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1

May Air National Guard Industrial Hygiene Survey.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents the results of industrial hygiene evaluations conducted at the May Air National Guard installation. The greatest potential health hazard was ultrasonic degreasing in the Pneudraulics Shop. Recommendations and findings are presented for...

P. Diamond W. B. Lubinsky

1975-01-01

2

Perspectives on Suicide in the Army National Guard.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Suicides in the US military were observed rising in 2004, most notably in the Army and Marine Corps, and particularly, in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Alarmed, Army leaders and researchers have offered various explanations and prescriptions, often lack...

J. Griffith M. Vaitkus

2013-01-01

3

Suicide in the Army National Guard: An Empirical Inquiry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather,…

Griffith, James

2012-01-01

4

National Guard and the War on Terror: Operation Iraqi Freedom.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Operation Iraqi Freedom provides a battle history of the National Guard's role in the early years of the Iraq War. From the initial invasion in March 2003 to the outbreak of brutal violence in the sectarian uprising of 2006, extended and repeated deployme...

M. D. Doubler

2008-01-01

5

Border Security and Utilizing the National Guard: A New Paradigm.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the wake of increased violence, political pressure, and public outcry, the current Administration is sending 1,200 National Guard soldiers to the border area between the United States and Mexico. The issue at hand is twofold; the Customs and Border Pat...

C. M. Schneider

2011-01-01

6

National Hospital Discharge Survey  

Cancer.gov

The National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS), which has been conducted annually since 1965, collects data from a sample of approximately 270,000 inpatient records acquired from a national sample of about 500 hospitals. Only hospitals with an average length of stay of fewer than 30 days for all patients, general hospitals, or children's general hospitals are included in the survey. Information collected includes diagnoses, surgical and nonsurgical procedures, prescription and over-the-counter drugs, immunizations, allergy shots, anesthetics, and dietary supplements.

7

33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...specific, infrequent periods when Military exercises will be conducted, as...

2013-07-01

8

Feasibility of a Virtual Health and Wellness Center for the Oregon Air National Guard.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of implementing a virtual health and wellness center in the Oregon Air National Guard (ORANG). The specific aims of the study were to describe Air Guard Members goals for making health behavior chan...

D. C. Messecar

1999-01-01

9

Response capabilities of the National Guard: a focus on domestic disaster medical response.  

PubMed

The National Guard has a 373-year history of responding to the nation's call to duty for service both at home and abroad (The National Guard Bureau Web site: Available at http://www.ngb.army.mil/default. aspx.). The National Guard (NG) is a constitutionally unique organization (United States Constitution, US Government Printing Office Web site: Available at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/constitution/index.html.). Today's Guard conducts domestic disaster response and civilian assistance missions on a daily basis. Yet, the NG's role, mission, and capabilities are not well-known or understood. The National Response Framework (NRF) places significant responsibility on the local and state disaster planners (Department of Homeland Security: National Response Framework. US Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC, January 2008). The public health professionals are an integral component of the disaster planning community. It is critical that the public health community be knowledgeable of types and capabilities of all the response assets at their disposal. PMID:20349703

Bochicchio, Daniel

2010-01-01

10

National Guard service members returning home after deployment: the case for increased community support.  

PubMed

National Guard service members and their families face unique circumstances that distinguish them from other branches of the military. In this article, we highlight unique National Guard needs and argue that more can be done by policy makers to help this population. We present the findings from a representative survey of Michigan citizens showing that public support exists for increased assistance for these service members. Using the multiple streams framework, we propose that policy makers currently have the opportunity to facilitate increased support for National Guard members and families. Specifically we suggest policy implications that feature the important role of state and local resources. PMID:21547542

Blow, Adrian; MacInnes, Maryhelen D; Hamel, Jessica; Ames, Barbara; Onaga, Esther; Holtrop, Kendal; Gorman, Lisa; Smith, Sheila

2012-09-01

11

Strategic Plan for the Academic Component of the Army National Guard Distance Learning Demonstration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document outlines the overall strategy for implementing an academic component for distance learning (DL) in the Army National Guard (NG). This plan support an initiate to develop a regional demonstration network for DL that will serve as a prototype ...

P. F. Ramsberger C. M. Knerr D. D. McKinney P. J. Sticha E. A. Kronholm

1998-01-01

12

Transforming the Army National Guard Health Promotion Policy - Meeting the Challenges of a 'Fit to Fight' Army National Guard in the 21st Century.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Army National Guard (ARNG) has become an operational force vital to the successful achievement of the Army's strategic goals. This new role has propelled the ARNG into frequent deployments of extended durations of time. The ARNG soldier has met the ch...

D. T. Rooney

2006-01-01

13

Task force St. Bernard: operational issues and medical management of a National Guard disaster response operation.  

PubMed

After Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast of the United States on 29 August 2005, it became obvious that the country was facing an enormous national emergency. With local resources overwhelmed, governors across the US responded by deploying thousands of National Guard soldiers and airmen. The National Guard has responded to domestic disasters due to natural hazards since its inception, but an event with the magnitude of Hurricane Katrina was unprecedented. The deployment of >900 Army National Guard soldiers to St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana in the aftermath of the Hurricane was studied to present some of the operational issues involved with providing medical support for this type of operation. In doing so, the authors attempt to address some of the larger issues of how the National Guard can be incorporated into domestic disaster response efforts. A number of unforeseen issues with regards to medical operations, medical supply, communication, preventive medicine, legal issues, and interactions with civilians were encountered and are reviewed. A better understanding of the National Guard and how it can be utilized more effectively in future disaster response operations can be developed. PMID:18087915

Bonnett, Carl J; Schock, Tony R; McVaney, Kevin E; Colwell, Christopher B; Depass, Christopher

2007-01-01

14

Learning Without Boundaries: A NASA - National Guard Bureau Distance Learning Partnership  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With a variety of high-quality live interactive educational programs originating at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas and other space and research centers, the US space agency NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) has a proud track record of connecting with students throughout the world and stimulating their creativity and collaborative skills by teaching them underlying scientific and technological underpinnings of space exploration. However, NASA desires to expand its outreach capability for this type of interactive instruction. In early 2002, NASA and the National Guard Bureau -- using the Guard's nationwide system of state-ofthe-art classrooms and high bandwidth network -- began a collaboration to extend the reach of NASA content and educational programs to more of America's young people. Already, hundreds of elementary, middle, and high school students have visited Guard e-Learning facilities and participated in interactive NASA learning events. Topics have included experimental flight, satellite imagery-interpretation, and Mars exploration. Through this partnership, NASA and the National Guard are enabling local school systems throughout the United States (and, increasingly, the world) to use the excitement of space flight to encourage their students to become passionate about the possibility of one day serving as scientists, mathematicians, technologists, and engineers. At the 54th International Astronautical Conference MAJ Stephan Picard, the guiding visionary behind the Guard's partnership with NASA, and Chris Chilelli, an educator and senior instructional designer at NASA, will share with attendees background on NASA's educational products and the National Guard's distributed learning network; will discuss the unique opportunity this partnership already has provided students and teachers throughout the United States; will offer insights into the formation by government entities of e-Learning partnerships with one another; and will suggest a possible future for the NASA - National Guard Bureau partnership, one potentially to include live multi-party interaction of hundreds of students in several countries with astronauts, scientists, engineers and designers. To inspire the next generation of explorers as only NASA can!

Anderson, Susan H.; Chilelli, Christopher J.; Picard, Stephan

2003-01-01

15

Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms among National Guard Soldiers Deployed to Iraq: Associations with Parenting Behaviors and Couple Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: In this article, we report findings from a 1-year longitudinal study examining the impact of change in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following combat deployment on National Guard soldiers' perceived parenting and couple adjustment 1 year following return from Iraq. Method: Participants were 468 Army National Guard

Gewirtz, Abigail H.; Polusny, Melissa A.; DeGarmo, David S.; Khaylis, Anna; Erbes, Christopher R.

2010-01-01

16

Children of National Guard Troops Deployed in the Global War on Terrorism  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined deployment effects in children and spouses of National Guard troops using a longitudinal design to assess 18 children (ages 6 to 17 years) and 13 nondeployed spouses before, during, and after deployment. Both self- and parent reports revealed that children of deployed service personnel experienced emotional and behavioral symptoms during the deployment of their fathers relative to

Betty Pfefferbaum; J. Brian Houston; Michelle D. Sherman; Ashley G. Melson

2011-01-01

17

78 FR 42452 - Safety Zone; Kentucky Air National Guard Vessel for Parachute Rescue Jumpmaster Training, Lake...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...around a training vessel on Lake Erie near Dunkirk, NY. This moving...vessels from a portion of Lake Erie while the Kentucky Air National...Temporary Final Rule A. Regulatory History and Information The Coast Guard...personnel deploying into Lake Erie from the hazards...

2013-07-16

18

The US Army and National Guard Vibration Management Enhancement Program (VMEP): Data Analysis and Statistical Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Army and South Carolina National Guard have developed automated vibration monitoring and fault diagnostic tools as part of the Vibration Management Enhancement Program (VMEP). VMEP is intended to improve the operations and support activities by keeping the maintainers aware of the health of the critical dynamic components of their aircraft. This paper outlines the program results to date.

Paul Grabill; Tom Brotherton; John Berry

19

Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Facility, Installation 25255, Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Rehoboth National Guard Facility (RNGF) in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for ftirther action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the RNGF property, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities under the control of the MAARNG and the past activities contained within that area.

Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

1993-08-01

20

Mixed Methods in a Post-Deployment Study of U.S. Army National Guard Soldiers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mixed methods research combines quantitative and qualitative methodologies to achieve a product that is more than the sum of its parts. Here, the authors combine two different data reduction techniques—factor and content analyses of quantitative and qualitative data, respectively—to tap the dimensions of deployment-related variables among U.S. Army National Guard (ARNG) soldiers: stressors and supports, resilience, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms,

Wilbur J. Scott; David R. McCone; Lisa Sayegh; Joe Don Looney; Robert J. Jackson

2011-01-01

21

Underground Storage Tank Location and Mapping of Former Landfills by Electromagnetic Surveys for the Delaware National Guard.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Delaware Army National Guard tasked the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL) to provide electromagnetic surveys to identify possible subsurface metallic features at various loca...

P. H. Nielsen

2001-01-01

22

Blood characteristics of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hematology, serum chemistry, and prevalence of antibodies against selected, pathogens in a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, in 1989 and 1990. Samples fr...

P. M. McCue W. G. Standley

1992-01-01

23

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Otis Air National Guard (USAF), Operable Unit 3, Falmouth, MA, September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, lies within the boundaries of the towns of Falmouth, Mashpee, Sandwich, and Bourne. The Area of Contamination (AOC) known as Chemical Spill 3 United States Coast Guard (CS-3 (USCG)) is located on Lee Road, in the south central portion of the MMR. The Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) Installation Restoration Program Office at Otis Air National Guard (ANG) Base, Massachusetts.

NONE

1999-03-01

24

Stationwide environmental baseline survey and related environmental factors, Ontario Air National Guard Station, California  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Baseline Survey (EBS) has been prepared to document the environmental condition of real property at Ontario Air National Guard Station (ANGS), California, resulting from the storage, release, and disposal of hazardous substances and petroleum products and their derivatives over the installations history. This EBS is also used by the Air Force to meet its obligations under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 United States Code Section 9620(h), as amended by the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) (Public Law 102-426). Table ES-1 list all uncontaminated property based on information obtained through a records search, interviews, and visual site inspections at Ontario ANGS. Figure ES-1 depicts their respective locations.

NONE

1996-11-26

25

75 FR 78978 - Record of Decision for the 158th Fighter Wing's Proposed Realignment of National Guard Avenue and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Record of Decision for the 158th Fighter...and New Main Gate Construction, Vermont Air National Guard, Burlington International...On November 18, 2010, the United States Air Force signed the ROD for the 158th...

2010-12-17

26

Maryland Defense Force Discovers Another Way to Serve the Maryland National Guard and the State Defense Force.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

At present, the U.S. Military is experiencing a shortage of chaplains in both its active and reserve components. The shortage in this critical MOS is greatest in the Reserves and National Guard, particularly for units in home quarters. The reason for this...

M. Hershkowitz

2007-01-01

27

The Predictive Validity of the PTSD Checklist in a Nonclinical Sample of Combat-Exposed National Guard Troops  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After returning from an extended combat deployment to Iraq, 348 National Guard soldiers were administered the PTSD Checklist (PCL-M), and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) followed, on average, 3 months later by structured diagnostic interviews including the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) for the "Diagnostic and Statistical…

Arbisi, Paul A.; Kaler, Matthew E.; Kehle-Forbes, Shannon M.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Thuras, Paul

2012-01-01

28

Lifelong Education Needs for Providing Pastoral Care for Post-Traumatic Stress in South Dakota National Guard Soldiers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Throughout many communities in South Dakota the members of the South Dakota National Guard have been activated to serve in many different parts of the world since 2001. Approximately 20% of these individuals returned to their homes with some degree of PTSD (Hoge, et al., 2004). Pastoral Care has changed since September 11, 2001. The purpose of…

Meirose, William J.

2010-01-01

29

Determinants of Job Satisfaction in U.S. Army Reserve/National Guard Units: A Multidisciplinary Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research reports an empirical analysis of job satisfaction in the U.S. Army Reserve/National Guard units. Job satisfaction is explained in terms of an economic theory of the effect of pay, the psychological theory of commitment and motivation, and a ...

H. A. Lakhani

1990-01-01

30

Anger problems and posttraumatic stress disorder in male and female National Guard and Reserve Service members.  

PubMed

Anger is a common problem among veterans and has been associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study aimed to improve understanding of how anger and PTSD co-occur by examining gender differences and differences by whether the triggering traumatic event is deployment-related vs. civilian-related in current service members. A representative cohort of Reserve and National Guard service personnel (n = 1293) were interviewed to assess for deployment- or civilian-related traumas, PTSD, and anger. The prevalence of self-reported anger problems was estimated among male (n = 1036) and female (n = 257) service members. Log Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to estimate the associations of problems with anger with PTSD and PTSD symptom severity for men and women. Self-reported anger problems were common among male (53.0%) and female (51.3%) service members. Adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) showed associations between anger and PTSD connected to both civilian- and deployment-related traumas (PR were 1.77 (95% CI 1.52-2.05) and 1.85 (95% CI 1.62-2.12), respectively). PTSD symptom severity was also associated with anger. This study was cross-sectional and so a causal relationship between PTSD and anger cannot be established. Problems with anger are common among male and female current Guard and Reserve members. These findings suggest that anger treatment should be made available to current service members and that clinicians should assess anger problems irrespective of gender. Future research should examine the effectiveness of anger treatment protocols by gender. PMID:24755257

Worthen, Miranda; Rathod, Sujit D; Cohen, Gregory; Sampson, Laura; Ursano, Robert; Gifford, Robert; Fullerton, Carol; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer

2014-08-01

31

Ohio Army National Guard Mental Health Initiative: Risk and Resilience Factors for Combat-Related Posttraumatic Psychopathology and Post Combat Adjustment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The general objective of the Ohio Army National Guard Mental Health Initiative is to evaluate the relationships between resilience and risk factors, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally, before, during, and after deployment in the Ohio Army National ...

J. R. Calabrese S. Galea

2013-01-01

32

Risk factors for hospitalization in a national sample of medicare home health care patients.  

PubMed

Acute care hospitalization during or immediately following a Medicare home health care (HHC) episode is a major adverse outcome, but little has been published about HHC patient-level risk factors for hospitalization. The authors determined risk factors at HHC admission associated with subsequent acute care hospitalization in a nationally representative Medicare patient sample (N = 374,123). Hospitalization was measured using Medicare claims data; risk factors were measured using Outcome Assessment and Information Set data. Seventeen percent of sample members were hospitalized. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that the most influential risk factors (all p < .001) were skin wound as primary HHC diagnosis, clinician-judged guarded rehabilitation prognosis, congestive heart failure as primary HHC diagnosis, presence of depressive symptoms, dyspnea severity, and Black, compared to White. HHC initiatives that minimize chronic condition exacerbations and actively treat depressive symptoms might help reduce Medicare patient hospitalizations. Unmeasured reasons for higher hospitalization rates among Black HHC patients deserve further investigation. PMID:24781967

Fortinsky, Richard H; Madigan, Elizabeth A; Sheehan, T Joseph; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Kleppinger, Alison

2014-06-01

33

Risk Factors for Hospitalization in a National Sample of Medicare Home Health Care Patients  

PubMed Central

Acute care hospitalization during or immediately following a Medicare home health care (HHC) episode is a major adverse outcome, but little has been published about HHC patient-level risk factors for hospitalization. We determined risk factors at HHC admission associated with subsequent acute care hospitalization in a nationally representative Medicare patient sample (n=374,123). Hospitalization was measured using Medicare claims data; risk factors were measured using Outcome Assessment and Information Set data. Seventeen percent of sample members were hospitalized. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that the most influential risk factors (all p<.001) were: skin wound as primary HHC diagnosis; clinician-judged guarded rehabilitation prognosis; congestive heart failure as primary HHC diagnosis; presence of depressive symptoms; dyspnea severity; and Black, compared to White. HHC initiatives that minimize chronic condition exacerbations, and that actively treat depressive symptoms, might help reduce Medicare patient hospitalizations. Unmeasured reasons for higher hospitalization rates among Black HHC patients deserve further investigation.

Fortinsky, Richard H.; Madigan, Elizabeth A.; Sheehan, T. Joseph; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Kleppinger, Alison

2012-01-01

34

Embedded behavioral health providers: An assessment with the Army National Guard.  

PubMed

Although the Army has recently begun the practice of embedding behavioral health care providers (EBHP) in units in an effort to improve soldier well-being, the efficacy of this practice has not been evaluated. This study assesses 1 of the first programs implemented by the military. Using cross-sectional data obtained from a confidential survey of 12 company-level units in the California Army National Guard (n = 1,132), this study examines differences between units with and without EBHPs across a number of measures. Multilevel analysis of behavioral health symptoms, unit climate, perceptions of stigma, and practical barriers to care failed to detect main effects between units with EBHPs relative to those without. However, cross-level interactions were detected between unit EBHP status and soldiers reporting close relationship (e.g., spouse, girlfriend/boyfriend) impairment. Exploratory findings suggest that, among soldiers reporting close relationship impairment, those belonging to units with EBHPs reported significantly lower behavioral health symptoms and significantly more positive unit climates. Based on these limited exploratory finings, this study suggests that EBHPs in reserve units may have a positive effect on a subset of soldiers (i.e., those reporting close relationship impairment). More assessments of embed programs should be conducted, particularly using prospective longitudinal data among randomized units. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24841511

Russell, Dale W; Whalen, Ronald J; Riviere, Lyndon A; Clarke-Walper, Kristina; Bliese, Paul D; Keller, Darc D; Pangelian, Susan I; Thomas, Jeffrey L

2014-08-01

35

A specific labor market comparison of male and female willingness to travel: The case of the Army National Guard  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on an examination of gender differences in commuting behavior within the Army National Guard. This labor market provides a more level playing field than most for a direct comparison between male and female willingness to travel. In contrast to other studies, we find that women as a group are willing to travel greater distances, in this particular labor market. 9 refs., 1 fig., 10 tabs.

Daniell, A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Bell, S.E. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Vogt, D.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-01-01

36

Longitudinal predictors of desire to re-enlist in the military among male and female national guard soldiers.  

PubMed

Given the cost and burden associated with training and recruitment of military members, identifying predictors of military retention remains an important goal. The aim of the current study was to examine predictors of male and female service members' likelihood of remaining in the National Guard following combat deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Using a prospective, longitudinal design, this study assessed a wide range of predictors including mental health functioning, personality variables, deployment stressors, and various domains of quality of life. Results indicated perceived unit support was the strongest predictor of intention to re-enlist for both male and female participants. However, significant gender differences emerged as predeployment depression and a trend toward perceived life threat during deployment were predictors of men's intention to re-enlist, whereas the predeployment personality dimension of introversion (low positive emotionality) and postdeployment life stressors were predictors of women's intention to re-enlist. Surprisingly, no postdeployment mental health variables predicted National Guard soldiers' intention to re-enlist. Findings from this study suggest factors associated with National Guard service members' retention or attrition from the military may be amenable to intervention. PMID:23707112

Lancaster, Steven L; Erbes, Christopher R; Kumpula, Mandy J; Ferrier-Auerbach, Amanda; Arbisi, Paul A; Polusny, Melissa A

2013-03-01

37

Phase I Archaeological Survey of the Proposed Kentucky National Guard MATES Facility and Adjoining Areas on the Fort Knox Military Reservation, Hardin County, Kentucky.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Between November 1993 and May 1995, the Fort Knox contract cultural resource management personnel conducted a Phase I archaeological survey of approximately 126 acres (51 ha) encompassing the proposed Kentucky National Guard MATES facility, secondary acce...

P. A. Schenian

1995-01-01

38

Medium temperature thermal desorption soil remediation case study - Selfridge Air National Guard Base, Mt. Clemens, Michigan  

SciTech Connect

Carlo Environmental Technologies, Inc., (CET) was contracted by the Selfridge Air National Guard base (SANG) to remove an abandoned underground storage tank (UST) farm and remediate the contaminated soil using thermal desorption technology. The first phase of this project was to remove fourteen 25,000 gal underground storage tanks that had been installed during the 1930's, including all ancillary equipment at the facility. The USTs had been used to store aviation fuels, including both av-gas and jet fuels. The tank-removal project disclosed over 5000 yd[sup 3] of contaminated soil in the tank excavation pit, and excavation continued until analytical sampling demonstrated that the perimeter was within the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) Act 307 Type B cleanup criteria (state superfund act). The contaminated soil was trucked to a remote location on the base property for the thermal remediation. CET employed its Cedarapids 64MT thermal desorption plant to treat the contaminated soils from the tank removal site. These soils were predominantly clays, and the contamination included BTEX compounds up to 5 parts per million (ppm), and PNA compounds per 100 ppm. The medium temperature thermal desorption process, which heats the contaminated soil to approximately 850[degrees]F was successful in removing BTEX and PNA contamination from the soil (to levels below MDNR Type B cleanup criteria). The vapor stream from the desorption process was then filtered to minimize particulate emissions, and the contaminant compounds were then destroyed in the thermal oxidizer section of the process, at temperatures up to 1800[degrees]F. The remediated soil was returned to the original excavation as clean compacted fill material. With the use of the thermal desorption technology, CET remediated the site to MDNR cleanup standards, recycled the soils from the site, and eliminated off-site disposal liability for SANG.

Flemingloss, K. (Carlo Environmental Technologies, Inc., Clinton Township, MI (United States))

1994-08-01

39

Bumper guard  

SciTech Connect

A bumper guard is described for protecting a selected portion of an automobile body comprising guard means for covering the selected portion of the automobile body and shaped complementary to the automobile body. A bracket means is attached to the automobile frame for holding the guard means in position on the selected portion of the automobile body. The guard means comprises a V-shaped angle iron adapted to fit over the selected portion of the automobile body. The guard means further comprises a padding secured to the angle iron for interposition between the angle iron and automobile body to thereby protectively separate the angle iron from the automobile body.

Heyman, N.R.

1987-02-10

40

Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Among National Guard Soldiers Deployed to Iraq: Associations with Parenting Behaviors and Couple Adjustment  

PubMed Central

Objective This article reports findings from a one-year longitudinal study examining the impact of change in PTSD symptoms following combat deployment on National Guard soldiers’ perceived parenting, and couple adjustment one year following return from Iraq. Method Participants were 468 Army National Guard fathers from a Brigade Combat Team (mean age 36 years; median deployment length 16 months; 89% European American, 5% African American, 6% Hispanic American). Participants completed an in-theater survey one month before returning home from OIF deployment (Time 1), and again, one year post-deployment (Time 2). The PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M; Weathers, Litz, Herman, Huska, & Keane, 1993) was gathered at both times, and two items assessing social support were gathered at baseline only. At Time 2, participants also completed self-report measures of parenting (Alabama Parenting Questionnaire—Short Form; Elgar, Waschbusch, Dadds, & Sigvaldason, 2007), couple adjustment (Dyadic Adjustment Scale-7; Sharpley & Rogers, 1984; Spanier, 1976), parent-child relationship quality (4 items from the Social Adjustment Scale-Self Report; Weissman & Bothwell, 1976), alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test; Babor, Higgins-Biddle, Saunders, & Monteiro, 2001), and items assessing injuries sustained while deployed. Results Structural equation modeling analyses showed that increases in PTSD symptoms were associated with poorer couple adjustment and greater perceived parenting challenges at Time 2 (both at p<.001). Furthermore, PTSD symptoms predicted parenting challenges independent of their impact on couple adjustment. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of investigating and intervening to support parenting and couple adjustment among combat-affected National Guard families.

Gewirtz, Abigail H.; Polusny, Melissa A.; DeGarmo, David S.; Khaylis, Anna; Erbes, Christopher R.

2011-01-01

41

Components of secondary traumatic stress in female partners of National Guard and Reservist veterans displaying symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study offers an extensive view of how male National Guardsmen and Reservists' Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms affect their female partners. This study is one of the few that investigates the experience of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) in female partners of National Guard and Reservist veterans. The study included female partners of United States Army National Guardsmen and

Chasity L Kern

2011-01-01

42

Supporting the Transition to Adulthood among High School Dropouts: An Impact Study of the National Guard Youth Challenge Program.  

PubMed

Using a multi-year, random assignment design, this study evaluated the effects of the National Guard Youth Challenge Program (NGYCP), an intensive residential intervention program for youth ages 16-18 who have dropped out of high school. The sample included 1,173 youth (predominantly male) of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds from ten NGYCP sites across the country. Positive impacts on educational and employment outcomes were sustained 3 years after entering the program, with older participants generally showing greater benefits than younger participants. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:23543360

Millenky, Megan; Schwartz, Sarah E O; Rhodes, Jean E

2014-08-01

43

Bird guard  

DOEpatents

The bird guard provides a device to protect electrical insulators comprising a central shaft; a clamp attached to an end of the shaft to secure the device to a transmission tower; a top and bottom cover to shield transmission tower insulators; and bearings to allow the guard to rotate in order to frighten birds away from the insulators.

Fairchild, Dana M. (Armour, SD) [Armour, SD

2010-03-02

44

Peers and peer-based interventions in supporting reintegration and mental health among National Guard soldiers: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

National Guard soldiers experience high levels of mental health symptoms following deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, yet many do not seek treatment. We interviewed 30 National Guard soldiers with prior deployments to Iraq or Afghanistan to assess mental health treatment barriers and the role of peers in treatment engagement. Interview transcripts were analyzed by a multidisciplinary research team using techniques drawn from grounded theory. The following themes were identified: (1) personal acceptance of having a mental health problem rather than treatment access is the major barrier to treatment entry; (2) tightly connected, supportive peer networks can decrease stigma related to mental health problems and encourage treatment; however, soldiers in impoverished or conflicted peer networks are less likely to receive these benefits; and (3) soldiers are generally positive about the idea of peer-based programs to improve treatment engagement, although they note the importance of leadership support, peer assignment, and unit specialty in implementing these programs. We conclude that some, but not all, naturally occurring peer networks serve to overcome stigma and encourage mental health treatment seeking by soldiers. Formal peer-based programs may assist soldiers not sufficiently benefitting from natural peer networks, although there are barriers to implementation. PMID:23397691

Pfeiffer, Paul N; Blow, Adrian J; Miller, Erin; Forman, Jane; Dalack, Gregory W; Valenstein, Marcia

2012-12-01

45

33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger...Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties;...

2011-07-01

46

33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger...Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties;...

2012-07-01

47

33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger...Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties;...

2010-07-01

48

Risking the Guard: Risking America.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For over 372 years the citizen soldier has performed his or her duties as a member of a strong and independent National Guard, an organization dedicated to serving its citizens at home and abroad. While the Guard is a vital component of the national secur...

M. Eshelman M. Johnson

2009-01-01

49

Preliminary assessment report for Fort William Henry Harrison, Montana Army National Guard, Helena, Montana. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at a Montana Army National Guard (MTARNG) property near Helena, Montana. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort William Henry Harrison property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

DuWaldt, J.; Meyer, T.

1993-07-01

50

Increased risk of alcohol dependency in a cohort of National Guard troops with PTSD: a longitudinal study.  

PubMed

Studies show high rates of co-morbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) but there is no consensus on the causal direction of the relationship. Some theories suggest AUD develops as a coping mechanism to manage PTSD symptoms and others that AUD is a vulnerability factor for PTSD. A third hypothesis posits independent developmental pathways stemming from a shared etiology, such as the trauma exposure itself. We examined these hypotheses using longitudinal data on 922 National Guard soldiers, representing a subsample (56%) of a larger pre- and post-deployment cross-sectional study of New Jersey National Guard soldiers deployed to Iraq. Measures included the PTSD Checklist (PCL), DSM-IV-based measures of alcohol use/misuse from the National Household Survey of Drug Use and Health and other concurrent mental health, military and demographic measures. Results showed no effect of pre-deployment alcohol status on subsequent positive screens for new onset PTSD. However, in multivariate models, baseline PTSD symptoms significantly increased the risk of screening positive for new onset alcohol dependence (AD), which rose 5% with each unit increase in PCL score (AOR = 1.05; 95% CI = 1.02-1.07). Results also supported the shared etiology hypothesis, with the risk of a positive screen for AD increasing by 9% for every unit increase in combat exposure after controlling for baseline PTSD status (AOR = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.03-1.15) and, in a subsample with PCL scores <34, by 17% for each unit increase in exposure (AOR = 1.17; 95% CI = 1.05-1.31). These findings have implications for prevention, treatment and compensation policies governing co-morbidity in military veterans. PMID:24332924

Kline, Anna; Weiner, Marc D; Ciccone, Donald S; Interian, Alejandro; St Hill, Lauren; Losonczy, Miklos

2014-03-01

51

National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1994 (on Magnetic Tape).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) provides data on ambulatory care rendered in hospital emergency and outpatient departments (EDs and OPDs). The NHAMCS is a national probability sample of visits to the emergency and outpatient ...

1996-01-01

52

National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1993 (on Magnetic Tape).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) provides data on ambulatory care rendered in hospital emergency and outpatient departments (EDs and OPDs). The NHAMCS is a national probability sample of visits to the emergency and outpatient ...

1996-01-01

53

Population trends of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Population trends of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1989 through August 1991. Six semiannual livetrapping sessions and eight scent-station survey sessions were conducted. Livetrapping results and radiotelemetry data were used to calculate minimum population size, density, and distribution. A total of 175 individual foxes were trapped 463 times. The number of individuals trapped and minimum population size calculations showed a decline over time. The highest minimum population (109) was observed in winter 1988. Summer 1991 had the lowest minimum population size (45). No evidence was found to indicate that the apparent population decline was a result of military-authorized activities.

Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.

1992-10-01

54

Military unit support, postdeployment social support, and PTSD symptoms among active duty and National Guard soldiers deployed to Iraq.  

PubMed

Research suggests that military unit support and community postdeployment social support are associated with fewer PTSD symptoms following military deployment. This study extended prior research by examining the associations among predeployment unit support and PTSD symptoms before Iraq deployment as well as unit support, PTSD symptoms, and postdeployment social support after deployment among 835 U.S. Army and 173 National Guard soldiers. Multiple regression analyses indicated that predeployment unit support was not significantly associated with postdeployment PTSD severity in either group of soldiers, whereas higher unit support during deployment was significantly associated with lower postdeployment PTSD severity among active duty soldiers only. Among both groups, higher levels of postdeployment social support were associated with lower levels of postdeployment PTSD symptom severity. These findings suggest that postdeployment social support is a particularly strong buffer against postdeployment PTSD symptoms among both groups of soldiers whereas the effects of unit support may be limited. PMID:24846492

Han, Sohyun C; Castro, Frank; Lee, Lewina O; Charney, Meredith E; Marx, Brian P; Brailey, Kevin; Proctor, Susan P; Vasterling, Jennifer J

2014-06-01

55

Using USRDS generated hospitalization tables to compare local dialysis patient hospitalization rates to national rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using USRDS generated hospitalization tables to compare local dialysis patient hospitalization rates to national rates. Hospitalization tables of the U.S. Renal Data System allow description of national hospitalization rates among incident and prevalent dialysis patients in five-year age groups. These rates are further stratified by sex, race, and four primary disease categories. Based on these tables derived from the data

Robert L Strawderman; Gregory Levine; Richard A Hirth; Friedrich K Port; Philip J Held; Robert L Strawderman ScD

1996-01-01

56

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal imager applied to San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal infrared imaging were used to evaluate the effects of military activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site. The Ground Penetrating Radar was used to identify underground burrows of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) dens in an attempt to evaluate the impact of tracked vehicles on the integrity of kit fox

E. A. Reese; T. T. Kato; W. H. Berry

1992-01-01

57

Critical Needs and Level of Support for the Military Spouse: A Comparative Study of the National Guard and Active Army during the Iraq War  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

National Guard units have been asked to serve in ways never before experienced since the beginning of the Iraq War and throughout the continued war on terror. Multiple deployments, frequent long-term separations from families, communities, and jobs may have far reaching implications. Family Readiness Groups and a climate of support shown by…

Vasilas, Cynthia Nikki

2009-01-01

58

Statement to the National Research Council Study Committee for the Assessment of U.S. Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Roles and Future Needs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The age and condition of the U.S. Coast Guard's polar icebreakers are jeopardizing national security and scientific research in the Arctic and Antarctic. Because of a shortfall in funding for U.S. polar icebreaking activities, long-term maintenance on the...

D. H. Laible

2005-01-01

59

Suicide and War: The Mediating Effects of Negative Mood, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, and Social Support among Army National Guard Soldiers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mediating effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, negative mood, and social support on the relationship of war experiences to suicidality were examined. The research literature suggested a sequence among study scales representing these constructs, which was then tested on survey data obtained from a sample of National Guard

Griffith, James

2012-01-01

60

The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form in National Guard Soldiers Screening Positive for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2 RF) was administered to 251 National Guard soldiers who had recently returned from deployment to Iraq. Soldiers were also administered questionnaires to identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). On the basis of responses to the…

Arbisi, Paul A.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Thuras, Paul; Reddy, Madhavi K.

2011-01-01

61

Sound Guard  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lubrication technology originally developed for a series of NASA satellites has produced a commercial product for protecting the sound fidelity of phonograph records. Called Sound Guard, the preservative is a spray-on fluid that deposits a microscopically thin protective coating which reduces friction and prevents the hard diamond stylus from wearing away the softer vinyl material of the disc. It is marketed by the Consumer Products Division of Ball Corporation, Muncie, Indiana. The lubricant technology on which Sound Guard is based originated with NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO), an Earth-orbiting satellite designed and built by Ball Brothers Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado, also a division of Ball Corporation. Ball Brothers engineers found a problem early in the OSO program: known lubricants were unsuitable for use on satellite moving parts that would be exposed to the vacuum of space for several months. So the company conducted research on the properties of materials needed for long life in space and developed new lubricants. They worked successfully on seven OSO flights and attracted considerable attention among other aerospace contractors. Ball Brothers now supplies its "Vac Kote" lubricants and coatings to both aerospace and non-aerospace industries and the company has produced several hundred variations of the original technology. Ball Corporation expanded its product line to include consumer products, of which Sound Guard is one of the most recent. In addition to protecting record grooves, Sound Guard's anti-static quality also retards particle accumulation on the stylus. During comparison study by a leading U.S. electronic laboratory, a record not treated by Sound Guard had to be cleaned after 50 plays and the stylus had collected a considerable number of small vinyl particles. The Sound Guard-treated disc was still clean after 100 plays, as was its stylus.

1978-01-01

62

Disposal and reuse of portions of Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base, Ohio, environmental impact statement. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act of 1990, Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base is scheduled for realignment on September 30, 1994. This EIS, prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, analyzes potential environmental impacts of disposal. Although disposal will have few direct effects, future use by others will create indirect effects. The document includes analyses of potential impacts that a range of reasonable foreseeable reuses could have on local land use and aesthetics, transportation, utilities, hazardous materials/wastes, geology and soils, water resources, air quality, noise, biological resources, and cultural resources. All reuse alternatives, including the proposed action and the No-Action Alternative, incorporate aviation and land use areas. Potential impacts associated with the proposed action include land use conflicts, aircraft-related noise, traffic increases, increased air emissions and wetland disturbance. Proposed mitigations include restricting residential development near the airport; incorporation of FAA-mandated Stage III engines on all commercial aircraft by the year 2000; planned improvement to local roads; application of state control measures to reduce traffic trips, especially during peak hours; and avoiding wetland areas to the extent possible. Because the Air Force is disposing of the property, some of the mitigation measures are beyond Air Force control. Remediation of Installation Restoration Program sites will continue to be the responsibility of the Air Force.

NONE

1994-07-01

63

Role, Status and Command and Control of the National Guard in Homeland Security.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

President Bush's top priority for the Federal Government is the defense of our nation against its enemies. Keeping America safe will require resources and attention from a multitude of agencies from every level, including the Department of Defense. But th...

M. Grinder

2003-01-01

64

Perception of change and burden in children of national guard troops deployed as part of the global war on terror.  

PubMed

Changes in relationships, roles, and dynamics associated with deployment of troops to the Global War on Terror can create challenges for their families as non-deployed spouses and their children take on new responsibilities. Children, aged 6 to 18 years, of deployed National Guard troops were assessed to determine the children's perceptions about how their father's deployment would or did change them and their family, the burden the children experienced in relation to helping their mothers, and child- and parent-reported emotional and behavioral symptoms in the children. Endorsement of personal change was associated with psychological health. During deployment, recognizing personal change was associated with less perceived burden while perceived change in the family was associated with more perceived burden. In general, increased perception of burden was associated with increased psychological symptoms and problems. The children of deployed service personnel may experience burdens and challenges in relation to the changes associated with the circumstances of deployment. Helping children prepare for and manage changes in relationships, roles, rules, and routines may lessen adverse reactions to changes in the environment. PMID:23894799

Pfefferbaum, Betty; Houston, J Brian; Allen, Sandra F

2012-01-01

65

Blood characteristics of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Hematology, serum chemistry, and prevalence of antibodies against selected, pathogens in a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, in 1989 and 1990. Samples from 18 (10 female, 8 male) adult kit foxes were used to establish normal hematology and serum chemistry values for this population. Average values were all within the normal ranges reported for kit foxes in other locations. Three hematology parameters had significant differences between male and female values; males had higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and lower lymphocyte counts. There were no significant differences between serum chemistry values from male and female foxes. Prevalence of antibodies was determined from serum samples from 47 (26 female, 21 male) adult kit foxes and eight (4 female, 4 male) juveniles. Antibodies were detected against five of the eight pathogens tested: canine parvovirus, Toxoplasma gondii Leptospira interrogans, canine distemper virus, and canine hepatitis virus. Antibodies were not detected against Brucella, canis, Coccidioides immitis, or Yersinia pestis.

Standley, W.G.; McCue, P.M.

1992-09-01

66

Coast Guard  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that about 16,000 oil spills involving the release of more than 46 million gallons of oil took place in U.S. navigable waters in 1988; spills at water-front facilities, where vessels load and unload oil, accounted for about half of the oil spilled. While the Coast Guard acknowledges its responsibility for regulating and inspecting waterfront facilities, it efforts in this area have fallen short because it has not been inspecting portions of intrafacility pipes that transport oil between docks and storage tanks. Water pollution and noncompliance with federal oil pollution prevention regulations continue to be high at waterfront facilities. Yet the Coast Guard cannot determine how effective its inspection program has been in reducing the risk of oil spills because information on program results, such as the types, severity, and frequency of deficiencies found by inspectors, is not compiled an linked with information on the causes of oil spills found by investigators. Until the Coast Guard collects this type of information, it will not be in a position to establish measurable goals.

Not Available

1991-06-01

67

Does cynicism play a role in failure to obtain needed care? Mental health service utilization among returning U.S. National Guard soldiers.  

PubMed

In the present study, the authors examined cynicism, a trait associated with mistrust and a misanthropic world view, as an impediment to seeking needed mental health services among a group of National Guard Soldiers with diagnoses of anxiety, depression, or substance abuse or dependence after a combat deployment. On their return from deployment, 40 National Guard soldiers were assessed for self-stigma, current distress, attitudes toward mental health care, and psychiatric diagnoses. Eight and a half months later, mental health service utilization was evaluated. Cynicism assessed prior to deployment was associated with lower odds of utilizing mental health services independent of self-stigma and negative attitudes toward mental health care. Further, neither self-stigma nor attitudes toward mental health care predicted engaging in needed mental health care when cynicism was included in the model. PMID:23544401

Arbisi, Paul A; Rusch, Laura; Polusny, Melissa A; Thuras, Paul; Erbes, Christopher R

2013-09-01

68

Efficacy of a post-secondary environmental science education program on the attitude toward science of a group of Mississippi National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program (ChalleNGe) is a 17 month quasi-military training program authorized by Congress in the 1993 Defense Authorization Bill designed to improve life skills, education levels, and employment potential of 16--18 year old youth who drop out of high school. ChalleNGe is currently operational in 27 states\\/territories with the focus of this study on the Mississippi

William Bradford Smith Jr.

2003-01-01

69

Installation restoration program. Site investigation report. Volume 1. Alabama Air National Guard 187th Fighter Group Dannelly Field Municipal Airport Montgomery, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

A Site Investigation (SI) was conducted as part of the IRP for the 187th Fighter Group of the Alabama National Guard, Dannelly Field Municipal Airport, Montgomery, Alabama (the base). The SI was conducted in accordance with the SI Work Plan dated December 1990 and followed the 1987 Preliminary Assessment (PA) at the base that identified five sites that were potential sources of environmental contamination.

Hill

1995-11-01

70

Effects of Repeated Deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan on the Health of New Jersey Army National Guard Troops: Implications for Military Readiness  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We assessed the effects of prior military service in Iraq or Afghanistan on the health of New Jersey Army National Guard members preparing for deployment to Iraq. Methods. We analyzed anonymous, self-administered predeployment surveys from 2543 National Guard members deployed to Iraq in 2008. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to measure the effects of prior service in Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom [OEF]) or Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom [OIF]) on mental and physical health. Results. Nearly 25% of respondents reported at least 1 previous OEF or OIF deployment. Previously deployed soldiers were more than 3 times as likely as soldiers with no previous deployments to screen positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.59, 5.24) and major depression (AOR = 3.07; 95% CI = 1.81, 5.19), more than twice as likely to report chronic pain (AOR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.78, 2.72) and more than 90% more likely to score below the general population norm on physical functioning (AOR = 1.94; 95% CI = 1.51, 2.48). Conclusions. Repeated OEF and OIF deployments may adversely affect the military readiness of New Jersey National Guard combat soldiers.

Falca-Dodson, Maria; Sussner, Bradley; Ciccone, Donald S.; Chandler, Helena; Callahan, Lanora; Losonczy, Miklos

2010-01-01

71

Adverse outcomes in Belgian acute hospitals: retrospective analysis of the national hospital discharge dataset  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The prevalence and variability of adverse outcome rates in Belgian acute hospitals is examined by using the national hospital discharge database. Design, setting, and participants. Retrospective analysis based on administrative data of all Belgian acute hospitals, covering the full medical (n = 1 024 743) and surgical (n = 633 027) in-patients population for the year 2000. Main outcome

KOEN VAN DEN HEEDE; WALTER SERMEUS; LUWIS DIYA; EMMANUEL LESAFFRE; ARTHUR VLEUGELS

2006-01-01

72

Baseline water-quality characteristics of the Alaska Army National Guard Stewart River Training Area near Nome, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Army National Guard Stewart River Training Area is approximately 23 miles north of Nome on the Seward Peninsula in northwest Alaska. The Stewart River Training Area encompasses much of the Stewart River Basin and a small part of the Snake River Basin. Hydrologic, water-quality, and physical-habitat data were collected at seven surface-water sites within the Stewart River Training Area during the summer runoff months (late-May to early-September) in 2004. Two of the sampling sites selected for this study were on the main stem Stewart River, one at the upstream boundary and one at the downstream boundary of the training area. Continuous hydrologic, precipitation, and water temperature data were collected at these two sites throughout the summer of 2004. Three pond sites, along the upper, middle, and lower reaches of the Stewart River within the training area, were each sampled twice during the summer of 2004 for analysis of water-quality constituents. Two tributaries to the Snake River Basin, Goldbottom Creek and North Fork Snake River, within the Stewart River Training Area boundary, also were sampled twice during the summer of 2004. Water-quality data collected from the Stewart River at the upstream and downstream study sites indicate similar constituent concentrations. Concentrations of most water-quality constituents collected during the summer of 2004 did not exceed standards for drinking water or recreational contact. Analysis of trace-element concentrations in bed sediment samples indicate the threshold effect concentration (below which no adverse effects on organisms is expected) was exceeded for arsenic, chromium, and nickel concentrations at all sample sites within the Stewart River Training Area and cadmium, copper, zinc, and lead concentrations were found to exceed the threshold effect concentration in varying degrees at the sample sites. The probable effect concentration (above which toxic effects on organisms is likely) was exceeded by arsenic concentrations at all sites except the lower pond site. Chromium and nickel concentrations exceeded the probable effect concentration at the upstream Stewart River site and at the North Fork Snake River site.

Eash, Josh D.

2005-01-01

73

Installation Restoration Program (IRP) for IRP sites numbers 4, 5, 7 and 14. 152 Tactical Reconnaissance Group, Nevada Air National Guard, Reno Tahoe International Airport, Reno, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Remedial Investigation Report for IRP Site Nos. 4,5,7, and 14, Nevada Air National Guard, 152nd Tactical Reconnaissance Group, Reno Tahoe International Airport, Reno, Nevada. This is the remedial investigation report. The sites were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis was recommended to fully delineate the extent of contamination and conduct remediation activities, if required for sites 4,5,7, and 14. Groundwater monitoring was recommended for the all sites.

NONE

1996-01-01

74

Installation restoration program final remedial investigation report IRP sites 8 and 10. 151st air refueling group Utah Air National Guard, Salt Lake City, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from a Remedial Investigation (RI) for two sites at the Utah Air National Guard (UANG) Base located in Salt Lake City, Utah. The two sites investigated are identified as Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site 8, a former underground storage tank (UST) location, and IRP Site 10, an existing petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL) yard. The RI was conducted as outlined in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan prepared by Stone Webster and submitted to and approved by the ANG in May 1993. The field work associated with the RI was performed in June, July, and August 1995.

NONE

1996-06-01

75

Nations hospitable to organized crime and terrorism  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report assesses conditions that contribute to or are potentially hospitable to transnational criminal activity and terrorist\\u000a activity in selected regions of the world during the period 1999–2002. Although the focus of the report is on transnational\\u000a activity, domestic criminal activity is recognized as a key foundation for transnational crime, especially as the forces of\\u000a globalization intensify.\\u000a \\u000a The report has

Glenn E. Curtis; John N. Gibbs; Ramón Miró

2004-01-01

76

National Hospital Discharge and Ambulatory Surgery Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this site offers a host of data on inpatients discharged from non-Federal, short-stay hospitals in the US and the use of ambulatory surgery services. These data include patient characteristics (age and sex, patient disposition, expected sources of payment, etc.), admission and discharge dates, and medical information such as diagnoses and procedures performed. Like other CDC data sites, this is not the easiest to navigate, but diligent users will be rewarded with numerous reports, raw data files, and related documentation.

77

Final report on testing of ACONF technology for the US Coast Guard National Distress Systems : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a six month test program of an Alternative Configuration (ACONF) power management system design for a typical United States Coast Guard (USCG) National Distress System (NDS) site. The USCG/USDOE funded work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories to evaluate the effect of a Sandia developed battery management technology known as ACONF on the performance of energy storage systems at NDS sites. This report demonstrates the savings of propane gas, and the improvement of battery performance when utilizing the new ACONF designs. The fuel savings and battery performance improvements resulting from ACONF use would be applicable to all current NDS sites in the field. The inherent savings realized when using the ACONF battery management design was found to be significant when compared to battery replacement and propane refueling at the remote NDS sites.

Storey, Leanne M.; Byrd, Thomas M., Jr.; Murray, Aaron T.; Ginn, Jerry W.; Symons, Philip C. (Electrochemical Engineering Consultants, Inc., Morgan Hill, CA); Corey, Garth P.

2005-08-01

78

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Otis Air National Guard, (AOC CS-1 (USCG)), Falmouth, MA, September 29, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, lies within the boundaries of the towns of Falmouth, Mashpee, Sandwich, and Bourne. The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Transmitter Station, designed Area of Contamination (AOC) CS-1 (USCG) is located adjacent to the eastern boundary of the MMR. The NGB, acting as executive agent of the USCG, and USEPA, with concurrence of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, have determined that No Action is necessary to address the contamination at AOC CS-1 (USCG). However, groundwater monitoring will be performed at well WW-7 for a period of five years to provide information over time on the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) detected in this well, and on the sporadic detection of inorganics in groundwater at this AOC.

NONE

1996-03-01

79

Seoul National University Bundang Hospital's Electronic System for Total Care  

PubMed Central

Objectives Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, which is the first Stage 7 hospital outside of North America, has adopted and utilized an innovative and emerging information technology system to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care. The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce the major components of the SNUBH information system and to describe our progress toward a next-generation hospital information system (HIS). Methods SNUBH opened in 2003 as a fully digital hospital by successfully launching a new HIS named BESTCare, "Bundang hospital Electronic System for Total Care". Subsequently, the system has been continuously improved with new applications, including close-loop medication administration (CLMA), clinical data warehouse (CDW), health information exchange (HIE), and disaster recovery (DR), which have resulted in the achievement of Stage 7 status. Results The BESTCare system is an integrated system for a university hospital setting. BESTCare is mainly composed of three application domains: the core applications, an information infrastructure, and channel domains. The most critical and unique applications of the system, such as the electronic medical record (EMR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support system (CDSS), CLMA, CDW, HIE, and DR applications, are described in detail. Conclusions Beyond our achievement of Stage 7 hospital status, we are currently developing a next-generation HIS with new goals of implementing infrastructure that is flexible and innovative, implementing a patient-centered system, and strengthening the IT capability to maximize the hospital value.

Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee Hyuck; Lee, Hak Jong; Ha, Kyooseob; Lim, Cheong; Chin, Ho Jun; Yun, Jonghoar; Cho, Eun-Young; Chung, Eunja; Baek, Rong-Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Chul Hee; Lee, Hai-Seok; Byeon, Nam-Soo

2012-01-01

80

Final closure assessment work plan for sites 2 and 10, 119th Fighter-Interceptor Group, North Dakota Air National Guard Base, Hector Field, Fargo, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This Work Plan (WP) outlines closure assessment activities to be conducted at two sites at the North Dakota Air National Guard (NDANG) Base, Hector International Airport (also known as Hector Field), Fargo, North Dakota. The sites to be assessed include one 300-gal nominal capacity waste oil underground storage tank (UST) which is scheduled to be removed (Site 2), and a former fire training area (Site 10) where removal of contaminated soils is scheduled. The objectives of the assessment are to provide documentation of soil and water conditions following excavation of the UST at Site 2 and excavation of contaminated soils at Site 10 in order to support closure in accordance with applicable North Dakota State Department of Health and Consolidated Laboratories requirements.

NONE

1994-06-01

81

Home Guard, Police, and the Social Contract.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Establishing local security through indigenous security forces or 'Home Guard' programs has proven beneficial in establishing security and separating the civilian population from the insurgents. Joint and Army doctrine provide for host nation government c...

K. S. MacWatters

2011-01-01

82

The Coast Guard Comes to Class.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focuses on Sea Partners, by the United States Coast Guard, that enables students to understand how pollution affects the marine environment. Correlates the activities with the National Science Education Standards. (DDR)

Fawcett, Paul

2002-01-01

83

Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program. Radiological Survey of the National Guard Armory at Washington Park, 52ND Street and Cottage Grove Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, September 19, 1977-October 11, 1978.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A comprehensive radiological survey was conducted at the Illinois National Guard Armory at Washington Park in Chicago. This facility, used for uranium processing during the MED/AEC era, is now used as offices, classrooms, and storage and garage areas. For...

R. A. Wynveen W. H. Smith C. B. Mayes A. L. Justus

1983-01-01

84

National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS): 1997 Summary: National Hospital Discharge Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Last month, the NCHS released statistics from its 1997 National Hospital Discharge Survey. The "report presents national estimates of the use of non-Federal, short-stay hospitals in the United States during 1997. Numbers and rates of discharges, diagnoses, and procedures are shown by age and sex." The summary gives average lengths of stays for all discharges, broken down by region, as well as average lengths of stays for selected diagnostic categories, including infant delivery.

Hall, Margaret.; Lawrence, Linda.

85

ASHP national survey of pharmaceutical services in federal hospitals--1993.  

PubMed

The results of a national mail survey of pharmaceutical services in federal hospitals conducted by ASHP from May to July 1993 are reported. Mailing lists were compiled of all Air Force, Army, Navy, Public Health Service, and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals, as well as some federal prison hospitals. Questionnaires were mailed to each chief of pharmacy. The adjusted gross population size was 326. The net response rate was 76%. Complete unit dose drug distribution was offered by 85% of respondents, and 83% offered complete, comprehensive i.v. admixture programs. About half of the pharmacies provided decentralized services. Over 99% provided services to ambulatory care patients. A computerized pharmacy system was present in 99% of the departments. More than 95% of hospitals participated in adverse drug reaction, medication error management, and drug-use-evaluation programs. A total of 93% provided drug therapy monitoring, and 89% provided patient education. About 70% provided written documentation of pharmacist interventions in the medical records, and 57% participated in drug research. A total of 42% provided pharmacist-managed drug clinics, 41% participated in drug management of medical emergencies, 30% provided written medication histories, and 30% provided drug therapy management planning. Pharmacokinetic consultations were provided by 64% of departments. About 90% had a well-controlled formulary system and prescribing restrictions. Therapeutic interchange was practiced by 64%. Diversified pharmaceutical services included telephone or mail-in refill services (80%), mail-out pharmaceutical services (58%), and services to long-term-care facilities (49%). A total of 70% of the hospitals were affiliated with a pharmacy school. The first ASHP national survey of pharmaceutical services in federal hospitals showed that comprehensive distributive and clinical services were offered by most of the facilities. PMID:7847403

Crawford, S Y; Santell, J P

1994-10-01

86

National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1996 (on CD-ROM with Search and Retrieval Software).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) provides data on ambulatory medical care rendered in hospital emergency and outpatient departments (EDs and OPDs). The NHAMCS is a nationally probability sample survey of visits to the emergenc...

1998-01-01

87

Cost of Hospitalization and Length of Stay in People with Down Syndrome: Evidence from a National Hospital Discharge Claims Database  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present paper aims to describe the hospitalization profiles which include medical expenses and length of stays, and to determine their possible influencing factors of hospital admission on persons with Down syndrome in Taiwan. We employed a population-based, retrospective analyses used national health insurance hospital discharge data of the…

Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

2011-01-01

88

Feasibility and desirability of web-based mental health screening and individualized education for female OEF/OIF reserve and national guard war veterans.  

PubMed

Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Reserve and National Guard (RNG) service members have an increased risk for postdeployment mental health (MH) and readjustment problems, yet most do not access needed care. It is unknown if RNG servicewomen experiencing postdeployment readjustment symptoms are aware these may signify treatable MH concerns or if this knowledge activates care-seeking. The aims of this proof-of-concept study were to determine the feasibility of web-based MH screening for postdeployment MH symptoms to inform individualized psychoeducation, and to assess user perceptions about the online instrument and process, MH care access, and VA and other MH care. A midwestern sample (N = 131) of recently deployed (past 24 months) OEF/OIF RNG Army and Air Force servicewomen participated. High rates of combat experiences (95%) and military sexual trauma (50%) were reported. Positive screens for key symptoms of MH problems were prevalent. One third (31%) of satisfaction survey completers indicated online information reduced discomfort with seeking MH care; 42% reported they would subsequently seek MH assessment. Participants interviewed by telephone indicated that stigma and limited knowledge about women-specific services were key reasons servicewomen do not use MH care. This study demonstrated web-based screenings with individualized psychoeducation are implementable and favorable to RNG servicewomen. PMID:23696367

Sadler, Anne G; Mengeling, Michelle A; Torner, James C; Smith, Jeffrey L; Franciscus, Carrie L; Erschens, Holly J; Booth, Brenda M

2013-06-01

89

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal imager applied to San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal infrared imaging were used to evaluate the effects of military activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site. The Ground Penetrating Radar was used to identify underground burrows of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) dens in an attempt to evaluate the impact of tracked vehicles on the integrity of kit fox dens. The thermal imaging was used to identify kit foxes within the live-fire impact area. The ground penetrating radar equipment was initially unsuccessfull in detecting burrows in the hard, compacted soils. Changes in antenna systems and sampling methods resulted in small improvements, but the data were inadequate to test for effects of military vehicles on dens. Further refinements would have required the intentional destruction of dens, or the redesign of the ground penetrating radar hardware and software. Thermal imaging was useful in observing kit foxes at close range but was not suitable for detecting foxes in the impact area because the images were not clear enough for conclusive species identification.

Reese, E.A.; Kato, T.T.; Berry, W.H.; O`Farrell, T.P.

1992-10-01

90

Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

1992-10-01

91

Installation restoration program: Remedial investigation report addendum for IRP site number 6. Volume 2. 161st Air Refueling Group Arizona Air National Guard Sky Harbor International Airport Phoenix, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Remedial Investigation Report Addendum for IRP Site No. 6, Arizona National Guard, 161st Air Refueling Group, Sky Harbor International Airport, Phoenix, Arizona. This is the first volume of a two volume addendum to the Remedial Investigation Report, May 1996. Site 6. POL Facility was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Remedial Action was recommended for both groundwater and soil associated with the site.

NONE

1996-05-01

92

Installation restoration program: Remedial investigation report addendum for IRP site number 6. Volume 1. 161st Air Refueling Group Arizona Air National Guard Sky Harbor International Airport Phoenix, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Remedial Investigation Report Addendum for IRP Site No. 6, Arizona National Guard, 161st Air Refueling Group, Sky Harbor International Airport, Phoenix, Arizona. This is the first volume of a two volume addendum to the Remedial Investigation Report, May 1996. Site 6. POL Facility was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Remedial Action was recommended for both groundwater and soil associated with the site.

NONE

1996-05-01

93

Coping with national health insurance: Strategic behaviours of Taiwan’s hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary goals of this study are to profile the strategic behaviours of Taiwan’s hospitals under the National Health Insurance programme, identify the related factors for such behaviours, and assess the influences of hospitals’ strategic behaviours on their performance. Findings indicate that the most prevalent strategy adopted by hospitals is strategic alliance. The results demonstrate that hospital level is a

Kuo-Cherh Huang; Ning Lu; Yi-Hsin Hsu; Mei-Ling Sheu; Che-Ming Yang; Yi-Hua Chen

2009-01-01

94

OnGuard Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the OnGuard website "provides practical tips from the federal government and the technology industry to help you be on guard against Internet fraud, secure your computer, and protect your personal information." Visitors can learn how to avoid online scams, secure their computers, protect kids online and more. On the homepage, users can find useful information divided into subpages for educators, parents, techies, small business owners, the military and kids.

95

Assessment of soil and water contaminants from selected locations in and near the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area, Ada County, Idaho, 2001-2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2001, the National Guard Bureau and the U.S. Geological Survey began a project to compile hydrogeologic data and determine presence or absence of soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination at the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area in southwestern Idaho. Between June 2002 and April 2003, a total of 114 soil, surface-water, ground-water, precipitation, or dust samples were collected from 68 sample sites (65 different locations) in the Orchard Training Area (OTA) or along the vehicle corridor to the OTA. Soil and water samples were analyzed for concentrations of selected total trace metals, major ions, nutrients, explosive compounds, semivolatile organics, and petroleum hydrocarbons. Water samples also were analyzed for concentrations of selected dissolved trace metals and major ions. Distinguishing naturally occurring large concentrations of trace metals, major ions, and nutrients from contamination related to land and water uses at the OTA was difficult. There were no historical analyses for this area to compare with modern data, and although samples were collected from 65 locations in and near the OTA, sampled areas represented only a small part of the complex OTA land-use areas and soil types. For naturally occurring compounds, several assumptions were made?anomalously large concentrations, when tied to known land uses, may indicate presence of contamination; naturally occurring concentrations cannot be separated from contamination concentrations in mid- and lower ranges of data; and smallest concentrations may represent the lowest naturally occurring range of concentrations and (or) the absence of contaminants related to land and water uses. Presence of explosive, semivolatile organic (SVOC), and petroleum hydrocarbon compounds in samples indicates contamination from land and water uses. In areas along the vehicle corridor and major access roads within the OTA, most trace metal, major ion, and nutrient concentrations in soil samples were not in the upper 10th percentile of data, but concentrations of 25 metals, ions, or nutrients were in the upper 10th percentile in a puddle sample near the heavy equipment maneuvering area, MPRC-H. The largest concentrations of tin, ammonia, and nitrite plus nitrate (as nitrogen) in water from the OTA were detected in a sample from this puddle. Petroleum hydrocarbons were the most common contaminant, detected in all soil and surface-water samples. An SVOC, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, a plasticizer, was detected at a site along the vehicle corridor. In Maneuver Areas within the OTA, many soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of cobalt, iron, mercury, titanium, sodium, ammonia, or total phosphorus were detected in 6 of 13 soil samples outside the Tadpole Lake area. The largest concentrations of aluminum, arsenic, beryllium, nickel, selenium, silver, strontium, thallium, vanadium, chloride, potassium, sulfate, and nitrite plus nitrate were detected in soil samples from the Tadpole Lake area. Water from Tadpole Lake contained the largest total concentrations of 19 trace metals, 4 major ions, and 1 nutrient. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 5 soil samples and water from Tadpole Lake. SVOCs related to combustion of fuel or plasticizers were detected in 1 soil sample. Explosive compounds were detected in 1 precipitation sample.In the Impact Area within the OTA, most soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of barium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, or orthophosphate were detected in 6 of the 18 soil samples. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 4 soil samples, SVOCs in 6 samples, and explosive compounds in 4 samples. In the mobilization and training equipment site (MATES) compound adjacent to the OTA, all soil and water samples contained at lea

Parliman, D. J.

2004-01-01

96

Gender differences in the risk and protective factors associated with PTSD: a prospective study of National Guard troops deployed to Iraq.  

PubMed

This study examines gender differences in post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and PTSS risk/protective factors among soldiers deployed to Iraq. We pay special attention to two potentially modifiable military factors, military preparedness and unit cohesion, which may buffer the deleterious psychological effects of combat. Longitudinal data were collected on 922 New Jersey National Guard soldiers (91 women) deployed to Iraq in 2008. Anonymous surveys administered at pre- and post-deployment included the PTSD Checklist (PCL), the Unit Support Scale, and a preparedness scale adapted from the Iowa Gulf War Study. Bivariate analyses and hierarchical multiple regression were used to identify predictors of PTSS and their explanatory effects on the relationship between gender and PTSS. Women had a higher prevalence of probable post-deployment PTSD than men (18.7% vs. 8.7%; OR = 2.45; CI [1.37, 4.37]) and significantly higher post-deployment PTSS (33.73 vs. 27.37; p = .001). While there were no gender differences in combat exposure, women scored higher on pre-deployment PTSS (26.9 vs. 23.1; p ? .001) and lower on military preparedness (1.65 vs. 2.41; p ? .001) and unit cohesion (32.5 vs. 38.1; p ? .001). In a multivariate model, controlling for all PTSS risk/resilience factors reduced the gender difference as measured by the unstandardized Beta (B) by 45%, with 18% uniquely attributable to low cohesion and low preparedness. In the fully controlled model, gender remained a significant predictor of PTSS but the effect size was small (d = .26). Modifiable military institutional factors may account for much of the increased vulnerability of women soldiers to PTSD. PMID:23965264

Kline, Anna; Ciccone, Donald S; Weiner, Marc; Interian, Alejandro; St Hill, Lauren; Falca-Dodson, Maria; Black, Christopher M; Losonczy, Miklos

2013-01-01

97

National Hospital Discharge Survey Data Analysis of Breast Cancer Between African American and White Women.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present study estimated age-specific hospital admission rates for breast cancer in African American (AA) and White women through analyzing National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data from 1988 to 1994. Weighted linear regression was used to analyze...

K. S. Kim

2000-01-01

98

Nosocomial Infections at Kenyatta National Hospital Intensive-Care Unit in Nairobi, Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to identify the common bacteria isolated from patients, antibiotics used, sensitivity patterns, therapeutic procedures and cleaning protocols practised in Kenyatta National Hospital Intensive-Care Unit (ICU). Kenyatta National Hospital is a 1,800-bed referral and tertiary-care hospital which is also the Teaching University Hospital. The ICU has 20 beds. Two members of staff, a consultant and

Z. W. W. Ngumi

2006-01-01

99

49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.143 ...Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

2013-10-01

100

49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355 ...6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

2013-10-01

101

Surface-water quantity and quality, aquatic biology, stream geomorphology, and groundwater-flow simulation for National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, 2002-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Base-line and long-term monitoring of water resources of the National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap in south-central Pennsylvania began in 2002. Results of continuous monitoring of streamflow and turbidity and monthly and stormflow water-quality samples from two continuous-record long-term stream sites, periodic collection of water-quality samples from five miscellaneous stream sites, and annual collection of biological data from 2002 to 2005 at 27 sites are discussed. In addition, results from a stream-geomorphic analysis and classification and a regional groundwater-flow model are included. Streamflow at the facility was above normal for the 2003 through 2005 water years and extremely high-flow events occurred in 2003 and in 2004. Water-quality samples were analyzed for nutrients, sediments, metals, major ions, pesticides, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, and explosives. Results indicated no exceedances for any constituent (except iron) above the primary and secondary drinking-water standards or health-advisory levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Iron concentrations were naturally elevated in the groundwater within the watershed because of bedrock lithology. The majority of the constituents were at or below the method detection limit. Sediment loads were dominated by precipitation due to the remnants of Hurricane Ivan in September 2004. More than 60 percent of the sediment load measured during the entire study was transported past the streamgage in just 2 days during that event. Habitat and aquatic-invertebrate data were collected in the summers of 2002-05, and fish data were collected in 2004. Although 2002 was a drought year, 2003-05 were above-normal flow years. Results indicated a wide diversity in invertebrates, good numbers of taxa (distinct organisms), and on the basis of a combination of metrics, the majority of the 27 sites indicated no or slight impairment. Fish-metric data from 25 sites indicated results similar to the invertebrate data. Stream classification based on evolution of the stream channels indicates about 94 percent of the channels were considered to be in equilibrium (type B or C channels), neither aggrading nor eroding. A regional, uncalibrated groundwater-flow model indicated the surface-water and groundwater-flow divides coincided. Because of folding of rock layers, groundwater was under confined conditions and nearly all the water leaves the facility via the streams.

Langland, Michael J.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Chichester, Douglas C.; Bilger, Michael D.; Brightbill, Robin A.

2010-01-01

102

New Guard: A Service-Equivalent Force.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This thesis proposes that the National Guard is a service-equivalent force that requires expanded authorities to develop capabilities for its dual- role mission. The paper provides an in-depth analysis of the historical role of the colonial militia and it...

J. E. Scalf

2012-01-01

103

ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: Dispensing and administration—2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of the 2002 ASHP nation- al survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings that pertain to dispensing and ad- ministration are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1101 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. SMG Market- ing Group, Inc., supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn

CRAIG A. PEDERSEN; PHILIP J. SCHNEIDER; DOUGLAS J. SCHECKELHOFF

104

Hospitalized Younger: A Comparison of a National Sample of Homeless and Housed Inpatient Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Homelessness is associated with high rates of hospitalizations and age-adjusted mortality. Few studies have examined whether homeless people are admitted to the hospital at an earlier age than the general population or for different diagnoses. Methods. We compared the age at admission and the primary discharge diagnoses in a national sample of 43,868 hospitalized veterans. Results. The difference in

Jennifer Adams; Robert. Rosenheck; Lauren. Gee; Catherine L. Seibyl; Margot. Kushel

2007-01-01

105

Adhesive Guard Hair Removal.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Long hairs of fur pelts known as guard hairs are removed to reveal soft underfur by contacting the pelt with a substrate coated with adhesive and then pulling the substrate away from the pelt. Recoverable or nonrecoverable adhesive systems may be used.

H. E. Hull

1976-01-01

106

Coast Guard Firefighting Module  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA and the U.S. Coast Guard are jointly developing a lightweight, helicopter-transportable, completely self-contained firefighting module for combating shipboard and dockside fires. The project draws upon NASA technology in high-capacity rocket engine pumps, lightweight materials and compact packaging.

1977-01-01

107

Improved table-saw guard  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Guard makes lighter contact on materials being sawed. Cuts are better controlled, and damages to fragile foam-type materials are reduced. Overhead support makes it possible to perform slot and step cuts, and thick materials are pushed under guard with less force. Guard is transparent plastic enclosure held by side-attached overhead support arm.

Dunn, B. R.; Zebus, P. P.

1980-01-01

108

Correlates of In-Hospital Deaths among Hospitalizations with Pulmonary Embolism: Findings from the 2001-2008 National Hospital Discharge Survey  

PubMed Central

Background Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE) are responsible for substantial mortality, morbidity, and impaired health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlates of in-hospital deaths among hospitalizations with a diagnosis of PE in the United States. Methods By using data from the 2001?2008 National Hospital Discharge Survey, we assessed the correlates of in-hospital deaths among 14,721 hospitalizations with a diagnosis of PE and among subgroups stratified by age, sex, race, days of hospital stay, type of admission, cancer, pneumonia, and fractures. We produced adjusted rate ratios (aRR) and 95% confidence intervals using log-linear multivariate regression models. Results Regardless of the listing position of diagnostic codes, we observed an increased likelihood of in-hospital death in subgroups of hospitalizations with ages 50 years and older (aRR?=?1.82?8.48), less than 7 days of hospital stay (aRR?=?1.43?1.57), cancer (aRR?=?2.10?2.28), pneumonia (aRR?=?1.79?2.20), or fractures (aRR?=?2.18) (except for first-listed PE), when compared to the reference groups with ages 1?49 years, 7 days or more of hospital stay, without cancer, pneumonia, or fractures while adjusting for covariates. In addition, we observed an increased likelihood of in-hospital death for first-listed PE in hospitalizations of women, when compared to those of men (aRR?=?1.45). Conclusions The results of this study provide support for identifying, developing, and implementing effective, evidence-based clinical assessment and management strategies to reduce PE-related morbidity and mortality among hospitalized PE patients who may have concurrent health conditions including cancer, pneumonia, and fractures.

Tsai, James; Grosse, Scott D.; Grant, Althea M.; Reyes, Nimia L.; Hooper, W. Craig; Atrash, Hani K.

2012-01-01

109

Performance Analysis of Hospital Information System of the National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study evaluated the qualitative and quantitative performances of the newly developed information system which was implemented on November 4, 2011 at the National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital. Methods Registration waiting time and changes in the satisfaction scores for the key performance indicators (KPI) before and after the introduction of the system were compared; and the economic effects of the system were analyzed by using the information economics approach. Results After the introduction of the system, the waiting time for registration was reduced by 20%, and the waiting time at the internal medicine department was reduced by 15%. The benefit-to-cost ratio was increased to 1.34 when all intangible benefits were included in the economic analysis. Conclusions The economic impact and target satisfaction rates increased due to the introduction of the new system. The results were proven by the quantitative and qualitative analyses carried out in this study. This study was conducted only seven months after the introduction of the system. As such, a follow-up study should be carried out in the future when the system stabilizes.

Han, Jung Mi; Boo, Eun Hee; Kim, Jung A; Yoon, Soo Jin; Kim, Seong Woo

2012-01-01

110

Laser beam guard clamps  

DOEpatents

A quick insert and release laser beam guard panel clamping apparatus having a base plate mountable on an optical table, a first jaw affixed to the base plate, and a spring-loaded second jaw slidably carried by the base plate to exert a clamping force. The first and second jaws each having a face acutely angled relative to the other face to form a V-shaped, open channel mouth, which enables wedge-action jaw separation by and subsequent clamping of a laser beam guard panel inserted through the open channel mouth. Preferably, the clamping apparatus also includes a support structure having an open slot aperture which is positioned over and parallel with the open channel mouth.

Dickson, Richard K. (Stockton, CA) [Stockton, CA

2010-09-07

111

Hydrogeologic framework and water quality of the Vermont Army National Guard Ethan Allen Firing Range, northern Vermont, October 2002 through December 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ethan Allen Firing Range of the Vermont Army National Guard is a weapons-testing and training facility in a mountainous region of Vermont that has been in operation for about 80 years. The hydrologic framework and water quality of the facility were assessed between October 2002 and December 2003. As part of the study, streamflow was continuously measured in the Lee River and 24 observation wells were installed at 19 locations in the stratified drift and bedrock aquifers to examine the hydrogeology. Chemical analyses of surface water, ground water, streambed sediment, and fish tissue were collected to assess major ions, trace elements, nutrients, and volatile and semivolatile compounds. Sampling included 5 surface-water sites sampled during moderate and low-flow conditions; streambed-sediment samples collected at the 5 surface-water sites; fish-tissue samples collected at 3 of the 5 surface-water sites; macroinvertebrates collected at 4 of the 5 surface-water sites; and ground-water samples collected from 10 observation wells, and samples collected at all surface- and ground-water sites. The hydrogeologic framework at the Ethan Allen Firing Range is dominated by the upland mountain and valley setting of the site. Bedrock wells yield low to moderate amounts of water (0 to 23 liters per minute). In the narrow river valleys, layered stratified-drift deposits of sand and gravel of up to 18 meters thick fill the Lee River and Mill Brook Valleys. In these deposits, the water table is generally within 3 meters below the land surface and overall ground-water flow is from east to west. Streamflow in the Lee River averaged 0.72 cubic meters per second (25.4 cubic feet per second) between December 2002 and December 2003. Streams are highly responsive to precipitation events in this mountainous environment and a comparison with other nearby watersheds shows that Lee River maintains relatively high streamflow during dry periods. Concentrations of trace elements and nutrients in surface-water samples are well below freshwater-quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Brook-trout samples collected in 1992 and 2003 show trace-metal concentrations have decreased over the past 11 years. concentrations in water samples are well below levels that restrict swimming at all five stream sites at moderate and low-flow conditions and in all observation wells. Comparisons among surface-water, streambed-sediment, and biological samples collected in 2003 to earlier studies at the Ethan Allen Firing Range indicate water-quality conditions are similar or have improved over the past 15 years. Ground water in the stratified-drift aquifers at the facility is well buffered with relatively high alkalinities and pH greater than 6. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, uranium, and zinc were below detection levels in ground-water samples. Barium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, and strontium were the only trace elements detected in ground-water samples. Cobalt and iron were detected at low levels in two wells near Mill Brook, and copper was detected at the detection limit in one of these wells. These same two wells had concentrations of barium and manganese 2 to 10 times greater than other ground-water samples. Concentrations of nutrients are at or below detection levels in most ground-water samples. Volatile organic compounds and semivolatile organic compounds were not detected in any water samples from the Ethan Allen Firing Range.

Clark, Stewart F., Jr.; Chalmers, Ann; Mack, Thomas J.; Denner, Jon C.

2005-01-01

112

Building an FTP guard  

SciTech Connect

Classified designs usually include lesser classified (including unclassified) components. An engineer working on such a design needs access to the various sub-designs at lower classification levels. For simplicity, the problem is presented with only two levels: high and low. If the low-classification component designs are stored in the high network, they become inaccessible to persons working on a low network. In order to keep the networks separate, the component designs may be duplicated in all networks, resulting in a synchronization problem. Alternatively, they may be stored in the low network and brought into the high network when needed. The latter solution results in the use of sneaker-net (copying the files from the low system to a tape and carrying the tape to a high system) or a file transfer guard. This paper shows how an FTP Guard was constructed and implemented without degrading the security of the underlying B3 platform. The paper then shows how the guard can be extended to an FTP proxy server or an HTTP proxy server. The extension is accomplished by allowing the high-side user to select among items that already exist on the low-side. No high-side data can be directly compromised by the extension, but a mechanism must be developed to handle the low-bandwidth covert channel that would be introduced by the application.

Sands, P.D.

1998-08-01

113

Safety net hospital performance on national quality of care process measures.  

PubMed

Several studies have found poor or mixed performance by safety net hospitals on national measures of quality. The study's purposes were to determine whether safety net hospital performance is similar to the average U.S. hospital, both currently and during earlier reporting periods, and to summarize features commonly used to assess performance, including definition of safety net and patient characteristics. This study reviewed quality performance data for the Joint Commission's accountability measures for hospitals that are members of the National Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems (NAPH)-safety net hospitals that serve a large proportion of Medicaid and uninsured patients. Analyses of quality performance on the earliest data show that on average there was no statistically significant difference in performance between NAPH members and other hospitals on 6 of 15 measures. According to the most recent data, NAPH hospitals on average had no statistically significant differences as other hospitals on 13 of 18 measures and had statistically significantly better scores on two measures. These results are an important addition to the literature regarding safety net hospitals that serve a high proportion of Medicaid, low income, and uninsured patients, and support the case that quality of care at safety net hospitals is equivalent to that of non-safety net hospitals. PMID:22192517

Marshall, Lindsey; Harbin, Vanessa; Hooker, Jane; Oswald, John; Cummings, Linda

2012-01-01

114

[Establishment of national naval hospitals in the XVIII century].  

PubMed

The first naval hospitals were established in St. Petersburg, Revel and Kronstadt, Kazan, Revel, Astrakhan and Archangel. The question when the first hospitals were opened is still controversial because of the lack of many documents of those years. Researchers disagree, probably because of the fact that they take into account different timeframes for the project of a hospital corps. Regardless of whether you will find unequivocal, direct evidence for their discoveries in a given year, the value of the old hospital as medical institutions will not change. Much more important is the fact of their education because of intense activity of the domestic fleet. In the creation of naval hospitals as in anything else to take care of the state of preservation, strengthening and restoring the health of personnel, of which largely depended on the readiness of the fleet. PMID:22329177

Kostiukov, A V

2011-11-01

115

Trends in hospital admissions for adverse drug reactions in England: analysis of national hospital episode statistics 1998-2005  

PubMed Central

Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a frequent cause of mortality and morbidity to patients worldwide, with great associated costs to the healthcare providers including the NHS in England. We examined trends in hospital admissions associated with adverse drug reaction in English hospitals and the accuracy of national reporting. Methods Data from the Hospital Episode Statistics database (collected by the Department of Health) was obtained and analysed for all English hospital episodes (1998–2005) using ICD-10 codes with a primary (codes including the words ('drug-induced' or 'due to') or secondary diagnosis of ADR (Y40–59). More detailed analysis was performed for the year 2004–2005 Results Between 1998 and 2005 there were 447 071 ADRs representing 0.50% of total hospital episodes and over this period the number of ADRs increased by 45%. All ADRs with an external code increased over this period. In 2005 the total number of episodes (all age groups) was 13,706,765 of which 76,692 (0.56%) were drug related. Systemic agents, which include anti-neoplastic drugs, were the most implicated class (15.7%), followed by analgesics (11.7%) and cardiovascular drugs (10.1%). There has been a 6 fold increase in nephropathy secondary to drugs and a 65% decline in drug induced extra-pyramidal side effects. 59% of cases involving adverse drug reactions involved patients above 60 years of age. Conclusion ADRs have major public health and economic implications. Our data suggest that national Hospital Episode Statistics in England have recognised limitations and that consequently, admissions associated with adverse drug reactions continue to be under-recorded. External causes of ADR have increased at a greater rate than the increase in total hospital admissions. Improved and more detailed reporting combined with educational interventions to improve the recording of ADRs are needed to accurately monitor the morbidity caused by ADRs and to meaningfully evaluate national initiatives to reduce adverse drug reactions.

Patel, Hitesh; Bell, Derek; Molokhia, Mariam; Srishanmuganathan, Janakan; Patel, Mitesh; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem

2007-01-01

116

National perspective on in-hospital emergency units in Iraq  

PubMed Central

Background: Hospitals play a crucial role in providing communities with essential medical care during times of disasters. The emergency department is the most vital component of hospitals' inpatient business. In Iraq, at present, there are many casualties that cause a burden of work and the need for structural assessment, equipment updating and evaluation of process. Objective: To examine the current pragmatic functioning of the existing set-up of services of in-hospital emergency departments within some general hospitals in Baghdad and Mosul in order to establish a mechanism for future evaluation for the health services in our community. Methods: A cross-sectional study was employed to evaluate the structure, process and function of six major hospitals with emergency units: four major hospitals in Baghdad and two in Mosul. Results: The six surveyed emergency units are distinct units within general hospitals that serve (collectively) one quarter of the total population. More than one third of these units feature observation unit beds, laboratory services, imaging facilities, pharmacies with safe storage, and ambulatory entrance. Operation room was found only in one hospital's reception and waiting area. Consultation/track area, cubicles for infection control, and discrete tutorial rooms were not available. Patient assessment was performed (although without adequate privacy). The emergency specialist, family medicine specialist and interested general practitioner exist in one-third of the surveyed units. Psychiatrist, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and social work links are not available. The shortage in medication, urgent vaccines and vital facilities is an obvious problem. Conclusions: Our emergency unit's level and standards of care are underdeveloped. The inconsistent process and inappropriate environments need to be reconstructed. The lack of drugs, commodities, communication infrastructure, audit and training all require effective build up.

Lafta, Riyadh K.; Al-Nuaimi, Maha A.

2013-01-01

117

Record retention practices among the nation's "most wired" hospitals.  

PubMed

This exploratory study examined health record retention practices among health information management professionals in acute care general hospitals in the United States. A descriptive research design was used, and data were collected using a self-reporting survey. Respondents answered questions about record retention policies, the responsibility of health information professionals in policy administration, record retention periods, factors that determine retention periods, and other information about health record retention practices. PMID:18563205

Rinehart-Thompson, Laurie A

2008-01-01

118

National Survey of Children's Hospitals on Legacy-Making Activities  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective Many hospitals offer legacy-building activities for children with serious illnesses or their family members, yet legacy-making has received little empirical attention. This descriptive cross-sectional study examined healthcare provider perceptions of legacy-making activities (e.g., memory books) currently offered by hospitals to pediatric patients and their families. Methods Healthcare providers in seventy-seven (100%) teaching children's hospitals across the United States completed an electronic survey. Results Nearly all providers surveyed reported offering legacy-making activities to ill children and their families, with patients and families usually completing the activity together. Most activities were offered before a patient died and when cure is no longer being sought. Perceived outcomes included benefit to bereaved families and a tangible memento of their deceased child. Conclusion Legacy-making may enhance life and decrease suffering for dying children and their families. Healthcare professionals can facilitate opportunities for children and their families to build legacies. Additional research is needed to examine activities across different age groups and conditions, the best time to offer such activities, and associations with positive and negative outcomes for ill children, their family members, and the bereaved.

Dietrich, Mary S.; Friedman, Debra L.; Gordon, Jessie E.; Gilmer, Mary J.

2012-01-01

119

Organizational and market factors associated with leadership development programs in hospitals: a national study.  

PubMed

Effective leadership in hospitals is widely recognized as the key to organizational performance. Clinical, financial, and operational performance is increasingly being linked to the leadership practices of hospital managers. Moreover, effective leadership has been described as a means to achieve competitive advantage. Recent environmental forces, including reimbursement changes and increased competition, have prompted many hospitals to focus on building leadership competencies to successfully address these challenges. Using the resource dependence theory as our conceptual framework, we present results from a national study of hospitals examining the association of organizational and market factors with the provision of leadership development program activities, including the presence of a leadership development program, a diversity plan, a program for succession planning, and career development resources. The data are taken from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) 2008 Survey of Hospitals, the Area Resource File, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The results of multilevel logistic regressions of each leadership development program activity on organizational and market factors indicate that hospital size, system and network affiliation, and accreditation are significantly and positively associated with all leadership development program activities. The market factors significantly associated with all leadership development activities include a positive odds ratio for metropolitan statistical area location and a negative odds ratio for the percentage of the hospital's service area population that is female and minority. For-profit hospitals are less likely to provide leadership development program activities. Additional findings are presented, and the implications for hospital management are discussed. PMID:22530292

Kim, Tae Hyun; Thompson, Jon M

2012-01-01

120

Adverse Events in Hospitals: National Incidence Among Medicare Beneficiaries.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We selected a nationally representative random sample of 780 Medicare beneficiaries from all beneficiaries discharged during October 2008. Physician reviewers determined (1) whether an adverse event occurred, (2) whether the event was on the NQF list of S...

2010-01-01

121

Happy crisis tests hospitals' PR plan. Septuplets' arrival swamps Iowa hospitals with national, international media. Blank Children's Hospital, Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Des Moines.  

PubMed

The public relations staff believed the birth of healthy septuplets would become a human interest story for local media. But the staff was stunned at the outpouring of international and national media knocking at their front doors. The staff of both Iowa Methodist Medical Center and Blank Children's Hospital in Des Moines, Iowa, organized a communications plan for 14 official press conferences, constant updates to the media and a website to handle ongoing inquiries from the public. As a result, the story of the McCaughey septuplets was shown in more than 10,000 television stories around the world. The hospitals received more than 36,000 magazine and newspaper articles. The public relations staff not only fielded more than 2,000 phone calls in the days following the Nov. 19 birth, but more than 15 major networks parked their vehicles and satellite dishes in front of the hospital. PMID:10177636

1998-01-01

122

Extent and consequences of misclassified injury diagnoses in a national hospital discharge registry  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundClassification of injuries and estimation of injury severity on the basis of ICD-10 injury coding are powerful epidemiological tools. Little is known about the characteristics and consequences of primary coding errors and their consequences for such applications.Materials and methodsFrom the Swedish national hospital discharge register, 15 899 incident injury cases primarily admitted to the two hospitals in Uppsala County between

Monica Frick Bergström; Liisa Byberg; Håkan Melhus; Karl Michaelsson; Rolf Gedeborg

2010-01-01

123

Motor vehicle injuries in childhood: a hospital-based study in Saudi Arabia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motor vehicles are a major cause of injury-related deaths in children and may also result in temporary or permanent disability. A retrospective analysis of the medical charts of children aged 12 years and younger, who were involved in motor vehicle injuries during a 10-year period, was undertaken. All children who were admitted and treated at King Fahad National Guard Hospital, Riyadh

2006-01-01

124

A nationally representative survey of hospital malnutrition: the Italian PIMAI (Project: Iatrogenic MAlnutrition in Italy) study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hospital malnutrition is high in every country it was investigated, but no nationally representative prevalence study, considering\\u000a potential geographical interfering factors, has yet been performed. We designed a multidisciplinary, cross-sectional, nation-wide\\u000a survey: the PIMAI study (Project: Iatrogenic MAlnutrition in Italy). Adult (>18 years old) patient inclusion was managed on\\u000a a four-strata randomisation model according to sex and age (<65 and

Lucio Lucchin; Amleto D’Amicis; Maria Gabriella Gentile; Nino Carlo Battistini; Maria Antonia Fusco; Augusta Palmo; Maurizio Muscaritoli; Franco Contaldo; Emanuele Cereda

2009-01-01

125

Smoking prevalence of female nurses in the national hospitals of Japan  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To estimate the prevalence of smoking and the attitudes towards the restriction of smoking at work among female nurses in the national hospitals in Japan.?DESIGN—Questionnaires mailed to 14 randomly selected national hospitals and sanitariums in Japan in 1993.?SUBJECTS—2207 female nurses.?MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Smoking status and history, and attitudes towards the restriction of smoking at work.?RESULTS—The prevalence of smoking among female nurses was 18.6%, which was higher than the age-adjusted prevalence of the general female population using this study's subjects as a standardised population. Banning smoking in the hospital in which they worked was supported by 15.0%, whereas 81.6% supported the restriction of smoking.?CONCLUSIONS—The results showed that smoking is more common among female nurses than among the general female adult population. The survey suggested that nurses favour restriction, but not banning, of smoking.???Keywords: smoking prevalence; nurses; Japan

Ohida, T.; Osaki, Y.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sekiyama, M.; Minowa, M.

1999-01-01

126

Improving Service Quality in Long-term Care Hospitals: National Evaluation on Long-term Care Hospitals and Employees Perception of Quality Dimensions  

PubMed Central

Objectives To investigate predictors for specific dimensions of service quality perceived by hospital employees in long-term care hospitals. Methods Data collected from a survey of 298 hospital employees in 18 long-term care hospitals were analysed. Multivariate ordinary least squares regression analysis with hospital fixed effects was used to determine the predictors of service quality using respondents’ and organizational characteristics. Results The most significant predictors of employee-perceived service quality were job satisfaction and degree of consent on national evaluation criteria. National evaluation results on long-term care hospitals and work environment also had positive effects on service quality. Conclusion The findings of the study show that organizational characteristics are significant determinants of service quality in long-term care hospitals. Assessment of the extent to which hospitals address factors related to employeeperceived quality of services could be the first step in quality improvement activities. Results have implications for efforts to improve service quality in longterm care hospitals and designing more comprehensive national evaluation criteria.

Kim, Jinkyung; Han, Woosok

2012-01-01

127

A&M. Guard house (TAN638), contextual view. Built in 1968. Camera ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A&M. Guard house (TAN-638), contextual view. Built in 1968. Camera faces south. Guard house controlled access to radioactive waste storage tanks beyond and to left of view. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-4-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

128

Coast Guard: Observations on the Preparation, Response, and Recovery Missions Related to Hurricane Katrina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hurricane Katrina was one of the largest natural disasters in our nation's history. Significant federal, state, and local resources were mobilized to respond to the Hurricane Katrina disaster, including those of the U.S. Coast Guard. The Coast Guard playe...

2006-01-01

129

Incidence Rate of Needlestick and Sharps Injuries in 67 Japanese Hospitals: A National Surveillance Study  

PubMed Central

Background Determining incidence rates of needlestick and sharps injuries (NSIs) using data from multiple hospitals may help hospitals to compare their in-house data with national averages and thereby institute relevant measures to minimize NSIs. We aimed to determine the incidence rate of NSIs using the nationwide EPINet surveillance system. Methodology/Principal Findings Data were analyzed from 5,463 cases collected between April 2009 and March 2011 from 67 Japanese HIV/AIDS referral hospitals that participated in EPINet-Japan. The NSI incidence rate was calculated as the annual number of cases with NSIs per 100 occupied beds, according to the demographic characteristics of the injured person, place, timing, device, and the patients’ infectious status. The NSI incidence rates according to hospital size were analyzed by a non-parametric test of trend. The mean number of cases with NSIs per 100 occupied beds per year was 4.8 (95% confidence interval, 4.1–5.6) for 25 hospitals with 399 or fewer beds, 6.7 (5.9–7.4) for 24 hospitals with 400–799 beds, and 7.6 (6.7–8.5) for 18 hospitals with 800 or more beds (p-trend<0.01). NSIs frequently occurred in health care workers in their 20 s; the NSI incidence rate for this age group was 2.1 (1.6–2.5) for hospitals having 399 or fewer beds, 3.5 (3.0–4.1) for hospitals with 400–799 beds, and 4.5 (3.9–5.0) for hospitals with 800 or more beds (p-trend<0.01). Conclusions/Significance The incidence rate of NSIs tended to be higher for larger hospitals and in workers aged less than 40 years; injury occurrence was more likely to occur in places such as patient rooms and operating rooms. Application of the NSI incidence rates by hospital size, as a benchmark, could allow individual hospitals to compare their NSI incidence rates with those of other institutions, which could facilitate the development of adequate control strategies.

Yoshikawa, Toru; Wada, Koji; Lee, Jong Ja; Mitsuda, Toshihiro; Kidouchi, Kiyoshi; Kurosu, Hitomi; Morisawa, Yuji; Aminaka, Mayumi; Okubo, Takashi; Kimura, Satoshi; Moriya, Kyoji

2013-01-01

130

[Problems in career planning for novice medical technologists in Japanese national hospitals].  

PubMed

Skills and knowledge regarding many different types of test are required for medical technologists (MTs) to provide accurate information to help doctors and other medical specialists. In order to become an efficient MT, specialized training programs are required. Certification in specialized areas of clinical laboratory sciences or a doctoral degree in medical sciences may help MTs to realize career advancement, a higher earning potential, and expand the options in their career. However, most young MTs in national university hospitals are employed as part-time workers on a three-year contract, which is too short to obtain certifications or a doctoral degree. We have to leave the hospital without expanding our future. We need to take control of our own development in order to enhance our employability within the period. As teaching and training hospitals, national university hospitals in Japan are facing a difficult dilemma in nurturing MTs. I hope, as a novice medical technologist, that at least university hospitals in Japan create an appropriate workplace environment for novice MTs. PMID:23427696

Ogasawara, Shu; Tsutaya, Shoji; Akimoto, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Keiya; Yabaka, Hiroyuki

2012-12-01

131

Strategies for Improving the Data Quality in National Hospital Discharge Data System: a Delphi Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction: National hospital discharge data system can play a critical role in community health assessment, disease surveillance, strategic planning, policymaking, service quality control, and research. Moreover, the quality of hospital discharge data affects the usefulness of the data and is one of the prerequisites for effective utilization of the data. Thus, the present study aimed to identify the necessary actions for improving the data quality in the national hospital discharge data system and present a model for Iran based on the experiences of England, Canada, and New Zealand. Methods: In doing so, the measures performed in these countries were investigated. The related data were organized in six categories of standards and procedures, training and coordination with the users, assurance from the capability of the system’s software, data modification, data quality control, and documentation and reporting the data quality. According to the gathered data, the primary model was designed. Then, the model was assessed using a two-round Delphi technique by 33 and 31 experts, respectively. Conclusion: According to the findings, a model was presented in order to improve the data quality of Iran’s national hospital discharge data system.

Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, Zahra; Ahmadi, Maryam

2013-01-01

132

An international survey of physicians regarding clinical trials: a comparison between Kyoto University Hospital and Seoul National University Hospital  

PubMed Central

Background International clinical trials are now rapidly expanding into Asia. However, the proportion of global trials is higher in South Korea compared to Japan despite implementation of similar governmental support in both countries. The difference in clinical trial environment might influence the respective physicians’ attitudes and experience towards clinical trials. Therefore, we designed a questionnaire to explore how physicians conceive the issues surrounding clinical trials in both countries. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted at Kyoto University Hospital (KUHP) and Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH) in 2008. The questionnaire consisted of 15 questions and 2 open-ended questions on broad key issues relating to clinical trials. Results The number of responders was 301 at KUHP and 398 at SNUH. Doctors with trial experience were 196 at KUHP and 150 at SNUH. Among them, 12% (24/196) at KUHP and 41% (61/150) at SUNH had global trial experience. Most respondents at both institutions viewed clinical trials favorably and thought that conducting clinical trials contributed to medical advances, which would ultimately lead to new and better treatments. The main reason raised as a hindrance to conducting clinical trials was the lack of personnel support and time. Doctors at both university hospitals thought that more clinical research coordinators were required to conduct clinical trials more efficiently. KUHP doctors were driven mainly by pure academic interest or for their desire to find new treatments, while obtaining credits for board certification and co-authorship on manuscripts also served as motivation factors for doctors at SNUH. Conclusions Our results revealed that there might be two different approaches to increase clinical trial activity. One is a social level approach to establish clinical trial infrastructure providing sufficient clinical research professionals. The other is an individual level approach that would provide incentives to encourage doctors to participate in and conduct clinical trials.

2013-01-01

133

The Place of the Hospital Library Consortium in the National Biomedical Communications Network *  

PubMed Central

The National Library of Medicine has issued a policy statement outlining expectations of more self-sufficiency at the Basic Unit level than was required during earlier programs under the Medical Library Assistance Act. A consortium of hospital libraries is presented as one viable alternative for meeting NLM's expectations that hospital libraries serve the primary and most immediate information needs of their own constituencies. The Biomedical Communications Network is reviewed so that hospital administrators and librarians will have a more thorough understanding of the system which they should now enter as contributors rather than as recipients only. A Network configuration illustrating the interaction of Basic Units functioning in consortia relationships is presented, and general areas for sharing are discussed.

Fink, Wendy Ratcliff; Bloomquist, Harold; Allen, Richard G.

1974-01-01

134

A national survey of inpatient medication systems in English NHS hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background Systems and processes for prescribing, supplying and administering inpatient medications can have substantial impact on medication administration errors (MAEs). However, little is known about the medication systems and processes currently used within the English National Health Service (NHS). This presents a challenge for developing NHS-wide interventions to increase medication safety. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional postal census of medication systems and processes in English NHS hospitals to address this knowledge gap. Methods The chief pharmacist at each of all 165 acute NHS trusts was invited to complete a questionnaire for medical and surgical wards in their main hospital (July 2011). We report here the findings relating to medication systems and processes, based on 18 closed questions plus one open question about local medication safety initiatives. Non-respondents were posted another questionnaire (August 2011), and then emailed (October 2011). Results One hundred (61% of NHS trusts) questionnaires were returned. Most hospitals used paper-based prescribing on the majority of medical and surgical inpatient wards (87% of hospitals), patient bedside medication lockers (92%), patients’ own drugs (89%) and ‘one-stop dispensing’ medication labelled with administration instructions for use at discharge as well as during the inpatient stay (85%). Less prevalent were the use of ward pharmacy technicians (62% of hospitals) or pharmacists (58%) to order medications on the majority of wards. Only 65% of hospitals used drug trolleys; 50% used patient-specific inpatient supplies on the majority of wards. Only one hospital had a pharmacy open 24 hours, but all had access to an on-call pharmacist. None reported use of unit-dose dispensing; 7% used an electronic drug cabinet in some ward areas. Overall, 85% of hospitals had a double-checking policy for intravenous medication and 58% for other specified drugs. “Do not disturb” tabards/overalls were routinely used during nurses’ drug rounds on at least one ward in 59% of hospitals. Conclusions Inter- and intra-hospital variations in medication systems and processes exist, even within the English NHS; future research should focus on investigating their potential effects on nurses’ workflow and MAEs, and developing NHS-wide interventions to reduce MAEs.

2014-01-01

135

A&M. Guard house (TAN638). Interior, partitioned area in front of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A&M. Guard house (TAN-638). Interior, partitioned area in front of view is toilet enclosure. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-7-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

136

A&M. Guard house (TAN638). Detail of window grill on front ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A&M. Guard house (TAN-638). Detail of window grill on front door (west facade). Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-6-4 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

137

A&M. Guard house (TAN638), contextual view with camera facing northeast ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A&M. Guard house (TAN-638), contextual view with camera facing northeast towards TAN-607. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-4-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

138

A&M. Guard house (TAN638). Interior detail of corner and windows. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A&M. Guard house (TAN-638). Interior detail of corner and windows. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-7-3 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

139

A&M. Guard house (TAN638). Oblique view of east and south ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A&M. Guard house (TAN-638). Oblique view of east and south facades. Camera facing northerly. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-4-4 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

140

A&M. Guard house (TAN638). Interior detail turnstile and view to ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A&M. Guard house (TAN-638). Interior detail turnstile and view to door. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-7-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

141

US Coast Guard Marine Safety Laboratory. Sample Handling and Transmittal Guide, Sixth Edition.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Marine Safety Laboratory (MSL), under the auspices of the National Maritime Center, is the Coast Guards forensic laboratory for oil pollution. Samples collected by field units are analyzed at MSL to determine if a relationship exists between the spill...

2002-01-01

142

IET. Exclusion guard house, 71.8% complete. Camera facing northerly. Pumice ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

IET. Exclusion guard house, 71.8% complete. Camera facing northerly. Pumice block walls, canopy over concrete slabs. Date: October 20, 1954. INEEL negative no. 12541 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

143

Coast Guard: Station Readiness Improving, but Resource Challenges and Management Concerns Remain.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For years, the Coast Guard has conducted search and rescue operations from its network of stations along the nations coasts and waterways. In 2001, reviews of station operations found that station readiness the ability to execute mission requirements in k...

2005-01-01

144

Criminal Manifestations of Dementia Patients: Report from the National Forensic Hospital  

PubMed Central

Background/Aims Some dementia patients have profound behavioral and psychological symptoms which might cause legal violation. We illustrate clinical and criminal characteristics of dementia patients who had been incarcerated because of criminal activity. Methods The National Forensic Hospital is the only hospital-based correctional facility in the Republic of Korea which incarcerates criminals with psychiatric or neurological disease. Between May 2008 and April 2009, those patients who had been diagnosed with dementia in the National Forensic Hospital were included in the study. We reviewed their medical and legal reports. Results There were 7 dementia patients out of 752 patients, including 2 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, 1 vascular dementia patient, and 4 patients with alcohol-related dementia. Criminal behavior included simple larceny by the 2 AD patients, and multiple violent crimes in a drunken state by the other 5 patients. Conclusions This study reported diverse criminal behaviors among dementia patients. Inebriation may be related to violent criminal behavior among some dementia patients.

Kim, Jeong-Min; Chu, Kon; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Choi, Sang-Sub; Lee, Sang Kun

2011-01-01

145

Surgical treatment of ovarian cancer in different hospital categories – A prospective nation-wide study in Finland  

Microsoft Academic Search

This prospective nation-wide study was performed to evaluate the effect of hospital category and subspeciality training on surgical treatment of ovarian cancer. Data were obtained from a questionnaire filled in by the operating unit, and from the surgical and histopathology reports. The survey included 307 patients. Half of them were operated in the university hospitals where gynaecologic oncologists performed 72%

Salla Kumpulainen; Tapio Kuoppala; Arto Leminen; Jorma Penttinen; Ulla Puistola; Eero Pukkala; Risto Sankila; Juha Mäkinen; Seija Grénman

2006-01-01

146

Armor and Cavalry National Guard Training Constraints.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the conduct and results of part of a project to develop training plans for Armor and Cavalry Reserve Components which use the M48A5 tank. The purpose of the present report is work to identify the constraints that might affect designi...

R. E. O'Brien J. P. Ford J. A. Boldovici

1977-01-01

147

Analysis of emergency department visits for palpitations (from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey).  

PubMed

Palpitations is a common complaint in patients who visit the emergency department (ED), with causes ranging from benign to life threatening. We analyzed the ED component of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 2001 through 2010 for visits with a chief complaint of palpitations and calculated nationally representative weighted estimates for prevalence, demographic characteristics, and admission rates. ED and hospital discharge diagnoses were tabulated and categorized, and recursive partitioning was used to identify factors associated with admission. An estimated 684,000 visits had a primary reason for visit of "palpitations" representing a national prevalence of 5.8 per 1,000 ED visits (0.58%, 95% confidence interval 0.52 to 0.64). Women and non-Hispanic whites were responsible for most visits. A cardiac diagnosis made up 34% of all ED diagnoses. The overall admission rate was 24.6% (95% confidence interval 21.2 to 28.1), with higher rates seen in the Midwest and Northeast compared with the West. Survey-weighted recursive partitioning revealed several factors associated with admission including age >50 years, male gender, cardiac ED diagnosis, tachycardia, hypertension, and Medicare insurance. In conclusion, palpitations are responsible for a significant minority of ED visits and are associated with a cardiac diagnosis roughly 1/3 of the time. This was associated with a relatively high admission rate, although significant regional variation in these rates exists. PMID:24698469

Probst, Marc A; Mower, William R; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Hoffman, Jerome R; Buch, Eric F; Sun, Benjamin C

2014-05-15

148

The 2007 Belgian national prevalence survey for hospital-acquired infections.  

PubMed

Despite ongoing targeted surveillance efforts, no overall in-hospital prevalence data for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) have been published for Belgium. Sixty-three Belgian acute hospitals participated in a point-prevalence study among either all patients admitted in their institution or 50% of the patients in each ward. HAIs were registered bed-site at a single day per ward during the period October-November 2007. The diagnosis was made according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria implemented in a custom-made rule-based software expert system available on a portable computer. The total number of patients surveyed nationally was 17 343, from 543 distinct hospital wards. The overall prevalence of HAIs was 7.1% (95% confidence interval: 6.7-7.4%); 6.2% (5.9-6.5%) of the patients suffered from at least one HAI. Prevalence of HAIs on adult intensive care was 31.3%. The major proportion of HAIs was observed among patients admitted on non-intensive care unit (non-ICU) wards, mainly on the wards of internal medicine, surgery, geriatrics and rehabilitation. Urinary tract infections were the most common type of HAI at geriatric and rehabilitation wards. This study demonstrates that the use of a portable computer system with a designated expert system for diagnosing HAIs according to the CDC criteria in a large point prevalence study is feasible and may reduce the within-subject variation. In Belgium, the prevalence of HAIs in acute hospitals thus identified is similar to that of neighbouring countries. As more than 80% of all HAIs occur on non-ICU wards, preventive efforts need to extend beyond the ICU. PMID:20381904

Gordts, B; Vrijens, F; Hulstaert, F; Devriese, S; Van de Sande, S

2010-07-01

149

Emergency department physician training in Jamaica: a national public hospital survey  

PubMed Central

Background Emergency Department (ED) medical officers are often the first medical responders to emergencies in Jamaica because pre-hospital emergency response services are not universally available. Over the past decade, several new ED training opportunities have been introduced locally. Their precise impact on the health care system in Jamaica has not yet been evaluated. We sought to determine the level of training, qualifications and experience of medical officers employed in public hospital EDs across the nation. Methods A database of all medical officers employed in public hospital EDs was created from records maintained by the Ministry of Health in Jamaica. A specially designed questionnaire was administered to all medical officers in this database. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 10.0. Results There were 160 ED medical officers across Jamaica, of which 47.5% were males and the mean age was 32.3 years (SD +/- 7.1; Range 23–57). These physicians were employed in the EDs for a mean of 2.2 years (SD +/- 2.5; Range 0–15; Median 2.5) and were recent graduates of medical schools (Mean 5.1; SD +/- 5.9; Median 3 years). Only 5.5% of the medical officers had specialist qualifications (grade III/IV), 12.8% were grade II medical officers and 80.5% were grade I house officers or interns. The majority of medical officers had no additional training qualifications: 20.9% were exposed to post-graduate training, 27.9% had current ACLS certification and 10.3% had current ATLS certification. Conclusion The majority of medical officers in public hospital EDs across Jamaica are relatively inexperienced and inadequately trained. Consultant supervision is not available in most public hospital EDs. With the injury epidemic that exists in Jamaica, it is logical that increased training opportunities and resources are required to meet the needs of the population.

Crandon, Ivor W; Harding, Hyacinth E; Cawich, Shamir O; Williams, Eric W; Williams-Johnson, Jean

2008-01-01

150

[Nosocomial infection of scabies in national hospitals and sanatoria in Japan].  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate cases of nosocomial infection of scabies in the national hospitals in Japan. Questionnaires sent to 183 hospitals and sanatoria were returned by 93. Fifty-three cases in 24 institutions of nosocomial infection were reported in the past 5 years. No nosocomial infection was reported from 7 sanatoria for Hansen's diseases where the patients were relatively older and had higher ADL scores. It took 7.5 weeks on the average to eliminate nosocomial infection and more than 8 weeks were required to control them in the hospitals where more than 10 cases had occurred. Benzyl benzoate, gamma benzene hexachloride, and Pyrethroids, which were not approved as drugs for the treatment of scabies in Japan, were used in the all institutions where nosocomial infection occurred except for one institution. Problems to be solved were as follows; (1) delay of diagnosis and treatment, (2) lack of nursing staff, (3) difficulties of complete isolation due to lack of spaces, inability of patients to understand the need for isolation and also the psychological instability of the isolated patients, (4) recurrence due to the use of ineffective drugs, (5) insufficient information about the prevalence of scabies in the previous institutions, (6) misdiagnosis of non-scabies patients with itchy skin rash as the scabies, (7) inconsisitent care due to poor evaluation of skin lesions. PMID:15387285

Yamamoto, Tomoko; Miura, Hisayuki; Nakashima, Kazumitsu

2004-07-01

151

Black/white differences in colorectal tumor location in a national sample of hospitals.  

PubMed Central

This article describes a retrospective study that compared the distribution of colorectal tumors among black and white discharges. A total of 188,109 discharges with colorectal cancer were selected from the Hospital Cost and Utilization Project, a national sample of hospitals with 34 million patient discharges from 1980 to 1987. Black/white differences were small for right, left, and rectal tumors; however, black discharges had a higher percentage of colorectal tumors with sites unspecified. From 1980 to 1987, 295 per 1000 discharges of blacks had an unspecified tumor location, compared with 229 per 1000 discharges of whites (a 29% difference). Black discharges had a higher proportion of unspecified tumors than whites regardless of cancer severity, discharge status, procedure type, age, sex, expected third-party payer, and year. Black/white differences were maintained across hospital characteristics (region, rural/urban location, teaching status, bed size, and ownership). Differences in specification of tumor site may be an indicator of poor continuity of care, poor access, or other quality-related measures.

Elixhauser, A.; Ball, J. K.

1994-01-01

152

Evaluation of US rear underride guard regulation for large trucks using real-world crashes.  

PubMed

Current requirements for rear underride guards on large trucks are set by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) 223 and 224. The standards have been in place since 1998, but their adequacy has not been evaluated apart from two series of controlled crash tests. The current study used detailed reviews of real-world crashes from the Large Truck Crash Causation Study to assess the ability of guards that comply with certain aspects of the regulation to mitigate passenger vehicle underride. It also evaluated the dangers posed by underride of large trucks that are exempt from guard requirements. For the 115 cases meeting the inclusion criteria, coded data, case narratives, photographs, and measurements were used to examine the interaction between study vehicles. The presence and type of underride guard was determined, and its performance in mitigating underride was categorized. Overall, almost one-half of the passenger vehicles had underride damage classified as severe or catastrophic. These vehicles accounted for 23 of the 28 in which occupants were killed. For the cases involving trailers with underride guards compliant with one or both FMVSS, guard deformation or complete failure was frequent and most commonly due to weak attachments, buckling of the trailer chassis, or bending of the lateral end of the guard under narrow overlap loading. Most of the truck units studied qualified for at least one of the FMVSS exemptions. The two largest groups were trailers with small wheel setbacks and single-unit straight trucks. Dump trucks represented a particularly hazardous category of straight truck. The current study suggests several weaknesses in the rear underride guard regulation. The standard allows too much ground clearance, the quasi-static test conditions allow guard designs that fail in narrow overlap crashes, and certifying guards independent of trailers leads to systems with inadequate attachment and chassis strength. Additionally, the regulation should be expanded to cover a higher percentage of the large truck fleet. PMID:21512906

Brumbelow, Matthew L; Blanar, Laura

2010-11-01

153

Challenges in Evaluating All-Cause Hospital Readmission Measures for Use as National Consensus Standards  

PubMed Central

Context: The National Quality Forum (NQF) aims to improve the quality of health care for all Americans through fulfillment of its three-part mission. The NQF uses its formal Consensus Development Process to evaluate and endorse consensus standards, including performance measures, best practices, frameworks, and reporting guidelines. Objective: To understand the opportunities and challenges in endorsing measures addressing all-cause readmissions to hospitals for use as national voluntary consensus standards for accountability and quality-improvement purposes. Design: Report of standards development process. Main Outcome Measures: The Consensus Development Process was used to evaluate 3 candidate standards using the NQF Measure Evaluation Criteria. A 21-member steering committee rated each standard according to the criteria and made initial endorsement recommendations for all measures. Results: Through the evaluation of measures for endorsement, several overarching issues in measuring all-cause readmissions were identified, including statistical modeling and the usability of the measures for quality improvement and accountability. Additionally, it was decided that, for the first time, quality monitoring and accountability of readmissions will take place at the health-plan level. Measuring at various levels of accountability reinforces the idea that multiple stakeholders have a responsibility and a role to reduce readmissions. Conclusions: These NQF-endorsed measures are a major step in promoting better understanding of readmissions and a reduction in hospital readmission rates, when appropriate. These measures can help reduce the substantial financial and emotional stress that readmissions place on the health care system, and patients will be able to communicate hospital-level performance on this important quality indicator.

Morgan, Alexis; Khan, Adeela; Amin, Taroon

2013-01-01

154

Breath tests sustainability in hospital settings: cost analysis and reimbursement in the Italian National Health System.  

PubMed

The high demand of Breath Tests (BT) in many gastroenterological conditions in time of limited resources for health care systems, generates increased interest in cost analysis from the point of view of the delivery of services to better understand how use the money to generate value. This study aims to measure the cost of C13 Urea and other most utilized breath tests in order to describe key aspects of costs and reimbursements looking at the economic sustainability for the hospital. A hospital based cost-analysis of the main breath tests commonly delivery in an ambulatory setting is performed. Mean salary for professional nurses and gastroenterologists, drugs/preparation used and disposable materials, purchase and depreciation of the instrument and the testing time was used to estimate the cost, while reimbursements are based on the 2013 Italian National Health System ambulatory pricelist. Variables that could influence the model are considered in the sensitivity analyses. The mean cost for C13--Urea, Lactulose and Lactose BT are, respectively, Euros 30,59; 45,20 and 30,29. National reimbursement often doesn't cover the cost of the analysis, especially considering the scenario with lower number of exam. On the contrary, in high performance scenario all the reimbursement could cover the cost, except for the C13 Urea BT that is high influenced by the drugs cost. However, consideration about the difference between Italian Regional Health System ambulatory pricelist are done. Our analysis shows that while national reimbursement rates cover the costs of H2 breath testing, they do not cover sufficiently C13 BT, particularly urea breath test. The real economic strength of these non invasive tests should be considered in the overall organization of inpatient and outpatient clinic, accounting for complete diagnostic pathway for each gastrointestinal disease. PMID:24443075

Volpe, M; Scaldaferri, F; Ojetti, V; Poscia, A

2013-01-01

155

Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients' rights at Uganda's national referral hospital  

PubMed Central

Background The realisation of patients’ rights in resource-constrained and patient-burdened public health care settings in Uganda remains an obstacle towards quality health care delivery, health care-seeking behaviour and health outcomes. Although the Uganda Patients’ Charter of 2009 empowers patients to demand quality care, inequitable access and abuse remain common. Aim The study aimed to assess level of awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights amongst patients and health workers (HWs) at Uganda’s national referral hospital, Mulago Hospital in Kampala. Methods A three-phase cross-sectional questionnaire-based descriptive survey was conducted amongst 211 patients, 98 HWs and 16 key informants using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods. The study was conducted in May–June 2012, 2.5 years after the launch of the Uganda Patients’ Charter. Results At least 36.5% of patients faced a challenge regarding their rights whilst seeking health care. Most of the patients (79%) who met a challenge never attempted to demand their rights. Most patients (81.5%) and HWs (69.4%) had never heard of the Uganda Patients’ Charter. Awareness of patients’ rights was significantly higher amongst HWs (70%) than patients (40%) (p < 0.01). Patients’ awareness was associated with education level (?2 = 42.4, p < 0.001), employment status (?2 = 33.6, p < 0.001) and hospital visits (?2 = 3.9, p = 0.048). For HWs it was associated with education level (?2 = 155.6, p < 0.001) and length of service (?2 = 154.5, p <0.001). Patients feel powerless to negotiate for their rights and fear being discriminated against based on their ability to bribe HWs with money to access care, and political, socio-economic and tribal status. Conclusion and recommendations Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights remains limited at Mulago Hospital. There is a need for urgent implementation of an integrated multilevel, multichannel, patient-centred approach that incorporates social services and addresses intrinsic patient, HW and health system factors to strengthen patients’ rights issues at the hospital.

Kagoya, Harriet Rachel; Kibuule, Dan; Mitonga-Kabwebwe, Honore; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Ssempebwa, John C.

2013-01-01

156

Systems Engineering of Coast Guard Aviator Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a total-program application of the systems engineering concept of the U.S. Coast Guard aviation training programs. The systems approach used treats all aspects of the training to produce the most cost-effective integration of academic, synthetic, and flight training for the production of graduate Coast Guard aviators. The…

Hall, Eugene R.; Caro, Paul W.

157

29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...restoration of power. (7) The power supply to machines shall be turned off, locked...moving parts. (2) Belt, rope and chain drives shall be guarded to prevent employees...parts. (3) Gears, sprockets and chains shall be guarded to prevent...

2013-07-01

158

The urgency of visits to hospital emergency departments: data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), 1992.  

PubMed

During 1992, an estimated 89.8 million visits were made to the emergency departments (EDs) of nonfederal, short-stay or general hospitals in the United States. Of these ED visits, 40.1 million (44.6 percent) were labeled urgent by hospital staff. For survey purposes, an urgent visit was defined as one in which the patient requires immediate attention for an acute illness or injury that threatens life or function and where delay would be harmful to the patient. However, visits to hospital EDs, whether reported as urgent or nonurgent by hospital staff, may resemble each other in a number of ways. The "appropriateness" of an ED visit should not be equated solely with staff determinations of urgency, which are often made following evaluation and diagnosis rather than on the patient's presenting condition. Stomach pain was the reason most frequently given by patients for making an ED visit. These visits were reported by hospital staff to be urgent about half the time (47.5 percent of visits). The proportion of urgent visits for the most frequent reasons ranged from three-quarters of visits for chest pain and asthma to one-fifth of visits for throat symptoms and skin rash. About one-third of all ED visits (32.7 percent) received principal diagnoses within the broad category of injury and poisoning; roughly half of these visits were considered urgent. Along with injury and poisoning, diseases of the respiratory system and "signs, symptoms, and ill-defined conditions" accounted for the majority of both urgent and nonurgent ED visits. About one-quarter (24.9 percent) of urgent ED visits resulted in hospital admission. However, the most common disposition at both urgent and nonurgent ED visits was referral to another physician. PMID:8879068

Schappert, S M

1995-01-01

159

Dying in two acute hospitals: would usual care meet Australian national clinical standards?  

PubMed

The Australian Commission for Quality and Safety in Health Care (ACQSHC) has articulated 10 clinical standards with the aim of improving the consistency of quality healthcare delivery. Currently, the majority of Australians die in acute hospitals. But despite this, no agreed standard of care exists to define the minimum standard of care that people should accept in the final hours to days of life. As a result, there is limited capacity to conduct audits that focus on the gap between current care and recommended care. There is, however, accumulating evidence in the end of life literature to define which aspects of care are likely to be considered most important to those people facing imminent death. These themes offer standards against which to conduct audits. This is very apt given the national recommendation that healthcare should be delivered in the context of considering people's wishes while always treating people with dignity and respect. PMID:24589365

Clark, Katherine; Byfieldt, Naomi; Green, Malcolm; Saul, Peter; Lack, Jill; Philips, Jane L

2014-05-01

160

Evaluation of the department of neurosurgery of the seoul national university hospital.  

PubMed

The Department of Neurosurgery (DNS) of the Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH), belongs to the largest and oldest such institutions in Korea. Because of its growing reputation it is hardly surprising that the DNS draws visitor and scholars for clinical education and academic exchange from far beyond Korea. I myself visited the SNUH in February and March 2013. During this time I composed this evaluation in which I compare the DNS to my home Department at the Johannes Gutenberg-University in Mainz/Germany, as well as the situation of Neurosurgery in Korea and Germany in general. In the first part this evaluation summarizes data concerning equipment, staff and organizational structure, as well as educational and scientific issues of the DNS. In the second part some issues of interest are discussed in special regard to the corresponding practices in Germany. PMID:23908698

Kantelhardt, Sven R

2013-05-01

161

The Dutch Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio (HSMR) method and cardiac surgery: benchmarking in a national cohort using hospital administration data versus a clinical database  

PubMed Central

Objective To compare the accuracy of data from hospital administration databases and a national clinical cardiac surgery database and to compare the performance of the Dutch hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR) method and the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation, for the purpose of benchmarking of mortality across hospitals. Methods Information on all patients undergoing cardiac surgery between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2010 in 10 centres was extracted from The Netherlands Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery database and the Hospital Discharge Registry. The number of cardiac surgery interventions was compared between both databases. The European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation and hospital standardised mortality ratio models were updated in the study population and compared using the C-statistic, calibration plots and the Brier-score. Results The number of cardiac surgery interventions performed could not be assessed using the administrative database as the intervention code was incorrect in 1.4–26.3%, depending on the type of intervention. In 7.3% no intervention code was registered. The updated administrative model was inferior to the updated clinical model with respect to discrimination (c-statistic of 0.77 vs 0.85, p<0.001) and calibration (Brier Score of 2.8% vs 2.6%, p<0.001, maximum score 3.0%). Two average performing hospitals according to the clinical model became outliers when benchmarking was performed using the administrative model. Conclusions In cardiac surgery, administrative data are less suitable than clinical data for the purpose of benchmarking. The use of either administrative or clinical risk-adjustment models can affect the outlier status of hospitals. Risk-adjustment models including procedure-specific clinical risk factors are recommended.

Siregar, S; Pouw, M E; Moons, K G M; Versteegh, M I M; Bots, M L; van der Graaf, Y; Kalkman, C J; van Herwerden, L A; Groenwold, R H H

2014-01-01

162

Disability and Hospital Care Expenses among National Health Insurance Beneficiaries: Analyses of Population-Based Data in Taiwan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nationwide data were collected concerning inpatient care use and medical expenditure of people with disabilities (N = 937,944) among national health insurance beneficiaries in Taiwan. Data included gender, age, hospitalization frequency and expenditure, healthcare setting and service department, discharge diagnose disease according to the ICD-9-CM…

Lin, Lan-Ping; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Fu-Gong; Lin, Pei-Ying; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

2011-01-01

163

Does hospital procedure-specific volume affect treatment costs? A national study of knee replacement surgery.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The long-run cost savings potential of private sector reform efforts, such as selective contracts with providers, depends in part on the relationship between procedure-specific volume and average hospital resources that are consumed in treating patients associated with that specific procedure. Study examines a model that estimates the relationship between hospital procedure-specific volume and average hospital treatment costs, using an elective surgical procedure as an example. DATA SOURCES: Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MedPAR) files for 1989 for hospitalizations in which a Medicare beneficiary received a knee replacement (KR) surgery during 1989. Hospital information was obtained from the American Hospital Association's 1989 Annual Survey. All patient-level data were aggregated to the hospital level to create a data file, with the hospital as the unit of observation. STUDY DESIGN: This study used administrative claims data and regression analysis to estimate the effect of hospital procedure-specific volume on average hospital treatment costs of patients receiving KR surgery. We also examined the stability of the volume-cost relationship across hospitals of different sizes. PRINCIPAL FINDING: The average treatment costs associated with KR surgery are inversely related to a hospital's KR volume in the regression equation estimated using all hospitals performing KR surgery. The inverse relationship between cost and volume is found to be robust for different-size hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: The potential cost savings associated with performing KR surgery at incrementally higher hospital volume level can amount to as much as 10 percent of the hospital's average treatment cost. However, the incremental cost savings associated with increased patient volume depends on the hospital's current volume level and its size.

Gutierrez, B; Culler, S D; Freund, D A

1998-01-01

164

Holmium Laser Enucleation of Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Seoul National University Hospital Experience  

PubMed Central

Purpose The objective of this study was to report the experience acquired at the Seoul National University Hospital with Holmium Laser Enucleation of Prostate (HoLEP), combined with mechanical morcellation for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods A retrospective review was performed on the clinical data of 309 consecutive patients who underwent HoLEP at our institution between July 2008 and June 2010. All patients were evaluated preoperatively for prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound, maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) and quality of life (QoL) score. Peri- and postoperative parameters were evaluated and patients were followed-up at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12- months with the aforementioned investigations. Results The patients' mean age was 68.3 (±6.5) years and mean prostate volume was 55.6 (±23.6) mL. Mean enucleation time was 56.2 (±25.1) minutes, mean morcellation time was 11.3 (±9.5) minutes, and the mean resected weight of the prostate was 20.8 (±16.9) g. The mean catheter indwelling period was 1.9 (±1.7) days and mean hospital stay was 2.9 (±1.5) days. Significant improvement was noted in Qmax, IPSS, and QoL at the 1-year follow-up compared with baseline (P<0.01). At 1 month 17.2% of patients complained of irritative urinary symptoms, which were typically self-limiting within 3 months. Transient stress incontinence was reported in 15.2% of patients. No patient experienced persistent obstructive symptoms that required reoperation. Conclusions Our study showed that HoLEP is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for BPH.

Bae, Jungbum; Choo, Minsoo; Park, Ji Hyun; Oh, Jin Kyu; Paick, Jae-Seung

2011-01-01

165

Registration of acute medical hospital admissions in the Danish National Patient Registry: a validation study  

PubMed Central

Background In recent years, the number of acute hospital admissions has increased and this has imposed both organizational and financial strains on the health care system. Consequently, it is of crucial importance that we have valid data on admission types in the administrative databases in order to provide data for health care planning and research. Objective To examine the validity of registration of acute admissions among medical patients in the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR) using medical record reviews as the reference standard. Methods We used the nationwide DNPR to identify a sample of 160 medical patients admitted to a hospital in the North Denmark Region during 2009. Data on admission type was obtained from the DNPR and confirmed by a medical record review. We computed positive predictive values, sensitivity, and specificity including 95% confidence intervals (CI) using the medical record review as the reference standard. Results Among the 160 medical inpatients identified in the DNPR, 128 were registered with an acute admission, and 32 were registered with a nonacute admission. Two medical records could not be located. Thus, the analyses included 158 medical patients. Among the 127 patients registered with acute admission, 124 were confirmed to be correctly classified. Correspondingly, 28 of the 31 patients with a registered nonacute admission were confirmed to be correctly classified. The overall positive predictive value of the acute admissions among medical patients was 97.6% (95% CI, 93.8%–99.3%). Sensitivity was 97.6% (95% CI, 93.8%–99.3%) and specificity was 90.3% (95% CI, 76.4%–97.2%). Conclusion The registration of acute admission among medical patients in the DNPR has high validity.

Vest-Hansen, Betina; Riis, Anders Hammerich; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

2013-01-01

166

Epidemiology of injuries presenting to the national hospital in Kampala, Uganda: implications for research and policy  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the growing burden of injuries in LMICs, there are still limited primary epidemiologic data to guide health policy and health system development. Understanding the epidemiology of injury in developing countries can help identify risk factors for injury and target interventions for prevention and treatment to decrease disability and mortality. Aim To estimate the epidemiology of the injury seen in patients presenting to the government hospital in Kampala, the capital city of Uganda. Methods A secondary analysis of a prospectively collected database collected by the Injury Control Centre-Uganda at the Mulago National Referral Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, 2004-2005. Results From 1 August 2004 to 12 August 2005, a total of 3,750 injury-related visits were recorded; a final sample of 3,481 records were analyzed. The majority of patients (62%) were treated in the casualty department and then discharged; 38% were admitted. Road traffic injuries (RTIs) were the most common causes of injury for all age groups in this sample, except for those under 5 years old, and accounted for 49% of total injuries. RTIs were also the most common cause of mortality in trauma patients. Within traffic injuries, more passengers (44%) and pedestrians (30%) were injured than drivers (27%). Other causes of trauma included blunt/penetrating injuries (25% of injuries) and falls (10%). Less than 5% of all patients arriving to the emergency department for injuries arrived by ambulance. Conclusions Road traffic injuries are by far the largest cause of both morbidity and mortality in Kampala. They are the most common cause of injury for all ages, except those younger than 5, and school-aged children comprise a large proportion of victims from these incidents. The integration of injury control programs with ongoing health initiatives is an urgent priority for health and development.

Ozgediz, Doruk; Mutto, Milton; Jayaraman, Sudha; Kyamanywa, Patrick; Kobusingye, Olive C.

2010-01-01

167

Coast Guard AHLTA Technology Business Case Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Coast Guard must deliver AHLTA to its clinics, either through direct connection to military treatment facilities (MTFs), making the clinics satellite clinics, or through developing their own servers at the Operational Service Center (OSC) complex in M...

M. R. Freese

2007-01-01

168

Analysis of the Coast Guard Enlisted Attrition.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this this thesis, survival analysis is used to study US Coast Guard enlisted attrition behavior in terms of individual personnel characteristics such as sex, marital status, race, paygrade and rating. Results obtained based on 8 years of historical dat...

L. E. Rubiano

1993-01-01

169

Livestock Guarding Dogs: Protecting Sheep from Predators.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A livestock guarding dog is one that generally stays with sheep without harming them and aggressively repels predators. The dog chooses to remain with sheep because it has been reared from puppyhood with them. Its protective behaviors are largely instinct...

1999-01-01

170

49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

2013-10-01

171

33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

2013-07-01

172

Implementing smoking bans in American hospitals: results of a national survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESTo determine how well hospitals complied with the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) tobacco control standards, which required banning smoking in hospital buildings; to explore issues involved in developing and implementing smoking bans; and to ascertain the perceived success of the policies.DESIGNPostal survey conducted January through June 1994.PARTICIPANTSStratified random sample of American hospitals surveyed by JCAHO (n

Daniel R Longo; Mary M Feldman; Robin L Kruse; Ross C Brownson; Gregory F Petroski; John E Hewett

1998-01-01

173

Implementation Issues of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure and Its Case Study for a Physician's Round at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital  

PubMed Central

Objectives The cloud computing-based virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) allows access to computing environments with no limitations in terms of time or place such that it can permit the rapid establishment of a mobile hospital environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the empirical issues to be considered when establishing a virtual mobile environment using VDI technology in a hospital setting and to examine the utility of the technology with an Apple iPad during a physician's rounds as a case study. Methods Empirical implementation issues were derived from a 910-bed tertiary national university hospital that recently launched a VDI system. During the physicians' rounds, we surveyed patient satisfaction levels with the VDI-based mobile consultation service with the iPad and the relationship between these levels of satisfaction and hospital revisits, hospital recommendations, and the hospital brand image. Thirty-five inpatients (including their next-of-kin) and seven physicians participated in the survey. Results Implementation issues pertaining to the VDI system arose with regard to the highly availability system architecture, wireless network infrastructure, and screen resolution of the system. Other issues were related to privacy and security, mobile device management, and user education. When the system was used in rounds, patients and their next-of-kin expressed high satisfaction levels, and a positive relationship was noted as regards patients' decisions to revisit the hospital and whether the use of the VDI system improved the brand image of the hospital. Conclusions Mobile hospital environments have the potential to benefit both physicians and patients. The issues related to the implementation of VDI system discussed here should be examined in advance for its successful adoption and implementation.

Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Kim, Taegi; Kim, Jon Soo; Baek, Rong-Min; Suh, Chang Suk; Chung, Chin Youb

2012-01-01

174

A national study of the efficiency of hospitals in urban markets.  

PubMed Central

Using a sample of 3,000 urban hospitals, this article examines the contributions of selected hospital characteristics to variations in hospital technical efficiencies, while it accounts for multiple products and inputs, and controls for local environmental variations. Four hospital characteristics are examined: hospital size, membership in a multihospital system, ownership, and payer mix (managed care contracts, percent Medicare, and percent Medicaid). Ownership and percent Medicare are consistently found to be related significantly to hospital efficiency. Within the ownership variable, government hospitals tend to be more efficient and for-profit hospitals less efficient than other hospitals. Higher percentages of Medicare payment are negatively related to efficiency. While not consistently significant across all five of the MSA size categories in which the analyses are conducted, possession of managed care contracts, membership in a multihospital system, and size all are consistently related positively to hospital technical efficiency. These variables are also all significant when the hospitals are examined in a combined analysis. Percent Medicaid was not significant in any of the analyses. Implications for policy and the need for methodological work are discussed.

Ozcan, Y A; Luke, R D

1993-01-01

175

National and regional trends in heart failure hospitalization and mortality rates for Medicare beneficiaries: 1998-2008  

PubMed Central

Context Whether recent declines in ischemic heart disease and its risk factors have been accompanied by declines in heart failure (HF) hospitalization and mortality is not known. Objective To examine changes in HF hospitalization rate and 1-year mortality rate in the U.S., nationally and by state/territory. Design, Setting, and Participants 55,097,390 fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized between 1998 and 2008 in acute care hospitals in the U.S. and Puerto Rico admitted with a principal discharge diagnosis code for HF. Main Outcome Measures Changes in patient demographics and comorbidities, HF hospitalization rates, and 1-year mortality rates. Results The HF hospitalization rate adjusted for age, sex, and race declined from 2,845 per 100,000 person-years in 1998 to 2,007 per 100,000 person-years in 2008 (p<0.001), a relative decline of 29.5%. Age-adjusted HF-hospitalization rates declined over the study period for all race-sex categories. Black men had the lowest rate of decline (4,142 to 3,201 per 100,000 person-years) among all race-sex categories which persisted after adjusting for age (incidence rate ratio=0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79 to 0.84). HF hospitalization rates declined significantly faster than the national mean in 16 states, and significantly slower in 3 states. Risk-adjusted 1-year mortality fell from 31.7% in 1999 to 29.6% in 2008 (p<0.001), a relative decline of 6.6%. 1-year mortality rates declined significantly in 4 states, but increased in 5 states. Conclusions The overall HF hospitalization rate declined substantially from 1998 to 2008, but at a lower rate for black men. The overall 1-year mortality rate declined slightly over the past decade, but remains high. Changes in HF hospitalization and 1-year mortality rates were uneven across states.

Chen, Jersey; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Wang, Yun; Krumholz, Harlan M.

2013-01-01

176

Organizational Characteristics Associated with the Use of Daily Interruption of Sedation in US Hospitals: A National Study  

PubMed Central

Objective Daily interruption of sedation (DIS) has multiple proven benefits, but implementation is erratic. Past research on sedative interruption utilization focused on individual clinicians, ignoring the role of organizations in shaping practice. We test the hypothesis that specific hospital organizational characteristics are associated with routine use of DIS. Design & Setting National, mailed survey to stratified random sample of United States (US) hospitals in 2009. Respondents were the lead infection control professionals at each institution. Methods Survey items inquired about DIS use, institutional structure, and organizational culture. Multivariable analysis was used to evaluate the independent association of these factors with DIS use. Results A total of 386 hospitals formed our final analytic sample; the response rate was 69.4%. Hospitals ranged in size from 25 to 1359 beds. 26% of hospitals were associated with a medical school. Almost 80% reported regular use of DIS for ventilated patients. While 75.4% of hospitals reported having leadership focus on safety culture, only 42.7% reported that their staff were receptive to changes in practice. In a multivariable logistic regression model, structural characteristics such as size and academic affiliation were not associated with use of DIS. However, leadership emphasis on safety culture (p=0.04), staff receptivity to change (p=0.02) and involvement in an infection prevention collaborative (p=0.04) were significantly associated with regular DIS use. Conclusions Several elements of hospital organizational culture were associated with regular use of DIS in US hospitals. Our findings emphasize the importance of combining specific administrative approaches with strategies to encourage receptivity to change among bedside clinicians in order to successfully implement complex evidence-based practices in the intensive care setting.

Miller, Melissa A.; Krein, Sarah L.; Saint, Sanjay; Kahn, Jeremy M.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

2014-01-01

177

Quality of intrapartum care at Mulago national referral hospital, Uganda: clients' perspective  

PubMed Central

Background Quality of intrapartum care is an important intervention towards increasing clients’ utilization of skilled attendance at birth and accelerating improvements in newborn’s and maternal survival and wellbeing. Ensuring quality of care is one of the key challenges facing maternal and neonatal services in Uganda. The study assessed quality of intrapartum care services in the general labor ward of the Mulago national referral and teaching hospital in Uganda from clients’ perspective. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted using face to face interviews at discharge with 384 systematically selected clients, who delivered in general labor ward at Mulago hospital during May, 2012. Data analysis was done using STATA Version (10) software. Means and median general index scores for quality of intrapartum care services were calculated. Linear regression models were used to determine factors associated with quality of care. Results Overall, quality of intrapartum care mean index score was 49.4 (standard deviation (sd) 15.46, and the median (interquartile range (IQR)) was 49.1 (37.5–58.9). Median index scores (IQR) per selected quality of care indicators were; dignity and respect 75 (50–87.5); relief of pain and suffering 71.4 (42.8-85.7); information 42.1 (31.6-55.3); privacy and confidentiality 33.3 (1–66.7); and involvement in decision making 16.7 (1–33.3). On average, higher educational level (college/university) (?: 6.81, 95% CI: 0.85-15.46) and rural residence of clients (?: 5.67, 95% CI: 0.95-10.3) were statistically associated with higher quality scores. Conclusion This study has revealed that quality of intrapartum care services from clients’ perspective was low. Improvements should be focused on involving clients in decision making, provision of information about their conditions and care, and provision of privacy and confidentiality. There is also need to improve the number and availability of health care providers in the labor ward.

2013-01-01

178

Barriers to healthy eating by National Health Service (NHS) hospital doctors in the hospital setting: results of a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background With high levels of obesity and related illness, improving the health of the nation is a major public health concern. This study aimed to identify factors that prevent healthy eating among doctors, and that are associated with satisfaction with catering services. Findings Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 328 NHS doctors working in two NHS Trusts with on-site hospital canteen. Questionnaire to establish perceived barriers to healthy eating, weekly use and satisfaction with the hospital canteen, lifestyle and dietary habits, gender, age, height, weight, job details, and affect. Results: 70% of doctors reported using their hospital canteen each week, with 2 visits per week on average. Canteen opening times, lack of selection and lack of breaks were the most commonly perceived barriers to healthy eating. Availability of healthy options caused the most dissatisfaction. Only 12% felt the NHS was supportive of healthy eating. 74% did not feel their canteen advocated healthy eating. Canteen use is associated with younger age (r = -0.254, p < 0.0001) and health score (r = 0.123, p = 0.049). Conclusion Interventions to encourage regular meal breaks, eating breakfast and drinking more water each day need developing. Improved canteen accessibility and availability of healthy options at evenings and weekends may be beneficial.

Winston, James; Johnson, Carol; Wilson, Sue

2008-01-01

179

Prospective surveillance applying the national nosocomial infection surveillance methods in a Brazilian pediatric public hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: A hospital-wide, traditional prospective surveillance for nosocomial infections was commenced in 1992 in Centro Geral de Pediatria in Minas Gerais, Brazil, to describe the epidemiology of nosocomial infection in this pediatric hospital and to implement cross-infection prevention and control policies. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort nosocomial infection surveillance of all patients receiving acute care according to the hospital-wide

J. M. M. Lopes; E. Tonelli; J. A. Lamounier; B. R. G. M. Couto; A. L. Siqueira; F. Komatsuzaki; A. P. Champs; C. E. F. Starling

2002-01-01

180

Contemporary Evidence about Hospital Strategies for Reducing 30-Day Readmissions: A National Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives We sought to determine the range and prevalence of practices being implemented by hospitals to reduce 30-day readmissions of patients with heart failure or acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Background Readmissions of patients with heart failure or AMI are both common and costly; however evidence on strategies adopted by hospitals to reduce readmission rates is limited. Methods We used a web-based survey to conduct a cross-sectional study of hospitals’ reported use of specific practices to reduce readmissions for patients with heart failure or AMI. We contacted all hospitals enrolled in the Hospital to Home (H2H) quality improvement initiative as of July 2010. Of 594 hospitals, 537 completed the survey (response rate of 90.4%). We used standard frequency analysis to describe the prevalence of key hospital practices in the areas of 1) quality improvement resources and performance monitoring, 2) medication management efforts, and 3) discharge and follow-up processes. Results Nearly 90% of hospitals agreed or strongly agreed that they had a written objective of reducing preventable readmission for patients with heart failure or AMI. More hospitals reported having quality improvement teams to reduce preventable readmissions for patients with heart failure (87%) than for patients with AMI (54%). On average, hospitals used 4.8 of 10 key practices; fewer than 3% of hospitals utilized all 10 practices. Conclusions Although most hospitals have a written objective of reducing preventable readmissions of patients with heart failure or AMI, the implementation of recommended practices varied widely. More evidence establishing the effectiveness of various practices is needed.

Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie; Horwitz, Leora I.; Sipsma, Heather; Thompson, Jennifer W.; Elma, Mary Anne; Walsh, Mary Norine; Krumholz, Harlan M.

2012-01-01

181

[Nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in the intensive care units of a national hospital of Lima, Peru].  

PubMed

In order to describe the incidence of nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in intensive care units (UCI) of the National Hospital Cayetano Heredia, a retrospective observational study was conducted using the data from the Office of Epidemiology and Environmental Health from 2010 to 2012. A total number of 222 nosocomial infections were reported; the general medicine UCI reported the highest incidence of pneumonia cases associated to a mechanical ventilator in 1000 days of use of the device (28.6); infection of the blood stream associated to central venous catheter (11.9), and infection of the urinary tract associated to a catheter (8,1). The main infectious agents isolated were Pseudomona sp. (32.3%) in the emergency UCI, negative Staphylococcus coagulasa (36%) in the general medicine UCI and Candida sp (69.2%) in the Surgery UCI. The rates of infections associated to invasive devices were high as in other national hospitals with limited resources and infrastructure. PMID:24448938

Chincha, Omayra; Cornelio, Elia; Valverde, Violeta; Acevedo, Mónica

2013-01-01

182

National Hospital Prospective Payment Evaluation Case Study Site Report: Mobile, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Medicare Hospitals Prospective Payment System (PPS) was enacted by the Congress in 1983. That legislation requires that the Secretary study this major change in the way hospitals are paid and report annually (Public Law 98-211, Section 603 (a) (2) (A)...

A. Hendricks C. Carter L. Forgy H. Korda G. Pope

1986-01-01

183

Maternal oral health status and preterm low birth weight at Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania: a case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The study examined the relationship between oral health status (periodontal disease and carious pulpal exposure (CPE)) and preterm low-birth-weight (PTLBW) infant deliveries among Tanzanian-African mothers at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Tanzania. METHODS: A retrospective case-control study was conducted, involving 373 postpartum mothers aged 14–44 years (PTLBW – 150 cases) and at term normal-birth-weight (TNBW) – 223 controls), using structured

Elifuraha GS Mumghamba; Karim P Manji

2007-01-01

184

45 CFR 60.17 - Information which hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...request from the National Practitioner Data Bank. 60.17 Section 60.17 Public...ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL PRACTITIONER DATA BANK Disclosure of Information by the National Practitioner Data Bank § 60.17 Information which...

2013-10-01

185

Good for the Goose, Good for the Gander; A Coast Guard Model for the Thousand-Ship Navy.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As a nation at war, facing a diverse set of new challenges, the stakes are high and are growing for the United States. The nation needs to expand its 'operationalization' of the national fleet and ensure that the Coast Guard and Navy work together to most...

D. A. Cinalli

2006-01-01

186

Work Hours and Self rated Health of Hospital Doctors in Norway and Germany. A comparative study on national samples  

PubMed Central

Background The relationship between extended work hours and health is well documented among hospital doctors, but the effect of national differences in work hours on health is unexplored. The study examines the relationship between work hours and self rated health in two national samples of hospital doctors. Methods The study population consisted of representative samples of 1,260 German and 562 Norwegian hospital doctors aged 25-65 years (N = 1,822) who received postal questionnaires in 2006 (Germany) and 2008 (Norway). The questionnaires contained items on demography, work hours (number of hours per workday and on-call per month) and self rated subjective health on a five point scale - dichotomized into "good" (above average) and "average or below". Results Compared to Norway, a significantly higher proportion of German doctors exceeded a 9 hour work day (58.8% vs. 26.7%) and 60 hours on-call per month (63.4% vs. 18.3%). Every third (32.2%) hospital doctor in Germany worked more than this, while this pattern was rare in Norway (2.9%). In a logistic regression model, working in Norway (OR 4.17; 95% CI 3.02-5.73), age 25-44 years (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.29-2.14) and not exceeding 9 hour work day and 60 hours on-call per month (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.03-1.77) were all independent significant predictors of good self reported health. Conclusion A lower percentage of German hospital doctors reported self rated health as "good", which is partly explained by the differences in work time pattern. Initiatives to increase doctors' control over their work time are recommended.

2011-01-01

187

A&M. Guard house (TAN638). Detail of west facade and front ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A&M. Guard house (TAN-638). Detail of west facade and front door. Flood light bent below eave. Traffic control signal in view. Camera facing east. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-6-3 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

188

A&M. Guard house (TAN638). Oblique view of north and west ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A&M. Guard house (TAN-638). Oblique view of north and west facades. (Door in west facade) . Facing southerly. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-4-3 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

189

Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Modernization: Background, Issues, and Options for Congress.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Of the Coast Guard's three polar icebreakers, two--Polar Star and Polar Sea--have exceeded their intended 30-year service lives. The Polar Star is not operational and has been in caretaker status since July 1, 2006. A 2007 report from the National Researc...

R. O'Rourke

2009-01-01

190

Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Modernization: Background, Issues, and Options for Congress. Updated December 23, 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Of the Coast Guard's three polar icebreakers, two -- Polar Star and Polar Sea -- have exceeded their intended 30-year service lives. The Polar Star is not operational and has been in caretaker status since July 1, 2006. A 2007 report from the National Res...

R. O'Rourke

2009-01-01

191

A national intervention to prevent the spread of carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae in israeli post-acute care hospitals.  

PubMed

Objective.?Patients hospitalized in post-acute care hospitals (PACHs) constitute an important reservoir of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. High carriage prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) has been observed among patients hospitalized in PACHs. The objective of the study is to describe the impact of a national infection control intervention on the prevalence of CRE in PACHs. Design.?A prospective cohort interventional study. Setting.?Thirteen PACHs in Israel. Intervention.?A multifaceted intervention was initiated between 2008 and 2011 as part of a national program involving all Israeli healthcare facilities. The intervention has included (1) periodic on-site assessments of infection control policies and resources, using a score comprised of 16 elements; (2) assessment of risk factors for CRE colonization; (3) development of national guidelines for CRE control in PACHs involving active surveillance and contact isolation of carriers; and (4) 3 cross-sectional surveys of rectal carriage of CRE that were conducted in representative wards. Results.?The infection control score increased from 6.8 to 14.0 (P < .001) over the course of the study period. A total of 3,516 patients were screened in the 3 surveys. Prevalence of carriage among those not known to be carriers decreased from 12.1% to 7.9% (P = .008). Overall carrier prevalence decreased from 16.8% to 12.5% (P = .013). Availability of alcohol-based hand rub, appropriate use of gloves, and a policy of CRE surveillance at admission to the hospital were independently associated with lower new carrier prevalence. Conclusion.?A nationwide infection control intervention was associated with enhanced infection control measures and a reduction in the prevalence of CRE in PACHs. PMID:24915207

Ben-David, Debby; Masarwa, Samira; Adler, Amos; Mishali, Hagit; Carmeli, Yehuda; Schwaber, Mitchell J

2014-07-01

192

Hospital staffing, organization, and quality of care: Cross-national findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the effects of nurse staffing and organizational support for nursing care on nurses' dissatisfaction with their jobs, nurse burnout, and nurse reports of quality of patient care in an international sample of hospitals. Design: Multisite cross-sectional survey Setting: Adult acute-care hospitals in the U.S. (Pennsylvania), Canada (Ontario and British Columbia), England and Scotland. Study Participants: 10319 nurses

Linda H. Aiken; Sean P. Clarke; Douglas M. Sloane

2002-01-01

193

Double-blind evaluation of the DKL LifeGuard Model 2  

SciTech Connect

On March 20, 1998, Sandia National Laboratories performed a double-blind test of the DKL LifeGuard human presence detector and tracker. The test was designed to allow the device to search for individuals well within the product`s published operational parameters. The Test Operator of the DKL LifeGuard was provided by the manufacturer and was a high-ranking member of DKL management. The test was developed and implemented to verify the performance of the device as specified by the manufacturer. The device failed to meet its published specifications and it performed no better than random chance.

Murray, D.W.; Spencer, F.W.; Spencer, D.D.

1998-05-01

194

Independent Testing and Integration of the Network Management Guard Proxy.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The document provides an overview of the network management guard/ proxy. The network management guard/proxy is a modified firewall that sits between two networks of different classification levels. This modified firewall is used to provide network monito...

A. Hovak J. Riolo

2002-01-01

195

30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

2013-07-01

196

76 FR 34738 - National Boating Safety Advisory Committee; Vacancies  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [Docket...National Boating Safety Advisory Committee...Department of Homeland Security through the Coast...recreational boating safety regulations and...Department of Homeland Security through the Coast Guard on boating safety regulations...

2011-06-14

197

Livestock Guarding Dogs: Protecting Your Sheep.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The video examines the problem of predation and takes a look at one approach to cutting down losses that occur each year by using special breeds of guarding dogs. The video provides helpful advice about purchasing and raising dogs, training and caring for...

1994-01-01

198

29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and hand-fed circular crosscut table saws. Unless fixed or manually adjustable...and hand-fed circular crosscut table saws shall be guarded as follows to keep employees...completely enclosing those portions of the saw above the table and the material...

2010-07-01

199

29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and hand-fed circular crosscut table saws. Unless fixed or manually adjustable...and hand-fed circular crosscut table saws shall be guarded as follows to keep employees...completely enclosing those portions of the saw above the table and the material...

2009-07-01

200

Coast Guard's Response to Spilled Oil  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Coast Guard utilizes a number of monitoring detectors, sensors, and techniques to find, recover and identify oil spills. Discussed in this article are in-situ and airborne sensors, systems developed to provide clean-up capability such as air deployable anti-pollution transfer system (ADAPTS), and techniques which will determine the source of a…

Ard, R. W., Jr.

1976-01-01

201

Schools Wrestle with Issue of Armed Guards  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the March 21, 2005, shootings at Red Lake High School that brought to light an issue of whether school security personnel should be armed. Among the what-ifs being asked after the shootings at Red Lake High is one with uncomfortable implications for many school leaders: What if the two security guards posted near the…

Trotter, Andrew

2005-01-01

202

Interim results of a national test of the rapid assessment of hospital procurement barriers in donation (RAPiD).  

PubMed

Organ donation remains a major public health challenge with over 114 000 people on the waitlist in the United States. Among other factors, extant research highlights the need to improve the identification and timely referral of potential donors by hospital healthcare providers (HCPs) to organ procurement organizations (OPOs). We implemented a national test of the Rapid Assessment of hospital Procurement barriers in Donation (RAPiD) to identify assets and barriers to the organ donation and patient referral processes; assess hospital-OPO relationships and offer tailored recommendations for improving these processes. Having partnered with seven OPOs, data were collected at 70 hospitals with high donor potential in the form of direct observations and interviews with 2358 HCPs. We found that donation attitudes and knowledge among HCPs were high, but use of standard referral criteria was lacking. Significant differences were found in the donation-related attitudes, knowledge and behaviors of physicians and emergency department staff as compared to other staff in intensive care units with high organ donor potential. Also, while OPO staff were generally viewed positively, they were often perceived as outsiders rather than members of healthcare teams. Recommendations for improving the referral and donation processes are discussed. PMID:22900761

Traino, H M; Alolod, G P; Shafer, T; Siminoff, L A

2012-11-01

203

Are Tuberculosis Patients in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Hyderabad, India Being Managed According to National Guidelines?  

PubMed Central

Setting A tertiary health care facility (Government General and Chest hospital) in Hyderabad, India. Objectives To assess a) the extent of compliance of specialists to standardized national (RNTCP) tuberculosis management guidelines and b) if patients on discharge from hospital were being appropriately linked up with peripheral health facilities for continuation of anti-Tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Methods A descriptive study using routine programme data and involving all TB patients admitted to inpatient care from 1st January to 30th June, 2010. Results and Conclusions There were a total of 3120 patients admitted of whom, 1218 (39%) required anti-TB treatment. Of these 1104 (98%) were treated with one of the RNTCP recommended regimens, while 28 (2%) were treated with non-RNTCP regimens. The latter included individually tailored MDR-TB treatment regimens for 19 patients and adhoc regimens for nine patients. A total of 957 (86%) patients were eventually discharged from the hospital of whom 921 (96%) had a referral form filled for continuing treatment at a peripheral health facility. Formal feedback from peripheral health facilities on continuation of TB treatment was received for 682 (74%) patients. In a tertiary health facility with specialists the great majority of TB patients are managed in line with national guidelines. However a number of short-comings were revealed and measures to rectify these are discussed.

Kondapaka, Kiran Kumar; Prasad, Surapaneni Venkateswara; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Kandi, Subhakar; Zachariah, Rony; Harries, Anthony David; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Tetali, Shailaja; Anchala, Raghupathy; Kannuri, Nanda Kishore; Murthy, Krishna; Koppu, Dhanamurthy; Vangari, Latha; Rao, Sreenivas

2012-01-01

204

Influenza in Outpatient ILI Case-Patients in National Hospital-Based Surveillance, Bangladesh, 2007-2008  

PubMed Central

Background Recent population-based estimates in a Dhaka low-income community suggest that influenza was prevalent among children. To explore the epidemiology and seasonality of influenza throughout the country and among all age groups, we established nationally representative hospital-based surveillance necessary to guide influenza prevention and control efforts. Methodolgy/Principal Findings We conducted influenza-like illness and severe acute respiratory illness sentinel surveillance in 12 hospitals across Bangladesh during May 2007–December 2008. We collected specimens from 3,699 patients, 385 (10%) which were influenza positive by real time RT-PCR. Among the sample-positive patients, 192 (51%) were type A and 188 (49%) were type B. Hemagglutinin subtyping of type A viruses detected 137 (71%) A/H1 and 55 (29%) A/H3, but no A/H5 or other novel influenza strains. The frequency of influenza cases was highest among children aged under 5 years (44%), while the proportions of laboratory confirmed cases was highest among participants aged 11–15 (18%). We applied kriging, a geo-statistical technique, to explore the spatial and temporal spread of influenza and found that, during 2008, influenza was first identified in large port cities and then gradually spread to other parts of the country. We identified a distinct influenza peak during the rainy season (May–September). Conclusions/Significance Our surveillance data confirms that influenza is prevalent throughout Bangladesh, affecting a wide range of ages and causing considerable morbidity and hospital care. A unimodal influenza seasonality may allow Bangladesh to time annual influenza prevention messages and vaccination campaigns to reduce the national influenza burden. To scale-up such national interventions, we need to quantify the national rates of influenza and the economic burden associated with this disease through further studies.

Zaman, Rashid Uz; Alamgir, A. S. M.; Rahman, Mustafizur; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Gurley, Emily S.; Sharker, M. Abu Yushuf; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Azim, Tasnim; Fry, Alicia M.; Lindstrom, Stephen; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Xu, Xiyan; Garten, Rebecca J.; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Khan, Salah Uddin; Faruque, Labib Imran; Ameer, Syeda Shegufta; Klimov, Alexander I.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P.

2009-01-01

205

33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35 Section 173...Numbering § 173.35 Coast Guard validation sticker. No person may operate...by the Coast Guard unless it has the validation sticker issued with the...

2013-07-01

206

46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping...This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard Symbol means that impression stamped on...

2013-10-01

207

The National Accreditation Board for Hospital and Health Care Providers accreditation programme in India.  

PubMed

Quality in health care is important as it is directly linked with patient safety. Quality as we know is driven either by regulation or by market demand. Regulation in most developing countries has not been effective, as there is shortage of health care providers and governments have to be flexible. In such circumstances, quality has taken a back seat. Accreditation symbolizes the framework for quality governance of a hospital and is based on optimum standards. Not only is India establishing numerous state of the art hospitals, but they are also experiencing an increase in demand for quality as well as medical tourism. India launched its own accreditation system in 2006, conforming to standards accredited by ISQua. This article shows the journey to accreditation in India and describes the problems encountered by hospitals as well as the benefits it has generated for the industry and patients. PMID:24938026

Gyani, Girdhar J; Krishnamurthy, B

2014-01-01

208

The Incidence and Repetition of Hospital-Treated Deliberate Self Harm: Findings from the World's First National Registry  

PubMed Central

Background Suicide is a significant public health issue with almost one million people dying by suicide each year worldwide. Deliberate self harm (DSH) is the single most important risk factor for suicide yet few countries have reliable data on DSH. We developed a national DSH registry in the Republic of Ireland to establish the incidence of hospital-treated DSH at national level and the spectrum and pattern of presentations with DSH and repetition. Methods and Findings Between 2003 and 2009, the Irish National Registry of Deliberate Self Harm collected data on DSH presentations to all 40 hospital emergency departments in the country. Data were collected by trained data registration officers using standard methods of case ascertainment and definition. The Registry recorded 75,119 DSH presentations involving 48,206 individuals. The total incidence rate fell from 209 (95% CI: 205–213) per 100,000 in 2003 to 184 (95% CI: 180–189) per 100,000 in 2006 and increased again to 209 (95% CI: 204–213) per 100,000 in 2009. The most notable annual changes were successive 10% increases in the male rate in 2008 and 2009. There was significant variation by age with peak rates in women in the 15–19 year age group (620 (95% CI: 605–636) per 100,000), and in men in the 20–24 age group (427 (95% CI: 416–439) per 100,000). Repetition rates varied significantly by age, method of self harm and number of previous episodes. Conclusions Population-based data on hospital-treated DSH represent an important index of the burden of mental illness and suicide risk in the community. The increased DSH rate in Irish men in 2008 and 2009 coincided with the advent of the economic recession in Ireland. The findings underline the need for developing effective interventions to reduce DSH repetition rates as a key priority for health systems.

Perry, Ivan J.; Corcoran, Paul; Fitzgerald, Anthony P.; Keeley, Helen S.; Reulbach, Udo; Arensman, Ella

2012-01-01

209

Admission to acute care hospitals for adolescent substance abuse: a national descriptive analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Use of alcohol and illicit drugs by adolescents remains a problem in the U.S. Case identification and early treatment can occur within a broad variety of healthcare and non-healthcare settings, including acute care hospitals. The objective of this study is to describe the extent and nature of adolescent admissions to the acute inpatient setting for substance abuse (SA). We

Deena J Chisolm; Kelly J Kelleher

2006-01-01

210

Risk Factors for Violent Offending in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A National Study of Hospitalized Individuals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about risk factors for violence among individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study uses data from Swedish longitudinal registers for all 422 individuals hospitalized with autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome during 1988-2000 and compares those committing violent or sexual offenses with those who did not. Thirty-one…

Langstrom, Niklas; Grann, Martin; Ruchkin, Vladislav; Sjostedt, Gabrielle; Fazel, Seena

2009-01-01

211

[The Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified National Health System: a performance evaluation for auditing maternal near miss].  

PubMed

This study aimed to investigate the performance of the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SIH-SUS) in identifying cases of maternal near miss in a hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2008. Cases were identified by reviewing medical records of pregnant and postpartum women admitted to the hospital. The search for potential near miss events in the SIH-SUS database relied on a list of procedures and codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) that were consistent with this diagnosis. The patient chart review identified 27 cases, while 70 potential occurrences of near miss were detected in the SIH-SUS database. However, only 5 of 70 were "true cases" of near miss according to the chart review, which corresponds to a sensitivity of 18.5% (95%CI: 6.3-38.1), specificity of 94.3% (95%CI: 92.8-95.6), area under the ROC of 0.56 (95%CI: 0.48-0.63), and positive predictive value of 10.1% (IC95%: 4.7-20.3). These findings suggest that SIH-SUS does not appear appropriate for monitoring maternal near miss. PMID:23843001

Nakamura-Pereira, Marcos; Mendes-Silva, Wallace; Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos; Reichenheim, Michael E; Lobato, Gustavo

2013-07-01

212

National analysis of in-hospital resource utilization in choledocholithiasis management using propensity scores  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Two treatment options exist for choledocholithiasis (CDL): endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and common\\u000a bile duct exploration (CBDE). Resource utilization measured by total in-hospital charges (THC) and length of stay (LOS) was\\u000a compared using the propensity score (PS). In this study, PS was the probability that a patient received CBDE based on comorbidities\\u000a and demographics. The power of this method lies

B. K. Poulose; P. G. Arbogast; M. D. Holzman

2006-01-01

213

Health service delay among pulmonary tuberculosis patients presenting to a National Referral Hospital, Kampala, Uganda: a cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Delay in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is common in many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Timely diagnosis of active tuberculosis is crucial in minimizing morbidity and mortality in the community as well as nosocomial transmission in health care facilities. This study aimed at determining factors associated with health service delay in the diagnosis and initiation of treatment among new PTB patients presenting to the National Referral Hospital-Mulago. Methods This was a cross-sectional study among eligible new PTB patients presenting at the National referral TB treatment center Mulago hospital, between March to May 2009. The patients were consecutively recruited and interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire to assess socio- demographic and health service factors. Multivariate logistic regression using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals was done. Results Two hundred and sixty six newly diagnosed PTB patients were enrolled, of which 65.4% experienced health systems delay. The median health service delay was 9days (IQR=8-19). Factors associated with health service delay were: 1n-patient (OR= 4.68, 95% CI: 1.91-11.45), secondary as highest level of education attained (OR= 3.56, 95% CI: 1.18-10.74), primary as highest level of education attained (OR= 6.70, 95% CI: 2.13-21.02), presence of fever (OR= 3.28, 95% CI: 1.05-10.79), and patient delay at health facility (OR= 5.01, 95% CI: 1.33-18.9). Conclusion The study found a significant proportion of Health service delay among pulmonary tuberculosis patients presenting at the referral hospital. Being an in-patient and having fever as a symptom of tuberculosis needs further attention in order to have timely diagnosis. There is need for awareness on TB especially that most of the TB symptoms present like other febrile illnesses such as malaria and needs consideration when patients present to a health facility.

Kansiime, Catherine; Kiwuwa, Stephen M; Levi, Mugenyi; Asiimwe, Benon B; Katamba, Achilles

2013-01-01

214

The national database of hospital-based cancer registries: a nationwide infrastructure to support evidence-based cancer care and cancer control policy in Japan.  

PubMed

Monitoring the current status of cancer care is essential for effective cancer control and high-quality cancer care. To address the information needs of patients and physicians in Japan, hospital-based cancer registries are operated in 397 hospitals designated as cancer care hospitals by the national government. These hospitals collect information on all cancer cases encountered in each hospital according to precisely defined coding rules. The Center for Cancer Control and Information Services at the National Cancer Center supports the management of the hospital-based cancer registry by providing training for tumor registrars and by developing and maintaining the standard software and continuing communication, which includes mailing lists, a customizable web site and site visits. Data from the cancer care hospitals are submitted annually to the Center, compiled, and distributed as the National Cancer Statistics Report. The report reveals the national profiles of patient characteristics, route to discovery, stage distribution, and first-course treatments of the five major cancers in Japan. A system designed to follow up on patient survival will soon be established. Findings from the analyses will reveal characteristics of designated cancer care hospitals nationwide and will show how characteristics of patients with cancer in Japan differ from those of patients with cancer in other countries. The database will provide an infrastructure for future clinical and health services research and will support quality measurement and improvement of cancer care. Researchers and policy-makers in Japan are encouraged to take advantage of this powerful tool to enhance cancer control and their clinical practice. PMID:23448800

Higashi, Takahiro; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Shibata, Akiko; Emori, Yoshiko; Nishimoto, Hiroshi

2014-01-01

215

The Guarding Problem - Complexity and Approximation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Let G = (V, E) be the given graph and G R = (V R ,E R ) and G C = (V C ,E C ) be the sub graphs of G such that V R ? V C = ? and V R ? V C = V. G C is referred to as the cops region and G R is called as the robber region. Initially a robber is placed at some vertex of V R and the cops are placed at some vertices of V C . The robber and cops may move from their current vertices to one of their neighbours. While a cop can move only within the cops region, the robber may move to any neighbour. The robber and cops move alternatively. A vertex v ? V C is said to be attacked if the current turn is the robber's turn, the robber is at vertex u where u ? V R , (u,v) ? E and no cop is present at v. The guarding problem is to find the minimum number of cops required to guard the graph G C from the robber's attack. We first prove that the decision version of this problem when G R is an arbitrary undirected graph is PSPACE-hard. We also prove that the complexity of the decision version of the guarding problem when G R is a wheel graph is NP-hard. We then present approximation algorithms if G R is a star graph, a clique and a wheel graph with approximation ratios H(n 1), 2 H(n 1) and left( H(n1) + 3/2 right) respectively, where H(n1) = 1 + 1/2 + ... + 1/n1 and n 1 = ? V R ?.

Reddy, T. V. Thirumala; Krishna, D. Sai; Rangan, C. Pandu

216

Dementia Increases the Risks of Acute Organ Dysfunction, Severe Sepsis and Mortality in Hospitalized Older Patients: A National Population-Based Study  

PubMed Central

Background Dementia increases the risk of death in older patients hospitalized for acute illnesses. However, the effect of dementia on the risks of developing acute organ dysfunction and severe sepsis as well as on the risk of hospital mortality in hospitalized older patients remains unknown, especially when treatments for these life-threatening situations are considered. Methods In this population-based cohort study, we analyzed 41,672 older (?65 years) patients, including 3,487 (8.4%) with dementia, from the first-time admission claim data between 2005 and 2007 for a nationally representative sample of one million beneficiaries enrolled in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Outcomes included acute organ dysfunction, severe sepsis, and hospital mortality. The effect of dementia on outcomes was assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Results Dementia was associated with a 32% higher risk of acute organ dysfunction (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19–1.46), a 50% higher risk of severe sepsis (aOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.32–1.69) and a 28% higher risk of hospital mortality (aOR 1.28, 95% CI 1.10–1.48) after controlling age, sex, surgical condition, comorbidity, principal diagnosis, infection status, hospital level, and length of hospital stay. However, the significant adverse effect of dementia on hospital mortality disappeared when life-support treatments, including vasopressor use, hemodialysis, mechanical ventilation, and intensive care, were also controlled. Conclusions In hospitalized older patients, the presence of dementia increased the risks of acute organ dysfunction, severe sepsis and hospital mortality. However, after intervention using life-support treatments, dementia only exhibited a minor role on short-term mortality.

Shen, Hsiu-Nien; Lu, Chin-Li; Li, Chung-Yi

2012-01-01

217

A constraint-based approach to guarded algebraic data types  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study HMG(X), an extension of the constraint-based type system HM(X) with deep pat- tern matching, polymorphic recursion, and guarded algebraic data types. Guarded algebraic data types subsume the concepts known in the literature as indexed types, guarded recursive datatype constructors, (first-class) phantom types, and equality qualified types, and are closely related to inductive types. Their characteristic property is to

Vincent Simonet; François Pottier

2007-01-01

218

RoboGuard, a teleoperated mobile security robot  

Microsoft Academic Search

The so-called RoboGuard is a mobile security device which is tightly integrated into the existing surveillance framework developed and marketed by Quadrox, a Belgian SME. RoboGuards are semi-autonomous mobile robots providing video streams via wireless Intranet-connections to existing watchguard systems, supplemented by various basic and optional behaviors. RoboGuards fill several market niches. Especially, they are a serious alternative to the

Andreas Birk; Holger Kenn

2002-01-01

219

Credit BG. View looking north northeast at Guard House and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Credit BG. View looking north northeast at Guard House and entrance to Building 4505 complex. This Guard House was built in 1993 as a portable unit; it replaced an older structure. The Building 4505 complex is surrounded by a security fence. Building 4496 appears to immediate right of view - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Guard House, Northeast of A Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

220

GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the Guard House and Barracks, and South Fire House in relation to nearby roads, railroad tracks, and the piers). Navy Yard, Mare Island, California. P.W. Drawing No. C-1899, approved 1941; file no. 930-C-1. Scale one inch to forty feet. 72 cn x 97 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

221

Self-Aligned Guard Rings For Schottky-Barrier Diodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed self-aligned guard ring increases active area of Schottky-barrier infrared detector. Concept developed for silicide Schottky-barrier diodes in which platinum silicide or iridium silicide Schottky-contacts provide cutoff wavelengths of about 6 or 10 micrometers. Grid of silicon dioxide doped with phosphorus etched on silicon wafer, and phosphorus from grid diffused into substrate, creating n-type guard rings. Silicide layers formed in open areas of grid. Overlap of guard rings and silicide layers small.

Lin, True-Lon

1990-01-01

222

Intertwined Epidemics: National Demographic Trends in Hospitalizations for Heroin- and Opioid-Related Overdoses, 1993-2009  

PubMed Central

The historical patterns of opiate use show that sources and methods of access greatly influence who is at risk. Today, there is evidence that an enormous increase in the availability of prescription opiates is fuelling a rise in addiction nationally, drawing in new initiates to these drugs and changing the geography of opiate overdoses. Recent efforts at supply-based reductions in prescription opiates may reduce harm, but addicted individuals may switch to other opiates such as heroin. In this analysis, we test the hypothesis that changes in the rates of Prescription Opiate Overdoses (POD) are correlated with changes in the rate of heroin overdoses (HOD). ICD9 codes from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and population data from the Census were used to estimate overall and demographic specific rates of POD and HOD hospital admissions between 1993 and 2009. Regression models were used to test for linear trends and lagged negative binomial regression models were used to model the interrelationship between POD and HOD hospital admissions. Findings show that whites, women, and middle-aged individuals had the largest increase in POD and HOD rates over the study period and that HOD rates have increased in since 2007. The lagged models show that increases in a hospitals POD predict an increase in the subsequent years HOD admissions by a factor of 1.26 (p<0.001) and that each increase in HOD admissions increase the subsequent years POD by a factor of 1.57 (p<0.001). Our hypothesis of fungibility between prescription opiates and heroin was supported by these analyses. These findings suggest that focusing on supply-based interventions may simply lead to a shift in use to heroin rather minimizing the reduction in harm. The alternative approach of using drug abuse prevention resources on treatment and demand-side reduction is likely to be more productive at reducing opiate abuse related harm.

Unick, George Jay; Rosenblum, Daniel; Mars, Sarah; Ciccarone, Daniel

2013-01-01

223

View of commissary, central guard tower, and cell block five, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of commissary, central guard tower, and cell block five, looking from the chapel stairs, facing southeast - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

224

Protocol: optimised electrophyiological analysis of intact guard cells from Arabidopsis  

PubMed Central

Genetic resources available for Arabidopsis thaliana make this species particularly attractive as a model for molecular genetic studies of guard cell homeostasis, transport and signalling, but this facility is not matched by accessible tools for quantitative analysis of transport in the intact cell. We have developed a reliable set of procedures for voltage clamp analysis of guard cells from Arabidopsis leaves. These procedures greatly simplify electrophysiological recordings, extending the duration of measurements and scope for analysis of the predominant K+ and anion channels of intact stomatal guard cells to that achieved previously in work with Vicia and tobacco guard cells.

2012-01-01

225

77 FR 41688 - Security Zones; 2012 Republican National Convention, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2011-0922] RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; 2012 Republican National Convention...Guard is establishing seven temporary security zones on the waters and adjacent...

2012-07-16

226

Passive surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Queensland public hospitals: the basis for a national system?  

PubMed

Australia currently has no system of passive surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in spite of the importance of surveillance in identifying and defining emergent resistance being generally accepted. Queensland Health Pathology and Scientific Services have developed flexible software for passive surveillance with the capacity to handle national data. The system imports raw data strings in delimited ASCII text format into a relational database and screens to exclude duplicates before the processing of the cumulative susceptibility data. It allows considerable flexibility in inquiry parameters and has the ability to 'drill down' to individual laboratory results. Examples of analytical output are given for 49,169 unique isolate results obtained in all Queensland Health Pathology Service laboratories from 1 January to 30 June 2003. The system could form the basis of a national system for passive antimicrobial resistance surveillance. PMID:15460960

Nimmo, Graeme R; Fong, Jonathan

2004-01-01

227

Pattern of occurrence and treatment of impacted teeth at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Impacted teeth predispose to periodontal disease and dental caries of adjacent teeth resulting in pain, discomfort and loss of function. This study analyzed the pattern of occurrence of impacted teeth, associated symptoms, treatment and complications of treatment in patients who presented at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania. Method This was a crossectional descriptive study which utilized notes and x rays of patients who were treated for impacted teeth at the Oral and Maxillofacial firm in Muhimbili National Hospital over five years, from January 2005 to August 2010. These records were retrieved and examined for the major complaint of the patient at presentation to hospital, demography, impacted tooth, type of impaction (for third molars), treatment offered and complications after treatment. Similar information was collected from all patients with impacted teeth attended in the same centre from 1st September 2010 to 31st August 2011. Results A total of 896 patients (496 males and 400 females) treated for complaints related to impacted teeth were recorded. The male to female ratio was 1.2:1, age range of 16 to 85 years and a mean age of 28.9 years (SD = 9.5). Slightly more than 84% of the patients presented with mandibular third molar impactions. Most (44.7%) of these patients had an impacted lower right third molar followed by those presenting with a lower left third molar impaction (39.7%). In 1.3% of the patients all the four third molars were impacted. Sixty nine (7.7%) patients had impacted upper 3rd molars while 2% had impacted upper canines. Of the mandibular 3rd molar impactions 738 (76%) were mesio-angular type, 87 (8.9%) horizontal type and 69 (7.1%) disto-angular. Patients presented with a variety of complaints. About 85% of the patients presented to hospital due to varying degrees of pain. In 4.9% the detection of the impacted tooth/teeth was coincidental after presenting to hospital for other reasons not related to the impaction. Majority of the patients with impacted mandibular third molars had carious lesions on the impacted teeth, neighbouring tooth or both. Four hundred and five (45.2%) patients had a carious lesion on one of the impacted teeth while 201(22.4%) patients had a carious lesion on the adjacent second molar. In 122 (13.6%) patients both the impacted third molar and the adjacent second molar were carious. In twelve patients who presented with a main complaint of fracture of the angle of the mandible there was an associated impacted 3rd molar. Eight hundred and fifteen (91%) patients with impacted teeth were treated by surgical removal. Among these only 15 (1.8%) had complications that ranged from excessive swellings, trismus and severe pain post operatively. One patient was reported to have fracture of the angle of the mandible sustained during surgical removal of an impacted 48. Conclusions The majority of patients with impacted teeth were young with an almost equal sex distribution. The most commonly impacted teeth were mandibular third molars followed by the maxillary third molars. Patients with impacted teeth reported for health care predominantly because of pain due to dental caries or infection. There is a need of creating appropriate programmes that would further raise peoples’ awareness to regular dental checkups so that appropriate measures are taken before complications arise.

2013-01-01

228

Catering & Hospitality, Serving Food & Drink, Levels 1-3. 2nd Edition. Catering & Hospitality, Reception & Housekeeping, Levels 1-3. Catering & Hospitality, Supervisory Management, Level 3. Catering & Hospitality Management, Level 4. 2nd Edition. National Vocational Qualifications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Britain's National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) are work qualifications that measure what an employee or potential employee can do as well as how much he or she knows and understands about a particular job. Used as written proof of usable workplace skills that can be put to profitable use by an employer, NVQs range from basic Level 1, for…

Business and Technology Education Council, London (England).

229

The effectiveness of shin guards used by football players.  

PubMed

In football, injuries from opponent contact occur commonly in the lower extremities. FIFA the world's governing body for football requires players to wear shin guards. The aim of this study was to compare the protective effectiveness of polypropylene based shin guards with custom-made carbon fiber ones. Three commercial polypropylene shin guards (Adidas Predator™, Adidas UCL™, and Nike Mercurial™) and two custom-made carbon fiber shin guards were examined. The experimental setup had the following parts: 1) A pendulum attached a load cell at the tip (CAS Corp., Korea) and a fixed prosthetic foot equipped with a cleat to simulate an attacker's foot. 2) An artificial tibia prepared by condensed foam and reinforced by carbon fibers protected with soft clothing. 3) A multifunctional sensor system (Tekscan Corp., F-Socket System, Turkey) to record the impact on the tibia. In the low impact force trials, only 2.79-9.63 % of the load was transmitted to the sensors. When comparing for mean force, peak force and impulse, both carbon fiber shin guards performed better than the commercial ones (Adidas Predator™, Adidas UCL™, and Nike Mercurial™) (p = 0.000). Based on these same parameters, the Nike Mercurial™ provided better protection than the Adidas Predator™ and the Adidas UCL™ (p = 0.000). In the high impact force trials, only 5.16-10.90 % of the load was transmitted to the sensors. For peak force and impulse, the carbon fiber shin guards provided better protection than all the others. Carbon fiber shin guards possess protective qualities superior to those of commercial polypropylene shin guards. Key PointsShin guards decrease the risk of serious injuries.Carbon shin guards provide sufficient protection against high impact forces.Commercially available Polypropylene based shin guards do not provide sufficient protection against high impact forces. PMID:24570615

Tatar, Yasar; Ramazanoglu, Nusret; Camliguney, Asiye Filiz; Saygi, Evrim Karadag; Cotuk, Hasan Birol

2014-01-01

230

Conditions triggering local incident reviews in UK hospital maternity units: A national survey  

PubMed Central

Objectives In countries, such as the UK, where maternal deaths are rare, reviews of other severe complications of pregnancy and the puerperium can provide an additional perspective to help learn lessons to improve future care. The objective of this survey was to identify the types of incidents which triggered local reviews in the UK, in order to inform national safety reporting guidance. Design A national descriptive survey. Setting UK. Participants Consultant-led maternity units. Main outcome measure Seventy-one per cent of maternity units provided an incident review trigger list. The conditions included were classified by two assessors. Incidents that were listed by at least 5% of maternity units were reported and compared with incidents recommended for review by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). Results The conditions covered were highly variable, although those recommended by the RCOG were most highly represented. The most commonly listed conditions that had not been recommended for review by the RCOG included inadequate staffing levels (70%), cardiac arrest (69%) and maternal sepsis (64%). Conclusions Substantial variation exists in the types of incident listed for review by maternity units in the UK. Importantly, some units are not reviewing cases of severe infective complications even though this is a current major concern. Future guidance concerning local serious incident review processes should include how the list of conditions triggering a review should be managed in the light of changing clinical and safety priorities.

Mohamed-Ahmed, Olaa; McClymont, Charlotte; Knight, Marian

2014-01-01

231

Survey of perinatal hepatitis B virus transmission after Korean National Prevention Program in a tertiary hospital  

PubMed Central

Background/Aims The Ministry of Health and Welfare and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in South Korea have been organizing hepatitis B virus (HBV) vertical infection prevention projects since July 2002. In this single-institute study, the results of surveys conducted in target mothers who delivered babies in a tertiary hospital were investigated and analyzed. Methods Of the 9,281 mothers and their 9,824 neonates born between July 2002 and December 2012, 308 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive mothers and their 319 neonates were selected for this study, and their records were analyzed retrospectively. Results A total of 308 mothers were HBsAg-positive, with an HBV prevalence of 3.32% (308/9,281). There were 319 neonates born to these HBsAg-positive mothers, and 252 were confirmed to as either HBsAg-positive or -negative. Four were confirmed as HBsAg-positive, with a 1.59% (4/252) HBV vertical infection rate. All the mothers of neonates who had an HBV vertical infection were hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive. Among the HBsAg-positive neonates, three were HBeAg-positive and had an HBV DNA titer of 1.0 × 108 copies/mL. Conclusions The HBV prevalence of mothers was 3.32% (308/9,281), and their vertical infection rate was 1.59% (4/252). Thus, the South Korean HBV vertical infection prevention projects are effective, and, accordingly, HBV prevalence in South Korea is expected to decrease continuously.

Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Ju Seung; Lee, Jong Joon; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Suk Young; Kwon, Oh Sang; Kim, Yun Soo; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Ju Hyun

2014-01-01

232

Smoking behaviour predicts tobacco control attitudes in a high smoking prevalence hospital: A cross-sectional study in a Portuguese teaching hospital prior to the national smoking ban  

PubMed Central

Background Several studies have investigated attitudes to and compliance with smoking bans, but few have been conducted in healthcare settings and none in such a setting in Portugal. Portugal is of particular interest because the current ban is not in line with World Health Organization recommendations for a "100% smoke-free" policy. In November 2007, a Portuguese teaching-hospital surveyed smoking behaviour and tobacco control (TC) attitudes before the national ban came into force in January 2008. Methods Questionnaire-based cross-sectional study, including all eligible staff. Sample: 52.9% of the 1, 112 staff; mean age 38.3 ± 9.9 years; 65.9% females. Smoking behaviour and TC attitudes and beliefs were the main outcomes. Bivariable analyses were conducted using chi-squared and MacNemar tests to compare categorical variables and Mann-Whitney tests to compare medians. Multilogistic regression (MLR) was performed to identify factors associated with smoking status and TC attitudes. Results Smoking prevalence was 40.5% (95% CI: 33.6-47.4) in males, 23.5% (95% CI: 19.2-27.8) in females (p < 0.001); 43.2% in auxiliaries, 26.1% in nurses, 18.9% among physicians, and 34.7% among other non-health professionals (p = 0.024). The findings showed a very high level of agreement with smoking bans, even among smokers, despite the fact that 70.3% of the smokers smoked on the premises and 76% of staff reported being frequently exposed to second-hand smoke (SHS). In addition 42.8% reported that SHS was unpleasant and 28.3% admitted complaining. MLR showed that smoking behaviour was the most important predictor of TC attitudes. Conclusions Smoking prevalence was high, especially among the lower socio-economic groups. The findings showed a very high level of support for smoking bans, despite the pro-smoking environment. Most staff reported passive behaviour, despite high SHS exposure. This and the high smoking prevalence may contribute to low compliance with the ban and low participation on smoking cessation activities. Smoking behaviour had greater influence in TC attitudes than health professionals' education. Our study is the first in Portugal to identify potential predictors of non-compliance with the partial smoking ban, further emphasising the need for a 100% smoke-free policy, effective enforcement and public health education to ensure compliance and promote social norm change.

2011-01-01

233

Pertrochanteric fracture of the femur in the Finnish National Hospital Discharge Register: validity of procedural coding, external cause for injury and diagnosis  

PubMed Central

Background Hospital discharge data is routinely collected in Finland and it is an invaluable source of information when assessing injury epidemiology as well as treatment. The database can be used when planning injury prevention and redirecting resources of the health care system. Most recently our hospital discharge register has been used to assess the incidence of surgical treatment of common fractures. This study was aimed to evaluate the coverage and accuracy of the Finnish National Hospital Discharge Register (NHDR) focusing on hip fractures. In other words, patients hospitalized for a pertrochanteric hip fracture were used to assess the validity of the NHDR. Methods The validity of the NHDR was assessed by comparing the data in hospital discharge register with the original patient records and radiographs in three separate hospitals; Tampere University Hospital, Hatanpää City Hospital of Tampere, and the Central Hospital of Kanta-Häme. The study analysis included 741 patients hospitalized due to pertrochanteric hip fracture between 1st January 2008 and 31st December 2010. Results The diagnosis was correctly placed on 96% (95% CI: 94 to 97%) of the 741 patients when radiographs were used as golden standard. The procedural coding had coverage of 98% (95% CI: 96 to 98%) and an accuracy of 88% (95% CI: 85 to 90%). The coverage of the external cause for injury was found to be 95% (95% CI: 94 to 97%) with an accuracy of 90% (95% CI: 87 to 92%). Conclusions Our results show that the validity of the Finnish NHDR is excellent as determined by accuracy of diagnosis and both accuracy and coverage of procedural coding and external cause for injury. The database can be used to assess injury epidemiology and changes in surgical treatment protocols.

2014-01-01

234

Adherence to medication: A nation-wide study from the Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate adherence to medical regimen and predictors for non-adherence among children with cancer in Egypt. METHODS: We administered two study specific questionnaires to 304 parents of children diagnosed with cancer at the Children’s Cancer Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, one before the first chemotherapy treatment and the other before the third. The questionnaires were translated to colloquial Egyptian Arabic, and due, to the high illiteracy level in Egypt an interviewer read the questions in Arabic to each parent and registered the answers. Both questionnaires consisted of almost 90 questions each. In addition, a Case Report Form was filled in from the child’s medical journal. The study period consisted of 7 mo (February until September 2008) and we had a participation rate of 97%. Descriptive statistics are presented and Fisher’s exact test was used to check for possible differences between the adherent and non-adherent groups. A P-value below 0.05 was considered significant. Software used was SAS version 9.3 for Windows (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, United States). RESULTS: Two hundred and eighty-one (90%) parents answered the second questionnaire, regarding their child’s adherence behaviour. Approximately two thirds of the children admitted to their third chemotherapy treatment had received medical recommendations upon discharge from the first or second chemotherapy treatment (181/281, 64%). Sixty-eight percent (123/181) of the parents who were given medical recommendations reported that their child did not follow the recommendations. Two main predictors were found for non-adherence: child resistance (111/123, 90%) and inadequate information (100/123, 81%). In the adherent group, 20% of the parents (n = 12/58) reported trust in their child’s doctor while 14 percent 8/58 reported trust in the other health-care professionals. Corresponding numbers for the non-adherent group are 8/123 (7%) for both their child’s doctor and other health-care professionals. Almost all of the parents expressed a lack of optimism towards the treatment (116/121, 96%), yet they reported an intention to continue with the treatment for two main reasons, for the sake of their child’s life (70%) (P = 0.005) and worry that their child would die if they discontinued the treatment (81%) (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Non-adherence to medical regimen is common among children diagnosed with cancer in Egypt, the main reasons being child resistance and inadequate information.

El Malla, Hanan; Ylitalo Helm, Nathalie; Wilderang, Ulrica; El Sayed Elborai, Yasser; Steineck, Gunnar; Kreicbergs, Ulrika

2013-01-01

235

33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Coast Guard commission pennant. The Coast Guard commission pennant shall have the union part composed of thirteen blue stars in a horizontal line on a white field, one-fourth the length of the pennant; the remaining three-fourths shall...

2013-07-01

236

Constraint-Based Type Inference for Guarded Algebraic Data Types  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guarded algebraic data types, which subsume the concepts known in the literature as indexed types, guarded recursive datatype constructors, and phantom types, and are closely related to inductive types, have the distinguishing feature that, when typechecking a function defined by cases, every branch must be checked under different typing assumptions. This mechanism allows exploiting the presence of dynamic tests in

Vincent Simonet; François Pottier

2003-01-01

237

Self-guarding Schottky barrier infrared detector array  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A two dimensional focal plane array of Schottky photodiodes on a silicon substrate for infrared imaging is presented. The array is designed for mating with multiplexing circuitry and has a self-guarding feature wherein adjacent Schottky electrodes act as guard electrodes. This feature allows a substantial increase of the focal plane area coverage ratio.

Shepherd, F. D., Jr.; Pellegrini, P. W.; Ludington, C. E.; Weeks, M. M.

1985-07-01

238

FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, PLANS AND DETAILS. Plan No. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, PLANS AND DETAILS. Plan No. 6754-319, dated August 1, 1933. Construction Division, Office of the Constructing Quartermaster - Hamilton Field, Fire Station & Guard House, Southwest corner of Seventh Street & Hangar Avenue, Novato, Marin County, CA

239

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) EXTERIOR AND MISCELLANEOUS DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

240

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) FRONT ELEVATION DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

241

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

242

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) FIRST AND SECOND FLOOR AND ROOF PLANS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

243

FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS, AND DETAILS. Plan ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS, AND DETAILS. Plan No. 6754-320, dated August 1, 1933. Constructing Division, Office of the Constructing Quartermaster - Hamilton Field, Fire Station & Guard House, Southwest corner of Seventh Street & Hangar Avenue, Novato, Marin County, CA

244

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) CELL BLOCK DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

245

Dynamic Guard Bandwidth Scheme for Wireless Broadband Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In future wireless broadband networks, bandwidth demands could fluctuate abruptly due to movement of high data rate users. Dynamic bandwidth reservation plays a key rule in ensuring that mobile calls are not disrupted after they are admitted into the network. We propose a dynamic guard bandwidth scheme that adapts the amount of guard bandwidth in both wired and wireless links

Wee-seng Soh; Hyong S. Kim

2001-01-01

246

LG-GUARD for missile defense and offence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

LG-GUARD employs a hierarchy of multi-resolution games (LG hypergame) to represent various areas of operations at different levels of detail. LG-GUARD includes a full implementation of advanced fire control by dynamic preemptive control of sensor-to-shooter and shooter-to-target pairing. However, the greatest advantage of LG-GUARD is a fast planning and re-planning based on the Linguistic Geometry (LG) approach. This ability allows LG-GUARD to generate COA aiming to achieve the commander"s intent for the entire operation, vs. an ability to shoot as many targets as possible at each snapshot of a battle. LG-GUARD operates in two modes. The Planning Mode (long range planning) enabled LG-GUARD to automatically select best types, quantities, and locations for defensive assets from the entire area permitted for the operations of the Blue side to achieve a given probability of success (with as little total opportunity cost as possible). After selection and turning to the Engagement Mode (short range planning), LG-GUARD generates the best courses of action for all sides of the most probable operation (which involves defensive assets selected in the Planning Mode). The capabilities of LG-GUARD are shown in this paper by describing two kinds of scenarios, those executable now and those to be executable in the near future.

Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Vladimir; Umanskiy, Oleg

2003-09-01

247

46 CFR 107.117 - Coast Guard addresses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...a) For approval by Commandant (CG-CVC)âAttn: Office of Commercial Vessel Compliance, U.S. Coast Guard...For approval by Commandant (CG-ENG)âAttn: Office of Design and Engineering Systems, U.S. Coast Guard...

2013-10-01

248

75 FR 23212 - Security Zone; U.S. Coast Guard BSU Seattle, Pier 36, Seattle, WA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...discussed in the preamble, the Coast Guard proposes to amend 33 CFR Part...1334 Security Zone; U.S. Coast Guard BSU Seattle, Pier 36, Elliot...within this security zone, contact United States Coast Guard Sector Seattle Joint Harbor...

2010-05-03

249

33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12 Section 125...Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES...of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) The Coast...

2013-07-01

250

Causality analysis on health care evaluation criteria for state-operated mental hospitals in Korea using Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award model.  

PubMed

Hospitals today are pressured to move away from the conventional health services management techniques and provide higher-quality health care to survive in intense competition. In our study, we aimed to develop health care evaluation criteria for the mental health care sector based on the existing Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award model, and verify the causality of the evaluation model to lay groundwork for future research on the outcomes of national quality awards for mental health care. We focused on comparison groups comprising five state-operated mental hospitals in Korea using 92 survey questions derived from the MBNQA criteria for health care through structural equation modeling techniques. We verified that Leadership drives Foundation and Direction, which affect System that creates Results with 15 hypotheses supported out of 18 hypotheses established. We believe our findings will provide valuable implications to the top management of mental hospitals for self-examining quality management and promoting competitiveness. PMID:22015958

Kim, Yang-Kyun; Oh, Hyun-Jong

2012-10-01

251

National Workshop on the Delivery of Hospital Social Work Services in Obstetrics/Gynecology and Services to the Newborn (1st).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Material based on the proceedings of the First National Workshop on the Delivery of Hospital Social Work Services in Obstetrics/Gynecology and Services to the Newborn are provided. Included are 13 papers on the roles, needs, and responsibilities of contem...

1977-01-01

252

Shoplifter faces 27 years in prison for biting security guard.  

PubMed

A Pennsylvania man was sentenced to 13.5 to 27 years in prison following a biting incident after he was caught shoplifting at a Wal-Mart. [Name removed] was convicted of aggravated assault for attempting to inflict serious bodily harm on a security guard by "knowingly exposing her to an infectious disease". [Name removed] bit the guard who detained him and told the guard repeatedly that he had AIDS. A blood test later confirmed his HIV status. The prosecution argued that the guard did not have to show that she had a serious injury, only that [name removed] had placed her at risk. The prosecutor and defense attorneys had earlier agreed to a plea bargain with a sentence of no more than 27 months, but the judge rejected the plea, citing the seriousness of the offense and the defendant's long criminal record. The guard has tested negative. PMID:11366397

1999-03-01

253

Patient-Safety-Related Hospital Deaths in England: Thematic Analysis of Incidents Reported to a National Database, 2010-2012  

PubMed Central

Background Hospital mortality is increasingly being regarded as a key indicator of patient safety, yet methodologies for assessing mortality are frequently contested and seldom point directly to areas of risk and solutions. The aim of our study was to classify reports of deaths due to unsafe care into broad areas of systemic failure capable of being addressed by stronger policies, procedures, and practices. The deaths were reported to a patient safety incident reporting system after mandatory reporting of such incidents was introduced. Methods and Findings The UK National Health Service database was searched for incidents resulting in a reported death of an adult over the period of the study. The study population comprised 2,010 incidents involving patients aged 16 y and over in acute hospital settings. Each incident report was reviewed by two of the authors, and, by scrutinising the structured information together with the free text, a main reason for the harm was identified and recorded as one of 18 incident types. These incident types were then aggregated into six areas of apparent systemic failure: mismanagement of deterioration (35%), failure of prevention (26%), deficient checking and oversight (11%), dysfunctional patient flow (10%), equipment-related errors (6%), and other (12%). The most common incident types were failure to act on or recognise deterioration (23%), inpatient falls (10%), healthcare-associated infections (10%), unexpected per-operative death (6%), and poor or inadequate handover (5%). Analysis of these 2,010 fatal incidents reveals patterns of issues that point to actionable areas for improvement. Conclusions Our approach demonstrates the potential utility of patient safety incident reports in identifying areas of service failure and highlights opportunities for corrective action to save lives. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

Donaldson, Liam J.; Panesar, Sukhmeet S.; Darzi, Ara

2014-01-01

254

The evaluation of hospital laboratory information management systems based on the standards of the American National Standard Institute  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Nowadays, modern laboratories are faced with a huge volume of information. One of the goals of the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is to assist in the management of the information generated in the laboratory. This study intends to evaluate the LIMS based on the standards of the American National Standard Institute (ANSI). Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive–analytical study, which had been conducted in 2011, on the LIMSs in use, in the teaching and private hospitals in Isfahan. The data collecting instrument was a checklist, which was made by evaluating three groups of information components namely: ‘System capabilities’, ‘work list functions,’ and ‘reporting’ based on LIS8-A. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 20. Data were analyzed using (relative) frequency, percentage. To compare the data the following statistical tests were used: Leven test, t-test, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Results: The results of the study indicated that the LIMS had a low conformity (30%) with LIS8-A (P = 0.001), with no difference between teaching and private hospitals (P = 0.806). The ANOVA revealed that in terms of conformity with the LIS8-A standard, there was a significant difference between the systems produced by different vendors (P = 0.023). According to the results, a Kowsar system with more than %57 conformity in the three groups of information components had a better conformity to the standard, compared to the other systems. Conclusions: This study indicated that none of the LIMSs had a good conformity to the standard. It seems that system providers did not pay sufficient attention to many of the information components required by the standards when designing and developing their systems. It was suggested that standards from certified organizations and institutions be followed in the design and development process of health information systems.

Isfahani, Sakineh Saghaeiannejad; Khajouei, Reza; Jahanbakhsh, Maryan; Mirmohamadi, Mahboubeh

2014-01-01

255

A national infection control evaluation of drug-resistant tuberculosis hospitals in South Africa  

PubMed Central

Background The importance of infection control (IC) in health care settings with tuberculosis (TB) patients has been highlighted by recent health care-associated outbreaks in South Africa. Objective To conduct operational evaluations of IC in drug-resistant TB settings at a national level. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from June to September 2009 in all multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) facilities in South Africa. Structured interviews with key informants were completed, along with observation of IC practices. Health care workers (HCWs) were asked to complete an anonymous knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) questionnaire. Multilevel modeling was used to take into consideration the relationship between center and HCW level variables. Results Twenty-four M(X)DR-TB facilities (100%) were enrolled. Facility infrastructure and staff adherence to IC recommendations were highly varied between facilities. Key informant interviews were incongruent with direct observation of practices in all settings. A total of 499 HCWs were enrolled in the KAP evaluation. Higher level of clinical training was associated with greater IC knowledge (P < 0.001), more appropriate attitudes (P < 0.001) and less time spent with coughing patients (P < 0.001). IC practices were poor across all disciplines. Conclusion These findings demonstrate a clear need to improve and standardize IC infrastructure in drug-resistant TB settings in South Africa.

Farley, J. E.; Tudor, C.; Mphahlele, M.; Franz, K.; Perrin, N. A.; Dorman, S.; Van der Walt, M.

2013-01-01

256

Incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage: an Australian national hospital morbidity database analysis.  

PubMed

Incidences of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in Australia have been reported in regional studies with variable rates. We investigated the national SAH rate and evaluated the trend over the 10 years from 1998 to 2008. The crude SAH incidence, not related to trauma or arteriovenous malformation, was estimated at 10.3 cases per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.2-10.4). Females have a higher incidence of SAH (12.5 cases per 100,000; 95% CI: 12.3-12.8) compared to males (8.0 cases per 100,000; 95% CI: 7.8-8.3), with age-adjusted incidence increases with increasing age for both sexes. Less than 10% of SAH occurred in the first three decades of life. The peak age group for patients to experience SAH was between 45 years and 64 years, accounting for almost 45% of the overall annual SAH admissions. Aneurysms located in the anterior circulation were a more common source of rupture compared to those located in the posterior circulation (rate ratio 3.9; 95% CI: 3.6-4.2). Contrary to contemporary observations in the literature, we did not observe a decline in the incidence of SAH during this specified study period. PMID:22326203

Lai, Leon; Morgan, Michael Kerin

2012-05-01

257

Efficacy of hand rubs with a low alcohol concentration listed as effective by a national hospital hygiene society in Europe  

PubMed Central

Background Some national hospital hygiene societies in Europe such as the French society for hospital hygiene (SFHH) have positive lists of disinfectants. Few hand disinfectants with a rather low concentration of ethanol are listed by one society as effective for hygienic hand disinfection with 3 mL in 30 s including a virucidal activity in 30 s or 60 s, but published data allow having doubts. We have therefore evaluated the efficacy of three commonly used hand disinfectants according to EN 1500 and EN 14476. Methods Products 1 (Aniosgel 85 NPC) and 2 (Aniosrub 85 NPC) were based on 70% ethanol, product 3 (ClinoGel derma+) on 60% ethanol and 15% isopropanol (all w/w). They were tested in 3 laboratories according to EN 1500. Three mL were applied for 30 s and compared to the reference treatment of 2 × 3 mL applications of isopropanol 60% (v/v), on hands artificially contaminated with Escherichia coli. Each laboratory used a cross-over design against the reference alcohol with 15 or 20 volunteers. The virucidal activity of the products was evaluated (EN 14476) in one laboratory against adenovirus and poliovirus in different concentrations (80%, 90%, 97%), with different organic loads (none; clean conditions; phosphate-buffered saline) for up to 3 min. Results Product 1 revealed a mean log10-reduction of 3.87 ± 0.79 (laboratory 1) and 4.38 ± 0.87 (laboratory 2) which was significantly lower compared to the reference procedure (4.62 ± 0.89 and 5.00 ± 0.87). In laboratory 3 product 1 was inferior to the reference disinfection (4.06 ± 0.86 versus 4.99 ± 0.90). Product 2 revealed similar results. Product 3 fulfilled the requirements in one laboratory but failed in the two other. None of the three products was able to reduce viral infectivity of both adenovirus and poliovirus by 4 log10 steps in 3 min according to EN 14476. Conclusions Efficacy data mentioned in a positive list published by a society for hospital hygiene should still be regarded with caution if they quite obviously contradict published data on the same or similar products.

2013-01-01

258

US Coast Guard differential GPS network  

SciTech Connect

In order to aid navigation and to prevent disasters such as oil spills, collisions, and wrecks of vessels and aircraft, the US Coast Guard is charged with establishing, maintaining, and operating electronic aids to navigation. In a technological advance developed and operated by the Department of Defense, the global positioning system (GPS) provides all-weather global coverage, 24 hours/day at unprecedented accuracies. GPS provides standard positioning service (SPS) and precise positioning service (PPS). By applying differential techniques to GPS, navigational accuracies of better than 10 meters can be achieved. For the first time, an all-weather system is possible to meet all the marine navigator's needs including harbor and harbor approach navigation. This should revolutionize navigation safety and efficiency, surveying operations, search and rescue operations, and underwater mine disposal efficiency and safety.

Alsip, D.H.; Butler, J.M.; Radice, J.T.

1993-03-01

259

"Comfortable Camps?" Archaeology of the Confederate Guard Camp at the Florence Stockade  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How can we best learn about the world around us? The talented individuals at the National Park Service have continued to answer this question by carefully creating the Teaching with Historic Places Lessons over the past few years. Each lesson plan contains teaching guides, activities, and helpful primary documents. This plan looks at the Confederate Guard Camp at the Florence Stockade in South Carolina, and offers some tremendous insights into what life was like for the guards there. The lesson includes a thematic essay about the historical context of the lesson, along with maps, visual evidence in the form of site plans and artifacts, and helpful first-person narratives by those who were there. The activities here are a real pip, as they include a template for students seeking to build their own campground. [KMG

260

78 FR 24124 - National Guard Bureau Privacy Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...under 5 U.S.C. 552 and 32 CFR part 286. (f) NGB offices will permit individuals...S.C. 552, pursuant to 32 CFR part 286. (ii) If the System Manager finds that...U.S.C. 552a as well as 32 CFR part 286, 32 CFR part 310, subpart D to give...

2013-04-24

261

Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells  

SciTech Connect

Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

Schroeder, Julian I.

2007-05-02

262

Compliance with a time-out procedure intended to prevent wrong surgery in hospitals: results of a national patient safety programme in the Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Objective To prevent wrong surgery, the WHO ‘Safe Surgery Checklist’ was introduced in 2008. The checklist comprises a time-out procedure (TOP): the final step before the start of the surgical procedure where the patient, surgical procedure and side/site are reviewed by the surgical team. The aim of this study is to evaluate the extent to which hospitals carry out the TOP before anaesthesia in the operating room, whether compliance has changed over time, and to determine factors that are associated with compliance. Design Evaluation study involving observations. Setting Operating rooms of 2 academic, 4 teaching and 12 general Dutch hospitals. Participants A random selection was made from all adult patients scheduled for elective surgery on the day of the observation, preferably involving different surgeons and different procedures. Results Mean compliance with the TOP was 71.3%. Large differences between hospitals were observed. No linear trend was found in compliance during the study period. Compliance at general and teaching hospitals was higher than at academic hospitals. Compliance decreased with the age of the patient, general surgery showed lower compliance in comparison with other specialties and compliance was higher when the team was focused on the TOP. Conclusions Large differences in compliance with the TOP were observed between participating hospitals which can be attributed at least in part to the type of hospital, surgical specialty and patient characteristics. Hospitals do not comply consistently with national guidelines to prevent wrong surgery and further implementation as well as further research into non-compliance is needed.

van Schoten, Steffie M; Kop, Veerle; de Blok, Carolien; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Groenewegen, Peter P; Wagner, Cordula

2014-01-01

263

Exploring emergent properties in cellular homeostasis using OnGuard to model K+ and other ion transport in guard cells.  

PubMed

It is widely recognized that the nature and characteristics of transport across eukaryotic membranes are so complex as to defy intuitive understanding. In these circumstances, quantitative mathematical modeling is an essential tool, both to integrate detailed knowledge of individual transporters and to extract the properties emergent from their interactions. As the first, fully integrated and quantitative modeling environment for the study of ion transport dynamics in a plant cell, OnGuard offers a unique tool for exploring homeostatic properties emerging from the interactions of ion transport, both at the plasma membrane and tonoplast in the guard cell. OnGuard has already yielded detail sufficient to guide phenotypic and mutational studies, and it represents a key step toward 'reverse engineering' of stomatal guard cell physiology, based on rational design and testing in simulation, to improve water use efficiency and carbon assimilation. Its construction from the HoTSig libraries enables translation of the software to other cell types, including growing root hairs and pollen. The problems inherent to transport are nonetheless challenging, and are compounded for those unfamiliar with conceptual 'mindset' of the modeler. Here we set out guidelines for the use of OnGuard and outline a standardized approach that will enable users to advance quickly to its application both in the classroom and laboratory. We also highlight the uncanny and emergent property of OnGuard models to reproduce the 'communication' evident between the plasma membrane and tonoplast of the guard cell. PMID:24268743

Blatt, Michael R; Wang, Yizhou; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Hills, Adrian

2014-05-15

264

Exploring emergent properties in cellular homeostasis using OnGuard to model K+ and other ion transport in guard cells???  

PubMed Central

It is widely recognized that the nature and characteristics of transport across eukaryotic membranes are so complex as to defy intuitive understanding. In these circumstances, quantitative mathematical modeling is an essential tool, both to integrate detailed knowledge of individual transporters and to extract the properties emergent from their interactions. As the first, fully integrated and quantitative modeling environment for the study of ion transport dynamics in a plant cell, OnGuard offers a unique tool for exploring homeostatic properties emerging from the interactions of ion transport, both at the plasma membrane and tonoplast in the guard cell. OnGuard has already yielded detail sufficient to guide phenotypic and mutational studies, and it represents a key step toward ‘reverse engineering’ of stomatal guard cell physiology, based on rational design and testing in simulation, to improve water use efficiency and carbon assimilation. Its construction from the HoTSig libraries enables translation of the software to other cell types, including growing root hairs and pollen. The problems inherent to transport are nonetheless challenging, and are compounded for those unfamiliar with conceptual ‘mindset’ of the modeler. Here we set out guidelines for the use of OnGuard and outline a standardized approach that will enable users to advance quickly to its application both in the classroom and laboratory. We also highlight the uncanny and emergent property of OnGuard models to reproduce the ‘communication’ evident between the plasma membrane and tonoplast of the guard cell.

Blatt, Michael R.; Wang, Yizhou; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Hills, Adrian

2014-01-01

265

78 FR 11676 - Notice of Inventory Completion: National Guard Bureau/A7AN, Air National Guard, Joint Base...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...deer, and wolf tooth necklace containing drilled canines; 4 drilled canines; 6 bone awls; 9 polished or worked bone tools; 2 polished small mammal mandibles; 1 worked canine; 2 fish spine needles; 1 antler flaker; and...

2013-02-19

266

Security enhancement subproject: Protected area guard towers. Final environmental assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas proposes to design and construct four (4) reinforced concrete guard tower stations, access roads, and associated sitework in Zones 4 and 12 on the Pantex Plant property. Construction for this proposed project would begi...

1992-01-01

267

6. Historic American Buildings Survey GUARD ROOM INTERIOR, LOOKING TOWARDS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Historic American Buildings Survey GUARD ROOM INTERIOR, LOOKING TOWARDS SOUTH CELL BLOCK Lanny Miyamoto, Photographer October 1958 - Baltimore City Jail, 801 Van Buren & East Madison Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

268

View of the southwest guard tower, cell blocks seven and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of the southwest guard tower, cell blocks seven and eight, administration building west tower, and Fairmount Avenue, looking from the administration building facing west - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

269

4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CORRIDOR, LOOKING WEST TOWARDS GUARD ROOM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CORRIDOR, LOOKING WEST TOWARDS GUARD ROOM - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-449, West Side of East Twelfth Avenue, Approximately 300' South of East Twelfth Street & East "I" Street, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

270

5. INTERIOR VIEW OF GUARD ROOM, LOOKING WEST Fort ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. INTERIOR VIEW OF GUARD ROOM, LOOKING WEST - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-449, West Side of East Twelfth Avenue, Approximately 300' South of East Twelfth Street & East "I" Street, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

271

15. PLAN OF OFFICE, DETAILS, FIXED WINDOW GUARDS, SHEET NO. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. PLAN OF OFFICE, DETAILS, FIXED WINDOW GUARDS, SHEET NO. 1-10-39/10 OF 12. - Oakland Army Base, Warehouse Type, Tobruk Street, between Warehouse Road & Fifteenth Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

272

15. GENERAL VEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING BLUFF, COAST GUARD'S HOUSE, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. GENERAL VEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING BLUFF, COAST GUARD'S HOUSE, WARDEN'S HOUSE AND RUBBLE IN FOREGROUND - Alcatraz, Cell House, Alcatraz Island, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

273

PARTS WASHING ALTERNATIVES STUDY - UNITED STATES COAST GUARD  

EPA Science Inventory

This report has been written to assist the United States Coast Guard (USCG) industrial managers in determining the most cost effective and environmentally acceptable parts washing alternatives for their specific applications. n evaluation was conducted on four different cleaners ...

274

Improving Shipboard Supply Management in the Coast Guard.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The development of supply management policy has historically been centralized at Coast Guard Headquarters but technical direction and execution have been decentralized. The three inventory control points receive technical direction from the Headquarter's ...

G. L. Slyman A. J. Colaianni M. J. Sakowski D. Frank

1987-01-01

275

11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, GUARD RAIL AT CENTER, VIEW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, GUARD RAIL AT CENTER, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

276

Issues Related to Choosing a Guard Force Structure.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The establishment of a federal security force has been suggested as an additional step to protect nuclear material. The force would be given the responsibility for guarding nuclear facilities and shipments of nuclear materials. A study to identify the iss...

C. Averbach J. Cusack L. Green W. Higinbotham J. Indusi

1975-01-01

277

30 CFR 57.12034 - Guarding around lights.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12034 Guarding around lights. Portable extension lights, and other lights that...

2013-07-01

278

12. Bottom and side planking at stern, showing chine guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

12. Bottom and side planking at stern, showing chine guard (to the right in photo) and copper ice sheathing on starboard side. - Two-Sail Bateau E. C. COLLIER, Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, Mills Street, Saint Michaels, Talbot County, MD

279

Neonatal sepsis at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; aetiology, antimicrobial sensitivity pattern and clinical outcome  

PubMed Central

Background Neonatal sepsis contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality among young infants. The aetiological agents as well as their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents are dynamic. This study determined aetiology, antimicrobial susceptibility and clinical outcome of neonatal sepsis at Muhimbili National Hospital. Methods Three hundred and thirty neonates admitted at the Muhimbili National Hospital neonatal ward between October, 2009 and January, 2010 were recruited. Standardized questionnaires were used to obtain demographic and clinical information. Blood and pus samples were cultured on MacConkey, blood and chocolate agars and bacteria were identified based on characteristic morphology, gram stain appearance and standard commercially prepared biochemical tests. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was performed for ampicillin, cloxacillin, gentamicin, amikacin, cefuroxime and ceftriaxone on Mueller Hinton agar using the Kirby Bauer diffusion method. Results Culture proven sepsis was noted in 24% (74/330) of the study participants. Isolated bacterial pathogens were predominantly Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp and Escherichia coli. Klebsiella spp 32.7% (17/52) was the predominant blood culture isolate in neonates aged below seven days while Staphylococcus aureus 54.5% (12/22) was commonest among those aged above seven days. Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant pus swabs isolate for both neonates aged 0–6 days 42.2% (98/232) and 7–28 days 52.3% (34/65). Resistance of blood culture isolates was high to ampicillin 81.1% (60/74) and cloxacillin 78.4% (58/74), moderate to ceftriaxone 14.9% (11/74) and cefuroxime 18.9% (14/74), and low to amikacin 1.3% (1/74). Isolates from swabs had high resistance to ampicillin 89.9% (267/297) and cloxacillin 85.2 (253/297), moderate resistance to ceftriaxone 38.0% (113/297) and cefuroxime 36.0% (107/297), and low resistance to amikacin 4.7% (14/297). Sepsis was higher in neonates with fever and hypothermia (p=0.02), skin pustules (p<0.001), umbilical pus discharge and abdominal wall hyperemia (p=0.04). Presence of skin pustules was an independent predictor of sepsis OR 0.26, 95% CI (0.10-0.66) p=0.004. The overall death rate was 13.9% (46/330), being higher in neonates with sepsis 24.3% (18/74) than those without 10.9% (28/256), p=0.003. Conclusions Staphylococcus aureus was predominant isolate followed by Klebsiella and Escherichia coli. There was high resistance to ampicillin and cloxacillin. Mortality rate due to neonatal sepsis was high in our setting. Routine antimicrobial surveillance should guide the choice of antibiotics for empirical treatment of neonatal sepsis.

2012-01-01

280

Record linkage between hospital discharges and mortality registries for motor neuron disease case ascertainment for the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry.  

PubMed

Abstract Our objective was to analyse the coverage of hospital discharge data and the mortality registry (MR) of La Rioja to ascertain motor neuron disease (MND) cases to be included in the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry. MND cases that occurred in La Rioja during the period 1996-2011 were selected from hospital discharge data and the MR by means of the International Classification of Diseases. Review of the medical histories was carried out to confirm the causes of death reported. Characteristics of the population with MND were analysed. A total of 133 patients with MND were detected in La Rioja during the period 1996-2011; 30.1% were only recorded in the hospital discharges data, 12.0% only in the MR, and 57.9% were recorded by both databases. Medical records revealed a miscoding of patients who had been diagnosed with progressive supranuclear palsy but were recorded in the MR with an MND code. In conclusion, the hospital discharges data and the MR appear to be complementary and are valuable databases for the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry when MNDs are properly codified. Nevertheless, it would be advisable to corroborate the validity of the MR as data source since the miscoding of progressive supranuclear palsy has been corrected. PMID:24641576

Ruiz, Elena; Ramalle-Gómara, Enrique; Quiñones, Carmen

2014-06-01

281

Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow  

DOEpatents

Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

Louge, M.Y.

1995-10-17

282

Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow  

DOEpatents

Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

Louge, M.Y.

1996-08-13

283

Acceptance of Routine Testing for HIV among Adult Patients at the Medical Emergency Unit at a National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda  

Microsoft Academic Search

HIV testing is an entry point to comprehensive HIV\\/AIDS prevention and care. In Uganda, Routine Testing and Counseling for\\u000a HIV (RTC) is not widely offered as part of standard medical care in acute care settings. This study determined the acceptance\\u000a of RTC in a medical emergency setting at Mulago national referral hospital. We interviewed 233 adult patients who were offered

Damalie Nakanjako; Moses Kamya; Kyabayinze Daniel; Harriet Mayanja-Kizza; Jurgen Freers; Christopher Whalen; Elly Katabira

2007-01-01

284

Minimizing guard ring dead space in silicon detectors with an n-type guard ring at the edge of the detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detectors with n-type silicon with an n+-type guard ring were investigated. In the present work, a new p+\\/n\\/n+ detector structure with an n+ guard ring is described. The guard ring is placed at the edge of the detector. The detector depletion region extends also sideways, allowing for signal collection very close to the n-guard ring. In this kind of detector

Tanja Palviainen; Tuure Tuuva; Kari Leinonen

2007-01-01

285

Does long-term care use within primary health care reduce hospital use among older people in Norway? A national five-year population-based observational study  

PubMed Central

Background Population ageing may threaten the sustainability of future health care systems. Strengthening primary health care, including long-term care, is one of several measures being taken to handle future health care needs and budgets. There is limited and inconsistent evidence on the effect of long-term care on hospital use. We explored the relationship between the total use of long-term care within public primary health care in Norway and the use of hospital beds when adjusting for various effect modifiers and confounders. Methods This national population-based observational study consists of all Norwegians (59% women) older than 66 years (N = 605676) (13.2% of total population) in 2002-2006. The unit of analysis was defined by municipality, age and sex. The association between total number of recipients of long-term care per 1000 inhabitants (LTC-rate) and hospital days per 1000 inhabitants (HD-rate) was analysed in a linear regression model. Modifying and confounding effects of socioeconomic, demographic and geographic variables were included in the final model. We defined a difference in hospitalization rates of more than 1000 days per 1000 inhabitants as clinically important. Results Thirty-one percent of women and eighteen percent of men were long-term care users. Men had higher HD-rates than women. The crude association between LTC-rate and HD-rate was weakly negative. We identified two effect modifiers (age and sex) and two strong confounders (travel time to hospital and mortality). Age and sex stratification and adjustments for confounders revealed a positive statistically significant but not clinically important relationship between LTC-rates and hospitalization for women aged 67-79 years and all men. For women 80 years and over there was a weak but negative relationship which was neither statistically significant nor clinically important. Conclusions We found a weak positive adjusted association between LTC-rates and HD-rates. Opposite to common belief, we found that increased volume of LTC by itself did not reduce pressure on hospitals. There still is a need to study integrated care models for the elderly in the Norwegian setting and to explore further why municipalities far away from hospital achieve lower use of hospital beds.

2011-01-01

286

29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Reprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced in Subpart B, for Determination of Coast Guard...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced...Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 1915âReprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced...Persons This appendix provides a complete reprint of U.S. Coast Guard regulations...

2010-07-01

287

29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Reprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced in Subpart B, for Determination of Coast Guard...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Reprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced...Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 1915âReprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced...Persons This appendix provides a complete reprint of U.S. Coast Guard regulations...

2009-07-01

288

National survey on cholecystectomy related bile duct injury--public health and financial aspects in Belgian hospitals--1997.  

PubMed

Public health and financial aspects of cholecystectomy related bile duct injury (BDI) are highlighted in a National Cholecystectomy Survey carried out through 'datamining' the Federal State Medical Records Summaries and Financial Summaries of all Belgian hospitals in 1997. All cancer diagnoses, children < or = 10 years, cholecystectomies performed as an abdominal co-procedure or patients having undergone other non-related surgery were excluded from the study. 10.595 laparoscopic (LC) and 1.033 open cholecystectomies (OC) as well as 137 secondary BDI treatments (LC/OC) were included in the survey (total 11.765). Both LC and OC groups turned out to be significantly different as to distribution of patient's age and APR-DRG severity classes. Composite criteria in terms of ICD-9-CM and billing codes were elaborated to classify: 1) primary, intra-operatively detected and treated BDI (N = 30), 2) primary delayed BDI treatments (N = 38), 3) secondary BDI treatments (N = 137), 4) non-BDI abdomino-surgical complications (N = 119), 4) uneventful laparoscopic (N = 7.476) and 5) uneventful open cholecystectomy (N = 681). Complication rates, community costs of LC and OC groups, incidence of preoperative ERCP and/or intra-operative cholangiography as well as interventions for complications were studied. Incidence of cholecystectomy related BDI was 0.37% in LC, 2.81% in OC and 0.58% overall. Average costs amounted to [symbol: see text] 1.721 for uneventful LC, [symbol: see text] 2.924 for uneventful OC, [symbol: see text] 7.250 for primary, intra-operatively detected and immediately treated BDI [symbol: see text] 9.258 for primary delayed BDI treatments, [symbol: see text] 6.076 for secondary BDI treatments and [symbol: see text] 10.363 for non-BDI abdomino-surgical complications. In conclusion BDI with cholecystectomy reveals to be a serious complication increasing the overall average cost factor ninefold if not detected intra-operatively, in which case the raise is only fourfold. As a consequence BDI should be avoided by all means. In this respect 4 crucial surgical guidelines are emphasised. PMID:12768860

Van de Sande, St; Bossens, M; Parmentier, Y; Gigot, J F

2003-04-01

289

NCHSR (National Center for Healt Services Research) National Health Care Expenditures Study: Inpatient Hospital Services: Use, Expenditures, and Sources of Payment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Examining how Americans use health care services and determining national patterns of health expenditures and insurance coverage are the goals of a landmark study by the National Center for Health Services Research (NCHSR). This study will provide importa...

1983-01-01

290

Implementation and adoption of nationwide electronic health records in secondary care in England: final qualitative results from prospective national evaluation in "early adopter" hospitals  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate the implementation and adoption of the NHS detailed care records service in “early adopter” hospitals in England. Design Theoretically informed, longitudinal qualitative evaluation based on case studies. Setting 12 “early adopter” NHS acute hospitals and specialist care settings studied over two and a half years. Data sources Data were collected through in depth interviews, observations, and relevant documents relating directly to case study sites and to wider national developments that were perceived to impact on the implementation strategy. Data were thematically analysed, initially within and then across cases. The dataset consisted of 431 semistructured interviews with key stakeholders, including hospital staff, developers, and governmental stakeholders; 590 hours of observations of strategic meetings and use of the software in context; 334 sets of notes from observations, researchers’ field notes, and notes from national conferences; 809 NHS documents; and 58 regional and national documents. Results Implementation has proceeded more slowly, with a narrower scope and substantially less clinical functionality than was originally planned. The national strategy had considerable local consequences (summarised under five key themes), and wider national developments impacted heavily on implementation and adoption. More specifically, delays related to unrealistic expectations about the capabilities of systems; the time needed to build, configure, and customise the software; the work needed to ensure that systems were supporting provision of care; and the needs of end users for training and support. Other factors hampering progress included the changing milieu of NHS policy and priorities; repeatedly renegotiated national contracts; different stages of development of diverse NHS care records service systems; and a complex communication process between different stakeholders, along with contractual arrangements that largely excluded NHS providers. There was early evidence that deploying systems resulted in important learning within and between organisations and the development of relevant competencies within NHS hospitals. Conclusions Implementation of the NHS Care Records Service in “early adopter” sites proved time consuming and challenging, with as yet limited discernible benefits for clinicians and no clear advantages for patients. Although our results might not be directly transferable to later adopting sites because the functionalities we evaluated were new and untried in the English context, they shed light on the processes involved in implementing major new systems. The move to increased local decision making that we advocated based on our interim analysis has been pursued and welcomed by the NHS, but it is important that policymakers do not lose sight of the overall goal of an integrated interoperable solution.

2011-01-01

291

Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells  

SciTech Connect

Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in the stomatal response to CO2 will investigate downstream targets of the CO2 response. Success in characterizing a zeaxanthin-dependent CO2 sensing mechanism in guard cells will significantly enhance our understanding of stomatal function and CO2 sensing in plants cells. Further characterization of guard cells acclimation to CO2 should enrich our understanding of plant acclimations and adaptations to their environment, and of possible effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on the vegetation.

Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

2003-06-30

292

Light Quality and Osmoregulation in Vicia Guard Cells 1  

PubMed Central

Osmoregulation in opening stomata of epidermal peels from Vicia faba L. leaves was investigated under a variety of experimental conditions. The K+ content of stomatal guard cells and the starch content of guard cell chloroplasts were examined with cobaltinitrite and iodine-potassium iodide stains, respectively; stomatal apertures were measured microscopically. Red light (50 micromoles per square meter per second) irradiation caused a net increase of 3.1 micrometers in aperture and a decrease of ?0.4 megapascals in guard cell osmotic potential over a 5 hour incubation, but histochemical observations showed no increase in guard cell K+ content or starch degradation in guard cell chloroplasts. At 10 micromoles per square meter per second, blue light caused a net 6.8 micrometer increase in aperture over 5 hours and there was a substantial decrease in starch content of chloroplasts but no increase in guard cell K+ content. At 25 micromoles per square meter per second of blue light, apertures increased faster (net gain of 5.7 micrometers after 1 hour) and starch content decreased. About 80% of guard cells had a higher K+ content after 1 hour of incubation but that fraction decreased to 10% after 5 hours. In the absence of KCl in the incubation medium, stomata opened slowly in response to 25 micomoles per square meter per second of blue light, without any K+ gain or starch loss. In dual beam experiments, stomata irradiated with 50 micomoles per square meter per second of red light for 3 hours opened without detectable starch loss or K+ gain; addition of 25 micomoles per square meter per second of blue light caused a further net gain of 4.4 micometers in aperture accompanied by substantial K+ uptake and starch loss. Comparison of K+ content in guard cells of opened stomata in epidermal peels with those induced to open in leaf discs showed a substantially higher K+ content in the intact tissue than in isolated peels. These results are not consistent with K+ (and its counterions) as the universal osmoticum in guard cells of open stomata under all conditions; rather, the data point to sugars arising from photosynthesis and from starch degradation as additional osmotica. Biochemical confirmation of these findings would indicate that osmoregulation during stomatal opening is the result of three key metabolic processes: ion transport, photosynthesis, and sugar metabolism. Images Fig. 2

Tallman, Gary; Zeiger, Eduardo

1988-01-01

293

OnGuard, a Computational Platform for Quantitative Kinetic Modeling of Guard Cell Physiology1[W][OA  

PubMed Central

Stomatal guard cells play a key role in gas exchange for photosynthesis while minimizing transpirational water loss from plants by opening and closing the stomatal pore. Foliar gas exchange has long been incorporated into mathematical models, several of which are robust enough to recapitulate transpirational characteristics at the whole-plant and community levels. Few models of stomata have been developed from the bottom up, however, and none are sufficiently generalized to be widely applicable in predicting stomatal behavior at a cellular level. We describe here the construction of computational models for the guard cell, building on the wealth of biophysical and kinetic knowledge available for guard cell transport, signaling, and homeostasis. The OnGuard software was constructed with the HoTSig library to incorporate explicitly all of the fundamental properties for transporters at the plasma membrane and tonoplast, the salient features of osmolite metabolism, and the major controls of cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentration and pH. The library engenders a structured approach to tier and interrelate computational elements, and the OnGuard software allows ready access to parameters and equations ‘on the fly’ while enabling the network of components within each model to interact computationally. We show that an OnGuard model readily achieves stability in a set of physiologically sensible baseline or Reference States; we also show the robustness of these Reference States in adjusting to changes in environmental parameters and the activities of major groups of transporters both at the tonoplast and plasma membrane. The following article addresses the predictive power of the OnGuard model to generate unexpected and counterintuitive outputs.

Hills, Adrian; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R.; Lew, Virgilio L.

2012-01-01

294

AvantGuard: exploring the distribution of autonomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Every war introduces a new round of tactics and technologies. Our present war might be characterized as a confrontation between the Suicide Bomber and the Unmanned Air Vehicle. AvantGuard models this confrontation and exposes it to study. It is a computer game in which UAVs are used to protect a convoy in hostile urban terrain. Adversaries hide among the residents and prepare an ambush. The operator directs small UAVs and studies the resulting sensor stream. He must find the ambush before the convoy arrives. AvantGuard serves those who seek to improve the effectiveness of the UAV mission. It is an instrument with which researchers can measure performance as they develop new systems. AvantGuard is particularly designed to study the interplay of human supervisor and autonomous UAVs. Its cognitive challenges are organized into distinct tasks. For each task, the autonomy level of the UAV is set independently. Calibrated to established standards, results are easily compared to one another and to the findings of other researchers. By addressing real-world problems, such as battlefield constraints on bandwidth and the limits of machine vision, AvantGuard presents a credible approach to mission simulation, training and eventual execution. By employing sophisticated game techniques, AvantGuard advances an innovative design. By considering the post-combat role of the military, it prepares an instrument to advance the goals of peace as well as those of war.

Jacobson, Dov

2005-05-01

295

Minimizing guard ring dead space in silicon detectors with an n-type guard ring at the edge of the detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detectors with n-type silicon with an n +-type guard ring were investigated. In the present work, a new p +/n/n + detector structure with an n + guard ring is described. The guard ring is placed at the edge of the detector. The detector depletion region extends also sideways, allowing for signal collection very close to the n-guard ring. In this kind of detector structure, the dead space of the detector is minimized to be only below the guard ring. This is proved by simulations done using Silvaco/ATLAS software.

Palviainen, Tanja; Tuuva, Tuure; Leinonen, Kari

2007-04-01

296

ILC TARGET WHEEL RIM FRAGMENT/GUARD PLATE IMPACT ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

A positron source component is needed for the International Linear Collider Project. The leading design concept for this source is a rotating titanium alloy wheel whose spokes rotate through an intense localized magnetic field. The system is composed of an electric motor, flexible motor/drive-shaft coupling, stainless steel drive-shaft, two Plumber's Block tapered roller bearings, a titanium alloy target wheel, and electromagnet. Surrounding the target wheel and magnet is a steel frame with steel guarding plates intended to contain shrapnel in case of catastrophic wheel failure. Figure 1 is a layout of this system (guard plates not shown for clarity). This report documents the FEA analyses that were performed at LLNL to help determine, on a preliminary basis, the required guard plate thickness for three potential plate steels.

Hagler, L

2008-07-17

297

The Cancer Patient Experiences Questionnaire (CPEQ): reliability and construct validity following a national survey to assess hospital cancer care from the patient perspective  

PubMed Central

Objectives Patient experience questionnaires have been criticised owing to the lack of supporting psychometric evidence. The objective of this study was to describe the development and psychometric evaluation of the Cancer Patient Experiences Questionnaire (CPEQ) in Norway. Design Questionnaire development was based on a literature review of existing questionnaires, patient interviews, expert-group consultations, pretesting of questionnaire items and a national survey. Psychometric evaluation included exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and tests of internal consistency reliability and test–retest reliability. Setting Data were collected using a postal survey of cancer patients attending 54 hospitals in all 4 health regions. The subjects were 14?227 adult cancer patients who had attended an outpatient clinic or who had been discharged from an inpatient ward. Patients with all types of cancer were included. Data quality, internal consistency reliability and construct validity were assessed. Results Of the 13?846 patients who received the CPEQ, 7212 (52%) responded. Exploratory factor analysis identified six scales of outpatient experiences relating to nurse contact, doctor contact, information, organisation, patient safety and contact with next of kin, and seven scales of inpatient experiences, with the addition of hospital standard to the aforementioned scales. All but two of the scales met the criterion of 0.70 for Cronbach's ? testing, and test–retest correlations ranged from 0.57 to 0.85. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the interpretation of six and seven scales for outpatients and inpatients, respectively. Statistically significant associations based on explicit hypotheses provided evidence for the construct validity of the scales. One additional scale measuring the hospital level was identified (?=0.85). Conclusions The CPEQ is a self-report instrument that includes the most important aspects of patient experiences with cancer care at hospitals. The instrument was tested following a national survey in Norway; good evidence is provided herein for the internal consistency reliability, test–retest reliability and construct validity.

Iversen, Hilde Hestad; Holmboe, Olaf; Bjertnaes, ?yvind Andresen

2012-01-01

298

Quality of acute stroke care improvement framework for the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry: facilitating policy and system change at the hospital level.  

PubMed

The Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry prototypes baseline data collection demonstrated a significant gap in the use of evidenced-based interventions. Barriers to the use of these interventions can be characterized as relating to lack of knowledge, attitudes, and ineffective behaviors and systems. Quality improvement programs can address these issues by providing didactic presentations to disseminate the science and peer interactions to address the lack of belief in the evidence, guidelines, and likelihood of improved patient outcomes. Even with knowledge and intention to provide evidenced-based care, the absence of effective systems is a significant behavioral barrier. A program for quality improvement that includes multidisciplinary teams of clinical and quality improvement professionals has been successfully used to carry out redesign of stroke care delivery systems. Teams are given a methodology to set goals, test ideas for system redesign, and implement those changes that can be successfully adapted to the hospital's environment. Bringing teams from several hospitals together substantially accelerates the process by sharing examples of successful change and by providing strategies to support the behavior change necessary for the adoption of new systems. The participation of many hospitals also creates momentum for the adoption of change by demonstrating observable and successful improvement. Data collection and feedback are useful to demonstrate the need for change and evaluate the impact of system change, but improvement occurs very slowly without a quality improvement program. This quality improvement framework provides hospitals with the capacity and support to redesign systems, and has been shown to improve stroke care considerably, when coupled with an Internet-based decision support registry, and at a much more rapid pace than when hospitals use only the support registry. PMID:17178313

LaBresh, Kenneth A

2006-12-01

299

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Navy Yard, Mare Island, CA. H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 7 of 15, accompanying specification Noy-4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 7, 1941. Yards & Docks drawing no. 160692; P.W. (Public Works) drawing no. 10388-31; file no. 930-CR-7. Scale three eighths inch to one foot. 73 cm x 129 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

300

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, ROOF FRAMING DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, ROOF FRAMING DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Navy Yard, Mare Island, CA. H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 9 of 15, accompanying specification Noy-4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 7, 1941. Yards & Docks drawing no. 160694; P.W. (Public Works) drawing no. 10388-33; file no. 930-S-4. Scale three eighths inch to one foot. 73 cm x 129 cm. Black line print - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

301

The occlusal guard: a simplified technique for fabrication and equilibration.  

PubMed

Hard occlusal guards have been used effectively to treat myofacial pain originating from parafunctional activities. Also, they can protect the natural dentition when it opposes porcelain restorations, help to evaluate changes in occlusal vertical dimension during full mouth rehabilitation, minimize further tooth loss in patients with abfraction lesions, and redirect occlusal loads more favorably onto dental implant-supported prostheses. A simplified technique is described to fabricate a properly designed wax model of an occlusal guard that can be processed in acrylic in the same manner used to construct a complete denture. PMID:23649575

Antonelli, John; Hottel, Timothy L; Siegel, Sharon C; Brandt, Robert; Silva, Gladston

2013-01-01

302

DIFERENCIAS EN LAS ESTADÍSTICAS DE JUEGO ENTRE BASES, ALEROS Y PÍVOTS EN BALONCESTO FEMENINO Differences between women's basketball guards, forwards and centres through game-related statistics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to analyze the differences in game-related statistics between basketball guards, forwards and centres from the WNBA League (professional league in fe- male basketball in USA, organized by the Women National Bas- ketball Association). The sample was gathered from the WNBA boxscores from the 2005 season (n= 215 games), selecting an amount of 75

Miguel Ángel Gómez Ruano; Alberto Lorenzo Calvo; Enrique Ortega Toro; Jaime Sampaio; Sergio-José Ibáñez Godoy

2007-01-01

303

Books or Guards? Charter School Security Costs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about the costs charter schools incur to foster security--a vexing phenomenon when one considers policymakers' and parents' seemingly high and growing want for school safety. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics and Texas, we reveal how much charter schools spend on security, how they put these resources to…

DeAngelis, Karen J.; Brent, Brian O.

2012-01-01

304

77 FR 37318 - Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Sound of Independence; Santa Rosa Sound; Fort...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Sound of Independence; Santa Rosa Sound; Fort Walton Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Coast Guard will enforce a Safety Zone for the Sound of Independence event in the Santa Rosa...

2012-06-21

305

48 CFR 3052.209-76 - Prohibition on Federal Protective Service guard services contracts with business concerns owned...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...of the Federal Protective Service Guard Contracting Reform...into a contract for guard services under the Federal Protective Service (FPS) guard services program...the individual's spouse, child, or other family...

2013-10-01

306

33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.906 Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a)...

2013-07-01

307

Improved Inventory Models for the United States Coast Guard Requirements Determination Process.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Requirements determination is the process by which the Coast Guard supply system forecasts future customer demands and sets levels of inventory to satisfy those demands. Currently, the Coast Guard is in the process of modernizing its inventory-management ...

G. L. Slyman D. L. Zimmerman

1993-01-01

308

29 CFR 1915.73 - Guarding of deck openings and edges.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the edges shall be guarded by adequate guardrails meeting the requirements of § 1915...prohibit the use or installation of such guardrails. (e) When employees are working...have been removed shall be guarded by guardrails except where they would...

2013-07-01

309

33 CFR 165.100 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01... Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District...Section 165.100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF...

2013-07-01

310

19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards...CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Safety Standards for Boats and Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety...

2010-04-01

311

19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 2009-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards...CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Safety Standards for Boats and Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety...

2009-04-01

312

Guard Cell Biochemistry: Response to Environmental Stimuli Causing Changes in Gas Exchange. Progress Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Progress is reported in research on the biochemistry of guard cells. Methods for the isolation of guard cell protoplasts have been developed. Aqueous two-phase polymer systems for isolating cells, organelles and macromolecules were investigated. Ultramicr...

1981-01-01

313

30 CFR 56.12023 - Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. 56.12023 Section 56.12023 Mineral...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. Electrical connections and resistor grids that are difficult or impractical to...

2010-07-01

314

30 CFR 57.12023 - Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. 57.12023 Section 57.12023 Mineral...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. Electrical connections and resistor grids that are difficult or impractical to...

2010-07-01

315

30 CFR 57.12023 - Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. 57.12023 Section 57.12023 Mineral...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. Electrical connections and resistor grids that are difficult or impractical to...

2013-07-01

316

30 CFR 56.12023 - Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. 56.12023 Section 56.12023 Mineral...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. Electrical connections and resistor grids that are difficult or impractical to...

2009-07-01

317

30 CFR 57.12023 - Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. 57.12023 Section 57.12023 Mineral...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. Electrical connections and resistor grids that are difficult or impractical to...

2009-07-01

318

77 FR 14703 - Safety Zone, Temporary Change for Recurring Fireworks Display Within the Fifth Coast Guard...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Display Within the Fifth Coast Guard District, Pamlico River and Tar River; Washington, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...restrict vessel traffic in a portion of the Pamlico River and Tar River near Washington, NC, during the...

2012-03-13

319

78 FR 37963 - Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display Cape Fear River; Wilmington, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Guard District Fireworks Display Cape Fear River; Wilmington, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard...event, held adjacent to the Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. The fireworks...vessel traffic in a portion of the Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina,...

2013-06-25

320

49 CFR 571.223 - Standard No. 223; Rear impact guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...perpendicular to the longitudinal vertical plane passing through the longitudinal centerline...projected horizontally on a transverse vertical plane. Those installation instructions or...guard width from the vertical longitudinal plane passing through center of the guard;...

2013-10-01

321

77 FR 31803 - Safety Zone for Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display Currituck Sound; Corolla, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Guard District Fireworks Display Currituck Sound; Corolla, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...event, held adjacent to the Currituck Sound, Corolla, North Carolina. The fireworks...vessel traffic in a portion of the Currituck Sound, Corolla, NC, during the event....

2012-05-30

322

76 FR 13508 - Ninth Coast Guard District Sector Realignment; Northern Lake Michigan and Lake Huron  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Ninth Coast Guard District Sector Realignment; Northern Lake Michigan and Lake Huron AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final Rule...reflect the realignment of boundaries shared among Sector Lake Michigan, Sector Detroit, and Sector Sault Ste....

2011-03-14

323

99. Catalog HHistory 1, C.C.C., 23 Guard Rail Construction, Negative ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

99. Catalog H-History 1, C.C.C., 23 Guard Rail Construction, Negative No. P455e (Photographer and date unknown) GUARD RAIL INSTALLATION. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

324

United States Coast Guard Emergency Underwater Escape Rebreather Evaluation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) Emergency Underwater Escape Rebreather (UER) was evaluated at the Navy Experimental Diving Unit. Physiologic testing in the dry laboratory, monitoring breath-to-breath O2 and CO2 levels, delineated the factors used in ...

C. G. Gray E. O. Thalmann R. Syklawer

1981-01-01

325

Within compound, from Guard Tower, looking southeast, Power Plant (Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Within compound, from Guard Tower, looking southeast, Power Plant (Building 5761) to left, Satellite Communications Terminal (Building 5771) center, Supply Warehouse (Building 5768) to left - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

326

Mate guarding and gallivanting by male hoary marmots ( Marmota caligata )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seven years data on the vernal behavior of hoarty marmots, Marmota caligata, suggest that males engage in a two-part reproductive strategy, which consists of guarding their mates against possible copulation with additional males, and also gallivanting — wandering about in search of additional reproductive opportunities for themselves. Data are presented which support seven predictions derived from the assumption that mate

David P. Barash

1981-01-01

327

Light-sensitive membrane potentials in onion guard cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRACELLULAR electrical recordings in onion guard cells show that they maintain a membrane potential difference (MPD), inside negative. The MPD is light-sensitive; cells subjected to short light and dark cycles depolarise in the dark and hyperpolarise in the light. The swiftness of the electrical changes makes them among the fastest known stomatal responses, suggesting a causal relationship between the reception

E. Zeiger; W. Moody; P. Hepler; F. VARELA

1977-01-01

328

Improving Self-Directed Learning in the Phoenix Air Guard.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to (1) identify obstacles to self-directed learning, (2) develop strategies to overcome them, and (3) identify the self-directed learning readiness level of two groups of employees for possible clues in improving self-directed learning in the Phoenix Air Guard. The study used two group processes (the Delphi technique with a…

Torbert, James Brison

329

Potential Benefits Of Underride Guards In Large Truck Side Crashes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the maximum potential for side underride guards (SUGs) to reduce passenger vehicle occupant fatalities and injuries in crashes with large trucks in the United States.Methods: Examination of the Large Truck Crash Causation Study (LTCCS) identified 206 crash events involving a passenger vehicle impact with the side of a large truck. Each case was evaluated to determine whether

Matthew L. Brumbelow

2012-01-01

330

US COAST GUARD/EPA EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM JURISDICTIONAL BOUNDARY  

EPA Science Inventory

This line coverage represents the United States Coast Guard(USCG)/Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9 Geographic/Jurisdictional Boundary located in California. The boundary was determined from the text description provided in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region...

331

Race for Martyrdom: The Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) is often referred to in Western press but still, little is known about these uniformed zealots. This thesis is an attempt to show that the IRGC is not a haphazard army but one that is striving to organize whil...

S. E. Merdinger

1982-01-01

332

Seakeeping Characteristics of a United States Coast Guard Buoy Tender.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Seakeeping experiments conducted with a model of a United States Coast Guard Buoy tender are described, and the results thereof are presented. It is shown that the in-transit performance of the buoy tender will be limited by deck wetness. It is further sh...

N. K. Bales

1975-01-01

333

46 CFR 28.215 - Guards for exposed hazards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Vessels That Operate Beyond the Boundary Lines or With More Than 16 Individuals On Board, or for Fish Tender Vessels Engaged in the Aleutian Trade § 28.215 Guards for exposed hazards. (a) Each space on board a vessel must meet the requirements of this...

2013-10-01

334

29 CFR 1910.243 - Guarding of portable powered tools.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...shall cover the saw to the depth of the teeth, except for the minimum arc required...shall cover the saw to the depth of the teeth, except for the minimum arc required...used with the correct shield, guard, or attachment recommended by the manufacturer....

2012-07-01

335

29 CFR 1910.243 - Guarding of portable powered tools.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...shall cover the saw to the depth of the teeth, except for the minimum arc required...shall cover the saw to the depth of the teeth, except for the minimum arc required...used with the correct shield, guard, or attachment recommended by the manufacturer....

2011-07-01

336

Photocopy of measured drawing (from First Coast Guard District Office, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of measured drawing (from First Coast Guard District Office, John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Government Center, Boston, Massachusetts) designed by Edward P. Adams and Royal Luther, 1890 "PLAN FOR FRAMED DOUBLE DWELLING AT PORTLAND HEAD, ME., LIGHT STATION" - Portland Head Light, Portland Head, approximately 1/2 mile East of Shore Road, Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland County, ME

337

Latest update of tests and improvements to US Coast Guard viscous oil pumping system.  

PubMed

Over the past nine years, the US Coast Guard has incorporated the prevention through people (PTP) philosophy as a "human factors" approach to learn how maritime operations can be regulated safer and be more efficient by evaluating training, management policies, operational procedures, and establishing partnerships with the maritime industry. One of the key elements of applying a PTP approach is identifying and incorporating lessons learned from major marine casualties and pollution incidents. Since 1997, the US Coast Guard National Strike Force has responded to three major oil spills involving foreign freight vessels grounding, which included the removal of highly viscous oil using various lightering equipment and systems. An informal workgroup consisting of the US Coast Guard, US Navy Supervisor of Salvage (NAVSUPSALV), and various representatives from oil pollution clean-up companies met at the following facilities: the Chevron Asphalt Facility in Edmonds, WA (September 1999), the Oil and Hazardous Materials Simulated Environmental Test Tank (OHMSETT) testing facility in Leonardo, New Jersey (November 1999 and March 2000), the Alaska Clean Seas (ACS) warehouse annex in Prudhoe Bay, AK (October 2000), and Cenac Towing Company facility in Houma, LA (May 2002). The group shared ideas and techniques, and tested different pumps and hose lengths with viscous oil. It was during the early tests that the first quantitative results showed just how efficient lubricated transport of heavy oil product could be, and broadened the knowledge of such methods to the entire industry. Although this technology had existed for many years in the oil production and handling industry, its use had never been investigated in a laboratory setting with regard to salvage response lightering systems. PMID:12899890

Drieu, Michael D; Nourse, Peter C; MacKay, Ronald; Cooper, David A; Hvidbak, Flemming

2003-01-01

338

Age differences in alcohol drinking patterns among Norwegian and German hospital doctors - a study based on national samples  

PubMed Central

Aims: To describe and discuss the alcohol drinking patterns of the younger generation of hospital doctors in Norway and Germany – respectively the abstainers, frequent drinkers, episodic heavy drinkers and hazardous drinkers. Methods: Data were collected in nationwide postal surveys among doctors in Norway (2000) and Germany (2006). A representative sample of 1898 German and 602 Norwegian hospital doctors aged 27–65 years were included in the analyses (N=2500). Alcohol drinking patterns were measured using the first three items of AUDIT in Norway and the AUDIT-C in Germany, scores of ?5 (ranking from 0 to 12) indicating hazardous drinking. Episodic heavy drinking was defined by the intake of ?60g of ethanol, on one occasion, at least once a week. Frequent drinkers were who drank alcoholic beverages at least twice a week. Abstainers were persons who drank no alcohol. The analyses were performed separately for age groups (27–44 years versus 45–65 years) and genders. Results: Compared to the age groups 45 to 65 years in the Norwegian and German samples, the younger age groups (27–44 years) tend to have higher rates of abstainers, higher rates of infrequent drinking of moderate amount of alcoholic drinks, lower rates of episodic heavy drinking and lower rates of hazardous drinking. Conclusion: The younger generation of hospital doctors in Norway and Germany showed tendencies to healthier drinking habits. Changes in professional life, and in the attitude towards alcohol consumption, may go some way towards explaining these findings.

Rosta, Judith; Aasland, Olaf G.

2010-01-01

339

Prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients admitted to Australian hospitals: summary of National Health and Medical Research Council clinical practice guideline.  

PubMed

Each year in Australia, about 1 in 1000 people develop a first episode of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which approximates to about 20,000 cases. More than half of these episodes occur during or soon after a hospital admission, which makes them potentially preventable. This paper summarises recommendations from the National Health and Medical Research Council's 'Clinical Practice Guideline for the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients Admitted to Australian Hospitals' and describes the way these recommendations were developed. The guideline has two aims: to provide advice on VTE prevention to Australian clinicians and to support implementation of effective programmes for VTE prevention in Australian hospitals by offering evidence-based recommendations which local hospital guidelines can be based on. Methods for preventing VTE are pharmacological and/or mechanical, and they require appropriate timing, dosing and duration and also need to be accompanied by good clinical care, such as promoting mobility and hydration whilst in hospital. With some procedures or injuries, the risk of VTE is sufficiently high to require that all patients receive an effective form of prophylaxis unless this is contraindicated; in other clinical settings, the need for prophylaxis requires individual assessment. For optimal VTE prevention, all patients admitted to hospital should have early and formal assessments of: (i) their intrinsic VTE risk and the risks related to their medical conditions; (ii) the added VTE risks resulting from surgery or trauma; (iii) bleeding risks that would contraindicate pharmacological prophylaxis; (iv) any contraindications to mechanical prophylaxis, culminating in (v) a decision about prophylaxis (pharmacological and/or mechanical, or none). The most appropriate form of prophylaxis will depend on the type of surgery, medical condition and patient characteristics. Recommendations for various clinical circumstances are provided as summary tables with relevance to orthopaedic surgical procedures, other types of surgery and medical inpatients. In addition, the tables indicate the grades of supporting evidence for the recommendations (these range from Grade A which can be trusted to guide practice, to Grade D where there is more uncertainty; Good Practice Points are consensus-based expert opinions). PMID:22697152

Wickham, N; Gallus, A S; Walters, B N J; Wilson, A

2012-06-01

340

Incidence and costs of hip fractures vs strokes and acute myocardial infarction in Italy: comparative analysis based on national hospitalization records  

PubMed Central

Objectives As osteoporotic fractures are becoming a major health care problem in countries characterized by an increasing number of older adults, in this study we aimed to compare the incidence and costs of hip fragility fractures in Italian elderly people versus those of major cardiovascular diseases (strokes and acute myocardial infarctions [AMI]) occurring in the whole adult population. Methods We analyzed hospitalization records maintained at the national level by the Italian Ministry of Health for the diagnosis of hip fractures (ICD-9-CM codes 820–821), AMI (code 410), hemorrhagic (codes 430, 431, 432) and ischemic strokes (codes 433–434), and TIA (code 435) between 2001–2005. Cost analyses were based on diagnosis-related groups. Results The incidence of hip fractures in elderly people has increased (+12.9% between 2001 and 2005), as well as that of AMI (+20.2%) and strokes (hemorrhagic: +9.6%; ischemic: +14.7) occurring in the whole adult population; conversely, hospitalization due to TIA decreased by a rate of 13.6% between 2001 and 2005. In 2005, the hospital costs across the national health care system that were associated with hip fragility fractures in the elderly were comparable to those of strokes (both hemorrhagic and ischemic), which occurred in the whole Italian adult population. Moreover, these costs were higher than those generated by AMI and TIA. Rehabilitation costs following strokes reached about 3 billion Euros in 2005, but rehabilitative costs of hip fractures and AMI were comparable (about 530 million Euros in 2005). Conclusion The burden of hip fragility fractures in Italy is comparable to that of AMI and strokes.

Piscitelli, Prisco; Iolascon, Giovanni; Argentiero, Alberto; Chitano, Giovanna; Neglia, Cosimo; Marcucci, Gemma; Pulimeno, Manuela; Benvenuto, Marco; Mundi, Santa; Marzo, Valentina; Donati, Daniela; Baggiani, Angelo; Migliore, Alberto; Granata, Mauro; Gimigliano, Francesca; Di Blasio, Raffaele; Gimigliano, Alessandra; Renzulli, Lorenzo; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Distante, Alessandro; Gimigliano, Raffaele

2012-01-01

341

U.S. Coast Guard cutter personnel on Sweetbriar train their fire ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

U.S. Coast Guard cutter personnel on Sweetbriar train their fire hoses on a burning pleasure boat in an Alaskan harbor. A U.S. Coast Guard rigid-hull inflatable helps with the fire-fighting effort - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter SWEETBRIER, Cordova, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

342

Reduction of guard interval by impulse compression for DMT modulation on twisted pair cables  

Microsoft Academic Search

In multicarrier modulation schemes like orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) or discrete multi tone (DMT) a guard interval represented by a cyclic prefix is inserted between successive multicarrier symbols in order to reduce intersymbol interference (ISI). The length of the guard interval is determined by the length of the channel impulse response (CIR). For a fixed guard interval, the longer

Romed Schur; Joachim Speidel; Ralf Angerbauer

2000-01-01

343

33 CFR 165.100 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District. 165.100 Section...Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.100 Regulated...Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District. (a)...

2010-07-01

344

33 CFR 165.100 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District. 165.100 Section...Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.100 Regulated...Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District. (a)...

2009-07-01

345

How to Place Efficiently Guards and Paintings in an Art Gallery  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the art gallery problem the goal is to place guards (as few as possible) in a polygon so that a maximal area of the polygon is covered. We address here a closely related problem: how to place paintings and guards in an art gallery so that the total value of guarded paintings is a maximum. More formally, a simple

Christodoulos Fragoudakis; Euripides Markou; Stathis Zachos

2005-01-01

346

78 FR 35756 - Special Local Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. USCG-2013-0398] Special Local Regulations; Recurring...in the Seventh Coast Guard District AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...accordance with previously issued special local regulations, vessels...Coast Guard will enforce the special local regulations for the...

2013-06-14

347

78 FR 34886 - Special Local Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. USCG-2013-0213] Special Local Regulations; Recurring...in the Seventh Coast Guard District AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...the enforcement period, the special local regulation establishes...Coast Guard will enforce the special local regulation for the...

2013-06-11

348

76 FR 25548 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard...for Coast Guard Use of Force Training exercises. This safety zone will be established...and/or helicopters taking part in the exercise. Unauthorized persons or vessels...

2011-05-05

349

National Multicenter Study of Predictors and Outcomes of Bacteremia upon Hospital Admission Caused by Enterobacteriaceae Producing Extended-Spectrum ?-Lactamases ?  

PubMed Central

Extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae are pathogens that may lead to a spectrum of clinical syndromes. We aimed to identify predictors and outcomes of ESBL bacteremia upon hospital admission (UHA) in a nationwide prospective study. Thus, a multicenter prospective study was conducted in 10 Israeli hospitals. Adult patients with bacteremia due to Enterobacteriaceae diagnosed within 72 h of hospitalization were included. Patients with ESBL producers (cases) were compared to those with non-ESBL producers (controls), and a 1:1 ratio was attempted in each center. A case-control study to identify predictors and a cohort study to identify outcomes were conducted. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used for analyses. Overall, 447 patients with bacteremia due to Enterobacteriaceae were recruited: 205 cases and 242 controls. Independent predictors of ESBL were increased age, multiple comorbid conditions, poor functional status, recent contact with health care settings, invasive procedures, and prior receipt of antimicrobial therapy. In addition, patients presenting with septic shock and/or multiorgan failure were more likely to have ESBL infections. Patients with ESBL producers suffered more frequently from a delay in appropriate antimicrobial therapy (odds ratio [OR], 4.7; P, <0.001) and had a higher mortality rate (OR, 3.5; P, <0.001). After controlling for confounding variables, both ESBL production (OR, 2.3; P, 9.1) and a delay in adequate therapy (OR, 0.05; P, 0.001) were significant predictors for mortality and other adverse outcomes. We conclude that among patients with bacteremia due to Enterobacteriaceae UHA, those with ESBL producers tend to be older and chronically ill and to have a delay in effective therapy and severe adverse outcomes. Efforts should be directed to improving the detection of patients with ESBL bacteremia UHA and to providing immediate appropriate therapy.

Marchaim, Dror; Gottesman, Tamar; Schwartz, Orna; Korem, Maya; Maor, Yasmin; Rahav, Galia; Karplus, Rebekah; Lazarovitch, Tsipora; Braun, Eyal; Sprecher, Hana; Lachish, Tamar; Wiener-Well, Yonit; Alon, Danny; Chowers, Michal; Ciobotaro, Pnina; Bardenstein, Rita; Paz, Alona; Potasman, Israel; Giladi, Michael; Schechner, Vered; Schwaber, Mitchell J.; Klarfeld-Lidji, Shiri; Carmeli, Yehuda

2010-01-01

350

US Coast Guard 1995 oil pollution research grants publications: Part 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Pollution Research Grants Program was created by the Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990, P.L. 101-380 (OPA 90), 33 U.S.C. 28761(c)(8) and 2761(c)(9). The OPA established a regional research program and authorized those agencies represented on the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Oil Pollution Research, including the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), to make grants to universities and other research institutions to perform research related to regional effects of oil pollution. The USCG established such a grant program and the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center), a component of the Research and Special Programs Administration of the Department of Transportation (DOT), was chosen to administer this program on behalf of the USCG. In August 1995, the Volpe Center awarded seven one-year grants. Coast Guard funds were matched by funds from the university or non-profit research institution. This report contains the final reports for research performed under these grants.

NONE

1997-08-01

351

US Coast Guard 1995 oil pollution research grants publications: Part 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Pollution Research Grants Program was created by the Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990, P.L. 101-380 (OPA 90), 33 U.S.C. 28761(c)(8) and 2761(c)(9). The OPA established a regional research program and authorized those agencies represented on the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Oil Pollution Research, including the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), to make grants to universities and other research institutions to perform research related to regional effects of oil pollution. The USCG established such a grant program and the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center), a component of the Research and Special Programs Administration of the Department of Transportation (DOT), was chosen to administer this program on behalf of the USCG. In August 1995, the Volpe Center awarded seven one-year grants. Coast Guard funds were matched by funds from the university or non-profit research institution. This report contains the final reports for research performed under these grants.

NONE

1997-08-01

352

Epidemiology of Hospitalized Traumatic Pelvic Fractures and Their Combined Injuries in Taiwan: 2000-2011 National Health Insurance Data Surveillance  

PubMed Central

Background. From the viewpoint of prehospital emergency medicine, a greater proportion of pelvic fractures not of a life-threatening status but combined with other injuries need more comprehensive recognition. Methods. A 12-year nationwide health database of inpatients was reviewed. All cases diagnosed as pelvic fractures were enrolled. The associated injuries classified into 20 categories were further analyzed. Results. During 2000–2011, the hospitalized incidence of pelvic fractures in Taiwan ranged from 17.17 to 19.42 per 100,000, and an increasing trend with age was observed. The mean case-fatality rate was 1.6% for females and 2.1% for males; male patients with pelvic fractures had a significantly higher risk of death than female patients after adjusting for other covariates. 74.2% of these cases were combined with other injuries. The most common associated injuries in an identified body region were other orthopedic fractures of the lower limbs (21.50%), spine/trunk (20.97%), or upper limbs (18.18%), followed by significant head injuries (17.59%), intra-abdominal injuries (11.00%), and thoracic injuries (7.20%). Conclusion. The incidence of hospitalized pelvic fractures in Taiwan was low and the case-fatality rate was lower than those of other countries. Concurrently, coexistence of major combined injuries with pelvic fractures was easily treated at medical centers.

Chan, Chien-Lung; Chu, Dachen; Lin, Yu-Zhen; Lin, Kai-Biao; Yu, Ching-Shao; Yu, I-Liang; Lee, Yi-Hui

2014-01-01

353

The burden of co-existing dermatological disorders and their tendency of being overlooked among patients admitted to muhimbili national hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Skin diseases are underestimated and overlooked by most clinicians despite being common in clinical practice. Many patients are hospitalized with co-existing dermatological conditions which may not be detected and managed by the attending physicians. The objective of this study was to determine the burden of co-existing and overlooked dermatological disorders among patients admitted to medical wards of Muhimbili National hospital in Dar es Salaam. Study design and settings A hospital-based descriptive cross-sectional study conducted at Muhimbili National hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods Patients were consecutively recruited from the medical wards. Detailed interview to obtain clinico-demographic characteristics was followed by a complete physical examination. Dermatological diagnoses were made mainly clinically. Appropriate confirmatory laboratory investigations were performed where necessary. Data was analyzed using the 'Statistical Package for Social Sciences' (SPSS) program version 10.0. A p-value of < 0.5 was statistically significant. Results Three hundred and ninety patients admitted to medical wards were enrolled into the study of whom, 221(56.7%) were females. The mean age was 36.7 ± 17.9 (range 7-84 years). Overall, 232/390 patients (59.5%) had co-existing dermatological disorders with 49% (191/390) having one, 9% (36/390) two and 5 patients (1%) three. A wide range of co-existing skin diseases was encountered, the most diverse being non-infectious conditions which together accounted for 36.4% (142/390) while infectious dermatoses accounted for 31.5% (123/390). The leading infectious skin diseases were superficial fungal infections accounting for 18%. Pruritic papular eruption of HIV/AIDS (PPE) and seborrheic eczema were the most common non-infectious conditions, each accounting for 4.3%. Of the 232/390 patients with dermatological disorders, 191/232 (82.3%) and 154/232 (66.3%) had been overlooked by their referring and admitting doctors respectively. Conclusion Dermatological disorders are common among patients admitted to medical wards and many are not detected by their referring or admitting physicians. Basic dermatological education should be emphasized to improve knowledge and awareness among clinicians.

2011-01-01

354

The interface between the national tuberculosis control programme and district hospitals in Cameroon: missed opportunities for strengthening the local health system -a multiple case study  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. District hospitals (DHs) play a central role in district-based health systems, and their relation with vertical programmes is very important. Studies on the impact of vertical programmes on DHs are rare. This study aims to fill this gap. Its purpose is to analyse the interaction between the National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTCP) and DHs in Cameroon, especially its effects on the human resources, routine health information system (HIS) and technical capacity at the hospital level. Methods We used a multiple case study methodology. From the Adamaoua Region, we selected two DHs, one public and one faith-based. We collected qualitative and quantitative data through document reviews, semi-structured interviews with district and regional staff, and observations in the two DHs. Results The NTCP trained and supervised staff, designed and provided tuberculosis data collection and reporting tools, and provided anti-tuberculosis drugs, reagents and microscopes to DHs. However, these interventions were limited to the hospital units designated as Tuberculosis Diagnostic and Treatment Centres and to staff dedicated to tuberculosis control activities. The NTCP installed a parallel HIS that bypassed the District Health Services. The DH that performs well in terms of general hospital care and that is well managed was successful in tuberculosis control. Based on the available resources, the two hospitals adapt the organisation of tuberculosis control to their settings. The management teams in charge of the District Health Services are not involved in tuberculosis control. In our study, we identified several opportunities to strengthen the local health system that have been missed by the NTCP and the health system managers. Conclusion Well-managed DHs perform better in terms of tuberculosis control than DHs that are not well managed. The analysis of the effects of the NTCP on the human resources, HIS and technical capacity of DHs indicates that the NTCP supports, rather than strengthens, the local health system. Moreover, there is potential for this support to be enhanced. Positive synergies between the NTCP and district health systems can be achieved if opportunities to strengthen the district health system are seized. The question remains, however, of why managers do not take advantage of the opportunities to strengthen the health system.

2013-01-01

355

Emerging Infectious Diseases in Free-Ranging Wildlife-Australian Zoo Based Wildlife Hospitals Contribute to National Surveillance  

PubMed Central

Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly originating from wildlife. Many of these diseases have significant impacts on human health, domestic animal health, and biodiversity. Surveillance is the key to early detection of emerging diseases. A zoo based wildlife disease surveillance program developed in Australia incorporates disease information from free-ranging wildlife into the existing national wildlife health information system. This program uses a collaborative approach and provides a strong model for a disease surveillance program for free-ranging wildlife that enhances the national capacity for early detection of emerging diseases.

Cox-Witton, Keren; Reiss, Andrea; Woods, Rupert; Grillo, Victoria; Baker, Rupert T.; Blyde, David J.; Boardman, Wayne; Cutter, Stephen; Lacasse, Claude; McCracken, Helen; Pyne, Michael; Smith, Ian; Vitali, Simone; Vogelnest, Larry; Wedd, Dion; Phillips, Martin; Bunn, Chris; Post, Lyndel

2014-01-01

356

National Park Service Careers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet provides profiles of career opportunities in the National Park Service. Careers profiled include park ranger, park police, guard, administrator, design and construction, and maintenance, trade and craft positions, and other opportunities. Each career description includes information on some or all of the following: duties; location;…

National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

357

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS; SECOND FLOOR PLAN AND DOOR FRAME ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS; SECOND FLOOR PLAN AND DOOR FRAME AND WINDOW DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Navy Yard, Mar Island, CA. Albert F. Roller, Architect, San Francisco, CA. H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 2 of 15, accompanying specification Noy-4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 14, 1941. Yards & Docks drawing no. 160687; P.W. (Public Works) drawing no. 10388-26; file no. 930-CR-4. Scale one eighth inch to one foot (floor plan) and 3 inches to one foot (details). 73 cm x 129 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

358

National Trends over One Decade in Hospitalization for Acute Myocardial Infarction among Spanish Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Cumulative Incidence, Outcomes and Use of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention  

PubMed Central

Background This study aims to describe trends in the rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and use of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in patients with and without type 2 diabetes in Spain, 2001–2010. Methods We selected all patients with a discharge of AMI using national hospital discharge data. Discharges were grouped by diabetes status: type 2 diabetes and no diabetes. In both groups PCIs were identified. The cumulative incidence of discharges attributed to AMI were calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status and year. We calculated length of stay and in-hospital mortality (IHM). Use of PCI was calculated stratified by diabetes status. Multivariate analysis was adjusted by age, sex, year and comorbidity. Results: From 2001 to 2010, 513,517 discharges with AMI were identified (30.3% with type 2 diabetes). The cumulative incidence of discharges due to AMI in diabetics patients increased (56.3 in 2001 to 71 cases per 100,000 in 2004), then decreased to 61.9 in 2010. Diabetic patients had significantly higher IHM (OR, 1.14; 95%CI, 1.05–1.17). The proportion of diabetic patients that underwent PCI increased from 11.9% in 2001 to 41.6% in 2010. Adjusted incidence of discharge in patients with diabetes who underwent PCI increased significantly (IRR, 3.49; 95%CI, 3.30–3.69). The IHM among diabetics patients who underwent a PCI did not change significantly over time. Conclusions AMI hospitalization rates increased initially but declining slowly. From 2001 to 2010 the proportion of diabetic patients who undergo a PCI increased almost four-fold. Older age and more comorbidity may explain why IHM did not improve after a PCI.

Lopez-de-Andres, Ana; Jimenez-Garcia, Rodrigo; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentin; Jimenez-Trujillo, Isabel; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; de Miguel, Angel Gil; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

2014-01-01

359

Perfect equalization for DMT systems without guard interval  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a new, low-complexity frequency-domain equalizer for discrete multitone (DMT) systems, which, in the absence of a guard interval, utilizes existing redundancy in the frequency-domain to completely eliminate intersymbol and interchannel interference. A perfect reconstruction condition is derived for the noise-free case leading to a sparse equalizer matrix structure. It is furthermore shown that under realistic scenarios minimum mean

Steffen Trautmann; Norbert J. Fliege

2002-01-01

360

Inter-Symbol Guard Time for Synchronizing Optical PPM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An inter-symbol guard time has been proposed as a means of synchronizing the symbol and slot clocks of an optical pulse-position modulation (PPM) receiver with the symbol and slot periods of an incoming optical PPM signal.The proposal is applicable to the low-flux case in which the receiver photodetector operates in a photon-counting mode and the count can include contributions from incidental light sources and dark current.

Far, William; Gin, Jonathan; Srinivasan, Meera; Quirk, Kevin

2009-01-01

361

Guard cell wall: immunocytochemical detection of polysaccharide components  

Microsoft Academic Search

The composition of guard cell walls in sugar beet leaves (Beta vulgaris L.) was studied by using histochemical staining and immunocytochemical detection of cell wall antigens. The findings were compared with those in the walls of epidermal and mesophyll cells. Probing of leaf sections with mono- clonal antibodies against pectins, terminal fucosyl residues linked a-(1)2) to galactose, b-(1)3)-glucans and arabinogalactan-proteins

Anna Majewska-Sawka; Agnieszka Munster; Maria Isabel Rodrõ ´

2002-01-01

362

Coast Guard has new tool to counter tanker oil spills  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new system, now in the final stages of development, to remove the oil cargo from a damaged tanker may well be critical for use in averting a major pollution incident. The Coast Guard-developed system basically involves the air-drop of pumping equipment and huge collapsible plastic bags next to a stricken tanker. The oil cargo is transferred to the 500-ton-capacity

1970-01-01

363

United States Coast Guard recycling guide. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990, the United States Coast Guard (CG) is committed to a pollution prevention program that will improve the quality of the environment. A key element of this program is the minimization of municipal, industrial, and hazardous waste being generated at CG facilities nationwide. Recycling of wastes serves to reduce disposal costs and minimize adverse effects on the environment. This document gives guidance to personnel responsible for establishing CG recycling programs.

NONE

1996-07-01

364

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) Funding for Studies of Hospital-Associated Bacterial Pathogens: Are Funds Proportionate to Burden of Disease?  

PubMed Central

Background Hospital-associated infections (HAIs) are associated with a considerable burden of disease and direct costs greater than $17 billion. The pathogens that cause the majority of serious HAIs are Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species, referred as ESCKAPE. We aimed to determine the amount of funding the National Institute of Health (NIH) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) allocates to research on antimicrobial resistant pathogens, particularly ESCKAPE pathogens. Methods The NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) database was used to identify NIAID antimicrobial resistance research grants funded in 2007-2009 using the terms "antibiotic resistance," "antimicrobial resistance," and "hospital-associated infection." Results Funding for antimicrobial resistance grants has increased from 2007-2009. Antimicrobial resistance funding for bacterial pathogens has seen a smaller increase than non-bacterial pathogens. The total funding for all ESKCAPE pathogens was $ 22,005,943 in 2007, $ 30,810,153 in 2008 and $ 49,801,227 in 2009. S. aureus grants received $ 29,193,264 in FY2009, the highest funding amount of all the ESCKAPE pathogens. Based on 2009 funding data, approximately $1,565 of research money was spent per S. aureus related death and $750 of was spent per C. difficile related death. Conclusions Although the funding for ESCKAPE pathogens has increased from 2007 to 2009, funding levels for antimicrobial resistant bacteria-related grants is still lower than funding for antimicrobial resistant non-bacterial pathogens. Efforts may be needed to improve research funding for resistant-bacterial pathogens, particularly as their clinical burden increases.

2012-01-01

365

42 CFR 412.212 - National rate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...product ofâ (1) The national average standardized amount...from time to time) of the national rate computed under...hospital wage level in the geographic area of the hospital compared to the national average hospital wage...

2013-10-01

366

Quality of life among patients living with epilepsy attending the neurology clinic at kenyatta national hospital, Nairobi, Kenya: a comparative study  

PubMed Central

Background Most of the studies on epilepsy in Kenya and indeed the sub-Saharan region of Africa mainly focus on prevalence, psychiatric profile, and factors associated with increased seizure burden. This being the first Kenyan and sub-Saharan African study assessing quality of life among people living with epilepsy, it will identify their ‘intangible’ needs and enable evidence-based intervention that would ultimately lead to a comprehensive management and better outcome. Methods Design: A cross-sectional comparative study, using the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire, a socio-demographic questionnaire, seizure burden and characteristics, drug and treatment profile questionnaires and the Mini-Mental state examination, among PLWE and those accompanying them, herein referred to as the normal healthy controls, attending the neurology clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. Setting and subjects: Study was carried out between October 2006 and February 2007 at the neurology clinic in the hospital where three hundred consecutive subjects who satisfied the inclusion criteria and gave consent were recruited. Statistical tests used: Descriptive statistics were used to compute means, standard deviations as well as frequencies. Significance of associations was tested using the Chi square test statistic (x2), an independent samples t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a step-wise (forward) regression analysis. A p?National Hospital was significantly impaired and lower than that of the normal controls accompanying them. A comprehensive epilepsy management program is recommended to address this problem and its associated risk factors for the people living with epilepsy in Kenya.

2013-01-01

367

Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students' expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

Wright, T.S.

1992-05-01

368

Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students` expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

Wright, T.S.

1992-05-01

369

Evaluation of the national surveillance system for point-prevalence of healthcare-associated infections in hospitals and in long-term care facilities for elderly in Norway, 2002-2008  

PubMed Central

Background Since 2002, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health has invited all hospitals and long-term care facilities for elderly (LTCFs) to participate in two annual point-prevalence surveys covering the most frequent types of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). In a comprehensive evaluation we assessed how well the system operates to meet its objectives. Methods Surveillance protocols and the national database were reviewed. Data managers at national level, infection control practitioners and ward personnel in hospitals as well as contact persons in LTCFs involved in prevalence data collection were surveyed. Results The evaluation showed that the system was structurally simple, flexible and accepted by the key partners. On average 87% of hospitals and 32% of LTCFs participated in 2004-2008; high level of data completeness was achieved. The data collected described trends in the prevalence of reportable HAIs in Norway and informed policy makers. Local results were used in hospitals to implement targeted infection control measures and to argue for more resources to a greater extent than in LTCFs. Both the use of simplified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) definitions and validity of data seemed problematic as compliance with the standard methodology were reportedly low. Conclusions The surveillance system provides important information on selected HAIs in Norway. The system is overall functional and well-established in hospitals, however, requires active promotion in LTCFs. Validity of data needs to be controlled in the participating institutions before reporting to the national level.

2011-01-01

370

Interprofessional conflict and medical errors: results of a national multi-specialty survey of hospital residents in the US.  

PubMed

Clear communication is considered the sine qua non of effective teamwork. Breakdowns in communication resulting from interprofessional conflict are believed to potentiate errors in the care of patients, although there is little supportive empirical evidence. In 1999, we surveyed a national, multi-specialty sample of 6,106 residents (64.2% response rate). Three questions inquired about "serious conflict" with another staff member. Residents were also asked whether they had made a "significant medical error" (SME) during their current year of training, and whether this resulted in an "adverse patient outcome" (APO). Just over 20% (n = 722) reported "serious conflict" with another staff member. Ten percent involved another resident, 8.3% supervisory faculty, and 8.9% nursing staff. Of the 2,813 residents reporting no conflict with other professional colleagues, 669, or 23.8%, recorded having made an SME, with 3.4% APOs. By contrast, the 523 residents who reported conflict with at least one other professional had 36.4% SMEs and 8.3% APOs. For the 187 reporting conflict with two or more other professionals, the SME rate was 51%, with 16% APOs. The empirical association between interprofessional conflict and medical errors is both alarming and intriguing, although the exact nature of this relationship cannot currently be determined from these data. Several theoretical constructs are advanced to assist our thinking about this complex issue. PMID:19012138

Baldwin, Dewitt C; Daugherty, Steven R

2008-12-01

371

Effects of density experience on mate guarding behavior by adult male Kanzawa spider mites  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Kanzawa spider mite, Tetranychus kanzawai (Acari: Tetranychidae), adult males guard pre-reproductive quiescent females. I experimentally examined the effects of density\\u000a experience during development and\\/or after adult emergence on precopulatory mate guarding behavior by T. kanzawai males. Mate guarding behavior was modified by density experience after adult emergence. When males had previously experienced\\u000a high density after adult emergence (n = 71),

Keiko Oku

2009-01-01

372

Pharmacy officer support of U.S. Coast Guard cutters.  

PubMed

U.S. Public Health Service commissioned officers serve in 16 pharmacy billets with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). Thirteen of these billets involve serving as points of contact for, and providing logistical, materiel, and educational support to, USCG cutters. USCG instructions have solidified the role of pharmacy officers in the support of USCG afloat units. This article describes one USCG pharmacy officer's experience in providing pharmacy service support to USCG cutters based in Alameda, California, Yerba Buena Island (San Francisco), California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. PMID:11143434

Huntzinger, P E

2000-11-01

373

Patient evaluation of hospital outcomes: an analysis of open-ended comments from extreme clusters in a national survey  

PubMed Central

Objectives A recent study identified patients in six distinct response groups based on their evaluations of outcomes related to overall satisfaction, malpractice and benefit of treatment. This study validates the response clusters by analysing and comparing open-ended comments from the extreme positive and extreme negative response groups. Design Qualitative content analysis. Setting Data from open-ended comment fields provided by patients who completed a national patient-experience survey carried out in Norway in 2011. 10?514 patients responded to the questionnaire and 3233 provided comments. A random sample of 50 open-ended comments from respondents representing cluster 1 (‘excellent services’), cluster 5 (‘services have clear improvement needs’) and outliers (‘very poor services’) was reviewed. Results 3 distinct patient profiles were identified. More than half of the comments in cluster 1 included descriptions of positive healthcare experiences, one addressed patient safety issues. Only 1 of the comments in cluster 5 was positive, and 12 were related to safety. All comments from the outliers were negative, and more than three-quarters reported experiences related to malpractice or adverse events. Recurring themes did not differ significantly between the three respondent groups, but significant differences were found for the descriptions and severity of the experiences. Conclusions Patients in negative response groups had distinct and much poorer healthcare descriptions than those in the extreme positive group, supporting the interpretation of quality differences between these groups. Further research should assess ways of combining statistical cluster information and qualitative comments, which could be used for local quality improvement and public reporting.

Iversen, Hilde Hestad; Bjertnaes, ?yvind Andresen; Skudal, Kjersti Eeg

2014-01-01

374

The social environment affects mate guarding behavior in Japanese beetles, Popillia japonica  

PubMed Central

The effect of the social environment on post-copulatory mate guarding duration in Japanese beetles, (Popillia japonica Newman), was examined in a laboratory experiment. The mate guarding durations of beetles in different sex ratios and densities were observed for 10 hours. Guarding duration was longer when females were larger, suggesting the presence of ‘cryptic’ male mate choice. Densities, but not sex ratio, affected the duration of guarding bouts, with males guarding for longer at higher densities. This result implies that males increase their guarding duration under conditions in which their female may be likely to be encountered by other males. The lack of a sex ratio effect on the duration of guarding bouts is consistent with other studies on this species that indicate males have difficulty distinguishing females from males. Consequently, because the sex ratio on food plants is typically male-biased, a paired male may react just to density, treating surrounding individuals as if they were mostly males. The total amount of time males spent guarding was lower at lower densities and at male-biased sex ratios; this suggests that after ceasing to guard one female, males were less able to find a subsequent mate under these conditions.

Saeki, Yoriko; Kruse, Kipp C.; Switzer, Paul V.

2005-01-01

375

Incidence and Predictors of 30-Day Hospital Re-Admission Rate Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (From the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry)  

PubMed Central

Post-discharge outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are important measures of quality of care and complement in-hospital measures. We sought to assess in-hospital and post-discharge PCI outcomes to 1) better understand the relationship between acute and 30 day outcomes, 2) identify predictors of 30-day hospital re-admission, and 3) determine the prognostic significance of 30-day hospital readmission. We analyzed in-hospital death and length of stay (LOS) and non-elective cardiac-related re-hospitalization following discharge in 10,965 patients following PCI in the Dynamic Registry. From 1999–2006, in-hospital death rate and LOS declined. The 30-day cardiac re-admission rate was 4.6%, with considerable variability over time and among hospitals. The risk of re-hospitalization was greater in women, those with CHF, unstable angina, multiple lesions and emergency PCI. Conversely, a lower risk of re-hospitalization was associated with a higher number of treated lesions. Patients re-admitted within 30 days had higher one-year mortality than those free from hospital readmission. In conclusion, while in-hospital mortality and LOS following PCI have decreased over time, the observed 30 day cardiac re-admission rate was highly variable and the risk of re-admission was more closely associated with underlying patient characteristics than procedural characteristics.

Ricciardi, Mark J.; Selzer, Faith; Marroquin, Oscar C.; Holper, Elizabeth M.; Venkitachalam, Lakshmi; Williams, David O.; Kelsey, Sheryl F.; Laskey, Warren K.

2012-01-01

376

6. Photocopy of original plans (from National Archives, Cartographic Division, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Photocopy of original plans (from National Archives, Cartographic Division, Record Group 156) Delineator unknown. Commanding Officer's signature dated May 22, 1871 PLAN, ELEVATION, AND SECTION - Benicia Arsenal, Guard & Engine House, Benicia, Solano County, CA

377

Oxalate production by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum deregulates guard cells during infection.  

PubMed

Oxalic acid is a virulence factor of several phytopathogenic fungi, including Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, but the detailed mechanisms by which oxalic acid affects host cells and tissues are not understood. We tested the hypothesis that oxalate induces foliar wilting during fungal infection by manipulating guard cells. Unlike uninfected leaves, stomatal pores of Vicia faba leaves infected with S. sclerotiorum are open at night. This cellular response appears to be dependent on oxalic acid because stomatal pores are partially closed when leaves are infected with an oxalate-deficient mutant of S. sclerotiorum. In contrast to oxalate-deficient S. sclerotiorum, wild-type fungus causes an increase in stomatal conductance and transpiration as well as a decrease in plant biomass. Green fluorescent protein-tagged S. sclerotiorum emerges through open stomata from the uninfected abaxial leaf surface for secondary colonization. Exogenous application of oxalic acid to the detached abaxial epidermis of V. faba leaves induces stomatal opening. Guard cells treated with oxalic acid accumulate potassium and break down starch, both of which are known to contribute to stomatal opening. Oxalate interferes with abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) L. Heynh. mutants abi1, abi3, abi4, and aba2 are more susceptible to oxalate-deficient S. sclerotiorum than wild-type plants, suggesting that Sclerotinia resistance is dependent on ABA. We conclude that oxalate acts via (1) accumulation of osmotically active molecules to induce stomatal opening and (2) inhibition of ABA-induced stomatal closure. PMID:15502012

Guimarães, Rejane L; Stotz, Henrik U

2004-11-01

378

New approaches to the biology of stomatal guard cells.  

PubMed

CO2 acts as an environmental signal that regulates stomatal movements. High CO2 concentrations reduce stomatal aperture, whereas low concentrations trigger stomatal opening. In contrast to our advanced understanding of light and drought stress responses in guard cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying stomatal CO2 sensing and signaling are largely unknown. Leaf temperature provides a convenient indicator of transpiration, and can be used to detect mutants with altered stomatal control. To identify genes that function in CO2 responses in guard cells, CO2-insensitive mutants were isolated through high-throughput leaf thermal imaging. The isolated mutants are categorized into three groups according to their phenotypes: (i) impaired in stomatal opening under low CO2 concentrations; (ii) impaired in stomatal closing under high CO2 concentrations; and (iii) impaired in stomatal development. Characterization of these mutants has begun to yield insights into the mechanisms of stomatal CO2 responses. In this review, we summarize the current status of the field and discuss future prospects. PMID:24104052

Negi, Juntaro; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Kusumi, Kensuke; Iba, Koh

2014-02-01

379

[Evaluation of the colonic endoscopic polypectomy in patients of the National Carlos Alberto Seguín Escobedo Hospital ESSALUD of Arequipa (1999-2004)].  

PubMed

The investigation was performed in the Carlos Alberto Seguín Escobedo National Hospital of Essalud-Arequipa, in 194 patients that were submitted to Colonic Endoscopic Polypectomy from January of 1999 to December of 2004. This study is observational, retrospective and transverse. The clinical histories, endoscopies reports and pathological anatomy reports were reviewed, taking the personal data, clinical symptoms, endoscopic and pathologic characteristics of the polyps; colonoscopies associate findings; surgical technique of polypectomies, complications and complementary treatment of post-polypectomy. The colonic endoscopic polypectomy was performed in 194 patients from 1380 colonoscopies (14.05 %), with more frequency in the sixth decade of life, and corresponding most to the masculine sex. Most of the patients did not have previous symptoms, and of those who had clinical manifestations the more frequent were the bleeding lost and changes in the intestinal rhythm. The polyps endoscopic characteristics found that the sessile were the more frequent and were located in rectum--sigmoid zone. The preponderant size was from 5 to 10mm, and mostly unique. The histopathology type of the polyps was adenoma, frequently with some grade of dysplasia. The surgical techniques for the colonic endoscopy polypectomy were with cold pincer and electric cut. The complications were rare. The complementary treatment after polypectomy was injectotherapy and surgery. Finally, our results were discussed and compared with other similar studies, and then we elaborated the conclusions and recommendations, with whom we expect to contribute to a better knowledge of the Colonic Endoscopy Polypectomy in our country. PMID:16622486

Suárez Cueva, Yanyne; Campos Nizama, Juan

2006-01-01

380

Seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and C viruses and syphilis infections among blood donors at the Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background According to the latest Tanzanian National AIDS Control Programme (NACP) report a total of 147,271 individuals donated blood during the year 2002. However, blood safety remains an issue of major concern in transfusion medicine in Tanzania where national blood transfusion services and policies, appropriate infrastructure, trained personnel and financial resources are inadequate. Most of the donated blood is screened for HIV alone. Methods We determined among blood donors at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), the seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and syphilis by donor type, sex and age and to determine association, if any, in the occurrence of the pathogens. The sample included 1599 consecutive donors, 1424(89.1%) males and 175 (10.9%) females, who donated blood between April 2004 and May, 2005. Most of them 1125 (70.4%) were replacement donors and a few 474 (29.6%) voluntary donors. Their age (in years) ranged from 16 to 69, and most (72.2%) were between 20–39 years. Results Two hundred and fifty four (15.9%) of the donated blood had serological evidence of infection with at least one pathogen and 28 (1.8%) had multiple infections. The current seroprevalence of HIV, HBsAg, HCV and syphilis among blood donors at MNH in Dar es Salaam was found to be 3.8%, 8.8%, 1.5% and 4.7%, respectively. Respective seroprevalences among HIV seronegative blood donors were 8.7% for HBV, 1.6% for HCV and 4.6% for syphilis. The differences in the prevalence of HIV and syphilis infections between replacement and voluntary donors were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Syphilis was the only infection that occurred more frequently among HIV infected (12.1%) than non-infected (4.6%) blood donors (P < 0.05), and whose prevalence increased with age (X2 = 58.5 df = 5, P < 0.001). There were no significant sex differences in the occurrence of pathogens. Finally, there were significant associations in the occurrence of HBsAg and syphilis (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1.-4.2) and HIV and syphilis (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.0–5.3). Conclusion The high (15.9%) seroprevalence of blood-borne infections in blood donated at MNH calls for routine screening of blood donors for HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis and for strict selection criteria of donors, with emphasis on getting young voluntary donors and for establishment of strict guidelines for blood transfusions.

Matee, Mecky IN; Magesa, Pius M; Lyamuya, Eligius F

2006-01-01

381

Evaluation of fuel-cell technology for Coast Guard applications. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent proposals and the literature show promise of fuel cells being commercially available in the next decade. We searched the literature to determine the current state of fuel-cell technology, to determine if fuel cells can be used by the U.S. Coast Guard, and to make proposals for possible research and development efforts by the Coast Guard. Alkaline and phosphoric acid

Barrett

1988-01-01

382

78 FR 55214 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement...O.R.T.) boat races to be held on the Neches River in Orange, TX from 3 p.m. on September 20, 2013, through 6...

2013-09-10

383

77 FR 47519 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement...Regulations for the S.P.O.R.T. Power Boat Neches River in Orange, TX from 3 p.m. on September 21, 2012, through 6...

2012-08-09

384

77 FR 59083 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, Washington  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, Washington AGENCY: Coast...in a Coast Guard Ready for Operations exercise in Hood Canal, WA that will take place...safety of the maritime public during the exercise and will do so by prohibiting any...

2012-09-26

385

Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Modernization: Background and Issues for Congress. Updated July 24, 2013.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Coast Guard s FY2013 budget initiated a new project for the design and construction of a new polar icebreaker. The Coast Guard s proposed FY2013 budget requested $8 million in FY2013 acquisition funding to initiate survey and design activities for the...

R. O'Rourke

2013-01-01

386

Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Modernization: Background, Issues, and Options for Congress. Updated September 29, 2010.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Coast Guard polar icebreakers perform a variety of missions supporting U.S. interests in polar regions. The Coast Guard's two heavy polar icebreakers-Polar Star and Polar Sea-have exceeded their intended 30-year service lives. The Polar Star is not operat...

R. O'Rourke

2010-01-01

387

Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Modernization: Background, Issues, and Options for Congress. Updated July 2, 2010.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Coast Guard polar icebreakers perform a variety of missions supporting U.S. interests in polar regions. The Coast Guard's two heavy polar icebreakers-Polar Star and Polar Sea-have exceeded their intended 30-year service lives. The Polar Star is not operat...

R. O'Rourke

2010-01-01

388

A Comparative Study of the Arabidopsis thaliana Guard-Cell Transcriptome and Its Modulation by Sucrose  

PubMed Central

Microarray analysis was performed on RNA isolated from guard cells that were manually dissected from leaves of Arabidopsis. By pooling our data with those of two earlier studies on Arabidopsis guard cell protoplasts, we provide a robust view of the guard-cell transcriptome, which is rich in transcripts for transcription factors, signaling proteins, transporters, and carbohydrate-modifying enzymes. To test the hypothesis that photosynthesis-derived sugar signals guard cells to adjust stomatal opening, we determined the profile of genes expressed in guard cells from leaves that had been treated with sucrose. The results revealed that expression of 440 genes changed in guard cells in response to sucrose. Consistent with this hypothesis, these genes encoded cellular functions for photosynthesis and transport of sugars, water, amino acids, and ions. Plants of T-DNA insertion lines for 50 genes highly responsive to sucrose were examined for defects in guard cell function. Twelve genes not previously known to function in guard cells were shown to be important in leaf conductance, water-use efficiency, and/or stomate development. Of these, three are of particular interest, having shown effects in nearly every test of stomatal function without a change in stomatal density: TPS5 (At4g17770), a TRAF domain-containing protein (At1g65370), and a WD repeat–containing protein (At1g15440).

Bates, George W.; Rosenthal, David M.; Sun, Jindong; Chattopadhyay, Maitreyi; Peffer, Emily; Yang, Jing; Ort, Donald R.; Jones, Alan M.

2012-01-01

389

29 CFR 1910.23 - Guarding floor and wall openings and holes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the use of fixed standard railing (as when located in aisle spaces, etc.), the guard shall consist of a hinged floor opening...board. (d) Stairway railings and guards. (1) Every flight of stairs having four or more risers shall be equipped...

2013-07-01

390

Analysis of abscisic acid responsive proteins in Brassica napus guard cells by multiplexed isobaric tagging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guard cells, which form stomata on the leaf epidermis, play important roles in plant gas exchange and defense against pathogens. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone that can be induced by drought and leads to stomatal closure. Guard cells have been a premier model system for studying ABA signal transduction. Despite significant progress on the identification of molecular components in

Mengmeng Zhu; Brigitte Simons; Ning Zhu; David G. Oppenheimer; Sixue Chen

2010-01-01

391

Light and Stomatal Function: Blue Light Stimulates Swelling of Guard Cell Protoplasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Onion guard cell protoplasts swell when illuminated with blue light. The response is a 35 to 60 percent increase in volume and is dependent on potassium ion. Epidermal cell protoplasts do not swell under the same conditions. It is postulated that a membrane-bound blue photoreceptor mediates a direct response of guard cells to light.

E. Zeiger; P. K. Hepler

1977-01-01

392

Improved quality of management of eclampsia patients through criteria based audit at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Bridging the quality gap  

PubMed Central

Background Criteria-based audits (CBA) have been used to improve clinical management in developed countries, but have only recently been introduced in the developing world. This study discusses the use of a CBA to improve quality of care among eclampsia patients admitted at a University teaching hospital in Dar es Salaam Tanzania. Objective The prevalence of eclampsia in MNH is high (?6%) with the majority of cases arriving after start of convulsions. In 2004–2005 the case-fatality rate in eclampsia was 5.1% of all pregnant women admitted for delivery (MNH obstetric data base). A criteria-based audit (CBA) was used to evaluate the quality of care for eclamptic mothers admitted at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania after implementation of recommendations of a previous audit. Methods A CBA of eclampsia cases was conducted at MNH. Management practices were evaluated using evidence-based criteria for appropriate care. The Ministry of Health (MOH) guidelines, local management guidelines, the WHO manual supplemented by the WHO Reproductive Health Library, standard textbooks, the Cochrane database and reviews in peer reviewed journals were adopted. At the initial audit in 2006, 389 case notes were assessed and compared with the standards, gaps were identified, recommendations made followed by implementation. A re-audit of 88 cases was conducted in 2009 and compared with the initial audit. Results There was significant improvement in quality of patient management and outcome between the initial and re-audit: Review of management plan by senior staff (76% vs. 99%; P=0.001), urine for albumin test (61% vs. 99%; P=0.001), proper use of partogram to monitor labour (75% vs. 95%; P=0.003), treatment with steroids for lung maturity (2.0% vs. 24%; P=0.001), Caesarean section within 2 hours of decision (33% vs. 61%; P=0.005), full blood count (28% vs. 93%; P=0.001), serum urea and creatinine (44% vs. 86%; P=0.001), liver enzymes (4.0% vs. 86%; P=0.001), and specialist review within 2 hours of admission (25% vs. 39%; P=0.018). However, there was no significant change in terms of delivery within 24 hours of admission (69% vs. 63%; P=0.33). There was significant reduction of maternal deaths (7.7% vs. 0%; P=0.001). Conclusion CBA is applicable in low resource setting and can help to improve quality of care in obstetrics including management of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia.

2012-01-01

393

Health-related quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs at National Referral Hospitals in Uganda: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Epilepsy is a devastating disorder that impacts on patients’ quality of life, irrespective of use of anti epileptic drugs (AEDs). This study estimates the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its associated predictors among epilepsy patients receiving AEDs. Methods A total of 175 epilepsy patients already receiving AED for at least 3 months were randomly selected and interviewed from mental clinics at Mulago and Butabika national referral hospitals in Uganda between May - July 2011. A HRQOL index, the primary outcome, was constructed using items from Quality Of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaires. The internal consistency and adequacy of these items was also computed using Cronbach's alpha and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin tests. Partial correlations were used to evaluate the contribution of the health dimensions (mental, psychological, social, physical functioning and emotional well being) and, multiple linear regressions to determine factors independently associated with HRQOL. Results Just about half of the respondents (54%) were males, and nearly two thirds (62%) had received AEDs for at least 12 months. The average age was 26.6 years (SD?=?11.1). The overall HRQOL mean score was 58 (SD?=?13) on a scale of 0–100. The average scores of different dimensions or subscales ranged from 41 (physical) to 65 (psychological). At least three quarters (75%) of all subscales had good internal consistency and adequacy. The largest variations in the overall HRQOL were explained by social and mental functioning; each accounting for about 30% of the difference in the HRQOL but seizure control features explained a little (6%) variation. Factors negatively associated with HRQOL were poly-therapy (-1.16, p?=?0.01) and frequency of seizures (-2.29, p?=?0.00). Other factors associated with overall HRQOL included drug side effects, sex, marital status and education. Duration on AEDs was not a significant predictor of HRQOL. Conclusion The HRQOL for epilepsy patients on AEDs is very low. The predictors of low HRQOL were socio factors (marital status, education) and drug side effects, frequency of seizure, and type of therapy.

2014-01-01

394

Proceedings: National Workshops on Hospital Waste Incineration and Hospital Sterilization. Held in San Francisco, California on May 10-12, 1988 and in Baltimore, Maryland on May 24-26, 1988.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The primary goals of the workshops were to present the most advanced research and policies on hospital waste incineration being pursued in the regulatory sector, encourage the formation of networks among those involved, and improve permitting and enforcem...

1989-01-01

395

Technical efficiency of Italian public hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the late eighties the Italian National Health System, in particular hospital care, has undergone deep reforms. This paper evaluates the technical efficiency of Italian public hospitals in light of the main features of the hospital system at a regional level. The evaluation was carried out using data on endowments and admissions of all Italian public hospitals over the period

Alessandro Schiavone

2008-01-01

396

Relation Between Hospital Specialization With Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Clinical Outcomes in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction National Registry of Myocardial Infarction4 Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background—Hospitals with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) capability may choose to predominately offer PPCI to their patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), or they may selectively offer PPCI or fibrinolytic therapy based on patient and hospital-level factors. Whether a greater level of hospital specialization with PPCI is associated with better quality of care is unknown. Methods and Results—We analyzed

Brahmajee K. Nallamothu; Yongfei Wang; David J. Magid; Robert L. McNamara; Jeph Herrin; Elizabeth H. Bradley; Eric R. Bates; Charles V. Pollack; Harlan M. Krumholz

2010-01-01

397

Male songbirds provide indirect parental care by guarding females during incubation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Across many taxa, guarding of fertile mates is a widespread tactic that enhances paternity assurance. However, guarding of mates can also occur during the nonfertile period, and the fitness benefits of this behavior are unclear. Male songbirds, for example, sometimes guard nonfertile females during foraging recesses from incubation. We hypothesized that guarding postreproductive mates may have important, but unrecognized, benefits by enhancing female foraging efficiency, thereby increasing time spent incubating eggs. We tested the hypothesis in 2 songbird species by examining female behavior during natural and experimentally induced absences of males. Male absence caused increased vigilance in foraging females that decreased their efficiency and resulted in less time spent incubating eggs. Male guarding of nonfertile females can thus provide a previously unrecognized form of indirect parental care.

Fedy, B. C.; Martin, T. E.

2009-01-01

398

U.S. Coast Guard Cuban Mass Emigration Operations Planning. Does It Meet the Tenets of Operational Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Does Coast Guard strategic level planning for Cuban Mass Emigration Emergency Operations adequately meet the tenets of Operational Design proposed by the Naval War College. A step by step comparison of the Commander, Coast Guard Atlantic Area strategic le...

B. P. Smith

1997-01-01

399

33 CFR 140.101 - Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors or Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Guard marine inspectors or Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement...Guard marine inspectors or Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement...subject to inspection by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and...

2013-07-01

400

76 FR 28795 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security United States Coast Guard-024 Auxiliary...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...United States Coast Guard-024 Auxiliary Database System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office...United States Coast Guard-024 Auxiliary Database (AUXDATA) System of Records.'' This...titled, ``DHS/USCG-024 Auxiliary Database (AUXDATA) System of...

2011-05-18

401

The "Guarded Torus" approach for MUPUS thermal properties measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past few years scientists developed an increasing interest in the structure and behaviour of extraterrestrial surfaces. Comets are playing a main role as targets of these investigations. They are composed of ice, dust and organics and it is assumed that comets consist of the basic material out of which the solar system was formed. The properties at the surface and the upper layers of comets as well as their change during the approach to the sun are therefore of special interest. The thermal and mechanical properties of the comet 67P/Churyumov- Gerasimenko and their changes should be measured with the MUPUS-probe, one of the instruments on the Rosetta lander Philae. The "Guarded Torus" approach is a possible way of optimizing the scientific results of the thermal conductivity measurements with MUPUS like sensors.

Kaufmann, E.; Knollenberg, J.; Kargl, G.; Kömle, N. I.

2012-09-01

402

US Coast Guard lightweight fire-fighting module  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. Coast Guard Fire-fighting Module developed for the purpose of fighting fires in harbors and on ships is described. The module can be lifted by a dockside crane or helicopter and placed on the deck of a patrol boat or cutter for transportation to the scene of the fire. At the fire the module can be set up and put in operation by a crew of two in approximately fifteen minutes. Once in operation the module will deliver water to two fire nozzles at a pressure of 150 psi and a flow rate of 2000 gpm. Sufficient fuel is carried in the module for three hours of continuous operation. A record of the development of the fire fighting module is also presented.

1980-01-01

403

Conditioned mate-guarding behavior in the female rat.  

PubMed

Female and male rats are often described as having a promiscuous mating strategy, yet simple Pavlovian conditioning paradigms, in which a neutral odor or strain-related cues are paired with preferred sexual reward states during an animal's first sexual experiences, shift this strategy toward copulatory and mate preferences for partners bearing the familiar odor or strain cue. We examined whether female rats given exclusive rewarding copulation with one particular male would display mate-guarding behavior, a strong index of monogamous mating. Ovariectomized, hormone-primed female Long-Evans rats were given their first 10 paced sexual experiences at 4-day intervals with a particular unscented male of the same strain. A final test was conducted in an open field 4-days later in which the primed, partnered female was given access to the male partner and a fully-primed competitor female. In this situation, the partnered females mounted the competitor female repeatedly if she came near the vicinity of the male. This behavior prevented the male from copulating with the competitor, and was not displayed if partnered females could not pace the rate of copulatory behavior efficiently during the training trials, nor was it displayed by the competitor females. Fos expression was examined in both the partnered and competitor females after the final open field test. Partnered females had significantly higher expression within the supraoptic nucleus and nucleus accumbens shell compared to partnered females that did not develop this behavior or competitor females. These data show that females engaged in paced copulation with the same male display mate-guarding when exposed to that male and a competitor female. Increased activation of the SON and NAc may underlie this behavior. PMID:24768651

Holley, Amanda; Shalev, Shy; Bellevue, Shannon; Pfaus, James G

2014-05-28

404

20 CFR 1002.62 - Does USERRA cover a member of the Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a âuniformed serviceâ for some purposes, it is not...Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Civil Air Patrol, and the Coast Guard Auxiliary is...

2013-04-01

405

47 CFR Appendix B to Part 64 - Priority Access Service (PAS) for National Security and Emergency Preparedness (NSEP)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...e.g., Manager, National...National Guard Leadership, State and...Assessment Team Leaders; (iii...Command Center Managers, local emergency managers, other state...State police leadership; (iii...medical service leaders;...

2010-10-01

406

47 CFR Appendix B to Part 64 - Priority Access Service (PAS) for National Security and Emergency Preparedness (NSEP)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...e.g., Manager, National...National Guard Leadership, State and...Assessment Team Leaders; (iii...Command Center Managers, local emergency managers, other state...State police leadership; (iii...medical service leaders;...

2009-10-01

407

Nontraumatic dental condition-related visits to emergency departments on weekdays, weekends and night hours: findings from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care survey  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether the rates of nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC)-related emergency department (ED) visits are higher during the typical working hours of dental offices and lower during night hours, as well as the associated factors. Methods We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 1997 through 2007 using multivariate binary and polytomous logistic regression adjusted for survey design to determine the effect of predictors on specified outcome variables. Results Overall, 4,726 observations representing 16.4 million NTDC-related ED visits were identified. Significant differences in rates of NTDC-related ED visits were observed with 40%–50% higher rates during nonworking hours and 20% higher rates on weekends than the overall average rate of 170 visits per hour. Compared with 19–33 year olds, subjects < 18 years old had significantly higher relative rates of NTDC-related ED visits during nonworking hours [relative rate ratio (RRR) = 1.6 to 1.8], whereas those aged 73 and older had lower relative rates during nonworking hours (RRR = 0.4; overall P = 0.0005). Compared with those having private insurance, Medicaid and self-pay patients had significantly lower relative rates of NTDC visits during nonworking and night hours (RRR = 0.6 to 0.7, overall P < 0.0003). Patients with a dental reason for visit were overrepresented during the night hours (RRR = 1.3; overall P = 0.04). Conclusion NTDC-related visits to ED occurred at a higher rate during nonworking hours and on weekends and were significantly associated with age, patient-stated reason for visit and payer type.

Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Fischer, Melissa Christine; Sadeghi, Saba Noori; Xiang, Qun; Szabo, Aniko

2013-01-01

408

Motivation and values of hospital consultants in south-east England who work in the national health service and do private practice.  

PubMed

In the UK, a small private health care sector has always existed alongside the national health service (NHS). The conventional assumption is that doctors who work as salaried employees of the NHS are guided in their clinical practice by professional values which encourage them to put their patients' interests first. A common suspicion is that doctors undertaking fee-for-service practice in the private sector are motivated by self-interest, with commitment to their patients compromised by consideration for their purse. The great majority of hospital consultants are salaried employees of the NHS, but most also undertake some private practice. This paper uses findings from an interview study of 60 surgeons and physicians engaged in dual practice of this kind to investigate their reasons for working in this way and look at how they reconcile their personal, professional and public sector values and responsibilities with the temptations of the market. The existence of the private sector and their own engagement in it was regarded by almost all respondents as a net benefit, not only to themselves and their private patients, but also to the NHS, so long as they handled it properly. The interviews revealed a complex range of beliefs and assumptions through which these doctors justify their activities and a variety of informal principles for dealing with such conflicts of interest as they acknowledge. Neither their values nor their actions can be adequately explained using generic concepts of professional self-interest or public service values without consideration of what such concepts represented in the specific social, economic, professional and policy context of health care in south-east England at the time of the study. PMID:15210095

Humphrey, Charlotte; Russell, Jill

2004-09-01

409

Hepatitis A, B and C viral co-infections among HIV-infected adults presenting for care and treatment at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Tanzania is currently scaling-up access to anti-retro viral therapy (ART) to reach as many eligible persons as possible. Hepatitis viral co-infections are known to influence progression, management as well as outcome of HIV infection. However, information is scarce regarding the prevalence and predictors of viral hepatitis co-infection among HIV-infected individuals presenting at the HIV care and treatment clinics in the country. Methods A cross-sectional study conducted between April and September 2006 enrolled 260 HIV-1 infected, HAART naïve patients aged ?18 years presenting at the HIV care and treatment clinic (CTC) of the Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH). The evaluation included clinical assessment and determination of CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, serum transaminases and serology for Hepatitis A, B and C markers by ELISA. Results The prevalence of anti HAV IgM, HBsAg, anti-HBc IgM and anti-HCV IgG antibodies were 3.1%, 17.3%, 2.3% and 18.1%, respectively. Dual co-infection with HBV and HCV occurred in 10 individuals (3.9%), while that of HAV and HBV was detected in two subjects (0.8%). None of the patients had all the three hepatitis viruses. Most patients (81.1%) with hepatitis co-infection neither had specific clinical features nor raised serum transaminases. History of blood transfusion and jaundice were independent predictors for HBsAg and anti-HBc IgM positivity, respectively. Conclusion There is high prevalence of markers for hepatitis B and C infections among HIV infected patients seeking care and treatment at MNH. Clinical features and a raise in serum alanine aminotransferase were of limited predictive values for the viral co-infections. Efforts to scale up HAART should also address co-infections with Hepatitis B and C viruses.

Nagu, Tumaini J; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky

2008-01-01

410

Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in Argentinean women attending two different hospitals prior to the implementation of the National vaccination program  

PubMed Central

Cervarix vaccine was included in the National Immunization Program of Argentina in 2011 but data about the local distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women exposed to the virus are scarce. This cross-sectional study determined the prevalence and type distribution of HPV infection in unvaccinated women attending routine gynaecological screening in two public hospitals located in Buenos Aires and Santa Fe, Argentina. Socio-demographic, sexual behaviour and co-factors information was obtained from all participants (Buenos Aires, n=429; Santa Fe, n=433). Cervicovaginal swabs were tested with an MY11/09 primer-based assay and with the CUT primer system targeting mucosal/cutaneous HPVs. Participants from Buenos Aires showed significantly higher rates of HPV infection (52.4% vs. 40.6%), of multiple infections (24.2% vs. 16.4%), and of low-risk (20.3% vs. 13.9%) and high-risk types (44.1% vs. 33.3%) than those from Santa Fe. HPV-66 (Buenos Aires: 17%) and HPV-16 (Santa Fe: 8.5%) were the most prevalent types. Novel HPV-66 putative subtype and variants were identified. Vaccine types 16 and 18 were frequent (Buenos Aires: 13.5%; Santa Fe F: 10.2%) but few participants had co-infections with both (Buenos Aires: 1.4%; Santa Fe: 0.2%). A common risk factor for HPV infection was having a new sexual partner in the last year (Buenos Aires: OR 2.53, p<0.001; Santa Fe: OR 1.85, p=0.04). This study provides valuable baseline data for future assessment of the impact of massive vaccination in Argentina and it underlines the use of additional HPV testing strategies, such as the CUT system, for surveillance and vaccinology.

Chouhy, Diego; D'Andrea, Ruben Mamprin; Iglesias, Mercedes; Messina, Analia; Ivancovich, Juan J.; Cerda, Belen; Galimberti, Diana; Bottai, Hebe; Giri, Adriana A.

2012-01-01

411

Compare Hospitals  

MedlinePLUS

... to making information about the safety, quality, and efficiency of their hospital available to the public. We ... Hospitals that implement these quality, safety, and/or efficiency practices have reported that their internal processes of ...

412

76 FR 52266 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Detroit River, Ambassador Bridge to the Western Tip of Belle Isle  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Detroit River, Ambassador Bridge to...Detroit River during the Coast Guard Exercise. This safety zone is necessary to protect...hazards associated with this Coast Guard exercise. DATES: This rule is effective...

2011-08-22

413

76 FR 49494 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security United States Coast Guard DHS/USCG-027...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Coast Guard DHS/USCG-027 Recruiting Files System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office...United States Coast Guard-027 Recruiting Files System of Records.'' This system of...United States Coast Guard-027 Recruiting Files System of Records.'' This record...

2011-08-10

414

Emergency response in National Marine Sanctuaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

National Marine Sanctuaries preserve and protect unique national treasures in our coastal environments. They are not immune from threats posed by marine transportation accidents. NOAA has been working with the U.S. Coast Guard and state partners to ensure that emergencies in sanctuaries are met with the most effective and protective response possible. NOAA developed an emergency response exercise called Safe

L. C. Symons; R. Pavia; M. Hodges

2005-01-01

415

Rural and Urban Hospitals' Role in Providing Inpatient Care, 2010  

MedlinePLUS

... hospitals in the health care system in 2010. Keywords: National Hospital Discharge Survey, inpatient hospital utilization What ... but according to the U.S. Agriculture Department’s Economic Research Service ( 14 ), metropolitan status is used to determine ...

416

Understanding promiscuity: when is seeking additional mates better than guarding an already found one?  

PubMed

Paternity protection and the acquisition of multiple mates select for different traits. The consensus from theoretical work is that mate-guarding intensifies with an increasing male bias in the adult sex ratio (ASR). A male bias can thus lead to male monogamy if guarding takes up the entire male time budget. Given that either female- or male-biased ASRs are possible, why is promiscuity clearly much more common than male monogamy? We address this question with two models, differing in whether males can assess temporal cues of female fertility. Our results confirm the importance of the ASR: guarding durations increase with decreasing female availability and increasing number of male competitors. However, several factors prevent the mating system from switching to male monogamy as soon as the ASR becomes male biased. Inefficient guarding, incomplete last male sperm precedence, any mechanism that allows sperm to fertilize eggs after the male's departure, and (in some cases) the unfeasibility of precopulatory guarding all help explain cases where promiscuity exists on its own or alongside temporally limited mate-guarding. Shortening the window of fertilization shifts guarding time budgets from the postcopulatory to the precopulatory stage. PMID:24094337

Harts, Anna M F; Kokko, Hanna

2013-10-01

417

Installation Restoration Program. Preliminary Assessment: 162nd Combat Communications Group, Mt. Disappointment Air National Guard Station, California Air National Guard, Los Angeles, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The preliminary assessment include the following activities: (1) An on-site visit, including interviews and field surveys; (2) Data acquisition and analysis on past hazardous materials use, waste generation, and waste disposal at the Station; (3) Acquisit...

1991-01-01

418

Guard cell biochemistry: response to environmental stimuli causing changes in gas exchange. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

A progress report covering several interrelated studies on the biochemistry and metabolism of leaf guard cells is presented. Subjects covered are: (1) abscisic acid and the control of stomatal aperture size; (2) real-time, direct measurements of NAD(P)H in microdroplets; (3) electron transport through the PSII reaction center in guard cells; (4) organic anion/acid fluctuations as a general phenomena; (5) histological compartmentation of metabolic functions; (6) construction of a gas exchange system; and (7) guard cell protoplast isolation. (DT)

Not Available

1983-01-01

419

Mortality among shipyard Coast Guard workers: a retrospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background The mortality experience of 4702 (4413 men and 289 women) civilian workers in a US Coast Guard shipyard was evaluated. Methods All workers employed at the shipyard between 1 January 1950 and 31 December 1964 were included in the study and were followed through 31 December 2001 for vital status. Detailed shipyard and lifetime work histories found in the shipyard personnel records and job descriptions were evaluated. Workers were classified as likely exposed to any potential hazardous substances. In addition, 20 job groups were created on likely similar exposures. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated based on the general population of the state and adjusted for age, calendar period, sex and race. Results The follow?up was successful for 93.3% of the workers. Among all men employed in the shipyard, there was an excess of mortality from all causes of death (SMR 1.08; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.12), respiratory cancers (SMR 1.29; 95% CI 1.15 to 1.43), lung cancer (SMR 1.26; 95% CI 1.12 to 1.41), mesothelioma (SMR 5.07; 95% CI 1.85 to 11.03) and emphysema (SMR 1.44; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.99) and a decrease for cardiovascular diseases (OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.90 to 1.00), vascular lesions of the central nervous system (SMR 0.80; 95% CI 0.67 to 0.96), cirrhosis of the liver (SMR 0.38; 95% CI 0.25 to 0.57) and external causes of death (SMR 0.55; 95% CI 0.44 to 0.68). A similar pattern was observed for the men classified as exposed. No increasing trend of mortality was found with duration of employment in the shipyard, with the exception of mesothelioma (SMRs of 4.23 and 6.27 for <10 years and ?10 years, respectively). In occupations with at least three cases and with an SMR of ?1.3, the authors observed a significantly elevated mortality for lung cancer among machinists (SMR 1.60; 95% CI 1.08 to 2.29) and shipfitters, welders and cutters (SMR 1.34; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.65) and for oral and nasopharyngeal cancers among wood workers (SMR 6.20; 95% CI 2.27 to 13.50). Conclusion Employment in this Coast Guard shipyard revealed a small but significant excess mortality from all causes, lung cancer and mesothelioma, most of which is probably related to asbestos exposure.

Krstev, S; Stewart, P; Rusiecki, J; Blair, A

2007-01-01

420

Emergency department visits and hospitalizations by tube-fed nursing home residents with varying degrees of cognitive impairment: a national study  

PubMed Central

Background Numerous studies indicate that the use of feeding tubes (FT) in persons with advanced cognitive impairment (CI) does not improve clinical outcomes or survival, and results in higher rates of hospitalization and emergency department (ED) visits. It is not clear, however, whether such risk varies by resident level of CI and whether these ED visits and hospitalizations are potentially preventable. The objective of this study was to determine the rates of ED visits, hospitalizations and potentially preventable ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) ED visits and ACS hospitalizations for long-stay NH residents with FTs at differing levels of CI. Methods We linked Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services inpatient & outpatient administrative claims and beneficiary eligibility data with Minimum Data Set (MDS) resident assessment data for nursing home residents with feeding tubes in a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries residing in US nursing facilities in 2006 (n?=?3479). Severity of CI was measured using the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS) and categorized into 4 groups: None/Mild (CPS?=?0-1, MMSE?=?22-25), Moderate (CPS?=?2-3, MMSE?=?15-19), Severe (CPS?=?4-5, MMSE?=?5-7) and Very Severe (CPS?=?6, MMSE?=?0-4). ED visits, hospitalizations, ACS ED visits and ACS hospitalizations were ascertained from inpatient and outpatient administrative claims. We estimated the risk ratio of each outcome by CI level using over-dispersed Poisson models accounting for potential confounding factors. Results Twenty-nine percent of our cohort was considered “comatose” and “without any discernible consciousness”, suggesting that over 20,000 NH residents in the US with feeding tubes are non-interactive. Approximately 25% of NH residents with FTs required an ED visit or hospitalization, with 44% of hospitalizations and 24% of ED visits being potentially preventable or for an ACS condition. Severity of CI had a significant effect on rates of ACS ED visits, but little effect on ACS hospitalizations. Conclusions ED visits and hospitalizations are common in cognitively impaired tube-fed nursing home residents and a substantial proportion of ED visits and hospitalizations are potentially preventable due to ACS conditions.

2014-01-01

421

Classification of community hospitals.  

PubMed Central

This articles describes the methodology, results, and potential applications of a study conducted by the authors to classify the nation's community hospitals. The classification system is offered as a preferable alternative to the system presently used by the Social Security Administration to implement Section 223 of the Social Security Amendments of 1972 (P.L. 92-603).

Phillip, P J; Iyer, R N

1975-01-01

422

Cost of a cardiac surgical and a general thoracic surgical patient to the National Health Service in a London teaching hospital.  

PubMed Central

The cost of the inpatient stay for a typical aortic valve replacement and for an oesophagectomy were determined by recording and costing every aspect of the patients' care from admission until discharge. This method of cost calculation was found to be satisfactory and could be used by other centres to allow comparisons between hospitals or countries. At St Thomas's Hospital in 1977 the cost of a cardiac operation was 2755 pounds, an oesophagectomy 1870 pounds, and a general surgical operation 564 pounds.

Morgan, K D; Disbury, F C; Braimbridge, M V

1979-01-01

423

Challenges of caring for children with mental disorders: Experiences and views of caregivers attending the outpatient clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam - Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background It is estimated that world-wide up to 20?% of children suffer from debilitating mental illness. Mental disorders that pose a significant concern include learning disorders, hyperkinetic disorders (ADHD), depression, psychosis, pervasive development disorders, attachment disorders, anxiety disorders, conduct disorder, substance abuse and eating disorders. Living with such children can be very stressful for caregivers in the family. Therefore, determination of challenges of living with these children is important in the process of finding ways to help or support caregivers to provide proper care for their children. The purpose of this study was to explore the psychological and emotional, social, and economic challenges that parents or guardians experience when caring for mentally ill children and what they do to address or deal with them. Methodology A qualitative study design using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions was applied. The study was conducted at the psychiatric unit of Muhimbili National Hospital in Tanzania. Two focus groups discussions (FGDs) and 8 in-depth interviews were conducted with caregivers who attended the psychiatric clinic with their children. Data analysis was done using content analysis. Results The study revealed psychological and emotional, social, and economic challenges caregivers endure while living with mentally ill children. Psychological and emotional challenges included being stressed by caring tasks and having worries about the present and future life of their children. They had feelings of sadness, and inner pain or bitterness due to the disturbing behaviour of the children. They also experienced some communication problems with their children due to their inability to talk. Social challenges were inadequate social services for their children, stigma, burden of caring task, lack of public awareness of mental illness, lack of social support, and problems with social life. The economic challenges were poverty, child care interfering with various income generating activities in the family, and extra expenses associated with the child’s illness. Conclusion Caregivers of mentally ill children experience various psychological and emotional, social, and economic challenges. Professional assistance, public awareness of mental illnesses in children, social support by the government, private sector, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are important in addressing these challenges.

2012-01-01

424

Hospitality Management Education and Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…

Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

1995-01-01

425

SARS in Hospital Emergency Room  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-one cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred after exposure in the emergency room at the National Taiwan University Hospital. The index patient was linked to an outbreak at a nearby municipal hospital. Three clusters were identified over a 3-week period. The first cluster (5 patients) and the second cluster (14 patients) occurred among patients, family members, and nursing

Yee-Chun Chen; Li-Min Huang; Chang-Chuan Chan; Chan-Ping Su; Shan-Chwen Chang; Ying-Ying Chang; Mei-Ling Chen; Chien-Ching Hung; Wen-Jone Chen; Fang-Yue Lin

426

Mortality among United States Coast Guard marine inspectors.  

PubMed

Work history records and fitness reports were obtained for 1,767 marine inspectors of the U.S. Coast Guard between 1942 and 1970 and for a comparison group of 1,914 officers who had never been marine inspectors. Potential exposure to chemicals was assessed by one of the authors (RP), who is knowledgeable about marine inspection duties. Marine inspectors and noninspectors had a deficit in overall mortality compared to that expected from the general U.S. population (standardized mortality ratios [SMRs = 79 and 63, respectively]). Deficits occurred for most major causes of death, including infectious and parasitic diseases, digestive and urinary systems, and accidents. Marine inspectors had excesses of cirrhosis of the liver (SMR = 136) and motor vehicle accidents (SMR = 107), and cancers of the lymphatic and hematopoietic system (SMR = 157), whereas noninspectors had deficits for these causes of death. Comparison of mortality rates directly adjusted to the age distribution of the inspectors and noninspectors combined also demonstrated that mortality for these causes of death was greater among inspectors than noninspectors (directly adjusted ratio ratios of 190, 145, and 198) for cirrhosis of the liver, motor vehicle accidents, and lymphatic and hematopoietic system cancer, respectively. The SMRs rose with increasing probability of exposure to chemicals for motor vehicle accidents, cirrhosis of the liver, liver cancer, and leukemia, which suggests that contact with chemicals during inspection of merchant vessels may be involved in the development of these diseases among marine inspectors. PMID:2751350

Blair, A; Haas, T; Prosser, R; Morrissette, M; Blackman, K; Grauman, D; van Dusen, P; Moran, F

1989-01-01

427

36 CFR 7.74 - Virgin Islands National Park.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Virgin Islands National Park. 7.74 Section...THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.74 Virgin Islands National Park. (a) [Reserved...States Coast Guard and Territory of the Virgin Islands. (e) Fishing. (1)...

2013-07-01

428

33 CFR 100.501 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events in the Fifth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Special Local Regulations; Marine Events in the Fifth Coast Guard...HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.501 Special Local Regulations; Marine Events in the Fifth Coast...

2009-07-01

429

Selection and Training of Watchstanders for Coast Guard Vessel Traffic Services.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Based on operational manuals as well as observations and interviews during several visits to operating Coast Guard Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) centers, some basic problems in the selection and training of VTS watchstanders are identified and evaluated. R...

D. B. Devoe J. W. Royal N. Moore

1981-01-01

430

78 FR 39595 - Safety Zone, Fifth Coast Guard District Firework Display, Pagan River; Smithfield, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Display, Pagan River; Smithfield, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...changing the date of a safety zone for one specific recurring fireworks display...held on the Pagan River in Smithfield, VA. The regulation currently states...

2013-07-02

431

33 CFR 149.404 - Can I use firefighting equipment that has no Coast Guard standards?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Can I use firefighting equipment that has no Coast Guard standards...DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT Firefighting and Fire Protection Equipment Firefighting Requirements § 149.404 Can I...

2010-07-01

432

33 CFR 149.404 - Can I use firefighting equipment that has no Coast Guard standards?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Can I use firefighting equipment that has no Coast Guard standards...DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT Firefighting and Fire Protection Equipment Firefighting Requirements § 149.404 Can I...

2009-07-01

433

Full-Scale Crash Tests of Rigid Simulated Heavy Vehicle Underride Guard.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results of six tests of automobiles impacting a rigid simulated heavy vehicle underride guard are presented. The test vehicles represented three general classes of conventional automobiles: (1) small, lightweight rear engine vehicles, (2) standard full si...

N. J. DeLeys K. N. Naab

1970-01-01

434

Business Process Redesign of the U.S. Coast Guard Port State Control Boarding Process.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The United States Coast Guard Port State Control (PSC) is a port entry tracking process, which is currently performed primarily using paper and pencil. This thesis examines the feasibility and effectiveness of redesigning the PSC process in light of moder...

J. A. Fosdick

2000-01-01

435

Anthrax Vaccine: Preliminary Results of GAO's Survey of Guard/Reserve Pilots and Aircrew Members.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

While many factors can influence an individual's decision to leave the military, surveyed Guard and Reserve pilots and aircrew members cited the anthrax immunization as a key reason for leaving or otherwise changing their military status. Since September ...

K. Chan

2000-01-01

436

INTERIOR TV/GAME ROOM, LOOKING NORTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR TV/GAME ROOM, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

437

INTERIOR TV/GAME, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR TV/GAME, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

438

An Investigation of Potential Uses of Animals in Coast Guard Operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The primary objective of the study was the identification of the capabilities and behavioral characteristics of animals which were potentially useful in assisting the Coast Guard in the fulfillment of its mission requirements and mission performance. Capa...

1981-01-01

439

78 FR 36664 - Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display, Currituck Sound; Corolla, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...District Fireworks Display, Currituck Sound; Corolla, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...event, held adjacent to the Currituck Sound, Corolla, North Carolina. The fireworks...vessel traffic in a portion of the Currituck Sound, Corolla, NC, during the event....

2013-06-19

440

30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can...

2013-07-01

441

30 CFR 56.12023 - Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12023 Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. Electrical connections and resistor grids that...

2013-07-01

442

Statistical organelle dissection of Arabidopsis guard cells using image database LIPS  

PubMed Central

To comprehensively grasp cell biological events in plant stomatal movement, we have captured microscopic images of guard cells with various organelles markers. The 28,530 serial optical sections of 930 pairs of Arabidopsis guard cells have been released as a new image database, named Live Images of Plant Stomata (LIPS). We visualized the average organellar distributions in guard cells using probabilistic mapping and image clustering techniques. The results indicated that actin microfilaments and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are mainly localized to the dorsal side and connection regions of guard cells. Subtractive images of open and closed stomata showed distribution changes in intracellular structures, including the ER, during stomatal movement. Time-lapse imaging showed that similar ER distribution changes occurred during stomatal opening induced by light irradiation or femtosecond laser shots on neighboring epidermal cells, indicating that our image analysis approach has identified a novel ER relocation in stomatal opening.

Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Akita, Kae; Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi; Kondo, Noriaki; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

2012-01-01

443

Patient-reported outcomes at hospital discharge from Heart Centres, a national cross-sectional survey with a register-based follow-up: the DenHeart study protocol  

PubMed Central

Introduction Patient reported health status, which includes symptom burden, functional status and quality of life, is an important measure of health. Differences in health status between diagnostic groups within cardiology have only been sparsely investigated. These outcomes may predict morbidity, mortality, labour market affiliation and healthcare utilisation in various diagnostic groups. A national survey aiming to include all cardiac diagnostic groups from a total Heart Centre population has been designed as the DenHeart survey. Methods and analysis DenHeart is designed as a cross-sectional survey with a register-based follow-up. All diagnostic groups at the five national Heart Centres are included during 1?year (15 April 2013 to 15 April 2014) and asked to fill out a questionnaire at hospital discharge. The total eligible population, both responders and non-responders, will be followed in national registers. The following instruments are used: SF-12, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, EQ-5D, Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ), HeartQoL and Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale. The following variables are collected from national registers: action diagnosis, procedures, comorbidity, length of hospital stay, type of hospitalisation, visits to general practitioners and other agents in primary healthcare, dispensed prescription medication, vital status and cause of death. Labour market affiliation, sick leave, early retirement pension, educational degree and income will be collected from registers. Frequency distributions and multiple logistic regression analyses will be used to describe and assess differences in patient reported outcomes at hospital discharge between diagnostic groups and in-hospital predicting factors. Cox proportional hazards regression models with age as the time scale will be used to investigate associations between patient reported outcomes at baseline and morbidity/mortality, labour market affiliation and healthcare utilisation after 1?year. Ethics and dissemination The study complies with the Declaration of Helsinki. The study has been approved by the Danish Data Protection Agency: 2007-58-0015/30-0937 and registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01926145). Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer reviewed publications and conference presentations.

Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Svanholm, Jette; Lauberg, Astrid; Borregaard, Britt; Herning, Margrethe; Mygind, Anna; Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Christensen, Anne Illemann; Ekholm, Ola; Juel, Knud; Thrys?e, Lars

2014-01-01

444

Analysis and Design of Crosstalk Noise Reduction for Coupled Striplines Inserted Guard Trace With an Open-Stub on Time-Domain in High-Speed Digital Circuits  

Microsoft Academic Search

Grounded guard traces are increasingly utilized to mitigate crosstalk noise interference in printed circuit boards or packages. This paper discusses how the coupled striplines inserted guard trace with an open-stub affects the crosstalk noise. The guard trace with an open-stub, also called guard trace stub, seriously degrades the performance of the coupled striplines with respect to signal integrity, and the

Guang-Hwa Shiue; Jia-Hung Shiu; Po-Wei Chiu

2011-01-01

445

Internal Lateral Nasal Osteotomy: Double-Guarded Osteotome and Mucosa Tearing  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the internal lateral nasal osteotomy, a 4-mm double-guarded straight osteotome that separates the external periost and\\u000a mucoperiosteum while the osteotomy is progressing is presented. Before the osteotomy, the external periost and the internal\\u000a mucoperiosteum are infiltrated with local anesthesia and elevated by tunneling with an elevator. As the sharp part is behind\\u000a the guards, it is not possible for

A. Aldo Mottura

2011-01-01

446

The effects of manipulating phospholipase C on guard cell ABA-signalling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies using stably transformed tobacco plants containing very low levels of PI-PLC in their guard cells show that this enzyme plays a role in the events associated with the inhibition of stomatal opening by ABA, but not in the cellular reactions that are responsible for ABA-induced stomatal closure. However, Commelina communis guard cells microinjected with the InsP3 antagonist, heparin, fail

Lewis N. Mills; Lee Hunt; Calum P. Leckie; Fiona L. Aitken; Mark Wentworth; Martin R. McAinsh; Julie E. Gray; Alistair M. Hetherington

2010-01-01

447

Rapid adjustment of guard-cell abscisic acid levels to current leaf-water status  

SciTech Connect

Detached broad bean (Vicia faba L.) leaflets were water stressed; within 15 minutes, guard-cell abscisic acid (ABA) concentration increased ninefold. This result eliminates the apparent discrepancy raised by reports of no correlation between initial water-stress effects on stomata and leaf ABA concentration. Six hours after stress relief, guard-cell ABA concentration was near the prestress value, which would seem to implicate other factors in stress after-effects on stomata.

Harris, M.J.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (United States))

1991-01-01

448

On the effectiveness of a message-driven confidence-driven protocol for guarded software upgrading  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to accomplish dependable onboard evolution, we develop a methodology which is called guarded software upgrading (GSU). The core of the methodology is a low-cost error containment and recovery protocol that escorts an upgraded software component through onboard validation and guarded operation, safeguarding mission functions. The message-driven confidence-driven (MDCD) nature of the protocol elim- inates the need for costly

Ann T. Tai; Kam S. Tso; Leon Alkalai; Savio N. Chau; William H. Sanders

2001-01-01

449

On the effectiveness of a message-driven confidence-driven protocol for guarded software upgrading  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to accomplish dependable onboard evolution, we develop a methodology which is called “guarded software upgrading” (GSU). The core of the methodology is a low-cost error containment and recovery protocol that escorts an upgraded software component through onboard validation, and guarded operation, safeguarding mission functions. The message-driven confidence-driven (MDCD) nature of the protocol eliminates the need for costly process

A. T. Tai; K. S. Tso; L. Alkalai; S. N. Chau; W. H. Sanders

2000-01-01

450

Ethylene-induced flavonol accumulation in guard cells suppresses reactive oxygen species and moderates stomatal aperture.  

PubMed

Guard cell swelling controls the aperture of stomata, pores that facilitate gas exchange and water loss from leaves. The hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has a central role in regulation of stomatal closure through synthesis of second messengers, which include reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS accumulation must be minimized by antioxidants to keep concentrations from reaching damaging levels within the cell. Flavonols are plant metabolites that have been implicated as antioxidants; however, their antioxidant activity in planta has been debated. Flavonols accumulate in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana, but not surrounding pavement cells, as visualized with a flavonol-specific dye. The expression of a reporter driven by the promoter of CHALCONE SYNTHASE, a gene encoding a flavonol biosynthetic enzyme, in guard cells, but not pavement cells, suggests guard cell-specific flavonoid synthesis. Increased levels of ROS were detected using a fluorescent ROS sensor in guard cells of transparent testa4-2, which has a null mutation in CHALCONE SYNTHASE and therefore synthesizes no flavonol antioxidants. Guard cells of transparent testa4-2 show more rapid ABA-induced closure than the wild type, suggesting that flavonols may dampen the ABA-dependent ROS burst that drives stomatal closing. The levels of flavonols are positively regulated in guard cells by ethylene treatment in the wild type, but not in the ethylene-insensitive2-5 mutant. In addition, in both ethylene-overproducing1 and ethylene-treated wild-type plants, elevated flavonols lead to decreasing ROS and slower ABA-mediated stomatal closure. These results are consistent with flavonols suppressing ROS accumulation and decreasing the rate of ABA-dependent stomatal closure, with ethylene-induced increases in guard cell flavonols modulating these responses. PMID:24596331

Watkins, Justin M; Hechler, Paul J; Muday, Gloria K

2014-04-01

451

Blue light activates electrogenic ion pumping in guard cell protoplasts of Vicia faba  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transmembrane ion exchange and blue-light dependent responses are central processes in plants in general1,2 and stomatal guard cells in particular3. Stimuli, including light, cause H+ extrusion by stomatal guard cells4,5, K+ uptake, osmotic swelling and enlarged stomatal pore apertures, resulting in increased leaf conductance for CO2 influx and water efflux6. The mechanisms under-lying ion movement and the specific response of

S. M. Assmann; L. Simoncini; J. I. Schroeder

1985-01-01

452

Mate guarding in the Seychelles warbler is energetically costly and adjusted to paternity risk.  

PubMed Central

Males may increase their fitness through extra-pair copulations (copulations outside the pair bond) that result in extra-pair fertilizations, but also risk lost paternity when they leave their own mate unguarded. The fitness costs of cuckoldry for Seychelles warblers (Acrocephalus sechellensis) are considerable because warblers have a single-egg clutch and, given the short breeding season, no time for a successful replacement clutch. Neighbouring males are the primary threat to a male's genetic paternity. Males minimize their loss of paternity by guarding their mates to prevent them from having extra-pair copulations during their fertile period. Here, I provide experimental evidence that mate-guarding behaviour is energetically costly and that the expression of this trade-off is adjusted to paternity risk (local male density). Free-living males that were induced to reduce mate guarding spent significantly more time foraging and gained significantly better body condition than control males. The larger the reduction in mate guarding, the more pronounced was the increase in foraging and body condition (accounting for food availability). An experimental increase in paternity risk resulted in an increase in mate-guarding intensity and a decrease in foraging and body condition, and vice versa. This is examined using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data. This study on the Seychelles warbler offers experimental evidence that mate guarding is energetically costly and adjusted to paternity risk.

Komdeur, J.

2001-01-01