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1

Successful Army National Guard units: A guard perspective  

SciTech Connect

This project sought to identify factors contributing to a healthy Army National Guard (ARNG) unit. Its results were intended to contribute to a computerized forecasting model under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model, the ARNG Regional Recruiting Potential Model (RRPM), forecasts locations of successful new or modified Guard units. The study was expected to enhance the understanding of what constituents a healthy Guard unit. A Delphi approach was used to define criteria for healthy Guard units and to elicit rankings of those criteria. Two sets of telephone interviews were conducted with a sample of 102 individuals-two battalion-level administrative officers, or their equivalents, in each state in Washington, DC. During these telephone calls, the phrase ``unit supportability`` was used to express the notion of a healthy unit. The first set of interviews obtained background information and respondents` ideas of the criteria that lead to unit supportability and to a lack of supportability. The data were analyzed to develop a list of ten criteria for unit supportability. In the second interview, the same respondents were asked to rank those criteria in order of importance.

Wolfe, A.K.; Saulsbury, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexanayder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1991-10-01

2

Successful Army National Guard units: A guard perspective  

SciTech Connect

This project sought to identify factors contributing to a healthy Army National Guard (ARNG) unit. Its results were intended to contribute to a computerized forecasting model under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model, the ARNG Regional Recruiting Potential Model (RRPM), forecasts locations of successful new or modified Guard units. The study was expected to enhance the understanding of what constituents a healthy Guard unit. A Delphi approach was used to define criteria for healthy Guard units and to elicit rankings of those criteria. Two sets of telephone interviews were conducted with a sample of 102 individuals-two battalion-level administrative officers, or their equivalents, in each state in Washington, DC. During these telephone calls, the phrase unit supportability'' was used to express the notion of a healthy unit. The first set of interviews obtained background information and respondents' ideas of the criteria that lead to unit supportability and to a lack of supportability. The data were analyzed to develop a list of ten criteria for unit supportability. In the second interview, the same respondents were asked to rank those criteria in order of importance.

Wolfe, A.K.; Saulsbury, J.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Schexanayder, S.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

1991-10-01

3

Exercise and Nutrition Survey of Nevada Air National Guard Members.  

E-print Network

??One hundred seventy-three Nevada Air National Guard members voluntarily participated in this exercise science and nutrition survey-based study. The survey consisted of ten closed-ended questions;… (more)

Demattei, Matthew Antonio

2012-01-01

4

Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Facility, Installation 25255, Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Rehoboth National Guard Facility (RNGF) in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Prelim...

R. Haffenden, S. Flaim, M. Krokosz

1993-01-01

5

75 FR 78978 - Record of Decision for the 158th Fighter Wing's Proposed Realignment of National Guard Avenue and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Realignment of National Guard Avenue and New Main Gate Construction, Vermont Air National Guard...Realignment of National Guard Avenue and New Main Gate Construction, Vermont Air National Guard...Realignment of National Guard Avenue and New Main Gate Construction, inputs from the public...

2010-12-17

6

Suicide in the Army National Guard: An Empirical Inquiry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather,…

Griffith, James

2012-01-01

7

National Hospital Discharge Survey  

Cancer.gov

The National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS), which has been conducted annually since 1965, collects data from a sample of approximately 270,000 inpatient records acquired from a national sample of about 500 hospitals. Only hospitals with an average length of stay of fewer than 30 days for all patients, general hospitals, or children's general hospitals are included in the survey. Information collected includes diagnoses, surgical and nonsurgical procedures, prescription and over-the-counter drugs, immunizations, allergy shots, anesthetics, and dietary supplements.

8

PRIORITY PREREGISTRATION FOR ACTIVE DUTY, VETERANS, RESERVISTS AND VIRGINIA NATIONAL GUARD SERVICE MEMBERS  

E-print Network

29a PRIORITY PREREGISTRATION FOR ACTIVE DUTY, VETERANS, RESERVISTS AND VIRGINIA NATIONAL GUARD, veterans, reservists and Virginia National Guard members. Old Dominion University wishes to facilitate, students will be granted a priority registration time slot. Veterans receiving federal VA educational

9

The Mobilization and Return of Undergraduate Students Serving in the National Guard and Reserves  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some reserve and National Guard personnel are enrolled in college. Much like those who choose not to attend college, reservists and Guard members who are students are challenged by issues of separation from family and employment. However, members of the reserves and National Guard who are college students must also separate from their educational…

Bauman, Mark

2009-01-01

10

78 FR 59153 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 Proclamation 9023--National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2013 Memorandum of September 20, 2013...Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 By the President of the United...

2013-09-25

11

75 FR 58277 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010 Proclamation 8565--National Farm Safety and Health Week, 2010 Proclamation 8566--National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2010 Presidential Documents Federal...

2010-09-23

12

Predictors of Postdeployment Alcohol Use Disorders in National Guard Soldiers Deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alcohol use in the military is a significant problem. The goal of this study was to examine the associations between personality, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and postdeployment alcohol use disorders (AUDs) among a group of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) deployed National Guard soldiers, with a focus on differentiating predeployment and postdeployment onset AUDs. Participants were 348 National Guard soldiers

Shannon M. Kehle; Amanda G. Ferrier-Auerbach; Laura A. Meis; Paul A. Arbisi; Christopher R. Erbes; Melissa A. Polusny

2012-01-01

13

The "Suicide Guard Rail": a minimal structural intervention in hospitals reduces suicide jumps  

PubMed Central

Background Jumping from heights is a readily available and lethal method of suicide. This study examined the effectiveness of a minimal structural intervention in preventing suicide jumps at a Swiss general teaching hospital. Following a series of suicide jumps out of the hospital’s windows, a metal guard rail was installed at each window of the high-rise building. Results In the 114?months prior to the installation of the metal guard rail, 10 suicides by jumping out of the hospital’s windows occurred among 119,269 inpatients. This figure was significantly reduced to 2 fatal incidents among 104,435 inpatients treated during the 78?months immediately following the installation of the rails at the hospital’s windows (?2?=?4.34, df?=?1, p?=?.037). Conclusions Even a minimal structural intervention might prevent suicide jumps in a general hospital. Further work is needed to examine the effectiveness of minimal structural interventions in preventing suicide jumps. PMID:22862804

2012-01-01

14

Evaluating National Hospital Policy  

PubMed Central

Using a systems approach, this study develops an explanatory model on the basis of which federal political action on specific issues concerning the nation's hospitals is related to political ideals underlying U.S. health policy. The degree to which these ideals are realized is then determined by examination of the empirical relation of policy and other social and economic factors to the outcomes of selected issues. PMID:5025954

Jaeger, B. J.

1972-01-01

15

Learning Without Boundaries: A NASA - National Guard Bureau Distance Learning Partnership  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With a variety of high-quality live interactive educational programs originating at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas and other space and research centers, the US space agency NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) has a proud track record of connecting with students throughout the world and stimulating their creativity and collaborative skills by teaching them underlying scientific and technological underpinnings of space exploration. However, NASA desires to expand its outreach capability for this type of interactive instruction. In early 2002, NASA and the National Guard Bureau -- using the Guard's nationwide system of state-ofthe-art classrooms and high bandwidth network -- began a collaboration to extend the reach of NASA content and educational programs to more of America's young people. Already, hundreds of elementary, middle, and high school students have visited Guard e-Learning facilities and participated in interactive NASA learning events. Topics have included experimental flight, satellite imagery-interpretation, and Mars exploration. Through this partnership, NASA and the National Guard are enabling local school systems throughout the United States (and, increasingly, the world) to use the excitement of space flight to encourage their students to become passionate about the possibility of one day serving as scientists, mathematicians, technologists, and engineers. At the 54th International Astronautical Conference MAJ Stephan Picard, the guiding visionary behind the Guard's partnership with NASA, and Chris Chilelli, an educator and senior instructional designer at NASA, will share with attendees background on NASA's educational products and the National Guard's distributed learning network; will discuss the unique opportunity this partnership already has provided students and teachers throughout the United States; will offer insights into the formation by government entities of e-Learning partnerships with one another; and will suggest a possible future for the NASA - National Guard Bureau partnership, one potentially to include live multi-party interaction of hundreds of students in several countries with astronauts, scientists, engineers and designers. To inspire the next generation of explorers as only NASA can!

Anderson, Susan H.; Chilelli, Christopher J.; Picard, Stephan

2003-01-01

16

Mortality of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sources and rates of mortality of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. National Guard-authorized activities, including military training, caused the death of three of the 94 (3%) kit foxes radiocollared, and do not appear to jeopardize the continued existence of

W. G. Standley; W. H. Berry; T. P. OFarrell; T. T. Kato

1992-01-01

17

Staying on Course: Three-Year Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

High school dropouts face an uphill battle in a labor market that increasingly rewards skills and postsecondary credentials: they are more likely than their peers to need public assistance, be arrested or incarcerated, and less likely to marry. This report presents results from a rigorous evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program,…

Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Muller-Ravett, Sara; Broadus, Joseph

2011-01-01

18

ABR, Inc KPMG LLP Alaska Air National Guard Mikunda, Cottrell & Co  

E-print Network

ABR, Inc KPMG LLP Alaska Air National Guard Mikunda, Cottrell & Co Alaska Airlines NANA Management Services Alaska Anvil Incorp. NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Alaska Center for Energy and Power New Northwest Broadcasters Alaska Earth Sciences, Inc Northern Alaska Tour Company Alaska Interstate

Wagner, Diane

19

The US Army and National Guard Vibration Management Enhancement Program (VMEP): Data Analysis and Statistical Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Army and South Carolina National Guard have developed automated vibration monitoring and fault diagnostic tools as part of the Vibration Management Enhancement Program (VMEP). VMEP is intended to improve the operations and support activities by keeping the maintainers aware of the health of the critical dynamic components of their aircraft. This paper outlines the program results to date.

Paul Grabill; Tom Brotherton; John Berry

20

Fielded ATM network for the Air National Guard Global Yankee Fort Drum exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper will review the deployment, demonstration, and test of an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) network to support the Air National Guard `Global Yankee' field exercise held at Fort Drum, New York. The network provided forty five (45) megabit per second (mbps) ATM connections between the Air Operations Center (AOC) and Forward Operating Location (FOL) located at Fort Drum, the

Robert L. Kaminski; Daniel Hague; Chester Maciag

1996-01-01

21

Dental Health in the Army Reserves and National Guard--A Mobilization Problem.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During mobilization for the Persian Gulf War, the dental health of Army Reserve and National Guard soldiers became a subject of widespread interest. Indeed, at one time or another, this issue commanded the attention of the Chief of Staff of the Army, the ...

G. W. Allen

1992-01-01

22

Making the Transition: Interim Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young people who drop out of high school face long odds of success in a labor market that increasingly values education and skills. This report presents interim results from a rigorous, ongoing evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, which aims to "reclaim the lives of at-risk youth" who have dropped out of high school. ChalleNGe…

Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Dillon, Colleen

2010-01-01

23

Making the Transition: Interim Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation. [Executive Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young people who drop out of high school face long odds of success in a labor market that increasingly values education and skills. This report presents interim results from a rigorous, ongoing evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, which aims to "reclaim the lives of at-risk youth" who have dropped out of high school. ChalleNGe…

Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Dillon, Colleen

2010-01-01

24

ICEPOD - Developing Ice Imaging Capabilities for the New York Air National Guard's LC130 Aircraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ICEPOD program is a 5-year development effort to develop a polar instrumentation suite for the New York Air National Guard's (NYANG) LC-130's supported by the NSF American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) Major Research Instrumentation program. The fundamental goal of the ICEPOD program is to develop an instrumentation package that can capture the dynamics of the changing polar regions,

J. Detemple; N. Frearson; C. J. Zappa; M. Turrin; R. E. Bell

2010-01-01

25

Representational Rights of Security Guards Under the National Labor Relations Act: The Need for a Balancing of Interests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The private security industry is experiencing great prosperity. Despite the job opportunities in the industry, however, there are various problems endemic to employment as a security guard. Wages are usually low and risks can be high. While union membership has increased among security guards, collective bargaining has been unsuccessful in alleviating the occupation's problems. Section 9(b)(3) of the National Labor

Vivian A. Rattay

1984-01-01

26

Mixed Methods in a Post-Deployment Study of U.S. Army National Guard Soldiers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mixed methods research combines quantitative and qualitative methodologies to achieve a product that is more than the sum of its parts. Here, the authors combine two different data reduction techniques—factor and content analyses of quantitative and qualitative data, respectively—to tap the dimensions of deployment-related variables among U.S. Army National Guard (ARNG) soldiers: stressors and supports, resilience, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms,

Wilbur J. Scott; David R. McCone; Lisa Sayegh; Joe Don Looney; Robert J. Jackson

2011-01-01

27

Assessment of a postdeployment yellow ribbon reintegration program for national guard members and supporters.  

PubMed

The Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program (YRRP) was created to meet the needs of National Guard members and their families throughout the deployment cycle. This study examined the perceived utility of the YRRP's delivery of information and assistance during the postdeployment reintegration period by National Guard members and accompanying supporters who were mostly spouses. Over 22 months, from 10 YRRP events, 683 service members and 411 supporters completed questionnaires immediately after the YRRP. We analyzed questions on information and avenues for help, timeliness and concerns related to education, employment, legal, family, and health. Service members and supporters most often endorsed information delivery on education being met (76.8% and 78.2%, respectively) and were least likely to endorse legal information delivery (63.5% and 60%, respectively). Significantly more supporters than service members (p < 0.0001) reported that the YRRP was the first time they learned of available services across all domains. Service members were significantly more likely than supporters to report concerns about education, employment, and health, while supporters were significantly more likely to report concerns about family. Results suggest the YRRP fills gaps in supporter knowledge and provides needed information and resources to most National Guard families 2 to 4 months after a deployment. PMID:25373071

Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Widner, Greg; Shroff, Manan; Matthieu, Monica; Balan, Sundari; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; Price, Rumi K

2014-11-01

28

Spouse Support, Career Continuance, and Family Life in the Reserve Components: A Study of Members and Spouses of the Virginia National Guard.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Survey responses of 2,427 married members of the Virginia Army National Guard and 1,540 members' spouses suggest that spouses are strongly committed to career continuance with the Guard and have greater preference for continuance than do Guard members themselves. Implications for family policies in the military reserves are discussed. (SLD)

Green, Robert G.; Harris, Robert N., Jr.

1992-01-01

29

Access to mental health services for active duty and National Guard TRICARE enrollees in Indiana.  

PubMed

Mental health problems are a well-known consequence of combat exposure, and the problem of barriers to receiving mental health care for veterans is well known. The current heavy reliance on reserve component soldiers may aggravate this problem. This study tries to characterize problems with access to mental health care for activated members of the National Guard reserve component, active duty service members, and their families in the state of Indiana. Data from a telephone survey of Indiana mental health providers listed in the TRICARE provider revealed that only 25% were accepting new TRICARE patients, although regression analyses revealed that acceptance of patients was positively related to market population and negatively related to the number of deployed soldiers in the market. The primary barrier to obtain care appears to be the accuracy of the TRICARE provider list. PMID:21456350

Avery, George H; Wadsworth, Shelley M MacDermid

2011-03-01

30

Stationwide environmental baseline survey and related environmental factors, Ontario Air National Guard Station, California  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Baseline Survey (EBS) has been prepared to document the environmental condition of real property at Ontario Air National Guard Station (ANGS), California, resulting from the storage, release, and disposal of hazardous substances and petroleum products and their derivatives over the installations history. This EBS is also used by the Air Force to meet its obligations under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 United States Code Section 9620(h), as amended by the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) (Public Law 102-426). Table ES-1 list all uncontaminated property based on information obtained through a records search, interviews, and visual site inspections at Ontario ANGS. Figure ES-1 depicts their respective locations.

NONE

1996-11-26

31

20 CFR 1002.57 - Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?”  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...subject to call-up by the State Governor for duty not subject to Federal control, such as emergency duty in cases of floods or riots. National Guard members may perform service under either Federal or State authority, but only Federal National Guard...

2011-04-01

32

20 CFR 1002.57 - Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?”  

...subject to call-up by the State Governor for duty not subject to Federal control, such as emergency duty in cases of floods or riots. National Guard members may perform service under either Federal or State authority, but only Federal National Guard...

2014-04-01

33

20 CFR 1002.57 - Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?”  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...subject to call-up by the State Governor for duty not subject to Federal control, such as emergency duty in cases of floods or riots. National Guard members may perform service under either Federal or State authority, but only Federal National Guard...

2010-04-01

34

20 CFR 1002.57 - Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?”  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...subject to call-up by the State Governor for duty not subject to Federal control, such as emergency duty in cases of floods or riots. National Guard members may perform service under either Federal or State authority, but only Federal National Guard...

2013-04-01

35

20 CFR 1002.57 - Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?”  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...subject to call-up by the State Governor for duty not subject to Federal control, such as emergency duty in cases of floods or riots. National Guard members may perform service under either Federal or State authority, but only Federal National Guard...

2012-04-01

36

Risk Factors for Hospitalization in a National Sample of Medicare Home Health Care Patients  

PubMed Central

Acute care hospitalization during or immediately following a Medicare home health care (HHC) episode is a major adverse outcome, but little has been published about HHC patient-level risk factors for hospitalization. We determined risk factors at HHC admission associated with subsequent acute care hospitalization in a nationally representative Medicare patient sample (n=374,123). Hospitalization was measured using Medicare claims data; risk factors were measured using Outcome Assessment and Information Set data. Seventeen percent of sample members were hospitalized. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that the most influential risk factors (all p<.001) were: skin wound as primary HHC diagnosis; clinician-judged guarded rehabilitation prognosis; congestive heart failure as primary HHC diagnosis; presence of depressive symptoms; dyspnea severity; and Black, compared to White. HHC initiatives that minimize chronic condition exacerbations, and that actively treat depressive symptoms, might help reduce Medicare patient hospitalizations. Unmeasured reasons for higher hospitalization rates among Black HHC patients deserve further investigation. PMID:24781967

Fortinsky, Richard H.; Madigan, Elizabeth A.; Sheehan, T. Joseph; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Kleppinger, Alison

2012-01-01

37

Staying on Course: Three-Year Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation. Executive Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

High school dropouts face an uphill battle in a labor market that increasingly rewards skills and postsecondary credentials: they are more likely than their peers to need public assistance, be arrested or incarcerated, and less likely to marry. This executive summary summarizes results from a rigorous evaluation of the National Guard Youth…

Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Muller-Ravett, Sara; Broadus, Joseph

2011-01-01

38

Lifelong Education Needs for Providing Pastoral Care for Post-Traumatic Stress in South Dakota National Guard Soldiers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Throughout many communities in South Dakota the members of the South Dakota National Guard have been activated to serve in many different parts of the world since 2001. Approximately 20% of these individuals returned to their homes with some degree of PTSD (Hoge, et al., 2004). Pastoral Care has changed since September 11, 2001. The purpose of…

Meirose, William J.

2010-01-01

39

Reengaging High School Dropouts: Early Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program Evaluation. Full Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

High school dropouts face daunting odds of success in a labor market that increasingly rewards education and skills. This report presents very early results from a rigorous, independent evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, an intensive residential program that aims to "reclaim the lives" of young people ages 16 to 18 who have…

Bloom, Dan; Gardenhire-Crooks, Alissa; Mandsager, Conrad

2009-01-01

40

Blood characteristics of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hematology, serum chemistry, and prevalence of antibodies against selected, pathogens in a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, in 1989 and 1990. Samples from 18 (10 female, 8 male) adult kit foxes were used to establish normal hematology and serum chemistry values for this population. Average values

W. G. Standley; P. M. McCue

1992-01-01

41

Population trends of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Population trends of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1989 through August 1991. Six semiannual livetrapping sessions and eight scent-station survey sessions were conducted. Livetrapping results and radiotelemetry data were used to calculate minimum population size, density, and distribution. A total of 175 individual

W. H. Berry; W. G. Standley

1992-01-01

42

Reproduction of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reproduction of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) was investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 38 vixens radiocollared prior to parturition, 12 (32%) were successful in raising pups from conception to the point where pups were observed above ground. No yearling vixens were known tb

K. A. Spencer; W. H. Berry; W. G. Standley; T. P. OFarrell

1992-01-01

43

Children of National Guard troops: a pilot study of deployment, patriotism, and media coverage.  

PubMed

This exploratory pilot study examined the psychosocial effects of the war in Iraq, patriotism, and attention to war-related media coverage in the children of National Guard troops across phases of parental deployment--pre deployment, during deployment, and post deployment. Participants included 11 children, ages 8 to 18 years. Data collected in each deployment phase included demographics, the Behavior Assessment System for Children, (Second Edition, BASC-2), patriotism (national identity, uncritical patriotism, and constructive patriotism), and attention to war-related media coverage. School problems and emotional symptoms were significantly higher during deployment than post deployment. National identity and constructive patriotism increased and uncritical patriotism decreased post deployment from levels during deployment. Uncritical patriotism correlated positively with emotional symptoms and correlated negatively with personal adjustment. Constructive patriotism correlated positively with emotional symptoms and with internalizing problems. Greater attention to war-related media coverage correlated with uncritical patriotism, and attention to internet coverage correlated with constructive patriotism. Attention to media coverage was linked to greater emotional and behavioral problems and was negatively correlated with personal adjustment. The results of this pilot study identified relationships of both patriotism and attention to media coverage with children's emotional and behavioral status and personal adjustment suggesting areas for future investigation. PMID:24558700

Pfefferbaum, Betty; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Jacobs, Anne K; Houston, J Brian

2013-01-01

44

Preliminary assessment report for Redmond Army National Guard Facility, Installation 53120, Redmond, Washington. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Washington Army National Guard (WAARNG) property in Redmond, Washington. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Redmond ARNG property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) supply/storage of hazardous materials, (2) weapons cleaning, (3) the underground storage tanks (USTs), and (4) the use of herbicides. These ESOs are no longer active because of the closure of OMS 10 activities in 1988.

Ketels, P.; Aggarwal, P.

1993-08-01

45

Mental health diagnosis and occupational functioning in National Guard/Reserve veterans returning from Iraq.  

PubMed

Occupational functioning represents both an important outcome for military service members returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom and a predictor for long-term mental health functioning. We investigated the role of mental health diagnoses, determined by structured clinical interviews, on occupational functioning in a group of 262 National Guard/Reserve service members within 1 year of returning from a 16-month OIF combat deployment. We assessed occupational functioning at the time of diagnostic interviews and 1 year later. We hypothesized that service members with diagnoses of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and/or alcohol abuse or dependence would exhibit lower rates of employment at both time points and lower rates of reported work and/or school role functioning. Service members with a diagnosis of PTSD (5%, n = 13), subthreshold PTSD (6%, n = 15), a major depressive disorder (11%, n = 29), or alcohol abuse or dependence (11%, n = 28) did not differ on employment status from service members without a diagnosis at either time point. However, those with a diagnosis of PTSD, depression, and/or alcohol abuse or dependence reported lower levels of work role functioning. In addition, service members with a diagnosis of PTSD reported greater rates of deterioration in work role functioning over time. PMID:22234661

Erbes, Christopher R; Kaler, Matthew E; Schult, Tamara; Polusny, Melissa A; Arbisi, Paul A

2011-01-01

46

ICEPOD - Developing Ice Imaging Capabilities for the New York Air National Guard's LC-130 Aircraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ICEPOD program is a 5-year development effort to develop a polar instrumentation suite for the New York Air National Guard’s (NYANG) LC-130’s supported by the NSF American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) Major Research Instrumentation program. The fundamental goal of the ICEPOD program is to develop an instrumentation package that can capture the dynamics of the changing polar regions, focusing on ice and ocean targets. The vision is for this instrumentation to be operated both on routine flights of the NYANG in the polar regions, such as missions between McMurdo and South Pole Station and on targeted science missions, such as mapping the sea ice and outlet glaciers surrounding Ross Island or the draining systems from large subglacial lakes in East Antarctica. We are in the process of finalizing the science requirements for the system. To provide support to the ICEPOD development, we are defining the goals for imaging the surface of the ice sheet with a scanning laser system and stereo-photogrammetry, the temperature of the ice surface using an IR camera and the internal structure of the ice sheet using a depth-sounding radar and an accumulation radar. The instrumentation will be positioned using an IMU and differential GPS. We also are working toward two operational modes - low-altitude flight operations to optimize the surface imaging systems, specifically the scanning laser, and a high-altitude flight operation to facilitate wide use of the instrumentation suite during a routine NYANG support mission flight envelope. The ICEPOD program is seeking input on the science goals of the instrumentation suite to ensure the system meets the community’s need for observations. The ultimate goal of the ICEPOD program is to provide the community with a facility for dedicated and routine measurements over the polar regions using the suite of instruments. The final ICEPOD system will also be capable of supporting instrumentation developed by other groups. The backbone ICEPOD system will provide power, positioning and data acquisition. The IcePod program provides an excellent opportunity to promote STEM education initiatives. An education team is being assembled to develop activities focused on polar concepts, ice data, technology and science careers exploration. Partnerships for educational outreach are available.

Detemple, J.; Frearson, N.; Zappa, C. J.; Turrin, M.; Bell, R. E.

2010-12-01

47

Installation Restoration Program. Remedial Investigation Report. Minnesota Air National Guard Base, Duluth International Airport, Duluth, Minnesota. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the remedial actions performed on sites confirmed to contain hazardous waste contamination which endangers the human health. The actions performed are described and the potential for future problems. The study was conducted under the Air National Guard's Installation Restoration Program. Partial contents of Volume I include: description of Installation Restoration Program; physiography, climate and drainage; demography and land use; geology and topography; hydrology; water quality; history; drainage; ground water; sampling; surface water; soils; chemical contamination; migration; and sedimentation.

Not Available

1990-01-01

48

Fleas of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 3,241 fleas, representing seven species, were identified from 398 samples collected from San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis), California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi), and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 3,109 fleas collected from kit foxes 95.7% were Echidnophaga gallinacea, 4.0% Pulex

K. A. Spencer; H. J. Egoscue

1992-01-01

49

Fielded ATM network for the Air National Guard Global Yankee Fort Drum exercise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper will review the deployment, demonstration, and test of an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) network to support the Air National Guard `Global Yankee' field exercise held at Fort Drum, New York. The network provided forty five (45) megabit per second (mbps) ATM connections between the Air Operations Center (AOC) and Forward Operating Location (FOL) located at Fort Drum, the State University of New York (SUNY) Health Science Center located in Syracuse, New York and Rome Laboratory located in Rome, New York. Connections were made with both fiber and free space equipment. The fiber connections used were part of the existing ATM New York Network (NYNet) between Rome Lab, SUNY Health Science Center and NYNEX Corporation. This network was extended to Watertown, New York by NYNEX to provide connectivity to Fort Drum. The free space links were provided by commercial DS-3 (45 mbps) radios, and 2 to 6 mbps Troposcatter Satellite Support Radios (TSSRs). This paper will also discuss significant digital Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence enhancements to the battlefield provided by the deployed ATM network. For example, videoconferencing and shared workspace capability was demonstrated over the AOC-to-FOL TSSR link, enabling remote intelligence briefings, pilot Battle Damage Assessment, and Search and Rescue coordination. Remote Medical Diagnostics videoconferencing with MRI high resolution digital imagery was demonstrated between the FOL, AOC, and SUNY Health Science Center. Finally, the network provided connectivity between the AOC and the Joint Surveillance System (JSS) radar's located at Griffiss Air Force BAse. The JSS data combined with the Rome Lab developed Radar Analysis Program provided AOC personnel with air picture areas of interest.

Kaminski, Robert L.; Hague, Daniel; Maciag, Chester

1996-06-01

50

Bumper guard  

SciTech Connect

A bumper guard is described for protecting a selected portion of an automobile body comprising guard means for covering the selected portion of the automobile body and shaped complementary to the automobile body. A bracket means is attached to the automobile frame for holding the guard means in position on the selected portion of the automobile body. The guard means comprises a V-shaped angle iron adapted to fit over the selected portion of the automobile body. The guard means further comprises a padding secured to the angle iron for interposition between the angle iron and automobile body to thereby protectively separate the angle iron from the automobile body.

Heyman, N.R.

1987-02-10

51

32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.  

...OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL...Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon presentation of a letter...care as set forth in AR 40-3 (Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Care) and...

2014-07-01

52

Components of secondary traumatic stress in female partners of National Guard and Reservist veterans displaying symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study offers an extensive view of how male National Guardsmen and Reservists' Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms affect their female partners. This study is one of the few that investigates the experience of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) in female partners of National Guard and Reservist veterans. The study included female partners of United States Army National Guardsmen and

Chasity L Kern

2011-01-01

53

Mortality of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Sources and rates of mortality of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. National Guard-authorized activities, including military training, caused the death of three of the 94 (3%) kit foxes radiocollared, and do not appear to jeopardize the continued existence of the population. Predation by larger carnivores, primarily coyotes (Canis latrans), caused the death of 75% of the 32 radiocollared kit foxes recovered dead for which a cause of death could be determined; vehicle impacts, disease (rabies), poisoning, and shooting were each responsible for the deaths of 6.3%. Adult annual mortality rate was 0.47 and the juvenile mortality rate was 0.80, and both rates are similar to rates reported for kit foxes in other locations. There was no significant difference between male and female mortality rates in either age class. The proportions of dead kit foxes recovered in different habitat types were similar to the availability of the habitat types within the distribution of kit fox on the installation.

Standley, W.G.; Berry, W.H.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

1992-09-01

54

Peers and peer-based interventions in supporting reintegration and mental health among National Guard soldiers: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

National Guard soldiers experience high levels of mental health symptoms following deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, yet many do not seek treatment. We interviewed 30 National Guard soldiers with prior deployments to Iraq or Afghanistan to assess mental health treatment barriers and the role of peers in treatment engagement. Interview transcripts were analyzed by a multidisciplinary research team using techniques drawn from grounded theory. The following themes were identified: (1) personal acceptance of having a mental health problem rather than treatment access is the major barrier to treatment entry; (2) tightly connected, supportive peer networks can decrease stigma related to mental health problems and encourage treatment; however, soldiers in impoverished or conflicted peer networks are less likely to receive these benefits; and (3) soldiers are generally positive about the idea of peer-based programs to improve treatment engagement, although they note the importance of leadership support, peer assignment, and unit specialty in implementing these programs. We conclude that some, but not all, naturally occurring peer networks serve to overcome stigma and encourage mental health treatment seeking by soldiers. Formal peer-based programs may assist soldiers not sufficiently benefitting from natural peer networks, although there are barriers to implementation. PMID:23397691

Pfeiffer, Paul N; Blow, Adrian J; Miller, Erin; Forman, Jane; Dalack, Gregory W; Valenstein, Marcia

2012-12-01

55

Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-09-01

56

Preliminary assessment report for Fort William Henry Harrison, Montana Army National Guard, Helena, Montana. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at a Montana Army National Guard (MTARNG) property near Helena, Montana. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort William Henry Harrison property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

DuWaldt, J.; Meyer, T.

1993-07-01

57

Increased risk of alcohol dependency in a cohort of National Guard troops with PTSD: a longitudinal study.  

PubMed

Studies show high rates of co-morbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) but there is no consensus on the causal direction of the relationship. Some theories suggest AUD develops as a coping mechanism to manage PTSD symptoms and others that AUD is a vulnerability factor for PTSD. A third hypothesis posits independent developmental pathways stemming from a shared etiology, such as the trauma exposure itself. We examined these hypotheses using longitudinal data on 922 National Guard soldiers, representing a subsample (56%) of a larger pre- and post-deployment cross-sectional study of New Jersey National Guard soldiers deployed to Iraq. Measures included the PTSD Checklist (PCL), DSM-IV-based measures of alcohol use/misuse from the National Household Survey of Drug Use and Health and other concurrent mental health, military and demographic measures. Results showed no effect of pre-deployment alcohol status on subsequent positive screens for new onset PTSD. However, in multivariate models, baseline PTSD symptoms significantly increased the risk of screening positive for new onset alcohol dependence (AD), which rose 5% with each unit increase in PCL score (AOR = 1.05; 95% CI = 1.02-1.07). Results also supported the shared etiology hypothesis, with the risk of a positive screen for AD increasing by 9% for every unit increase in combat exposure after controlling for baseline PTSD status (AOR = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.03-1.15) and, in a subsample with PCL scores <34, by 17% for each unit increase in exposure (AOR = 1.17; 95% CI = 1.05-1.31). These findings have implications for prevention, treatment and compensation policies governing co-morbidity in military veterans. PMID:24332924

Kline, Anna; Weiner, Marc D; Ciccone, Donald S; Interian, Alejandro; St Hill, Lauren; Losonczy, Miklos

2014-03-01

58

Population trends of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Population trends of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1989 through August 1991. Six semiannual livetrapping sessions and eight scent-station survey sessions were conducted. Livetrapping results and radiotelemetry data were used to calculate minimum population size, density, and distribution. A total of 175 individual foxes were trapped 463 times. The number of individuals trapped and minimum population size calculations showed a decline over time. The highest minimum population (109) was observed in winter 1988. Summer 1991 had the lowest minimum population size (45). No evidence was found to indicate that the apparent population decline was a result of military-authorized activities.

Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.

1992-10-01

59

Wastewater characterization survey, Charlotte Air National Guard Base, North Carolina. Final report, 1-9 March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Personnel from the Armstrong Laboratory Water Quality Branch conducted a wastewater characterization survey for the 145th TAC Clinic, Charlotte Air National Guard Base, North Carolina, from 1-9 March 1994. The scope of the survey was to sample waste water throughout the base to determine if significant pollutant concentrations exist in the wastwater discharge, and how much is coming onto the base from the commercial operations located adjacent to the base. The base currently has very stringent permit levels and the three effluent sampling locations indicated that the sanitary discharge does exceed these levels. The parameters that exceed these limits are: metals, BOD, and Total Suspended Solids. These constituents are at levels typical of sanitary sewage, and the permit levels should be renegotiated. The base also ask that we evaluate the Geographically Separated Unit (GSU) located at Badin NC. The sanitary did not appear unusual for the operations conducted there, however the potable water did contain some chlorinated solvents. (AN).

Williston, C.A.; Hemenway, D.A.

1995-06-01

60

Site Investigation Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site Number 4 and Number 5. Volume 1. 216th Engineering Installation Squardron and 234th Combat Communications Squadron California Air National Guard Station Hayward, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Site-Investigation Report for IRP Site No. 4 and 5, California Air National Guard, 216th EIS 234th CCS, Hayward Air National Guard Station, Hayward, CA - Volume I. This is the first volume of a two volume site investigation report. The sites were investig...

1996-01-01

61

Site Investigation Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site Number 4 and Number 5. Volume 2. Appendices A-H. 216th Engineering Installation Squardron and 234th Combat Communications Squadron California Air National Guard Station Hayward, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Site Investigation Report for IRP Site No. 4 and 5 California Air National Guard, 216th EIS 234th CCS, Hayward Air National Guard Station, Hayward, CA - Volume II. This is the second volume of a two volume site investigation report. The sites were investi...

1996-01-01

62

Prey abundance and food habits of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prey abundance and food habits of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. The sampling methods initially used to assess abundance of prey species resulted in indices too low to be of value. Because of this, the relationship between relative abundance and

C. G. Logan; W. H. Berry; W. G. Standley; T. T. Kato

1992-01-01

63

Critical Needs and Level of Support for the Military Spouse: A Comparative Study of the National Guard and Active Army during the Iraq War  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

National Guard units have been asked to serve in ways never before experienced since the beginning of the Iraq War and throughout the continued war on terror. Multiple deployments, frequent long-term separations from families, communities, and jobs may have far reaching implications. Family Readiness Groups and a climate of support shown by…

Vasilas, Cynthia Nikki

2009-01-01

64

Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard, Environmental Programs Directorate  

E-print Network

Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard 08 Lt Col Reuben Sendejas #12;Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army The Breakfast Analogy #12;11/11/2008 3 Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army

65

The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form in National Guard Soldiers Screening Positive for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2 RF) was administered to 251 National Guard soldiers who had recently returned from deployment to Iraq. Soldiers were also administered questionnaires to identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). On the basis of responses to the…

Arbisi, Paul A.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Thuras, Paul; Reddy, Madhavi K.

2011-01-01

66

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal imager applied to San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal infrared imaging were used to evaluate the effects of military activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site. The Ground Penetrating Radar was used to identify underground burrows of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) dens in an attempt to evaluate the impact of tracked vehicles on the integrity of kit fox

E. A. Reese; T. T. Kato; W. H. Berry

1992-01-01

67

Habitat, soils, and den use of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Den use patterns, den characteristics, and effects of military training on dens were studied for San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California.Ninety-four radiocollared kit foxes used 1059 dens and 334 buildings as shelter from December 1988, through September 1991. There were 1001 (95%) earthen dens, 57 (5%) culverts, and one den

E. A. Reese; W. G. Standley; W. H. Berry

1992-01-01

68

Sound Guard  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lubrication technology originally developed for a series of NASA satellites has produced a commercial product for protecting the sound fidelity of phonograph records. Called Sound Guard, the preservative is a spray-on fluid that deposits a microscopically thin protective coating which reduces friction and prevents the hard diamond stylus from wearing away the softer vinyl material of the disc. It is marketed by the Consumer Products Division of Ball Corporation, Muncie, Indiana. The lubricant technology on which Sound Guard is based originated with NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO), an Earth-orbiting satellite designed and built by Ball Brothers Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado, also a division of Ball Corporation. Ball Brothers engineers found a problem early in the OSO program: known lubricants were unsuitable for use on satellite moving parts that would be exposed to the vacuum of space for several months. So the company conducted research on the properties of materials needed for long life in space and developed new lubricants. They worked successfully on seven OSO flights and attracted considerable attention among other aerospace contractors. Ball Brothers now supplies its "Vac Kote" lubricants and coatings to both aerospace and non-aerospace industries and the company has produced several hundred variations of the original technology. Ball Corporation expanded its product line to include consumer products, of which Sound Guard is one of the most recent. In addition to protecting record grooves, Sound Guard's anti-static quality also retards particle accumulation on the stylus. During comparison study by a leading U.S. electronic laboratory, a record not treated by Sound Guard had to be cleaned after 50 plays and the stylus had collected a considerable number of small vinyl particles. The Sound Guard-treated disc was still clean after 100 plays, as was its stylus.

1978-01-01

69

Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, and Perceived Barriers of Colorectal Cancer Screening among Family Physicians in National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh  

PubMed Central

Objectives. The objective of this study is to explore the current knowledge, attitude, and practice of family physicians working in family medicine clinics in National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA), Riyadh, toward colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and to identify the barriers of the screening. Methods. Data were collected using a validated self-administered questionnaire adopted from the National Cancer Institute in USA, customized by adding and eliminating questions to be in line with the institution (NGHA) characteristics. Results. Of the 130 physicians, 56.2% of the physicians were not practicing CRC screening although 94.6% considered CRC screening effective. Board certified physicians had higher knowledge score and were practicing CRC screening more when compared to other physicians. Physicians who reported practicing CRC screening scored more on the knowledge score than those not practicing. Male physicians scored better on attitude score than female physicians. The study found that barriers were cited in higher rates among physicians not practicing CRC screening compared with practicing physicians. Lack of patients' awareness was the most cited barrier. Conclusion. Large percentage of family physicians in this study do not practice CRC screening, despite the knowledge level and the positive attitude. PMID:25328703

2014-01-01

70

Hospital Disclosure Practices: Results Of A National Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

New patient safety standards from JCAHO that require hospitals to disclose to patients all unexpected outcomes of care took effect 1 July 2001. In an early 2002 survey of risk managers at a nationally representative sample of hospitals, the vast majority re- ported that their hospital's practice was to disclose harm at least some of the time, al- though only

Rae M. Lamb; David M. Studdert; Richard M. J. Bohmer; Donald M. Berwick; Troyen A. Brennan

2003-01-01

71

Installation-Restoration Program. Phase 2. Confirmation/quantification. Stage 1. Problem confirmation study: Otis Air National Guard Base, Massachusetts, Air National Guard Support Center, Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. Final technical report, November 1983-July 1985  

SciTech Connect

A Problem Confirmation Study was performed at seven sites on Otis Air National Guard Base: the Current and Former Training Areas, the Base Landfill, the Nondestructive Inspection Laboratory, the Fuel Test Dump Site, the Railyard Fuel Pumping Station, and the Petrol Fuel Storage Area. The field investigation was conducted in two stages, in November 1983 through January 1984, and in October through December 1984. Resampling was performed at selected locations in April and July 1985. A total of 11 monitor wells were installed and sampled and test-pit investigations were conducted at six sites. In addition, the contents of a sump tank, and two header pipes for fuel-transmission lines were sampled. Analytes included TOC, TOX, cyanide, phenols, Safe Drinking Water metals, pesticides and herbicides, and in the second round, priority-pollutant volatile organic compounds and a GC fingerprint scan for fuel products. On the basis of the field-work findings, it is concluded that, to date, water-quality impacts on ground water from past activities have been minimal.

Kraybill, R.L.; Smart, G.R.; Bopp, F.

1985-09-04

72

Adverse outcomes in Belgian acute hospitals: retrospective analysis of the national hospital discharge dataset  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The prevalence and variability of adverse outcome rates in Belgian acute hospitals is examined by using the national hospital discharge database. Design, setting, and participants. Retrospective analysis based on administrative data of all Belgian acute hospitals, covering the full medical (n = 1 024 743) and surgical (n = 633 027) in-patients population for the year 2000. Main outcome

KOEN VAN DEN HEEDE; WALTER SERMEUS; LUWIS DIYA; EMMANUEL LESAFFRE; ARTHUR VLEUGELS

2006-01-01

73

Master resilience training and its relationship to individual well-being and stress buffering among army national guard soldiers.  

PubMed

To better enable soldiers to adapt to stressors of military life, Master Resilience Training has been offered to soldiers since 2009. Few studies have examined whether the training achieves its intended effects. To fill this gap, resilience-trained Army National Guard soldiers and civilians (N?=?611) completed online questionnaires about their resilience training experience (72% completion rate, N?=?441). Respondents (92% or more) indicated the training was helpful and improved resilience competencies that enhanced coping with stressful circumstances. Respondents (97% or more) indicated that these competencies were subsequently used in their military and civilian jobs. A measure of resilience competencies was developed and showed self-reported changes largely pertained to increased self-awareness and strength of character, including improved optimism, mental agility, and connection with others. Self-reported change in resilience competencies was associated with fewer behavioral health symptoms, especially, for those reporting more current stressful events (known as the buffering effect). Findings are discussed in terms of resilience's potency of training, content of the training, and the need to elaborate on resilience's relationship to specific stressors. PMID:23494766

Griffith, James; West, Courtney

2013-04-01

74

Fleas of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

A total of 3,241 fleas, representing seven species, were identified from 398 samples collected from San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis), California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi), and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 3,109 fleas collected from kit foxes 95.7% were Echidnophaga gallinacea, 4.0% Pulex irritans, 0.2% Hoplopsyllus anomolus, and 0.1% Odontopsyllus dentatus. One male Ctenocephalides fells was also collected from a kit fox. The 118 fleas collected from California ground squirrels consisted of Hoplopsyllus anomolus (55.9%), Echidnophaga gallinacea (37.3%), and Oropsylla montanus (6.8%). The 14 fleas collected from deer mice were Aetheca wagneri. Based on the distribution and abundance of flea species collected, and the vector efficiency of these fleas, it appears that kit foxes could play a role in the transfer of natural vectors of sylvatic plague between rodent populations, if the bacterium responsible for plague (Yersinia pestis) were present at Camp Roberts. Little information regarding kit fox food habits was evidenced by the distribution and abundance of small mammal flea species collected from kit foxes.

Spencer, K.A.; Egoscue, H.J.

1992-09-01

75

Blood characteristics of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Hematology, serum chemistry, and prevalence of antibodies against selected, pathogens in a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, in 1989 and 1990. Samples from 18 (10 female, 8 male) adult kit foxes were used to establish normal hematology and serum chemistry values for this population. Average values were all within the normal ranges reported for kit foxes in other locations. Three hematology parameters had significant differences between male and female values; males had higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and lower lymphocyte counts. There were no significant differences between serum chemistry values from male and female foxes. Prevalence of antibodies was determined from serum samples from 47 (26 female, 21 male) adult kit foxes and eight (4 female, 4 male) juveniles. Antibodies were detected against five of the eight pathogens tested: canine parvovirus, Toxoplasma gondii Leptospira interrogans, canine distemper virus, and canine hepatitis virus. Antibodies were not detected against Brucella, canis, Coccidioides immitis, or Yersinia pestis.

Standley, W.G.; McCue, P.M.

1992-09-01

76

Reproduction of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

The reproduction of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) was investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 38 vixens radiocollared prior to parturition, 12 (32%) were successful in raising pups from conception to the point where pups were observed above ground. No yearling vixens were known tb be reproductively active. The mean litter size during 1989 - 1991 was 3.0 (n = 21, SE = 0.28) and ranged from one to six pups. Both the proportion of vixens successfully raising pups and the mean litter size observed at Camp Roberts during this study were lower than those reported at other locations. Sex ratios of kit fox pups were male biased two of the three years, but did not differ statistically from 1:1 throughout the study. Whelping was estimated to occur between February 15 and March 5. Results of this study support previous reports that kit foxes are primarily monogamous, although one case of polygamy may have occurred. Both the proportion of dispersing radiocollared juveniles (26%) and the mean dispersal distance (5.9 km) of juveniles at Camp Roberts appeared low compared to other locations.

Spencer, K A; Berry, W H; Standley, W G; O`Farrell, T P

1992-09-01

77

Perception of change and burden in children of national guard troops deployed as part of the global war on terror.  

PubMed

Changes in relationships, roles, and dynamics associated with deployment of troops to the Global War on Terror can create challenges for their families as non-deployed spouses and their children take on new responsibilities. Children, aged 6 to 18 years, of deployed National Guard troops were assessed to determine the children's perceptions about how their father's deployment would or did change them and their family, the burden the children experienced in relation to helping their mothers, and child- and parent-reported emotional and behavioral symptoms in the children. Endorsement of personal change was associated with psychological health. During deployment, recognizing personal change was associated with less perceived burden while perceived change in the family was associated with more perceived burden. In general, increased perception of burden was associated with increased psychological symptoms and problems. The children of deployed service personnel may experience burdens and challenges in relation to the changes associated with the circumstances of deployment. Helping children prepare for and manage changes in relationships, roles, rules, and routines may lessen adverse reactions to changes in the environment. PMID:23894799

Pfefferbaum, Betty; Houston, J Brian; Allen, Sandra F

2012-01-01

78

Predictors of Army National Guard and Reserve Members' Use of Veteran Health Administration Health Care After Demobilizing From OEF/OIF Deployment.  

PubMed

This study described rates and predictors of Army National Guard and Army Reserve members' enrollment in and utilization of Veteran Health Administration (VHA) services in the 365 days following demobilization from an index deployment. We also explored regional and VHA facility variation in serving eligible members in their catchment areas. The sample included 125,434 Army National Guard and 48,423 Army Reserve members who demobilized after a deployment ending between FY 2008 and FY 2011. Demographic, geographic, deployment, and Military Health System eligibility were derived from Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System and "Contingency Tracking System" data. The VHA National Patient Care Databases were used to ascertain VHA utilization and status (e.g., enrollee, TRICARE). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate predictors of VHA utilization as an enrollee in the year following demobilization. Of the study members demobilizing during the observation period, 56.9% of Army National Guard members and 45.7% of Army Reserve members utilized VHA as an enrollee within 12 months. Demographic, regional, health coverage, and deployment-related factors were associated with VHA enrollment and utilization, and significant variation by VHA facility was found. These findings can be useful in the design of specific outreach efforts to improve linkage from the Military Health System to the VHA. PMID:25269126

Harris, Alex H S; Chen, Cheng; Mohr, Beth A; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

2014-10-01

79

Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed

W. H. Berry; W. G. Standley; T. T. Kato

1992-01-01

80

IcePod - A versatile Science Platform for the New York Air National Guard's LC-130 Aircraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ICEPOD program is a five-year effort to develop an ice imaging system mounted on New York Air National Guard (NYANG) LC-130 aircraft to map the surface and sub-surface topography of ice sheets, ice streams and outlet glaciers for the NSF Major Research Instrumentation program. The project is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The fundamental goal of the ICEPOD program is to develop an instrumentation package that can capture the dynamics of the changing polar regions, focusing on ice and ocean systems. The vision is that this instrumentation will be operated both on routine flights of the NYANG in the polar regions, such as on missions between McMurdo and South Pole Station, and on targeted science missions, from mapping sea ice and outlet glaciers such as those surrounding Ross Island or Greenland to quantifying the drainage systems from large subglacial lakes in East Antarctica. It is a key aspect of the design that at the conclusion of this program, the Pod, Deployment Arm and Data Acquisition and Management system will become available for use by the science community at large to install their own instruments onto. The science requirements for the primary instruments in the Icepod program have been defined and can be viewed on-line at www.ldeo.columbia.edu/icepod. As a consequence, the instrumentation will consist of a scanning laser for precise measurements of the ice surface, stereo-photogrammetry from both visible and infrared imaging cameras to document the ice surface and temperature, a VHF coherent, pulsed radar to recover ice thickness and constrain the distribution of water at the ice sheet bed and an L-band radar to measure surface accumulation or sea-ice thickness. All instrument data sets will be time-tagged and geo-referenced by recording precision GPS satellite data integrated with inertial measurement technology integrated into the pod. There will also be two operational modes - a low altitude flight mode that will optimize the imaging systems and a high altitude flight mode that will facilitate wider use of the instrumentation suite on routine NYANG support missions. Proposals for new observations are welcome. The sensor system will become a research facility operated for the science community, and data will be maintained at and provided through a polar data center.

Frearson, N.; Bell, R. E.; Zappa, C. J.

2011-12-01

81

Baseline water-quality characteristics of the Alaska Army National Guard Stewart River Training Area near Nome, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Army National Guard Stewart River Training Area is approximately 23 miles north of Nome on the Seward Peninsula in northwest Alaska. The Stewart River Training Area encompasses much of the Stewart River Basin and a small part of the Snake River Basin. Hydrologic, water-quality, and physical-habitat data were collected at seven surface-water sites within the Stewart River Training Area during the summer runoff months (late-May to early-September) in 2004. Two of the sampling sites selected for this study were on the main stem Stewart River, one at the upstream boundary and one at the downstream boundary of the training area. Continuous hydrologic, precipitation, and water temperature data were collected at these two sites throughout the summer of 2004. Three pond sites, along the upper, middle, and lower reaches of the Stewart River within the training area, were each sampled twice during the summer of 2004 for analysis of water-quality constituents. Two tributaries to the Snake River Basin, Goldbottom Creek and North Fork Snake River, within the Stewart River Training Area boundary, also were sampled twice during the summer of 2004. Water-quality data collected from the Stewart River at the upstream and downstream study sites indicate similar constituent concentrations. Concentrations of most water-quality constituents collected during the summer of 2004 did not exceed standards for drinking water or recreational contact. Analysis of trace-element concentrations in bed sediment samples indicate the threshold effect concentration (below which no adverse effects on organisms is expected) was exceeded for arsenic, chromium, and nickel concentrations at all sample sites within the Stewart River Training Area and cadmium, copper, zinc, and lead concentrations were found to exceed the threshold effect concentration in varying degrees at the sample sites. The probable effect concentration (above which toxic effects on organisms is likely) was exceeded by arsenic concentrations at all sites except the lower pond site. Chromium and nickel concentrations exceeded the probable effect concentration at the upstream Stewart River site and at the North Fork Snake River site.

Eash, Josh D.

2005-01-01

82

Installation restoration program final remedial investigation report IRP sites 8 and 10. 151st air refueling group Utah Air National Guard, Salt Lake City, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from a Remedial Investigation (RI) for two sites at the Utah Air National Guard (UANG) Base located in Salt Lake City, Utah. The two sites investigated are identified as Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site 8, a former underground storage tank (UST) location, and IRP Site 10, an existing petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL) yard. The RI was conducted as outlined in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan prepared by Stone Webster and submitted to and approved by the ANG in May 1993. The field work associated with the RI was performed in June, July, and August 1995.

NONE

1996-06-01

83

Seoul National University Bundang Hospital's Electronic System for Total Care  

PubMed Central

Objectives Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, which is the first Stage 7 hospital outside of North America, has adopted and utilized an innovative and emerging information technology system to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care. The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce the major components of the SNUBH information system and to describe our progress toward a next-generation hospital information system (HIS). Methods SNUBH opened in 2003 as a fully digital hospital by successfully launching a new HIS named BESTCare, "Bundang hospital Electronic System for Total Care". Subsequently, the system has been continuously improved with new applications, including close-loop medication administration (CLMA), clinical data warehouse (CDW), health information exchange (HIE), and disaster recovery (DR), which have resulted in the achievement of Stage 7 status. Results The BESTCare system is an integrated system for a university hospital setting. BESTCare is mainly composed of three application domains: the core applications, an information infrastructure, and channel domains. The most critical and unique applications of the system, such as the electronic medical record (EMR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support system (CDSS), CLMA, CDW, HIE, and DR applications, are described in detail. Conclusions Beyond our achievement of Stage 7 hospital status, we are currently developing a next-generation HIS with new goals of implementing infrastructure that is flexible and innovative, implementing a patient-centered system, and strengthening the IT capability to maximize the hospital value. PMID:22844650

Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee Hyuck; Lee, Hak Jong; Ha, Kyooseob; Lim, Cheong; Chin, Ho Jun; Yun, Jonghoar; Cho, Eun-Young; Chung, Eunja; Baek, Rong-Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Chul Hee; Lee, Hai-Seok; Byeon, Nam-Soo

2012-01-01

84

Rural hospitals' experience with the National Practitioner Data Bank.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This study examined hospital administrators' experiences with the National Practitioner Data Bank. METHODS: One hundred forty-nine rural hospital administrators completed questionnaires assessing their perceptions of the data bank. RESULTS: Nearly 90% of respondents rated the data bank as an important source of information for credentialing. Three percent indicated it had directly affected privileging decisions; 43% and 34%, respectively, believed the costs exceeded or equaled the benefits. Twenty percent reported changes that could decrease disciplinary action reports to the data bank. CONCLUSIONS: While the National Practitioner Data Bank is an important source of information to rural hospitals, it may, affect few credentialing decisions and motivate behavioral changes that could have a paradoxical effect on quality assurance. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9146450

Neighbor, W E; Baldwin, L M; West, P A; Hart, L G

1997-01-01

85

National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS): 1997 Summary: National Hospital Discharge Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Last month, the NCHS released statistics from its 1997 National Hospital Discharge Survey. The "report presents national estimates of the use of non-Federal, short-stay hospitals in the United States during 1997. Numbers and rates of discharges, diagnoses, and procedures are shown by age and sex." The summary gives average lengths of stays for all discharges, broken down by region, as well as average lengths of stays for selected diagnostic categories, including infant delivery.

Hall, Margaret.; Lawrence, Linda.

86

Hospital episode statistics: improving the quality and value of hospital data: a national internet e-survey of hospital consultants  

PubMed Central

Hypothesis Senior hospital clinicians are poorly engaged with clinical coding and hospital episode statistics (HES). Aims ???To understand the current level of clinical engagement with collection of national data and clinical coding. ??To gain the views of frontline staff on proposed improvements to hospital statistics. ??To gain an indication of likely clinical engagement in change. ??To understand the clinical priority for improvement. Design Internet e-survey accessible from Academy of Royal Medical College Website. Setting National Health Service (NHS) Trusts. Participants 1081 NHS hospital consultants and two general practitioners who volunteered to take part. Results 3.4% of the sample regularly access HES data; 21% are regularly involved in clinical coding and 6.2% meet coding staff at least monthly. 95% would like to access HES data and there was a strong support for using this data for appraisal, revalidation and improving the quality of patient care. In terms of improvements, 91.9% would be prepared to code diagnosis in outpatients given the right tools. The highest priority for improvement is clinical validation of diagnostic data. Conclusions Clinical engagement with coding and access to HES data is poor. However, there is professional support for improvement. Clinical requirements should be considered in all future developments of national data collection to provide the quality and scope of data that is required to deliver the information revolution. PMID:23166129

Spencer, Stephen Andrew; Davies, Mark Price

2012-01-01

87

Coast Guard  

SciTech Connect

In the wake of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound, Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, thereby activating the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund. This fund had been set up four years earlier with the proviso that no money could be spent until the enactment of comprehensive oil spill legislation. Passage of the Oil Pollution Act, which significantly expanded the nation's oil spill prevention and response activities, meant that funds became available to federal agencies for the cost of oil spill prevention and response activities. This report provides information on the fund's receipts and disbursements as of March 31, 1991, and the status of activities under way to fully implement the provisions of the Act concerning the fund, including the development of regulations.

Not Available

1991-08-01

88

Installation restoration program: Closure investigation report. Site 1: Former base landfill; Stewart Air National Guard Base, Newburgh, New York. Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A Closure Investigation (Cl) of Site 1, the former Base Landfill at Stewart Air National Guard Base (the Base) located at the Stewart International Airport (lAP), was performed by Aneptek Corporation (ANEPTEK). Site 1 is located southeast of the airport complex. Site 1 and Site 2 (the former pesticide pit disposal area) have been the subject of several previous investigations by both the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and the National Guard Bureau. Scope of Investigation. The CI field program included air monitoring and the sampling of subsurface soils, surface water and groundwater to provide data for an evaluation of site geology, hydrogeology, and potential environmental impacts from the Site 1 landfill. Ml groundwater and surface water samples submitted for off-site laboratory analysis were analyzed for the full list of Baseline Parameters provide in Chapter 6 of the New York Codes, Rules, and Regulations (6 NYCRR) Part 360-2.11. Physical characteristics of the fill and cover material were defined through the installation and monitoring of slope stability monuments and settlement pads. Test pits were excavated to determine the lateral extent of waste. Soil samples collected from the existing interim cover were submitted to an off-site laboratory for grain size analyses. Slug tests were performed on monitoring wells to provide estimates of formation hydraulic conductivity. In accordance with the requirements of 6 NYCRR Part 360-2.15, an explosive gas investigation was conducted using a slam-bar and monitoring gasses with a flame ionization detector (FID) and a meter capable of detecting percent oxygen, percent lower explosive limit (LEL), carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide. A complete site walkover of the landfill was made to locate any areas of leachate outbreak; and a vector survey was conducted by a field biologist.

NONE

1997-04-01

89

Cost of Hospitalization and Length of Stay in People with Down Syndrome: Evidence from a National Hospital Discharge Claims Database  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present paper aims to describe the hospitalization profiles which include medical expenses and length of stays, and to determine their possible influencing factors of hospital admission on persons with Down syndrome in Taiwan. We employed a population-based, retrospective analyses used national health insurance hospital discharge data of the…

Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

2011-01-01

90

A Comparison of the Human Characteristics of Curriculum Materials Used in an Air National Guard Leadership Development Program with the Characteristics of Students Encountering the Materials: A Study Using the Annehurst Curriculum Classification System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Annehurst Curriculum Classification System (ACCS), a tool for matching individual learners with appropriate curriculum materials, was used with a group of fifty-nine students (Air National Guard officer candidates) and their four instructor-advisors to examine two issues: (1) the applicability of the ACCS in a highly structured,…

French, Russell L.; And Others

91

RepoRt on a MaMMal SuRvey at CaMp Maxey, laMaR County, texaS (texaS aRMy national GuaRd faCility)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mammal survey was conducted of Camp Maxey (Texas Army National Guard training site), Lamar County, Texas, from October 2002 through June 2004. This military installation is located in eastern Texas and is situated at the gradational boundary between the Pineywoods (east) and Blackland Prairies (west). Sherman traps, snap traps, pitfall traps, mist nets, DK-1 and Macabee gopher traps, and

Cody W. EdWards

92

New Integrated Information System for Pusan National University Hospital  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study presents the information system for Pusan National University Hospital (PNUH), evaluates its performance qualitatively, and conducts economic analysis. Methods Information system for PNUH was designed by component-based development and developed by internet technologies. Order Communication System, Electronic Medical Record, and Clinical Decision Support System were newly developed. The performance of the hospital information system was qualitatively evaluated based on the performance reference model in order to identify problem areas for the old system. The Information Economics approach was used to analyze the economic feasibility of hospital information system in order to account for the intangible benefits. Results Average performance scores were 3.16 for input layer, 3.35 for process layer, and 3.57 for business layer. In addition, the cumulative benefit to cost ratio was 0.50 in 2011, 1.73 in 2012, 1.76 in 2013, 1.71 in 2014, and 1.71 in 2015. The B/C ratios steadily increase as value items are added. Conclusions While overall performance scores were reasonably high, doctors were less satisfied with the system, perhaps due to the weak clinical function in the systems. The information economics analysis demonstrated the economic profitability of the information systems if all intangible benefits were included. The second qualitative evaluation survey and economic analysis were proposed to evaluate the changes in performance of the new system. PMID:21818459

Kim, Hyung Hoi; Cho, Kyung-Won; Kim, Hye Sook; Kim, Ju-Sim; Kim, Jung Hyun; Han, Sang Pil; Park, Chun Bok; Kim, Seok

2011-01-01

93

The Guarded Neural Classifier  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new approach for classifying multi-dimensional data using an artificial neural network. The proposed network is an extension of a counterpropagation net- work with two special neurons controlling (or 'guarding') the 'de- cisions' of the network - that is why it is called Guarded Neu- ral Classifier (GNC). The design of the GNC network is aimed at

Torsten Felzer; Bernd Freisleben; Martin Hoof

2001-01-01

94

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal imager applied to San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal infrared imaging were used to evaluate the effects of military activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site. The Ground Penetrating Radar was used to identify underground burrows of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) dens in an attempt to evaluate the impact of tracked vehicles on the integrity of kit fox dens. The thermal imaging was used to identify kit foxes within the live-fire impact area. The ground penetrating radar equipment was initially unsuccessfull in detecting burrows in the hard, compacted soils. Changes in antenna systems and sampling methods resulted in small improvements, but the data were inadequate to test for effects of military vehicles on dens. Further refinements would have required the intentional destruction of dens, or the redesign of the ground penetrating radar hardware and software. Thermal imaging was useful in observing kit foxes at close range but was not suitable for detecting foxes in the impact area because the images were not clear enough for conclusive species identification.

Reese, E.A.; Kato, T.T.; Berry, W.H.; O'Farrell, T.P.

1992-10-01

95

Prey abundance and food habits of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California  

SciTech Connect

Prey abundance and food habits of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. The sampling methods initially used to assess abundance of prey species resulted in indices too low to be of value. Because of this, the relationship between relative abundance and frequency of occurrence of prey species could not be examined. Six hundred forty-nine fecal samples (scats) were analyzed to determine the frequency of occurrence of prey items. California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) and lagomorphs primarily desert cottontails (Sylvilagus audubonii) and black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) were the most frequently occurring mammalian prey items found in scats (35.0% and 12.2%, respectively). The frequency of occurrence of ground squirrel (but not lagomorph) remains in scats collected from juveniles was significantly higher than in scats collected from adults. The frequency of occurrence of ground squirrel and lagomorph remains in scats collected from males was not significant different than in scats collected from females. There were significant variations in the frequency of ground squirrel remains among the years 1989--1991 and during the June--November periods between 1989 and 1990 and between 1990 and 1991. The frequency of lagomorph remains collected during the June--November period differed significantly among the years 1989--1991 and between 1990 and 1991.

Logan, C.G.; Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; Kato, T.T.

1992-09-01

96

Suicide and war: the mediating effects of negative mood, posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and social support among army National Guard soldiers.  

PubMed

The mediating effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, negative mood, and social support on the relationship of war experiences to suicidality were examined. The research literature suggested a sequence among study scales representing these constructs, which was then tested on survey data obtained from a sample of National Guard soldiers (N=4,546). Results from structural equation modeling suggested that war experiences may precipitate a sequence of psychological consequences leading to suicidality. However, suicidality may be an enduring behavioral health condition. War experiences showed no direct effects on postdeployment suicidality, rather its effect was indirect through PTSD symptoms and negative mood. War experiences were, however, predictive of PTSD symptoms, as would be expected. PSTD symptoms showed no direct effect on postdeployment suicidality, but showed indirect effects through negative mood. Results also suggested that suicidality is relatively persistent, at least during deployment and postdeployment. The percentage of those at risk for suicide was low both during and after deployment, with little association between suicidality and time since returning from deployment. Additionally, few soldiers were initially nonsuicidal and then reported such symptoms at postdeployment. Implications of relationships of both negative mood and combat trauma to suicidality are discussed, as well as possible mediating effects of both personal dispositions and social support on relationships of war experiences to PTSD, negative mood, and suicidality. PMID:22924892

Griffith, James

2012-08-01

97

Nosocomial Infections at Kenyatta National Hospital Intensive-Care Unit in Nairobi, Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to identify the common bacteria isolated from patients, antibiotics used, sensitivity patterns, therapeutic procedures and cleaning protocols practised in Kenyatta National Hospital Intensive-Care Unit (ICU). Kenyatta National Hospital is a 1,800-bed referral and tertiary-care hospital which is also the Teaching University Hospital. The ICU has 20 beds. Two members of staff, a consultant and

Z. W. W. Ngumi

2006-01-01

98

Assessment of soil and water contaminants from selected locations in and near the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area, Ada County, Idaho, 2001-2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2001, the National Guard Bureau and the U.S. Geological Survey began a project to compile hydrogeologic data and determine presence or absence of soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination at the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area in southwestern Idaho. Between June 2002 and April 2003, a total of 114 soil, surface-water, ground-water, precipitation, or dust samples were collected from 68 sample sites (65 different locations) in the Orchard Training Area (OTA) or along the vehicle corridor to the OTA. Soil and water samples were analyzed for concentrations of selected total trace metals, major ions, nutrients, explosive compounds, semivolatile organics, and petroleum hydrocarbons. Water samples also were analyzed for concentrations of selected dissolved trace metals and major ions. Distinguishing naturally occurring large concentrations of trace metals, major ions, and nutrients from contamination related to land and water uses at the OTA was difficult. There were no historical analyses for this area to compare with modern data, and although samples were collected from 65 locations in and near the OTA, sampled areas represented only a small part of the complex OTA land-use areas and soil types. For naturally occurring compounds, several assumptions were made?anomalously large concentrations, when tied to known land uses, may indicate presence of contamination; naturally occurring concentrations cannot be separated from contamination concentrations in mid- and lower ranges of data; and smallest concentrations may represent the lowest naturally occurring range of concentrations and (or) the absence of contaminants related to land and water uses. Presence of explosive, semivolatile organic (SVOC), and petroleum hydrocarbon compounds in samples indicates contamination from land and water uses. In areas along the vehicle corridor and major access roads within the OTA, most trace metal, major ion, and nutrient concentrations in soil samples were not in the upper 10th percentile of data, but concentrations of 25 metals, ions, or nutrients were in the upper 10th percentile in a puddle sample near the heavy equipment maneuvering area, MPRC-H. The largest concentrations of tin, ammonia, and nitrite plus nitrate (as nitrogen) in water from the OTA were detected in a sample from this puddle. Petroleum hydrocarbons were the most common contaminant, detected in all soil and surface-water samples. An SVOC, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, a plasticizer, was detected at a site along the vehicle corridor. In Maneuver Areas within the OTA, many soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of cobalt, iron, mercury, titanium, sodium, ammonia, or total phosphorus were detected in 6 of 13 soil samples outside the Tadpole Lake area. The largest concentrations of aluminum, arsenic, beryllium, nickel, selenium, silver, strontium, thallium, vanadium, chloride, potassium, sulfate, and nitrite plus nitrate were detected in soil samples from the Tadpole Lake area. Water from Tadpole Lake contained the largest total concentrations of 19 trace metals, 4 major ions, and 1 nutrient. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 5 soil samples and water from Tadpole Lake. SVOCs related to combustion of fuel or plasticizers were detected in 1 soil sample. Explosive compounds were detected in 1 precipitation sample.In the Impact Area within the OTA, most soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of barium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, or orthophosphate were detected in 6 of the 18 soil samples. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 4 soil samples, SVOCs in 6 samples, and explosive compounds in 4 samples. In the mobilization and training equipment site (MATES) compound adjacent to the OTA, all soil and water samples contained at lea

Parliman, D. J.

2004-01-01

99

OnGuard Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the OnGuard website "provides practical tips from the federal government and the technology industry to help you be on guard against Internet fraud, secure your computer, and protect your personal information." Visitors can learn how to avoid online scams, secure their computers, protect kids online and more. On the homepage, users can find useful information divided into subpages for educators, parents, techies, small business owners, the military and kids.

100

Habitat, soils, and den use of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Den use patterns, den characteristics, and effects of military training on dens were studied for San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California.Ninety-four radiocollared kit foxes used 1059 dens and 334 buildings as shelter from December 1988, through September 1991. There were 1001 (95%) earthen dens, 57 (5%) culverts, and one den in a hollow log. Denentrance dimensions were measured for single entrance dens; the average height was 20 cm, and the average width was 21 cm. Most dens had two to five den entrances, and only 36% of dens found showed sign of fox activity. Dens were found at elevations between 161 and 351 m. The average slope of dens found on hillsides was 19 degrees, and most dens faced the western quadrant. Dens were found over much of the post exceptthe steep southwest portion. More kit fox dens were located in grassland and low to medium density oak woodlands than expected, and fewer dens were located in developed areas and medium to high density oak woodlands than expected. Denning range size was calculated for 16 foxes that were radiocollared at least one year and that were found using only earthen and culvert dens. The average denning range size was 171.0 [plus minus] 24.0 ha. There was no significant difference in male and female average denning range sizes. When buildings used as shelter were included in denning range sizes, there was no significant difference in average denning range size between developed and undeveloped areas. Foxes used 26 of 36 available soil series, and dens were not distributed proportionally among the 36 soil series. Kit fox dens were typically found in well drained soils. Few den entrances were destroyed by military training exercises.

Reese, E.A.; Standley, W.G.; Berry, W.H.

1992-09-01

101

Habitat, soils, and den use of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Den use patterns, den characteristics, and effects of military training on dens were studied for San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California.Ninety-four radiocollared kit foxes used 1059 dens and 334 buildings as shelter from December 1988, through September 1991. There were 1001 (95%) earthen dens, 57 (5%) culverts, and one den in a hollow log. Denentrance dimensions were measured for single entrance dens; the average height was 20 cm, and the average width was 21 cm. Most dens had two to five den entrances, and only 36% of dens found showed sign of fox activity. Dens were found at elevations between 161 and 351 m. The average slope of dens found on hillsides was 19 degrees, and most dens faced the western quadrant. Dens were found over much of the post exceptthe steep southwest portion. More kit fox dens were located in grassland and low to medium density oak woodlands than expected, and fewer dens were located in developed areas and medium to high density oak woodlands than expected. Denning range size was calculated for 16 foxes that were radiocollared at least one year and that were found using only earthen and culvert dens. The average denning range size was 171.0 {plus_minus} 24.0 ha. There was no significant difference in male and female average denning range sizes. When buildings used as shelter were included in denning range sizes, there was no significant difference in average denning range size between developed and undeveloped areas. Foxes used 26 of 36 available soil series, and dens were not distributed proportionally among the 36 soil series. Kit fox dens were typically found in well drained soils. Few den entrances were destroyed by military training exercises.

Reese, E.A.; Standley, W.G.; Berry, W.H.

1992-09-01

102

ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: Dispensing and administration—2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of the 2002 ASHP nation- al survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings that pertain to dispensing and ad- ministration are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1101 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. SMG Market- ing Group, Inc., supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn

CRAIG A. PEDERSEN; PHILIP J. SCHNEIDER; DOUGLAS J. SCHECKELHOFF

103

Hospitalized Younger: A Comparison of a National Sample of Homeless and Housed Inpatient Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Homelessness is associated with high rates of hospitalizations and age-adjusted mortality. Few studies have examined whether homeless people are admitted to the hospital at an earlier age than the general population or for different diagnoses. Methods. We compared the age at admission and the primary discharge diagnoses in a national sample of 43,868 hospitalized veterans. Results. The difference in

Jennifer Adams; Robert. Rosenheck; Lauren. Gee; Catherine L. Seibyl; Margot. Kushel

2007-01-01

104

Neonatal telephone consultations in the National Maternity Hospital.  

PubMed

Details of telephone consultations concerning infants were recorded prospectively over a two month period in the National Maternity Hospital (NMH). There were one hundred and forty-six calls recorded. One hundred and sixteen (79.5%) calls were from mothers. The average age of the infants was twenty-eight days. Eighty (54.8%) calls were answered by Nursing Staff while the remainder were taken by Doctors. There were thirty-nine (26.7%) calls relating to the gastrointestinal system. There were twenty-seven (18.5%) calls regarding infants with respiratory concerns. The next most common problem was irritability followed by calls concerning jaundice, rashes and umbilical issues. Fifty-five (37.7%) callers were given home care advice or reassurance. Thirty-six (24.7%) were advised to attend a Paediatric Emergency Department (ED). GP visits and Baby Clinic appointments were advised for twenty-four (16.4%) and twenty-three (15.8%) infants respectively while six (4.1%) of the callers were directed to attend NMH immediately. PMID:25282972

Travers, C P; Murphy, J F A

2014-09-01

105

Correlates of In-Hospital Deaths among Hospitalizations with Pulmonary Embolism: Findings from the 2001-2008 National Hospital Discharge Survey  

PubMed Central

Background Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE) are responsible for substantial mortality, morbidity, and impaired health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlates of in-hospital deaths among hospitalizations with a diagnosis of PE in the United States. Methods By using data from the 2001?2008 National Hospital Discharge Survey, we assessed the correlates of in-hospital deaths among 14,721 hospitalizations with a diagnosis of PE and among subgroups stratified by age, sex, race, days of hospital stay, type of admission, cancer, pneumonia, and fractures. We produced adjusted rate ratios (aRR) and 95% confidence intervals using log-linear multivariate regression models. Results Regardless of the listing position of diagnostic codes, we observed an increased likelihood of in-hospital death in subgroups of hospitalizations with ages 50 years and older (aRR?=?1.82?8.48), less than 7 days of hospital stay (aRR?=?1.43?1.57), cancer (aRR?=?2.10?2.28), pneumonia (aRR?=?1.79?2.20), or fractures (aRR?=?2.18) (except for first-listed PE), when compared to the reference groups with ages 1?49 years, 7 days or more of hospital stay, without cancer, pneumonia, or fractures while adjusting for covariates. In addition, we observed an increased likelihood of in-hospital death for first-listed PE in hospitalizations of women, when compared to those of men (aRR?=?1.45). Conclusions The results of this study provide support for identifying, developing, and implementing effective, evidence-based clinical assessment and management strategies to reduce PE-related morbidity and mortality among hospitalized PE patients who may have concurrent health conditions including cancer, pneumonia, and fractures. PMID:22792153

Tsai, James; Grosse, Scott D.; Grant, Althea M.; Reyes, Nimia L.; Hooper, W. Craig; Atrash, Hani K.

2012-01-01

106

Medication safety practices in hospitals: A national survey in Saudi Arabia  

PubMed Central

Background Medication errors in hospitals are a worldwide concern. The World Health Organization has recommended the implementation of basic applications in healthcare systems to improve medication safety, but it is largely unknown whether these recommendations are adhered to by hospitals. We assessed the presence of core medication safety practices in Saudi Arabian hospitals. Methods We developed and validated a survey to assess medication safety practices in hospitals. Major headings included Look-Alike Sound-Alike (LASA) medications, control of concentrated electrolyte solutions, transitions in care, information technology, drug information and other medication safety practices. Trained pharmacists visited samples of hospitals from all regions of Saudi Arabia. Results Seventy-eight hospitals were surveyed. Only 30% of the hospitals had a medication safety committee and 9% of hospitals had a medication safety officer. Only 33% of hospitals had a list of LASA medications and 50% had a list of error-prone abbreviations. Concentrated electrolytes were available in floor stock in 60% of the hospitals. No hospital involved pharmacists in obtaining medication histories and only 37% of the hospitals provided a medication list to the patients at discharge. While 61% of hospitals used a computer system in their pharmacy to enter prescriptions, only 29% of these hospitals required entry of patient’s allergies before entering a drug order. Conclusions Core practices to improve medication safety were not implemented in many hospitals in Saudi Arabia. In developing countries, an effort must be made at the national level to increase the adoption of such practices. PMID:23960830

Aljadhey, Hisham; Alhusan, Abdulaziz; Alburikan, Khalid; Adam, Mansour; Murray, Michael D.; Bates, David W.

2012-01-01

107

Performance Analysis of Hospital Information System of the National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study evaluated the qualitative and quantitative performances of the newly developed information system which was implemented on November 4, 2011 at the National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital. Methods Registration waiting time and changes in the satisfaction scores for the key performance indicators (KPI) before and after the introduction of the system were compared; and the economic effects of the system were analyzed by using the information economics approach. Results After the introduction of the system, the waiting time for registration was reduced by 20%, and the waiting time at the internal medicine department was reduced by 15%. The benefit-to-cost ratio was increased to 1.34 when all intangible benefits were included in the economic analysis. Conclusions The economic impact and target satisfaction rates increased due to the introduction of the new system. The results were proven by the quantitative and qualitative analyses carried out in this study. This study was conducted only seven months after the introduction of the system. As such, a follow-up study should be carried out in the future when the system stabilizes. PMID:23115744

Han, Jung Mi; Boo, Eun Hee; Kim, Jung A; Yoon, Soo Jin; Kim, Seong Woo

2012-01-01

108

Surface-water quantity and quality, aquatic biology, stream geomorphology, and groundwater-flow simulation for National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, 2002-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Base-line and long-term monitoring of water resources of the National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap in south-central Pennsylvania began in 2002. Results of continuous monitoring of streamflow and turbidity and monthly and stormflow water-quality samples from two continuous-record long-term stream sites, periodic collection of water-quality samples from five miscellaneous stream sites, and annual collection of biological data from 2002 to 2005 at 27 sites are discussed. In addition, results from a stream-geomorphic analysis and classification and a regional groundwater-flow model are included. Streamflow at the facility was above normal for the 2003 through 2005 water years and extremely high-flow events occurred in 2003 and in 2004. Water-quality samples were analyzed for nutrients, sediments, metals, major ions, pesticides, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, and explosives. Results indicated no exceedances for any constituent (except iron) above the primary and secondary drinking-water standards or health-advisory levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Iron concentrations were naturally elevated in the groundwater within the watershed because of bedrock lithology. The majority of the constituents were at or below the method detection limit. Sediment loads were dominated by precipitation due to the remnants of Hurricane Ivan in September 2004. More than 60 percent of the sediment load measured during the entire study was transported past the streamgage in just 2 days during that event. Habitat and aquatic-invertebrate data were collected in the summers of 2002-05, and fish data were collected in 2004. Although 2002 was a drought year, 2003-05 were above-normal flow years. Results indicated a wide diversity in invertebrates, good numbers of taxa (distinct organisms), and on the basis of a combination of metrics, the majority of the 27 sites indicated no or slight impairment. Fish-metric data from 25 sites indicated results similar to the invertebrate data. Stream classification based on evolution of the stream channels indicates about 94 percent of the channels were considered to be in equilibrium (type B or C channels), neither aggrading nor eroding. A regional, uncalibrated groundwater-flow model indicated the surface-water and groundwater-flow divides coincided. Because of folding of rock layers, groundwater was under confined conditions and nearly all the water leaves the facility via the streams.

Langland, Michael J.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Chichester, Douglas C.; Bilger, Michael D.; Brightbill, Robin A.

2010-01-01

109

49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.143 ...Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

2011-10-01

110

49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355 ...6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

2011-10-01

111

49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355 ...6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

2012-10-01

112

49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355 ...6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

2013-10-01

113

49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.143 ...Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

2010-10-01

114

49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355 ...6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

2010-10-01

115

Coast Guard Firefighting Module  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA and the U.S. Coast Guard are jointly developing a lightweight, helicopter-transportable, completely self-contained firefighting module for combating shipboard and dockside fires. The project draws upon NASA technology in high-capacity rocket engine pumps, lightweight materials and compact packaging.

1977-01-01

116

Maternal Clinical Diagnoses and Hospital Variation in the Risk of Cesarean Delivery: Analyses of a National US Hospital Discharge Database  

PubMed Central

Background Cesarean delivery is the most common inpatient surgery in the United States, where 1.3 million cesarean sections occur annually, and rates vary widely by hospital. Identifying sources of variation in cesarean use is crucial to improving the consistency and quality of obstetric care. We used hospital discharge records to examine the extent to which variability in the likelihood of cesarean section across US hospitals was attributable to individual women's clinical diagnoses. Methods and Findings Using data from the 2009 and 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project—a 20% sample of US hospitals—we analyzed data for 1,475,457 births in 1,373 hospitals. We fitted multilevel logistic regression models (patients nested in hospitals). The outcome was cesarean (versus vaginal) delivery. Covariates included diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy, hypertension in pregnancy, hemorrhage during pregnancy or placental complications, fetal distress, and fetal disproportion or obstructed labor; maternal age, race/ethnicity, and insurance status; and hospital size and location/teaching status. The cesarean section prevalence was 22.0% (95% confidence interval 22.0% to 22.1%) among women with no prior cesareans. In unadjusted models, the between-hospital variation in the individual risk of primary cesarean section was 0.14 (95% credible interval 0.12 to 0.15). The difference in the probability of having a cesarean delivery between hospitals was 25 percentage points. Hospital variability did not decrease after adjusting for patient diagnoses, socio-demographics, and hospital characteristics (0.16 [95% credible interval 0.14 to 0.18]). A limitation is that these data, while nationally representative, did not contain information on parity or gestational age. Conclusions Variability across hospitals in the individual risk of cesarean section is not decreased by accounting for differences in maternal diagnoses. These findings highlight the need for more comprehensive or linked data including parity and gestational age as well as examination of other factors—such as hospital policies, practices, and culture—in determining cesarean section use. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:25333943

Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Arcaya, Mariana C.; Subramanian, S. V.

2014-01-01

117

Survival Trends of Patients Treated at the National Cancer Center Hospital, Japan, from 1962 to 1994  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Cancer Center (NCC) was established in 1962 in Tokyo as a national institute within the Ministry of Health and Welfare of the national government of Japan. However, there has not been a report on the long-term trends in survival rates at the NCC Hospital. In this paper, we show time trends in 5- year relative survival rates (RSR)

Yasuto Sato; Hiroko Arimoto; Koichi Benjamin Ishikawa; Kimio Yoshimura; Satoshi Kaneko; Mikio Koshiji; Takashi Takada; Naohito Yamaguchi

118

Decision Procedures for Guarded Logics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different variants of guarded logics (a powerful generalization of modal logics) are surveyed and the recent decidability\\u000a result for guarded fixed point logic (obtained in joint work with I. Walukiewicz) is explained. The exposition given here\\u000a emphasizes the tree model property of guarded logics: every satisfiable sentence has a model of bounded tree width.

Erich Grädel; Rwth Aachen

119

77 FR 35855 - Safety Zone, Temporary Change for Recurring Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...regulation would restrict access to these areas...2012, (ii) the Coast Guard will give advance...on this rule. The Coast Guard certifies under...and National Harbor Access Channel during the...the preamble, the Coast Guard amends 33 CFR...AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS 0 1. The...

2012-06-15

120

Biological assessment of the effects of activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard training site, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties, California, on the endangered san joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica  

SciTech Connect

Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 imposes several requirements on federal agencies concerning listed threatened and endangered species and their designated critical habitat. Camp Roberts is operated by the California Army National Guard (CA ARNG) with funding from the National Guard Bureau (NGB). Its primary mission to provide a site where military training requirements of the western United States can be met. The presence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) was confirmed in 1960 and the distribution and abundance of the species increased over the next two decades. The Secretary of Interior has not designated any critical habitat for San Joaquin kit fox. The major objective of this Biological Assessment is to provide FWS with sufficient information concerning the possible impacts that routine military training, maintenance and repair activities, and proposed construction projects may have on the San Joaquin kit fox and its essential habitat at Camp Roberts so that formal consultation with NGB and CA ARNG can begin. FWS will use this information as part of the basis for issuing a Biological Opinion which will include an incidental take provision. 45 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1989-12-01

121

Building an FTP guard  

SciTech Connect

Classified designs usually include lesser classified (including unclassified) components. An engineer working on such a design needs access to the various sub-designs at lower classification levels. For simplicity, the problem is presented with only two levels: high and low. If the low-classification component designs are stored in the high network, they become inaccessible to persons working on a low network. In order to keep the networks separate, the component designs may be duplicated in all networks, resulting in a synchronization problem. Alternatively, they may be stored in the low network and brought into the high network when needed. The latter solution results in the use of sneaker-net (copying the files from the low system to a tape and carrying the tape to a high system) or a file transfer guard. This paper shows how an FTP Guard was constructed and implemented without degrading the security of the underlying B3 platform. The paper then shows how the guard can be extended to an FTP proxy server or an HTTP proxy server. The extension is accomplished by allowing the high-side user to select among items that already exist on the low-side. No high-side data can be directly compromised by the extension, but a mechanism must be developed to handle the low-bandwidth covert channel that would be introduced by the application.

Sands, P.D.

1998-08-01

122

Implementation of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program: critical steps to success for surgeons and hospitals.  

PubMed

The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), as administered by the American College of Surgeons, became available to private sector hospitals across the United States in 2004. The program works to improve surgical outcomes by providing high-quality, risk-adjusted data to surgeons at a given hospital to stimulate discussion and define target areas for improvement. Although the NSQIP began in the early 1990s with Veterans Administration hospitals and expanded to private sector hospitals nearly 5 years ago, the "how to" process for NSQIP implementation has been left to individual institutions to manage on their own. The NSQIP was instituted at a large tertiary hospital in 2005, identifying through experience 12 critical steps to help surgeons and hospitals implement the NSQIP. PMID:19584373

Velanovich, Vic; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Patton, Joe H; Ritz, Jennifer; Jordan, Jack; Dulchavsky, Scott

2009-01-01

123

National Survey of Children's Hospitals on Legacy-Making Activities  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective Many hospitals offer legacy-building activities for children with serious illnesses or their family members, yet legacy-making has received little empirical attention. This descriptive cross-sectional study examined healthcare provider perceptions of legacy-making activities (e.g., memory books) currently offered by hospitals to pediatric patients and their families. Methods Healthcare providers in seventy-seven (100%) teaching children's hospitals across the United States completed an electronic survey. Results Nearly all providers surveyed reported offering legacy-making activities to ill children and their families, with patients and families usually completing the activity together. Most activities were offered before a patient died and when cure is no longer being sought. Perceived outcomes included benefit to bereaved families and a tangible memento of their deceased child. Conclusion Legacy-making may enhance life and decrease suffering for dying children and their families. Healthcare professionals can facilitate opportunities for children and their families to build legacies. Additional research is needed to examine activities across different age groups and conditions, the best time to offer such activities, and associations with positive and negative outcomes for ill children, their family members, and the bereaved. PMID:22577785

Dietrich, Mary S.; Friedman, Debra L.; Gordon, Jessie E.; Gilmer, Mary J.

2012-01-01

124

Organizational and market factors associated with leadership development programs in hospitals: a national study.  

PubMed

Effective leadership in hospitals is widely recognized as the key to organizational performance. Clinical, financial, and operational performance is increasingly being linked to the leadership practices of hospital managers. Moreover, effective leadership has been described as a means to achieve competitive advantage. Recent environmental forces, including reimbursement changes and increased competition, have prompted many hospitals to focus on building leadership competencies to successfully address these challenges. Using the resource dependence theory as our conceptual framework, we present results from a national study of hospitals examining the association of organizational and market factors with the provision of leadership development program activities, including the presence of a leadership development program, a diversity plan, a program for succession planning, and career development resources. The data are taken from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) 2008 Survey of Hospitals, the Area Resource File, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The results of multilevel logistic regressions of each leadership development program activity on organizational and market factors indicate that hospital size, system and network affiliation, and accreditation are significantly and positively associated with all leadership development program activities. The market factors significantly associated with all leadership development activities include a positive odds ratio for metropolitan statistical area location and a negative odds ratio for the percentage of the hospital's service area population that is female and minority. For-profit hospitals are less likely to provide leadership development program activities. Additional findings are presented, and the implications for hospital management are discussed. PMID:22530292

Kim, Tae Hyun; Thompson, Jon M

2012-01-01

125

Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance Version 1.0 08-Sep-2009 BC Singer et al., Lawrence Berkeley National Lab  

E-print Network

Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance ­ Version 1.0 08-Sep-2009 BC Singer et al., Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance ­ Version 1.0 Brett C. Singer Lawrence Berkeley National describes an energy benchmarking framework for hospitals. The document is organized as follows

126

National trends in utilization and in-hospital outcomes of bariatric surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

In view of recent enthusiasm for surgery to treat morbid obesity, we examined national changes in utilization and in-hospital\\u000a outcomes of bariatric surgery over time. With the use of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) codes, we identified\\u000a all bariatric procedures (n=12,203) performed on adults from 1990 to 1997 in hospitals participating in the Nationwide Inpatient\\u000a Sample. We then applied sampling

George Darby Pope; John D. Birkmeyer; Samuel R. G. Finlayson

2002-01-01

127

Surgical Management of Obesity - National University Hospital Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: The Singapore National Survey of 2004 reported the prevalence of obesity to have increased to 6.9%, thus refl ecting the profound changes in our society's lifestyle and eating habits. Bariatric surgery has steadily been increasing to counter the ill effects of obesity. Materials and Methods: We audited our prospective series of 31 patients who had laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding

Asim Shabbir; Tsuan Hao Loi; Davide Lomanto; Thiow Kong Ti

128

Development of hospital-integrated large-scale PACS in Seoul National University Hospital  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SNUH has started a PACS project with three main goals: to develop a fully hospital-integrated PACS, to develop a cost effective PACS using open systems architecture, and to extend PACS' role to the advanced application such as image guided surgery, multi-media assisted education and research. In order to achieve these goals, we have designed a PACS architecture which takes advantage of client-server computing, high speed communication network, computing power of up-to-date high-end PC, and advanced image compression method. We have installed ATM based communication network in radiology department and in-patient wards, and implemented DICOM compliant acquisition modules, image storage and management servers, and high resolution display workstations based on high-end PC and Microsoft Windows 95 and Windows NT operating systems. The SNUH PACS is in partial scale operation now, and will be expanded to full scale by the end of 1998.

Kim, JongHyo; Yeon, Kyoung M.; Han, Man Chung; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Cho, Han I.

1997-05-01

129

49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

2013-10-01

130

49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

2012-10-01

131

Women's secure hospital services: national bed numbers and distribution  

PubMed Central

A mapping exercise as part of a pathway study of women in secure psychiatric services in the England and Wales was conducted. It aimed to (i) establish the extent and range of secure service provision for women nationally and (ii) establish the present and future care needs and pathways of care of women mentally disordered offenders (MDO) currently in low, medium and enhanced medium secure care. The study identified 589 medium secure beds, 46 enhanced medium secure beds (WEMSS) and 990 low secure beds for women nationally. Of the 589 medium secure beds, the majority (309, 52%) are in the NHS and under half (280, 48%) are in the independent sector (IS). The distribution of low secure beds is in the opposite direction, the majority (745, 75%) being in the IS and 254 (25%) in the NHS. Medium secure provision for women has grown over the past decade, but comparative data for low secure provision are not available. Most women are now in single sex facilities although a small number of mixed sex units remain. The findings have implications for the future commissioning of secure services for women. PMID:23236263

Harty, Mari; Somers, Nadia; Bartlett, Annie

2012-01-01

132

A nationally representative survey of hospital malnutrition: the Italian PIMAI (Project: Iatrogenic MAlnutrition in Italy) study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hospital malnutrition is high in every country it was investigated, but no nationally representative prevalence study, considering\\u000a potential geographical interfering factors, has yet been performed. We designed a multidisciplinary, cross-sectional, nation-wide\\u000a survey: the PIMAI study (Project: Iatrogenic MAlnutrition in Italy). Adult (>18 years old) patient inclusion was managed on\\u000a a four-strata randomisation model according to sex and age (<65 and

Lucio Lucchin; Amleto D’Amicis; Maria Gabriella Gentile; Nino Carlo Battistini; Maria Antonia Fusco; Augusta Palmo; Maurizio Muscaritoli; Franco Contaldo; Emanuele Cereda

2009-01-01

133

Department Directors' Perceptions of the Roles and Functions of Hospital Chaplains: A National Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

A national survey of hospital directors of medicine, nursing, social services, and pastoral care was conducted to obtain opinions about the importance of various chaplain roles. On average, directors in all four disciplines rated three of the seven chaplain roles (grief and death, prayer, and emotional support) to be \\

Kevin J. Flannelly; Kathleen Galek; John Bucchino; George F. Handzo; Helen P. Tannenbaum

2005-01-01

134

other hospital U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health  

E-print Network

Center achieves this mission through a culture that fosters collaboration, innovation, diversity the laboratory into better health and health care has been the Clinical Center's focus since the facilityThere's no other hospital like it U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES · National

135

National Trends in Incidence Rates of Hospitalization for Stroke in Children With Sickle Cell Disease  

PubMed Central

Background The success of primary stroke prevention for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) throughout the United States is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to generate national incidence rates of hospitalization for stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) before and after publication of the Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP trial) in 1998. Procedure We performed a retrospective trend analysis of the 1993–2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample and Kids’ Inpatient Databases. Hospitalizations for SCD patients 0–18 years old with stroke were identified by ICD-9CM code. The primary outcome, the trend in annual incidence rate of hospitalization for stroke in children with SCD, was analyzed by linear regression. Incidence rates of hospitalization for stroke before and after 1998 were compared by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results From 1993 to 2009, 2,024 hospitalizations were identified for stroke. Using the mean annual incidence rate of hospitalization for stroke from 1993 to 1998 as the baseline, the rate decreased from 1993 to 2009 (point estimate = ?0.022/100 patient years [95% CI, ?0.039, ?0.005], P = 0.027). The mean annual incidence rate of hospitalization stroke decreased by 45% from 0.51 per 100 patient years in 1993–1998 to 0.28 per 100 patient years in 1999–2009 (P = 0.008). Total hospital days and charges attributed to stroke also decreased by 45% and 24%, respectively. Conclusions After publication of the STOP trial and hydroxyurea licensure in 1998, the incidence of hospitalization for stroke in children with SCD decreased across the United States, suggesting that primary stroke prevention has been effective nationwide, but opportunity for improvement remains. PMID:23151905

McCavit, Timothy L.; Xuan, Lei; Zhang, Song; Flores, Glenn; Quinn, Charles T.

2014-01-01

136

Prevalence study of hospital-acquired infections in 14 Greek hospitals: planning from the local to the national surveillance level  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prevalence study of hospital-acquired infections (HAI) was carried out in 14 of 112 Greek hospitals (15.7%), scattered throughout Greece. Five of seven Greek university hospitals and nine regional hospitals participated in the one-day study, and 3925 hospitalized patients (10.5% of the total hospital beds in Greece) were recorded. The aim of this project was to organize a surveillance of

A. Gikas; J. Pediaditis; J. A. Papadakis; J. Starakis; S. Levidiotou; P. Nikolaides; G. Kioumis; E. Maltezos; M. Lazanas; E. Anevlavis; M. Roubelaki; Y. Tselentis

2002-01-01

137

A comparison of hospital administrative costs in eight nations: US costs exceed all others by far.  

PubMed

A few studies have noted the outsize administrative costs of US hospitals, but no research has compared these costs across multiple nations with various types of health care systems. We assembled a team of international health policy experts to conduct just such a challenging analysis of hospital administrative costs across eight nations: Canada, England, Scotland, Wales, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United States. We found that administrative costs accounted for 25.3 percent of total US hospital expenditures--a percentage that is increasing. Next highest were the Netherlands (19.8 percent) and England (15.5 percent), both of which are transitioning to market-oriented payment systems. Scotland and Canada, whose single-payer systems pay hospitals global operating budgets, with separate grants for capital, had the lowest administrative costs. Costs were intermediate in France and Germany (which bill per patient but pay separately for capital projects) and in Wales. Reducing US per capita spending for hospital administration to Scottish or Canadian levels would have saved more than $150 billion in 2011. This study suggests that the reduction of US administrative costs would best be accomplished through the use of a simpler and less market-oriented payment scheme. PMID:25201663

Himmelstein, David U; Jun, Miraya; Busse, Reinhard; Chevreul, Karine; Geissler, Alexander; Jeurissen, Patrick; Thomson, Sarah; Vinet, Marie-Amelie; Woolhandler, Steffie

2014-09-01

138

Strategies for Improving the Data Quality in National Hospital Discharge Data System: a Delphi Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction: National hospital discharge data system can play a critical role in community health assessment, disease surveillance, strategic planning, policymaking, service quality control, and research. Moreover, the quality of hospital discharge data affects the usefulness of the data and is one of the prerequisites for effective utilization of the data. Thus, the present study aimed to identify the necessary actions for improving the data quality in the national hospital discharge data system and present a model for Iran based on the experiences of England, Canada, and New Zealand. Methods: In doing so, the measures performed in these countries were investigated. The related data were organized in six categories of standards and procedures, training and coordination with the users, assurance from the capability of the system’s software, data modification, data quality control, and documentation and reporting the data quality. According to the gathered data, the primary model was designed. Then, the model was assessed using a two-round Delphi technique by 33 and 31 experts, respectively. Conclusion: According to the findings, a model was presented in order to improve the data quality of Iran’s national hospital discharge data system. PMID:24554802

Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, Zahra; Ahmadi, Maryam

2013-01-01

139

Helper, Guard or Mediator? Teachers' Space for Action in "The Cultural Rucksack," a Norwegian National Program for Arts and Culture in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Arts encounters in schools are often portrayed as encounters between art/artists and children. However, in such encounters, teachers are most often involved. The study presented discusses teachers' experiences with and space for action within The Cultural Rucksack; a national program for arts and culture in Norwegian schools. Observations and…

Christophersen, Catharina

2013-01-01

140

[Quality management of medical laboratory--a survey for National University Hospital].  

PubMed

Since ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 15189 for medical laboratories was established in Japan in 2003, 60 medical laboratories had been certified until April 2011. Among them, 10 medical laboratories belong to national university hospitals. To investigate the current status for the development of a quality management system, we carried out a questionnaire survey targeting all national university hospitals. ISO and ISO 15189 have already been introduced in about 70% of all laboratories and 53% are ready to accept them. In medical laboratories that have already accepted ISO 15189, it was suggested that their quality management systems have been functioning effectively and a gradual decrease of the number of the incidents has been confirmed. PMID:22973727

Okada, Ken; Itoshima, Kouichi

2012-07-01

141

A national study of pressure ulcer prevalence and incidence in acute care hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study sought to establish national benchmarks for pressure ulcer prevalence and incidence among acute care health organizations served by Novation LLC. Setting and subjects: One hundred sixteen acute care facilities from 34 states participated; the sample consisted of 17,560 patients in hospital-based medical-surgical or intensive care units. Instruments: Standardized education kits were provided to each participating site. The

Kathy Whittington; Martha Patrick; Joan L. Roberts

2000-01-01

142

29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917...Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a) Definition...b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees...

2013-07-01

143

29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917...Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a) Definition...b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees...

2011-07-01

144

Analysis of emergency department visits for palpitations (from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey).  

PubMed

Palpitations is a common complaint in patients who visit the emergency department (ED), with causes ranging from benign to life threatening. We analyzed the ED component of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 2001 through 2010 for visits with a chief complaint of palpitations and calculated nationally representative weighted estimates for prevalence, demographic characteristics, and admission rates. ED and hospital discharge diagnoses were tabulated and categorized, and recursive partitioning was used to identify factors associated with admission. An estimated 684,000 visits had a primary reason for visit of "palpitations" representing a national prevalence of 5.8 per 1,000 ED visits (0.58%, 95% confidence interval 0.52 to 0.64). Women and non-Hispanic whites were responsible for most visits. A cardiac diagnosis made up 34% of all ED diagnoses. The overall admission rate was 24.6% (95% confidence interval 21.2 to 28.1), with higher rates seen in the Midwest and Northeast compared with the West. Survey-weighted recursive partitioning revealed several factors associated with admission including age >50 years, male gender, cardiac ED diagnosis, tachycardia, hypertension, and Medicare insurance. In conclusion, palpitations are responsible for a significant minority of ED visits and are associated with a cardiac diagnosis roughly 1/3 of the time. This was associated with a relatively high admission rate, although significant regional variation in these rates exists. PMID:24698469

Probst, Marc A; Mower, William R; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Hoffman, Jerome R; Buch, Eric F; Sun, Benjamin C

2014-05-15

145

Establishment of National Laboratory Standards in Public and Private Hospital Laboratories  

PubMed Central

In September 2007 national standard manual was finalized and officially announced as the minimal quality requirements for all medical laboratories in the country. Apart from auditing laboratories, Reference Health Laboratory has performed benchmarking auditing of medical laboratory network (surveys) in provinces. 12th benchmarks performed in Tehran and Alborz provinces, Iran in 2010 in three stages. We tried to compare different processes, their quality and accordance with national standard measures between public and private hospital laboratories. The assessment tool was a standardized checklist consists of 164 questions. Analyzing process show although in most cases implementing the standard requirements are more prominent in private laboratories, there is still a long way to complete fulfillment of requirements, and it takes a lot of effort. Differences between laboratories in public and private sectors especially in laboratory personnel and management process are significant. Probably lack of motivation, plays a key role in obtaining less desirable results in laboratories in public sectors. PMID:23514840

ANJARANI, Soghra; SAFADEL, Nooshafarin; DAHIM, Parisa; AMINI, Rana; MAHDAVI, Saeed; MIRAB SAMIEE, Siamak

2013-01-01

146

33 CFR 334.783 - Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area. 334.783...783 Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area....

2010-07-01

147

'Shell shock' revisited: an examination of the case records of the National Hospital in London.  

PubMed

During the First World War the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic, in Queen Square, London, then Britain's leading centre for neurology, took a key role in the treatment and understanding of shell shock. This paper explores the case notes of all 462 servicemen who were admitted with functional neurological disorders between 1914 and 1919. Many of these were severe or chronic cases referred to the National Hospital because of its acknowledged expertise and the resources it could call upon. Biographical data was collected together with accounts of the patient's military experience, his symptoms, diagnostic interpretations and treatment outcomes. Analysis of the notes showed that motor syndromes (loss of function or hyperkinesias), often combined with somato-sensory loss, were common presentations. Anxiety and depression as well as vegetative symptoms such as sweating, dizziness and palpitations were also prevalent among this patient population. Conversely, psychogenic seizures were reported much less frequently than in comparable accounts from German tertiary referral centres. As the war unfolded the number of physicians who believed that shell shock was primarily an organic disorder fell as research failed to find a pathological basis for its symptoms. However, little agreement existed among the Queen Square doctors about the fundamental nature of the disorder and it was increasingly categorised as functional disorder or hysteria. PMID:25284893

Linden, Stefanie Caroline; Jones, Edgar

2014-10-01

148

'Shell shock' Revisited: An Examination of the Case Records of the National Hospital in London  

PubMed Central

During the First World War the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic, in Queen Square, London, then Britain’s leading centre for neurology, took a key role in the treatment and understanding of shell shock. This paper explores the case notes of all 462 servicemen who were admitted with functional neurological disorders between 1914 and 1919. Many of these were severe or chronic cases referred to the National Hospital because of its acknowledged expertise and the resources it could call upon. Biographical data was collected together with accounts of the patient’s military experience, his symptoms, diagnostic interpretations and treatment outcomes. Analysis of the notes showed that motor syndromes (loss of function or hyperkinesias), often combined with somato-sensory loss, were common presentations. Anxiety and depression as well as vegetative symptoms such as sweating, dizziness and palpitations were also prevalent among this patient population. Conversely, psychogenic seizures were reported much less frequently than in comparable accounts from German tertiary referral centres. As the war unfolded the number of physicians who believed that shell shock was primarily an organic disorder fell as research failed to find a pathological basis for its symptoms. However, little agreement existed among the Queen Square doctors about the fundamental nature of the disorder and it was increasingly categorised as functional disorder or hysteria.

Linden, Stefanie Caroline; Jones, Edgar

2014-01-01

149

Human bite injuries in the oro-facial region at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Human bites in the maxillofacial region compromise function and aesthetics, resulting in social and psychological effects. There is paucity of information regarding human bite injuries in Tanzania. The aim of the study was to assess the occurrence, treatment modalities and prognosis of human bite injuries in the oro-facial region at the Muhimbili National Hospital Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods In a prospective study the details of patients with human bite injuries in the oro-facial region who attended at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Muhimbili National Hospital between January 2001 and December 2005 were recorded. Data included information on age, sex, site, duration of the injury at the time of reporting to hospital, reasons, details of treatment offered and outcome after treatment. Results A total of 33 patients, 13 males and 20 females aged between 12 and 49 years with human bite injuries in the oro-facial region were treated. Thirty patients presented with clean uninfected wounds while 3 had infected wounds. The most (45.5%) frequently affected site was the lower lip. Treatment offered included thorough surgical cleansing with adequate surgical debridement and primary suturing. Tetanus prophylaxis and a course of broad-spectrum antibiotics were given to all the patients. In 90% of the 30 patients who were treated by suturing, the healing was uneventful with only 10% experiencing wound infection or necrosis. Three patients who presented with wounds that had signs of infection were treated by surgical cleansing with debridement, antibiotics and daily dressing followed by delayed primary suturing. Conclusion Most of the human bite injuries in the oro-facial region were due to social conflicts. Although generally considered to be dirty or contaminated they could be successfully treated by surgical cleansing and primary suture with a favourable outcome. Management of such injuries often need multidisciplinary approach. PMID:18447929

Shubi, Farrid M; Hamza, Omar JM; Kalyanyama, Boniphace M; Simon, Elison NM

2008-01-01

150

The Complexity of Guarding Terrains  

E-print Network

A set $G$ of points on a 1.5-dimensional terrain, also known as an $x$-monotone polygonal chain, is said to guard the terrain if any point on the terrain is 'seen' by a point in $G$. Two points on the terrain see each other if and only if the line segment between them is never strictly below the terrain. The minimum terrain guarding problem asks for a minimum guarding set for the given input terrain. We prove that the decision version of this problem is NP-hard. This solves a significant open problem and complements recent positive approximability results for the optimization problem. Our proof uses a reduction from PLANAR 3-SAT. We build gadgets capable of 'mirroring' a consistent variable assignment back and forth across a main valley. The structural simplicity of 1.5-dimensional terrains makes it difficult to build general clause gadgets that do not destroy this assignment when they are evaluated. However, we exploit the structure in instances of PLANAR 3-SAT to find very specific operations involving only...

King, James

2009-01-01

151

Patient Referral Patterns and the Spread of Hospital-Acquired Infections through National Health Care Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rates of hospital-acquired infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are increasingly used as quality indicators for hospital hygiene. Alternatively, these rates may vary between hospitals, because hospitals differ in admission and referral of potentially colonized patients. We assessed if different referral patterns between hospitals in health care networks can influence rates of hospital-acquired infections like MRSA. We used the

Tjibbe Donker; Jacco Wallinga; Hajo Grundmann

2010-01-01

152

The Dutch Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio (HSMR) method and cardiac surgery: benchmarking in a national cohort using hospital administration data versus a clinical database  

PubMed Central

Objective To compare the accuracy of data from hospital administration databases and a national clinical cardiac surgery database and to compare the performance of the Dutch hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR) method and the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation, for the purpose of benchmarking of mortality across hospitals. Methods Information on all patients undergoing cardiac surgery between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2010 in 10 centres was extracted from The Netherlands Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery database and the Hospital Discharge Registry. The number of cardiac surgery interventions was compared between both databases. The European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation and hospital standardised mortality ratio models were updated in the study population and compared using the C-statistic, calibration plots and the Brier-score. Results The number of cardiac surgery interventions performed could not be assessed using the administrative database as the intervention code was incorrect in 1.4–26.3%, depending on the type of intervention. In 7.3% no intervention code was registered. The updated administrative model was inferior to the updated clinical model with respect to discrimination (c-statistic of 0.77 vs 0.85, p<0.001) and calibration (Brier Score of 2.8% vs 2.6%, p<0.001, maximum score 3.0%). Two average performing hospitals according to the clinical model became outliers when benchmarking was performed using the administrative model. Conclusions In cardiac surgery, administrative data are less suitable than clinical data for the purpose of benchmarking. The use of either administrative or clinical risk-adjustment models can affect the outlier status of hospitals. Risk-adjustment models including procedure-specific clinical risk factors are recommended. PMID:24334377

Siregar, S; Pouw, M E; Moons, K G M; Versteegh, M I M; Bots, M L; van der Graaf, Y; Kalkman, C J; van Herwerden, L A; Groenwold, R H H

2014-01-01

153

Does hospital competition harm equity? Evidence from the English National Health Service.  

PubMed

Increasing evidence shows that hospital competition under fixed prices can improve quality and reduce cost. Concerns remain, however, that competition may undermine socio-economic equity in the utilisation of care. We test this hypothesis in the context of the pro-competition reforms of the English National Health Service progressively introduced from 2004 to 2006. We use a panel of 32,482 English small areas followed from 2003 to 2008 and a difference in differences approach. The effect of competition on equity is identified by the interaction between market structure, small area income deprivation and year. We find a negative association between market competition and elective admissions in deprived areas. The effect of pro-competition reform was to reduce this negative association slightly, suggesting that competition did not undermine equity. PMID:23419634

Cookson, Richard; Laudicella, Mauro; Li Donni, Paolo

2013-03-01

154

The rise and fall of complementary medicine in National Health Service hospitals in England.  

PubMed

Whilst Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) has never been systematically integrated into National Health Service (NHS) provision, there has been some limited evidence of a developing presence of CAM in NHS hospital based nursing and midwifery. This paper reports on a qualitative study that sought to document the nature and extent of such integrative practice in England, and the interpersonal and organisational factors that facilitated or impeded it. The data revealed a history in which attempts to integrate CAM had some initial success underpinned by the enthusiasm of individual practitioners and a relatively permissive organisational context. However, this was followed by a decline in service provision. The fact that the services were established by individuals left them vulnerable when more restrictive funding and governance regimes emerged. Whilst the data revealed a consistent story about CAM within the NHS, it must be recognised that the use of a snowball sample limits the generalizability of the findings. PMID:22789786

Cant, Sarah; Watts, Peter; Ruston, Annmarie

2012-08-01

155

Dying in two acute hospitals: would usual care meet Australian national clinical standards?  

PubMed

The Australian Commission for Quality and Safety in Health Care (ACQSHC) has articulated 10 clinical standards with the aim of improving the consistency of quality healthcare delivery. Currently, the majority of Australians die in acute hospitals. But despite this, no agreed standard of care exists to define the minimum standard of care that people should accept in the final hours to days of life. As a result, there is limited capacity to conduct audits that focus on the gap between current care and recommended care. There is, however, accumulating evidence in the end of life literature to define which aspects of care are likely to be considered most important to those people facing imminent death. These themes offer standards against which to conduct audits. This is very apt given the national recommendation that healthcare should be delivered in the context of considering people's wishes while always treating people with dignity and respect. PMID:24589365

Clark, Katherine; Byfieldt, Naomi; Green, Malcolm; Saul, Peter; Lack, Jill; Philips, Jane L

2014-05-01

156

Guards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Born in 1938, Janusz Glowacki is a novelist; dramaturge, script-writer and essayist as well as being a playwright. He has a degree in philology from Warsaw University and has published five collections of short stories, two novels and also two volumes of essays. He has written the scripts of a number of films, among them one by Andrzej Wajda. Four

Janusz Glowacki

1985-01-01

157

Barriers to and determinants of medication adherence among hypertensive patients attended National Health Service Hospital, Sunderland  

PubMed Central

Background: Hypertension is a silent killer, a time bomb in both the developed and developing nations of the world. It is one of the most significant risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality resulting from target-organ damage to blood vessels in the heart, brain, kidney and eyes. Adherence to long-term therapy for chronic illnesses like hypertension is an important tool to enhance the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy. Objective: The two objectives of this study were to evaluate the extent and reasons of non-adherence in patients attended National Health Service (NHS) Hospital, Sunderland. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted for 4 months in the out-patient department of NHS Hospital. A total of 200 patients were selected randomly for this study. Morisky's Medication Adherence Scale was used to assess the adherence rate and the reason of non-adherence. Data were entered and analyzed using Microsoft Excel 2010. Results: The overall adherence rate was found to be 79% (n = 158). Adherence rate in females were low was compared with their male counterparts (74.7% vs. 85.7%). The higher rate of adherence was found in age group of 30-40 years (82%, n = 64). The major intentional and non-intentional reason of non-adherence was side-effects and forgetfulness respectively. Conclusion: Overall, more than three-fourth of the hypertensive participants were found to be adherent to their treatment. On the basis of factors associated with non-adherence, it is analyzed that suitable therapy must be designed for patients individually to increase medication adherence and its effectiveness. PMID:24741278

Khan, Muhammad Umair; Shah, Shahjahan; Hameed, Tahir

2014-01-01

158

Mate guarding in the swallow Hirundo rustica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The importance of mate guarding by males in the monogamous swallowHirundo rustica was studied by temporarily detaining the males. Mate guarding reduced the frequency of extra-pair copulations and of sexual\\u000a chases involving female mates. Males participated in sexual chases more frequently if they had a non-fertile female. Neighbouring\\u000a males of ‘widowed’ females increased their own mate guarding presumably in response

Anders Pape Møller

1987-01-01

159

Hospitalization for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in a National Sample of Children with Sickle Cell Disease Before and After PCV7 Licensure  

PubMed Central

Objective To estimate national hospitalization rates for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) before and after the 2000 licensure of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). Procedure We performed a retrospective trend analysis of the 1994-2007 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases. Hospitalizations involving children with SCD and IPD were identified by ICD-9CM code. The primary outcomes, the annual hospitalization rate for IPD in children with SCD and the proportion of hospitalizations for IPD per 100 total SCD hospitalizations, were analyzed using multivariable linear regression and contingency analysis, respectively. Results A total of 1,242 hospitalizations for IPD in SCD patients were identified from 1994-2007, with a mortality rate of 2.4%. The national mean annual rate of IPD hospitalization decreased by 65%, from 131.8 cases/year from 1994-2000 to 45.5 cases/year from 2001-2007 (p=0.001). The national proportion of hospitalizations for IPD per 100 total SCD hospitalizations decreased from 0.4 to 0.15 (p<0.0001) over the same interval. Following PCV7 licensure, the mean annual cumulative hospital days and cumulative hospital charges decreased nationally by 53% and 36%, respectively. Conclusion In a national sample, PCV7 licensure is temporally associated with a nearly three fold reduction in IPD hospitalizations in children with SCD. PMID:21793185

McCavit, Timothy L.; Xuan, Lei; Zhang, Song; Flores, Glenn; Quinn, Charles T.

2012-01-01

160

The psychotic patient as security guard.  

PubMed

The job of the security guard is generally regarded as stressful because of the potential for violent or other hostile confrontation. Although the public assumes that only mentally healthy individuals who possess the capability to handle stressful situations become employed as security guards, this may not be the case. A series of 15 individuals who suffered from psychotic disorders while working as security guards is studied and discussed in terms of the issues of dangerousness and public safety. One case is described in detail in order to highlight important issues resulting from being psychotic while working as a security guard. PMID:8263486

Silva, J A; Leong, G B; Weinstock, R

1993-11-01

161

An analysis of guard cell motion  

E-print Network

). In the absence of the turgor pressure in the epidermal cel7s, the resultant outward pushing force from the guard cell turgor is counter-balanced by the elastic force on the walls of the guard cell. The energy stored in the system is in the nature of elastic... be considered as a sequence of quasi-static states. At each equilibrium state, the zesultant force from the turgor pressure is counter-balanced by the elastic force on the walls of the guard cell. A guard cell can be pictured in the absence of external...

Wu, Hsin-i

2012-06-07

162

The provision of hospital chaplaincy in the United States: a national overview.  

PubMed

Over the past 25 years, the Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations has changed its guidelines regarding religious/spiritual care of hospitalized patients to increase attention concerning this aspect of hospital-based care. Little empirical evidence assesses the extent to which hospitals relied on hospital chaplains as care providers during these years. This study investigates (1) the extent of chaplaincy service availability in US hospitals between 1980 and 2003; (2) the predictors of having chaplaincy services in 1993 and 2003; and (3) the change in the magnitude of these predictors between years. This study examines the presence or absence of chaplaincy or pastoral care services in hospitals using the American Hospital Association Annual Survey of Hospitals (ranging from 4,946-6,353 hospitals) in 1980-1985, 1992-1993, and 2002-2003. Between 54% and 64% of hospitals had chaplaincy services between 1980 and 2003, with no systematic trend over this period. In 1993 and 2003, hospital size, location, and church affiliation were central factors influencing the presence of chaplaincy services. Smaller hospitals and those in rural areas were less likely to have chaplaincy services. Church-operated hospitals were much more likely to have chaplaincy services; but between 1993 and 2003, church-operated hospitals were more likely to drop chaplaincy services than to add them. Not-for-profit hospitals were more likely than investor-owned hospitals to add chaplaincy services. Changes to Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations policies about the religious/spiritual care of hospitalized patients between 1980 and 2003 seem to have had no discernible effect on the fraction of US hospitals that had chaplaincy services. Rather, characteristics of hospitals, their surroundings, and their religious affiliations influenced whether they provided chaplaincy services to patients. PMID:18475239

Cadge, Wendy; Freese, Jeremy; Christakis, Nicholas A

2008-06-01

163

The study motivations and study preferences of student groups from Asian nations majoring in hospitality and tourism management programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study identified why students in China, Taiwan, and Korea at both undergraduate and master's level want to major in hospitality and tourism management (HTM), why they prefer to study abroad, and their preferred concentration of study in the HTM major. Three Asian national student groups were selected at both the undergraduate and master's student level. In a comparison of

Samuel Seongseop Kim; Yingzhi Guo; Kuo-Ching Wang; Jerome Agrusa

2007-01-01

164

The Implications of the National Minimum Wage for Training Practices and Skill Utilisation in the United Kingdom Hospitality Industry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two key issues thrown up by the 1999 introduction of the National Minimum Wage (NMW) in the United Kingdom are its likely impact on employers' training practices in low paying sectors of the economy and the implications for skills. Based on a study of the hospitality industry, this article assesses the limited significance of the differential,…

Norris, Gill; Williams, Steve; Adam-Smith, Derek

2003-01-01

165

Advance Data Number 320. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 1999 Emergency Department Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes ambulatory care visits to hospital emergency departments (ED's) in the United States. Statistics are presented on selected hospital, patient, and visit characteristics. Highlights of trends in ED utilization from 1992 through 1999 ar...

L. F. McCaig, M. P. H. Burt, C. W. Burt

2001-01-01

166

Guards, Galleries, Fortresses, and the Octoplex  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The art gallery problem asks for the maximum number of stationary guards required to protect the interior of a polygonal art gallery with "n" walls. This article explores solutions to this problem and several of its variants. In addition, some unsolved problems involving the guarding of geometric objects are presented.

Michael, T. S.

2011-01-01

167

33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...in full color is described as follows: White anchors and white ring all outlined in medium blue (Coast Guard blue), letters and numerals medium blue (Coast Guard blue), white area within ring, shield with medium blue (Coast Guard...

2012-07-01

168

33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...in full color is described as follows: White anchors and white ring all outlined in medium blue (Coast Guard blue), letters and numerals medium blue (Coast Guard blue), white area within ring, shield with medium blue (Coast Guard...

2013-07-01

169

[Scorpion envenomation treated in the Infectious and Tropical Diseases at the Donka National Hospital, Guinea].  

PubMed

A retrospective descriptive study was conducted from 1(st) October 2010 to 30 November 2012 on the records of patients admitted for scorpion envenomation in the Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases at the Donka National Hospital. The objective of this study is to describe the epidemiological profile and clinical characteristics of scorpion envenomation in Maritime Guinea, from scorpion stings recently covered in this service. We collected 75 cases of scorpion envenomation. The median age was 21.5 with interquartile 8 and 20 and sex ratio was 1.29. The upper limbs were involved in 55% of cases, followed by the lower limbs (35%), trunk (6%), head and neck (4%). We observed 63% of patients with local signs, 30% mild and general clinical signs of 7% severe systemic symptoms. All patients received an analgesic and a heterologous antitoxin, associated with an antibiotic (87% of patients), a corticosteroid (72%), diazepam (13%) and furosemide (34.6%). The incidence of scorpion envenomation is not negligible despite underreporting of cases, most often treated in traditional medicine. PMID:25158841

Sako, F B; Bangoura, E F; Traoré, F A; Soumah, M M; Tounkara, T M; Djessanglar, R; Baldé, H; Baldé, O

2014-12-01

170

Thermal design of a miniature guarded hot plate apparatus  

SciTech Connect

Under contract from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the authors have developed a prototype design for a miniature guarded hot plate apparatus that can be used to determine the thermal resistance of very small specimens (1 to 3 cm square) of thermal insulation materials at temperatures from {minus}40 C to + 100 C, with the capability to carry out measurements in air, selected gases, or vacuum. The overall design approach for this apparatus has been published previously. In the present paper, the authors provide details concerning the thermal design of the apparatus, including discussions of heater designs to promote temperature uniformity of the hot plate, guard designs to control extraneous heat gains and losses, material selection for the components of the apparatus, and techniques for temperature measurements.

Flynn, D.R.; Gorthala, R. [DRF R and D, Inc., Millwood, VA (United States)

1997-11-01

171

Quality of intrapartum care at Mulago national referral hospital, Uganda: clients' perspective  

PubMed Central

Background Quality of intrapartum care is an important intervention towards increasing clients’ utilization of skilled attendance at birth and accelerating improvements in newborn’s and maternal survival and wellbeing. Ensuring quality of care is one of the key challenges facing maternal and neonatal services in Uganda. The study assessed quality of intrapartum care services in the general labor ward of the Mulago national referral and teaching hospital in Uganda from clients’ perspective. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted using face to face interviews at discharge with 384 systematically selected clients, who delivered in general labor ward at Mulago hospital during May, 2012. Data analysis was done using STATA Version (10) software. Means and median general index scores for quality of intrapartum care services were calculated. Linear regression models were used to determine factors associated with quality of care. Results Overall, quality of intrapartum care mean index score was 49.4 (standard deviation (sd) 15.46, and the median (interquartile range (IQR)) was 49.1 (37.5–58.9). Median index scores (IQR) per selected quality of care indicators were; dignity and respect 75 (50–87.5); relief of pain and suffering 71.4 (42.8-85.7); information 42.1 (31.6-55.3); privacy and confidentiality 33.3 (1–66.7); and involvement in decision making 16.7 (1–33.3). On average, higher educational level (college/university) (?: 6.81, 95% CI: 0.85-15.46) and rural residence of clients (?: 5.67, 95% CI: 0.95-10.3) were statistically associated with higher quality scores. Conclusion This study has revealed that quality of intrapartum care services from clients’ perspective was low. Improvements should be focused on involving clients in decision making, provision of information about their conditions and care, and provision of privacy and confidentiality. There is also need to improve the number and availability of health care providers in the labor ward. PMID:23941203

2013-01-01

172

Fluorescence Properties of Guard Cell Chloroplasts  

PubMed Central

The presence of chloroplasts in guard cells from leaf epidermis, coleoptile, flowers, and albino portions of variegated leaves was established by incident fluorescence microscopy, thus confirming the notion that guard cell chloroplasts are remarkably conserved. Room temperature emission spectra from a few chloroplasts in a single guard cell of Vicia faba showed one major peak at around 683 nanometers. Low-temperature (77 K) emission spectra from peels of albino portions of Chlorophytum comosum leaves and from mesophyll chloroplasts of green parts of the same leaves showed major peaks at around 687 and 733 nanometers, peaks usually attributed to photosystem II and photosystem I pigment systems, respectively. Spectra of peels of V. faba leaves showed similar peaks. However, fluorescence microscopy revealed that the Vicia peels, as well as those from Allium cepa and Tulipa sp., were contaminated with non-guard cell chloroplasts which were practically undetectable under bright field illumination. These observations pose restrictions on the use of epidermal peels as a source of isolated guard cell chloroplasts. Studies on the 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea-sensitive variable fluorescence kinetics of uncontaminated epidermal peels of C. comosum indicated that guard cell chloroplasts operate a normal, photosystem II-dependent, linear electron transport. The above properties in combination with their reported inability to fix CO2 photosynthetically may render the guard cell chloroplasts optimally suited to supply the reducing and high-energy phosphate equivalents needed to sustain active ion transport during stomatal opening in daylight. PMID:16661620

Zeiger, Eduardo; Armond, Paul; Melis, Anastasios

1981-01-01

173

Contemporary Evidence about Hospital Strategies for Reducing 30-Day Readmissions: A National Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives We sought to determine the range and prevalence of practices being implemented by hospitals to reduce 30-day readmissions of patients with heart failure or acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Background Readmissions of patients with heart failure or AMI are both common and costly; however evidence on strategies adopted by hospitals to reduce readmission rates is limited. Methods We used a web-based survey to conduct a cross-sectional study of hospitals’ reported use of specific practices to reduce readmissions for patients with heart failure or AMI. We contacted all hospitals enrolled in the Hospital to Home (H2H) quality improvement initiative as of July 2010. Of 594 hospitals, 537 completed the survey (response rate of 90.4%). We used standard frequency analysis to describe the prevalence of key hospital practices in the areas of 1) quality improvement resources and performance monitoring, 2) medication management efforts, and 3) discharge and follow-up processes. Results Nearly 90% of hospitals agreed or strongly agreed that they had a written objective of reducing preventable readmission for patients with heart failure or AMI. More hospitals reported having quality improvement teams to reduce preventable readmissions for patients with heart failure (87%) than for patients with AMI (54%). On average, hospitals used 4.8 of 10 key practices; fewer than 3% of hospitals utilized all 10 practices. Conclusions Although most hospitals have a written objective of reducing preventable readmissions of patients with heart failure or AMI, the implementation of recommended practices varied widely. More evidence establishing the effectiveness of various practices is needed. PMID:22818070

Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie; Horwitz, Leora I.; Sipsma, Heather; Thompson, Jennifer W.; Elma, Mary Anne; Walsh, Mary Norine; Krumholz, Harlan M.

2012-01-01

174

National Health and Hospital Reform Commission final report and patient-centred suggestions for reform.  

PubMed

The final report of the National Health and Hospital Reform Commission (NHHRC) called for a strengthened consumer voice and empowerment. This has salience for the development of health policy concerning chronic illnesses. This paper compares the recommendations for chronic illness care made in the NHHRC final report with suggestions made by people with chronic illness and family carers of people with chronic illness in a recent Australian study. Sixty-six participants were interviewed in a qualitative research project of the Serious and Continuing Illness Policy and Practice Study (SCIPPS). Participants were people with type II diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic heart failure. Family carers were also interviewed. Content analysis was undertaken and participants' recommendations for improving care were compared with those proposed in the NHHRC final report. Many suggestions from the participants of the SCIPPS qualitative research project appeared in the NHHRC final report, including the need to improve care coordination, health literacy and the experience of Indigenous Australians. The research project also identified important issues of family carers, immigrants and people with multiple illnesses, which were not addressed in the NHHRC final report. More specific attention is needed in health reform to improve the experience of family carers, Indigenous peoples, immigrants to Australia and people with multiple illnesses. To align more closely with their needs, health reform must be explicitly informed by the voices of people with chronic illness and their family carers. The NHHRC recommendations must be supplemented with proposals that address the needs of these people for support and the problems associated with poor care coordination. PMID:21645472

Jowsey, Tanisha; Yen, Laurann; Wells, Robert; Leeder, Stephen

2011-01-01

175

Hospital system management in France and Canada: National pluralism and provincial centralism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the mid-1960s, France and Canada have developed different ways of managing their hospital systems. In Canada, each provincial government has gradually imposed technocratic control with the aim of planning the allocation of health-care resources. In spite of attempts to do the same in France, the hospital system has grown with few restrictions other than those set by the medical

Gerard de Pouvourville; Marc Renaud

1985-01-01

176

A National Program to Expand Educational Opportunity in Hospital and Health Care Administration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report, prepared by the Association of University Programs in Hospital Administration (AUPHA), presents recommendations for increasing the representation of minorities in hospital and health-care administration careers on a nationwide basis. A short-term objective is to increase the representation of minorities in graduate degree programs…

Association of Univ. Programs in Health Administration, Washington, DC.

177

[The background of the hardships of Moabit Hospital; an aspect of German medicine under the National-Socialistic rule].  

PubMed

Under the National-Socialistic (Nazi) rule, Moabit Hospital (City Hospital of Berlin at Moabit) met various hardships. In the present communication, their sufferings and backgrounds are described as an aspect of German medicine during the Nazi regime. 1. Around April 1st, 1933, the day of an anti-Jewish boycott, the Jewish doctors, co-medical and non-medical personnel were banned from the hospital. 2. At the hospital, they were forced to perform involuntary sterilization on psychiatric patients and patients with hereditary disease, by an inhuman law. 3. Dr. Georg Groscurth, a chief physician of the hospital, was executed because of his anti-Nazi activity. His act came from his patriotism and righteous indignation against the cruelty of Nazism. 4. In comparison with the inhumanity of the Nazis and in relation to the origin of the name of the area, Moabit, the author comments on "the Prussian tolerance" realized by Elector Friedlich Wilhelm of Brandenburg. The author believes this tolerance was one of the important causes of the flourishing of German medicine in the ninteenth century. PMID:11618869

Izumi, H

1995-12-01

178

Maternal oral health status and preterm low birth weight at Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania: a case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The study examined the relationship between oral health status (periodontal disease and carious pulpal exposure (CPE)) and preterm low-birth-weight (PTLBW) infant deliveries among Tanzanian-African mothers at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Tanzania. METHODS: A retrospective case-control study was conducted, involving 373 postpartum mothers aged 14–44 years (PTLBW – 150 cases) and at term normal-birth-weight (TNBW) – 223 controls), using structured

Elifuraha GS Mumghamba; Karim P Manji

2007-01-01

179

49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

2011-10-01

180

49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

2010-10-01

181

49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

2012-10-01

182

49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

2013-10-01

183

33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

2013-07-01

184

33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

2011-07-01

185

33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

2010-07-01

186

33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

2012-07-01

187

33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

2014-07-01

188

46 CFR 127.330 - Guards in dangerous places.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Guards in dangerous places. 127.330 Section 127...and Guards § 127.330 Guards in dangerous places. Suitable hand covers, guards...must be installed on each exposed and dangerous place, such as gears of rotating...

2010-10-01

189

Hospital system management in France and Canada: national pluralism and provincial centralism.  

PubMed

Since the mid-1960s, France and Canada have developed different ways of managing their hospital systems. In Canada, each provincial government has gradually imposed technocratic control with the aim of planning the allocation of health-care resources. In spite of attempts to do the same in France, the hospital system has grown with few restrictions other than those set by the medical profession itself. Consequently, health expenditures have risen at one of the fastest paces in Europe. The provincial monopoly over hospital care in Canada contrasts with the juxtaposition of local 'cartels' throughout France resulting, for the latter, in a much more uncoordinated system. After a description of each country's hospital system and its historical origins, the advantages and disadvantages of each system are assessed so as to understand current public debate in each country. PMID:3975680

de Pouvourville, G; Renaud, M

1985-01-01

190

National Trends in US Hospital Admissions for Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 1999 to 2011  

PubMed Central

IMPORTANCE The increasing intensity of diabetes mellitus management over the past decade may have resulted in lower rates of hyperglycemic emergencies but higher rates of hospital admissions for hypoglycemia among older adults. Trends in these hospitalizations and subsequent outcomes are not known. OBJECTIVE To characterize changes in hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia hospitalization rates and subsequent mortality and readmission rates among older adults in the United States over a 12-year period, and to compare these results according to age, sex, and race. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Retrospective observational study using data from 33 952 331 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years or older from 1999 to 2011. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Hospitalization rates for hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, 30-day and 1-year mortality rates, and 30-day readmission rates. RESULTS A total of 279 937 patients experienced 302 095 hospitalizations for hyperglycemia, and 404 467 patients experienced 429 850 hospitalizations for hypoglycemia between 1999 and 2011. During this time, rates of admissions for hyperglycemia declined by 38.6% (from 114 to 70 admissions per 100 000 person-years), while admissions for hypoglycemia increased by 11.7% (from 94 to 105 admissions per 100 000 person-years). In analyses designed to account for changing diabetes mellitus prevalence, admissions for hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia declined by 55.2% and 9.5%, respectively. Trends were similar across age, sex, and racial subgroups, but hypoglycemia rates were 2-fold higher for older patients (?75 years) when compared with younger patients (65–74 years), and admission rates for both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia were 4-fold higher for black patients compared with white patients. The 30-day and 1-year mortality and 30-day readmission rates improved during the study period and were similar after an index hospitalization for either hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia (5.4%, 17.1%, and 15.3%, respectively, after hyperglycemia hospitalizations in 2010; 4.4%, 19.9%, and 16.3% after hypoglycemia hospitalizations). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Hospital admission rates for hypoglycemia now exceed those for hyperglycemia among older adults. Although admissions for hypoglycemia have declined modestly since 2007, rates among black Medicare beneficiaries and those older than 75 years remain high. Hospital admissions for severe hypoglycemia seem to pose a greater health threat than those for hyperglycemia, suggesting new opportunities for improvement in care of persons with diabetes mellitus. PMID:24838229

Lipska, Kasia J.; Ross, Joseph S.; Wang, Yun; Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Minges, Karl; Karter, Andrew J.; Huang, Elbert S.; Desai, Mayur M.; Gill, Thomas M.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

2014-01-01

191

Hospital-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD in Sweden--a national survey.  

PubMed

Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary and cost-effective intervention that leads to improved health in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD. However, the availability of PR programs varies between and within different countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the availability and content of hospital-based PR programs in patients with COPD in Sweden. A cross-sectional descriptive design was applied using a web-based questionnaire which was sent out to all hospitals in Sweden. The questionnaire consisted of 32 questions that concerned availability and content of PR in patients with COPD during 2011. Seventy out of 71 hospitals responded the electronic survey. Forty-six (66%) hospitals offered PR for patients with COPD. Around 75% of the hospitals in southern and middle parts of Sweden and 33% of the hospitals in the northern part offered PR. Thirty-four percent of the patients declined participation. A total number of 1355 patients participated in PR which represents 0.2% of the COPD population in Sweden. All hospitals had exercise training as major component and 76% offered an educational program. Not even half a percent of the patients with COPD in Sweden took part in a hospital-based PR program during 2011. There was a considerable geographic discrepancy in availability over the country. To enable a greater part of the increasing number of patients with COPD to take part in this evidence-based treatment, there is a need of evaluating other settings of PR programs; in primary care, at home and/or over the internet. PMID:23702089

Wadell, K; Janaudis Ferreira, T; Arne, M; Lisspers, K; Ställberg, B; Emtner, M

2013-08-01

192

Hospital staffing, organization, and quality of care: Cross-national findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the effects of nurse staffing and organizational support for nursing care on nurses' dissatisfaction with their jobs, nurse burnout, and nurse reports of quality of patient care in an international sample of hospitals. Design: Multisite cross-sectional survey Setting: Adult acute-care hospitals in the U.S. (Pennsylvania), Canada (Ontario and British Columbia), England and Scotland. Study Participants: 10319 nurses

Linda H. Aiken; Sean P. Clarke; Douglas M. Sloane

2002-01-01

193

Hospital malnutrition: the Brazilian national survey (IBRANUTRI): a study of 4000 patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:We assessed nutrition status and prevalence of malnutrition in hospital patients as determined by the Subjective Global Assessment Form, awareness of patients’ nutrition status by health teams, and the use of nutrition therapy.METHODS:We enrolled 4000 hospital patients at least 18 y old who were covered by the Brazilian public health care system in a cross-sectional, multicenter epidemiologic study. We used

Dan L Waitzberg; Waleska T Caiaffa; M. Isabel T. D Correia

2001-01-01

194

Does a referral from home to hospital affect satisfaction with childbirth? A cross-national comparison  

PubMed Central

Background The Belgian and Dutch societies present many similarities but differ with regard to the organisation of maternity care. The Dutch way of giving birth is well known for its high percentage of home births and its low medical intervention rate. In contrast, home births in Belgium are uncommon and the medical model is taken for granted. Dutch and Belgian maternity care systems are compared with regard to the influence of being referred to specialist care during pregnancy or intrapartum while planning for a home birth. We expect that a referral will result in lower satisfaction with childbirth, especially in Belgium. Methods Two questionnaires were filled out by 605 women, one at 30 weeks of pregnancy and one within the first two weeks after childbirth, either at home or in a hospital. Of these, 563 questionnaires were usable for analysis. Women were invited to participate in the study by independent midwives and obstetricians during antenatal visits in 2004–2005. Satisfaction with childbirth was measured by the Mackey Satisfaction with Childbirth Rating Scale, which takes into account the multidimensional nature of the concept. Results Belgian women are more satisfied than Dutch women and home births are more satisfying than hospital births. Women who are referred to the hospital while planning for a home birth are less satisfied than women who planned to give birth in hospital and did. A referral has a greater negative impact on satisfaction for Dutch women. Conclusion There is no reason to believe Dutch women receive hospital care of lesser quality than Belgian women in case of a referral. Belgian and Dutch attach different meaning to being referred, resulting in a different evaluation of childbirth. In the Dutch maternity care system home births lead to higher satisfaction, but once a referral to the hospital is necessary satisfaction drops and ends up lower than satisfaction with hospital births that were planned in advance. We need to understand more about referral processes and how women experience them. PMID:17626631

Christiaens, Wendy; Gouwy, Anneleen; Bracke, Piet

2007-01-01

195

Does decreased research funding from the National Institutes of Health to local academic hospitals cause an increase in industry sponsored research funding?  

E-print Network

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been the stalwart of research funding at universities and academic teaching hospitals. However, since the start of the last decade NIH funding has contracted in real terms. ...

Truesdell, John A., Jr. (John Alan)

2011-01-01

196

GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S82 Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, GuardWatch ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S82 - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, On ridge above Tunnel CE-1, on Prime Road on ridge above Tunnel B-11, & on ridge above Tunnel C-17, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

197

GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S84 Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, GuardWatch ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S84 - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, On ridge above Tunnel CE-1, on Prime Road on ridge above Tunnel B-11, & on ridge above Tunnel C-17, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

198

Final report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission: will we get the health care governance reform we need?  

PubMed

The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission (NHHRC) has recommended that Australia develop a "single health system", governed by the federal government. Steps to achieving this include: a "Healthy Australia Accord" to agree on the reform framework; the progressive takeover of funding of public hospitals by the federal government; and the possible implementation of a consumer-choice health funding model, called "Medicare Select". These proposals face significant implementation issues, and the final solution needs to deal with both financial and political sustainability. If the federal and state governments cannot agree on a reform plan, the Prime Minister may need to go to the electorate for a mandate, which may be shaped by other economic issues such as tax reform and intergenerational challenges. PMID:19807630

Stoelwinder, Johannes U

2009-10-01

199

Still making progress to improve the hospital workplace environment? Results from the 2008 National Survey of Registered Nurses.  

PubMed

Despite the majority of RNs perceiving a shortage of nurses, findings from the 2008 National Survey of RNs indicate the hospital workplace improved in several areas compared to a 2006 survey. Improvements included the time RNs spend with patients, quality of nursing care, and a decreasing impact of the shortage on delaying nurses' responses to pages or calls, staff communication, patients' wait time for surgery, and timeliness and efficiency of care. Areas the environment was perceived to have worsened included overtime hours, sexual harassment/hostile, and physical violence. RNs hold mixed views about the consequences of reporting errors and mistakes with a majority agreeing that reporting them had led to positive changes to prevent future errors, but that mistakes were held against them. Overall, results suggest that hospital managers can be reassured that their efforts to improve the workplace environment are having their intended effect but, at the same time, important areas for improvement remain. PMID:19927444

Buerhaus, Peter I; DesRoches, Catherine; Donelan, Karen; Hess, Robert

2009-01-01

200

Hospital contacts with infection and risk of schizophrenia: a population-based cohort study with linkage of danish national registers.  

PubMed

Infections and immune responses have been suggested to play an important role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Several studies have reported associations between maternal infections during pregnancy and the child's risk of schizophrenia; however, infection during childhood and adolescence unrelated to maternal infection during pregnancy has not been studied to nearly the same extent and the results are far from conclusive. Data were drawn from 2 population-based registers, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and the Danish National Hospital Register. We used a historical population-based cohort design and selected all individuals born in Denmark between 1981 and 1996 (n = 843 390). We identified all individuals with a first-time hospital contact with schizophrenia from 1991 through 2010. Out of the 3409 individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, a total of 1549 individuals had had a hospital contact with infection before their schizophrenia diagnosis (45%). Our results indicate that individuals who have had a hospital contact with infection are more likely to develop schizophrenia (relative risk [RR] = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.32-1.51) than individuals who had not had such a hospital contact. Bacterial infection was the type of infection that was associated with the highest risk of schizophrenia (RR = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.47-1.82). Our study does not exclude that a certain type of infection may have a specific effect; yet, it does suggest that schizophrenia is associated with a wide range of infections. This association may be due to inflammatory responses affecting the brain or genetic and environmental risk factors aggregating in families. PMID:24379444

Nielsen, Philip R; Benros, Michael E; Mortensen, Preben B

2014-11-01

201

Admission to acute care hospitals for adolescent substance abuse: a national descriptive analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Use of alcohol and illicit drugs by adolescents remains a problem in the U.S. Case identification and early treatment can occur within a broad variety of healthcare and non-healthcare settings, including acute care hospitals. The objective of this study is to describe the extent and nature of adolescent admissions to the acute inpatient setting for substance abuse (SA). We

Deena J Chisolm; Kelly J Kelleher

2006-01-01

202

Language, Literacy and Numeracy in National Training Packages: Case Studies in Aged Care and Hospitality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The implementation and effectiveness of the inclusion of literacy and numeracy in industry training packages was examined in case studies of three programs in Western Australia. Two were certificate programs in cooking and food and beverage as specified in the hospitality training package, and the third was an aged care program based on the…

Haines, Christine; Brand, Jennie Bickmore

203

Rising Obesity-Related Hospital Admissions among Children and Young People in England: National Time Trends Study  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe the trends in hospital admissions associated with obesity as a primary diagnosis and comorbidity, and bariatric surgery procedures among children and young people in England. Design National time trends study of hospital admissions data between 2000 and 2009. Participants Children and young people aged 5 to 19 years who were admitted to hospital with any diagnosis of obesity. Main outcome measures Age- and sex-specific admission rates per million children. Results Between 2000 and 2009, age- and sex-specific hospital admission rates in 5–19 year olds for total obesity-related diagnoses increased more than four-fold from 93.0 (95% CI 86.0 to 100.0) per million children to 414.0 (95% CI 410.7 to 417.5) per million children, largely due to rising admissions where obesity was mentioned as a co-morbidity. The median age of admission to hospital over the study period was 14.0 years; 5,566 (26.7%) admissions were for obesity and 15,319 (73.3%) mentioned obesity as a comorbidity. Admissions were more common in girls than boys (56.2% v 43.8%). The most common reasons for admission where obesity was a comorbid condition were sleep apnoea, asthma, and complications of pregnancy. The number of bariatric surgery procedures has risen from 1 per year in 2000 to 31 in 2009, with the majority were performed in obese girls (75.6%) aged 13–19 years. Conclusions Hospital admission rates for obesity and related comorbid conditions have increased more than four-fold over the past decade amongst children and young people. Although some of the increase is likely to be due to improved case ascertainment, conditions associated with obesity in children and young people are imposing greater challenges for health care providers in English hospitals. Most inpatient care is directed at dealing with associated conditions rather than primary assessment and management of obesity itself. PMID:23776541

Jones Nielsen, Jessica D.; Laverty, Anthony A.; Millett, Christopher; Mainous III, Arch G.; Majeed, Azeem; Saxena, Sonia

2013-01-01

204

National Trends in Main Causes of Hospitalization: A Multi-Cohort Register Study of the Finnish Working-Age Population, 1976–2010  

PubMed Central

Background The health transition theory argues that societal changes produce proportional changes in causes of disability and death. The aim of this study was to identify long-term changes in main causes of hospitalization in working-age population within a nation that has experienced considerable societal change. Methodology National trends in all-cause hospitalization and hospitalizations for the five main diagnostic categories were investigated in the data obtained from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. The seven-cohort sample covered the period from 1976 to 2010 and consisted of 3,769,356 randomly selected Finnish residents, each cohort representing 25% sample of population aged 18 to 64 years. Principal Findings Over the period of 35 years, the risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases and respiratory diseases decreased. Hospitalization for musculoskeletal diseases increased whereas mental and behavioral hospitalizations slightly decreased. The risk of cancer hospitalization decreased marginally in men, whereas in women an upward trend was observed. Conclusions/Significance A considerable health transition related to hospitalizations and a shift in the utilization of health care services of working-age men and women took place in Finland between 1976 and 2010. PMID:25379723

Kouvonen, Anne; Koskinen, Aki; Varje, Pekka; Kokkinen, Lauri; De Vogli, Roberto; Väänänen, Ari

2014-01-01

205

78 FR 43865 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Commission will tour Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and Ohio Air National Guard Wings at Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base, Springfield Air National...Governor's office and local U.S. Air Force and Ohio National Guard leadership who...

2013-07-22

206

Quality of care for people with dementia in general hospitals: national cross-sectional audit of patient assessment.  

PubMed

There have been recent reports of poor quality care in the National Health Service in the UK, and older people with dementia are particularly vulnerable. This study aims to examine the quality of assessment of people with dementia admitted to hospital. Cross-sectional case-note audit of key physical and psychosocial assessments was carried out in 7,934 people with dementia who were discharged from 206 general hospitals. Most people had no record of a standardised assessment of their cognitive state (56.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 55.8-58.0) or functioning (74.2%, 95% CI = 73.2-75.1). Information from carers was documented in 39.0% of cases (95% CI = 37.9-40.1). There was considerable variation across hospital sites. Key assessments were less likely when people were admitted to surgical wards. Assessments fall well below recommended standards especially with regard to social and cognitive functioning. Problems are particularly marked on surgical wards. PMID:25301908

Souza, Renata; Gandesha, Aarti; Hood, Chloe; Chaplin, Robert; Young, John; Crome, Peter; Crawford, Mike J

2014-10-01

207

2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building (Building 90), administration and clinical hospital building (Building 88), and hospital building (Building 91) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, 4101 South Fourth Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

208

National analysis of in-hospital resource utilization in choledocholithiasis management using propensity scores  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Two treatment options exist for choledocholithiasis (CDL): endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and common\\u000a bile duct exploration (CBDE). Resource utilization measured by total in-hospital charges (THC) and length of stay (LOS) was\\u000a compared using the propensity score (PS). In this study, PS was the probability that a patient received CBDE based on comorbidities\\u000a and demographics. The power of this method lies

B. K. Poulose; P. G. Arbogast; M. D. Holzman

2006-01-01

209

Subjective and objective outcomes of tympanoplasty surgery at National Hospital Abuja, Nigeria 2005–2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study is to determine the subjective and objective outcomes of tympanoplasty surgery carried out in\\u000a patients with otitis media and to identify factors responsible for these outcomes. The study setting is tertiary care urban\\u000a referral hospital in a developing economy and the study methodology is a prospective analysis of patients with diagnosis of\\u000a chronic suppurative otitis

Abiodun Daud Olusesi; Emmanuel Opaluwah; Sherifat Bolanle Hassan

2011-01-01

210

A national hospital-based survey of snakes responsible for bites in Thailand.  

PubMed

Snakes which had been killed and brought to hospital with the patients they had bitten were collected in 80 district and provincial hospitals throughout 67 provinces in Thailand in order to establish the geographical distribution and relative medical importance of the venomous species. Of the 1631 snakes collected, 1145 were venomous: Malayan pit vipers (Calloselasma rhodostoma), green pit vipers (Trimeresurus albolabris) and Russell's vipers (Daboia russelii) were the most numerous, while T. albolabris, C. rhodostoma and spitting cobras ('Naja atra') were the most widely distributed. In 22 cases, non-venomous species were mistaken for venomous ones and antivenom was used unnecessarily. The Malayan krait (Bungarus candidus) was confused with B. fasciatus in 5 cases and B. fasciatus antivenom was used inappropriately. The study extended the known ranges of most of the medically-important venomous species in Thailand. Correct identification of venomous snakes is especially important in Thailand because the locally-produced antivenoms are monospecific. The technique of hospital-based collection, labelling and preservation of dead snakes brought by bitten patients is recommended when rapid assessment of a country's medically important herpetofauna is required. PMID:1566285

Viravan, C; Looareesuwan, S; Kosakarn, W; Wuthiekanun, V; McCarthy, C J; Stimson, A F; Bunnag, D; Harinasuta, T; Warrell, D A

1992-01-01

211

A&M. Guard house (TAN638). Detail of west facade and front ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A&M. Guard house (TAN-638). Detail of west facade and front door. Flood light bent below eave. Traffic control signal in view. Camera facing east. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-6-3 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

212

159. ARAIII Guard house (ARA609). Shows west and north elevation, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

159. ARA-III Guard house (ARA-609). Shows west and north elevation, floor plan, and section details. Aerojet-general 880-area/GCRE-609-A-1. Date: February 1958. Ineel index code no. 063-0609-00-013-103683. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

213

121. ARAI Guard house (ARA628). Drawing shows north, south, east, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

121. ARA-I Guard house (ARA-628). Drawing shows north, south, east, and west elevations, floor plan, counter details, and roof plan. Norman Engineering Corporation 961-area/SF-628-A-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 063-0628-00-613-102772. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

214

Exploring ARAC Support of U.S. Coast Guard Planning and Response Capability  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Coast Guard is responsible for the protection of the marine environment from spills of oil and hazardous material. The USCG responsibilities include responding to oil and chemical spills from ships as well as from sources ashore. While responding to a spill, The USCG Marine Safety Offices and Detachments, and the National Strike Force (NSF) depend on interagency support

M. S. Baker; R. Baskett; J. S. Ellis

2001-01-01

215

A healthier future for all Australians: an overview of the final report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission.  

PubMed

After extensive community and health industry consultation, the final report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission, A healthier future for all Australians, was presented to the Australian Government on 30 June 2009. The reform agenda aims to tackle major access and equity issues that affect health outcomes for people now; redesign our health system so that it is better positioned to respond to emerging challenges; and create an agile, responsive and self-improving health system for long-term sustainability. The 123 recommendations are grouped in four themes: Taking responsibility: supporting greater individual and collective action to build good health and wellbeing. Connecting care: delivering comprehensive care for people over their lifetime, by strengthening primary health care, reshaping hospitals, improving subacute care, and opening up greater consumer choice and competition in aged care services. Facing inequities: taking action to tackle the causes and impact of health inequities, focusing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people in rural and remote areas, and access to mental health and dental services. Driving quality performance: having leadership and systems to achieve the best use of people, resources and knowledge, including "one health system" with national leadership and local delivery, revised funding arrangements, and changes to health workforce education, training and practice. PMID:19807629

Bennett, Christine C

2009-10-01

216

Trends in the incidence and treatment of necrotizing soft tissue infections: an analysis of the national hospital discharge survey.  

PubMed

Necrotizing soft tissue infections are a rare but potentially fatal condition of the soft tissues caused by virulent, toxin-producing bacteria. In the United States, there is an estimated annual incidence of 0.04 cases per 1000 annually, but previous estimates of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had the incidence at 500 to 1500 cases yearly. Early reports of mortality were variable with rates ranging from 46 to 76% but outcomes have been improving over time. The National Hospital Discharge Survey was analyzed to study current trends in the demographics, incidence, use, and mortality of patients diagnosed with necrotizing soft tissue infections. The authors analyzed the 1999, 2002, and 2007 National Hospital Discharge Survey by using a sampling weighting method. A total of 13,648 cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections were identified in 2007. This represents an increase from 12,153 cases in 2002 and 6612 cases in 1999. In the 9 years from 1999 to 2007 the gross incidence of necrotizing soft tissue infections more than doubled. Hospital stay was essentially unchanged within study years, at 16 days. Mean age increased from approximately 50 years in 1999 to 54 years in 2007. Further, mortality went from 10.45% in 1999 to 9.75% in the 2007 survey. The population-adjusted incidence rate increased 91% in the studied years. Rising use of immunosupression, exponential growth in the incidence of obesity, and type 2 diabetes could be a major contributing factor. The mortality rate is far below the rate in reports published from as early as 20 years ago, and at 9.75% compares with modern case series, but is a more accurate measure of mortality in this condition. PMID:25144805

Soltani, Ali M; Best, Matthew J; Francis, Cameron S; Allan, Bassan J; Askari, Morad; Panthaki, Zubin J

2014-01-01

217

Coast Guard's Response to Spilled Oil  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Coast Guard utilizes a number of monitoring detectors, sensors, and techniques to find, recover and identify oil spills. Discussed in this article are in-situ and airborne sensors, systems developed to provide clean-up capability such as air deployable anti-pollution transfer system (ADAPTS), and techniques which will determine the source of a…

Ard, R. W., Jr.

1976-01-01

218

Complexity Boundaries for Generalized Guarded Existential Rules  

E-print Network

Complexity Boundaries for Generalized Guarded Existential Rules Jean-Franc¸ois Baget INRIA, France of the conjunctive query entail- ment problem for classes of existential rules (also called Tuple under name Datalog. We con- sider here an extension of these rules that allows to create existentially

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

219

Unleashing the health care border guards.  

PubMed

A fervent anti-immigrant sentiment is picking up momentum, and it is reflected in state and federal legislative proposals, including those addressing health reform. If these bills become law, including a California initiative, doctors and nurses could be turned into border patrol guards, and as many as one million legal immigrants could be denied non-emergency medical care. PMID:10142812

Reynoso, C

1994-01-01

220

Double-blind evaluation of the DKL LifeGuard Model 2  

SciTech Connect

On March 20, 1998, Sandia National Laboratories performed a double-blind test of the DKL LifeGuard human presence detector and tracker. The test was designed to allow the device to search for individuals well within the product`s published operational parameters. The Test Operator of the DKL LifeGuard was provided by the manufacturer and was a high-ranking member of DKL management. The test was developed and implemented to verify the performance of the device as specified by the manufacturer. The device failed to meet its published specifications and it performed no better than random chance.

Murray, D.W.; Spencer, F.W.; Spencer, D.D.

1998-05-01

221

30 CFR 75.1722 - Mechanical equipment guards.  

...Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mechanical equipment guards. 75.1722 Section 75.1722 Mineral...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1722 Mechanical equipment guards. (a) Gears; sprockets;...

2014-07-01

222

30 CFR 75.1722 - Mechanical equipment guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mechanical equipment guards. 75.1722 Section 75.1722 Mineral...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1722 Mechanical equipment guards. (a) Gears; sprockets;...

2013-07-01

223

33 CFR 67.50-5 - First Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-5 First Coast Guard District. (a) Description....

2010-07-01

224

30 CFR 75.1722 - Mechanical equipment guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mechanical equipment guards. 75.1722 Section 75.1722 Mineral...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1722 Mechanical equipment guards. (a) Gears; sprockets;...

2012-07-01

225

30 CFR 75.1722 - Mechanical equipment guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mechanical equipment guards. 75.1722 Section 75.1722 Mineral...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1722 Mechanical equipment guards. (a) Gears; sprockets;...

2011-07-01

226

30 CFR 75.1722 - Mechanical equipment guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mechanical equipment guards. 75.1722 Section 75.1722 Mineral...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1722 Mechanical equipment guards. (a) Gears; sprockets;...

2010-07-01

227

46 CFR 108.223 - Guards on exposed equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Guards on exposed equipment. Each unit must have hand covers, guards, or rails installed on all belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, flywheels or other reciprocating, rotating or moving parts of machinery or equipment normally...

2010-10-01

228

33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-25 Eighth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2011-07-01

229

33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-25 Eighth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2012-07-01

230

33 CFR 67.50-45 - Thirteenth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-45 Thirteenth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2011-07-01

231

33 CFR 67.50-15 - Fifth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-15 Fifth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2013-07-01

232

33 CFR 67.50-50 - Seventeenth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-50 Seventeenth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2012-07-01

233

33 CFR 67.50-20 - Seventh Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-20 Seventh Coast Guard District. (a)...

2011-07-01

234

33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a)...

2011-07-01

235

33 CFR 67.50-30 - Ninth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-30 Ninth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2013-07-01

236

33 CFR 67.50-50 - Seventeenth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-50 Seventeenth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2013-07-01

237

33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-25 Eighth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2013-07-01

238

33 CFR 67.50-5 - First Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-5 First Coast Guard District. (a) Description....

2012-07-01

239

33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a)...

2013-07-01

240

33 CFR 67.50-50 - Seventeenth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-50 Seventeenth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2011-07-01

241

33 CFR 67.50-15 - Fifth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-15 Fifth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2012-07-01

242

33 CFR 67.50-15 - Fifth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-15 Fifth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2011-07-01

243

33 CFR 67.50-45 - Thirteenth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-45 Thirteenth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2012-07-01

244

33 CFR 67.50-30 - Ninth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-30 Ninth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2012-07-01

245

33 CFR 67.50-5 - First Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-5 First Coast Guard District. (a) Description....

2013-07-01

246

33 CFR 67.50-20 - Seventh Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-20 Seventh Coast Guard District. (a)...

2013-07-01

247

33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a)...

2012-07-01

248

33 CFR 67.50-30 - Ninth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-30 Ninth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2011-07-01

249

33 CFR 67.50-5 - First Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-5 First Coast Guard District. (a) Description....

2011-07-01

250

33 CFR 67.50-45 - Thirteenth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-45 Thirteenth Coast Guard District. (a)...

2013-07-01

251

33 CFR 67.50-20 - Seventh Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES District Regulations § 67.50-20 Seventh Coast Guard District. (a)...

2012-07-01

252

Cell block one and southeast guard tower, looking from the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Cell block one and southeast guard tower, looking from the central guard tower, facing southeast (note view also includes cell block ten (left) and cell block nine (right)) - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

253

Order defining the jurisdiction of the forestry guard, 30 December 1987.  

PubMed

This Order defines the jurisdiction of the Haitian forestry guard in order better to protect the State's hydrographic basins and national forest resources. It provides that the forestry guard is to have the following functions: 1) to oversee in general the application of forestry legislation; 2) to stop all forms of agricultural or forestry exploitation that harm state lands; 3) to confiscate all illicitly exploited forestry resources; 4) to inspect regularly the parts of the forest or parks assigned to its care; and 5) to control the circulation of wood and wood products, documents, and freight. In collaboration with other interested state agencies, the forestry guard is also to prevent forest fires and promote the natural and man-made generation of the forest. PMID:12289483

1988-01-01

254

41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Machine guarding. 50-204.5 Section 50-204...Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect...

2012-07-01

255

41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Machine guarding. 50-204.5 Section 50-204...Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect...

2011-07-01

256

41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Machine guarding. 50-204.5 Section 50-204...Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect...

2014-07-01

257

41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Machine guarding. 50-204.5 Section 50-204...Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect...

2013-07-01

258

46 CFR 167.40-30 - Guards and rails.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards and rails. 167.40-30 Section 167.40-30...Requirements § 167.40-30 Guards and rails. On nautical school ships all exposed...properly protected with covers, guards, or rails, in order that the danger of...

2010-10-01

259

46 CFR 190.25-15 - Guards in dangerous places.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Guards in dangerous places. 190.25-15 Section 190...Guards § 190.25-15 Guards in dangerous places. (a) Suitable hand covers...be installed in way of all exposed and dangerous places such as gears, machinery,...

2010-10-01

260

46 CFR 92.25-15 - Guards in dangerous places.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Guards in dangerous places. 92.25-15 Section 92...and Guards § 92.25-15 Guards in dangerous places. (a) Suitable hand covers...be installed in way of all exposed and dangerous places such as gears, machinery,...

2010-10-01

261

46 CFR 72.40-20 - Guards in dangerous places.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Guards in dangerous places. 72.40-20 Section 72...and Guards § 72.40-20 Guards in dangerous places. (a) Suitable covers...be installed in way of all exposed and dangerous places such as gears, machinery,...

2010-10-01

262

USGS with U.S. and Canadian Coast Guard  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Waiting to board the Canadian helicopter from U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy and visit Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent. From left to right: USGS scientist Jonathan Childs, chief scientist for this expedition on Healy; U.S. Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Douglas Petrusa; Canadian Coas...

2009-01-28

263

Social inequalities and women's satisfaction with childbirth care in Brazil: a national hospital-based survey.  

PubMed

The objective is to identify factors associated with women's satisfaction towards the care provided by the health professionals during hospital assisted delivery and identify how those factors influence their general levels of satisfaction. The cohort hospital based study was carried out in connection with the Birth in Brazil research. 15,688 women were included, interviewed at home, through the phone, from March 2011 to February 2012. All the variables that compose the professional/pregnant woman relationship (waiting time, respect, privacy, clarity of explanations, possibility of asking questions and participating in the decisions) and schooling remained independently associated with general satisfaction towards delivery care, in the adjusted model. The white women assisted in the southeastern and southern regions of the country, by the private sector and with a companion present gave a better evaluation of the care provided. Women value the way in which they are assisted by the health professionals, and there are inequalities in the way they are treated based on skin color, geographic region and financial situation. PMID:25167175

d'Orsi, Eleonora; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Diniz, Carmen Simone Grilo; de Aguiar, Janaina Marques; Gusman, Christine Ranier; Torres, Jacqueline Alves; Angulo-Tuesta, Antonia; Rattner, Daphne; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira

2014-08-01

264

A National Profile Of Patient Safety In U.S. Hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measures based on routinely collected data would be useful to examine the epidemiology of patient safety. Extending previous work, we established the face and con- sensual validity of twenty Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs). We generated a national profile of patient safety by applying these PSIs to the HCUP Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The inci- dence of most nonobstetric PSIs increased with

Patrick S. Romano; Jeffrey J. Geppert; Sheryl Davies; Marlene R. Miller; Anne Elixhauser; Kathryn M. McDonald

2003-01-01

265

Infusing industry, community, and the Coast Guard into the Civil Engineering Program at the United States Coast Guard Academy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Educating Civil Engineers at the United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA) presents its own unique challenges and opportunities. Given our dual mission to graduate civil engineers and officers for the United States Coast Guard, it is important that we infuse practices from industry into the Coast Guard Civil Engineering Program while ensuring that our graduates develop a sense of community

Hudson Jackson; Kassim Tarhini; Sharon Zelmanowitz

2009-01-01

266

The rate and cost of hospital-acquired infections occurring in patients admitted to selected specialties of a district general hospital in England and the national burden imposed  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between April 1994 and May 1995 4000 adult patients admitted to selected specialties of a district general hospital were recruited to this study. Hospital-acquired infections presenting during the in-patient stay were identified using previously validated methods of surveillance, and information on daily resource use by both infected and uninfected patients was recorded and estimates of their cost derived. Linear regression

R. Plowman; N. Graves; M. A. S. Griffin; J. A. Roberts; A. V. Swan; B. Cookson; L. Taylor

2001-01-01

267

Peer mentors, mobile phone and pills: collective monitoring and adherence in Kenyatta National Hospital's HIV treatment programme  

PubMed Central

In 2006, the Kenyan state joined the international commitment to make antiretroviral treatment free in public health institutions to people infected with HIV. Less than a decade later, treatment has reached over 60% of those who need it in Kenya. This paper, which is based on an in-depth ethnographic case study of the HIV treatment programme at Kenyatta National Hospital, conducted intermittently between 2008 and 2014, examines how HIV-positive peer mentors encourage and track adherence to treatment regimens within and beyond the clinic walls using mobile phones and computer technology. This research into the everyday practices of patient monitoring demonstrates that both surveillance and adherence are collective activities. Peer mentors provide counselling services, follow up people who stray from treatment regimens, and perform a range of other tasks related to patient management and treatment adherence. Despite peer mentors’ involvement in many tasks key to encouraging optimal adherence, their role is rarely acknowledged by co-workers, hospital administrators, or public health officials. Following a biomedical paradigm, adherence at Kenyatta and in Kenya is framed by programme administrators as something individual clients must do and for which they must be held accountable. This framing simultaneously conceals the sociality of adherence and undervalues the work of peer mentors in treatment programmes. PMID:25175291

Moyer, Eileen

2014-01-01

268

Peer mentors, mobile phone and pills: collective monitoring and adherence in Kenyatta National Hospital's HIV treatment programme.  

PubMed

In 2006, the Kenyan state joined the international commitment to make antiretroviral treatment free in public health institutions to people infected with HIV. Less than a decade later, treatment has reached over 60% of those who need it in Kenya. This paper, which is based on an in-depth ethnographic case study of the HIV treatment programme at Kenyatta National Hospital, conducted intermittently between 2008 and 2014, examines how HIV-positive peer mentors encourage and track adherence to treatment regimens within and beyond the clinic walls using mobile phones and computer technology. This research into the everyday practices of patient monitoring demonstrates that both surveillance and adherence are collective activities. Peer mentors provide counselling services, follow up people who stray from treatment regimens, and perform a range of other tasks related to patient management and treatment adherence. Despite peer mentors' involvement in many tasks key to encouraging optimal adherence, their role is rarely acknowledged by co-workers, hospital administrators, or public health officials. Following a biomedical paradigm, adherence at Kenyatta and in Kenya is framed by programme administrators as something individual clients must do and for which they must be held accountable. This framing simultaneously conceals the sociality of adherence and undervalues the work of peer mentors in treatment programmes. PMID:25175291

Moyer, Eileen

2014-01-01

269

On the Restraining Power of Guards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guarded fragments of first-order logic were recently introduced by Andr'eka, vanBenthem and N'emeti; they consist of relational first-order formulae whose quantifiersare appropriately relativized by atoms. These fragments are interesting because theyextend in a natural way many propositional modal logics, because they have usefulmodel-theoretic properties and especially because they are decidable classes that avoidthe usual syntactic restrictions (on the arity of

Erich Gradel; Rwth Aachen

1999-01-01

270

Checking Java Programs via Guarded Commands  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper defines a simple guarded-command--like language and its semantics.The language is used as an intermediate language in generating verification conditionsfor Java. The paper discusses why it is a good idea to generate verificationconditions via an intermediate language, rather than directly.Publication history. This paper appears in Formal Techniques for Java Programs,workshop proceedings. Bart Jacobs, Gary T. Leavens, Peter Muller, and

K. Rustan M. Leino; James B. Saxe; Raymie Stata

1999-01-01

271

Classification of patients based on their evaluation of hospital outcomes: cluster analysis following a national survey in Norway  

PubMed Central

Background A general trend towards positive patient-reported evaluations of hospitals could be taken as a sign that most patients form a homogeneous, reasonably pleased group, and consequently that there is little need for quality improvement. The objective of this study was to explore this assumption by identifying and statistically validating clusters of patients based on their evaluation of outcomes related to overall satisfaction, malpractice and benefit of treatment. Methods Data were collected using a national patient-experience survey of 61 hospitals in the 4 health regions in Norway during spring 2011. Postal questionnaires were mailed to 23,420 patients after their discharge from hospital. Cluster analysis was performed to identify response clusters of patients, based on their responses to single items about overall patient satisfaction, benefit of treatment and perception of malpractice. Results Cluster analysis identified six response groups, including one cluster with systematically poorer evaluation across outcomes (18.5% of patients) and one small outlier group (5.3%) with very poor scores across all outcomes. One-Way ANOVA with post-hoc tests showed that most differences between the six response groups on the three outcome items were significant. The response groups were significantly associated with nine patient-experience indicators (p?hospitals. More research on patient clustering in patient evaluation is needed, as well as standardization of methodology to increase comparability across studies. PMID:23433450

2013-01-01

272

Catering & Hospitality, Serving Food & Drink, Levels 1-3. 2nd Edition. Catering & Hospitality, Reception & Housekeeping, Levels 1-3. Catering & Hospitality, Supervisory Management, Level 3. Catering & Hospitality Management, Level 4. 2nd Edition. National Vocational Qualifications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Britain's National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) are work qualifications that measure what an employee or potential employee can do as well as how much he or she knows and understands about a particular job. Used as written proof of usable workplace skills that can be put to profitable use by an employer, NVQs range from basic Level 1, for…

Business and Technology Education Council, London (England).

273

Pattern of occurrence and treatment of impacted teeth at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Impacted teeth predispose to periodontal disease and dental caries of adjacent teeth resulting in pain, discomfort and loss of function. This study analyzed the pattern of occurrence of impacted teeth, associated symptoms, treatment and complications of treatment in patients who presented at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania. Method This was a crossectional descriptive study which utilized notes and x rays of patients who were treated for impacted teeth at the Oral and Maxillofacial firm in Muhimbili National Hospital over five years, from January 2005 to August 2010. These records were retrieved and examined for the major complaint of the patient at presentation to hospital, demography, impacted tooth, type of impaction (for third molars), treatment offered and complications after treatment. Similar information was collected from all patients with impacted teeth attended in the same centre from 1st September 2010 to 31st August 2011. Results A total of 896 patients (496 males and 400 females) treated for complaints related to impacted teeth were recorded. The male to female ratio was 1.2:1, age range of 16 to 85 years and a mean age of 28.9 years (SD = 9.5). Slightly more than 84% of the patients presented with mandibular third molar impactions. Most (44.7%) of these patients had an impacted lower right third molar followed by those presenting with a lower left third molar impaction (39.7%). In 1.3% of the patients all the four third molars were impacted. Sixty nine (7.7%) patients had impacted upper 3rd molars while 2% had impacted upper canines. Of the mandibular 3rd molar impactions 738 (76%) were mesio-angular type, 87 (8.9%) horizontal type and 69 (7.1%) disto-angular. Patients presented with a variety of complaints. About 85% of the patients presented to hospital due to varying degrees of pain. In 4.9% the detection of the impacted tooth/teeth was coincidental after presenting to hospital for other reasons not related to the impaction. Majority of the patients with impacted mandibular third molars had carious lesions on the impacted teeth, neighbouring tooth or both. Four hundred and five (45.2%) patients had a carious lesion on one of the impacted teeth while 201(22.4%) patients had a carious lesion on the adjacent second molar. In 122 (13.6%) patients both the impacted third molar and the adjacent second molar were carious. In twelve patients who presented with a main complaint of fracture of the angle of the mandible there was an associated impacted 3rd molar. Eight hundred and fifteen (91%) patients with impacted teeth were treated by surgical removal. Among these only 15 (1.8%) had complications that ranged from excessive swellings, trismus and severe pain post operatively. One patient was reported to have fracture of the angle of the mandible sustained during surgical removal of an impacted 48. Conclusions The majority of patients with impacted teeth were young with an almost equal sex distribution. The most commonly impacted teeth were mandibular third molars followed by the maxillary third molars. Patients with impacted teeth reported for health care predominantly because of pain due to dental caries or infection. There is a need of creating appropriate programmes that would further raise peoples’ awareness to regular dental checkups so that appropriate measures are taken before complications arise. PMID:23914842

2013-01-01

274

Intelligent scheduling support for the US Coast Guard  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss a joint effort by the U.S. Coast Guard Research & Development Center, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and Brunel University to provide the necessary tools to increase the human scheduler`s capability to handle the scheduling process more efficiently and effectively. Automating the scheduling process required a system that could think independently of the scheduler, that is, the systems needed its own control mechanism and knowledge base. Further, automated schedule generation became a design requirement and sophisticated algorithms were formulated to solve a complex combinatorial problem. In short, the resulting design can be viewed as a hybrid knowledge-based mathematical programming application system. This document contains an overview of the integrated system, a discrete optimization model for scheduling, and schedule diagnosis and analysis.

Darby-Dowman, K.; Lucas, C.; Mitra, G. [Brunel Univ., Uxbridge (United Kingdom); Fink, R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kingsley, L.; Smith, J.W. [Coast Guard Research and Development Center, Groton, CT (United States)

1992-12-31

275

Intelligent scheduling support for the US Coast Guard  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss a joint effort by the U.S. Coast Guard Research Development Center, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and Brunel University to provide the necessary tools to increase the human scheduler's capability to handle the scheduling process more efficiently and effectively. Automating the scheduling process required a system that could think independently of the scheduler, that is, the systems needed its own control mechanism and knowledge base. Further, automated schedule generation became a design requirement and sophisticated algorithms were formulated to solve a complex combinatorial problem. In short, the resulting design can be viewed as a hybrid knowledge-based mathematical programming application system. This document contains an overview of the integrated system, a discrete optimization model for scheduling, and schedule diagnosis and analysis.

Darby-Dowman, K.; Lucas, C.; Mitra, G. (Brunel Univ., Uxbridge (United Kingdom)); Fink, R. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Kingsley, L.; Smith, J.W. (Coast Guard Research and Development Center, Groton, CT (United States))

1992-01-01

276

Falls in English and Welsh hospitals: a national observational study based on retrospective analysis of 12 months of patient safety incident reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Falls in hospital inpatients are common, with reported rates ranging from 3 to 14 per 1000 bed days. They cause physical and psychological harm, are associated with impaired rehabilitation, increased length of stay and excess cost, and lead to complaints and litigation, making them a crucial area for risk manage- ment. A National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) for

F Healey; S Scobie; D Oliver; A Pryce; R Thomson

2009-01-01

277

The evaluation of hospital laboratory information management systems based on the standards of the American National Standard Institute  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Nowadays, modern laboratories are faced with a huge volume of information. One of the goals of the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is to assist in the management of the information generated in the laboratory. This study intends to evaluate the LIMS based on the standards of the American National Standard Institute (ANSI). Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive–analytical study, which had been conducted in 2011, on the LIMSs in use, in the teaching and private hospitals in Isfahan. The data collecting instrument was a checklist, which was made by evaluating three groups of information components namely: ‘System capabilities’, ‘work list functions,’ and ‘reporting’ based on LIS8-A. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 20. Data were analyzed using (relative) frequency, percentage. To compare the data the following statistical tests were used: Leven test, t-test, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Results: The results of the study indicated that the LIMS had a low conformity (30%) with LIS8-A (P = 0.001), with no difference between teaching and private hospitals (P = 0.806). The ANOVA revealed that in terms of conformity with the LIS8-A standard, there was a significant difference between the systems produced by different vendors (P = 0.023). According to the results, a Kowsar system with more than %57 conformity in the three groups of information components had a better conformity to the standard, compared to the other systems. Conclusions: This study indicated that none of the LIMSs had a good conformity to the standard. It seems that system providers did not pay sufficient attention to many of the information components required by the standards when designing and developing their systems. It was suggested that standards from certified organizations and institutions be followed in the design and development process of health information systems. PMID:25077154

Isfahani, Sakineh Saghaeiannejad; Khajouei, Reza; Jahanbakhsh, Maryan; Mirmohamadi, Mahboubeh

2014-01-01

278

A national infection control evaluation of drug-resistant tuberculosis hospitals in South Africa  

PubMed Central

Background The importance of infection control (IC) in health care settings with tuberculosis (TB) patients has been highlighted by recent health care-associated outbreaks in South Africa. Objective To conduct operational evaluations of IC in drug-resistant TB settings at a national level. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from June to September 2009 in all multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) facilities in South Africa. Structured interviews with key informants were completed, along with observation of IC practices. Health care workers (HCWs) were asked to complete an anonymous knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) questionnaire. Multilevel modeling was used to take into consideration the relationship between center and HCW level variables. Results Twenty-four M(X)DR-TB facilities (100%) were enrolled. Facility infrastructure and staff adherence to IC recommendations were highly varied between facilities. Key informant interviews were incongruent with direct observation of practices in all settings. A total of 499 HCWs were enrolled in the KAP evaluation. Higher level of clinical training was associated with greater IC knowledge (P < 0.001), more appropriate attitudes (P < 0.001) and less time spent with coughing patients (P < 0.001). IC practices were poor across all disciplines. Conclusion These findings demonstrate a clear need to improve and standardize IC infrastructure in drug-resistant TB settings in South Africa. PMID:22236851

Farley, J. E.; Tudor, C.; Mphahlele, M.; Franz, K.; Perrin, N. A.; Dorman, S.; Van der Walt, M.

2013-01-01

279

Makerere University College of Health Sciences' role in addressing challenges in health service provision at Mulago National Referral Hospital  

PubMed Central

Background Mulago National Referral Hospital (MNRH), Uganda’s primary tertiary and teaching hospital, and Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) have a close collaborative relationship. MakCHS students complete clinical rotations at MNRH, and MakCHS faculty partner with Mulago staff in clinical care and research. In 2009, as part of a strategic planning process, MakCHS undertook a qualitative study to examine care and service provision at MNRH, identify challenges, gaps, and solutions, and explore how MakCHS could contribute to improving care and service delivery at MNRH. Methods Key informant interviews (n=23) and focus group discussions (n=7) were conducted with nurses, doctors, administrators, clinical officers and other key stakeholders. Interviews and focus groups were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim, and findings were analyzed through collaborative thematic analysis. Results Challenges to care and service delivery at MNRH included resource constraints (staff, space, equipment, and supplies), staff inadequacies (knowledge, motivation, and professionalism), overcrowding, a poorly functioning referral system, limited quality assurance, and a cumbersome procurement system. There were also insufficiencies in the teaching of professionalism and communication skills to students, and patient care challenges that included lack of access to specialized services, risk of infections, and inappropriate medications. Suggestions for how MakCHS could contribute to addressing these challenges included strengthening referral systems and peripheral health center capacity, and establishing quality assurance mechanisms. The College could also strengthen the teaching of professionalism, communication and leadership skills to students, and monitor student training and develop courses that contribute to continuous professional development. Additionally, the College could provide in-service education for providers on professionalism, communication skills, strategies that promote evidence-based practice and managerial leadership skills. Conclusions Although there are numerous barriers to delivery of quality health services at MNRH, many barriers could be addressed by strengthening the relationship between the Hospital and MakCHS. Strategic partnerships and creative use of existing resources, both human and financial, could improve the quality of care and service delivery at MNRH. Improving services and providing more skills training could better prepare MakCHS graduates for leadership roles in other health care facilities, ultimately improving health outcomes throughout Uganda. PMID:21411007

2011-01-01

280

Efficacy of hand rubs with a low alcohol concentration listed as effective by a national hospital hygiene society in Europe  

PubMed Central

Background Some national hospital hygiene societies in Europe such as the French society for hospital hygiene (SFHH) have positive lists of disinfectants. Few hand disinfectants with a rather low concentration of ethanol are listed by one society as effective for hygienic hand disinfection with 3 mL in 30 s including a virucidal activity in 30 s or 60 s, but published data allow having doubts. We have therefore evaluated the efficacy of three commonly used hand disinfectants according to EN 1500 and EN 14476. Methods Products 1 (Aniosgel 85 NPC) and 2 (Aniosrub 85 NPC) were based on 70% ethanol, product 3 (ClinoGel derma+) on 60% ethanol and 15% isopropanol (all w/w). They were tested in 3 laboratories according to EN 1500. Three mL were applied for 30 s and compared to the reference treatment of 2 × 3 mL applications of isopropanol 60% (v/v), on hands artificially contaminated with Escherichia coli. Each laboratory used a cross-over design against the reference alcohol with 15 or 20 volunteers. The virucidal activity of the products was evaluated (EN 14476) in one laboratory against adenovirus and poliovirus in different concentrations (80%, 90%, 97%), with different organic loads (none; clean conditions; phosphate-buffered saline) for up to 3 min. Results Product 1 revealed a mean log10-reduction of 3.87 ± 0.79 (laboratory 1) and 4.38 ± 0.87 (laboratory 2) which was significantly lower compared to the reference procedure (4.62 ± 0.89 and 5.00 ± 0.87). In laboratory 3 product 1 was inferior to the reference disinfection (4.06 ± 0.86 versus 4.99 ± 0.90). Product 2 revealed similar results. Product 3 fulfilled the requirements in one laboratory but failed in the two other. None of the three products was able to reduce viral infectivity of both adenovirus and poliovirus by 4 log10 steps in 3 min according to EN 14476. Conclusions Efficacy data mentioned in a positive list published by a society for hospital hygiene should still be regarded with caution if they quite obviously contradict published data on the same or similar products. PMID:23759059

2013-01-01

281

Credit BG. View looking north northeast at Guard House and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Credit BG. View looking north northeast at Guard House and entrance to Building 4505 complex. This Guard House was built in 1993 as a portable unit; it replaced an older structure. The Building 4505 complex is surrounded by a security fence. Building 4496 appears to immediate right of view - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Guard House, Northeast of A Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

282

Self-Aligned Guard Rings For Schottky-Barrier Diodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed self-aligned guard ring increases active area of Schottky-barrier infrared detector. Concept developed for silicide Schottky-barrier diodes in which platinum silicide or iridium silicide Schottky-contacts provide cutoff wavelengths of about 6 or 10 micrometers. Grid of silicon dioxide doped with phosphorus etched on silicon wafer, and phosphorus from grid diffused into substrate, creating n-type guard rings. Silicide layers formed in open areas of grid. Overlap of guard rings and silicide layers small.

Lin, True-Lon

1990-01-01

283

GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the Guard House and Barracks, and South Fire House in relation to nearby roads, railroad tracks, and the piers). Navy Yard, Mare Island, California. P.W. Drawing No. C-1899, approved 1941; file no. 930-C-1. Scale one inch to forty feet. 72 cn x 97 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

284

Parallel Quality Assessment of Emergency Departments by European Foundation for Quality Management Model and Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation  

PubMed Central

Background European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model is a widely used quality management system (QMS) worldwide, including Iran. Current study aims to verify the quality assessment results of Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation (INPHE) based on those of EFQM. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 on a sample of emergency departments (EDs) affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Iran. The standard questionnaire of EFQM (V-2010) was used to gather appropriate data. The results were compared with those of INPHE. MS Excel was used to classify and display the findings. Results: The average assessment score of the EDs based on the INPHE and EFQM model were largely different (i.e. 86.4% and 31%, respectively). In addition, the variation range among five EDs’ scores according to each model was also considerable (22% for EFQM against 7% of INPHE), especially in the EDs with and without prior record of applying QMSs. Conclusion: The INPHE’s assessment results were not confirmed by EFQM model. Moreover, the higher variation range among EDs’ scores using EFQM model could allude to its more differentiation power in assessing the performance comparing with INPHE. Therefore, a need for improvement in the latter drawing on other QMSs’ (such as EFQM) strengths, given the results emanated from its comparison with EFQM seems indispensable. PMID:23967429

IMANI NASAB, Mohammad Hasan; MOHAGHEGH, Bahram; KHALESI, Nader; JAAFARIPOOYAN, Ebrahim

2013-01-01

285

IET. Exclusion guard house (TAN621) and unit substation (TAN622). Elevations ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

IET. Exclusion guard house (TAN-621) and unit substation (TAN-622). Elevations and floor plan. Also show concrete pad for substation. Ralph M. Parsons 902-4-ANP-621-622-A&S 411. Date: February 1954. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 035-0621-60-693-106968 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

286

Design concepts for a new Guarded Hot Plate Apparatus for Use over an Extended Temperature Range  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Institute of Standards and Technology is building a new guarded hot plate apparatus (GHP) for use at temperatures from 90 to 900 K, with provision to conduct tests in various gases at controlled pressures from 0.013 Pa to 0.105 MPa (= 1.04 atm). Important features of the design of the new NIST GHP include: enclosure of the entire

Daniel R. Flynn; Robert R. Zarr; Mahn Hee Hahn; W. M. Healy

2002-01-01

287

Compliance with a time-out procedure intended to prevent wrong surgery in hospitals: results of a national patient safety programme in the Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Objective To prevent wrong surgery, the WHO ‘Safe Surgery Checklist’ was introduced in 2008. The checklist comprises a time-out procedure (TOP): the final step before the start of the surgical procedure where the patient, surgical procedure and side/site are reviewed by the surgical team. The aim of this study is to evaluate the extent to which hospitals carry out the TOP before anaesthesia in the operating room, whether compliance has changed over time, and to determine factors that are associated with compliance. Design Evaluation study involving observations. Setting Operating rooms of 2 academic, 4 teaching and 12 general Dutch hospitals. Participants A random selection was made from all adult patients scheduled for elective surgery on the day of the observation, preferably involving different surgeons and different procedures. Results Mean compliance with the TOP was 71.3%. Large differences between hospitals were observed. No linear trend was found in compliance during the study period. Compliance at general and teaching hospitals was higher than at academic hospitals. Compliance decreased with the age of the patient, general surgery showed lower compliance in comparison with other specialties and compliance was higher when the team was focused on the TOP. Conclusions Large differences in compliance with the TOP were observed between participating hospitals which can be attributed at least in part to the type of hospital, surgical specialty and patient characteristics. Hospitals do not comply consistently with national guidelines to prevent wrong surgery and further implementation as well as further research into non-compliance is needed. PMID:24993761

van Schoten, Steffie M; Kop, Veerle; de Blok, Carolien; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Groenewegen, Peter P; Wagner, Cordula

2014-01-01

288

Exploring ARAC Support of U.S. Coast Guard Planning and Response Capability  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Coast Guard is responsible for the protection of the marine environment from spills of oil and hazardous material. The USCG responsibilities include responding to oil and chemical spills from ships as well as from sources ashore. While responding to a spill, The USCG Marine Safety Offices and Detachments, and the National Strike Force (NSF) depend on interagency support from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and state and local agencies. Currently, the USCG depends on NOAA Scientific Support Coordinators for predicting and assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous material. NOAA has several computer models that the Coast Guard can access in the event of a chemical release into the atmosphere or an in situ oil burn. However, the Department of Energy operates a more powerful modeling system called the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC). Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, ARAC offers a complex multiscale model in a system that is simple for the end user to operate. The applicability of ARAC to Coast Guard operations is the subject of this study.

Baker, M.S.; Baskett, R.; Ellis, J. S.

2001-07-01

289

An in-depth, exploratory assessment of the implementation of the National Health Information System at a district level hospital in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background A well functioning Health Information System (HIS) is crucial for effective and efficient health service delivery. In Tanzania there is a national HIS called Mfumo wa Taarifa za Uendeshaji Huduma za Afya (MTUHA). It comprises a guideline/manual, a series of registers for primary data collection and secondary data books where information from the registers is totalled or used for calculations. Methods A mix of qualitative methods were used. These included key informant interviews; staff interviews; participant observations; and a retrospective analysis of the hospital’s 2010 MTUHA reporting documents and the hospital’s development plan. Results All staff members acknowledged data collection as part of their job responsibilities. However, all had concerns about the accuracy of MTUHA data. Access to training was limited, mathematical capabilities often low, dissemination of MTUHA knowledge within the hospital poor, and a broad understanding of the HIS’s full capabilities lacking. Whilst data collection for routine services functioned reasonably well, filling of the secondary data tools was unsatisfactory. Internal inconsistencies between the different types of data tools were found. These included duplications, and the collection of data that was not further used. Sixteen of the total 72 forms (22.2%) that make up one of the key secondary data books (Hospital data/MTUHA book 2) could not be completed with the information collected in the primary data books. Moreover, the hospital made no use of any of the secondary data. The hospital’s main planning document was its development plan. Only 3 of the 22 indicators in this plan were the same as indicators in MTUHA, the information for 9 more was collected by the MTUHA system but figures had to be extracted and recalculated to fit, while for the remaining 10 indicators no use could be made of MTUHA at all. Conclusion The HIS in Tanzania is very extensive and it could be advisable to simplify it to the core business of data collection for routine services. Alternatively, the more comprehensive, managerial aspects could be sharpened for each type of facility, with a focus upon the hospital level. In particular, hospital planning documents need to be more closely aligned with MTUHA indicators. PMID:24572013

2014-01-01

290

[Acute appendicitis at the National University Hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic: epidemiologic, clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic aspects].  

PubMed

We carried out a retrospective study to analyse clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic aspects of acute appendicitis cases as the National University Hospital (CNHU) at Bangui in the Central African Republic. We compared our findings with those for other African countries and for industrialized countries. From September 15 1990 to February 15 1992, 285 patients underwent laparotomy to treat acute appendicitis. We carried out a study of clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic aspects on 57 patients with complete case histories (20% of the patients undergoing surgery). The appendices of these patients were sent to the Laboratory of Pathological Anatomy of the Faculty of Medicine at Marseille, France, for analysis. The frequency of appendectomy among patients undergoing visceral surgery by laparotomy with no acute traumatic abdominal syndrome was 42.3%. The incidence of appendectomy for the city of Bangui in 1991 was 36.5 per 100,000 inhabitants. These cases of appendicitis were diagnosed essentially on clinical grounds. Leukocyte counts exceeded 10,000 per mm3 in 30% of the patients. Histological examination revealed the presence of parasites in 10 cases : Schistosoma mansoni eggs (seven cases) and Ascaris lumbricoides eggs (one case) in patients with acute appendicitis and one case each of Schistosoma mansoni eggs and Ascaris lumbricoides eggs at the time of diagnosis but normal histological results for the removed appendix. Most of the patients consulted late, a mean of four days after the onset of symptoms. The frequency of appendectomy on principle was 12.7% and parenteral antibiotic treatment was prescribed systematically follow- ing surgery. The mean duration of hospital stay after surgery was 7.6 days. No early postoperative complications were noted. However, two late postoperative complications resulting in the death of the patient were observed, giving a mortality rate of 3.5%. These complications were one case of peritonitis after appendectomy involving intestinal resection and one case of occlusive syndrome with septic shock. The frequency of acute appendicitis at the CNHU at Bangui was similar to that reported in another tropical African country (~ 1%). However, the incidence of appendectomies at Bangui is lower than generally reported for western countries (15 to 40%). Positive diagnosis was made on classic data obtained on clinical examination and on associated biological data, if available. Parasites were identified on histological examination in some cases of acute appendicitis, but it is unclear whether these parasites were actually responsible for the appendicitis. Efficient examinations for the exploration of acute nonspecific abdominal pain, such as the measurement of inflammation indicators, particularly serum activated protein C levels, graded-compression ultrasound scans and celioscopy, should be made available in the hospitals of African countries to increase the precision of diagnosis and to decrease the still too high frequency of appendectomies performed on principle. The postoperative mortality rate at the CNHU of Bangui is higher than the low rates (0.1 to 0.25%) reported for industrialized countries but is close to those reported for African countries. This high rate of mortality results partly from the lateness of consultations, because patients in tropical Africa often consult a traditional healer before resorting to modern medicine, and partly from misdiagnoses. PMID:11440889

Zoguéreh, D D; Lemaître, X; Ikoli, J F; Delmont, J; Chamlian, A; Mandaba, J L; Nali, N M

2001-01-01

291

LG-GUARD for missile defense and offence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

LG-GUARD employs a hierarchy of multi-resolution games (LG hypergame) to represent various areas of operations at different levels of detail. LG-GUARD includes a full implementation of advanced fire control by dynamic preemptive control of sensor-to-shooter and shooter-to-target pairing. However, the greatest advantage of LG-GUARD is a fast planning and re-planning based on the Linguistic Geometry (LG) approach. This ability allows LG-GUARD to generate COA aiming to achieve the commander's intent for the entire operation, vs. an ability to shoot as many targets as possible at each snapshot of a battle. LG-GUARD operates in two modes. The Planning Mode (long range planning) enabled LG-GUARD to automatically select best types, quantities, and locations for defensive assets from the entire area permitted for the operations of the Blue side to achieve a given probability of success (with as little total opportunity cost as possible). After selection and turning to the Engagement Mode (short range planning), LG-GUARD generates the best courses of action for all sides of the most probable operation (which involves defensive assets selected in the Planning Mode). The capabilities of LG-GUARD are shown in this paper by describing two kinds of scenarios, those executable now and those to be executable in the near future.

Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Vladimir; Umanskiy, Oleg

2003-09-01

292

TITLE: THOR GUARD LIGHTNING PREDICTION SYSTEM OBJECTIVE AND  

E-print Network

of lightning strike exists. Using a series of strategically located horns and strobes, the system is designed1 TITLE: THOR GUARD LIGHTNING PREDICTION SYSTEM OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE: The University has installed a lightning prediction system manufactured by Thor Guard, Inc. at its Boca Raton campus in order to warn

Fernandez, Eduardo

293

U.S. Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Operations  

E-print Network

U.S. Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Operations 10 June 2009 CDR Lisa Mack #12;Overview Operating, Waterways & Coastal Security Defense Readiness #12;Polar Icebreaker Fleet POLAR STAR, POLAR SEA and HEALY sovereignty, and a range of Coast Guard statutory missions to be required in the future. Polar icebreaker

Kuligowski, Bob

294

46 CFR 28.215 - Guards for exposed hazards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...guards, or railing must be installed in way of machinery which can cause injury to personnel, such as gearing, chain or belt drives...drums, or gurdies. (c) Each exhaust pipe from an internal combustion engine which is within reach of personnel must be insulated or otherwise guarded to prevent...

2011-10-01

295

46 CFR 28.215 - Guards for exposed hazards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...guards, or railing must be installed in way of machinery which can cause injury to personnel, such as gearing, chain or belt drives...drums, or gurdies. (c) Each exhaust pipe from an internal combustion engine which is within reach of personnel must be insulated or otherwise guarded to prevent...

2012-10-01

296

Towards Efficient Reasoning Under Guarded-based Disjunctive Existential Rules  

E-print Network

Towards Efficient Reasoning Under Guarded-based Disjunctive Existential Rules Pierre Bourhis1 the main guarded-based classes of disjunc- tive existential rules has been recently settled. It has been of disjunctive existential rules. We show that (unions of) conjunctive queries of bounded hypertree- width

Boyer, Edmond

297

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) FRONT ELEVATION DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

298

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) EXTERIOR AND MISCELLANEOUS DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

299

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

300

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) CELL BLOCK DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

301

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) FIRST AND SECOND FLOOR AND ROOF PLANS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

302

Determining the effect of cricket leg guards on running performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modern-day cricket has experienced a shift towards limited over games, where the emphasis is on scoring runs at a rapid rate. Although the use of protective equipment in cricket is mandatory, players perceive that leg guards, in particular, can restrict their motion. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of cricket leg guards on running performance. Initial

James Webster; Jonathan Roberts

2011-01-01

303

FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, PLANS AND DETAILS. Plan No. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, PLANS AND DETAILS. Plan No. 6754-319, dated August 1, 1933. Construction Division, Office of the Constructing Quartermaster - Hamilton Field, Fire Station & Guard House, Southwest corner of Seventh Street & Hangar Avenue, Novato, Marin County, CA

304

FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS, AND DETAILS. Plan ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS, AND DETAILS. Plan No. 6754-320, dated August 1, 1933. Constructing Division, Office of the Constructing Quartermaster - Hamilton Field, Fire Station & Guard House, Southwest corner of Seventh Street & Hangar Avenue, Novato, Marin County, CA

305

Common mechanisms activate plant guard receptors and TLR4.  

PubMed

In metazoans, the innate immune system uses Pattern Recognition Receptors to detect conserved microbial products, whereas in plants Guard Receptors detect virulence factors or activities encoded by pathogens. In a recent study, Williams and colleagues report that plant Guard receptors can be activated by a mechanism remarkably similar to that of mammalian Toll-like Receptor 4. PMID:25224694

Kagan, Jonathan C

2014-10-01

306

33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Coast Guard commission pennant. The Coast Guard commission pennant shall have the union part composed of thirteen blue stars in a horizontal line on a white field, one-fourth the length of the pennant; the remaining three-fourths shall...

2013-07-01

307

Cape (Apis mellifera capensis) and European (Apis mellifera) honey bee guard age and duration of guarding small hive beetles (Aethina tumida)  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The guard age and duration of European (Apis mellifera) and Cape (A. m. capensis) honey bees guarding small hive beetles (Aethina tumida) were determined using 3-frame observation hives, noting the commencement and termination of beetle guarding by individually labelled honey bees. European honey bees in the USA began guarding small hive beetles significantly earlier (beginning age 18.55 ± 0.52

JAMES D ELLIS JR; ALEXANDRA J HOLLAND; RANDALL HEPBURN; PETER NEUMANN; PATTI J ELZEN

308

US Coast Guard differential GPS network  

SciTech Connect

In order to aid navigation and to prevent disasters such as oil spills, collisions, and wrecks of vessels and aircraft, the US Coast Guard is charged with establishing, maintaining, and operating electronic aids to navigation. In a technological advance developed and operated by the Department of Defense, the global positioning system (GPS) provides all-weather global coverage, 24 hours/day at unprecedented accuracies. GPS provides standard positioning service (SPS) and precise positioning service (PPS). By applying differential techniques to GPS, navigational accuracies of better than 10 meters can be achieved. For the first time, an all-weather system is possible to meet all the marine navigator's needs including harbor and harbor approach navigation. This should revolutionize navigation safety and efficiency, surveying operations, search and rescue operations, and underwater mine disposal efficiency and safety.

Alsip, D.H.; Butler, J.M.; Radice, J.T.

1993-03-01

309

Bio-repository of post-clinical test samples at the national cancer center hospital (NCCH) in Tokyo.  

PubMed

We established the Bio-repository at the National Cancer Center Hospital in October 2002. The main purpose of this article is to show the importance and usefulness of a bio-repository of post-clinical test samples not only for translational cancer research but also for routine clinical oncology by introducing the experience of setting up such a facility. Our basic concept of a post-clinical test sample is not as left-over waste, but rather as frozen evidence of a patient's pathological condition at a particular point. We can decode, if not all, most of the laboratory data from a post-clinical test sample. As a result, the bio-repository is able to provide not only the samples, but potentially all related laboratory data upon request. The areas of sample coverage are the following: sera after routine blood tests; sera after cross-match tests for transfusion; serum or plasma submitted at a patient's clinically important time period by the physician; and samples collected by the individual investigator. The formats of stored samples are plasma or serum, dried blood spot (DBS) and buffy coat. So far, 150 218 plasmas or sera, 35 253 DBS and 536 buffy coats have been registered for our bio-repository system. We arranged to provide samples to various concerned parties under strict legal and ethical agreements. Although the number of the utilized samples was initially limited, the inquiries for sample utilization are now increasing steadily from both research and clinical sources. Further efforts to increase the benefits of the repository are intended. PMID:19491083

Furuta, Koh; Yokozawa, Karin; Takada, Takako; Kato, Hoichi

2009-08-01

310

33 CFR 125.17 - Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards...and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF...FOR PERSONS REQUIRING ACCESS TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES... Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards...Persons having regular public or private...

2011-07-01

311

33 CFR 125.17 - Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards...and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF...FOR PERSONS REQUIRING ACCESS TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES... Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards...Persons having regular public or private...

2010-07-01

312

33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...CREDENTIALS FOR PERSONS REQUIRING ACCESS TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR...125.51 Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card....

2010-07-01

313

33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...CREDENTIALS FOR PERSONS REQUIRING ACCESS TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR...12 Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security...

2010-07-01

314

33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...CREDENTIALS FOR PERSONS REQUIRING ACCESS TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR...12 Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security...

2011-07-01

315

33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...CREDENTIALS FOR PERSONS REQUIRING ACCESS TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR...125.51 Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card....

2011-07-01

316

A system theoretic safety analysis of U.S. Coast Guard aviation mishap involving CG-6505  

E-print Network

During a 22-month period, between 2008 and 2010, the U.S. Coast Guard experienced seven Class-A aviation mishaps resulting in the loss of 14 Coast Guard aviators and seven Coast Guard aircraft. This represents the highest ...

Hickey, Jon (Jon Patrick)

2012-01-01

317

Job Number: 45638649 Company Name: Army National Guard  

E-print Network

in the classroom and part in the field. Applicants must meet minimum qualifications. Actual MOS assignment may be able to pass a physical exam and meet legal and moral standards Must meet citizenship requirements

Heller, Barbara

318

78 FR 24124 - National Guard Bureau Privacy Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...particular assigned to the individual, such as a finger or voice print or a photograph (As defined by 5 U.S.C. 552a...managers, public affairs officials, information technology professionals, and any other personnel...

2013-04-24

319

Acceptability of Associate Evaluation in National Guard Units.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present research was designed to assess the acceptability of a peer evaluation technique among enlisted men in combat and combat support units. Specifically, the objectives were to (1) measure soldier attitudes toward peer evaluations using the Unit A...

S. L. Goldberg, J. F. Lombardo

1976-01-01

320

Hospital A Hospital B Hospital C Practice Variation in Emergency Department Management of Children  

E-print Network

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Hospital A Hospital B Hospital C Practice Variation, Children's National Medical Center; 3Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, CBC, urinalysis, electrolytes, treatment with an antibiotic, and disposition of hospital admission

321

"Comfortable Camps?" Archaeology of the Confederate Guard Camp at the Florence Stockade  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How can we best learn about the world around us? The talented individuals at the National Park Service have continued to answer this question by carefully creating the Teaching with Historic Places Lessons over the past few years. Each lesson plan contains teaching guides, activities, and helpful primary documents. This plan looks at the Confederate Guard Camp at the Florence Stockade in South Carolina, and offers some tremendous insights into what life was like for the guards there. The lesson includes a thematic essay about the historical context of the lesson, along with maps, visual evidence in the form of site plans and artifacts, and helpful first-person narratives by those who were there. The activities here are a real pip, as they include a template for students seeking to build their own campground. [KMG

322

78 FR 11676 - Notice of Inventory Completion: National Guard Bureau/A7AN, Air National Guard, Joint Base...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...deer, and wolf tooth necklace containing drilled canines; 4 drilled canines; 6 bone awls; 9 polished or worked bone tools; 2 polished small mammal mandibles; 1 worked canine; 2 fish spine needles; 1 antler flaker; and...

2013-02-19

323

Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells  

SciTech Connect

Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

Schroeder, Julian I.

2007-05-02

324

Prevalance of and risk factors for hospital-acquired infections in Slovenia—results of the first national survey, 2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

A one-day survey was conducted in all (19) Slovenian acute-care hospitals in October 2001 to estimate the prevalence of all types of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) and to identify predominant micro-organisms and risk factors. Among 6695 patients surveyed, the prevalence of patients with at least one HAI was 4.6%. The prevalence of urinary tract infections was highest (1.2%), followed by pneumonia

I Klavs; T Bufon Lužnik; M Škerl; M Grgi?-Vitek; T Lejko Zupanc; M Dolinšek; V Prodan; M Vegnuti; A Kraigher; Z Arnež

2003-01-01

325

TRICARE; Reserve and Guard family member benefits. Final rule.  

PubMed

This final rule implements sections 704 and 705 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005. These provisions apply to eligible family members who become eligible for TRICARE as a result of their Reserve Component (RC) sponsor (including those with delayed effective date orders up to 90 days) being called or ordered to active duty for more than 30 days in support of a federal/contingency operation and choose to participate in TRICARE Standard or Extra, rather than enroll in TRICARE Prime. The first provision gives the Secretary the authority to waive the annual TRICARE Standard (or Extra) deductible, which is set by law (10 U.S.C. 1079(b)) at $150 per individual and $300 per family ($50/$100 for families of members in pay grades E-4 and below). The second provision gives the Secretary the authority to increase TRICARE payments up to 115 percent of the TRICARE maximum allowable charge, less the applicable patient cost share if not previously waived under the first provision, for covered inpatient and outpatient health services received from a provider that does not participate (accept assignment) with TRICARE. These provisions help ensure timely access to health care and maintain clinically appropriate continuity of health care to family members of Reservists and Guardsmen activated in support of a federal/contingency operation; limit the out-of-pocket health care expenses for those family members; and remove potential barriers to health care access by Guard and Reserve families. PMID:18956496

2008-08-12

326

Exploring emergent properties in cellular homeostasis using OnGuard to model K+ and other ion transport in guard cells???  

PubMed Central

It is widely recognized that the nature and characteristics of transport across eukaryotic membranes are so complex as to defy intuitive understanding. In these circumstances, quantitative mathematical modeling is an essential tool, both to integrate detailed knowledge of individual transporters and to extract the properties emergent from their interactions. As the first, fully integrated and quantitative modeling environment for the study of ion transport dynamics in a plant cell, OnGuard offers a unique tool for exploring homeostatic properties emerging from the interactions of ion transport, both at the plasma membrane and tonoplast in the guard cell. OnGuard has already yielded detail sufficient to guide phenotypic and mutational studies, and it represents a key step toward ‘reverse engineering’ of stomatal guard cell physiology, based on rational design and testing in simulation, to improve water use efficiency and carbon assimilation. Its construction from the HoTSig libraries enables translation of the software to other cell types, including growing root hairs and pollen. The problems inherent to transport are nonetheless challenging, and are compounded for those unfamiliar with conceptual ‘mindset’ of the modeler. Here we set out guidelines for the use of OnGuard and outline a standardized approach that will enable users to advance quickly to its application both in the classroom and laboratory. We also highlight the uncanny and emergent property of OnGuard models to reproduce the ‘communication’ evident between the plasma membrane and tonoplast of the guard cell. PMID:24268743

Blatt, Michael R.; Wang, Yizhou; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Hills, Adrian

2014-01-01

327

Status report : guard containment CFD analysis.  

SciTech Connect

Under the auspices of the CEA Cadarache/ANL-US I-NERI project a comprehensive investigation has been made of improvements to the Gen-IV GFR safety case over that of the GCFR safety case twenty five years ago. In particular, it has been concluded and agreed upon [1] that the GFR safety approach for the passive removal of decay heat in a protected depressurization accident with total loss of electric power needs to be different from that taken for the HTRs. The HTR conduction cooldown to the vessel wall boundary mode for an economically attractive core is not feasible in the case of the GFR because the high power densities (100kW/1 compared to 5 kW/1 for pebble bed thermal reactor) require decay heat fluxes well beyond those achievable by the heat conduction and radiation heat transfer mode. A set of alternative novel design options has been evaluated for potential passive safety mechanisms unique to the GFR. In summary, from a technological risk viewpoint and R&D planning, the option which has been identified is the block/plate-based or a pin-based reactor with a secondary guard containment/vessel around the primary vessel to maintain the primary system pressure at a high enough level which would allow primary system natural convection removal of core generated decay heat to be effective. Dedicated emergency decay heat exchangers would have to be connected in a 'failure-proof' configuration to the primary system and have natural convection capability all the way to the ultimate heat sink. What has been collaboratively agreed upon and selected for further development is the natural convection option with a block/plate or pin type derated core and a hybrid passive/active approach.[2] The guard containment will be utilized but it will be sized for an LWR containment range backup pressure (5-7 bars) with an initial pressure of 1 bar. The assessment has shown that a significantly higher back pressure is required for total natural convection driven removal of significant decay heat levels at GFR target power densities. The lower back-up pressure, plus whatever natural convection is available at this pressure, will be utilized to significantly reduce the blower power of the active DHR system sized to remove 2-3% decay power. The objective is to be able to have such low power requirements so that power supplies such as batteries without the need for startup, can be utilized. This lower back-up pressure should be sufficient to support natural convection removal of 0.5% decay heat which occurs at {approx}24 hrs. So there should be no more need for active systems/power supply after the initial period of one day. Furthermore, since there will be a decay of the after-heat from 2-3% to 0.5% in this time period, credit should be taken in probability space for loss of active systems during the 24 hours. The safety approach will then be a probabilistic one. In the future discussions with the regulatory authorities the approach which will then be taken is that this class of decay heat removal accidents should be treated in combination with the PRA rather than solely through deterministic calculations. Work is now ongoing in the U.S.-France I-NERI GFR project to further evaluate this hybrid passive/active approach to heat removal for depressurized decay heat accidents. The objective of the analysis documented in this report is to provide information on local and global temperature, pressure and flow distributions in the guard containment , during steady state, and reactor vessel depressurization conditions due to a small break in the reactor vessel bottom control rod drive system. This is for the 2400 MWt plant option. The results should lead to improved guard containment designs and enhanced margin for safety criteria.

Tzanos, C. P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2006-03-03

328

Implementing a national program to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infection: a quality improvement collaboration of state hospital associations, academic medical centers, professional societies, and governmental agencies.  

PubMed

Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) represents a significant proportion of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The US Department of Health and Human Services issued a plan to reduce HAIs with a target 25% reduction of CAUTI by 2013. Michigan's successful collaborative to reduce unnecessary use of urinary catheters and CAUTI was based on a partnership between diverse hospitals, the state hospital association (SHA), and academic medical centers. Taking the lessons learned from Michigan, we are now spreading this work throughout the 50 states. This national spread leverages the expertise of different groups and organizations for the unified goal of reducing catheter-related harm. The key components of the project are (1) centralized coordination of the effort and dissemination of information to SHAs and hospitals, (2) data collection based on established definitions and approaches, (3) focused guidance on the technical practices that will prevent CAUTI, (4) emphasis on understanding the socioadaptive aspects (both the general, unit-wide issues and CAUTI-specific challenges), and (5) partnering with specialty organizations and governmental agencies who have expertise in the relevant subject area. The work may serve in the future as a model for other large improvement efforts to address other hospital-acquired conditions, such as venous thromboembolism and falls. PMID:24018921

Fakih, Mohamad G; George, Christine; Edson, Barbara S; Goeschel, Christine A; Saint, Sanjay

2013-10-01

329

Hospitality in hospitals?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore an organization-wide philosophy of hospitality in a hospital setting. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An exploratory case study method approach matched the research purpose. First, a hospitality centric philosophy (HCP) was defined from the literature review. Next, a triangulation of unstructured visits, structured visits and key informant interviews is used to further explore

Denver Severt; Taryn Aiello; Shannon Elswick; Cheryl Cyr

2008-01-01

330

Photosynthetic Electron Transport in Guard Cells of Diverse Species 1  

PubMed Central

Guard cells of plants representing 18 species were assayed qualitatively for potential to conduct photosynthetic linear electron transport. These plants included C3 pteridophytes, C3 and C4 monocots, and C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism dicots. By use of a microfluorospectrophotometer, guard cell samples in epidermal peels were isolated optically. Chlorophyll fluorescence was monitored from the onset of excitation light. For guard cells of all these species, fluorescence intensity increased during illumination. When samples were preincubated with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, diuron, however, there was a more rapid increase in fluorescence. These results indicate that all tested guard cells conduct photosynthetic electron transport through the reaction center of photosystem II. PMID:16663621

Martin, Glen E.; Outlaw, William H.; Anderson, Loran C.; Jackson, Sidney G.

1984-01-01

331

PARTS WASHING ALTERNATIVES STUDY - UNITED STATES COAST GUARD  

EPA Science Inventory

This report has been written to assist the United States Coast Guard (USCG) industrial managers in determining the most cost effective and environmentally acceptable parts washing alternatives for their specific applications. An; evaluation was conducted on four different cleane...

332

30 CFR 57.12034 - Guarding around lights.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12034 Guarding around lights. Portable extension lights, and other lights that...

2013-07-01

333

15. PLAN OF OFFICE, DETAILS, FIXED WINDOW GUARDS, SHEET NO. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. PLAN OF OFFICE, DETAILS, FIXED WINDOW GUARDS, SHEET NO. 1-10-39/10 OF 12. - Oakland Army Base, Warehouse Type, Tobruk Street, between Warehouse Road & Fifteenth Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

334

16. Oblique, guard quarters; shower stalls at left; view to ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

16. Oblique, guard quarters; shower stalls at left; view to south-southwest, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

335

20. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM THIRD LEVEL GUARD STATION, CELL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM THIRD LEVEL GUARD STATION, CELL BLOCK 'B' IS ON THE LEFT AND CELL BLOCK 'C' IN ON THE RIGHT - Alcatraz, Cell House, Alcatraz Island, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

336

Carbon dioxide signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells  

E-print Network

extracellular stimuli to intracellular and whole plantplant cells. Guard cells respond to a great variety of external stimulistimuli, such as abscisic acid (ABA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and elicitors of plant

Young, Jared

2005-01-01

337

30 CFR 75.827 - Guarding of trailing cables.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2) Guarding must be constructed using nonconductive flame-resistant material or grounded metal. (b) Suspended...material; (vi) Made of material with a distinctive color. The color black must not be used; and (vii) Made of...

2013-07-01

338

30 CFR 75.827 - Guarding of trailing cables.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2) Guarding must be constructed using nonconductive flame-resistant material or grounded metal. (b) Suspended...material; (vi) Made of material with a distinctive color. The color black must not be used; and (vii) Made of...

2011-07-01

339

30 CFR 75.827 - Guarding of trailing cables.  

...2) Guarding must be constructed using nonconductive flame-resistant material or grounded metal. (b) Suspended...material; (vi) Made of material with a distinctive color. The color black must not be used; and (vii) Made of...

2014-07-01

340

30 CFR 75.827 - Guarding of trailing cables.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2) Guarding must be constructed using nonconductive flame-resistant material or grounded metal. (b) Suspended...material; (vi) Made of material with a distinctive color. The color black must not be used; and (vii) Made of...

2010-07-01

341

30 CFR 75.827 - Guarding of trailing cables.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2) Guarding must be constructed using nonconductive flame-resistant material or grounded metal. (b) Suspended...material; (vi) Made of material with a distinctive color. The color black must not be used; and (vii) Made of...

2012-07-01

342

14. Second floor office (coast guard) in area office building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. Second floor office (coast guard) in area office building looking southwest - Duluth Ship Canal, Marine Museum-Area Office, North end of Minnesota Point at Canal Park, Duluth, St. Louis County, MN

343

Hospital-based influenza morbidity and mortality surveillance system for influenza-like illnesses: a comparison with national influenza surveillance systems  

PubMed Central

The Hospital-based Influenza Morbidity and Mortality (HIMM) surveillance system is an emergency room (ER)-based influenza surveillance system in Korea that was established in 2011. The system was established under the assumption that integrated clinical and virologic surveillance could be performed rapidly and easily at seven tertiary hospitals' ER. Here, we assessed the correlation between data generated from the HIMM surveillance system and the Korean national influenza surveillance systems during the 2011–2012 influenza season using cross-correlation analysis and found strong correlations. Rapid antigen-test-based HIMM surveillance would predict the start of influenza epidemic earlier than pre-existing influenza-like-illness-based surveillance. PMID:24020512

Seo, Yu Bin; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Cho, Young Duck; Wie, Seong-Heon; Jeong, Hye Won; Kim, Woo Joo

2014-01-01

344

Blind Equalization in OFDM Systems Exploiting Guard Interval Redundancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce a new low-complexity equalizer for OFDM systems, which in the presence of a guard interval, utilizes existing redundancy in the time domain to completely eliminate inter-symbol-interference. We prove that the usage of this guard interval redundancy is sufficient to obtain a zero-forcing time domain equalizer of the channel. The main advantage of this approach resides in its simplicity

Faisal O. Alayyan; Karim Abed-Meraim; Abdelhak M. Zoubir

2005-01-01

345

Mate guarding and frequent in-pair copulation in humans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cuckoldry is an adaptive problem faced by parentally investing males of socially monogamous species (e.g., humans and many\\u000a avian species). Mate guarding and frequent in-pair copulation (IPC) may have evolved as anti-cuckoldry tactics in avian species\\u000a and in humans. In some avian species, the tactics are used concurrently, with the result that mate guarding behaviors and IPC frequency are correlated

Todd K. Shackelford; Aaron T. Goetz; Faith E. Guta; David P. Schmitt

2006-01-01

346

Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow  

DOEpatents

Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

Louge, M.Y.

1995-10-17

347

Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow  

DOEpatents

Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

Louge, Michel Y. (Ithaca, NY)

1996-01-01

348

Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow  

DOEpatents

Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

Louge, Michel Y. (Ithaca, NY)

1995-01-01

349

Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow  

DOEpatents

Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

Louge, M.Y.

1996-08-13

350

Chlorophyll a Fluorescence Transients in Mesophyll and Guard Cells 1  

PubMed Central

Chlorophyll fluorescence transients from mesophyll and guard cell chloroplasts of variegated leaves from Chlorophytum comosum were compared using high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy. Like their mesophyll counterparts, guard cell chloroplasts showed the OPS fluorescence transient indicating the operation of the linear electron transport and the possible generation of NADPH in these organelles. They also showed a slow fluorescence yield decrease, equivalent to the MT transition in mesophyll, suggesting the formation of the high energy state and photophosphorylation. Unlike the mesophyll chloroplasts, the fluorescence from guard cell chloroplasts lacked the increment of the SM transition, indicating that the two types of chloroplasts have some metabolic differences. The presence of CO2 (supplied as bicarbonate, pH 6.7) specifically inhibited the MT-equivalent transition while its absence accelerated it. These observations constitute the first specific evidence of a guard cell chloroplast response to CO2. Control of photosynthetic ATP levels in the guard cell cytoplasm by CO2 may provide a mechanism regulating the availability of high energy equivalents at the guard cell plasmalemma, thus affecting stomatal opening. PMID:16662265

Melis, Anastasios; Zeiger, Eduardo

1982-01-01

351

Train in vain: A statutory analysis of security guard training requirements  

Microsoft Academic Search

How does one become a security guard? What sort of training is mandated for those seeking to be a security guard? There are currently over 10,000 security companies in the United States, employing 1.8 million guards. Security guards already outnumber police by almost three to one, and this discrepancy is expected to continue to grow. Every state requires police officers

Jeff Maahs; Craig Hemmens

1998-01-01

352

49 CFR 571.223 - Standard No. 223; Rear impact guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...passing through center of the guard; (2) Lies on either side of the center of the guard's...horizontal member of the guard that: (1) Lies in the longitudinal vertical plane passing...passing through center of the guard; (2) Lies on either the right or left side of...

2011-10-01

353

49 CFR 571.223 - Standard No. 223; Rear impact guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...passing through center of the guard; (2) Lies on either side of the center of the guard's...horizontal member of the guard that: (1) Lies in the longitudinal vertical plane passing...passing through center of the guard; (2) Lies on either the right or left side of...

2012-10-01

354

The Impact of Influenza Vaccinations on the Adverse Effects and Hospitalization Rate in the Elderly: A National Based Study in an Asian Country  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the risk of adverse effects of special interest in persons vaccinated against seasonal influenza compared with unvaccinated persons aged 65 and above. Methods We retrospectively observed 41,986 vaccinated elderly persons and 50,973 unvaccinated elderly persons in Taiwan from October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009, using the National Health Insurance database. Neurological and autoimmune disorders and one-year hospitalization rates and in-hospital mortality rates were analyzed according to the vaccination status. Propensity score analysis was used to assess the relationship between adverse outcomes, hospitalization rates, and vaccination status. Results 45% of the elderly received influenza vaccination. Multiple logistic regression showed that the probability of being vaccinated was related to more patients visiting for URI symptoms (odds ratio (OR), 1.03; 95% CI, 1.02–1.03), men (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.12–1.17), increased age (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.02–1.03), and more comorbidities (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.17–1.23). There were no statistical differences in neurological and autoimmune diseases between the vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals using propensity score analysis, but vaccinated persons had a reduced hospitalization rate of 19% (odds ratio [OR], 0.81; 95% CI, 0.77–0.84) for the first six-months and 13% for one-year of follow-up (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.85–0.9). Conclusions Based on data from the one-year follow-ups among 93,049 elderly persons in Taiwan, reassuring results for selected neurological and autoimmune diseases were found among the vaccinated individuals after adjusting other factors. Influenza vaccination decreased the risk for hospitalization. Public health strategies must continue to improve the influenza vaccination rate among the elderly with information based upon tangible evidence. PMID:23209714

Huang, Tza-Ta; Huang, Yung-Sung; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Chou, Pesus; Lin, Chun-Hung; Wei, Chang-Kao; Lian, Wei-Chang; Chen, Ting-Chang; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lee, Ching-Chih

2012-01-01

355

Utilization and Expenditure of Hospital Admission in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder: National Health Insurance Claims Database Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There were not many studies to provide information on health access and health utilization of people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The present study describes a general profile of hospital admission and the medical cost among people with ASD, and to analyze the determinants of medical cost. A retrospective study was employed to analyze…

Lin, Jin-Ding; Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Lai, Chia-Im

2011-01-01

356

Utilization and expenditure of hospital admission in patients with autism spectrum disorder: National Health Insurance claims database analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

There were not many studies to provide information on health access and health utilization of people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The present study describes a general profile of hospital admission and the medical cost among people with ASD, and to analyze the determinants of medical cost. A retrospective study was employed to analyze medical fee of 397 individuals with

Jin-Ding Lin; Wen-Jiu Hung; Lan-Ping Lin; Chia-Im Lai

2011-01-01

357

Harnessing a Nation's Linguistic Competence: Identifying and Addressing Needs for LOTE in the Tourism and Hospitality Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports research that aimed to identify the foreign language and cross-cultural skill needs of workers in the tourism and hospitality industry in Australia and to develop foreign language competencies for use in industry training packages. Provides evidence for the need for foreign language skills in the industry and gives an account of the…

O'Neill, Shirley; Hatoss, Aniko

2003-01-01

358

Comparison of Evidence-Based Practice between Physicians and Nurses: A National Survey of Regional Hospitals in Taiwan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Although evidence-based practice (EBP) has been widely investigated, few studies compare physicians and nurses on performance. Methods: A structured questionnaire survey was used to investigate EBP among physicians and nurses in 61 regional hospitals of Taiwan. Valid postal questionnaires were collected from 605 physicians and 551…

Chiu, Ya-Wen; Weng, Yi-Hao; Lo, Heng-Lien; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Shih, Ya-Hui; Kuo, Ken N.

2010-01-01

359

Quality of human-computer interaction - results of a national usability survey of hospital-IT in Germany  

PubMed Central

Background Due to the increasing functionality of medical information systems, it is hard to imagine day to day work in hospitals without IT support. Therefore, the design of dialogues between humans and information systems is one of the most important issues to be addressed in health care. This survey presents an analysis of the current quality level of human-computer interaction of healthcare-IT in German hospitals, focused on the users' point of view. Methods To evaluate the usability of clinical-IT according to the design principles of EN ISO 9241-10 the IsoMetrics Inventory, an assessment tool, was used. The focus of this paper has been put on suitability for task, training effort and conformity with user expectations, differentiated by information systems. Effectiveness has been evaluated with the focus on interoperability and functionality of different IT systems. Results 4521 persons from 371 hospitals visited the start page of the study, while 1003 persons from 158 hospitals completed the questionnaire. The results show relevant variations between different information systems. Conclusions Specialised information systems with defined functionality received better assessments than clinical information systems in general. This could be attributed to the improved customisation of these specialised systems for specific working environments. The results can be used as reference data for evaluation and benchmarking of human computer engineering in clinical health IT context for future studies. PMID:22070880

2011-01-01

360

Chlorophyll a Fluorescence Transients in Mesophyll and Guard Cells : MODULATION OF GUARD CELL PHOTOPHOSPHORYLATION BY CO(2).  

PubMed

Chlorophyll fluorescence transients from mesophyll and guard cell chloroplasts of variegated leaves from Chlorophytum comosum were compared using high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy. Like their mesophyll counterparts, guard cell chloroplasts showed the OPS fluorescence transient indicating the operation of the linear electron transport and the possible generation of NADPH in these organelles. They also showed a slow fluorescence yield decrease, equivalent to the MT transition in mesophyll, suggesting the formation of the high energy state and photophosphorylation. Unlike the mesophyll chloroplasts, the fluorescence from guard cell chloroplasts lacked the increment of the SM transition, indicating that the two types of chloroplasts have some metabolic differences. The presence of CO(2) (supplied as bicarbonate, pH 6.7) specifically inhibited the MT-equivalent transition while its absence accelerated it. These observations constitute the first specific evidence of a guard cell chloroplast response to CO(2). Control of photosynthetic ATP levels in the guard cell cytoplasm by CO(2) may provide a mechanism regulating the availability of high energy equivalents at the guard cell plasmalemma, thus affecting stomatal opening. PMID:16662265

Melis, A; Zeiger, E

1982-03-01

361

Arterial blood gases and acid-base status of adult patients presenting with acute severe asthma at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi.  

PubMed

Forty adult patients with acute severe asthma were assessed for arterial blood gases and acid-base changes at presentation at the Casualty Unit, Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Marked degrees of hypoxaemia (mean P(a)O2 of 8.02 kP(a)), hypocapnia (mean P(a)CO2 of 4.62kP(a)) with apparently normal pH (mean 7.384) were documented in the majority of these patients. Based on these findings, a significant number of the patients (68.5%) were either candidates (5.3%) or potential candidates (63.2%) for artificial ventilation. Records at this hospital suggest an increasing trend in asthma admissions and mortality. Additionally, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admissions for asthma are associated with high mortality (54.4%). Pulsus paradoxicus emerged as the most significant (p = 0.002) clinical correlate to asthma severity. Central cyanosis was detected in none of the study patients suggesting that it is an unusual finding in the common presentation of acute severe asthma at this hospital. Its clinical detection would therefore imply an ominous clinical state. It is recommended that clinicians should take every opportunity to adequately assess their asthma patients before prescribing medications. They are also encouraged to more frequently request for blood gas studies in acute asthma. Those in charge of clinical teaching should direct appropriate efforts towards improved understanding of the pathophysiology and interpretation of acid-base disorders. PMID:1505418

Odhiambo, J A; Chwala, R D

1992-06-01

362

SPERTI Instrument Cell Building (PER606) elevation; plan of Guard House ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

SPERT-I Instrument Cell Building (PER-606) elevation; plan of Guard House (PER-607); elevations for Pit Building (PER-605) southwest, southeast, and northeast sides. Earthen shield is mounded between back wall of Instrument Cell Building and the southwest elevation of Pit Building. Detail of filtered louver in door of Instrument Cell Building. Idaho Operations Office PER-605-IDO-3. INEEL index no. 761-0605-00-396-109183 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

363

A National Survey of the Prevalence and Impact of Clostridium difficile Infection Among Hospitalized Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND:We sought to determine nationwide, population-based trends in rates of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection among hospitalized inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients in the United States, and to determine its mortality and economic impact.METHODS:We analyzed discharge records from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, and used the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes to identify Crohn's disease (CD)

Geoffrey C. Nguyen; Gilaad G. Kaplan; Mary L. Harris; Steven R. Brant

2008-01-01

364

OnGuard, a Computational Platform for Quantitative Kinetic Modeling of Guard Cell Physiology1[W][OA  

PubMed Central

Stomatal guard cells play a key role in gas exchange for photosynthesis while minimizing transpirational water loss from plants by opening and closing the stomatal pore. Foliar gas exchange has long been incorporated into mathematical models, several of which are robust enough to recapitulate transpirational characteristics at the whole-plant and community levels. Few models of stomata have been developed from the bottom up, however, and none are sufficiently generalized to be widely applicable in predicting stomatal behavior at a cellular level. We describe here the construction of computational models for the guard cell, building on the wealth of biophysical and kinetic knowledge available for guard cell transport, signaling, and homeostasis. The OnGuard software was constructed with the HoTSig library to incorporate explicitly all of the fundamental properties for transporters at the plasma membrane and tonoplast, the salient features of osmolite metabolism, and the major controls of cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentration and pH. The library engenders a structured approach to tier and interrelate computational elements, and the OnGuard software allows ready access to parameters and equations ‘on the fly’ while enabling the network of components within each model to interact computationally. We show that an OnGuard model readily achieves stability in a set of physiologically sensible baseline or Reference States; we also show the robustness of these Reference States in adjusting to changes in environmental parameters and the activities of major groups of transporters both at the tonoplast and plasma membrane. The following article addresses the predictive power of the OnGuard model to generate unexpected and counterintuitive outputs. PMID:22635116

Hills, Adrian; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R.; Lew, Virgilio L.

2012-01-01

365

AvantGuard: exploring the distribution of autonomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Every war introduces a new round of tactics and technologies. Our present war might be characterized as a confrontation between the Suicide Bomber and the Unmanned Air Vehicle. AvantGuard models this confrontation and exposes it to study. It is a computer game in which UAVs are used to protect a convoy in hostile urban terrain. Adversaries hide among the residents and prepare an ambush. The operator directs small UAVs and studies the resulting sensor stream. He must find the ambush before the convoy arrives. AvantGuard serves those who seek to improve the effectiveness of the UAV mission. It is an instrument with which researchers can measure performance as they develop new systems. AvantGuard is particularly designed to study the interplay of human supervisor and autonomous UAVs. Its cognitive challenges are organized into distinct tasks. For each task, the autonomy level of the UAV is set independently. Calibrated to established standards, results are easily compared to one another and to the findings of other researchers. By addressing real-world problems, such as battlefield constraints on bandwidth and the limits of machine vision, AvantGuard presents a credible approach to mission simulation, training and eventual execution. By employing sophisticated game techniques, AvantGuard advances an innovative design. By considering the post-combat role of the military, it prepares an instrument to advance the goals of peace as well as those of war.

Jacobson, Dov

2005-05-01

366

Biomechanical efficiency of wrist guards as a shock isolator.  

PubMed

Despite the use of wrist guards during skate- and snowboard activities, fractures still occur at the wrist or at further proximal locations of the forearm. The main objectives of this study were to conduct a human subject testing under simulated falling conditions for measurement of the impact force on the hand, to model wrist guards as a shock isolator, to construct a linear mass-spring-damper model for quantification of the impact force attenuation (Q-ratio) and energy absorption (S-ratio), and to determine whether wrist guards play a role of an efficient shock isolator. While the falling direction (forward and backward) significantly influenced the impact responses, use of wrist guards provided minimal improvements in the Q- and S-ratios. It was suggested based on the results under the submaximal loading conditions that protective functions of the common wrist guard design could be enhanced with substantial increase in the damping ratio so as to maximize the energy absorption. This would bring forth minor deterioration in the impact force attenuation but significant increase in the energy absorption by 19%, which would help better protection against fall-related injuries of the upper extremity. PMID:16524335

Hwang, Il-Kyu; Kim, Kyu-Jung; Kaufman, Kenton R; Cooney, William P; An, Kai-Nan

2006-04-01

367

Cell wall arabinan is essential for guard cell function  

PubMed Central

Stomatal guard cells play a key role in the ability of plants to survive on dry land, because their movements regulate the exchange of gases and water vapor between the external environment and the interior of the plant. The walls of these cells are exceptionally strong and must undergo large and reversible deformation during stomatal opening and closing. The molecular basis of the unique strength and flexibility of guard cell walls is unknown. We show that degradation of cell wall arabinan prevents either stomatal opening or closing. This locking of guard cell wall movements can be reversed if homogalacturonan is subsequently removed from the wall. We suggest that arabinans maintain flexibility in the cell wall by preventing homogalacturonan polymers from forming tight associations. PMID:13130074

Jones, Louise; Milne, Jennifer L.; Ashford, David; McQueen-Mason, Simon J.

2003-01-01

368

Catalases negatively regulate methyl jasmonate signaling in guard cells.  

PubMed

Methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced stomatal closure is accompanied by the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H?O?) in guard cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of catalases (CATs) in MeJA-induced stomatal closure using cat mutants cat2, cat3-1 and cat1 cat3, and the CAT inhibitor, 3-aminotriazole (AT). When assessed with 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein, the reduction of catalase activity by means of mutations and the inhibitor accumulated higher basal levels of H?O? in guard cells whereas they did not affect stomatal aperture in the absence of MeJA. In contrast, the cat mutations and the treatment with AT potentiated MeJA-induced stomatal closure and MeJA-induced H?O? production. These results indicate that CATs negatively regulate H?O? accumulation in guard cells and suggest that inducible H?O? production rather than constitutive elevation modulates stomatal apertures in Arabidopsis. PMID:22525681

Jannat, Rayhanur; Uraji, Misugi; Hossain, Mohammad Anowar; Islam, Mohammad Muzahidul; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Murata, Yoshiyuki

2012-07-01

369

Effect of a national primary care pay for performance scheme on emergency hospital admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: controlled longitudinal study  

PubMed Central

Objective To estimate the impact of a national primary care pay for performance scheme, the Quality and Outcomes Framework in England, on emergency hospital admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs). Design Controlled longitudinal study. Setting English National Health Service between 1998/99 and 2010/11. Participants Populations registered with each of 6975 family practices in England. Main outcome measures Year specific differences between trend adjusted emergency hospital admission rates for incentivised ACSCs before and after the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework scheme and two comparators: non-incentivised ACSCs and non-ACSCs. Results Incentivised ACSC admissions showed a relative reduction of 2.7% (95% confidence interval 1.6% to 3.8%) in the first year of the Quality and Outcomes Framework compared with ACSCs that were not incentivised. This increased to a relative reduction of 8.0% (6.9% to 9.1%) in 2010/11. Compared with conditions that are not regarded as being influenced by the quality of ambulatory care (non-ACSCs), incentivised ACSCs also showed a relative reduction in rates of emergency admissions of 2.8% (2.0% to 3.6%) in the first year increasing to 10.9% (10.1% to 11.7%) by 2010/11. Conclusions The introduction of a major national pay for performance scheme for primary care in England was associated with a decrease in emergency admissions for incentivised conditions compared with conditions that were not incentivised. Contemporaneous health service changes seem unlikely to have caused the sharp change in the trajectory of incentivised ACSC admissions immediately after the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework. The decrease seems larger than would be expected from the changes in the process measures that were incentivised, suggesting that the pay for performance scheme may have had impacts on quality of care beyond the directly incentivised activities. PMID:25389120

Harrison, Mark J; Dusheiko, Mark; Sutton, Matt; Gravelle, Hugh; Doran, Tim

2014-01-01

370

Design and evaluation of deer guards for Florida Key Deer  

E-print Network

-tailed deer from crossing. Over-population of white-tailed deer herds across the United States has been an emerging issue in recent years. Fencing in conjunction with my deer guard design could be useful in keeping deer out of residential areas, thus...-tailed deer from crossing. Over-population of white-tailed deer herds across the United States has been an emerging issue in recent years. Fencing in conjunction with my deer guard design could be useful in keeping deer out of residential areas, thus...

Sebesta, Jason Daryl

2012-06-07

371

The occlusal guard: a simplified technique for fabrication and equilibration.  

PubMed

Hard occlusal guards have been used effectively to treat myofacial pain originating from parafunctional activities. Also, they can protect the natural dentition when it opposes porcelain restorations, help to evaluate changes in occlusal vertical dimension during full mouth rehabilitation, minimize further tooth loss in patients with abfraction lesions, and redirect occlusal loads more favorably onto dental implant-supported prostheses. A simplified technique is described to fabricate a properly designed wax model of an occlusal guard that can be processed in acrylic in the same manner used to construct a complete denture. PMID:23649575

Antonelli, John; Hottel, Timothy L; Siegel, Sharon C; Brandt, Robert; Silva, Gladston

2013-01-01

372

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, ROOF FRAMING DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, ROOF FRAMING DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Navy Yard, Mare Island, CA. H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 9 of 15, accompanying specification Noy-4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 7, 1941. Yards & Docks drawing no. 160694; P.W. (Public Works) drawing no. 10388-33; file no. 930-S-4. Scale three eighths inch to one foot. 73 cm x 129 cm. Black line print - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

373

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS. Navy Department, Bureau ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards 7 Docks, Navy Yard, Mare Island, California. Albert F. Roller, Architect, San Francisco, CA H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 3 of 15, accompanying contract no. 4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 14, 1941; file no. 930-CR-5. Scale one eigth inch to one foot. 73 cm x 129 cm. Black line print - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

374

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Navy Yard, Mare Island, CA. H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 7 of 15, accompanying specification Noy-4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 7, 1941. Yards & Docks drawing no. 160692; P.W. (Public Works) drawing no. 10388-31; file no. 930-CR-7. Scale three eighths inch to one foot. 73 cm x 129 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

375

Status recognition of isolator based on SmartGuard  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper concerns the method for checking the status of isolators and is applied in the sequence control in smart substation based on SmartGuard--a mobile inspection robot for substations. It can recognize the status of an isolator through analyzing its feature. We could get the homography matrix by using the SIFT feature between the template image and new acquired image, then get the range of isolator, finally recognize the status of isolator by image processing. The experiment of results proved that the method could recognize isolator status effectively. The substation realizes one key sequence control system through this technology based SmartGuard.

Wang, Wanguo; Wang, Binhai; Wang, Zhenli; Li, Li; Zhang, Jingjing; Li, Yibin

2013-07-01

376

Emerging infectious diseases in free-ranging wildlife-Australian zoo based wildlife hospitals contribute to national surveillance.  

PubMed

Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly originating from wildlife. Many of these diseases have significant impacts on human health, domestic animal health, and biodiversity. Surveillance is the key to early detection of emerging diseases. A zoo based wildlife disease surveillance program developed in Australia incorporates disease information from free-ranging wildlife into the existing national wildlife health information system. This program uses a collaborative approach and provides a strong model for a disease surveillance program for free-ranging wildlife that enhances the national capacity for early detection of emerging diseases. PMID:24787430

Cox-Witton, Keren; Reiss, Andrea; Woods, Rupert; Grillo, Victoria; Baker, Rupert T; Blyde, David J; Boardman, Wayne; Cutter, Stephen; Lacasse, Claude; McCracken, Helen; Pyne, Michael; Smith, Ian; Vitali, Simone; Vogelnest, Larry; Wedd, Dion; Phillips, Martin; Bunn, Chris; Post, Lyndel

2014-01-01

377

Emerging Infectious Diseases in Free-Ranging Wildlife-Australian Zoo Based Wildlife Hospitals Contribute to National Surveillance  

PubMed Central

Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly originating from wildlife. Many of these diseases have significant impacts on human health, domestic animal health, and biodiversity. Surveillance is the key to early detection of emerging diseases. A zoo based wildlife disease surveillance program developed in Australia incorporates disease information from free-ranging wildlife into the existing national wildlife health information system. This program uses a collaborative approach and provides a strong model for a disease surveillance program for free-ranging wildlife that enhances the national capacity for early detection of emerging diseases. PMID:24787430

Cox-Witton, Keren; Reiss, Andrea; Woods, Rupert; Grillo, Victoria; Baker, Rupert T.; Blyde, David J.; Boardman, Wayne; Cutter, Stephen; Lacasse, Claude; McCracken, Helen; Pyne, Michael; Smith, Ian; Vitali, Simone; Vogelnest, Larry; Wedd, Dion; Phillips, Martin; Bunn, Chris; Post, Lyndel

2014-01-01

378

Workforce Issues: Physicians & Hospitals  

E-print Network

's publication is "Workforce Issues: Physicians & Hospitals." Oklahoma, like the rest of the nation, is facing, the solution to the problem is simple: Oklahoma needs more physicians, especially in rural areas Workforce Issues: Physicians & Hospitals State of the State's Rural Health 2008 Edition #12;On

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

379

The impact of the lung allocation scoring system at the single national Veterans Affairs Hospital lung transplantation program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The lung allocation score (LAS) has changed the distribution of donor lungs for transplantation. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of the LAS on a unique patient population undergoing lung transplantation (LTX) at the single national Veterans Affairs (VA) LT center. Methods: One hundred and ten consecutive VA patients underwent LTX between 1994 and 2007. Patients transplanted

Satoru Osaki; James D. Maloney; Keith C. Meyer; Richard D. Cornwell; Niloo M. Edwards; Nilto C. De Oliveira

2009-01-01

380

Scrub typhus in the northern provinces of Vietnam: an observational study of admissions to a national referral hospital  

PubMed Central

Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of fever in parts of South East and Southern Asia. Little is known about the disease burden in Vietnam. Methods A 2-year observational study of scrub typhus at a tertiary referral hospital in northern Vietnam was carried out. Diagnosis was based on a single serological test in patients with suggestive clinical symptoms. Results Scrub typhus was diagnosed in 3.5% (251/7226) of admissions. Cases occurred throughout the year, with incidence highest in the summer. Although complications were common, mortality was low (1.2%; 3/251). Conclusions These data suggest that scrub typhus is common, with a seasonal distribution in northern Vietnam. PMID:25253616

Nadjm, Behzad; Thuy, Pham T.; Trang, Van D.; Dang Ha, Le; Kinh, Nguyen V.; Wertheim, Heiman F.

2014-01-01

381

75 FR 30845 - National Offshore Safety Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Guard [USCG-2010-0453] National Offshore Safety Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast...teleconference meeting of the National Offshore Safety Advisory Committee (NOSAC) to...June 17, 2010. Written material for distribution to Committee members should reach...

2010-06-02

382

33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...navigation, shall be properly marked. The spoil banks should be examined at frequent...are no longer required due to settling of banks, the Coast Guard will authorize their...each side of a channel or pipe line, each bank will be considered...

2010-07-01

383

Mate guarding and gallivanting by male hoary marmots ( Marmota caligata )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seven years data on the vernal behavior of hoarty marmots, Marmota caligata, suggest that males engage in a two-part reproductive strategy, which consists of guarding their mates against possible copulation with additional males, and also gallivanting — wandering about in search of additional reproductive opportunities for themselves. Data are presented which support seven predictions derived from the assumption that mate

David P. Barash

1981-01-01

384

Guarded commands, nondeterminacy and formal derivation of programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

So-called “guarded commands” are introduced as a building block for alternative and repetitive constructs that allow nondeterministic program components for which at least the activity evoked, but possibly even the final state, is not necessarily uniquely determined by the initial state. For the formal derivation of programs expressed in terms of these constructs, a calculus will be be shown.

Edsger W. Dijkstra

1975-01-01

385

ORIGINAL PAPER Pup guarding by greater spear-nosed bats  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER Pup guarding by greater spear-nosed bats Kirsten M. Bohn & Cynthia F. Moss & Gerald to either mistaken identity, (i.e., recognition errors) or active cooperation. In greater spear-nosed bats (Phyllostomus hastatus), reproductive females roost together in stable long-term social groups in cave ceilings

Wilkinson, Gerald S.

386

6. DECK OF SIDEWALK AND GUARD RAILS. LOOKING NORTH. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. DECK OF SIDEWALK AND GUARD RAILS. LOOKING NORTH. - Route 31 Bridge, New Jersey Route 31, crossing disused main line of Central Railroad of New Jersey (C.R.R.N.J.) (New Jersey Transit's Raritan Valley Line), Hampton, Hunterdon County, NJ

387

PointGuardTM: Protecting Pointers From Buffer Overflow Vulnerabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite numerous security technologies crafted to resist buffer overflow vulnerabilities, buffer overflows continue to be the dominant form of software security vulnerability. This is because most buffer overflow defenses provide only partial coverage, and the attacks have adapted to exploit problems that are not well-defended, such as heap over- flows. This paper presents PointGuard, a compiler technique to defend against

Crispin Cowan; Steve Beattie; John Johansen; Perry Wagle

2003-01-01

388

Mesophyll photosynthesis and guard cell metabolism impacts on stomatal behaviour.  

PubMed

Stomata control gaseous fluxes between the internal leaf air spaces and the external atmosphere. Guard cells determine stomatal aperture and must operate to ensure an appropriate balance between CO2 uptake for photosynthesis (A) and water loss, and ultimately plant water use efficiency (WUE). A strong correlation between A and stomatal conductance (gs ) is well documented and often observed, but the underlying mechanisms, possible signals and metabolites that promote this relationship are currently unknown. In this review we evaluate the current literature on mesophyll-driven signals that may coordinate stomatal behaviour with mesophyll carbon assimilation. We explore a possible role of various metabolites including sucrose and malate (from several potential sources; including guard cell photosynthesis) and new evidence that improvements in WUE have been made by manipulating sucrose metabolism within the guard cells. Finally we discuss the new tools and techniques available for potentially manipulating cell-specific metabolism, including guard and mesophyll cells, in order to elucidate mesophyll-derived signals that coordinate mesophyll CO2 demands with stomatal behaviour, in order to provide a mechanistic understanding of these processes as this may identify potential targets for manipulations in order to improve plant WUE and crop yield. PMID:25077787

Lawson, Tracy; Simkin, Andrew J; Kelly, Gilor; Granot, David

2014-09-01

389

United States Coast Guard's Program for Identifying High Interest Vessels.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report identifies measures that the Coast Guard can take to improve the effectiveness of its scoring matrix for identifying high interest vessels that could pose security risks to the United States. It is based on interviews with employees and officia...

2009-01-01

390

1. GENERAL VIEW, TAKEN FROM EAST. GUARD HOUSE (Bldg. No. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. GENERAL VIEW, TAKEN FROM EAST. GUARD HOUSE (Bldg. No. 759) ON EXTREME LEFT, QUARTERMASTER STOREHOUSE AND OFFICE (Bldg. No. 757) IN CENTER, QUARTERMASTER STOREHOUSE (Bldg. No. 915) ON EXTREME RIGHT, STABLES (Bldg. Nos. 916 and 917) BEHIND AND SLIGHTLY TO LEFT OF Bldg. No. 915. - Fort Lawton, Discovery Park, Seattle, King County, WA

391

76 FR 49500 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security United States Coast Guard-020 Substance...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...United States Coast Guard--020 Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Program...United States Coast Guard--020 Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Program...United States Coast Guard's Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment...

2011-08-10

392

76 FR 28795 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security United States Coast Guard-024 Auxiliary...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...disenrollment or death of a member...Manager and address: United States Coast Guard, Office...20593-0001. United States Coast Guard, Office...Safety (CG-542), United States Coast Guard, 2100...to be made under penalty of perjury as...

2011-05-18

393

33 CFR 165.1184 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF...NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated...Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165...Guard will notify the public via...

2011-07-01

394

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) Funding for Studies of Hospital-Associated Bacterial Pathogens: Are Funds Proportionate to Burden of Disease?  

PubMed Central

Background Hospital-associated infections (HAIs) are associated with a considerable burden of disease and direct costs greater than $17 billion. The pathogens that cause the majority of serious HAIs are Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species, referred as ESCKAPE. We aimed to determine the amount of funding the National Institute of Health (NIH) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) allocates to research on antimicrobial resistant pathogens, particularly ESCKAPE pathogens. Methods The NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) database was used to identify NIAID antimicrobial resistance research grants funded in 2007-2009 using the terms "antibiotic resistance," "antimicrobial resistance," and "hospital-associated infection." Results Funding for antimicrobial resistance grants has increased from 2007-2009. Antimicrobial resistance funding for bacterial pathogens has seen a smaller increase than non-bacterial pathogens. The total funding for all ESKCAPE pathogens was $ 22,005,943 in 2007, $ 30,810,153 in 2008 and $ 49,801,227 in 2009. S. aureus grants received $ 29,193,264 in FY2009, the highest funding amount of all the ESCKAPE pathogens. Based on 2009 funding data, approximately $1,565 of research money was spent per S. aureus related death and $750 of was spent per C. difficile related death. Conclusions Although the funding for ESCKAPE pathogens has increased from 2007 to 2009, funding levels for antimicrobial resistant bacteria-related grants is still lower than funding for antimicrobial resistant non-bacterial pathogens. Efforts may be needed to improve research funding for resistant-bacterial pathogens, particularly as their clinical burden increases. PMID:22958856

2012-01-01

395

33 CFR 165.518 - Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF...NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated...Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165...maritime and general public by marine...

2011-07-01

396

33 CFR 165.518 - Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District.  

33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District. 165...Section 165.518 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF...

2014-07-01

397

33 CFR 165.1711 - Security Zones; Waters of the Seventeenth Coast Guard District  

33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zones; Waters of the Seventeenth Coast Guard District...Section 165.1711 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF...

2014-07-01

398

77 FR 31803 - Safety Zone for Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display Currituck Sound; Corolla, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Coast Guard Sector North Carolina--COTP Zone,'' add entry...Coast Guard Sector North Carolina--COTP Zone...W, located near Whale Head Bay...Captain of the Port Sector North Carolina. [FR Doc. 2012-12972...

2012-05-30

399

78 FR 36664 - Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display, Currituck Sound; Corolla, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Coast Guard Sector North Carolina--COTP Zone,'' add entry...Coast Guard Sector North Carolina--COTP Zone...located near Whale Head Bay...Captain of the Port Sector North Carolina. [FR Doc. 2013-14548...

2013-06-19

400

46 CFR 2.95-1 - Certificates or documents issued by Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Certificates or documents issued by Coast Guard. 2.95-1 Section 2.95-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...INSPECTIONS Retention of Records by the Public § 2.95-1 Certificates or documents issued by Coast...

2010-10-01

401

46 CFR 12.03-1 - Coast Guard-accepted training other than approved courses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Coast Guard-accepted training other than approved courses. 12.03-1...RATING ENDORSEMENTS Approved and Accepted Training § 12.03-1 Coast Guard-accepted training other than approved courses. (a)...

2012-10-01

402

46 CFR 12.03-1 - Coast Guard-accepted training other than approved courses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Coast Guard-accepted training other than approved courses. 12.03-1...RATING ENDORSEMENTS Approved and Accepted Training § 12.03-1 Coast Guard-accepted training other than approved courses. (a)...

2013-10-01

403

49 CFR 571.223 - Standard No. 223; Rear impact guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...maximum horizontal guard dimension that is perpendicular to the longitudinal vertical plane passing through...100 mm high projected vertical height are located...frame design types with dimensions, material thickness...guard width from the vertical longitudinal plane...

2013-10-01

404

99. Catalog HHistory 1, C.C.C., 23 Guard Rail Construction, Negative ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

99. Catalog H-History 1, C.C.C., 23 Guard Rail Construction, Negative No. P455e (Photographer and date unknown) GUARD RAIL INSTALLATION. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

405

Latest update of tests and improvements to US Coast Guard viscous oil pumping system.  

PubMed

Over the past nine years, the US Coast Guard has incorporated the prevention through people (PTP) philosophy as a "human factors" approach to learn how maritime operations can be regulated safer and be more efficient by evaluating training, management policies, operational procedures, and establishing partnerships with the maritime industry. One of the key elements of applying a PTP approach is identifying and incorporating lessons learned from major marine casualties and pollution incidents. Since 1997, the US Coast Guard National Strike Force has responded to three major oil spills involving foreign freight vessels grounding, which included the removal of highly viscous oil using various lightering equipment and systems. An informal workgroup consisting of the US Coast Guard, US Navy Supervisor of Salvage (NAVSUPSALV), and various representatives from oil pollution clean-up companies met at the following facilities: the Chevron Asphalt Facility in Edmonds, WA (September 1999), the Oil and Hazardous Materials Simulated Environmental Test Tank (OHMSETT) testing facility in Leonardo, New Jersey (November 1999 and March 2000), the Alaska Clean Seas (ACS) warehouse annex in Prudhoe Bay, AK (October 2000), and Cenac Towing Company facility in Houma, LA (May 2002). The group shared ideas and techniques, and tested different pumps and hose lengths with viscous oil. It was during the early tests that the first quantitative results showed just how efficient lubricated transport of heavy oil product could be, and broadened the knowledge of such methods to the entire industry. Although this technology had existed for many years in the oil production and handling industry, its use had never been investigated in a laboratory setting with regard to salvage response lightering systems. PMID:12899890

Drieu, Michael D; Nourse, Peter C; MacKay, Ronald; Cooper, David A; Hvidbak, Flemming

2003-01-01

406

Quality of life among patients living with epilepsy attending the neurology clinic at kenyatta national hospital, Nairobi, Kenya: a comparative study  

PubMed Central

Background Most of the studies on epilepsy in Kenya and indeed the sub-Saharan region of Africa mainly focus on prevalence, psychiatric profile, and factors associated with increased seizure burden. This being the first Kenyan and sub-Saharan African study assessing quality of life among people living with epilepsy, it will identify their ‘intangible’ needs and enable evidence-based intervention that would ultimately lead to a comprehensive management and better outcome. Methods Design: A cross-sectional comparative study, using the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire, a socio-demographic questionnaire, seizure burden and characteristics, drug and treatment profile questionnaires and the Mini-Mental state examination, among PLWE and those accompanying them, herein referred to as the normal healthy controls, attending the neurology clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. Setting and subjects: Study was carried out between October 2006 and February 2007 at the neurology clinic in the hospital where three hundred consecutive subjects who satisfied the inclusion criteria and gave consent were recruited. Statistical tests used: Descriptive statistics were used to compute means, standard deviations as well as frequencies. Significance of associations was tested using the Chi square test statistic (x2), an independent samples t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a step-wise (forward) regression analysis. A p?National Hospital was significantly impaired and lower than that of the normal controls accompanying them. A comprehensive epilepsy management program is recommended to address this problem and its associated risk factors for the people living with epilepsy in Kenya. PMID:23777194

2013-01-01

407

Implementation of the presence of companions during hospital admission for childbirth: data from the Birth in Brazil national survey.  

PubMed

Robust evidence of the benefits of continuous support during childbirth led to the recommendation that it should be offered for all women. In Brazil, it has been guaranteed by law since 2005, but scarce data on implementation is available. We aimed to estimate the frequency and associated socio-demographic, obstetric and institutional predictors of women having companionship during childbirth in the Birth in Brazil survey. Descriptive statistical analysis was done for the characterization of companions (at different moments of hospital stay), maternal and institutional factors; associations were investigated in bivariate and multivariate models. We found that 24.5% of women had no companion at all, 18.8% had continuous companionship and 56.7% had partial companionship. Independent predictors of having no or partial companionship at birth were: lower income and education, brown color of skin, using the public sector, multiparity, and vaginal delivery. Implementation of companionship was associated with having an appropriate environment, and clear institution al rules about women's rights to companionship. PMID:25167174

Diniz, Carmen Simone Grilo; d'Orsi, Eleonora; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira; Torres, Jacqueline Alves; Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos; Schneck, Camilla A; Lansky, Sônia; Teixeira, Neuma Zamariano Fanaia; Rance, Susanna; Sandall, Jane

2014-08-01

408

Flexible Mate Guarding Tactics in the Dragonfly Sympelrum Internum (Odonata: Libellulidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mate guarding–a behaviour prevalent in odonates–is a post copulatory association during which males prevent females from re-mating. Some species use two forms of guarding: contact mate guarding, which is energetically costly but highly effective and non-contact mate guarding, which is less costly but less effective. This study aimed to determine if male Sympetrum internum (Odonata:Libellulidae) adjust the duration of contact

Tanya M. Latty

2006-01-01

409

49 CFR 1520.15 - SSI disclosed by TSA or the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...not available for public inspection or copying...does TSA or the Coast Guard release...discretion of TSA or the Coast Guard, as appropriate, access to the SSI is...issued by TSA or the Coast Guard. (2...disclosure is not a public release of...

2011-10-01

410

49 CFR 1520.15 - SSI disclosed by TSA or the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...not available for public inspection or copying...does TSA or the Coast Guard release...discretion of TSA or the Coast Guard, as appropriate, access to the SSI is...issued by TSA or the Coast Guard. (2...disclosure is not a public release of...

2010-10-01

411

77 FR 31183 - Safety Zone, Temporary Change for Recurring Fireworks Display Within the Fifth Coast Guard...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...regulation will restrict access to the area, the effect...4, 2012; (ii) the Coast Guard will give advance...in the preamble, the Coast Guard amends 33 CFR part...NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS 0 1. The authority...0 a. Under ``(d) Coast Guard Sector North...

2012-05-25

412

78 FR 39595 - Safety Zone, Fifth Coast Guard District Firework Display, Pagan River; Smithfield, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...fireworks display, access to the Pagan River...Discussion of the Rule The Coast Guard is temporarily...regulation restricts access to the safety zone...and (iv), the Coast Guard will make notifications...the preamble, the Coast Guard amends 33 CFR...AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS 0 1. The...

2013-07-02

413

33 CFR 125.11 - Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...CREDENTIALS FOR PERSONS REQUIRING ACCESS TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.11 Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card....

2011-07-01

414

33 CFR 125.11 - Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...CREDENTIALS FOR PERSONS REQUIRING ACCESS TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.11 Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card....

2010-07-01

415

78 FR 37963 - Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display Cape Fear River; Wilmington, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...regulation restricts access to a small segment of...size; and (iii) the Coast Guard will make notifications...in the preamble, the Coast Guard amends 33 CFR part...NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS 0 1. The authority...amend section (d) Coast Guard Sector North...

2013-06-25

416

48 CFR 237.102-70 - Prohibition on contracting for firefighting or security-guard functions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...contracting for firefighting or security-guard functions. 237.102-70 Section 237.102-70...contracting for firefighting or security-guard functions. (a) Under 10 U.S.C. 2465...performance of firefighting or security-guard functions at any military installation or...

2010-10-01

417

Anim. Behav., 1991,41, 207-216 Post-copulatory mate guarding in decorated crickets  

E-print Network

Anim. Behav., 1991,41, 207-216 Post-copulatory mate guarding in decorated crickets SCOTT K. SAKALUK) Abstract. Although post-copulatory mate guarding occurs in a variety of crickets, its adaptive significance in decorated crickets, Gryllodes supplicans, by comparing ampulla retention times of females guarded

Sakaluk, Scott

418

76 FR 66239 - Safety Zones; Fireworks Displays Within the Fifth Coast Guard District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...be received by the Coast Guard on or before...of Transportation, West Building Ground Floor...line running east to west from points along...b.) Coast Guard Sector Baltimore...d.) Coast Guard Sector North...position located at the west end of Sugar...

2011-10-26

419

77 FR 16929 - Safety Zones; Fireworks Displays within the Fifth Coast Guard District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Transportation, West Building Ground Floor...Dennis Sens, Fifth Coast Guard District, Prevention...line running east to west from points along...b.) Coast Guard Sector Baltimore...d.) Coast Guard Sector North...position located at the west end of Sugar...

2012-03-23

420

U.S. Coast Guard cutter personnel on Sweetbriar train their fire ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

U.S. Coast Guard cutter personnel on Sweetbriar train their fire hoses on a burning pleasure boat in an Alaskan harbor. A U.S. Coast Guard rigid-hull inflatable helps with the fire-fighting effort - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter SWEETBRIER, Cordova, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

421

Guard cell biochemistry: response to environmental stimuli causing changes in gas exchange. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in research on the biochemistry of guard cells. Methods for the isolation of guard cell protoplasts have been developed. Aqueous two-phase polymer systems for isolating cells, organelles and macromolecules were investigated. Ultramicrofluorometry of NAD(P)H was developed. An attempt has been made to measure abscisic acid in guard cells. (ACR)

Not Available

1981-09-25

422

Reduction of guard interval by impulse compression for DMT modulation on twisted pair cables  

Microsoft Academic Search

In multicarrier modulation schemes like orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) or discrete multi tone (DMT) a guard interval represented by a cyclic prefix is inserted between successive multicarrier symbols in order to reduce intersymbol interference (ISI). The length of the guard interval is determined by the length of the channel impulse response (CIR). For a fixed guard interval, the longer

Romed Schur; Joachim Speidel; Ralf Angerbauer

2000-01-01

423

Compare Hospitals  

MedlinePLUS

2014 Leapfrog Hospital Survey Results Now Available Thank you for visiting the Leapfrog Hospital Survey Results Website. These results are based on surveys submitted by hospitals across the country that have demonstrated a commitment ...

424

American Hospital Association  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1898, the American Hospital Association (AHA) is the national umbrella organization that represents a wide range of hospitals and health care networks. While some of the siteâÂÂs contents are designed for health care professionals and executives, the general public and some scholars will find some of the features, such as their quarterly reports on the latest in hospital trends, quite valuable. A good place to start is the Resource Center section of the site, which contains helpful guides to locating the information on the site itself. There are a number of free resources available here, such as a fact sheet about AmericaâÂÂs hospitals and studies, including âÂÂThe State of AmericaâÂÂs Hospitals: Taking the Pulseâ and âÂÂCosts of Caring: Sources of Growth in Spending for Hospital CareâÂÂ.

2005-01-01

425

US Coast Guard 1995 oil pollution research grants publications: Part 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Pollution Research Grants Program was created by the Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990, P.L. 101-380 (OPA 90), 33 U.S.C. 28761(c)(8) and 2761(c)(9). The OPA established a regional research program and authorized those agencies represented on the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Oil Pollution Research, including the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), to make grants to universities and other research institutions to perform research related to regional effects of oil pollution. The USCG established such a grant program and the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center), a component of the Research and Special Programs Administration of the Department of Transportation (DOT), was chosen to administer this program on behalf of the USCG. In August 1995, the Volpe Center awarded seven one-year grants. Coast Guard funds were matched by funds from the university or non-profit research institution. This report contains the final reports for research performed under these grants.

NONE

1997-08-01

426

US Coast Guard 1995 oil pollution research grants publications: Part 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Pollution Research Grants Program was created by the Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990, P.L. 101-380 (OPA 90), 33 U.S.C. 28761(c)(8) and 2761(c)(9). The OPA established a regional research program and authorized those agencies represented on the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Oil Pollution Research, including the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), to make grants to universities and other research institutions to perform research related to regional effects of oil pollution. The USCG established such a grant program and the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center), a component of the Research and Special Programs Administration of the Department of Transportation (DOT), was chosen to administer this program on behalf of the USCG. In August 1995, the Volpe Center awarded seven one-year grants. Coast Guard funds were matched by funds from the university or non-profit research institution. This report contains the final reports for research performed under these grants.

NONE

1997-08-01

427

National drought atlas developed  

Microsoft Academic Search

A National Drought Atlas for the United States is nearing completion. The idea for the atlas was inspired by the severe droughts that plagued parts of the country from 1987 to 1989, covering much of the Great Plains states, the Ohio Valley, and the southeast. In California, the drought lasted 6 years. In general, water managers were caught off-guard by

W. J. Werick; G. E. Willeke; N. B. Guttman; J. R. M. Hosking; J. R. Wallis

1994-01-01

428

[Evaluation of the presence of bacteria in food and environment of an Oncological Service of a National Hospital, San José, Costa Rica].  

PubMed

The microbiological quality of 92 samples from the Oncological Service of a National Hospital, San José, Costa Rica was evaluated during the months of February to July, 2002. Of these samples, 48 were from salads, refreshments, and fruits and 44 from surfaces, air and hands of the medical personnel. The presence of total and fecal coliforms was determined by the total plate count technique, using Violet Red Bile Agar for the isolation of total and fecal coliforms, Baird-Parker Agar for Staphylococcus aureus, Cetrimide Agar for Pseudomonas and Listeria was enriched in University of Vermont Broth, Fraizer Broth and isolated in Oxford Agar. From the food samples analyzed, 77% were positive for at least one of the parameters studied; the fruits presented the greater contamination (94%) and the cooked salads the minor, even though Listeria was isolated in 13% of them. All tested salads (100%) were positive for fecal coliforms. Pseudomonas and S. aureus were isolated from fruits, raw salads, and refreshments. All the analyzed surfaces, with an exception, were negative for the parameters evaluated. 75% of the hands of the medical personnel were positive for at least one of the parameters evaluated; 25% had total coliforms (2.8x10(3) UFC/hand), 13% fecal coliforms (2.4x10(3) UFC/ hand), 69% S. aureus (1.3x10(3) UFC/hand) and 19% Pseudomonas sp. 115 isolates were randomly selected, and identified using miniaturized tests (API). When comparing these identifications with the 166 isolations done at the Clinical Laboratory of the Hospital from the infected patients of oncology, by means of variance analysis, it was determined that both bacterial populations were statistically similar. PMID:15807206

Jiménez, Fabiola; Garro, Laura; Rodríguez, Evelyn; Zeledón, Zenén

2004-09-01

429

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS; SECOND FLOOR PLAN AND DOOR FRAME ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS; SECOND FLOOR PLAN AND DOOR FRAME AND WINDOW DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Navy Yard, Mar Island, CA. Albert F. Roller, Architect, San Francisco, CA. H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 2 of 15, accompanying specification Noy-4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 14, 1941. Yards & Docks drawing no. 160687; P.W. (Public Works) drawing no. 10388-26; file no. 930-CR-4. Scale one eighth inch to one foot (floor plan) and 3 inches to one foot (details). 73 cm x 129 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

430

MATE GUARDING AND EXTRA-PAIR PATERNITY IN NORTHERN CARDINALS  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied patterns of mate guarding and paternity in 21 pairs of Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) nesting in~central_Kentucky. DbJA fingerprinting revealed that five of 37 nestlinas (13.5%) resulted from extra-pair fertilizations (EPFs). Of 19 broods sampled, three (16%)-bad at least one extra-pair young. Although our observations of male cardinals making extra-territorial movements suggest that some males in the population may

DAVID F. WESTNEAT

431

Magnetic Guarding of Octupo1e Conductor Supports  

E-print Network

in lifetime with guarding for a gun-injected plasma hav ing an ion temperature of about 40 eVJ and about a 1 octupole. Each hoop is supported by three hangers. A 40 eV Maxwellian plasma is produced by a Z-pinch gun at the Austin APS Plasma Divisional Meeting NOV 1967 Thermonuclear Plasma Studies Unive rsity of Wisconsin PLP

Sprott, Julien Clinton

432

Jasmonates Induce Intracellular Alkalinization and Closure of Paphiopedilum Guard Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jasmonates (jasmonic acid or methyl jasmonate) promote stomatal closure inPaphiopedilum Supersuk(RHS, 1973) andP. tonsum(Rchb.f) Stein. Studies on guard cells loaded with pH dependent fluorescent dyes show that jasmonates cause intracellular alkalinization of up to 0.5 pH units within 5 to 15 min. Jasmonate-induced alkalinization always preceded stomatal closure and where alkalinization was not detected no closure occurred. Propionic acid inhibited

C. A. GEHRING; H. R. IRVING; R. McCONCHIE; R. W. PARISH

1997-01-01

433

Automation of a guarded hot plate thermal conductivity instrument  

SciTech Connect

The Thermo-Physics Corporation's GP-1800 guarded hot plate thermal conductivity instrument has been automated using a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP 11/35 minicomputer with an Industrial Control Subsystem Remote. Automation included constructing a hardware link between the instrument and the minicomputer system and designing, writing, and documenting software to perform equipment control, data acquisition, data reduction, and report generation. The software was designed and written so that non-programmers can run the thermal conductivity experiment.

Holland, L.L.

1980-06-01

434

Perfect equalization for DMT systems without guard interval  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a new, low-complexity frequency-domain equalizer for discrete multitone (DMT) systems, which, in the absence of a guard interval, utilizes existing redundancy in the frequency-domain to completely eliminate intersymbol and interchannel interference. A perfect reconstruction condition is derived for the noise-free case leading to a sparse equalizer matrix structure. It is furthermore shown that under realistic scenarios minimum mean

Steffen Trautmann; Norbert J. Fliege

2002-01-01

435

Patient evaluation of hospital outcomes: an analysis of open-ended comments from extreme clusters in a national survey  

PubMed Central

Objectives A recent study identified patients in six distinct response groups based on their evaluations of outcomes related to overall satisfaction, malpractice and benefit of treatment. This study validates the response clusters by analysing and comparing open-ended comments from the extreme positive and extreme negative response groups. Design Qualitative content analysis. Setting Data from open-ended comment fields provided by patients who completed a national patient-experience survey carried out in Norway in 2011. 10?514 patients responded to the questionnaire and 3233 provided comments. A random sample of 50 open-ended comments from respondents representing cluster 1 (‘excellent services’), cluster 5 (‘services have clear improvement needs’) and outliers (‘very poor services’) was reviewed. Results 3 distinct patient profiles were identified. More than half of the comments in cluster 1 included descriptions of positive healthcare experiences, one addressed patient safety issues. Only 1 of the comments in cluster 5 was positive, and 12 were related to safety. All comments from the outliers were negative, and more than three-quarters reported experiences related to malpractice or adverse events. Recurring themes did not differ significantly between the three respondent groups, but significant differences were found for the descriptions and severity of the experiences. Conclusions Patients in negative response groups had distinct and much poorer healthcare descriptions than those in the extreme positive group, supporting the interpretation of quality differences between these groups. Further research should assess ways of combining statistical cluster information and qualitative comments, which could be used for local quality improvement and public reporting. PMID:24879826

Iversen, Hilde Hestad; Bjertnaes, ?yvind Andresen; Skudal, Kjersti Eeg

2014-01-01

436

Gate control: guard cell regulation by microbial stress.  

PubMed

Terrestrial plants rely on stomata, small pores in the leaf surface, for photosynthetic gas exchange and transpiration of water. The stomata, formed by a pair of guard cells, dynamically increase and decrease their volume to control the pore size in response to environmental cues. Stresses can trigger similar or opposing movements: for example, drought induces closure of stomata, whereas many pathogens exploit stomata and cause them to open to facilitate entry into plant tissues. The latter is an active process as stomatal closure is part of the plant's immune response. Stomatal research has contributed much to clarify the signalling pathways of abiotic stress, but guard cell signalling in response to microbes is a relatively new area of research. In this article, we discuss present knowledge of stomatal regulation in response to microbes and highlight common points of convergence, and differences, compared to stomatal regulation by abiotic stresses. We also expand on the mechanisms by which pathogens manipulate these processes to promote disease, for example by delivering effectors to inhibit closure or trigger opening of stomata. The study of pathogen effectors in stomatal manipulation will aid our understanding of guard cell signalling. PMID:25040778

McLachlan, Deirdre H; Kopischke, Michaela; Robatzek, Silke

2014-09-01

437

Littoral processes: US Coast Guard Station, Fort Point, San Francisco  

SciTech Connect

The US Coast Guard Station, Fort Point is located three-quarters of a nautical mile southeast of the Golden Gate Strait, the entrance to San Francisco Bay. The existing storm wave conditions at Fort Point Station pier make it extremely dangerous for the SAR crews to get on and off the Motor Life Boats at times requiring the vessels to be moored at the San Francisco Yacht Harbor about 1.5 miles east of the Fort Point Station. To mitigate these harsh working conditions the US Coast Guard is considering the feasibility of constructing suitable all-weather moorings for the three Motor Life Boats at the Fort Point Station to enable unimpeded SAR operations, to provide safe working conditions for Coast Guard small boat crews, and to improve small boat maintenance conditions at Fort Point Station. The purpose of this report is to identify, analyze and evaluate physical environmental factors that could affect all-weather moorings siting, configuration and entrance location, as well as potential post construction alterations to littoral conditions and processes. This report includes a description of the site, description of pertinent littoral processes, evaluation of how these processes could affect construction of all-weather moorings, and discussion of design considerations, as well as mitigation measures to minimize potential adverse effects to the physical environment. 19 references, 27 figures, 26 tables.

Ecker, R.M.; Whelan, G.

1983-10-01

438

Hospital Greenspace Lawson Memorial Hospital,  

E-print Network

H Hospital Greenspace Lawson Memorial Hospital, Golspie ­ Greenspace Case Study Background to hospital greenspace to be carried out in the Highlands. This project is now entering its third phase. Phase of Phase 2. This resulted in the identification of the Lawson Memorial Hospital as the site

439

Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students' expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

Wright, T.S.

1992-05-01

440

Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students` expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

Wright, T.S.

1992-05-01

441

77 FR 36394 - Safety Zone for Fireworks Display, Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel; Oxon Hill, MD  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Harbor Access Channel; Oxon Hill, MD AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...National Harbor Access Channel at Oxon Hill in Prince Georges County, Maryland. This...Gaylord National Resort Hotel, at Oxon Hill in Prince Georges County, Maryland...

2012-06-19

442

24 CFR 242.57 - Maintenance of hospital facility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Regulatory Agreement, Accounting and Reporting, and Financial...mortgagor shall maintain the hospital's grounds, buildings, and the equipment...

2012-04-01

443

24 CFR 242.57 - Maintenance of hospital facility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Regulatory Agreement, Accounting and Reporting, and Financial...mortgagor shall maintain the hospital's grounds, buildings, and the equipment...

2013-04-01

444

Patient safety incidents associated with tracheostomies occurring in hospital wards: a review of reports to the UK National Patient Safety Agency  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundTracheostomies are increasingly common in hospital wards due to the rising use of percutaneous and surgical tracheostomies in critical care and bed pressures in these units. Hospital wards may lack appropriate infrastructure to care for this vulnerable group and significant patient harm may result.ObjectivesTo identify and analyse tracheostomy related incident reports from hospital wards between 1 October 2005 and 30

B. A. McGrath; A. N. Thomas

2010-01-01

445

Rural hospitals  

PubMed Central

The 340B Drug Pricing Program has the potential to reduce outpatient pharmaceutical costs for qualifying hospitals—hut many rural hospital administrators are unaware of their organization’s eligibility. PMID:18637547

Radford, Andrea; Slifkin, Rebecca; Schur, Claudia; Cheung, Karen; Baernholdt, Marianne

2013-01-01

446

Norovirus - hospital  

MedlinePLUS

... be severe, becoming dehydrated (dried out) is common. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ... to understand an outbreak (for instance in a hospital setting). This test is done by collecting and ...

447

Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging  

SciTech Connect

Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

1982-11-12

448

[The cat cry (cri du chat) syndrome: report of a case with review of 10 cases at the National Taiwan University Hospital].  

PubMed

The cat cry (cri du chat) syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly due to partial deletion of the short arm of the No. 5 chromosome. Since the first report of Lejeune et al, in 1963, nearly 400 cases have been reported. However, the syndrome with a ring chromosome is still very rare and only 10 cases were reported up to 1988, since the first report of Rohde and Tompkins in 1965. To investigate the chromosomal changes in the patients of cat cry syndrome, a chromosomal study was carried out on 10 cases of cat cry syndrome from 5,870 cases submitted to the Laboratory of Cytogenetics, National Taiwan University Hospital from Nov. 1968 through Apr. 1988. These ten cases included 3 males and 7 females (M:F = 1:2.3) aged 2 days to 18 months with an average of 5.5 months. The most common clinical features are: cat-like cry, growth failure, microcephaly with mental retardation, round face with facial abnormalities including hypertelorism, downward slanting palpebral fissures, micrognathia and low-set ears, and simian crease. Laryngomalacia or underdevelopment of the larynx may be a factor causing the cat-like cry. On chromosome analysis, 8 out of these 10 cases showed the usual simple deletion of the short arm of the no. 5 chromosome, and the other 2 cases revealed ring chromosome including a case of pure ring chromosome([(4, XY, r (5)] and a case of mosaicism with one ring chromosome, 2 ring chromosomes and simple deletion of the short arm of the No. 5 chromosome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2677233

Chuang, S M; Wang, T R; Jean, H H; Lee, F Y

1989-06-01

449

Adherence to anti-diabetic drugs among patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania- A cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Adherence to diabetes mellitus treatment regimens among Type 2 diabetes patients in Tanzania has not been well documented. This study sought to assess adherence to antidiabetic drugs and associated factors among patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who were attending the Diabetic clinic of Muhimbili National hospital between May 2009 and February 2010. Assement ofadherence to antidiabetic medications was based on patients’ self-reported recall of skipped days without taking medications, over the past one week and three months. Data wereentered and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc. Chicago, Illinois version 16). The crude and adjusted odds ratio (COR/ AOR) and 95% Confidence Interval (CI) were performed to determine factors associated with anti-diabetic medications adherence and a p-value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant. Results Adherence rates to antidiabetic drugs were found to be 60.2% and 71.2% at one week and three months respectively. High cost of medication was significantly associated with anti-diabetic non-adherence. Adherence to anti-diabetic drugs significantly increased with an increase in number of non-diabetic medications. Conclusion Adherence to antidiabetic drugs was found to be suboptimal. Patients with other medical conditions in addition to diabetes mellitus are more likely to adhere to anti-diabetic medications. There is a need for the responsible authorities to set policies that subsidize cost of anti-diabetic drugs to improve adherence and reduce associated complications.

Rwegerera, Godfrey Mutashambara

2014-01-01

450

Clinical and histopathological characteristics of extra-facial basal cell carcinoma: Analysis of 35 patients at the Chonbuk National University Hospital in Korea.  

PubMed

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) primarily develops in the head and neck region, with 74-83 per cent of BCC occurring in this region. Unfortunately, most published studies on BCC were conducted in Caucasian populations, and analytic data on extra-facial BCC in Asian and Korean patients, in particular, are not readily available. Here, we report on a retrospective analysis of extra-facial BCC in Korean patients. Thirty-five patients (16 men, 19 women) diagnosed with extra-facial BCC at Chonbuk National University Hospital between January 1981 and December 2008 were evaluated. Their average age was 62.3 years and most of the patients (11 of 35, 31%) were in their fifties. The relative tumour density (RTD) was the highest in the genitalia (0.769), followed by the axilla (0.481). Other regions such as the trunk, buttocks and upper and lower extremities exhibited a much lower RTD (average: 0.1). Histopathological examinations showed that 16 tumours were nodular (46%), eight were superficial (23%) and seven were mixed (20%). Additionally, potential predisposing factors were identified in seven cases. In five patients the use of Asian medicine, including acupuncture and herbal medication, was ascertained. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to analyse the clinical and histopathological characteristics of extra-facial BCC in Korean patients. Our results indicate that the incidence of extra-facial BCC is higher in the axilla and genitalia than at other locations, although these sites are frequently overlooked during routine skin examinations. PMID:23574342

Roh, Si-Gyun; Park, Jin; Song, Ki-Hun; Nam, Kyung-Hwa; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk

2014-11-01

451

75 FR 12772 - National Offshore Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [USCG-2010-0127] National...issues relating to offshore safety and security. The meeting will be open to the public...the Waterbury Ballroom of the Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, 500 Canal...

2010-03-17

452

6. Photocopy of original plans (from National Archives, Cartographic Division, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Photocopy of original plans (from National Archives, Cartographic Division, Record Group 156) Delineator unknown. Commanding Officer's signature dated May 22, 1871 PLAN, ELEVATION, AND SECTION - Benicia Arsenal, Guard & Engine House, Benicia, Solano County, CA

453

Anthropometrics, body composition, and aerobic fitness in norwegian home guard personnel.  

PubMed

Aandstad, A, Hageberg, R, Holme, IM, and Anderssen, SA. Anthropometrics body composition and aerobic fitness in Norwegian Home Guard personnel. J Strength Cond Res 28(11): 3206-3214, 2014-The Norwegian Home Guard (HG) consists of soldiers and officers who primarily live a civilian life but are typically called in for military training a few days per year. Although full-time soldiers and officers are monitored annually on physical fitness, no such assessments are performed on regular HG personnel. Data on physical fitness of similar forces from other nations are also scarce. Thus, the main aim of this study was to collect reference data on physical fitness in HG personnel. A total of 799 male soldiers and officers from the regular and the rapid reaction HG force participated in this study. Between 13 and 19% of the subjects were obese, according to measured body mass index, waist circumference and estimations of body fat. The mean (95% confidence interval) estimated peak oxygen uptake from the 20-m shuttle run test was 50.1 (49.7-50.6) mL·kg·minute. Personnel from the rapid reaction force had a more favorable body composition compared with the regular HG personnel, whereas no differences were found for peak oxygen uptake. The physical demands on HG personnel are not well defined, but we believe that the majority of Norwegian HG soldiers and officers have a sufficient aerobic fitness level to fulfill their planned HG tasks. The gathered data can be used by military leaders to review the ability of the HG to perform expected military tasks, to serve as a future reference material for secular changes in HG fitness level, and for comparison purposes among similar international reserve forces. PMID:24832972

Aandstad, Anders; Hageberg, Rune; Holme, Ingar M; Anderssen, Sigmund A

2014-11-01

454

New Approaches to the Biology of Stomatal Guard Cells  

PubMed Central

CO2 acts as an environmental signal that regulates stomatal movements. High CO2 concentrations reduce stomatal aperture, whereas low concentrations trigger stomatal opening. In contrast to our advanced understanding of light and drought stress responses in guard cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying stomatal CO2 sensing and signaling are largely unknown. Leaf temperature provides a convenient indicator of transpiration, and can be used to detect mutants with altered stomatal control. To identify genes that function in CO2 responses in guard cells, CO2-insensitive mutants were isolated through high-throughput leaf thermal imaging. The isolated mutants are categorized into three groups according to their phenotypes: (i) impaired in stomatal opening under low CO2 concentrations; (ii) impaired in stomatal closing under high CO2 concentrations; and (iii) impaired in stomatal development. Characterization of these mutants has begun to yield insights into the mechanisms of stomatal CO2 responses. In this review, we summarize the current status of the field and discuss future prospects. PMID:24104052

Negi, Juntaro; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Kusumi, Kensuke; Iba, Koh

2014-01-01

455

Public and private maternal health service capacity and patient flows in southern Tanzania: using a geographic information system to link hospital and national census data  

PubMed Central

Background Strategies to improve maternal health in low-income countries are increasingly embracing partnership approaches between public and private stakeholders in health. In Tanzania, such partnerships are a declared policy goal. However, implementation remains challenging as unfamiliarity between partners and insufficient recognition of private health providers prevail. This hinders cooperation and reflects the need to improve the evidence base of private sector contribution. Objective To map and analyse the capacities of public and private hospitals to provide maternal health care in southern Tanzania and the population reached with these services. Design A hospital questionnaire was applied in all 16 hospitals (public n=10; private faith-based n=6) in 12 districts of southern Tanzania. Areas of inquiry included selected maternal health service indicators (human resources, maternity/delivery beds), provider-fees for obstetric services and patient turnover (antenatal care, births). Spatial information was linked to the 2002 Population Census dataset and a geographic information system to map patient flows and socio-geographic characteristics of service recipients. Results The contribution of faith-based organizations (FBOs) to hospital maternal health services is substantial. FBO hospitals are primarily located in rural areas and their patient composition places a higher emphasis on rural populations. Also, maternal health service capacity was more favourable in FBO hospitals. We approximated that 19.9% of deliveries in the study area were performed in hospitals and that the proportion of c-sections was 2.7%. Mapping of patient flows demonstrated that women often travelled far to seek hospital care and where catchment areas of public and FBO hospitals overlap. Conclusions We conclude that the important contribution of FBOs to maternal health services and capacity as well as their emphasis on serving rural populations makes them promising partners in health programming. Inclusive partnerships could increase integration of FBOs into the public health care system and improve coordination and use of scarce resources. PMID:24433944

Tabatabai, Patrik; Henke, Stefanie; Susac, Katharina; Kisanga, Oberlin M. E.; Baumgarten, Inge; Kynast-Wolf, Gisela; Ramroth, Heribert; Marx, Michael

2014-01-01

456

Hospital support.  

PubMed

Setting up a successful trauma system requires a significant amount of hospital support. This includes personnel and programs to assist with quality assurance programs, clinical compliance, and rural support and development. It is imperative that orthopaedic trauma surgeons are well versed in the types of hospital support available and the costs associated with each support measure. With this understanding, a strong, sustainable physician-hospital relationship can be created. PMID:24918831

O?Mara, Timothy J; Hill, Austin D; Althausen, Peter L

2014-07-01

457

A three year review of catheter-associated urinary tract infections reported to the national healthcare safety network at a tertiary care hospital.  

E-print Network

??Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are one of the most common hospital-associated infections. Recent efforts to characterize the etiology and reduce incidence of CAUTIs… (more)

Bond, Jessi

2014-01-01

458

Hospital diversification.  

PubMed

Hospital diversification and its impact on the operating ratio are studied for 168 hospitals during the period from 1999 to 2004. Diversification and the operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as being jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield a better financial position, and the better operating ratio allows the institution the wherewithal to diversify. The impact of external government planning and hospital competition are also measured. An institution lifecycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. Management's attitude concerning risk and reward is considered. PMID:18972998

Eastaugh, Steven R

2005-01-01

459

Low Body Mass Index but Not Obesity Is Associated With In-Hospital Adverse Events and Mortality Among Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Recipients: Insights From the National Cardiovascular Data Registry  

PubMed Central

Background Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are placed in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death, but the procedure may cause adverse events. Patient body habitus may be an important factor responsible for ICD implantation complications. We assessed whether underweight or obese compared with normal weight patients, as defined by body mass index (BMI), were at increased risk for adverse events from ICD implantation. Methods and Results We studied 83 312 first-time ICD recipients in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry-ICD Registry implanted between April 2010 and June 2011. Using hierarchical multivariable logistic regression adjusted for patient demographic and clinical characteristics, we examined the association of BMI with in-hospital complications, length of hospital stay, and mortality. Underweight (BMI ?18.5 kg/m2) patients comprised 1.7% of the cohort (n=1434), whereas obese (BMI?30 kg/m2) patients comprised 40.1% (n=33 339). Overall, a higher proportion of underweight patients experienced complications (normal weight, 2.3%; obese, 2.1%; underweight 5.2%; P<0.0001) and death (normal weight, 0.3%; obese, 0.3%; underweight 0.8%; P=0.026) as a result of ICD implantation. After multivariable adjustment, underweight ICD recipients had a greater odds of complications (odds ratio [OR], 2.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.68 to 2.75; P<0.0001), hospital stay >3 days (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.38 to 1.89; P<0.0001), and in-hospital death (OR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.21 to 4.27; P=0.011) compared with normal weight patients. Obese patients did not exhibit any meaningful differences in the same outcomes. Conclusions In a large, real-world population, underweight first-time ICD recipients experienced significantly more periprocedural complications, prolonged hospital stays, and in-hospital death compared with normal weight patients. PMID:23316325

Hsu, Jonathan C.; Varosy, Paul D.; Bao, Haikun; Wang, Yongfei; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Marcus, Gregory M.

2012-01-01

460

Mixed reproductive strategy and mate guarding in a semi-colonial passerine, the swallow Hirundo rustica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both male and female swallows Hirundo rustica have a mixed reproductive strategy (parental care for offspring and extra-pair couplations). Mate guarding protects females from male harassment and male swallows from being cuckolded. Females hide their fertile period by copulating successfully with their mates for an extended period during first clutches. Males guard in the pre-fertile period, when many unpaired males

Anders Pape Møller

1985-01-01

461

Testosterone correlates of mate guarding, singing and aggressive behaviour in male barn swallows, Hirundo rustica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sexual and social behaviour in male birds is largely controlled by gonadal secretions, most notably testosterone. In this paper the relationships between natural testosterone plasma concentrations and mate guarding, singing and rates of aggression in male barn swallows are reported. Behaviour of individually marked male swallows was observed in three breeding colonies. Individual mate-guarding rate was positively correlated with individual

N. SAINO; A. P. MØLLER

1995-01-01

462

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Sandy Hook, NJ), photographer unknown, circa 1977 aerial view looking north, detail of eastern docking structure travel lift, boat house and station - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

463

78 FR 38829 - Special Local Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...authorized by the Captain of the Port San Juan or a designated representative. DATES...or email Mr. Efrain Lopez, Sector San Juan Prevention Department, Coast Guard...Coast Guard, Captain of the Port San Juan. [FR Doc. 2013-15498 Filed...

2013-06-28

464

Adaptive significance of postcopulatory guarding of mates and nonmates by male Calopteryx maculata (Odonata)  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.The postcopulatory behavior of the damselfly Calopteryx maculata (De Beauvois) (Odonata: Calopterygidae) was studied in field populations to determine the adaptive significance of guarding of ovipositing females by males. Of particular interest was an explanation for the guarding of ovipositing nonmates by males. A promiscuous mating system and the large variation in mating success (Table 1) among territorial males indicated

Jonathan K. Waage

1979-01-01

465

78 FR 55214 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement...O.R.T.) boat races to be held on the Neches River in Orange, TX from 3 p.m. on September 20, 2013, through 6...

2013-09-10

466

77 FR 47519 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement...Regulations for the S.P.O.R.T. Power Boat Neches River in Orange, TX from 3 p.m. on September 21, 2012, through 6...

2012-08-09

467

Predicting essential components of signal transduction networks: a dynamic model of guard cell abscisic acid signaling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plants both lose water and take in carbon dioxide through microscopic stomatal pores, each of which is regulated by a surrounding pair of guard cells. During drought, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits stomatal opening and promotes stomatal closure, thereby promoting water conservation. Here we synthesize experimental results into a consistent guard cell signal transduction network for ABA-induced stomatal

Song Li; Sarah M. Assmann; Reka Albert

2006-01-01

468

Drop Outs and Rejects: An Analysis of the Prison Guard's Revolving Door  

Microsoft Academic Search

High turnover among prison guards has long been noted as a problem plaguing corrections. This study indicates that turnover among rank and file employees results from organizational and cultural strains within the formal organization. A sample survey of 55 former prison guards indicates that the most significant variable in explaining the termination of their prison work is race. Young urban

James B. Jacobs; Mary P. Grear

1977-01-01

469

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Sandy Hook, NJ), photographer unknown, after 1978 aerial view looking northeast - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

470

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit Providence, Warwick, RI) photographer unknown, 1977 Aerial view looking northeast - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

471

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Sandy Hook, NJ), photographer unknown, 1977 detail of ordnance wharf framing - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

472

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Sandy Hook, NJ), photographer unknown, 1977 detail of ordnance wharf decking - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

473

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit Providence, Warwick, RI) photographer unknown, 1975 Aerial view directly above - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

474

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Sandy Hook, NJ), photographer unknown, 1977 north elevation, ordance wharf deck house - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

475

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Sandy Hook, NJ), photographer unknown, circa 1977 Aerial view looking southeast - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

476

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Sandy Hook, NJ), photographer unknown, 1975 Aerial view looking northeast - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

477

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph (original in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit Providence, Warwich, RI), photographer unknown, 1977 view south, showing western docking structure and ordnance wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

478

33 CFR 165.506 - Safety Zones; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...near Essington, PA, west of Little Tinicum Island within...a line running east to west from points along the shoreline at...Franklin Bridge. (b) Coast Guard Sector Baltimore...Kingsmill Resort. (d) Coast Guard Sector North Carolina...position located at the west end of Sugar Loaf...

2010-07-01

479

A Comparative Study of the Arabidopsis thaliana Guard-Cell Transcriptome and Its Modulation by Sucrose  

PubMed Central

Microarray analysis was performed on RNA isolated from guard cells that were manually dissected from leaves of Arabidopsis. By pooling our data with those of two earlier studies on Arabidopsis guard cell protoplasts, we provide a robust view of the guard-cell transcriptome, which is rich in transcripts for transcription factors, signaling proteins, transporters, and carbohydrate-modifying enzymes. To test the hypothesis that photosynthesis-derived sugar signals guard cells to adjust stomatal opening, we determined the profile of genes expressed in guard cells from leaves that had been treated with sucrose. The results revealed that expression of 440 genes changed in guard cells in response to sucrose. Consistent with this hypothesis, these genes encoded cellular functions for photosynthesis and transport of sugars, water, amino acids, and ions. Plants of T-DNA insertion lines for 50 genes highly responsive to sucrose were examined for defects in guard cell function. Twelve genes not previously known to function in guard cells were shown to be important in leaf conductance, water-use efficiency, and/or stomate development. Of these, three are of particular interest, having shown effects in nearly every test of stomatal function without a change in stomatal density: TPS5 (At4g17770), a TRAF domain-containing protein (At1g65370), and a WD repeat–containing protein (At1g15440). PMID:23185391

Bates, George W.; Rosenthal, David M.; Sun, Jindong; Chattopadhyay, Maitreyi; Peffer, Emily; Yang, Jing; Ort, Donald R.; Jones, Alan M.

2012-01-01

480

Redox activity and peroxidase activity associated with the plasma membrane of guard-cell protoplasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Redox systems have been reported in the plasma membrane of numerous cell types and in cells from various species of higher plant. A search for a redox system in the plasma membrane of guard cells was therefore made in efforts to explain how blue light stimulates stomatal opening, a process which is coupled to guard cell H+ efflux and K+

O. Pantoja; C. M. Willmer

1988-01-01