empathy, blunting of affect and hyperorality. Key features of the language variant are either non-fluent effortful speech and grammatical errors or impaired word finding and loss of meaning of words and objects. Histopathological changes are characterised by the abnormal processing of proteins including microtubule associated protein Tau, transactive response DNA-binding protein, and tumour-associated protein fused in sarcoma. The familial forms of FTD are caused by mutations in 5 genes. The diagnosis of FTD rests on careful history and psychiatric, neuropsychological and neurological examination supported by laboratory assessments and brain imaging. The management requires an interdisciplinary approach involving the carer and using non-pharmacological approaches in the first line. Current antidementia drugs, including cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, have no consistent positive effects in FTD. Behavioural symptoms may respond favourably to selective serotonergic antidepressants. Antipsychotic agents should be used with caution regarding motor, cardiovascular and mortality risks. PMID:25059437

  7. Multiplex analyte assays to characterize different dementias: brain inflammatory cytokines in poststroke and other dementias.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiqing; Oakley, Arthur E; Monteiro, Maria; Tuomela, Katri; Allan, Louise M; Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta B; O'Brien, John T; Kalaria, Raj N

    2016-02-01

    possible specific involvement of immunosenescence in dementia pathogenesis. In contrast, CRP was not altered between dementia and nondementia subjects or between PSD and PSND. Our study provides evidence not only for the feasibility of tracking cytokines in postmortem brain tissue but also suggests differentially impaired inflammatory mechanisms underlying dementia including AD. There was a diminished inflammatory response, possibly reflecting immunosenescence and cerebral atrophy, in all dementias. Strategies to enhance anti-inflammatory cytokines and boost the immune system of the brain may be beneficial for preventing cognitive dysfunction, especially after stroke. PMID:26827643

  8. Multiplex analyte assays to characterize different dementias: brain inflammatory cytokines in poststroke and other dementias

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aiqing; Oakley, Arthur E.; Monteiro, Maria; Tuomela, Katri; Allan, Louise M.; Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta B.; O'Brien, John T.; Kalaria, Raj N.

    2016-01-01

    possible specific involvement of immunosenescence in dementia pathogenesis. In contrast, CRP was not altered between dementia and nondementia subjects or between PSD and PSND. Our study provides evidence not only for the feasibility of tracking cytokines in postmortem brain tissue but also suggests differentially impaired inflammatory mechanisms underlying dementia including AD. There was a diminished inflammatory response, possibly reflecting immunosenescence and cerebral atrophy, in all dementias. Strategies to enhance anti-inflammatory cytokines and boost the immune system of the brain may be beneficial for preventing cognitive dysfunction, especially after stroke. PMID:26827643

  9. [National planning of health policy in Brazil: strategies and instruments in the 2000s].

    PubMed

    Machado, Cristiani Vieira; Baptista, Tatiana Wargas de Faria; de Lima, Luciana Dias

    2010-08-01

    This paper discusses the national planning of health policy between 2003 and 2010, in the light of the development of state planning in Brazil and Lula's administration. Firstly an historical overview is presented of the key moments for national planning, regarding its effects on health care. The governmental context is then described with a review of the strategies and instruments in health planning over recent years. The methodology involved a bibliographic and documental review - including the Multi-year Plans, the National Health Plan, the Health Pact and the More Health program - considering their intention, contents and development processes. The results indicate that national health planning has been condensed in order to enable better direction of the policy. Two key moments in federal health planning were identified: between 2003 and 2006 a managerial and participative line was followed; between 2007 and 2010, the managerial line was kept allied to an effort to tie health policy to the development model. Despite the advances, health planning has displayed limitations, such as: restrictions in health financing, which has compromised the execution of the plans; failure to tackle structural problems in the health care system; and the fragile territorial organization. PMID:20802870

  10. Biomarkers of aggression in dementia.

    PubMed

    Gotovac, Kristina; Nikolac Perković, Matea; Pivac, Nela; Borovečki, Fran

    2016-08-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome defined by progressive global impairment of acquired cognitive abilities. It can be caused by a number of underlying conditions. The most common types of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Despite the fact that cognitive impairment is central to the dementia, noncognitive symptoms, most commonly described nowadays as neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) exist almost always at certain point of the illness. Aggression as one of the NPS represents danger both for patients and caregivers and the rate of aggression correlates with the loss of independence, cognitive decline and poor outcome. Therefore, biomarkers of aggression in dementia patients would be of a great importance. Studies have shown that different genetic factors, including monoamine signaling and processing, can be associated with various NPS including aggression. There have been significant and multiple neurotransmitter changes identified in the brains of patients with dementia and some of these changes have been involved in the etiology of NPS. Aggression specific changes have also been observed in neuropathological studies. The current consensus is that the best approach for development of such biomarkers may be incorporation of genetics (polymorphisms), neurobiology (neurotransmitters and neuropathology) and neuroimaging techniques. PMID:26952705

  11. Community outreach and engagement strategies from the Wisconsin Study Center of the National Children's Study.

    PubMed

    Riesch, Susan K; Ngui, Emmanuel M; Ehlert, Carey; Miller, M Katie; Cronk, Christine A; Leuthner, Steven; Strehlow, Mary; Hewitt, Jeanne B; Durkin, Maureen S

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this methods article was to describe and evaluate outreach and engagement strategies designed to initially build county-wide awareness and support for the National Children's Study (NCS or the study) and subsequently to target the segment communities where recruitment for the study occurred. Selected principles from community outreach, social marketing, and health care system and personal referral formed the foundation for the strategies. The strategies included a celebration event, community advisory board, community needs assessment, building relationships with health care providers and systems, eliciting a network of study supporters, newsletters, appearances at local young family-oriented events (health fairs, parades), presentations to local community leaders, community forums, "branding" with assistance from a women-owned local marketing firm, and mailings including an oversized, second-touch postcard. Six months after study launch, approximately 4,600 study-eligible women were asked in a door-to-door survey if and how they became aware of the study. On average, 40% of eligible women reported being aware of the study. The most frequently cited strategy to cultivate their awareness was study-specific mailings. Awareness of the NCS increased by 7.5% among those receiving a second-touch postcard relative to controls (95% CIs [4.9, 10.7] z = 5.347, p < 0.0000, d = 0.16). Community outreach and engagement strategies, in particular the oversized postcard as a second-touch effort, may be used effectively by researchers for participant recruitment and by public health nurses for delivery of important population-focused messages. PMID:23586770

  12. Skills for Life: Statement on the National Strategy for Improving Adult Literacy and Numeracy Skills. The Agency Responds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Penny, Ed.

    England's Learning and Skills Development Agency welcomes the introduction of a coherent national funding and delivery strategy for adult literacy, numeracy, and English for speakers of other languages (ESOL). The agency believes that the strategy should incorporate the lessons of previous literacy and numeracy initiatives and build on examples of…

  13. Open University and Distance Education Coordination: Strategies Used to Consolidate Distance Education at the National Autonomous University of Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berruecos, Citlalli

    2004-01-01

    This case study describes three main strategies used from March 2002 to November 2003 at the Open University and Distance Education Coordination (CUAED) of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) to consolidate distance education at the University. The author explains how, in just 18 months, these three main strategies enabled the UNAM…

  14. Clarifying dementia risk factors: treading in murky waters.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Halima; Oh, Esther S

    2016-07-01

    In light of the growing burden of dementia, continued research into risk factors and potential contributors to disease development is essential. Clearly established risk factors can not only inform our understanding of disease pathophysiology and treatments but also identify potential preventive strategies. While age and the ApoE4 allele have consistently been shown to increase risk of developing dementia (Kukull et al., 2002), other risk factors have been less studied or have had inconsistent findings. The study by Booker and colleagues (Booker et al., 2016) re-examines proposed late-life medical risk factors for incident dementia in a large population-based case-control study. This important contribution is best interpreted in the context of existing research. PMID:27225941

  15. Use of photovoice with people with younger onset dementia.

    PubMed

    Evans, David; Robertson, Jacinta; Candy, Allen

    2016-07-01

    Photography is a tool that has been used in research for many years. It allows people to create a record of an event, capture a complex phenomenon or to tell a story with pictures. Because it does not rely on language, it can be used with vulnerable populations who might not normally be included in research. This paper discusses the use of photography as one component of the evaluation strategy for a project that provided an opportunity for people with younger onset dementia to return to the workplace one day per week. Participants in the workplace project used photography to create a record of their experience of returning to the workplace. Based on the nature of the participant's comments, photographs were grouped into four broad areas: impact of dementia, impact on family, the work experience and new friends. Issues related to the use of photography with people who have dementia are explored based on the experiences gained during this project. PMID:24962000

  16. Disease-modifying therapeutic directions for Lewy-Body dementias

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Kim, Young-Cho; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.

    2015-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second leading cause of dementia following Alzheimer's disease (AD) and accounts for up to 25% of all dementia. DLB is distinct from AD in that it involves extensive neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as motor symptoms, leads to enormous societal costs in terms of direct medical care and is associated with high financial and caregiver costs. Although, there are no disease-modifying therapies for DLB, we review several new therapeutic directions in treating DLB. We discuss progress in strategies to decrease the level of alpha-synuclein, to prevent the cell to cell transmission of misfolded alpha-synuclein, and the potential of brain stimulation in DLB. PMID:26347604

  17. The Concept of Missing Incidents in Persons with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Meredeth; Houston, Amy; Molinari, Victor; Bulat, Tatjana; Bowen, Mary Elizabeth; Spring, Heather; Mutolo, Sandra; McKenzie, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral symptoms of dementia often present the greatest challenge for informal caregivers. One behavior, that is a constant concern for caregivers, is the person with dementia leaving a designated area such that their whereabouts become unknown to the caregiver or a missing incident. Based on an extensive literature review and published findings of their own research, members of the International Consortium on Wandering and Missing Incidents constructed a preliminary missing incidents model. Examining the evidence base, specific factors within each category of the model were further described, reviewed and modified until consensus was reached regarding the final model. The model begins to explain in particular the variety of antecedents that are related to missing incidents. The model presented in this paper is designed to be heuristic and may be used to stimulate discussion and the development of effective preventative and response strategies for missing incidents among persons with dementia. PMID:27417817

  18. Disease-modifying therapeutic directions for Lewy-Body dementias.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Kim, Young-Cho; Narayanan, Nandakumar S

    2015-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second leading cause of dementia following Alzheimer's disease (AD) and accounts for up to 25% of all dementia. DLB is distinct from AD in that it involves extensive neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as motor symptoms, leads to enormous societal costs in terms of direct medical care and is associated with high financial and caregiver costs. Although, there are no disease-modifying therapies for DLB, we review several new therapeutic directions in treating DLB. We discuss progress in strategies to decrease the level of alpha-synuclein, to prevent the cell to cell transmission of misfolded alpha-synuclein, and the potential of brain stimulation in DLB. PMID:26347604

  19. The 'ripple effect': Towards researching improvisational music therapy in dementia care homes.

    PubMed

    Pavlicevic, Mercédès; Tsiris, Giorgos; Wood, Stuart; Powell, Harriet; Graham, Janet; Sanderson, Richard; Millman, Rachel; Gibson, Jane

    2015-09-01

    Increased interest in, and demand for, music therapy provision for persons with dementia prompted this study's exploration of music therapists' strategies for creating musical communities in dementia care settings, considering the needs and resources of people affected by dementia. Focus group discussions and detailed iterative study of improvisational music therapy work by six experienced practitioners clarify the contextual immediacy and socio-musical complexities of music therapy in dementia care homes. Music therapy's 'ripple effect', with resonances from micro (person-to-person musicking), to meso (musicking beyond 'session time') and macro level (within the care home and beyond), implies that all who are part of the dementia care ecology need opportunities for flourishing, shared participation, and for expanded self-identities; beyond 'staff', 'residents', or 'being in distress'. On such basis, managers and funders might consider an extended brief for music therapists' roles, to include generating and maintaining musical wellbeing throughout residential care settings. PMID:24381215

  20. Advanced dementia research in the nursing home: the CASCADE study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Susan L; Kiely, Dan K; Jones, Richard N; Prigerson, Holly; Volicer, Ladislav; Teno, Joan M

    2006-01-01

    Despite the growing number of persons with advanced dementia, and the need to improve their end-of-life care, few studies have addressed this important topic. The objectives of this report are to present the methodology established in the CASCADE (Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advanced Dementia at the End-of-Life) study, and to describe how challenges specific to this research were met. The CASCADE study is an ongoing, federally funded, 5-year prospective cohort study of nursing [nursing home (NH)] residents with advanced dementia and their health care proxies (HCPs) initiated in February 2003. Subjects were recruited from 15 facilities around Boston. The recruitment and data collection protocols are described. The demographic features, ownership, staffing, and quality of care of participant facilities are presented and compared to NHs nationwide. To date, 189 resident/HCP dyads have been enrolled. Baseline data are presented, demonstrating the success of the protocol in recruiting and repeatedly assessing NH residents with advanced dementia and their HCPs. Factors challenging and enabling implementation of the protocol are described. The CASCADE experience establishes the feasibility of conducting rigorous, multisite dementia NH research, and the described methodology serves as a detailed reference for subsequent CASCADE publications as results from the study emerge. PMID:16917187

  1. Frontotemporal dementia mimicking bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, Andrew H; Schroeder, Ryan W; Baade, Lyle E; Lincoln, Janka; Khan, Ahsan Y

    2013-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is a cause of behavioral disturbance that usually appears in individuals between 45 and 65 years of age. The authors present the case of a 65-year-old patient that illustrates how frontotemporal dementia can be misdiagnosed based on a behavioral pattern that suggests the presence of a primary mood disorder. Early accurate diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia and subsequent supportive measures can allow patients and families to make important decisions about business and legal affairs and how to spend remaining leisure time in the most meaningful and enjoyable way possible. PMID:24241504

  2. Comparing New Zealand's 'Middle Out' health information technology strategy with other OECD nations.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Tom; Coiera, Enrico

    2013-05-01

    Implementation of efficient, universally applied, computer to computer communications is a high priority for many national health systems. As a consequence, much effort has been channelled into finding ways in which a patient's previous medical history can be made accessible when needed. A number of countries have attempted to share patients' records, with varying degrees of success. While most efforts to create record-sharing architectures have relied upon government-provided strategy and funding, New Zealand has taken a different approach. Like most British Commonwealth nations, New Zealand has a 'hybrid' publicly/privately funded health system. However its information technology infrastructure and automation has largely been developed by the private sector, working closely with regional and central government agencies. Currently the sector is focused on finding ways in which patient records can be shared amongst providers across three different regions. New Zealand's healthcare IT model combines government contributed funding, core infrastructure, facilitation and leadership with private sector investment and skills and is being delivered via a set of controlled experiments. The net result is a 'Middle Out' approach to healthcare automation. 'Middle Out' relies upon having a clear, well-articulated health-reform strategy and a determination by both public and private sector organisations to implement useful healthcare IT solutions by working closely together. PMID:23287413

  3. Improving the identification of people with dementia in primary care: evaluation of the impact of primary care dementia coding guidance on identified prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Paul; Banerjee, Sube; Watt, Jen; Adleman, Rosalyn; Agoe, Belinda; Burnie, Nerida; Carefull, Alex; Chandan, Kiran; Constable, Dominie; Daniels, Mark; Davies, David; Deshmukh, Sid; Huddart, Martin; Jabin, Ashrafi; Jarrett, Penelope; King, Jenifer; Koch, Tamar; Kumar, Sanjoy; Lees, Stavroula; Mir, Sinan; Naidoo, Dominic; Nyame, Sylvia; Sasae, Ryuichiro; Sharma, Tushar; Thormod, Clare; Vedavanam, Krish; Wilton, Anja; Flaherty, Breda

    2013-01-01

    Objective Improving dementia care is a policy priority nationally and internationally; there is a ‘diagnosis gap’ with less than half of the cases of dementia ever diagnosed. The English Health Department's Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) encourages primary care recognition and recording of dementia. The codes for dementia are complex with the possibility of underidentification through miscoding. We developed guidance on coding of dementia; we report the impact of applying this to ‘clean up’ dementia coding and records at a practice level. Design The guidance had five elements: (1) identify Read Codes for dementia; (2) access QOF dementia register; (3) generate lists of patients who may have dementia; (4) compare search with QOF data and (5) review cases. In each practice, one general practitioner conducted the exercise. The number of dementia QOF registers before and after the exercise was recorded with the hours taken to complete the exercise. Setting London primary care. Participants 23 (85%) of 27 practices participated, covering 79 312 (19 562 over 65 s) participants. Outcomes The number on dementia QOF registers; time taken. Results The number of people with dementia on QOF registers increased from 1007 to 1139 (χ2=8.17, p=0.004), raising identification rates by 8.8%. It took 4.7 h per practice, on an average. Conclusions These data demonstrate the potential of a simple primary care coding exercise, requiring no specific training, to increase the dementia identification rate. An improvement of 8.8% between 2011 and 2012 is equivalent to that of the fourth most improved primary care trust in the UK. In absolute terms, if this effects were mirrored across the UK primary care, the number of cases with dementia identified would rise by over 70 000 from 364 329 to 434 488 raising the recognition rate from 46% to 54.8%. Implementing this exercise appears to be a simple and effective way to improve recognition rates in primary care. PMID

  4. Relationship between Dementia Severity and Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Yatabe, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tomohisa; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Kaneda, Keiichiro; Honda, Kazuki; Yuki, Seiji; Ogawa, Yusuke; Imamura, Toru; Kazui, Hiroaki; Kamimura, Naoto; Shinagawa, Syunichiro; Mizukami, Katsuyoshi; Mori, Etsuro; Ikeda, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are common in the clinical manifestation of dementia. Although most patients with dementia exhibit some BPSD during the course of the illness, the association of BPSD with the stage of dementia remains unclear. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the impact of severity of dementia on the expression of BPSD in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods Ninety-seven patients with DLB and 393 patients with AD were recruited from 8 dementia clinics across Japan. BPSD were assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). A relationship between BPSD and dementia stage classified by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) in each type of dementia was assessed. Results No significant difference was seen in NPI total score across CDR staging in the DLB group. On the other hand, the NPI total score significantly increased with dementia stage in the AD group. Conclusion The relationship of dementia stage with the expression of BPSD was different according to the type of dementia. BPSD and dementia stage were correlated in AD subjects, in whom psychiatric symptoms increase as the disease progresses, but not in DLB subjects. PMID:26195980

  5. Strategies used by hospital nurses to cope with a national crisis: a manager's perspective.

    PubMed

    Hendel, T; Fish, M; Aboudi, S

    2000-12-01

    This article explores the anxiety level of, and coping strategies used by, hospital nurses, during a national state of emergency. The study was guided by a stress and coping framework, developed by Lazarus & Folkman, and was conducted at a large teaching hospital, located in the centre of Israel, during the Iraqi crisis in January and February, 1998. Data were collected from a sample of 100 female nurses, and a descriptive correlational design was used. The findings indicated that approximately 33% of the nurses expressed feelings of stress, tension and a sense of discomfort. The dominant coping strategy used by the nurses was direct-active, which was found to be the most effective strategy. As they were unable to remove or control the stressor, stress management intervention by nursing managers focused mainly on communicating with staff and providing social support - informational and emotional--to buffer the stressful experience. Providing support and help in finding practical solutions is important for maintaining emotional stability of staff, thereby helping them to improve their nursing interventions in assisting people to cope with stressful situations. PMID:11153519

  6. Final Report of the External Evaluation of England's National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies. Final Report. Watching & Learning 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earl, Lorna; Watson, Nancy; Levin, Ben; Leithwood, Ken; Fullan, Michael; Torrance, Nancy

    The National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies (NLS and NNS) represent a major government initiative to improve classroom practice and student learning in literacy and mathematics in elementary schools across England. National targets were intended to increase the percentage of 11-year-olds reaching the "expected level"--Level 4--in annual national…

  7. Implementing a Large-Scale Reform in Secondary Schools: The Role of the Consultant within England's Secondary National Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, David Hagen

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role of the consultants in secondary schools and local authorities within a large-scale consultancy-based reform, the Secondary National Strategy (SNS), in London, UK. The SNS follows a cascade model of implementation in which nationally created initiatives are introduced and supported within local authorities (LA) and…

  8. Final Report of the External Evaluation of England's National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies. Executive Summary: Final Report. Watching & Learning 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earl, Lorna; Watson, Nancy; Levin, Ben; Leithwood, Ken; Fullan, Michael; Torrance, Nancy

    The National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies (NLS and NNS) represent a major government initiative to improve classroom practice and pupil learning in literacy and mathematics in primary schools across England. National targets were intended to increase the percentage of 11-year-olds reaching Level 4 in annual assessments for English and…

  9. Association between hypoglycemia and dementia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Yi-Jing; Sheu, Wayne H H

    2016-06-01

    In addition to increased risks of macrovascular and microvascular complications, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) usually also are at increased risk for cognitive impairment and dementia. Hypoglycemia, a common consequence of diabetes treatment, is considered an independent risk factor for dementia in patients with T2DM. Hypoglycemia and dementia are clinically underestimated and are related to poor outcomes; thus, they may compromise the life expectancy of patients with T2DM. Epidemiological evidence of hypoglycemia-associated cognitive decline and dementia is highly varied. Acute, severe hypoglycemic episodes induce chronic subclinical brain damage, cognitive decline, and subsequent dementia. However, the effects of recurrent moderate hypoglycemia on cognitive decline and dementia remain largely uninvestigated. Poor glycemic control (including fluctuation of hemoglobin A1C [HbA1c] and glucose values) and the viscous circle of bidirectional associations between dementia and hypoglycemia may be clinically relevant. The possible pathophysiological hypotheses include post-hypoglycemic neuronal damage, inflammatory processes, coagulation defects, endothelial abnormalities, and synaptic dysfunction of hippocampal neurons during hypoglycemia episodes. This article reviews previous findings, provides insight into the detection of groups at high risk of hypoglycemia-associated dementia, and proposes specific strategies to minimize the potential burdens associated with hypoglycemia-related neurocognitive disorders in patients with T2DM. PMID:27321346

  10. Prevalence of dementia in Al-Quseir city, Red Sea Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Tallawy, Hamdy N; Farghly, Wafaa M; Badry, Reda; Rageh, Tarek A; Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Hakeem M, N Abdel; Abd El Hamed, Mohamed; Sayd, Mohamed A M; Hamed, Yasser; Kandil, Mahmoud R

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is one of the most important public health problems as a result of the rapid increase in the number of elderly persons worldwide. Improvement of prevention strategies and caring for people with dementia should be undertaken. We performed a door-to-door study to screen all subjects aged 50 years and older (n=4,329 of 33,285 inhabitants) in Al-Quseir city. The screening was performed by 3 neuropsychiatrists, using a modified form of the Mini-Mental State Examination. Suspected cases were subjected to case ascertainment according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, diagnostic criteria for dementia; full clinical assessment; psychometric assessment using Cognitive Abilities Screening Instruments, Hachinski Ischaemic Score, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale; neuroimaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging); and laboratory investigations for selected patients when indicated. The prevalence of dementia was 2.01% for participants aged 50 years or older and 3.83% for those aged 60 years or older. It increased steeply with increasing age to a maximum of 13.5% for those aged 80 years or older. Alzheimer's dementia (48.3%) was the most common subtype, followed by vascular dementia (36.8%), dementia resulting from general medical conditions (11.5%), and last, dementia resulting from multiple etiologies (3.4%). PMID:24353410

  11. Dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferman, Tanis J.; Boeve, Bradley F.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The advent of new immunostains have improved our ability to detect limbic and cortical Lewy bodies, and it is now evident that Dementa with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementia, after Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Distinguishing DLB from AD has important implications for treatment, in terms of substances that may worsen symptoms (i.e., anticholinergic and certain neuroleptic medications) and those that may improve them (i.e., cholinesterase inhibitors, carbidopa-levodopa). Neurocognitive patterns, psychiatric features, extrapyramidal signs and sleep disturbance are helpful in differentiating DLB from AD early in the disease course. Differences in the severity of cholinergic depletion as well as type and distribution of neuropathology contribute to these clinical differences, though DLB patients with a high density of co-occuring AD pathology are less clinical distinguishable from AD. PMID:17659188

  12. In the Clinic. Dementia.

    PubMed

    Rabins, Peter V; Blass, David M

    2014-08-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of dementia, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, https://mksap.acponline.org/, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:25089871

  13. A Strategy for Thailand's Space Technology Development: National Space Program (NSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimnoo, Ammarin; Purivigraipong, Somphop

    2016-07-01

    The Royal Thai Government has established the National Space Policy Committee (NSPC) with mandates for setting policy and strategy. The NSPC is considering plans and budget allocation for Thai space development. NSPC's goal is to promote the utilization of space technology in a manner that is congruent with the current situation and useful for the economy, society, science, technology, educational development and national security. The first proposed initiative of the National Space Program (NSP) is co-development of THEOS-2, a next-generation satellite system that includes Thailand's second and third earth observation satellite (THAICHOTE-2 and THAICHOTE-3). THEOS-1 or THAICHOTE-1 was the first Earth Observation Satellite of Thailand launched in 2008. At present, the THAICHOTE-1 is over the lifetime, therefore the THEOS-2 project has been established. THEOS-2 is a complete Earth Observation System comprising THAICHOTE-2&3 as well as ground control segment and capacity building. Thus, NSPC has considered that Thailand should manage the space system. Geo-Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency (GISTDA) has been assigned to propose the initiative National Space Program (NSP). This paper describes the strategy of Thailand's National Space Program (NSP) which will be driven by GISTDA. First, NSP focuses on different aspects of the utilization of space on the basis of technology, innovation, knowledge and manpower. It contains driving mechanisms related to policy, implementation and use in order to promote further development. The Program aims to increase economic competitiveness, reduce social disparity, and improve social security, natural resource management and environmental sustainability. The NSP conceptual framework includes five aspects: communications satellites, earth observation satellite systems, space economy, space exploration and research, and NSP administration. THEOS-2 is considered a part of NSP with relevance to the earth observation

  14. Dementia, Caregiving, and Controlling Frustration

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you. Behaviors often associated with dementia, like wandering or asking questions repeatedly, can be frustrating for ... or tasks you need help with. Keep in mind that people feel useful and gratified when they ...

  15. Dementia - behavior and sleep problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000029.htm Dementia - behavior and sleep problems To use the sharing features on this ... sleep and stay asleep Tips for Behavior and Sleep Problems Having a daily routine may help. Calmly ...

  16. Dementia - behavior and sleep problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the person during outbursts. Do not take their behavior personally. Try to prevent them from getting hurt ... may be the cause of changes in the behavior of the person who has dementia. You think ...

  17. Dementia: Depression and Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Dementia | Depression and Alzheimer’s Disease What is depression? When doctors talk about ... time Thoughts about death or suicide What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer's disease is the most common type ...

  18. Dementia: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel and bladder control, difficulty drinking and eating, malnutrition, difficulty walking, falls, and injuries due to falls. ... Dementia can lead to complications too. These include malnutrition, falls, osteoporosis (“thinning bones”), bone fractures, frailty, sleep ...

  19. Dementia care in rural China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dementia is a major cause of disability and has immense cost implications for the individual suffering from the condition, family caregivers and society. Given the high prevalence of dementia in China with its enormous and rapidly expanding population of elderly adults, it is necessary to develop and test approaches to the care for patients with this disorder. The need is especially great in rural China where access to mental healthcare is limited, with the task made more complex by social and economic reforms over the last 30 years that have transformed the Chinese family support system, family values and health delivery systems. Evidence-based collaborative care models for dementia, depression and other chronic diseases that have been developed in some Western countries serve as a basis for discussion of innovative approaches in the management of dementia in rural China, with particular focus on its implementation in the primary care system. PMID:24427180

  20. [Non-pharmacologic approach in severe dementia].

    PubMed

    Pancrazi, Marie-Pierre; Métais, Patrick

    2005-03-01

    Care for patients with Alzheimer's disease, particularly with severe dementia, requires a global therapeutic strategy integrating pharmacological approach into the environmental dimensions, psychotherapeutics and rehabilitation. The objective is to maintain autonomy as long as possible but also to improve the quality of life by reducing the psychological suffering of patients and families. In severe dementia, behavioral techniques and organization of the environment are possible at home but, actually, most of the patients are institutionalized. Structures having a specific project of life, of care and specific architectural design should be preferred. Education and support for caregivers as well as training of the nursing staff are essential to develop better attitudes toward the patient, improve communication and optimize the quality of life. In spite of the low level of evidence in the evaluation of these strategies on account of the lack of adapted indicators and rarity of specific research, widely spread techniques can confer special purport to this difficult stage for the patients and their family. PMID:15899604

  1. Developing the national community health assistant strategy in Zambia: a policy analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2010, the Ministry of Health in Zambia developed the National Community Health Assistant strategy, aiming to integrate community health workers (CHWs) into national health plans by creating a new group of workers, called community health assistants (CHAs). The aim of the paper is to analyse the CHA policy development process and the factors that influenced its evolution and content. A policy analysis approach was used to analyse the policy reform process. Methodology Data were gathered through review of documents, participant observation and key informant interviews with CHA strategic team members in Lusaka district, and senior officials at the district level in Kapiri Mposhi district where some CHAs have been deployed. Results The strategy was developed in order to address the human resources for health shortage and the challenges facing the community-based health workforce in Zambia. However, some actors within the strategic team were more influential than others in informing the policy agenda, determining the process, and shaping the content. These actors negotiated with professional/statutory bodies and health unions on the need to develop the new cadre which resulted in compromises that enabled the policy process to move forward. International agencies also indirectly influenced the course as well as the content of the strategy. Some actors classified the process as both insufficiently consultative and rushed. Due to limited consultation, it was suggested that the policy content did not adequately address key policy content issues such as management of staff attrition, general professional development, and progression matters. Analysis of the process also showed that the strategy might create a new group of workers whose mandate is unclear to the existing group of health workers. Conclusions This paper highlights the complex nature of policy-making processes for integrating CHWs into the health system. It reiterates the need for recognising the

  2. Increased Long-Term Risk of Dementia in Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chung-Shun; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hong, Li-Yee; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Ma, Hon-Ping; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Tsai, Shin-Han; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wu, Mei-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning may cause toxicity of the central nervous system and heart. However, the association between CO poisoning and long-term dementia risk remains unestablished. We investigated the incidence of dementia in patients with CO poisoning in Taiwan and evaluated whether they had a higher risk of dementia than did the general population. A nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted among patients with CO poisoning identified using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) during 2004 to 2013. CO poisoning was defined according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. The study cohort comprised patients with CO poisoning between 2005 and 2010 (N = 14,590). Each patient was age-, sex-, and index date-matched with 4 randomly selected controls from the comparison cohort (N = 58,360). All patients were followed from the study date until dementia development, death, or the end of 2013. Cox proportional hazards regressions were performed for comparing the hazard ratios for dementia between the 2 cohorts. Incident cases of dementia were identified from the NHIRD. After adjustment for potential confounders, the study cohort was independently associated with a higher dementia risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.75; 95% confidence interval, 2.26–3.35). This population-based cohort study indicated that patients with CO poisoning have a higher risk of dementia than do people without CO poisoning. PMID:26817904

  3. The Impact of Dementia on Family Caregivers: What Is Research Teaching Us?

    PubMed

    Merrilees, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Dementia family caregiving has been the focus of research for decades. Much has been learned about the negative impact of caregiving as well as characteristics that may be protective. This paper explores themes in caregiving pertinent to clinicians and researchers working with dementia family caregivers: the psychological, subjective, and physical outcomes of caregiving, ways in which dementia alters relationships between the patient and caregiver, and strategies for improving outcomes for caregivers. Suggestions for next steps in research and clinical care are made. PMID:27541750

  4. Is the distinction between Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia possible and relevant?

    PubMed Central

    Ravona-Springer, Ramit; Davidson, Michael; Noy, Shlomo

    2003-01-01

    Advances in epidemiological, clinical, imaging, and neuropathological studies have undermined the clear distinction between vascular and Alzheimer-type dementia, which has characterized the last two decades of research in dementia. A significant degree of overlap between the two entities was demonstrated in terms of clinical expression, risk factors, and postmortem brain autopsy. In this article, we propose mechanisms by which cardiovascular risk factors might affect the manifestation of Alzheimer's disease, suggest possible explanations for the overlap with vascular dementia, and discuss the implications this might have on future differential diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:22033677

  5. Public health strategies to ensure reduction in suicide incidence in middle and low income nations.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Saurabh RamBihariLal; Shrivastava, Prateek Saurabh; Ramasamy, Jegadeesh

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, the incidence of suicide has increased at an alarming rate and in the year 2012 close to 1 million people died because of suicide. Although, it is a well-acknowledged fact that suicides are completely preventable, the public health authorities have failed to halt the rising trend of the suicide because of the presence of various social and health related factors. As suicide is a complex issue, in the low and middle-income nations, the most cost-effective approach is to ensure the integration of suicide prevention program into the primary health care network. To conclude, suicide is an important public health concern which is definitively preventable. However, the need of the hour is that all the stakeholders should take collective responsibility, and work in collaboration to develop and implement a comprehensive multi-sectoral suicide prevention strategy. PMID:26752917

  6. Treatment strategies in early-stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: a French national survey.

    PubMed

    Gorphe, Philippe; Blanchard, Pierre; Morinière, Sylvain; Fakhry, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study is to perform a national survey of practices in early-stage squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx (base of tongue and tonsils) targeting surgical and non-surgical procedures in France. A questionnaire concerning practices in surgery, radiotherapy, HPV screening, and two clinical cases were sent to all centers participating in the French Head and Neck Oncology Society, and to public hospitals listed as authorized to treat head and neck cancer according to the French National Cancer Institute (INCa). Sixty-four teams comprising almost all the University Hospitals and most of the Comprehensive Cancer Centers completed the survey questionnaire and responded to the clinical cases. Surgical and radiotherapy strategies were used in similar measure for early-stage SCC of the base of the tongue while tonsil lesions were mainly treated with surgery. The main arguments were disease control for the teams offering patients surgery, and functional results for those offering radiotherapy. However, concomitant chemoradiotherapy was chosen more frequently than radiotherapy alone in early-stage SCC of the base of tongue. Age and tobacco-alcohol addiction were decisive criteria in decision making for the majority of the teams. French oncology teams offered surgical and radiotherapy strategies in similar measure to treat early-stage SCC of the oropharynx (base of tongue and tonsils) as well as a high rate of multimodality therapy. Decision making was guided by the desire to achieve oncologic results adapted to the patient and his age, as well as functional preservation taking into account life expectancy. PMID:26253428

  7. Understanding Internet Use Among Dementia Caregivers: Results of Secondary Data Analysis Using the US Caregiver Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Informal caregivers of persons with dementia experience higher levels of chronic stress in the caregiving trajectory. The Internet provides diverse types of caregiver resources that may help ameliorate their stress and relevant negative outcomes. However, there is limited information about the prevalence and factors of using Internet-based resources for health- and caregiving-related purposes in informal caregivers of persons with dementia. Objective Specific aims of this study were (1) to determine the prevalence and factors of caregiver’s health-related Internet use and (2) to compare sociodemographic and caregiving-related characteristics between health-related Internet users and non–health-related Internet users among informal caregivers of persons with dementia. Methods This quantitative investigation was a descriptive correlational design using a secondary data analysis. Primary data were collected via a survey conducted in 2009 by the National Alliance for Caregiving and the American Association of Retired Persons. Telephone interviews utilizing standardized questionnaires were used to collect self-reported information about sociodemographics and caregiving-related history (N=450). Descriptive statistics and a hierarchical binary logistic regression analysis were completed based on the stress process model. Results Approximately 59% (265/450) of dementia caregivers were identified as health-related Internet users. Caregivers’ sociodemographics and their subjective responses of caregiving stress were the most significant factors to identify health-related Internet users followed by workload assisting in instrumental activities of daily living of persons with dementia. There were significant differences for caregiver’s age, levels of education and income, hours spent caregiving, and the relationship to persons with dementia between health-related Internet users and non–health-related Internet users (P<.05 for all). After controlling for

  8. The role of pulmonology in the National Health System Chronicity Strategy.

    PubMed

    Soler-Cataluña, Juan José; Sánchez Toril, Fernando; Aguar Benito, M Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Longer life expectancy and the progressive aging of the population is changing the epidemiological pattern of healthcare, with a reduction in the incidence of acute diseases and a marked increase in chronic diseases. This change brings important social, healthcare and economic consequences that call for a reorganization of patient care. In this respect, the Spanish National Health System has developed a Chronicity strategy that proposes a substantial change in focus from traditional rescue medicine to patient- and environment-centered care, with a planned, proactive, participative and multidisciplinary approach. Some of the more common chronic diseases are respiratory. In COPD, this integrated approach has been effective in reducing exacerbations, improving quality of life, and even reducing costs. However, the wide variety of management strategies, not only in COPD but also in asthma and other respiratory diseases, makes it difficult to draw definitive conclusions. Pulmonologists can and must participate in the new chronicity models and contribute their knowledge, experience, innovation, research, and special expertise to the development of these new paradigms. PMID:25554457

  9. The National Energy Strategy: A balanced program?. Proceedings of the nineteenth annual Illinois energy conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The Nineteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference was held in Chicago, Illinois November 1991. It was organized by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago with major support provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, the Illinois Commerce Commission, the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources, and the Citizens Council on Energy Resources. The conference program was developed by a planning committee who drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. The members of the planning committee were brought together for a full-day session where they were asked to assess the political, economic, and social impacts of the proposed National Energy Strategy as it relates to Illinois and the Midwest region. Within this context, the planning committee identified several major issues including: (1) Is the proposed plan a balanced strategy; (2) What are the NES impacts on the transportation sector; (3) What are the opportunities for improved efficiency in the Electric Utility Sector; and (4) What is the role of advanced research and development.

  10. Frontotemporal dementia: a bridge between dementia and neuromuscular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Adeline SL; Rademakers, Rosa; Miller, BL

    2015-01-01

    The concept that frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a purely “cortical” dementia has largely been refuted by the recognition of its close association with motor neuron disease, and the identification of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) as a major pathological substrate underlying both diseases. Genetic findings have transformed this field and revealed connections between disorders that were previous thought clinically unrelated. The discovery of the C9ORF72 locus as responsible for majority of hereditary FTD, ALS and FTD-ALS cases and the understanding that repeat-containing RNA plays a crucial role in pathogenesis of both disorders has paved the way for development of potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for these devastating diseases. In this review, we summarize the historical aspects leading up to our current understanding of the genetic, clinical and neuropathological overlap between FTD and ALS, and include brief discussions on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) given its association with TDP-43 pathology, increased dementia risk and reports of ALS in CTE patients. Additionally we describe other genetic associations between dementia and neuromuscular disease, such as inclusion body myositis with Paget’s disease and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). PMID:25557955

  11. Brain lipidomes of subcortical ischemic vascular dementia and mixed dementia.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sin Man; Wang, Yuting; Duan, Xinrui; Wenk, Markus R; Kalaria, Raj N; Chen, Christopher P; Lai, Mitchell K P; Shui, Guanghou

    2014-10-01

    Despite its importance as the leading cause of vascular dementia, the primary pathogenic mechanisms in subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) have remained elusive. Because of the lack of approved therapeutic agents for SIVD, there is a pressing need to identify novel therapeutic targets. Comparative lipidomic analyses of SIVD and mixed dementia (i.e., SIVD and Alzheimer's disease, MixD) may also confer new insights pertaining to the possible interaction between neurodegenerative and vascular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of dementia. Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to comprehensively analyze the lipidomes of white and gray matter from the temporal cortex of nondemented controls, SIVD, and MixD subjects. Detailed molecular profiles highlighted the pathologic relevance of gray matter sphingolipid fatty acyl chain heterogeneity in dementia. In addition, the levels of sulfatides and lysobisphosphatidic acids were progressively increased in the temporal cortex gray matter from control to SIVD to MixD. White matter phospholipid profiles indicated possible adaptive mechanisms (i.e., increased unsaturation) to chronic ischemia in SIVD and elevated membrane degradation in MixD. PMID:24684787

  12. Substance use history in behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia versus primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Kalapatapu, Raj K; Delucchi, Kevin L; Wang, Sophia; Harbison, John D; Nelson, Emily E; Kramer, Joel H

    2016-01-01

    As older adults are prone to cognitive disorders, the interaction of the fields of substance use and misuse and cognitive neuroscience is an emerging area of research. Substance use has been reported in some subtypes of frontotemporal dementia, such as behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. However, characterization of substance use in other subtypes of frontotemporal dementia, such as primary progressive aphasia, is unknown. The objective of this baseline analysis was to explore whether any measures of substance use history differed significantly among behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 842) and primary progressive aphasia (n = 526) in a large national dataset. The National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center's Uniform Data Set study is a national dataset that collects data on patients with various cognitive disorders and includes some questions on substance use. Each substance use variable was used as the outcome and the frontotemporal dementia subtype as the predictor. Total years smoked cigarettes, age when last smoked cigarettes, average number of packs/day smoked when participants smoked, and any recent, remote, or combined recent/remote history of alcohol abuse or drug abuse did not significantly differ between the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia subtypes (all p-values > .001). A significantly greater percentage of participants smoked in the last 30 days in the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia subtype (10.4%, n = 834) compared to the primary progressive aphasia subtype (3.3%, n = 517; p < .001). Clinical providers in both the dementia and substance use fields are encouraged to screen for and monitor substance use in all frontotemporal dementia subtypes. PMID:26485480

  13. From Heart Health to Brain Health: Legacy of the North Karelia Project for Dementia Research.

    PubMed

    Kivipelto, Miia; Ngandu, Tiia

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive impairment is very common in advanced age, with dementia representing the main cause of disability in older adults. Over the past 20 years, several modifiable risk factors have been identified for dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and many of them are shared with cardiovascular diseases. Given that the pathologic changes leading to dementia may start decades before dementia is diagnosed, it is crucial to adopt a life course approach when investigating risk factors for dementia. The CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia) study is one of the first and still very few existing observational studies to have investigated the role of midlife risk factors for the subsequent development of dementia and AD in late life. The CAIDE study is built on the North Karelia Project, enabling risk factor assessment 20 to 30 years before the dementia diagnosis. The CAIDE study has revealed that late-life dementia and AD are heterogeneous and multifactorial disorders, suggesting that multidomain interventions targeting several risk factors simultaneously may be needed for optimal preventive effects. The FINGER (Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability) study is the first large long-term multidomain lifestyle intervention showing effect on prevention of cognitive impairment in at-risk elderly people. The study is conducted within the existing framework and builds on multidisciplinary prevention expertise following the North Karelia Project and CAIDE study. The FINGER study will, together with the ongoing multinational preventive initiatives, pave the way for pragmatic prevention programs and integrated interventions to facilitate healthy brain aging. This paper summarizes major findings on risk and protective factors for dementia and AD, and reviews key aspects and future directions in preventative strategies. PMID:27242093

  14. Molecular neuroimaging in degenerative dementias.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Bonilla, J F; Carril Carril, J M

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the limitations of structural imaging, brain perfusion and metabolism using SPECT and PET have provided relevant information for the study of cognitive decline. The introduction of the radiotracers for cerebral amyloid imaging has changed the diagnostic strategy regarding Alzheimer's disease, which is currently considered to be a "continuum." According to this new paradigm, the increasing amyloid load would be associated to the preclinical phase and mild cognitive impairment. It has been possible to observe "in vivo" images using 11C-PIB and PET scans. The characteristics of the 11C-PIB image include specific high brain cortical area retention in the positive cases with typical distribution pattern and no retention in the negative cases. This, in combination with 18F-FDG PET, is the basis of molecular neuroimaging as a biomarker. At present, its prognostic value is being evaluated in longitudinal studies. 11C-PIB-PET has become the reference radiotracer to evaluate the presence of cerebral amyloid. However, its availability is limited due to the need for a nearby cyclotron. Therefore, 18F labeled radiotracers are being introduced. Our experience in the last two years with 11C-PIB, first in the research phase and then as being clinically applied, has shown the utility of the technique in the clinical field, either alone or in combination with FDG. Thus, amyloid image is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of dementia and it is a potentially useful method for early diagnosis and evaluation of future treatments. PMID:23933381

  15. Effectiveness of a confinement strategy for reducing campsite impacts in Shenandoah National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, S.E.; Marion, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    The expansion and proliferation of backcountry campsites is a persistent problem in many parks and protected areas. Shenandoah National Park (SNP) has one of the highest backcountry overnight use densities in the USA national parks system. SNP managers implemented a multi-option backcountry camping policy in 2000 that included camping containment with established campsites. These actions were intended to reduce the number of campsites and the area of camping disturbance at each site. This paper describes a longitudinal adaptive management assessment of the new campsite policies, applying quantitative measures of campsite conditions to evaluate the efficacy of management interventions. Physical campsite measurements combined with qualitative visitor interviews indicated SNP had successfully reduced the number of campsites and aggregate measures of camping-related disturbance in the Park, while minimizing the use of regulations, site facilities and staff resources. Implications for managers of other protected areas are that an established site camping policy can minimize camping disturbance, including the number and size of campsites, provided managers can sustain rehabilitation efforts to close and restore unneeded campsites. Experiential attributes, such as the potential for solitude, can also be manipulated through control over the selection of established campsites. Integrating resource and social science methods also provided a more holistic perspective on management policy assessments. Adaptive management research provided a timely evaluation of management success while facilitating effective modifications in response to unforeseen challenges. Conclusions regarding the effectiveness of a visitor impact containment strategy involving an established site camping option are offered.

  16. Living With Dementia: An Exploratory Study of Caregiving in a Chinese Family Context.

    PubMed

    Wong, Oi Ling; Kwong, Ping Sum; Ho, Candis Ka Yan; Chow, Susanna Miu Yee; Kwok, Timothy; Wong, Bel; Ho, Vennus; Lau, Andrew; Ho, Florence

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored themes that described families taking care of elderly relatives with dementia in Chinese society. Ten families were invited for two in-depth family interviews involving spousal caregivers, child caregivers, and care recipients. Five themes resulted: positive affection as coping strategies, power and control in the caregiving relationship, adult children's involvement in caregiving, sibling rivalry, and intergenerational conflicts. The ways these themes functioned and helped in dementia care, the research implications, and limitations are discussed. PMID:26399493

  17. [Healthcare of children and adolescents in national strategy for action for children for 2012-2017].

    PubMed

    Kuchma, V R

    2013-01-01

    The National Strategy defines the main directions and objectives of public policy in the interests of children and the key mechanisms for its implementation. The strategy is based on the universally recognized principles and norms of international law. Implementation of the National Strategy will be realized in the following areas: Family Child Welfare Policy, availability to quality education and training, cultural development, and information security of children, child-friendly health care, and healthy lifestyle; equal opportunities for children in need of special care of the State, the creation of protection and safeguarding the rights and interests of children and child-friendly justice, and children - members of the realization of National Strategy. School health care is intended to be actively involved in two directions: availability to quality education and training, cultural development, and information security of children, health care, child-friendly and healthy lifestyle. The main tasks in the part of hygiene and children's health are: state support for the construction of new preschool educational institutions and the development of all forms of safe preschool education, including non-state sector, providing for every upperclassman safe choice of training profile corresponding to his inclinations and life plans, as well as the functional possibilities and health state; providing quality psychological, correctional and pedagogical aid to children in educational institutions; renewal of forms and methods of control of child neglect, drug addiction, alcoholism, crime, prostitution; the development of effective mechanisms in prevention of deviant behavior in childhood; the creation and implementation of training programs for children and adolescents on rules of safety behavior in the World Wide Web, prevention of Internet addiction; the introduction of the system for monitoring of the educational environment; the creation of portals and sites accumulating

  18. Public health strategy against overweight and obesity in Mexico's National Agreement for Nutritional Health

    PubMed Central

    Latnovic, L; Rodriguez Cabrera, L

    2013-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are major world global health challenges of the 21st century. Mexico is not an exception. Approximately 70% of the adult Mexican population has an excessive body weight. The prevalence of obesity and overweight in Mexican school children aged 5–11 is also high: one child in four is overweight. In light of the seriousness of the situation, the solutions for this problem are based on modification of the environments and change of individual habits and behaviors related to nutrition and physical activity. As a result, the Mexican government, public sector and academy established three common goals and 10 priority objectives that are expressed in the National Agreement for Nutritional Health—Strategy to Control Overweight and Obesity. The obesity problem requires interventions and policies that reside outside of the health sector domain, key aspects of this public health policy was agreement among all stakeholders on cross-cutting actions. The best examples of National Agreement's inter-sectorial action implementation is in the school setting and Code of ‘Self Regulation' on Advertising of Food and Non-Alcoholic Beverages to Children introduced by the food and beverage industry. The ultimate goal of this national policy is to provide the strategic plan for healthy weight and better health, by promoting healthy lifestyles focused on correct diet and physical activity in all life stages, from pregnancy and early childhood and on into adulthood by a multi stakeholder approach. Although there have been great achievements in some areas of implementation, there are still challenges to confront. PMID:27152155

  19. Public health strategy against overweight and obesity in Mexico's National Agreement for Nutritional Health.

    PubMed

    Latnovic, L; Rodriguez Cabrera, L

    2013-06-01

    Overweight and obesity are major world global health challenges of the 21st century. Mexico is not an exception. Approximately 70% of the adult Mexican population has an excessive body weight. The prevalence of obesity and overweight in Mexican school children aged 5-11 is also high: one child in four is overweight. In light of the seriousness of the situation, the solutions for this problem are based on modification of the environments and change of individual habits and behaviors related to nutrition and physical activity. As a result, the Mexican government, public sector and academy established three common goals and 10 priority objectives that are expressed in the National Agreement for Nutritional Health-Strategy to Control Overweight and Obesity. The obesity problem requires interventions and policies that reside outside of the health sector domain, key aspects of this public health policy was agreement among all stakeholders on cross-cutting actions. The best examples of National Agreement's inter-sectorial action implementation is in the school setting and Code of 'Self Regulation' on Advertising of Food and Non-Alcoholic Beverages to Children introduced by the food and beverage industry. The ultimate goal of this national policy is to provide the strategic plan for healthy weight and better health, by promoting healthy lifestyles focused on correct diet and physical activity in all life stages, from pregnancy and early childhood and on into adulthood by a multi stakeholder approach. Although there have been great achievements in some areas of implementation, there are still challenges to confront. PMID:27152155

  20. Addressing the surveillance goal in the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention: the Department of Defense Suicide Event Report.

    PubMed

    Gahm, Gregory A; Reger, Mark A; Kinn, Julie T; Luxton, David D; Skopp, Nancy A; Bush, Nigel E

    2012-03-01

    The US National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (National Strategy) described 11 goals across multiple areas, including suicide surveillance. Consistent with these goals, the Department of Defense (DoD) has engaged aggressively in the area of suicide surveillance. The DoD's population-based surveillance system, the DoD Suicide Event Report (DoDSER) collects information on suicides and suicide attempts for all branches of the military. Data collected includes suicide event details, treatment history, military and psychosocial history, and psychosocial stressors at the time of the event. Lessons learned from the DoDSER program are shared to assist other public health professionals working to address the National Strategy objectives. PMID:22390595

  1. Addressing the Surveillance Goal in the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention: The Department of Defense Suicide Event Report

    PubMed Central

    Reger, Mark A.; Kinn, Julie T.; Luxton, David D.; Skopp, Nancy A.; Bush, Nigel E.

    2012-01-01

    The US National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (National Strategy) described 11 goals across multiple areas, including suicide surveillance. Consistent with these goals, the Department of Defense (DoD) has engaged aggressively in the area of suicide surveillance. The DoD's population-based surveillance system, the DoD Suicide Event Report (DoDSER) collects information on suicides and suicide attempts for all branches of the military. Data collected includes suicide event details, treatment history, military and psychosocial history, and psychosocial stressors at the time of the event. Lessons learned from the DoDSER program are shared to assist other public health professionals working to address the National Strategy objectives. PMID:22390595

  2. Seniors' Worsening Depression May Sometimes Predict Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158576.html Seniors' Worsening Depression May Sometimes Predict Dementia Study suggests a common ... HealthDay News) -- In some cases, worsening symptoms of depression in seniors might point to early dementia, a ...

  3. Ethical challenges when patients have dementia.

    PubMed

    Howe, Edmund G

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is among the most terrible diseases humans can have. Of all of the things that careproviders could do to enhance the quality of life that persons with dementia have, which ones should they do? PMID:22167982

  4. Dementia - keeping safe in the home

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000031.htm Dementia - keeping safe in the home To use the ... make sure the homes of people who have dementia are safe for them. Safety Tips for the ...

  5. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease- what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... recs.pdf . Accessed November 5, 2014. Knopman DS. Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, ...

  6. Seniors' Worsening Depression May Sometimes Predict Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158576.html Seniors' Worsening Depression May Sometimes Predict Dementia Study suggests a common ... HealthDay News) -- In some cases, worsening symptoms of depression in seniors might point to early dementia, a ...

  7. Treatment of dementia: where is it going?

    PubMed

    Fox, Chris; Boustani, Malaz; Moniz-Cook, Esme

    2009-08-01

    Global levels of dementia are escalating but alongside this new innovations and service models are developing to improve outcome and the patient journey. This article describes some of the current and horizon issues in dementia care. PMID:19684534

  8. [Alcohol-related dementia].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshifumi; Yokoyama, Akira; Matsushita, Sachio; Kozaki, Koichi; Higuchi, Susumu

    2014-04-01

    Excessive alcohol use is associated with health problems for the elderly in combination with their chronic conditions. One such complication, alcohol-related dementia (ARD) is brought about by direct or indirect ethanol intoxication, and coexisting nutritional deficiency, liver disease, cerebrovascular disease and traumatic brain injury. The elderly people with ARD have been underestimated and underdiagnosed. In these older alcoholics, atrophic changes, lacunar infarcts and deep white matter lesions of the brain are evident and are associated not only with their cognitive decline, but also with their frailty, leading to high morbidity and mortality ratio. Although lifelong abstinence can recover patients with ARD to temporally lull, aging, the severity of alcohol dependence, and the concomitant nutritional, physical and environmental factors can all impact negatively their outcome. Therefore, a comprehensive approach to lifestyle factors is recommended so that they can minimize preventable risks and maintain health status. Nursing home placement may be an appropriate treatment option for some refractory, long-term patients with ARD. PMID:24796110

  9. Marital Status, Lifestyle and Dementia: A Nationwide Survey in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ling-Yun; Sun, Yu; Lee, Huey-Jane; Yang, Shu-Chien; Chen, Ta-Fu; Lin, Ker-Neng; Lin, Chung-Chi; Wang, Pei-Ning; Tang, Li-Yu; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence of an association between lifestyle and marital status and risk of dementia is limited in Asia. Methods In this nationwide population-based cross-sectional survey, participants were selected by computerized random sampling from all 19 counties in Taiwan. A total of 10432 residents were assessed by a door-to-door in-person survey, among whom 7035 were normal and 929 were diagnosed with dementia using the criteria recommended by National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer’s Association. Premorbid lifestyle habits and demographic data including marital status were compared between normal subjects and participants with dementia. Results After adjustment for age, gender, education, body mass index, smoking, drinking, marital status, sleep habits, exercise, social engagement and co-morbidities including hypertension, diabetes and cerebrovascular diseases, an increased risk for dementia was found in people with widow or widower status (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.15–1.77) and people who used to take a nap in the afternoon (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.02–1.72). Decreased risk was found in people with the habit of regular exercise (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.09–0.16), adequate night sleep (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.39–0.76) and regular social engagement (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.36–0.77). Conclusions Our results provide preliminary evidence of possible risk-reduction effects for dementia, including regular exercise even in modest amounts, social engagement and adequate night sleep, whereas people with the widow/widower status or who used to take an afternoon nap might have increased risk of dementia. PMID:26413719

  10. [Sleep disorders in dementia patients].

    PubMed

    Savaskan, E

    2015-06-01

    Dementia is characterized by cognitive and also behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). The most prominent BPSD are depression and apathy but sleep disorders also complicate the clinical course of dementia. These symptoms are a severe burden for patients and caregivers and are difficult to treat partly due to comorbidities. Common sleep disorders in dementia are insomnia, hypersomnia, circadian rhythm alterations and aberrant nocturnal motor behavior. Sleep duration and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep are reduced. The diagnostic assessment of sleep disorders should include an evaluation of the underlying risk factors and a detailed sleep history for which several assessment instruments are available. The therapy of sleep disorders of dementia is primarily nonpharmacological: sleep counseling, sleep hygiene regulation, relaxation and psychotherapy techniques are given priority. Pharmacological treatment often has severe side effects in this elderly, vulnerable population and can only be considered if other nonpharmacological options have been unsuccessful. The application of medication should be limited in time and dosage. The pharmacological therapeutic options are critically discussed in detail. PMID:25957245

  11. Calcium channel blockers and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Nimmrich, V; Eckert, A

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative dementia is mainly caused by Alzheimer's disease and/or cerebrovascular abnormalities. Disturbance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis is central to the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer's disease, enhanced calcium load may be brought about by extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β. Recent studies suggest that soluble forms facilitate influx through calcium-conducting ion channels in the plasma membrane, leading to excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Calcium channel blockade attenuates amyloid-β-induced neuronal decline in vitro and is neuroprotective in animal models. Vascular dementia, on the other hand, is caused by cerebral hypoperfusion and may benefit from calcium channel blockade due to relaxation of the cerebral vasculature. Several calcium channel blockers have been tested in clinical trials of dementia and the outcome is heterogeneous. Nimodipine as well as nilvadipine prevent cognitive decline in some trials, whereas other calcium channel blockers failed. In trials with a positive outcome, BP reduction did not seem to play a role in preventing dementia, indicating a direct protecting effect on neurons. An optimization of calcium channel blockers for the treatment of dementia may involve an increase of selectivity for presynaptic calcium channels and an improvement of the affinity to the inactivated state. Novel low molecular weight compounds suitable for proof-of-concept studies are now available. PMID:23638877

  12. Development of an exercise intervention to improve cognition in people with mild to moderate dementia: Dementia And Physical Activity (DAPA) Trial, registration ISRCTN32612072.

    PubMed

    Brown, Deborah; Spanjers, Katie; Atherton, Nicky; Lowe, Janet; Stonehewer, Louisa; Bridle, Chris; Sheehan, Bart; Lamb, Sarah E

    2015-06-01

    More than 800000 people in the UK have dementia, and it is a government priority to improve dementia care. Drug treatment options are relatively limited. The Dementia And Physical Activity (DAPA) study is a randomised trial which targets cognition in people with dementia, using an exercise programme. There is evidence to suggest that both aerobic and resistance exercise may be useful in improving cognition. Hence the intervention comprises a supervised part of twice-weekly exercise classes of one hour duration for 4 months, including aerobic exercise at moderate intensity on static bicycles, and resistance (weight training) exercise using weight vests, weight belts and dumbbells. Thereafter participants progress to unsupervised, independent exercise. Aids to behaviour modification have been incorporated into the intervention. The DAPA intervention has been designed to maximise likelihood of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and for delivery in the UK National Health Service. PMID:25724322

  13. SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry – A Tool for Improving the Quality of Diagnostics, Treatment and Care of Dementia Patients in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Religa, Dorota; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cermakova, Pavla; Edlund, Ann-Katrin; Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Granqvist, Nicklas; Hallbäck, Anne; Kåwe, Kerstin; Farahmand, Bahman; Kilander, Lena; Mattsson, Ulla-Britt; Nägga, Katarina; Nordström, Peter; Wijk, Helle; Wimo, Anders; Winblad, Bengt; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem) was developed with the aim to improve the quality of diagnostic work-up, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden. Methods SveDem is an internet based quality registry where several indicators can be followed over time. It includes information about the diagnostic work-up, medical treatment and community support (www.svedem.se). The patients are diagnosed and followed-up yearly in specialist units, primary care centres or in nursing homes. Results The database was initiated in May 2007 and covers almost all of Sweden. There were 28 722 patients registered with a mean age of 79.3 years during 2007–2012. Each participating unit obtains continuous online statistics from its own registrations and they can be compared with regional and national data. A report from SveDem is published yearly to inform medical and care professionals as well as political and administrative decision-makers about the current quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden. Conclusion SveDem provides knowledge about current dementia care in Sweden and serves as a framework for ensuring the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care across the country. It also reflects changes in quality dementia care over time. Data from SveDem can be used to further develop the national guidelines for dementia and to generate new research hypotheses. PMID:25695768

  14. Driving and dementia: a clinical decision pathway

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Kirsty; Monaghan, Sophie; O'Brien, John; Teodorczuk, Andrew; Mosimann, Urs; Taylor, John-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to develop a pathway to bring together current UK legislation, good clinical practice and appropriate management strategies that could be applied across a range of healthcare settings. Methods The pathway was constructed by a multidisciplinary clinical team based in a busy Memory Assessment Service. A process of successive iteration was used to develop the pathway, with input and refinement provided via survey and small group meetings with individuals from a wide range of regional clinical networks and diverse clinical backgrounds as well as discussion with mobility centres and Forum of Mobility Centres, UK. Results We present a succinct clinical pathway for patients with dementia, which provides a decision-making framework for how health professionals across a range of disciplines deal with patients with dementia who drive. Conclusions By integrating the latest guidance from diverse roles within older people's health services and key experts in the field, the resulting pathway reflects up-to-date policy and encompasses differing perspectives and good practice. It is potentially a generalisable pathway that can be easily adaptable for use internationally, by replacing UK legislation for local regulations. A limitation of this pathway is that it does not address the concern of mild cognitive impairment and how this condition relates to driving safety. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24865643

  15. Proposed Methodology for Developing a National Strategy for Human Resource Development: Lessons Learned from a NNSA Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Elkhamri, Oksana O.; Frazar, Sarah L.; Essner, Jonathan; Vergino, Eileen; Bissani, Mo; Apt, Kenneth E.; McClelland-Kerr, John; Mininni, Margot; VanSickle, Matthew; Kovacic, Donald

    2009-10-07

    This paper describes a recent National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) workshop on Human Resource Development, which was focused on the potential methodology for developing a National Human Resource strategy for nuclear power in emerging nuclear states. The need for indigenous human resource development (HRD) has been singled out as a key milestone by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its 2007 Milestones document. A number of countries considering nuclear energy have reiterated this need for experts and specialists to support a national nuclear program that is sustainable and secure. Many have expressed concern over how best to assure the long-term availability of crucial human resource, how to approach the workforce planning process, and how to determine the key elements of developing a national strategy.

  16. [Ethical and legal issues in late stage of dementia].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Lia

    2008-01-01

    people with severe dementia will be preserved, mostly when this influences patient's behaviour, maximizing individual Independence in daily living activities. Finally, comfort is the last and the most important goal of care in late stages of dementia, using appropriate medical strategies and eliminating aggressive interventions (cardiopulmonary resuscitation, acute care setting, tube feeding and antibiotic treatment). The future work will focus on promoting more evidence-based decision-making on treatment and guidelines for prognostic information. Physician must be knowledgeable about broadly intersecting medical, legal, finance and ethics, underlying the long-term management of dementia. PMID:18489837

  17. Revisiting Regression in Autism: Heller's "Dementia Infantilis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, Alexander; Schelinski, Stefanie; Volkmar, Fred; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Theodor Heller first described a severe regression of adaptive function in normally developing children, something he termed dementia infantilis, over one 100 years ago. Dementia infantilis is most closely related to the modern diagnosis, childhood disintegrative disorder. We translate Heller's paper, Uber Dementia Infantilis, and discuss…

  18. Sense of Place and the National Parks, Strategies for Communicating the Interconnected Nature of Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vye, E. C.; Rose, W. I.; Huntoon, J. E.; Nash, B. L.

    2010-12-01

    Using sense of place can help scientists improve their communication of complex concepts related to the connectivity of the environment, geological processes, and human societies. National parks afford excellent examples of places that contain intellectual and emotional stimuli for diverse individuals - in other words, they foster a sense of place. Parks contain spectacular examples of how the processes that shape the earth influence ecosystem and societal development. Parks can therefore be used as outdoor classrooms to engage people in place-based Earth Science education. Incorporating place-based teaching methods can promote learning about Earth’s processes that ensures that a wider audience can be reached than by traditional instructional methods. Specific examples of using national parks on the Colorado Plateau, in the Rocky Mountains and the Keweenaw Peninsula for K-12 teacher training have resulted in a deepening of Earth Science content-area knowledge. The National Parks “Views of the National Park (Views)” multimedia education program can subsequently be used to promote engagement of students in the teachers’ classrooms. Teachers who wish to continue their education as interns in the parks are served by programs such as Geoscientists-in-the-Parks, Volunteers-in-Parks, and Teacher-Ranger-Teacher programs. The Michigan Teaching Excellence Program (MiTEP), multi-year teacher leadership and professional development program is working with middle-grade science teachers from selected urban districts and using the parks of the Midwest as natural classrooms. MiTEP has partnered with the NPS to develop internship opportunities for teachers in the parks. These internships will result in educational materials that can be hosted by “Views”. The goal of the internships are to improve teachers’ understanding of the natural environment and the processes that it reflects, and to assist park personnel in producing materials that are standards-based, age

  19. The dementia caregiver--a primary care approach.

    PubMed

    Dang, Stuti; Badiye, Amit; Kelkar, Geetanjali

    2008-12-01

    Caring for loved ones with dementia is challenging and stressful for family members who have to provide the home care. The responsibility takes a huge physical, emotional, and financial toll on the caregivers, which is known as caregiver burden. The survival and quality of life of the dementia patient have been shown to be related to the well-being of the caregiver. An overwhelmed caregiver can result in premature institutionalization and increased health-care utilization, by both the patients and the caregivers. The physician should periodically assess caregivers for the level of perceived burden, presence of depression and anxiety, social support, behavioral problems in the care recipient, and coping strategies and help the patient and caregiver with advance care planning. Strategies that meld support, education, and practical counseling about common caregiving stresses and community resources seem to mitigate caregiver burden and depression. PMID:19005434

  20. Coping with cognitive impairment and dementia: Rural caregivers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Branger, Camille; Burton, Rachel; O'Connell, Megan E; Stewart, Norma; Morgan, Debra

    2016-07-01

    Caregiving in a rural context is unique, but the experience of rural caregivers is understudied. This paper describes how rural caregivers cope with caring for a loved one diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment or dementia using qualitative description to generate a low-inference summary of a response to an open-ended question. This approach allowed these rural caregivers to describe their positive experiences in addition to the more commonly explored caregiver experiences related to stress. Analyses of coping revealed use of social support, engaging in relaxing and physical activity, and cognitive reframing. In addition, caregivers reported strong faith and religiosity, and to a lesser frequency behavioral changes, checking in with the person with dementia via telephone, and joint activity. Predominantly, these methods reflect approach-based strategies. The current data suggest that these caregivers manage well and adopt adaptive coping strategies to meet the demands of the caregiving role. PMID:24951255

  1. Leadership Strategies of Performance Measures Impacts in Public Sector Management: A National Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubala, James Joseph

    A quantitative and qualitative study examined three leadership strategies found in performance-based management (human resource, scientific management and political strategies used in public sector management); a framework by which performance measurement (PM) supports leadership strategies; and how the strategies impact PM. It examined leadership…

  2. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  3. Inverse Association Between Cancer and Dementia: A Population-based Registry Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiu-Li; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Tseng, Yuan-Fu; Chen, Shih-Chang; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

    2016-01-01

    Dementia and cancer are 2 common diseases in the elderly. This retrospective cohort study used a population-based insurance claim dataset, merged with a cancer registry, to test whether risk reduction of cancers occurs at various primary sites after diagnosis of dementia. The study included a cohort of 3282 patients who were first diagnosed with dementia between 2001 and 2002. A control cohort consisted of 13,128 subjects matched for age, sex, and year of enrollment. The site of cancer and duration between the diagnosis of dementia and cancer were analyzed. Among the dementia cases, 169 patients (5.2%) were diagnosed with cancer during a median observation period of 40 months. In the control group, 976 subjects (7.4%) were diagnosed with cancer, during a median observation period of 46 months. During a 7-year follow-up period, the adjusted hazard ratio for cancer among dementia patients was 0.77 (95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.91), and significantly lower for colon (0.54, 0.29-0.99) and prostate cancers (0.44, 0.20-0.98). This study showed an inverse association between cancer and dementia. Further studies focusing on colon and prostate cancers may help elucidate the underlying mechanism and expand the therapeutic strategies. PMID:26523711

  4. ['Dementia' and 'memory' in daily and weekly publications: an analysis of newspaper clippings in the period 1987-1990].

    PubMed

    Commissaris, C J; Jolles, J; Visser, A P

    1991-02-01

    Government, scientists and health care workers show an increasing interest in dementia and memory defects. It is unclear, however, whether the general public has acquired more access to the increased knowledge in this field. This is important to know because many people seem to worry about memory dysfunctions or about a possible dementia. An analysis of newspaper articles over a period of 3 years (March 1987 until March 1990) shows that the number of newspaper articles on memory has decreased. On the other hand, the average number of articles on dementia has increased from 11 per month in the first year to 25 and 28 in the second and third year. In these articles, most attention is given to research on dementia and to health care services for dementia patients. The number of articles on general aspects of dementia remained practically unchanged, although these articles in particular have an important informative function. In national newspapers, the attention for the six different themes is unequally divided. The themes 'general aspects of dementia', 'health care services' and 'research on dementia' have a relatively high impact. Finally, it appears that the same headline of an article can evoke different emotional reactions in a group of judges. Taking the results of this research into account, the authors argue that more health education activities should be directed at memory defects and dementia. Furthermore they conclude that a more systematic evaluation of these activities is necessary. PMID:1877069

  5. Evaluation of Academic Detailing for Primary Care Physician Dementia Education

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Marcia J.; Horst, Micki; Lawhorne, Larry W.; Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this evaluation study was to assess the effect of academic detailing (AcD) as a strategy to increase early detection of dementia in primary care practice and to improve support and management of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia disorders by increasing communication and referrals to local community agencies. As designed for dementia education, AcD consisted of 15-minute educational sessions delivered in primary care practice offices. Twenty-nine visits were conducted by trained teams comprised of a physician and representatives of the Alzheimer’s Association (AA) and Area Agency on Aging (AAA). A key outcome of the visits was increased knowledge of the specific programs and services available. In all, 77.4% rated the visit very effective, and follow-up evaluation suggests visits led to an increase in referral to these agencies (55%) and potentially enhanced early detection of dementia by physicians as measured by 35% making changes in the way they identify at-risk patients. PMID:20228361

  6. Functional MRI of music emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Agustus, Jennifer L; Mahoney, Colin J; Downey, Laura E; Omar, Rohani; Cohen, Miriam; White, Mark J; Scott, Sophie K; Mancini, Laura; Warren, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is an important neurodegenerative disorder of younger life led by profound emotional and social dysfunction. Here we used fMRI to assess brain mechanisms of music emotion processing in a cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia (n = 15) in relation to healthy age-matched individuals (n = 11). In a passive-listening paradigm, we manipulated levels of emotion processing in simple arpeggio chords (mode versus dissonance) and emotion modality (music versus human emotional vocalizations). A complex profile of disease-associated functional alterations was identified with separable signatures of musical mode, emotion level, and emotion modality within a common, distributed brain network, including posterior and anterior superior temporal and inferior frontal cortices and dorsal brainstem effector nuclei. Separable functional signatures were identified post-hoc in patients with and without abnormal craving for music (musicophilia): a model for specific abnormal emotional behaviors in frontotemporal dementia. Our findings indicate the potential of music to delineate neural mechanisms of altered emotion processing in dementias, with implications for future disease tracking and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25773639

  7. Functional MRI of music emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Agustus, Jennifer L; Mahoney, Colin J; Downey, Laura E; Omar, Rohani; Cohen, Miriam; White, Mark J; Scott, Sophie K; Mancini, Laura; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is an important neurodegenerative disorder of younger life led by profound emotional and social dysfunction. Here we used fMRI to assess brain mechanisms of music emotion processing in a cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia (n = 15) in relation to healthy age-matched individuals (n = 11). In a passive-listening paradigm, we manipulated levels of emotion processing in simple arpeggio chords (mode versus dissonance) and emotion modality (music versus human emotional vocalizations). A complex profile of disease-associated functional alterations was identified with separable signatures of musical mode, emotion level, and emotion modality within a common, distributed brain network, including posterior and anterior superior temporal and inferior frontal cortices and dorsal brainstem effector nuclei. Separable functional signatures were identified post-hoc in patients with and without abnormal craving for music (musicophilia): a model for specific abnormal emotional behaviors in frontotemporal dementia. Our findings indicate the potential of music to delineate neural mechanisms of altered emotion processing in dementias, with implications for future disease tracking and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25773639

  8. Characterizing Researchers by Strategies Used for Retaining Minority Participants: Results of a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James; Quinn, Sandra C.; Fryer, Craig S.; Garza, Mary A.; Kim, Kevin H.; Thomas, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Limited attention has been given to the optimal strategies for retaining racial and ethnic minorities within studies and during the follow-up period. High attrition limits the interpretation of results and reduces the ability to translate findings into successful interventions. This study examined the retention strategies used by researchers when retaining minorities in research studies. From May to August 2010, we conducted an online survey with researchers (principal investigators, research staff, and IRB members) and examined their use of seven commonly used retention strategies. The number and type of retention strategies used, how these strategies differ by researcher type, and other characteristics (e.g., funding) were explored. We identified three clusters of researchers: comprehensive retention strategy researchers - utilized the greatest number of retention strategies; moderate retention strategy researchers - utilized an average number of retention strategies; and limited retention strategy researchers - utilized the least number of retention strategies. The comprehensive and moderate retention strategy researchers were more likely than the limited retention strategy researchers to conduct health outcomes research, work with a community advisory board, hire minority staff, use steps at a higher rate to overcome retention barriers, develop new partnerships with the minority community, modify study materials for the minority population, and allow staff to work flexible schedules. This study is a novel effort to characterize researchers, without implying a value judgment, according to their use of specific retention strategies. It provides critical information for conducting future research to determine the effectiveness of using a combination of retention strategies. PMID:23764697

  9. Characterizing researchers by strategies used for retaining minority participants: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Butler, James; Quinn, Sandra C; Fryer, Craig S; Garza, Mary A; Kim, Kevin H; Thomas, Stephen B

    2013-09-01

    Limited attention has been given to the optimal strategies for retaining racial and ethnic minorities within studies and during the follow-up period. High attrition limits the interpretation of results and reduces the ability to translate findings into successful interventions. This study examined the retention strategies used by researchers when retaining minorities in research studies. From May to August 2010, we conducted an online survey with researchers (principal investigators, research staff, and IRB members) and examined their use of seven commonly used retention strategies. The number and type of retention strategies used, how these strategies differ by researcher type, and other characteristics (e.g., funding) were explored. We identified three clusters of researchers: comprehensive retention strategy researchers - utilized the greatest number of retention strategies; moderate retention strategy researchers - utilized an average number of retention strategies; and limited retention strategy researchers - utilized the least number of retention strategies. The comprehensive and moderate retention strategy researchers were more likely than the limited retention strategy researchers to conduct health outcomes research, work with a community advisory board, hire minority staff, use steps at a higher rate to overcome retention barriers, develop new partnerships with the minority community, modify study materials for the minority population, and allow staff to work flexible schedules. This study is a novel effort to characterize researchers, without implying a value judgment, according to their use of specific retention strategies. It provides critical information for conducting future research to determine the effectiveness of using a combination of retention strategies. PMID:23764697

  10. An Approach to Assessing Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Feightner, J.W.; Gass, D.A.; Bass, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Early tell-tale signs of dementia may not be manifest or recognized as significant by the patient or the physician. Often a spouse, relative, or someone close to the patient recognizes changes over time. While it might be argued that little is lost if the cause is irreversible, a small but significant number of cases have reversible causes and suffering can be alleviated. The recommendations of the Canadian Consensus Conference on the Assessment of Dementia take into account the family physician's perspective. This article looks at applications in the office setting. PMID:21221295

  11. Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B; Counts, Scott E; Nyenhuis, David

    2016-05-01

    Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment are receiving heightened attention as potentially modifiable factors for dementias of later life. These factors have now been linked not only to vascular cognitive disorders but also Alzheimer's disease. In this chapter we review 3 related topics that address vascular contributions to cognitive impairment: 1. vascular pathogenesis and mechanisms; 2. neuropsychological and neuroimaging phenotypic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease; and 3. prospects for prevention of cognitive impairment of later life based on cardiovascular and stroke risk modification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26704177

  12. [Lifestyle-related risk factors for dementia].

    PubMed

    Phung, Thien Kieu Thi; Andersen, Kjeld; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2006-10-01

    Emerging knowledge about modifiable risk factors for dementia has given rise to interventions that can potentially prevent or delay the onset of dementia and the possible target periods for intervention extend from prenatal period to old age. Factors during early life such as nutrition, education, and parental socioeconomic status can influence the development of dementia later in life. From mid to late life, a physically, socially, and intellectually active lifestyle is associated with reduced risk for dementia. Moreover, modification of cardiovascular risk factors during this period can potentially reduce risk for dementia. PMID:17032603

  13. Ethnic variability in dementia: results from Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ampil, Encarnita R; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Sodagar, Swati N; Chen, Christopher P L H; Auchus, Alexander P

    2005-01-01

    The diversity of Singapore's population affords a unique opportunity to study ethnic variability in the dementias. We sought to explore the effects of ethnicity on the frequency of Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia in a large Singaporean sample. A total of 357 patients were studied: 190 with vascular dementia and 167 with Alzheimer disease. Vascular dementia was more common among Chinese and Malays, whereas Alzheimer disease was more common in Indians and Eurasians. Factors that may contribute to the observed ethnic variability in dementia etiologies include differential frequency of the ApoE-e4 allele, frequency of vascular risk factors, lifestyle choices, and cultural attitudes toward health care utilization. PMID:16327344

  14. Oskar Fischer and the study of dementia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The centenary of Alois Alzheimer's description of the case of Auguste Deter has renewed interest in the early history of dementia research. In his 1907 paper Alzheimer described the presence of plaques and tangles in one case of presenile dementia. In the same year, Oskar Fischer reported neuritic plaques in 12 cases of senile dementia. These were landmark findings in the history of research in dementia because they delineated the clinicopathological entity that is now known as Alzheimer's disease. Although much has been written about Alzheimer, only little is known about Fischer. The present article discusses Fischer's work on dementia in the context of his life and time. PMID:18952676

  15. University Leaders' Strategies in the Global Environment: A Comparative Study of Universitas Indonesia and the Australian National University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon; Sawir, Erlenawati

    2006-01-01

    In a global environment in which global, national and local nodes relate freely within common networks, all research universities must pursue strategies for building global capacity and facilitating cross-border staff and student movement and research collaboration. The study compares readings of the global environment, global and international…

  16. Anti-Racist Strategies in Finnish Children's Literature: Physical Appearance and Language as Signifiers of National Belonging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesonen, Jaana

    2013-01-01

    This article examines anti-racist strategies employed in Finnish children's literature. The examples from four stories illustrate that certain physical characteristics and cultural markers can become strong signifiers of nationality, that is Finnishness. The characters in these stories have to cope with experiences of exclusion and loneliness…

  17. Achieving Equitable Outcomes. A Supporting Paper to Australia's National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training, 1998-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian National Training Authority, Brisbane.

    This paper is one of five supporting papers to "A Bridge to the Future: Australia's National Strategy for VET 1998-2003" (ED 420 764). Although some equity client groups in Australia are now relatively well represented in vocational education and training (VET), patterns of enrollment and achievement are not uniform. To respond to this situation…

  18. The Role of National Strategy Behaviour and Attendance Consultants with Regard to Training and Professional Development in Special Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Barry

    2009-01-01

    The year 2003 saw Behaviour and Attendance (B&A) consultants beginning work across the country, supporting (mostly) mainstream secondary schools. They are part of an extensive advisory team which is instrumental in improving standards in schools through the Government's Secondary National Strategy. Their brief was to develop and improve the…

  19. The Search for Quality: A Five Country Study of National Strategies to Improve Educational Quality in Central Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, D.W.; Weidman, J.; Cohen, M.; Mercer, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of the strategies employed over the last decade by governments of five Central Asia republics-Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan-to raise educational quality at the primary and secondary levels. Data are drawn from a 2002 cross-national study sponsored by the Asian…

  20. Moving People from Welfare to Work: Lessons from the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Gayle

    The findings of the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies (NEWWS) were analyzed to identify ways of improving the process of moving people from welfare to work. Selected lessons from the analysis were as follows: (1) welfare-to-work programs that rely on adult basic education programs for the general population are unlikely to improve…

  1. Can You See the Difference? Early Impacts of the Primary National Literacy Strategy on Four Secondary English Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beverton, Sue

    2003-01-01

    Examines early impact upon secondary English departments of the primary National Literacy Strategy (NLS). Examines shifts over time in departmental policy and practice across the primary/secondary transfer that may relate to the impact of the primary NLS. Reports findings from interviews in four secondary English departments. (BT)

  2. Evaluating the Impact of the US National HIV/AIDS Strategy, 2010-2015.

    PubMed

    Bonacci, Robert A; Holtgrave, David R

    2016-07-01

    The 2010 US National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) set key targets for the reduction of HIV incidence (25 %) and the transmission rate (30 %) by 2015. We utilized published CDC data on HIV prevalence and mortality for 2007-2012, and literature-based incidence estimates for 2008-2012, along with mathematical modeling to evaluate whether the original NHAS incidence and transmission rate goals were achieved. From 2010 to 2015, a decrease was estimated from about 37,366 to 33,218 (11.1 % net decrease) for HIV incidence, and from 3.16 to 2.61 (17.4 % net decrease) for the HIV transmission rate. Over the same period, estimated all-cause mortality decreased from 17,866 to 16,085, while HIV prevalence increased from 1,181,300 to 1,270,755 persons living with HIV. At the conclusion of the original NHAS time period, important incremental but ultimately insufficient progress was made in attempting to reach key incidence and transmission rate targets for the NHAS. HIV prevention efforts must be reinvigorated in the NHAS's second era. PMID:27129453

  3. Sexuality and Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search About FCA Mission and Values Programs and Services Overview Board and Staff Grants and Awards FCA Donors FCA History Jobs at FCA Caregiver Education Health Conditions Caregiving Issues and Strategies Fact and Tip Sheets Classes & Events FCA Webinars ...

  4. Goal Setting for Cognitive Rehabilitation in Mild to Moderate Parkinson's Disease Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies.

    PubMed

    Watermeyer, Tamlyn J; Hindle, John V; Roberts, Julie; Lawrence, Catherine L; Martyr, Anthony; Lloyd-Williams, Huw; Brand, Andrew; Gutting, Petra; Hoare, Zoe; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Clare, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the physical symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, health services must also address the cognitive impairments that accompany these conditions. There is growing interest in the use of nonpharmacological approaches to managing the consequences of cognitive disorder. Cognitive rehabilitation is a goal-orientated behavioural intervention which aims to enhance functional independence through the use of strategies specific to the individual's needs and abilities. Fundamental to this therapy is a person's capacity to set goals for rehabilitation. To date, no studies have assessed goal setting in early-stage Parkinson's disease dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 29 participants from an ongoing trial of cognitive rehabilitation for people with these conditions. Here, we examined the goal statements provided by these participants using qualitative content analysis, exploring the types and nature of the goals set. Participants' goals reflected their motivations to learn new skills or improve performance in areas such as technology-use, self-management and orientation, medication management, and social and leisure activities. These results suggest that goal setting is achievable for these participants, provide insight into the everyday cognitive difficulties that they experience, and highlight possible domains as targets for intervention. The trial is registered with ISRCTN16584442 (DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN16584442 13/04/2015). PMID:27446628

  5. Goal Setting for Cognitive Rehabilitation in Mild to Moderate Parkinson's Disease Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Julie; Lloyd-Williams, Huw; Gutting, Petra; Hoare, Zoe; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Clare, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the physical symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, health services must also address the cognitive impairments that accompany these conditions. There is growing interest in the use of nonpharmacological approaches to managing the consequences of cognitive disorder. Cognitive rehabilitation is a goal-orientated behavioural intervention which aims to enhance functional independence through the use of strategies specific to the individual's needs and abilities. Fundamental to this therapy is a person's capacity to set goals for rehabilitation. To date, no studies have assessed goal setting in early-stage Parkinson's disease dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 29 participants from an ongoing trial of cognitive rehabilitation for people with these conditions. Here, we examined the goal statements provided by these participants using qualitative content analysis, exploring the types and nature of the goals set. Participants' goals reflected their motivations to learn new skills or improve performance in areas such as technology-use, self-management and orientation, medication management, and social and leisure activities. These results suggest that goal setting is achievable for these participants, provide insight into the everyday cognitive difficulties that they experience, and highlight possible domains as targets for intervention. The trial is registered with ISRCTN16584442 (DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN16584442 13/04/2015). PMID:27446628

  6. Learning from the Disease: Lessons Drawn from Adolescents Having a Grandparent Suffering Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celdran, Montserrat; Triado, Carme; Villar, Feliciano

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore what adolescent grandchildren have learned from having a grandparent who suffers dementia and what coping strategies they might recommend for other adolescents in similar situations. We also present information on background factors influencing lessons learned and coping strategies. Adolescent…

  7. Averting Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type in Women: Can Counselors Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthit, Kathryn Z.

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in late life, taking its greatest toll on women over age 80. This article provides an overview of AD, including risk factors and counseling strategies targeting risk. Counseling strategies address stress, cardiovascular health, social integration, depression, and holistic wellness.

  8. Development, Implementation, and Testing of Fault Detection Strategies on the National Wind Technology Center's Controls Advanced Research Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K. E.; Fleming, P. A.

    2011-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center dedicates two 600 kW turbines for advanced control systems research. A fault detection system for both turbines has been developed, analyzed, and improved across years of experiments to protect the turbines as each new controller is tested. Analysis of field data and ongoing fault detection strategy improvements have resulted in a system of sensors, fault definitions, and detection strategies that have thus far been effective at protecting the turbines. In this paper, we document this fault detection system and provide field data illustrating its operation while detecting a range of failures. In some cases, we discuss the refinement process over time as fault detection strategies were improved. The purpose of this article is to share field experience obtained during the development and field testing of the existing fault detection system, and to offer a possible baseline for comparison with more advanced turbine fault detection controllers.

  9. Inclusion of Ethical Issues in Dementia Guidelines: A Thematic Text Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Knüppel, Hannes; Schmidhuber, Martina; Neitzke, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) aim to improve professionalism in health care. However, current CPG development manuals fail to address how to include ethical issues in a systematic and transparent manner. The objective of this study was to assess the representation of ethical issues in general CPGs on dementia care. Methods and Findings To identify national CPGs on dementia care, five databases of guidelines were searched and national psychiatric associations were contacted in August 2011 and in June 2013. A framework for the assessment of the identified CPGs' ethical content was developed on the basis of a prior systematic review of ethical issues in dementia care. Thematic text analysis and a 4-point rating score were employed to assess how ethical issues were addressed in the identified CPGs. Twelve national CPGs were included. Thirty-one ethical issues in dementia care were identified by the prior systematic review. The proportion of these 31 ethical issues that were explicitly addressed by each CPG ranged from 22% to 77%, with a median of 49.5%. National guidelines differed substantially with respect to (a) which ethical issues were represented, (b) whether ethical recommendations were included, (c) whether justifications or citations were provided to support recommendations, and (d) to what extent the ethical issues were explained. Conclusions Ethical issues were inconsistently addressed in national dementia guidelines, with some guidelines including most and some including few ethical issues. Guidelines should address ethical issues and how to deal with them to help the medical profession understand how to approach care of patients with dementia, and for patients, their relatives, and the general public, all of whom might seek information and advice in national guidelines. There is a need for further research to specify how detailed ethical issues and their respective recommendations can and should be addressed in dementia guidelines. Please

  10. [Epidemiology of Diabetes and Risk of Dementia].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Tomoyuki

    2016-07-01

    The association between diabetes and the risk of developing dementia has received much attention in epidemiological studies. An accurate population-based prospective cohort study has been conducted in the elderly population of the town of Hisayama in Japan since 1985 aiming to elucidate the secular trends in the prevalence of dementia and examine risk and protective factors for dementia in the Japanese population. The prevalence of all-cause dementia significantly increased from 1985 to 2012. In regard to subtypes of dementia, a similar trend was observed for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In a prospective study of risk factors for dementia in Hisayama elder residents without dementia, diabetes was identified as a significant risk factor for developing all-cause dementia, especially AD. Moreover, 2-hour post-load glucose levels were closely associated with increased risk of all-cause dementia, AD, and vascular dementia. In a pathological study of Hisayama residents, higher levels of 2-hour post-load glucose, fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were significantly associated with increased risk of neuritic plaques. The steep increase in the frequency of diabetes could lead to the increasing trend in the prevalence of dementia, especially AD, in the Japanese elderly. PMID:27395456

  11. [Anaesthesiological management of patients with dementia].

    PubMed

    Frietsch, Thomas; Schuler, Matthias; Adler, Georg

    2014-04-01

    The aging society challenges anaesthesiologists with a growing number of patients with dementia. These and their relatives worry about an aggravation of an already existing dementia or even the postoperative evocation of one. Common volatile anaesthetics and propofol are suspected to increase dementia - associated protein tau and amyloid-betalevels in the brain. Perioperative complications such as cognitive dysfunction and delirium occur more frequently in dementia patients. For anaesthesiologists, it seems prudent toassess the grade of dementia in the elderly to adjust anaesthesia drug doses and monitoring intra- and postoperatively. Pharmacological interactions with antidementic andneuroleptic current medications affectanaesthetic and analgesic effects.In dementia, perioperative malfunction of cognition, memory, attention, information processing, communication and social interaction abilities is of profound influence on the perioperative management.This review mentions actual knowledge about dementia forms and symptoms in brief. Recommendations for the anaesthesia care are given in more detail. PMID:24792593

  12. The initial recognition and diagnosis of dementia.

    PubMed

    Knopman, D S

    1998-04-27

    Dementia is characterized by a decline in cognition, behavioral disturbances, and interference with daily functioning and independence. Diagnosis is sometimes delayed as patients or family members often misattribute obvious manifestations of cognitive decline to normal aging rather than to the onset of a degenerative disease. Many physicians do not perform mental status examinations or do not use them effectively to detect early symptoms. Clinical markers are available to decrease the difficulty in distinguishing dementia from depression and confusional states such as delirium. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia; others include rapidly progressive dementias, dementias associated with strokes and Parkinson's disease, and frontotemporal dementias. Often, AD coexists with other forms of dementia. Sensitivity to early warning signs, interviews with family members, and mental status examinations are essential to early detection of AD, and will prove useful to primary-care physicians who care for older patients. PMID:9617846

  13. Neuroeconomic dissociation of semantic dementia and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Chiong, Winston; Wood, Kristie A; Beagle, Alexander J; Hsu, Ming; Kayser, Andrew S; Miller, Bruce L; Kramer, Joel H

    2016-02-01

    Many neuropsychiatric disorders are marked by abnormal behaviour and decision-making, but prevailing diagnostic criteria for such behaviours are typically qualitative and often ambiguous. Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (also called semantic dementia) are two clinical variants of frontotemporal dementia with overlapping but distinct anatomical substrates known to cause profound changes in decision-making. We investigated whether abnormal decision-making in these syndromes could be more precisely characterized in terms of dissociable abnormalities in patients' subjective evaluations of valence (positive versus negative outcome) and of time (present versus future outcome). We presented 28 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, 14 patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia, 25 patients with Alzheimer's disease (as disease controls), and 61 healthy older control subjects with experimental tasks assaying loss aversion and delay discounting. In general linear models controlling for age, gender, education and Mini-Mental State Examination score, patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia were less averse to losses than control subjects (P < 0.001), while patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia discounted delayed rewards more steeply than controls (P = 0.019). There was no relationship between loss aversion and delay discounting across the sample, nor in any of the subgroups. These findings suggest that abnormal behaviours in neurodegenerative disease may result from the disruption of either of two dissociable neural processes for evaluating the outcomes of action. More broadly, these findings suggest a role for computational methods to supplement traditional qualitative characterizations in the differential diagnosis of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26667277

  14. Dementia syndromes: evaluation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kevin R; Barrett, Anna M

    2008-01-01

    As our population ages, diseases affecting memory and daily functioning will affect an increasing number of individuals, their families and the healthcare system. The social, financial and economic impacts will be profound. This article provides an overview of current dementia syndromes to assist clinicians in evaluating, educating and treating these patients. PMID:17425495

  15. [Depression: A predictor of dementia].

    PubMed

    Deví Bastida, Josep; Puig Pomés, Núria; Jofre Font, Susanna; Fetscher Eickhoff, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Many studies suggest that in 10-25% of cases of Alzheimer's, the most common dementia in our society, can be prevented with the elimination of some risk factors. Barnes and Yaffe found that one-third of Alzheimer's cases are attributable to depression, but in the scientific literature it is not clear if it has a real causal effect on the development of dementia. The purpose of this study is to analyse the scientific evidence on the hypothesis that depression increases the risk of developing dementia. A systematic review and a meta-analysis were performed on the scientific literature published up until the present day, searching articles that were published between 1990 and 2014. Ten of the studies found met the selection criteria -similar to a) size and characteristics of the sample (origin, age…), b) process of gathering data c) method of studying the relationship (within and/or between group comparison), and d) statistical analysis of the results- and the previously established quality. The value of odds ratio varied from 1.72 to 3.59, and the hazard ratio from 1,72 to 5.44. This indicates that the subjects with a history of depression have a higher risk of developing dementia than others who did not suffer depression. PMID:26651420

  16. COTARD SYNDROME IN SEMANTIC DEMENTIA

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Mario F.; Ramírez-Bermúdez, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Background Semantic dementia is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of meaning of words or concepts. semantic dementia can offer potential insights into the mechanisms of content-specific delusions. Objective The authors present a rare case of semantic dementia with Cotard syndrome, a delusion characterized by nihilism or self-negation. Method The semantic deficits and other features of semantic dementia were evaluated in relation to the patient's Cotard syndrome. Results Mrs. A developed the delusional belief that she was wasting and dying. This occurred after she lost knowledge for her somatic discomforts and sensations and for the organs that were the source of these sensations. Her nihilistic beliefs appeared to emerge from her misunderstanding of her somatic sensations. Conclusion This unique patient suggests that a mechanism for Cotard syndrome is difficulty interpreting the nature and source of internal pains and sensations. We propose that loss of semantic knowledge about one's own body may lead to the delusion of nihilism or death. PMID:22054629

  17. TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH IN NEUROLOGY: DEMENTIA

    PubMed Central

    Honig, Lawrence S.

    2013-01-01

    Dementia disorders are characterized by clinicopathological criteria. Molecular understandings of these disorders, based on immunohistochemical studies, biochemical investigations, genetic approaches, and animal models have resulted in advances in diagnosis. Likewise translational research has allowed application of increasing basic scientific knowledge regarding neurodegeneration, to the rational development of new investigational therapies based on current understanding of disease pathogenesis. This review discusses application of translational research to both diagnosis and treatment of dementia disorders. The development of biomarkers has yielded imaging and biochemical methods that more assist in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative dementias, especially Alzheimer’s disease. New diagnostic criteria for disease are based on these molecular-based techniques. And these biomarkers are of potential use in monitoring disease activity during therapeutic trials. Translational investigations likewise have led towards new avenues in targeted dementia research. This is particularly so in the development and testing of disease-modifying treatments that might slow or deter progressive deterioration. Recent clinical trials have not been based on empiric trial of established drugs, but rather upon trial of drugs shown through culture and animal models to interfere with known elements of the pathogenetic cascade of Alzheimer disease. PMID:22473767

  18. HIV Infection Presenting with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, K; Gupta, Avneet; Manoj, S; Seshadri, Kp

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of dementia in a young healthy individual. On evaluation he was detected to have HIV infection with low CD4 count and a high viral load. He had no opportunistic infections or any other AIDS defining illnesses. He recovered fully within 3 months of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27604445

  19. 75 FR 75707 - Request for Public Comment on the Draft National Nanotechnology Initiative Strategy for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... is posted at http://strategy.nano.gov . Comments of approximately one page or less in length (4,000.... ADDRESSES: Respondents are encouraged to register online at the NNI Strategy Portal at http://strategy.nano... from agencies participating in the NNI ( http://www.nano.gov ). The NSET Subcommittee and...

  20. 76 FR 2428 - Request for Public Comment on the Draft National Nanotechnology Initiative Strategy for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... is posted at http://strategy.nano.gov . Comments of ] approximately one page or less in length (4,000... NNI Strategy Portal at http://strategy.nano.gov to post their comments (4,000 characters or less) as a...://www.nano.gov ). The NSET Subcommittee and its Nanotechnology Environmental and Health...

  1. Is There Room in Math Reform for Preservice Teachers to Use Reading Strategies? National Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Dana Pomykal; Hopper, Peggy F.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Research is proposed for preservice secondary mathematics teachers to develop and use reading strategies in math classrooms. Purpose: to determine if increased instruction on using specific reading strategies in secondary mathematics classrooms significantly impacts a) the type of reading-specific instructional strategies used, b)…

  2. Dementia Risk in Irradiated Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Chang, Chia-Lun; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with head and neck cancer are treated through surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy (CT). Carotid artery damage and neurotoxicity were previously observed in these patients. This study estimated the dementia risk associated with different treatment modalities in a head and neck cancer population with long-term follow-up. Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database and a cancer registry database from the Collaboration Center of Health Information Application were linked for the present analysis. Patients with head and neck cancer, treated from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010, were included in the study. The follow-up duration was the period from the index date to December 31, 2012. Inclusion criteria were head and neck cancer; an age >20 years; and having undergone surgery, CT, concurrent CT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. Exclusion criteria were another cancer diagnosed before the head and neck cancer, death or being diagnosed with dementia within 2 years after the treatment of the head and neck cancer, stroke before the index date, distant metastasis, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, head and neck cancer recurrence, an unknown sex, and an age <20 years. In total, 20,135 patients were included. In patient groups that underwent surgery alone, surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, and chemoradiotherapy alone, the dementia incidence per 1000 person-years was 1.44, 1.04, and 1.98, respectively. The crude hazard ratio (HR) of dementia was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21–2.81) in the RT with or without CT group. After adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage, and comorbidity, the HR was 1.92 (95% CI 1.14–3.24). Examining the dementia risk in patients who received different treatment modalities according to the Cox proportional-hazard model revealed that an age >65 years and having undergone RT with or without CT were risk factors (P < 0.001 and P = 0.015; and HRs of 16.5 and 1.92, respectively). The dementia risk

  3. Dementia Risk in Irradiated Patients With Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Chang, Chia-Lun; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer are treated through surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy (CT). Carotid artery damage and neurotoxicity were previously observed in these patients. This study estimated the dementia risk associated with different treatment modalities in a head and neck cancer population with long-term follow-up. Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database and a cancer registry database from the Collaboration Center of Health Information Application were linked for the present analysis. Patients with head and neck cancer, treated from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010, were included in the study. The follow-up duration was the period from the index date to December 31, 2012. Inclusion criteria were head and neck cancer; an age >20 years; and having undergone surgery, CT, concurrent CT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. Exclusion criteria were another cancer diagnosed before the head and neck cancer, death or being diagnosed with dementia within 2 years after the treatment of the head and neck cancer, stroke before the index date, distant metastasis, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, head and neck cancer recurrence, an unknown sex, and an age <20 years. In total, 20,135 patients were included. In patient groups that underwent surgery alone, surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, and chemoradiotherapy alone, the dementia incidence per 1000 person-years was 1.44, 1.04, and 1.98, respectively. The crude hazard ratio (HR) of dementia was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-2.81) in the RT with or without CT group. After adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage, and comorbidity, the HR was 1.92 (95% CI 1.14-3.24). Examining the dementia risk in patients who received different treatment modalities according to the Cox proportional-hazard model revealed that an age >65 years and having undergone RT with or without CT were risk factors (P < 0.001 and P = 0.015; and HRs of 16.5 and 1.92, respectively). The dementia risk in patients

  4. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Werder, Steven F

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1) Which patients should be tested? (2) What test should be ordered? (3) How are inferences made from such testing? (4) In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5) Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6) What is to be expected from treatment? (7) How is B12 deficiency treated? Methods On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment) and then reviewed in answering the above questions. Results The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed. Discussion Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test: 200 picograms per milliliter or less is low, and 201 to 350 picograms per milliliter is borderline low. Other tests may be indicated, including plasma

  5. Decision Factors Nurses Use to Assess Pain in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Todd B; Parish, Abby; Mion, Lorraine C

    2015-10-01

    Nurses caring for older people with various psychiatric illnesses face many obstacles when treating pain. One setting with a high percentage of psychiatric conditions is long-term care where more than half of residents have some form of dementia, and behavioral symptoms of dementia (BSDs) may mimic behavioral displays of pain. Furthermore, two-thirds of nursing home residents have pain. Thus, many nursing home residents with dementia have pain that may be confounded by BSDs. Since many people with dementia are at risk for poor pain management, determining current methods in which nurses assess and manage pain in nursing home residents will aid in recognizing potential barriers to using current pain management guidelines and help develop strategies to enhance nurses' assessment and management of pain in this vulnerable population. The aim of this study was to explore nursing home nurses' cues and practices to identify and alleviate pain in nursing home residents with dementia. Nurses use the constructs of 'comfort' and 'quality of life' as key components in their overall pain assessment strategy in people with dementia. Indeed, the extensive process they use involving frequent reassessment and application of interventions is geared towards "appearance of comfort." Nurses reported difficulty in ascertaining whether a person with dementia was in pain, and they expressed further difficulty determining the intensity associated with resident pain. Nurses further reported that residents with dementia who are not well know by the staff were are greater risk of poor pain management. It was not unusual for nurses to discuss the importance of conflict resolution among family members as well as allowing for open expression of family's concerns. Nurses had to focus not only on the resident's comfort, but also the families' level of comfort with pain management, especially at the end-of-life. Findings support further use and development of discomfort behavior scales to help

  6. Dementia - home care

    MedlinePlus

    ... If they wander, their caregiver can contact the police and the national Safe Return office, where information ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  7. Dementia - daily care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eating Handling their own personal care Help with Memory Loss People who have early memory loss can ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  8. Medicinal plants and dementia therapy: herbal hopes for brain aging?

    PubMed

    Perry, Elaine; Howes, Melanie-Jayne R

    2011-12-01

    An escalating "epidemic" of diseases like Alzheimer's has not yet been met by effective symptomatic treatments or preventative strategies. Among a few current prescription drugs are cholinesterase inhibitors including galantamine, originating from the snowdrop. Research into ethnobotanicals for memory or cognition has burgeoned in recent years. Based on a multi-faceted review of medicinal plants or phytochemicals, including traditional uses, relevant bioactivities, psychological and clinical evidence on efficacy and safety, this overview focuses on those for which there is promising clinical trial evidence in people with dementia, together with at least one other of these lines of supporting evidence. With respect to cognitive function, such plants reviewed include sage, Ginkgo biloba, and complex mixtures of other traditional remedies. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) challenge carers and lead to institutionalization. Symptoms can be alleviated by some plant species (e.g., lemon balm and lavender alleviate agitation in people with dementia; St John's wort treats depression in the normal population). The ultimate goal of disease prevention is considered from the perspective of limited epidemiological and clinical trial evidence to date. The potential value of numerous plant extracts or chemicals (e.g., curcumin) with neuroprotective but as yet no clinical data are reviewed. Given intense clinical need and carer concerns, which lead to exploration of such alternatives as herbal medicines, the following research priorities are indicated: investigating botanical agents which enhance cognition in populations with mild memory impairment or at earliest disease stages, and those for BPSD in people with dementia at more advanced stages; establishing an ongoing authoritative database on herbal medicine for dementia; and further epidemiological and follow up studies of promising phytopharmaceuticals or related nutraceuticals for disease prevention

  9. Burden of disease due to dementia in the elderly population of Korea: present and future

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the rapid aging of populations around the world, dementia has become one of the most important public health problems in Eastern Asian countries. The purpose of the present study was to provide an estimate of the burden of dementia and forecast its future burden, as generalized to the Korean population, and to provide detailed gender- and age-specific information regarding the burden of dementia in the elderly population of Korea. Methods ‘Disability-adjusted life years’ (DALYs) were used to estimate the burden of dementia. Epidemiologic data from national statistics and nationwide epidemiologic studies in the year 2008 were used to obtain representative outcomes for the Korean population. We estimated the DALYs due to dementia from the years 2010 to 2050 by applying demographic structure projections in terms of 5-year age groups in Korea. Results The burden of disease due to dementia in Korea is 528 per 100,000 population (males: 435, females: 622) and 5,117 per 100,000 in those over the age of 65 years (males: 5,228; females: 5,041); this accounts for 4.5% of the total burden of disease in the year 2008. In the year 2050, DALYs due to dementia (814,629) are expected to be 3.0 times higher than those in the year 2010 (274,849). Conclusion Dementia has the highest burden of disease in the elderly Korean population, and this burden will increase sharply with the aging of the population. More comprehensive and multi-dimensional approaches, including clinical, psychological, social, and political means will be needed for the management of the dramatically increasing burden of dementia. PMID:23552095

  10. Alaska North Slope National Energy Strategy initiative: Analysis of five undeveloped fields

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.P.; Allaire, R.B.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy was directed in the National Energy Strategy to establish a federal interagency task force to identify specific technical and regulatory barriers to the development of five undeveloped North Slope Alaska fields and make recommendations for their resolution. The five fields are West Sak, Point Thomson, Gwydyr Bay, Seal Island/Northstar, and Sandpiper Island. Analysis of environmental, regulatory, technical, and economic information, and data relating to the development potential of the five fields leads to the following conclusions: Development of the five fields would result in an estimated total of 1,055 million barrels of oil and 4.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and total investment of $9.4 billion in 1992 dollars. It appears that all five of the fields will remain economically marginal developments unless there is significant improvement in world oil prices. Costs of regulatory compliance and mitigation, and costs to reduce or maintain environmental impacts at acceptable levels influence project investments and operating costs and must be considered in the development decision making process. The development of three of the fields (West Sak, Point Thomson, and Gwydyr Bay) that are marginally feasible would have an impact on North Slope production over the period from about 2000 to 2014 but cannot replace the decline in Prudhoe Bay Unit production or maintain the operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) beyond about 2014 with the assumption that the TAPS will shut down when production declines to the range of 400 to 200 thousand barrels of oil/day. Recoverable reserves left in the ground in the currently producing fields and soon to be developed fields, Niakuk and Point McIntyre, would range from 1 billion to 500 million barrels of oil corresponding to the time period of 2008 to 2014 based on the TAPS shutdown assumption.

  11. The provision of assistive technology products and services for people with dementia in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Grant; Newton, Lisa; Pritchard, Gary; Finch, Tracy; Brittain, Katie; Robinson, Louise

    2016-07-01

    In this review we explore the provision of assistive technology products and services currently available for people with dementia within the United Kingdom. A scoping review of assistive technology products and services currently available highlighted 171 products or product types and 331 services. In addition, we assimilated data on the amount and quality of information provided by assistive technology services alongside assistive technology costs. We identify a range of products available across three areas: assistive technology used 'by', 'with' and 'on' people with dementia. Assistive technology provision is dominated by 'telecare' provided by local authorities, with services being subject to major variations in pricing and information provision; few currently used available resources for assistive technology in dementia. We argue that greater attention should be paid to information provision about assistive technology services across an increasingly mixed economy of dementia care providers, including primary care, local authorities, private companies and local/national assistive technology resources. PMID:24803646

  12. Geographical variation in dementia: systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Tom C; Batty, G David; Hearnshaw, Gena F; Fenton, Candida; Starr, John M

    2012-01-01

    Background Geographical variation in dementia prevalence and incidence may indicate important socio-environmental contributions to dementia aetiology. However, previous comparisons have been hampered by combining studies with different methodologies. This review systematically collates and synthesizes studies examining geographical variation in the prevalence and incidence of dementia based on comparisons of studies using identical methodologies. Methods Papers were identified by a comprehensive electronic search of relevant databases, scrutinising the reference sections of identified publications, contacting experts in the field and re-examining papers already known to us. Identified articles were independently reviewed against inclusion/exclusion criteria and considered according to geographical scale. Rural/urban comparisons were meta-analysed. Results Twelve thousand five hundred and eighty records were reviewed and 51 articles were included. Dementia prevalence and incidence varies at a number of scales from the national down to small areas, including some evidence of an effect of rural living [prevalence odds ratio (OR) = 1.11, 90% confidence interval (CI) 0.79–1.57; incidence OR = 1.20, 90% CI 0.84–1.71]. However, this association of rurality was stronger for Alzheimer disease, particularly when early life rural living was captured (prevalence OR = 2.22, 90% CI 1.19–4.16; incidence OR = 1.64, 90% CI 1.08–2.50). Conclusions There is evidence of geographical variation in rates of dementia in affluent countries at a variety of geographical scales. Rural living is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer disease, and there is a suggestion that early life rural living further increases this risk. However, the fact that few studies have been conducted in resource-poor countries limits conclusions. PMID:22798662

  13. Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Subsequent Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study evaluated the dementia risk after carbon monoxide poisoning (CO poisoning). Using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, a total of 9041 adults newly diagnosed with CO poisoning from 2000 to 2011 were identified as the CO poisoning cohort. Four-fold (N = 36,160) of non-CO poisoning insured people were randomly selected as controls, frequency-matched by age, sex, and hospitalization year. Incidence and hazard ratio (HR) of dementia were measured by the end 2011. The dementia incidence was 1.6-fold higher in the CO exposed cohort than in the non-exposed cohort (15.2 vs 9.76 per 10,000 person-years; n = 62 vs 174) with an adjusted HR of 1.50 (95% CI = 1.11–2.04). The sex- and age-specific hazards were higher in male patients (adjusted HR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.20–2.54), and those aged <=49 years (adjusted HR = 2.62, 95% CI = 1.38–4.99). CO exposed patients with 7-day or longer hospital stay had an adjusted HR of 2.18 (95% CI = 1.42, 3.36). The CO poisoning patients on hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy had an adjusted HR of 1.80 (95% CI = 0.96–3.37). This study suggests that CO poisoning may have association with the risk of developing dementia, which is significant for severe cases. The effectiveness of HBO2 therapy remains unclear in preventing dementia. Patients with CO poisoning are more prevalent with depression. PMID:26735545

  14. ‘The living death of Alzheimer's’ versus ‘Take a walk to keep dementia at bay’: representations of dementia in print media and carer discourse

    PubMed Central

    Peel, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Understanding dementia is a pressing social challenge. This article draws on the ‘Dementia talking: care conversation and communication’ project which aims to understand how talk about, and to people living with dementia is constructed. In this article I draw on the construction of dementia manifest in two data sets – a corpus of 350 recent UK national newspaper articles and qualitative data derived from in-depth interviews with informal carers. These data were analysed using a thematic discursive approach. A ‘panic-blame’ framework was evident in much of the print media coverage. Dementia was represented in catastrophic terms as a ‘tsunami’ and ‘worse than death’, juxtaposed with coverage of individualistic behavioural change and lifestyle recommendations to ‘stave off’ the condition. Contrary to this media discourse, in carers' talk there was scant use of hyperbolic metaphor or reference to individual responsibility for dementia, and any corresponding blame and accountability. I argue that the presence of individualistic dementia ‘preventative’ behaviour in media discourse is problematic, especially in comparison to other more ‘controllable’ and treatable chronic conditions. Engagement with, and critique of, the nascent panic-blame cultural context may be fruitful in enhancing positive social change for people diagnosed with dementia and their carers. PMID:24935028

  15. National Summit on Campus Public Safety. Strategies for Colleges and Universities in a Homeland Security Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Justice, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The aftermath of September 11, 2001 prompted the reexamination of the nation's defenses and vulnerabilities in light of new realities. Every sector of society, particularly those who protect the well being of communities, required change. Safety and security operations on the nation's college and university campuses are no exception. The nation's…

  16. Development of a National HRD Strategy Model: Cases of India and China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alagaraja, Meera; Wang, Jia

    2012-01-01

    National human resource development (NHRD) literature describes the importance of developing human resources at the national level and presents several models. These models are primarily concerned with the national contexts of developing and underdeveloped countries. In contrast, the NHRD models in the non-HRD literature focus primarily on…

  17. Introduction to the transforming dementia care in hospitals series.

    PubMed

    Evans, Simon; Brooker, Dawn; Thompson, Rachel; Bray, Jennifer; Milosevic, Sarah; Bruce, Mary; Carter, Christine

    2015-07-01

    A short series of articles in Nursing Older People, starting in September, presents case study examples of the positive work achieved by trusts that participated in the RCN's development programme to improve dementia care in acute hospitals. This introductory article reports on the independent evaluation of the programme. The programme included a launch event, development days, site visits, ongoing support by the RCN lead and carer representatives and a conference to showcase service improvements. The evaluation drew on data from a survey, the site visits, trust action plans and a range of self-assessment tools for dementia care. The findings highlight substantial progress towards programme objectives and learning outcomes and suggest that the programme provided the focus, impetus and structure for trusts to make sustainable changes. It also equipped participants with the strategies and confidence to change practice. Recommendations are made for taking the programme forward. PMID:26108943

  18. Wearable Technology to Garner the Perspective of Dementia Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Judith T.; Campbell, Grace B.; Hunsaker, Amanda E.; Klinger, Julie; Mecca, Laurel Person; Hu, Lu; Hostein, Sally; Lingler, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Family caregivers of persons with dementia typically have limited opportunity during brief clinical encounters to describe the dementia-related behaviors and interactions that they find difficult to handle. Lack of objective data depicting the nature, intensity, and impact of these manifestations of the underlying disease further constrains the extent to which strategies recommended by nurses or other health care providers can be tailored to the situation. We describe a prototype wearable camera system used to gather image and voice data from the caregiver’s perspective in a pilot feasibility intervention study conducted with 18 caregiving dyads. Several scenarios are presented that incorporate salient events (i.e., behaviors or interactions deemed difficult by the caregiver or identified as concerning by our team during screening) identified in the resulting video. We anticipate that future wearable camera systems and software will automate screening for salient events, providing new tools for assessment and intervention by nurses. PMID:26468655

  19. Increased Long-Term Risk of Dementia in Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chung-Shun; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hong, Li-Yee; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Ma, Hon-Ping; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Tsai, Shin-Han; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wu, Mei-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning may cause toxicity of the central nervous system and heart. However, the association between CO poisoning and long-term dementia risk remains unestablished. We investigated the incidence of dementia in patients with CO poisoning in Taiwan and evaluated whether they had a higher risk of dementia than did the general population.A nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted among patients with CO poisoning identified using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) during 2004 to 2013. CO poisoning was defined according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. The study cohort comprised patients with CO poisoning between 2005 and 2010 (N = 14,590). Each patient was age-, sex-, and index date-matched with 4 randomly selected controls from the comparison cohort (N = 58,360). All patients were followed from the study date until dementia development, death, or the end of 2013. Cox proportional hazards regressions were performed for comparing the hazard ratios for dementia between the 2 cohorts.Incident cases of dementia were identified from the NHIRD.After adjustment for potential confounders, the study cohort was independently associated with a higher dementia risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.75; 95% confidence interval, 2.26-3.35).This population-based cohort study indicated that patients with CO poisoning have a higher risk of dementia than do people without CO poisoning. PMID:26817904

  20. Effective Strategies for State Education Agencies in Community Education Development: A National Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLellis, Anthony J.; Semple, Barry F.

    This study focused on successful strategies employed by state education agencies (SEAs) to encourage the development of community education programs and on the priority local education agencies (LEAs) place on community education. Questionnaires were returned from representatives of 51 state education agencies. The top ranked strategy for…

  1. Subsonic Transonic Applied Refinements By Using Key Strategies - STARBUKS In the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paryz, Roman W.

    2014-01-01

    Several upgrade projects have been completed at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility over the last 1.5 years in an effort defined as STARBUKS - Subsonic Transonic Applied Refinements By Using Key Strategies. This multi-year effort was undertaken to improve NTF's overall capabilities by addressing Accuracy and Validation, Productivity, and Reliability areas at the NTF. This presentation will give a brief synopsis of each of these efforts.

  2. [Strategies by civil society organizations for access to breast cancer drugs in the Brazilian Unified National Health System].

    PubMed

    Deprá, Aline Scaramussa; Ribeiro, Carlos Dimas Martins; Maksud, Ivia

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to identify and analyze strategies by civil society organizations working with breast cancer (CSOs) on access to drugs in Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) and the main social actors. A qualitative approach used the snowball technique, semi-structured interviews, and participant observation. Thematic analysis was based on the following categories: access to drugs for breast cancer treatment, relationship between CSOs and government, relationship between CSOs and the pharmaceutical industry, and other strategies used by CSOs. The results showed that civil society organizations have influenced access to drugs for breast cancer in the SUS and that their main strategies have focused on pressuring government at all levels. Meanwhile, the pharmaceutical industry sponsors some CSOs in order to strengthen them and expand its own market. The main difficulties in access to such drugs involve insufficient services, unequal treatment, and inclusion of technology in the SUS. PMID:26248106

  3. Vascular lesions in mixed dementia, vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular disease: the Kurihara Project.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Kenichi; Tanaka, Naofumi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kei; Satoh, Masayuki

    2012-11-15

    The concept and diagnosis for mixed dementia is not simple, since it is difficult to identify the type and regions of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) responsible for causing dementia. An investigation is needed to confirm the presence of mixed dementia, those who met the criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and those for vascular dementia (VaD). According to the community-based stroke, dementia, and bed-confinement prevention in Kurihara, northern Japan (Kurihara Project), the prevalence of dementia and dementing diseases was surveyed in 2008-2010. Five hundred and ninety people finally agreed to participate (47.0%), and 73 (12.4%) people were diagnosed with dementia according to the DSM-IV. Using MRI, intensive evaluations on CVDs were performed for the 49 dementia patients associated with CVDs (mixed dementia, VaD, and AD with CVD). For the mixed dementia group, all had left subcortical strategic CVDs. These included the caudate head and thalamus. For the VaD group, all patients had at least cortical CVDs or subcortical strategic CVDs. The AD with CVD group had non-strategic CVDs in cortical, subcortical, or other areas in 5 or 6 patients each. Two extreme concepts regarding CVD and dementia are possible. One is that there is no concept for mixed dementia or VaD. An alternative is that the vascular factor should be considered as primary. Our data showed an importance of cortical and subcortical "strategic" areas, the latter included thalamus and caudate head. PMID:22871542

  4. Study Protocol: The Behaviour and Pain in Dementia Study (BePAID)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background People with dementia admitted to the acute hospital often receive poor quality care particularly with regards to management of behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and of pain. There have been no UK studies on the prevalence and type of pain or BPSD in people with dementia in this setting, or on how these may impact on patients, carers, staff and costs of care. Methods/Design We shall recruit older people with dementia who have unplanned acute medical admissions and measure the prevalence of BPSD using the Behave-AD (Behaviour in Alzheimer's Disease) and the CMAI (Cohen Mansfield Agitation Inventory). Pain prevalence and severity will be assessed by the PAINAD (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia) and the FACES pain scale. We will then analyse how these impact on a variety of outcomes and test the hypothesis that poor management of pain is associated with worsening of BPSD. Discussion By demonstrating the costs of BPSD to individuals with dementia and the health service this study will provide important evidence to drive improvements in care. We can then develop effective training for acute hospital staff and alternative treatment strategies for BPSD in this setting. PMID:22004045

  5. Hearing and music in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Julene K; Chow, Maggie L

    2016-01-01

    Music is a complex acoustic signal that relies on a number of different brain and cognitive processes to create the sensation of hearing. Changes in hearing function are generally not a major focus of concern for persons with a majority of neurodegenerative diseases associated with dementia, such as Alzheimer disease (AD). However, changes in the processing of sounds may be an early, and possibly preclinical, feature of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this chapter is to review the current state of knowledge concerning hearing and music perception in persons who have a dementia as a result of a neurodegenerative disease. The review focuses on both peripheral and central auditory processing in common neurodegenerative diseases, with a particular focus on the processing of music and other non-verbal sounds. The chapter also reviews music interventions used for persons with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25726296

  6. Hearing and music in dementia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julene K; Chow, Maggie L

    2015-01-01

    Music is a complex acoustic signal that relies on a number of different brain and cognitive processes to create the sensation of hearing. Changes in hearing function are generally not a major focus of concern for persons with a majority of neurodegenerative diseases associated with dementia, such as Alzheimer disease (AD). However, changes in the processing of sounds may be an early, and possibly preclinical, feature of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this chapter is to review the current state of knowledge concerning hearing and music perception in persons who have a dementia as a result of a neurodegenerative disease. The review focuses on both peripheral and central auditory processing in common neurodegenerative diseases, with a particular focus on the processing of music and other non-verbal sounds. The chapter also reviews music interventions used for persons with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25726296

  7. Thorstein Veblen and Dementia praecox.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Both of Thorstein Veblen's wives and another woman he loved had nervous breakdowns, while a fourth woman to whom he was emotionally very close committed suicide. Yet when Veblen published an article entitled "Dementia praecox," he did not mention his personal contact with serious mental disorder. This detachment is consistent with Veblen's approach to writing. Veblen considered himself to be a detached observer who wrote objectively about society rather than subjectively about himself. PMID:17623868

  8. Frontotemporal dementia: An updated overview

    PubMed Central

    Mohandas, E.; Rajmohan, V.

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome occurring between 45 and 65 years. The syndrome is also called frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, FTLD refers to a larger group of disorders FTD being one of its subgroups. The other subgroups of FTLD are progressive nonfluent aphasia (PFNA), and semantic dementia (SD). FTLD is characterized by atrophy of prefrontal and anterior temporal cortices. FTD occurs in 5-15% of patients with dementia and it is the third most common degenerative dementia. FTD occurs with equal frequency in both sexes. The age of onset is usually between 45 and 65 years though it may range anywhere from 21 to 81 years. The usual course is one of progressive clinicopathological deterioration with mortality within 6-8 years. Unlike Alzheimer’s disease (AD), this condition has a strong genetic basis and family history of FTD is seen in 40-50% of cases. FTD is a genetically complex disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance in majority of cases. Genetic linkage studies have revealed FTLD loci on chromosome 3p, 9, 9p, and 17q. The most prevalent genes are PGRN (progranulin) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein tau), both located on chromosome 17q21. More than 15 different pathologies can underlie FTD and related disorders and it has four major types of pathological features: (1) microvacuolation without neuronal inclusions, (2) microvacuolation with ubiquitinated rounded intraneuronal inclusions and dystrophic neurites FTLD-ubiquitinated (FTLD-U), (3) transcortical gliosis with tau-reactive rounded intraneuronal inclusions, (4) microvacuolation and taupositive neurofibrillary tangles. Behavior changes are the most common initial symptom of FTD (62%), whereas speech and language problems are most common in NFPA (100%) and SD (58%). There are no approved drugs for the management of FTD and trials are needed to find effective agents. Non-pharmacological treatment and caregiver

  9. Auditory object cognition in dementia.

    PubMed

    Goll, Johanna C; Kim, Lois G; Hailstone, Julia C; Lehmann, Manja; Buckley, Aisling; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2011-07-01

    The cognition of nonverbal sounds in dementia has been relatively little explored. Here we undertook a systematic study of nonverbal sound processing in patient groups with canonical dementia syndromes comprising clinically diagnosed typical amnestic Alzheimer's disease (AD; n=21), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n=5), logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA; n=7) and aphasia in association with a progranulin gene mutation (GAA; n=1), and in healthy age-matched controls (n=20). Based on a cognitive framework treating complex sounds as 'auditory objects', we designed a novel neuropsychological battery to probe auditory object cognition at early perceptual (sub-object), object representational (apperceptive) and semantic levels. All patients had assessments of peripheral hearing and general neuropsychological functions in addition to the experimental auditory battery. While a number of aspects of auditory object analysis were impaired across patient groups and were influenced by general executive (working memory) capacity, certain auditory deficits had some specificity for particular dementia syndromes. Patients with AD had a disproportionate deficit of auditory apperception but preserved timbre processing. Patients with PNFA had salient deficits of timbre and auditory semantic processing, but intact auditory size and apperceptive processing. Patients with LPA had a generalised auditory deficit that was influenced by working memory function. In contrast, the patient with GAA showed substantial preservation of auditory function, but a mild deficit of pitch direction processing and a more severe deficit of auditory apperception. The findings provide evidence for separable stages of auditory object analysis and separable profiles of impaired auditory object cognition in different dementia syndromes. PMID:21689671

  10. Frontotemporal dementia: An updated overview.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, E; Rajmohan, V

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome occurring between 45 and 65 years. The syndrome is also called frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, FTLD refers to a larger group of disorders FTD being one of its subgroups. The other subgroups of FTLD are progressive nonfluent aphasia (PFNA), and semantic dementia (SD). FTLD is characterized by atrophy of prefrontal and anterior temporal cortices. FTD occurs in 5-15% of patients with dementia and it is the third most common degenerative dementia. FTD occurs with equal frequency in both sexes. The age of onset is usually between 45 and 65 years though it may range anywhere from 21 to 81 years. The usual course is one of progressive clinicopathological deterioration with mortality within 6-8 years. Unlike Alzheimer's disease (AD), this condition has a strong genetic basis and family history of FTD is seen in 40-50% of cases. FTD is a genetically complex disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance in majority of cases. Genetic linkage studies have revealed FTLD loci on chromosome 3p, 9, 9p, and 17q. The most prevalent genes are PGRN (progranulin) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein tau), both located on chromosome 17q21. More than 15 different pathologies can underlie FTD and related disorders and it has four major types of pathological features: (1) microvacuolation without neuronal inclusions, (2) microvacuolation with ubiquitinated rounded intraneuronal inclusions and dystrophic neurites FTLD-ubiquitinated (FTLD-U), (3) transcortical gliosis with tau-reactive rounded intraneuronal inclusions, (4) microvacuolation and taupositive neurofibrillary tangles. Behavior changes are the most common initial symptom of FTD (62%), whereas speech and language problems are most common in NFPA (100%) and SD (58%). There are no approved drugs for the management of FTD and trials are needed to find effective agents. Non-pharmacological treatment and caregiver

  11. Who knows, who cares? Dementia knowledge among nurses, care workers, and family members of people living with dementia.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew; Eccleston, Claire; Annear, Michael; Elliott, Kate-Ellen; Andrews, Sharon; Stirling, Christine; Ashby, Michael; Donohue, Catherine; Banks, Susan; Toye, Christine; McInerney, Fran

    2014-01-01

    The number of people with dementia is increasing rapidly worldwide. Commensurate with population ageing, the use of nursing homes in Australia (known as residential aged care facilities) for individuals with dementia is growing. As a terminal condition, dementia is best managed by instituting a palliative approach to care. A good knowledge of dementia, including its progression and management, among staff and families of people living with dementia is essential for clear decision making and the provision of appropriate care. Yet there is limited information regarding relative levels of dementia knowledge. This paper reports the results of a study that assessed dementia knowledge among these two cohorts using the Dementia Knowledge Assessment Tool; the study surveyed 279 staff members and 164 family members of residents with dementia. Dementia knowledge deficits were evident in both cohorts across a range of areas. It is critical that dementia knowledge deficits are identified and addressed in order to support evidence-based dementia care. PMID:25265739

  12. Diagnosing young onset dementia can be challenging.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Samrah; Baker, Ian; Butler, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Although the risk of developing dementia increases with age, onset can be as early as the third or fourth decade of life. Genetic influences play a more important role in younger than in older people with dementia, so young onset dementia may cluster in families. Diagnosing young onset dementia is challenging. The range of possible presenting features is broad, encompassing behavioural, cognitive, psychiatric and neurological domains, and symptoms are often subtle initially. Frequently the complaints are misattributed to stress or depression, and the patient is falsely reassured that they are too young to have dementia. The most common causes of young onset dementia are early onset forms of adult neurodegenerative conditions and alcohol. Vascular dementia is the second most common cause of young onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Conventional vascular risk factors may be absent and diagnosis relies on imaging evidence of cerebrovascular disease. Obtaining a detailed history remains the most important part of the workup and usually requires corroboration by a third party. Undertaking a basic neurological examination is also important. Those with suspected young onset dementia should be referred to a neurology-led cognitive disorders clinic where available as the differenti diagnosis is considerably broader tha in older adults and requires specialist investigation. PMID:27382914

  13. Recognition of dementia in hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Katie; Mezey, Mathy

    2008-01-01

    Many hospital patients with dementia have no documented dementia diagnosis. In some cases, this is because they have never been diagnosed. Recognition of Dementia in Hospitalized Older Adults proposes several approaches that hospital nurses can use to increase recognition of dementia. This article describes the Try This approaches, how to implement them, and how to incorporate them into a hospital's current admission procedures. For a free online video demonstrating the use of these approaches, go to http://links.lww.com/A216. PMID:18156858

  14. Coronary artery disease in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Ross; Byrne, Matthew; Sinclair, Hannah; Tang, Eugene; Kunadian, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    Our population is ageing. The prevalence of dementia is increasing as the population ages. Dementia is known to share many common risk factors with coronary artery disease including age, genetics, smoking, the components of the metabolic syndrome and inflammation. Despite the growing ageing population with dementia, there is underutilization of optimal care (pharmacotherapy and interventional procedures) in this cohort. Given common risk factors and potential benefit, patients with cognitive impairment and dementia should be offered contemporary care. However, further research evaluating optimal care in this patient cohort is warranted. PMID:27159265

  15. Antipsychotic use in dementia: a systematic review of benefits and risks from meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Tampi, Rajesh R.; Tampi, Deena J.; Balachandran, Silpa; Srinivasan, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this review is to evaluate the data on the use of antipsychotics in individuals with dementia from meta-analyses. Methods: We performed a literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Cochrane collaboration databases through 30 November, 2015 using the following keywords: ‘antipsychotics’, ‘dementia’ and ‘meta-analysis’. The search was not restricted by the age of the patients or the language of the study. However, in the final analysis we only included studies involving patients that were published in English language journals or had official English translations. In addition, we reviewed the bibliographic databases of published articles for additional studies. Results: This systematic review of the literature identified a total of 16 meta-analyses that evaluated the use of antipsychotics in individuals with dementia. Overall, 12 meta-analyses evaluated the efficacy of antipsychotics among individuals with dementia. Of these, eight also assessed adverse effects. A further two studies evaluated the adverse effects of antipsychotics (i.e. death). A total of two meta-analyses evaluated the discontinuation of antipsychotics in individuals with dementia. Overall, three meta-analyses were conducted in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) whereas one focused on individuals with Lewy Body Dementia (LBD). The rest of the 12 meta-analyses included individuals with dementia. Conclusions: Antipsychotics have demonstrated modest efficacy in treating psychosis, aggression and agitation in individuals with dementia. Their use in individuals with dementia is often limited by their adverse effect profile. The use of antipsychotics should be reserved for severe symptoms that have failed to respond adequately to nonpharmacological management strategies. PMID:27583123

  16. Competency and consent in dementia.

    PubMed

    Fellows, L K

    1998-07-01

    Health care for demented older persons presents a range of ethical dilemmas. The disease process affects cognitive abilities, making competency a central issue. The syndrome of dementia carries a complex social overlay that colors perceptions of these patients and of their capacity for making decisions. An argument is made for a coherent, ethically based decision-making process that can be applied across the whole spectrum of dementia severity. The major ethical principles implicated in assessing a patient's ability to consent to treatment are reviewed. A sliding scale model of capacity is presented, in which the patient's ability to decide is weighed against the risk associated with the treatment decision in question. This model preserves the autonomy of the demented patient while minimizing the potential for harm. In situations where the patient is deemed incapable, two approaches that can be applied to making treatment decisions are contrasted. The 'prior competent choice' standard stresses the values that the patient held while competent. The 'best interests' standard moves the focus to the patient's subjective experience at the time the treatment is considered. The relative merits of these two concepts are evaluated in the context of dementia. Surveys of actual decision-making practice are contrasted with ethical and legal principles. The challenges inherent to applying the best interests standard are discussed. Despite the pitfalls, this standard offers an opportunity to restore the demented patient's sense of self. PMID:9670887

  17. White matter dementia in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M; Thompson, L L; Sze, C I; Simon, J A; Paskavitz, J F; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K

    1999-03-01

    Cerebral white matter disorders may be associated with profound neurobehavioral dysfunction. We report a 62-year-old man who had a slowly progressive 25-year history of personality change, psychosis, mood disorder, and dementia. Neurologic examination disclosed abulia, impaired memory retrieval, and preserved language, with only minimal motor impairment. Neuropsychological testing found a sustained attention deficit, cognitive slowing, impaired learning with intact recognition, and perseveration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed extensive leukoencephalopathy. Right frontal brain biopsy showed ill-defined white matter pallor with hyaline narrowing of white matter arterioles. Granular osmiophilic material adjacent to vascular smooth muscle cells on electron microscopy of a skin biopsy, and an arginine for cysteine replacement at position 169 in the 4 EGF motif of the notch 3 region on chromosome 19q12 established the diagnosis of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). This case illustrates that CADASIL can manifest as an isolated neurobehavioral disorder over an extended time period. The dementia associated with CADASIL closely resembles that which may occur with other white matter disorders, and represents an example of white matter dementia. PMID:10371078

  18. Sharing skills in dementia care with staff overseas.

    PubMed

    Marçal-Grilo, João

    2014-05-01

    More than 35 million people worldwide are living with dementia. In some countries the existence of a health and social welfare state offers a level of support to those affected, but in many others resources are limited and inadequate, with responsibility for care lying primarily with relatives and friends. Significant efforts are being made by low and middle income nations to respond to the health needs of patients and carers, yet insufficient numbers of professionals and lack of specialist training opportunities are barriers that are difficult to overcome. Based on the author's volunteering experience in Sri Lanka, this article explores the role of UK trained nurses in supporting the development of dementia care services in countries where resources are limited. It discusses the contribution that nurses can make to the creation of services and reflects on the benefits that such exchanges can have on nursing practice in the UK. PMID:24787946

  19. The Decline of Intelligence in America: A Strategy for National Renewal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itzkoff, Seymour W.

    It is argued that the United States is declining as a nation, a decline that can be confirmed by any of the criteria that historians have ever used to measure the state and condition of a nation and its people, and it is asserted that this decline is rooted in the overall decline of the intelligence capital of the nation, a decline in the levels…

  20. What is Family-Centered Care for Nursing Home Residents With Advanced Dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ruth Palan; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Givens, Jane L.

    2014-01-01

    To understand family members’ perspectives on person- and family-centered end-of-life care provided to nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia, we conducted a qualitative follow-up interview with 16 respondents who had participated in an earlier prospective study, Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advance Dementia at End of Life (CASCADE). Family members of NH residents (N = 16) with advanced dementia participated in semistructured qualitative interviews that inquired about overall NH experience, communication, surrogate decision making, emotional reaction, and recommendations for improvement. Analysis identified 5 areas considered important by family members: (1) providing basic care; (2) ensuring safety and security; (3) creating a sense of belonging and attachment; (4) fostering self-esteem and self-efficacy; and (5) coming to terms with the experience. These themes can provide a framework for creating and testing strategies to meet the goal of person- and family-centered care. PMID:24085250

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF CLINICAL DEMENTIA RATING SCALE CUTOFF SCORES FOR PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Wyman-Chick, Kathryn A.; Scott, BJ

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore validity of the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale in measuring cognitive impairment among individuals with Parkinson's disease. The scale was created for use in patients with Alzheimer's disease and, to date, there have been no published studies examining if this tool is appropriate for patients with Parkinson's disease. Methods The data were obtained from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database and included 490 subjects diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, further categorized as having Parkinson's disease dementia (n= 151), mild cognitive impairment (n= 186), or normal cognition (n = 153) by a treating physician. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values were calculated for the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale Global Score as well as the Sum of Boxes Score using existing cutoff scores. Finally, new cutoff scores were calculated using sensitivity and specificity values derived using Receiver Operating Characteristic curves. Results Sensitivity and specificity of the published Global Score cutoff scores for patients with dementia were .34 and .10, respectively. The newly calculated cutoff scores for patients with dementia yielded a sensitivity of .79 and a specificity of .96. The area under the curve was 0.92 (95% CI = 0.90-0.95). Conclusion The CDR is a useful tool in identifying dementia in patients with Parkinson's disease when the cutoff scores are adjusted. PMID:26660076

  2. Increased Risk of Dementia in Patients With Acute Organophosphate and Carbamate Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Yang, Chih-Hui; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate (CM) are the most commonly used pesticides against insects. Little is known regarding the relationship between dementia and acute OP and CM poisoning. A nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. The incidence and relative risk of dementia were assessed in patients hospitalized for acute OP and CM poisoning from 2000 to 2011. The comparison cohort was matched with the poisoned cohort at a 4:1 ratio based on age, sex, and the year of hospitalization. During the follow-up period, the incidence of dementia was 29.4 per 10,000 person-years in the poisoned group, and represented a 1.98-fold increased risk of dementia compared with the control cohort (95% confidence interval, 1.59–2.47). This study provides evidence on the association between dementia and acute OP and CM poisoning. Regular follow-up of poisoned patients for dementia is suggested. PMID:26200627

  3. Does food insufficiency in childhood contribute to dementia in later life?

    PubMed Central

    Momtaz, Yadollah Abolfathi; Haron, Sharifah Azizah; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Ibrahim, Rahimah; Masud, Jariah

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite several studies attempting to identify the risk factors for dementia, little is known about the impact of childhood living conditions on cognitive function in later life. The present study aims to examine the unique contribution of food insufficiency in childhood to dementia in old age. Methods Data for this study of 2,745 older Malaysians aged 60 years and older was obtained from a national survey entitled “Mental Health and Quality of Life of Older Malaysians” conducted from 2003 through 2005 using a cross-sectional design. The Geriatric Mental State-Automated Geriatric Examination for Computer Assisted Taxonomy was used to measure dementia. A multiple binary logistic regression using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 21 was conducted to assess the unique effect of food insufficiency in childhood on developing dementia in old age. Results A notably higher prevalence of dementia was found in respondents who indicated they had experienced food insufficiency in childhood than in their food-sufficient counterparts (23.5% versus 14.3%). The findings from multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that food insufficiency in childhood would independently increase the risk of developing dementia in old age by 81%, after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (odds ratio =1.81, 95% confidence interval 1.13–2.92, P<0.01). Conclusion Findings from the present study showing that food insufficiency in early life significantly contributes to dementia in later life highlight the importance of childhood living conditions in maintaining cognitive function in old age. It is, therefore, suggested that older adults with childhood food insufficiency might be targeted for programs designed to prevent dementia. PMID:25565786

  4. Pain Assessment in Elderly with Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Malara, Alba; De Biase, Giuseppe Andrea; Bettarini, Francesco; Ceravolo, Francesco; Di Cello, Serena; Garo, Michele; Praino, Francesco; Settembrini, Vincenzo; Sgrò, Giovanni; Spadea, Fausto; Rispoli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain is under-detected and undertreated in people with dementia. The present study investigates the prevalence of pain in people with dementia hospitalized in nursing homes that are members of National Association of Third Age Residences (ANASTE) Calabria, and evaluates the association among pain, mood, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Objective: The aim of this study is to define the prevalence of pain in people with dementia in long term care facilities using scales of self-reporting and observational tools and, particularly, to study the relationship between pain and BPSD. Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out on 233 patients. Pain assessment was performed using self-reporting tools such as the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for patients with slight cognitive impairment or no cognitive impairment and observational tools such as Pain Assessment In Advanced Dementia Scale (PAINAD) for patients with moderate or severe cognitive impairment. Mood was evaluated through the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) while behavioral problems were assessed through the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Results: Only 42.5% of patients evaluated by NRS provided a reliable answer; of these, 20.4% reported no pain. The percentage of pain evaluated by PAINAD was 51.8% . Analysis of data showed a statistically significant correlation between diagnosis of pain and depressive symptoms, assessed with CSDD (p = 0.0113), as well as by single items of NPI, such as anxiety (p = 0.0362) and irritability (p = 0.0034), and F1 profile (Aggression) of CMAI (p = 0.01). Conclusion: This study confirms that self-report alone is not sufficient to assess pain in elderly people with dementia; the observational tool is a necessary and suitable way of assessing pain in patients with cognitive impairment. If not adequately treated, chronic pain can cause depression

  5. Alternative Strategies to William Bennett's Plan for a National War on Drugs: A Comprehensive Systems Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Andrea, Michael

    As this country's first appointed "drug czar," William Bennett developed a set of proposals for a national campaign against drug abuse. These included: expanding the national prison capacity by 85 percent; providing additional fiscal support for states and local areas that adopt anti-drug laws; and increasing the availablility of programs designed…

  6. A National Strategy for the Education of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, 1996-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs, Carlton South (Australia).

    In preparing this report, the recommendations of the (Australian) National Review of Education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples were cross-referenced to the 21 goals of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Policy (NATSIEP) and aggregated into 8 priorities. These are: 1) to arrange for the participation of…

  7. Writing Organisation. Literacy Progress Unit (for Use with Small Groups). Key Stage 3: National Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    Developed for use in small groups, this unit focuses on developing the writing skills pupils need if they are to progress from Level 3 to Level 4 of England's National Curriculum. It is meant to supplement, but not to replace, the English curriculum for Year 7 pupils. The unit builds on the successful approaches of the National Literacy Strategy…

  8. IN UTERO ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES IN THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY - MEASUREMENT STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Children¿s Study (NCS) is a longitudinal cohort study which is designed to follow a nationally representative sample of American children from prior to conception or early pregnancy until age 21 years. The Children's Health Act of 2000 directs a consortium of United...

  9. Increased Risk of Dementia in Patients with Tension-Type Headache: A Nationwide Retrospective Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Te-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The association between primary headaches, including tension-type headache (TTH) as one of the most common primary headache disorders, and dementia remains controversial. In this nationwide, population-based, retrospective, cohort study, we explored the potential association between TTH and dementia and examined sex, age, and comorbidities as risk factors for dementia. Methods Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) claims data, the sample included 13908 subjects aged ≥20 years with newly-diagnosed TTH in 2000–2006. The non-TTH group included 55632 randomly selected sex- and age-matched TTH-free individuals. All subjects were followed until dementia diagnosis, death, or the end of 2011. Patients with dementia, including vascular and non-vascular (including Alzheimer’s) subtypes, were identified using International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the risk of dementia and dementia-associated risk factors, such as migraine and other medical comorbidities. Results During the average follow-up of 8.14 years, the incidence density rates of dementia were 5.30 and 3.68/1,000 person-years in the TTH and non-TTH groups, respectively. Compared with the non-TTH group, the risks of dementia were 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11–1.42) and 1.13 (95% CI, 1.01–1.27) times higher in the women and >65-year-old TTH group, respectively. TTH patients with comorbidities had a higher risk of dementia. TTH patients had a greater risk of non-vascular dementia (hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.09–1.34) than the non-TTH group. Conclusion TTH patients have a future risk of dementia, indicating a potentially linked disease pathophysiology that warrants further study. The association between TTH and dementia is greater in women, older adults, and with comorbidities. Clinicians should be aware of potential dementia comorbidity in

  10. [Dementia in Belgium: prevalence in aged patients consulting in general practice].

    PubMed

    Kurz, X; Scuvée-Moreau, J; Salmon, E; Pepin, J L; Ventura, M; Dresse, A

    2001-12-01

    Early detection of dementia is an important element for the efficacy of therapies currently proposed to slow down disease progression. This detection mainly relies on general practitioners. In order to estimate the impact of dementia on health services, we have estimated from the data of the NAtional Dementia Economic Study (NADES) the prevalence rate of dementia in patients aged > or = 65 years living at home and consulting in general practice. The study population was based on the sampling of consecutive patients consulting a general practitioner, irrespective of the reason and location of the consultation. The diagnosis of dementia was based on the CAMDEX performed at home in patients presenting > or = 3 warning signs of dementia. The prevalence rate of dementia among 2.234 registered patients living at home was 14.3% (CI95: 12.6-16.0). In age groups 65-74, 75-84 and > or = 85 years, it was 7.0%, 17.5% and 18.5%, respectively, in men, and 6.1%, 15.8% and 25.2%, respectively, in women. The percentage of demented with mild, mild to moderate, moderate and severe dementia was 35.0%, 38.8%, 13.1% and 13.1%, respectively. After adjusting for the age and sex distribution of the Belgian population, the prevalence rate in patients aged > or = 65 years was estimated at 11.3%. A diagnosis of dementia had already been made by a specialist in 41.5% of patients with dementia, with figures of 19.3%, 34.3%, 41.9% and 60.9% according to the severity of disease (mild, mild to moderate, moderate, severe). The onset of first symptoms had preceded the diagnosis by an average of 1 year. Our results show a high prevalence rate of dementia in the elderly living at home consulting in general practice, and less than half of the patients had previously been diagnosed. It is possible that a systematic detection will not be performed as long as specific treatments are not made widely available. PMID:11820036

  11. Influenza Vaccination Reduces Dementia Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Kao, Pai-Feng; Hao, Wen-Rui; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lin, Chao-Feng; Sung, Li-Chin; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Taiwan has the highest prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide. CKD, a manifestation of vascular diseases, is associated with a high risk of dementia. Here, we estimated the association between influenza vaccination and dementia risk in patients with CKD. Data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan were used in this study. The study cohort included all patients diagnosed with CKD (according to International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes) at healthcare facilities in Taiwan (n = 32,844) from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2007. Each patient was followed up to assess dementia risk or protective factors: demographic characteristics of age and sex; comorbidities of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular diseases, parkinsonism, epilepsy, substance and alcohol use disorders, mood disorder, anxiety disorder, psychotic disorder, and sleep disorder; urbanization level; monthly income; and statin, metformin, aspirin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) use. A propensity score was derived using a logistic regression model for estimating the effect of vaccination by accounting for covariates that predict receiving the intervention (vaccine). A time-dependent Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) of dementia among vaccinated and unvaccinated CKD patients. The study population comprised 11,943 eligible patients with CKD; 5745 (48%) received influenza vaccination and the remaining 6198 (52%) did not. The adjusted HRs (aHRs) of dementia decreased in vaccinated patients compared with those in unvaccinated patients (influenza season, noninfluenza season, and all seasons: aHRs = 0.68, 0.58, and 0.64; P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, respectively). In the sensitivity analysis, adjustments were made to estimate the association of age and sex; diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cerebrovascular diseases, anxiety

  12. A pharmacy led program to review anti-psychotic prescribing for people with dementia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-psychotics, prescribed to people with dementia, are associated with approximately 1,800 excess annual deaths in the UK. A key public health objective is to limit such prescribing of anti-psychotics. Methods This project was conducted within primary care in Medway Primary Care Trust (PCT) in the UK. There were 2 stages for the intervention. First, primary care information systems including the dementia register were searched by a pharmacy technician to identify people with dementia prescribed anti-psychotics. Second, a trained specialist pharmacist conducted targeted clinical medication reviews in people with dementia initiated on anti-psychotics by primary care, identified by the data search. Results Data were collected from 59 practices. One hundred and sixty-one (15.3%) of 1051 people on the dementia register were receiving low-dose anti-psychotics. People with dementia living in residential homes were nearly 3.5 times more likely to receive an anti-psychotic [25.5% of care home residents (118/462) vs. 7.3% of people living at home (43/589)] than people living in their own homes (p < 0.0001; Fisher’s exact test). In 26 practices there was no-one on the dementia register receiving low-dose anti-psychotics. Of the 161 people with dementia prescribed low-dose anti-psychotics, 91 were receiving on-going treatment from local secondary care mental health services or Learning Disability Teams. Of the remaining 70 patients the anti-psychotic was either withdrawn, or the dosage was reduced, in 43 instances (61.4%) following the pharmacy-led medication review. Conclusions In total 15.3% of people on the dementia register were receiving a low-dose anti-psychotic. However, such data, including the recent national audit may under-estimate the usage of anti-psychotics in people with dementia. Anti-psychotics were used more commonly within care home settings. The pharmacist-led medication review successfully limited the prescribing of anti-psychotics to

  13. Industrial grand challenges: A competitiveness strategy for the DOE national laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Werne, R.W.

    1993-10-14

    The Cold War has been won; won in part by superior technology; superior technology such as that found in the DOE national laboratories. However, new challenges face the country, for it is clear that our historic notions of national security have changed to include economic security as well as defense. Economic security means that our industries are able to successfully compete in international markets in order to provide a high domestic standard of living. It is also recognized that US industries must achieve and maintain a leadership in technology and that the technology base of the DOE national laboratories must now be mobilized to support US industry. Once again the laboratories are called upon to support the country in a time of need. Because of this need we are seeing a significant change in mission for the Department of Energy national laboratories in their role as problem solvers for the nation. In particular, the Defense Programs (DP) national labs (Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Sandia National Laboratories, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems Y-12) are moving from dosed institutions to open centers with significant resources ready to support US industry more vigorously than ever before. The DP laboratories are enthusiastic about their new mission and are reaching out to industry in an effort to understand industries` needs and find applications for Laboratory skills and technologies.

  14. [The national strategies for suicide prevention by the United Nation/World Health Organization and the present situation of suicide in the East Asia].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshitomo; Takahashi, Sho; Imamura, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Rira

    2014-01-01

    We discussed "Prevention of suicide: Guidelines for the formulation and implementation of national strategies" formulated by the United Nations and the World Health Organization in 1996 and the present situation of suicide in the East Asia. Although much public attention has been paid to a high suicide rate of Japan in the world, the increasing tendency of suicide rates have been found in other East Asian countries as well. For example the Republic of Korea shows a recent suicide rate higher than 30 per 100,000, which surpasses the suicide rate of Japan. Facing the fact, various measures for suicide prevention have been conducted. The UN guidelines for suicide prevention point out that these strategies should be discussed to meet each country's need for more appropriate suicide prevention. The Japanese government had the Basic Law on Suicide Prevention enforced in 2006 to implement measures that society must tackle because various social factors are behind suicides. In recent years, some countries in the East Asia also show increasing suicide rates, which attract the society's serious concern. The rapid economic growth and globalization have led to personnel cut, performance-based compensation, and the widening gap between the rich and the poor and the society cannot maintain the conventional employment system. In addition, socio-economic changes have brought collapse of the original societal and familial system, which might have existed behind the increase of suicide in this region. PMID:25244733

  15. Improved Wavelength Detuning Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Strategy for Polar Direct Drive at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; McKenty, P. W.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) reduces absorbed light and implosion velocity, alters time-resolved scattered-light spectra, and redistributes absorbed and scattered light. These effects reduce target performance in both symmetric direct-drive and polar-direct-drive (PDD) experiments on the OMEGA Laser System and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The CBET package (Adaawam) incorporated into the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO is an integral part of the 3-D ray-trace package (Mazinisin). The CBET exchange occurs primarily over the equatorial region in PDD, where successful mitigation strategies concentrate. Detuning the initial laser wavelength (dλ0) reduces the CBET interaction volume, which can be combined with other mitigation domains (e.g., spatial and temporal). By judiciously selecting the ring and/or port +/-dλ0 in each hemisphere, using new DRACO diagnostic abilities, improved wavelength detuning strategies trade-off overall energy absorption for improved hemispherical energy balance control. These balanced-wavelength detuning strategies improve performance for high-convergence implosions. Simulations (2-D DRACO) predict improved implosion performance and control in both the shell trajectory and morphology for planned intermediate PDD experiments on the NIF. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  16. Cancer linked to Alzheimer disease but not vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C M.; Fitzpatrick, A L.; Xiong, C; Sieh, W; Kuller, L; Miller, J P.; Williams, M M.; Kopan, R; Behrens, M I.; Morris, J C.

    2010-01-01

    disease; CHS = Cardiovascular Health Study; CI = confidence interval; HR = hazard ratio; ICD-9 = International Classification of Diseases–Ninth Revision; MCI = mild cognitive impairment; NINCDS-ADRDA = National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke–Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association; PD = Parkinson disease; VaD = vascular dementia. PMID:20032288

  17. Science, environment and technology summit: A long term national science strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Trivelpiece, A.W.

    1995-06-01

    This document contains the text of the testimony given by Alvin W. Trivelpiece, Director, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, before the Subcommittee on Basic Research, Committee on Science, US House of Representatives in Oak Ridge, TN on June 1, 1995.

  18. Enteral nutrition in dementia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Joanne; Ojo, Omorogieva

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life. PMID:25854831

  19. Stress Process Model for Individuals with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judge, Katherine S.; Menne, Heather L.; Whitlatch, Carol J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with dementia (IWDs) face particular challenges in managing and coping with their illness. The experience of dementia may be affected by the etiology, stage, and severity of symptoms, preexisting and related chronic conditions, and available informal and formal supportive services. Although several studies have examined…

  20. Enteral Nutrition in Dementia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Joanne; Ojo, Omorogieva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life. PMID:25854831