Sample records for national guard hospital

  1. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728...Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a...Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who...

  2. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728...Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a...Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who...

  3. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728...Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a...Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who...

  4. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728...Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a...Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who...

  5. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728...Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a...Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who...

  6. 32 CFR 643.41 - Policy-National Guard use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...ESTATE Policy § 643.41 Policy—National Guard use. Pursuant to the authority contained in 32 U.S.C. 503, the SA is authorized to grant revocable licenses to the States and territories for the use and occupancy of installations or portions...

  7. 32 CFR 643.41 - Policy-National Guard use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...ESTATE Policy § 643.41 Policy—National Guard use. Pursuant to the authority contained in 32 U.S.C. 503, the SA is authorized to grant revocable licenses to the States and territories for the use and occupancy of installations or portions...

  8. 32 CFR 643.41 - Policy-National Guard use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...ESTATE Policy § 643.41 Policy—National Guard use. Pursuant to the authority contained in 32 U.S.C. 503, the SA is authorized to grant revocable licenses to the States and territories for the use and occupancy of installations or portions...

  9. North Carolina National Guard Integrated Behavioral Health System.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Stephanie W; Brotherton, Jeffery L; Cohn, James A

    2011-01-01

    The North Carolina National Guard (NCNG) Integrated Behavioral Health System is designed to systematically bring the best internal and external military resources together to function collaboratively for the betterment of behavioral health assessment, crisis intervention, referral, and case management services available to NCNG service members and their families. PMID:21678689

  10. Guards 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    The British Army provided military assistance missions for friendly nations throughout the 20th century. The majority deployed to Africa during the decolonization process. By 1980 London had thirty-five years of institutional knowledge on how...

  11. 78 FR 59153 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ...Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 Proclamation 9023--National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2013 Memorandum of September 20, 2013...Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 By the President of the United...

  12. The “Suicide Guard Rail”: a minimal structural intervention in hospitals reduces suicide jumps

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Jumping from heights is a readily available and lethal method of suicide. This study examined the effectiveness of a minimal structural intervention in preventing suicide jumps at a Swiss general teaching hospital. Following a series of suicide jumps out of the hospital’s windows, a metal guard rail was installed at each window of the high-rise building. Results In the 114?months prior to the installation of the metal guard rail, 10 suicides by jumping out of the hospital’s windows occurred among 119,269 inpatients. This figure was significantly reduced to 2 fatal incidents among 104,435 inpatients treated during the 78?months immediately following the installation of the rails at the hospital’s windows (?2?=?4.34, df?=?1, p?=?.037). Conclusions Even a minimal structural intervention might prevent suicide jumps in a general hospital. Further work is needed to examine the effectiveness of minimal structural interventions in preventing suicide jumps. PMID:22862804

  13. 75 FR 58277 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ...National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010 Proclamation 8565--National Farm Safety and Health Week, 2010 Proclamation 8566--National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2010 Presidential Documents Federal...

  14. Focused feasibility study of Forbes Field Air National Guard Base, Topeka, Kansas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. B. II Garland; C. M. Morrissey; T. A. Cronk

    1989-01-01

    This focused feasibility study (FFS) for the Forbes Field Air National Guard Base (ANGB), Topeka, Kansas, has been prepared as part of Phase II of the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) of the US National Guard Bureau (NGB). The Remedial Investigation characterizes the contaminants and recommends remedial action. The Remedial Investigation Report (RIR) found fuel present in the subsurface environment at

  15. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...specific, infrequent periods when Military exercises will be conducted, as...

  16. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...specific, infrequent periods when Military exercises will be conducted, as...

  17. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...specific, infrequent periods when Military exercises will be conducted, as...

  18. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...specific, infrequent periods when Military exercises will be conducted, as...

  19. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...specific, infrequent periods when Military exercises will be conducted, as...

  20. SALUTE the KIDS - A Recognition Program For Children of the Army National Guard Soldiers

    E-print Network

    Rook, Michele

    2012-05-31

    SALUTE the KIDS A Recognition Program For Children of the Army National Guard Soldiers By Copyright 2012 Michele L. Rook Submitted to the graduate degree program in Architecture and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial... the Kids: A Recognition Program For Children of Army National Guard Soldiers Michele Rook, M.A Candidate, Design Management 2 Table of Contents Research Question...

  1. Task force St. Bernard: operational issues and medical management of a National Guard disaster response operation.

    PubMed

    Bonnett, Carl J; Schock, Tony R; McVaney, Kevin E; Colwell, Christopher B; Depass, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    After Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast of the United States on 29 August 2005, it became obvious that the country was facing an enormous national emergency. With local resources overwhelmed, governors across the US responded by deploying thousands of National Guard soldiers and airmen. The National Guard has responded to domestic disasters due to natural hazards since its inception, but an event with the magnitude of Hurricane Katrina was unprecedented. The deployment of >900 Army National Guard soldiers to St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana in the aftermath of the Hurricane was studied to present some of the operational issues involved with providing medical support for this type of operation. In doing so, the authors attempt to address some of the larger issues of how the National Guard can be incorporated into domestic disaster response efforts. A number of unforeseen issues with regards to medical operations, medical supply, communication, preventive medicine, legal issues, and interactions with civilians were encountered and are reviewed. A better understanding of the National Guard and how it can be utilized more effectively in future disaster response operations can be developed. PMID:18087915

  2. Learning Without Boundaries: A NASA - National Guard Bureau Distance Learning Partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Susan H.; Chilelli, Christopher J.; Picard, Stephan

    2003-01-01

    With a variety of high-quality live interactive educational programs originating at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas and other space and research centers, the US space agency NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) has a proud track record of connecting with students throughout the world and stimulating their creativity and collaborative skills by teaching them underlying scientific and technological underpinnings of space exploration. However, NASA desires to expand its outreach capability for this type of interactive instruction. In early 2002, NASA and the National Guard Bureau -- using the Guard's nationwide system of state-ofthe-art classrooms and high bandwidth network -- began a collaboration to extend the reach of NASA content and educational programs to more of America's young people. Already, hundreds of elementary, middle, and high school students have visited Guard e-Learning facilities and participated in interactive NASA learning events. Topics have included experimental flight, satellite imagery-interpretation, and Mars exploration. Through this partnership, NASA and the National Guard are enabling local school systems throughout the United States (and, increasingly, the world) to use the excitement of space flight to encourage their students to become passionate about the possibility of one day serving as scientists, mathematicians, technologists, and engineers. At the 54th International Astronautical Conference MAJ Stephan Picard, the guiding visionary behind the Guard's partnership with NASA, and Chris Chilelli, an educator and senior instructional designer at NASA, will share with attendees background on NASA's educational products and the National Guard's distributed learning network; will discuss the unique opportunity this partnership already has provided students and teachers throughout the United States; will offer insights into the formation by government entities of e-Learning partnerships with one another; and will suggest a possible future for the NASA - National Guard Bureau partnership, one potentially to include live multi-party interaction of hundreds of students in several countries with astronauts, scientists, engineers and designers. To inspire the next generation of explorers as only NASA can!

  3. Life goes on: the experiences of wives of multiply-deployed National Guard soldiers.

    PubMed

    Patzel, Brenda; McBride, Maryellen; Bunting, Judith; Anno, Tony

    2013-05-01

    Whether a service member is active duty or part of the National Guard, deployment of these service members is a major issue for most families. There is limited knowledge of the experience of multiple deployments on the family. The purpose of this study was to describe experiences of wives of National Guard soldiers that were deployed more than once. Nine wives were interviewed. An analysis of the interviews revealed four themes: (1) "Life Goes On" (i.e., despite the repeated deployments, life continues at home); (2) the "Guard is a Different Animal" (i.e., life as a National Guard spouse is different from that of an active duty spouse); (3) "It's a Mind-Set" (i.e., how wives cope their husband's deployment); and (4) "Going Back Again" (i.e., wives' experiences of multiple deployments). Exploring how multiple deployments affects wives of National Guard soldiers is helpful in understanding their experiences and the adjustments that must be made in family life. Knowledge of the experiences of these wives may help in formulating more effective interventions with families who have experienced multiple deployments. PMID:23663024

  4. Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms among National Guard Soldiers Deployed to Iraq: Associations with Parenting Behaviors and Couple Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewirtz, Abigail H.; Polusny, Melissa A.; DeGarmo, David S.; Khaylis, Anna; Erbes, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this article, we report findings from a 1-year longitudinal study examining the impact of change in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following combat deployment on National Guard soldiers' perceived parenting and couple adjustment 1 year following return from Iraq. Method: Participants were 468 Army National Guard

  5. Staying on Course: Three-Year Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Muller-Ravett, Sara; Broadus, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    High school dropouts face an uphill battle in a labor market that increasingly rewards skills and postsecondary credentials: they are more likely than their peers to need public assistance, be arrested or incarcerated, and less likely to marry. This report presents results from a rigorous evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program,…

  6. Making the Transition: Interim Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Dillon, Colleen

    2010-01-01

    Young people who drop out of high school face long odds of success in a labor market that increasingly values education and skills. This report presents interim results from a rigorous, ongoing evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, which aims to "reclaim the lives of at-risk youth" who have dropped out of high school. ChalleNGe…

  7. Children of National Guard Troops Deployed in the Global War on Terrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Houston, J. Brian; Sherman, Michelle D.; Melson, Ashley G.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined deployment effects in children and spouses of National Guard troops using a longitudinal design to assess 18 children (ages 6 to 17 years) and 13 nondeployed spouses before, during, and after deployment. Both self- and parent reports revealed that children of deployed service personnel experienced emotional and behavioral…

  8. Error Analysis for the National Bureau of Standards 1016 mm Guarded Hot Plate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Rennex

    1983-01-01

    An error analysis is given for the 1-meter Guarded Hot Plate at the National Bureau of Standards. This apparatus is used to measure the thermal resistance of insulation materials. The individual contributions to uncertainty in thermal resistance are discussed in detail. The total uncertainty is estimated to be less than 0.5 percent at sample thicknesses up to 150 mm (6

  9. Obama victorious Democrat's re-election 'about guarding the change' In Florida and nation

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Obama victorious Democrat's re-election 'about guarding the change' In Florida and nation Written by Jennifer Portman Democrat senior writer Barack Obama swept to victory in 2008, riding into the final days of the campaign, it was not enough to overcome Obama's strategic get-out-the- vote effort

  10. National hospital input price index.

    PubMed

    Freeland, M S; Anderson, G; Schendler, C E

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 per cent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  11. Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Facility, Installation 25255, Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Rehoboth National Guard Facility (RNGF) in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for ftirther action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the RNGF property, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities under the control of the MAARNG and the past activities contained within that area.

  12. Focused feasibility study of Forbes Field Air National Guard Base, Topeka, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, S.B. II; Morrissey, C.M.; Cronk, T.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-10-01

    This focused feasibility study (FFS) for the Forbes Field Air National Guard Base (ANGB), Topeka, Kansas, has been prepared as part of Phase II of the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) of the US National Guard Bureau (NGB). The Remedial Investigation characterizes the contaminants and recommends remedial action. The Remedial Investigation Report (RIR) found fuel present in the subsurface environment at Forbes Field ANGB but did not recommend feasibility studies be conducted because the tight clay soils prevent leaching of the fuel to the groundwater or off site. However, the RIR recommended that no excavations take place near the fuel laterals unless a plan is developed to manage the contaminated soil. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Army National Guard (ARNG) Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) end-user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pelath, R.P. [National Guard Bureau, Arlington, VA (United States)] [National Guard Bureau, Arlington, VA (United States); Rasch, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) project is designed to identify and develop programs which automate requirements not included in standard army systems. This includes providing automated interfaces between standard army systems at the National Guard Bureau (NGB) level and at the state/territory level. As part of the OSCAR project, custom software has been installed at NGB to streamline management of major end items. This software allows item managers to provide automated disposition on excess equipment to states operating the Standard Army Retail Supply System Objective (SARSS-O). It also accelerates movement of excess assets to improve the readiness of the Army National Guard (ARNG)--while reducing excess on hand. The purpose of the End-User Manual is to provide direction and guidance to the customer for implementing the ARNG Excess Management Program.

  14. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...

  15. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...

  16. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...

  17. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...

  18. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...

  19. Installation Restoration Program. Decision documents for seven sites. Forbes Field Air National Guard Base, Topeka, Kansas. Final decision documents

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report contains decision documents for seven sites at Forbes Field Air National Guard Base, Topeka, Kansas providing rational for no further action under the Air National Guard Installation Restoration Program. The following is a list of partial contents: (1) Geology; (2) Hydrology; (3) Contamination; (4) JP-4 Bulk Storage Area (Tank Farm); (5) Surface Drainage Ditch and Storm Sewer Outflow; and (6) Areas Adjacent to Refueling Hydrants.

  20. Preliminary assessment report for Kent National Guard Facility (Installation 53065), 24410 Military Road, Kent, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Ketels, P.; Aggarwal, P.; Rose, C.M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Washington Army National Guard property in Kent, Washington. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment.

  1. Site investigation for 125th fighter interceptor group Florida Air National Guard

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    A two-step Site Investigation (SI) was conducted to evaluate the nature and extent of environmental contamination that might have resulted from past activities at eight disposal/spill sites at the 125th Fighter Interceptor Group, Florida Air National Guard (FANG) in Jacksonville, Florida. The sites included in the SI are shown on the location map in Figure ES-i and briefly described below: Oil/water separator (OWS) inlets along the aircraft parking apron; Subsurface of aircraft parking apron; Fire training areas, separated for clarity into Site 3E for the east area and Site 3W for the west area; OWS at the Hush House; OWS at the Vehicle Maintenance Building; Area outside the Munitions Building; Trim pad for aircraft run-up; OWS at the Wash Rack.

  2. Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard, Environmental Programs Directorate

    E-print Network

    Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard 08 Lt Col Reuben Sendejas #12;Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard, Environmental Programs Directorate Sustainability Requires Commitment

  3. Reengaging High School Dropouts: Early Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program Evaluation. Full Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Dan; Gardenhire-Crooks, Alissa; Mandsager, Conrad

    2009-01-01

    High school dropouts face daunting odds of success in a labor market that increasingly rewards education and skills. This report presents very early results from a rigorous, independent evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, an intensive residential program that aims to "reclaim the lives" of young people ages 16 to 18 who have…

  4. Lifelong Education Needs for Providing Pastoral Care for Post-Traumatic Stress in South Dakota National Guard Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meirose, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout many communities in South Dakota the members of the South Dakota National Guard have been activated to serve in many different parts of the world since 2001. Approximately 20% of these individuals returned to their homes with some degree of PTSD (Hoge, et al., 2004). Pastoral Care has changed since September 11, 2001. The purpose of…

  5. MMRP: FUDS ActiveArmyMR AirForce NationalGuard BRAC Other-type FUDS PROPERTY NAME & NUMBER

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DATE: MMRP: FUDS ActiveArmyMR AirForce NationalGuard BRAC Other-type FUDS PROPERTY NAME & NUMBER: or INSTALLATION/SITE NAME: PROJECT NAME: (For FUDS include Project Number ) PROJECT PHASE: (Check discipline(s) and add name(s)) Chemistry Counsel Geology ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: (including

  6. The Predictive Validity of the PTSD Checklist in a Nonclinical Sample of Combat-Exposed National Guard Troops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbisi, Paul A.; Kaler, Matthew E.; Kehle-Forbes, Shannon M.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Thuras, Paul

    2012-01-01

    After returning from an extended combat deployment to Iraq, 348 National Guard soldiers were administered the PTSD Checklist (PCL-M), and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) followed, on average, 3 months later by structured diagnostic interviews including the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) for the "Diagnostic and Statistical…

  7. [The national union for private hospital oncology].

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Gérard

    2013-06-01

    In the French health system, social security is the same for both public and private hospitals regardless of their status. In terms of number of patients screened, diagnosed, or treated, independant medicine is the most important sector in the French oncology. The multitude of organizations representing private hospitals or independant oncologists, physicians, radiologists or pathologists have a common organization, the National Union for Private Hospital Oncology (UNHPC). It bases its action on two founding postulates to ensure the quality of the oncology practice : the medical and managerial cultures are complementary and should be articulated ; the quality of organizations is as important as professional competence. PMID:23735663

  8. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) released public-use data files for the 1997 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). The NHAMCS "collect[s] data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital emergency and outpatient departments." The Website for the survey describes methodology and data, provides technical documentation for accessing and manipulating the data, and links users to related reports. The data and documentation for the survey may be downloaded from the Website or from the NCHS FTP server.

  9. Preliminary assessment report for Redmond Army National Guard Facility, Installation 53120, Redmond, Washington. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ketels, P.; Aggarwal, P.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Washington Army National Guard (WAARNG) property in Redmond, Washington. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Redmond ARNG property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) supply/storage of hazardous materials, (2) weapons cleaning, (3) the underground storage tanks (USTs), and (4) the use of herbicides. These ESOs are no longer active because of the closure of OMS 10 activities in 1988.

  10. NGB 62E, 20061101 (EF) (Adobe v8.0) (PREVIOUS EDITIONS ARE OBSOLETE.) Page 1 of 5 APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL RECOGNITION AS AN ARMY NATIONAL GUARD OFFICER OR WARRANT OFFICER

    E-print Network

    Caughman, John

    FOR FEDERAL RECOGNITION AS AN ARMY NATIONAL GUARD OFFICER OR WARRANT OFFICER AND APPOINTMENT AS A RESERVE COMMISSIONED OFFICER OR WARRANT OFFICER OF THE ARMY IN THE ARMY NATIONAL GUARD OF THE UNITED STATES. PURPOSE: To apply for Federal Recognition as an Army National Guard Officer or Warrant Officer

  11. Validation of lay-administered mental health assessments in a large Army National Guard cohort.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Marta R; Tamburrino, Marijo; Calabrese, Joseph R; Liberzon, Israel; Slembarski, Renee; Shirley, Edwin; Fine, Thomas; Goto, Toyomi; Wilson, Kimberly; Ganocy, Stephen; Chan, Philip; Derus, Alphonse; Serrano, Mary Beth; Sizemore, James; Kauffman, Jeremy; Galea, Sandro

    2014-03-01

    To report the reliability and validity of key mental health assessments in an ongoing study of the Ohio Army National Guard (OHARNG). The 2616 OHARNG soldiers received hour-long structured telephone surveys including the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) checklist (PCV-C) and Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9). A subset (N?=?500) participated in two hour clinical reappraisals, using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID). The telephone survey assessment for PTSD and for any depressive disorder were both highly specific [92% (standard error, SE 0.01), 83% (SE 0.02)] with moderate sensitivity [54% (SE 0.09), 51% (SE 0.05)]. Other psychopathologies assessed included alcohol abuse [sensitivity 40%, (SE 0.04) and specificity 80% (SE 0.02)] and alcohol dependence [sensitivity, 60% (SE 0.05) and specificity 81% (SE 0.02)].The baseline prevalence estimates from the telephone study suggest alcohol abuse and dependence may be higher in this sample than the general population. Validity and reliability statistics suggest specific, but moderately sensitive instruments. PMID:24615746

  12. A specific labor market comparison of male and female willingness to travel: The case of the Army National Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Daniell, A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Bell, S.E. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Vogt, D.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an examination of gender differences in commuting behavior within the Army National Guard. This labor market provides a more level playing field than most for a direct comparison between male and female willingness to travel. In contrast to other studies, we find that women as a group are willing to travel greater distances, in this particular labor market. 9 refs., 1 fig., 10 tabs.

  13. Fielded ATM network for the Air National Guard Global Yankee Fort Drum exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Robert L.; Hague, Daniel; Maciag, Chester

    1996-06-01

    This paper will review the deployment, demonstration, and test of an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) network to support the Air National Guard `Global Yankee' field exercise held at Fort Drum, New York. The network provided forty five (45) megabit per second (mbps) ATM connections between the Air Operations Center (AOC) and Forward Operating Location (FOL) located at Fort Drum, the State University of New York (SUNY) Health Science Center located in Syracuse, New York and Rome Laboratory located in Rome, New York. Connections were made with both fiber and free space equipment. The fiber connections used were part of the existing ATM New York Network (NYNet) between Rome Lab, SUNY Health Science Center and NYNEX Corporation. This network was extended to Watertown, New York by NYNEX to provide connectivity to Fort Drum. The free space links were provided by commercial DS-3 (45 mbps) radios, and 2 to 6 mbps Troposcatter Satellite Support Radios (TSSRs). This paper will also discuss significant digital Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence enhancements to the battlefield provided by the deployed ATM network. For example, videoconferencing and shared workspace capability was demonstrated over the AOC-to-FOL TSSR link, enabling remote intelligence briefings, pilot Battle Damage Assessment, and Search and Rescue coordination. Remote Medical Diagnostics videoconferencing with MRI high resolution digital imagery was demonstrated between the FOL, AOC, and SUNY Health Science Center. Finally, the network provided connectivity between the AOC and the Joint Surveillance System (JSS) radar's located at Griffiss Air Force BAse. The JSS data combined with the Rome Lab developed Radar Analysis Program provided AOC personnel with air picture areas of interest.

  14. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2005 Emergency Department Summary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric W. Nawar; Richard W. Niska; Jianmin Xu

    2007-01-01

    Objective—This report presents the most current (2005) nationally representative data on visits to hospital emergency departments (ED) in the United States. Statistics are presented on selected hospital, patient, and visit characteristics. Selected trends in ED utilization from 1995 through 2005 are also presented. Methods—Data are from the 2005 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), the longest continuously running nationally

  15. Risk and resilience factors associated with posttraumatic stress in ethno-racially diverse National Guard members in Hawai?i.

    PubMed

    Whealin, Julia M; Nelson, Dawna; Stotzer, Rebecca; Guerrero, Anthony; Carpenter, Megan; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2015-06-30

    This study examinedrisk and resilience factors associated with posttraumatic stress symptomatology (PTSS) in an ethno-racially diverse sample of Hawai?i National Guard members comprised of Native Hawaiians, Filipino Americans, Japanese Americans, and European Americans. In the full sample, identifying as Japanese American and higher scores on measures of perceived social support and psychological resilience were negatively associated with PTSS, while Army Guard (vs. Air Guard) status and stronger family norms against disclosing mental health problems were positively associated with PTSS. Exploratory analyses of ethno-racial subgroups identified different patterns of within and between-group correlates of PTSS. For example, when controlling for other factors, higher psychological resilience scores were negatively associated with PTSS only among Native Hawaiian and European Americans. Overall, results of this study suggest that some risk and resilience factors associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may extend to military populations with high numbers of Filipino American, Japanese American, and Native Hawaiian Veterans. Results further suggest differences in risk and resilience factors unique to specific ethno-racial subgroups. PMID:25863819

  16. Hospitalization of patients with heart failure: National Hospital Discharge Survey, 1985 to 1995

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gail A. Haldeman; Janet B. Croft; Wayne H. Giles; Ali Rashidee

    1999-01-01

    Background In the United States, heart failure has emerged as the leading first-listed diagnosis among hospitalized older adults. Methods The number and prevalence of hospitalizations, procedure use, and discharge outcomes for men and women aged ?35 years hospitalized with heart failure were estimated from National Hospital Discharge Survey data for the years 1985 through 1995. Results In 10 years, the

  17. Supporting the transition to adulthood among high school dropouts: an impact study of the national guard youth challenge program.

    PubMed

    Millenky, Megan; Schwartz, Sarah E O; Rhodes, Jean E

    2014-08-01

    Using a multi-year, random assignment design, this study evaluated the effects of the National Guard Youth Challenge Program (NGYCP), an intensive residential intervention program for youth ages 16-18 who have dropped out of high school. The sample included 1,173 youth (predominantly male) of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds from ten NGYCP sites across the country. Positive impacts on educational and employment outcomes were sustained 3 years after entering the program, with older participants generally showing greater benefits than younger participants. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:23543360

  18. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The...

  19. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850.10 Section 850.10...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard...

  20. Bird guard

    DOEpatents

    Fairchild, Dana M. (Armour, SD)

    2010-03-02

    The bird guard provides a device to protect electrical insulators comprising a central shaft; a clamp attached to an end of the shaft to secure the device to a transmission tower; a top and bottom cover to shield transmission tower insulators; and bearings to allow the guard to rotate in order to frighten birds away from the insulators.

  1. Preliminary assessment report for Fort William Henry Harrison, Montana Army National Guard, Helena, Montana. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    DuWaldt, J.; Meyer, T.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at a Montana Army National Guard (MTARNG) property near Helena, Montana. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort William Henry Harrison property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  2. Critical Needs and Level of Support for the Military Spouse: A Comparative Study of the National Guard and Active Army during the Iraq War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasilas, Cynthia Nikki

    2009-01-01

    National Guard units have been asked to serve in ways never before experienced since the beginning of the Iraq War and throughout the continued war on terror. Multiple deployments, frequent long-term separations from families, communities, and jobs may have far reaching implications. Family Readiness Groups and a climate of support shown by…

  3. Suicide and War: The Mediating Effects of Negative Mood, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, and Social Support among Army National Guard Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    The mediating effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, negative mood, and social support on the relationship of war experiences to suicidality were examined. The research literature suggested a sequence among study scales representing these constructs, which was then tested on survey data obtained from a sample of National Guard

  4. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form in National Guard Soldiers Screening Positive for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbisi, Paul A.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Thuras, Paul; Reddy, Madhavi K.

    2011-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2 RF) was administered to 251 National Guard soldiers who had recently returned from deployment to Iraq. Soldiers were also administered questionnaires to identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). On the basis of responses to the…

  5. Full PACS installation in Seoul National University Hospital, Korea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HyunWoo Lim; DongOok Kim; JinYoung Ahn; DongHyuk Lee; JinHyung Lee; HeeJung Park; JongHyo Kim; JunKu Han

    2002-01-01

    Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH) is composed of two buildings and has more than 1500 beds for patients needing hospitalization. Marotech has provided full PACS to SNUH with total HIS Integration in this year. In this paper, the installation process and management experience for seven months will be presented. At SNUH, 1643.8 exams were held per day during seven month

  6. Disposal and reuse of portions of Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base, Ohio, environmental impact statement. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    Pursuant to the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act of 1990, Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base is scheduled for realignment on September 30, 1994. This EIS, prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, analyzes potential environmental impacts of disposal. Although disposal will have few direct effects, future use by others will create indirect effects. The document includes analyses of potential impacts that a range of reasonable foreseeable reuses could have on local land use and aesthetics, transportation, utilities, hazardous materials/wastes, geology and soils, water resources, air quality, noise, biological resources, and cultural resources. All reuse alternatives, including the proposed action and the No-Action Alternative, incorporate aviation and land use areas. Potential impacts associated with the proposed action include land use conflicts, aircraft-related noise, traffic increases, increased air emissions and wetland disturbance. Proposed mitigations include restricting residential development near the airport; incorporation of FAA-mandated Stage III engines on all commercial aircraft by the year 2000; planned improvement to local roads; application of state control measures to reduce traffic trips, especially during peak hours; and avoiding wetland areas to the extent possible. Because the Air Force is disposing of the property, some of the mitigation measures are beyond Air Force control. Remediation of Installation Restoration Program sites will continue to be the responsibility of the Air Force.

  7. Support for hospital-based HIV testing and counseling: a national survey of hospital marketing executives.

    PubMed Central

    Boscarino, J A; Steiber, S R

    1995-01-01

    Today, hospitals are involved extensively in social marketing and promotional activities. Recently, investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that routine testing of hospital patients for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) could identify more than 100,000 patients with previously unrecognized HIV infections. Several issues are assessed in this paper. These include hospital support for voluntary HIV testing and AIDS education and the impact that treating AIDS patients has on the hospital's image. Also tested is the hypothesis that certain hospitals, such as for-profit institutions and those outside the AIDS epicenters, would be less supportive of hospital-based AIDS intervention strategies. To assess these issues, a national random sample of 193 executives in charge of hospital marketing and public relations were surveyed between December 1992 and January 1993. The survey was part of an ongoing annual survey of hospitals and included questions about AIDS, health education, marketing, patient satisfaction, and hospital planning. Altogether, 12.4 percent of executives indicated their hospital had a reputation for treating AIDS patients. Among hospitals without an AIDS reputation, 34.1 percent believed developing one would be harmful to the hospital's image, in contrast to none in hospitals that had such a reputation (chi 2 = 11.676, df = 1, P = .0006). Although 16.6 percent did not know if large-scale HIV testing should be implemented, a near majority (47.7 percent) expressed some support. In addition, 15 percent reported that HIV-positive physicians on the hospital's medical staff should not be allowed to practice medicine, but 32.1 percent indicated that they should.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7638335

  8. Blood characteristics of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Standley, W.G.; McCue, P.M.

    1992-09-01

    Hematology, serum chemistry, and prevalence of antibodies against selected, pathogens in a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, in 1989 and 1990. Samples from 18 (10 female, 8 male) adult kit foxes were used to establish normal hematology and serum chemistry values for this population. Average values were all within the normal ranges reported for kit foxes in other locations. Three hematology parameters had significant differences between male and female values; males had higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and lower lymphocyte counts. There were no significant differences between serum chemistry values from male and female foxes. Prevalence of antibodies was determined from serum samples from 47 (26 female, 21 male) adult kit foxes and eight (4 female, 4 male) juveniles. Antibodies were detected against five of the eight pathogens tested: canine parvovirus, Toxoplasma gondii Leptospira interrogans, canine distemper virus, and canine hepatitis virus. Antibodies were not detected against Brucella, canis, Coccidioides immitis, or Yersinia pestis.

  9. Fleas of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, K.A.; Egoscue, H.J.

    1992-09-01

    A total of 3,241 fleas, representing seven species, were identified from 398 samples collected from San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis), California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi), and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 3,109 fleas collected from kit foxes 95.7% were Echidnophaga gallinacea, 4.0% Pulex irritans, 0.2% Hoplopsyllus anomolus, and 0.1% Odontopsyllus dentatus. One male Ctenocephalides fells was also collected from a kit fox. The 118 fleas collected from California ground squirrels consisted of Hoplopsyllus anomolus (55.9%), Echidnophaga gallinacea (37.3%), and Oropsylla montanus (6.8%). The 14 fleas collected from deer mice were Aetheca wagneri. Based on the distribution and abundance of flea species collected, and the vector efficiency of these fleas, it appears that kit foxes could play a role in the transfer of natural vectors of sylvatic plague between rodent populations, if the bacterium responsible for plague (Yersinia pestis) were present at Camp Roberts. Little information regarding kit fox food habits was evidenced by the distribution and abundance of small mammal flea species collected from kit foxes.

  10. Unexplained illness among Persian Gulf War veterans in an Air National Guard Unit: preliminary report--August 1990-March 1995.

    PubMed

    1995-06-16

    In November 1994, the U.S. Department of Veterans' Affairs (VA), the Department of Defense (DoD), and the Pennsylvania Department of Health requested that CDC investigate a report of unexplained illnesses among members of an Air National Guard (ANG) unit in south-central Pennsylvania (Unit A) who were veterans of the Persian Gulf War (PGW) (August 1990-June 1991). These veterans had been evaluated at a local VA medical center for symptoms that included recurrent rash, diarrhea, and fatigue. A three-stage investigation was planned to 1) verify and characterize signs and symptoms in PGW veterans attending the VA medical center; 2) determine whether the prevalence of symptoms was higher among members of Unit A than among members of other units deployed to the PGW and, if so, whether the increased prevalence was associated with PGW deployment; and 3) characterize the illness and identify associated risk factors. This report presents preliminary findings from stages 1 and 2 (stage 3 is in progress). PMID:7770029

  11. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation...

  12. 49 CFR 850.3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.3 Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation...

  13. 3 CFR 8715 - Proclamation 8715 of September 16, 2011. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...patriots serve not only in combat, but also when disaster strikes at home, offering a strong hand to victims of floods, tornadoes, and fires across America. The employers who provide jobs to our Guard and Reserve members when they are home are...

  14. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS): 1997 Summary: National Hospital Discharge Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hall, Margaret.

    Last month, the NCHS released statistics from its 1997 National Hospital Discharge Survey. The "report presents national estimates of the use of non-Federal, short-stay hospitals in the United States during 1997. Numbers and rates of discharges, diagnoses, and procedures are shown by age and sex." The summary gives average lengths of stays for all discharges, broken down by region, as well as average lengths of stays for selected diagnostic categories, including infant delivery.

  15. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  16. 46 CFR 4.40-35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 4.40-35 Section 4.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  17. 46 CFR 4.40-30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 4.40-30 Section 4.40-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  18. Cost of Hospitalization and Length of Stay in People with Down Syndrome: Evidence from a National Hospital Discharge Claims Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims to describe the hospitalization profiles which include medical expenses and length of stays, and to determine their possible influencing factors of hospital admission on persons with Down syndrome in Taiwan. We employed a population-based, retrospective analyses used national health insurance hospital discharge data of the…

  19. Guarding Polyhedral Terrains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Prosenjit Bose; Thomas C. Shermer; Godfried T. Toussaint; Binhai Zhu

    1997-01-01

    We prove that (n\\/2J vertex guards are always sufficient and sometimes necessary to guard the surface of an n-vertex polyhedral terrain. We also show that l(4n - 4)\\/13J edge guards are sometimes necessary to guard the surface of an n-vertex polyhedral terrain. The upper bound on the number of edge guards is ln\\/3J (Everett and Rivera-Campo, 1994). Since both upper

  20. Reported barriers to mental health care in three samples of U.S. Army National Guard soldiers at three time points.

    PubMed

    Valenstein, Marcia; Gorman, Lisa; Blow, Adrian J; Ganoczy, Dara; Walters, Heather; Kees, Michelle; Pfeiffer, Paul N; Kim, H Myra; Lagrou, Robert; Wadsworth, Shelley MacDermid; Rauch, Sheila A M; Dalack, Gregory W

    2014-08-01

    The military community and its partners have made vigorous efforts to address treatment barriers and increase appropriate mental health services use among returning National Guard soldiers. We assessed whether there were differences in reports of treatment barriers in 3 categories (stigma, logistics, or negative beliefs about treatment) in sequential cross-sectional samples of U.S. soldiers from a Midwestern Army National Guard Organization who were returning from overseas deployments. Data were collected during 3 time periods: September 2007-August 2008 (n = 333), March 2009-March 2010 (n = 884), and August 2011-August 2012 (n = 737). In analyses using discretized time periods and in trend analyses, the percentages of soldiers endorsing negative beliefs about treatment declined significantly across the 3 sequential samples (19.1%, 13.9%, and 11.1%). The percentages endorsing stigma barriers (37.8%, 35.2%, 31.8%) decreased significantly only in trend analyses. Within the stigma category, endorsement of individual barriers regarding negative reactions to a soldier seeking treatment declined, but barriers related to concerns about career advancement did not. Negative treatment beliefs were associated with reduced services use (OR = 0.57; 95% CI [0.33, 0.97]). PMID:25158634

  1. Sexual abuse of children as seen at Kenyatta National Hospital.

    PubMed

    Nduati, R W; Muita, J W

    1992-07-01

    A retrospective study of 21 sexually abused children admitted to the Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya, between January 1984 and December 1985 is presented. The peak incidence of sexual abuse was in the age group of 10-15 years (38.1%) followed by the 5-9 years age group (28.6%). Strangers and people familiar to the child were equally implicated as assailants. Fourteen out of the twenty one (66.7%) victims, presented with injuries ranging from perineal tears (19%), vaginal tears (19%), recto-vaginal fistulae (RVP) (4.8%) and vesico-vaginal-fistulae (VVF) and abdominal haematoma (4.8%). The victims presented to hospital within two days of the event usually accompanied by their mothers. PMID:1396187

  2. [Sleep survey of medical residents at a National University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Taoda, Kazushi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kitahara, Teruyo; Nishiyama, Kastuo

    2005-11-01

    In order to ascertain the workload and lifestyle of medical residents prior to the introduction of a new medical resident training system, 102 residents at a national university hospital were monitored for four consecutive weeks to ascertain their life habits. Valid responses were obtained from 76% of the respondents for a total of 2,722 person days. It was found that the average length of sleep was 5.7 h on weekdays and 6.8 h on weekends. Of the 102 residents, 40% slept less than six hours a night and 17% slept less than five hours a night. The time spent sleeping was particularly short among surgical residents. Given that lack of sleep not only affects the health of the residents negatively, but also compromises the safety of medical care that they provide, the new medical residency training system will need to monitor and analyze the wellbeing, including sleep patterns, of medical residents. PMID:16408436

  3. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: Dispensing and administration—2002

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CRAIG A. PEDERSEN; PHILIP J. SCHNEIDER; DOUGLAS J. SCHECKELHOFF

    Results of the 2002 ASHP nation- al survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings that pertain to dispensing and ad- ministration are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1101 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. SMG Market- ing Group, Inc., supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn

  4. The hospital cost of vertebral fractures in the EU: estimates using national datasets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henrik W. Finnern; David P. Sykes

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the hospital cost of vertebral fractures in the EU using national datasets to explore some of the methodologic limitations associated with such an approach. Hospital costs for vertebral fractures across the EU were compared with the hospital costs associated with hip fractures. Additionally, these costs were placed into the health care context

  5. Efficacy of a post-secondary environmental science education program on the attitude toward science of a group of Mississippi National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, William Bradford, Jr.

    The National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program (ChalleNGe) is a 17 month quasi-military training program authorized by Congress in the 1993 Defense Authorization Bill designed to improve life skills, education levels, and employment potential of 16--18 year old youth who drop out of high school. ChalleNGe is currently operational in 27 states/territories with the focus of this study on the Mississippi National Guard Program operated at Camp Shelby, Mississippi. During the five month residential portion of the program students are guided through an eight step process designed to meet the goals of improving life skills, education levels, and employment potential while ultimately leading to completion of high school equivalency credentials followed by a 12 month mentoring phase to encourage and track progress toward goals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitude toward science of a group of students enrolled in the ChalleNGe Program at Camp Shelby (ChalleNGe). The GED test is administered approximately two months into the residential phase of the program. While the program boasts an overall GED pass rate of nearly 80%, approximately 30--35% of students successfully complete the initial offering of the GED. As high school graduates, these students are offered college courses through William Carey College in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Twenty four students elected to take the Introduction to Environmental Science course and formed the experimental group while 24 other students who passed the GED comprised the control group. Each group was administered the Scientific Attitude Inventory II, a 40 statement instrument with Likert Scale responses, as a pretest. Paired samples t-tests indicated no significant difference in attitude toward science between the experimental and control groups on the pretest. Following the two week Introduction to Environmental Science course for the experimental group, both groups were post tested. As predicted, the attitude toward science of the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the control group. Further investigation into correlation between the length of time students were away from the traditional school prior to starting ChalleNGe, the number of science classes previously taken, and reading scores on the Test of Adult Basic Education revealed no significant relationship. Responses provided by students to each of these three factors was significantly different between the experimental and control groups. In summary, attitude toward science can be positively impacted by short term interventions such as the environmental science course described herein. While the positive impact on attitude toward science caused by this course was the desired outcome of this project, appropriate emphasis should be placed on prevention of dropouts and the accompanying social issues.

  6. Guarding rectangular art galleries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jurek Czyzowicz; Eduardo Rivera-campo; Nicola Santoro; Jorge Urrutia; Joseph Zaks

    1994-01-01

    Consider a rectangular art gallery divided into n rectangular rooms, such that any two rooms sharing a wall in common have a door connecting them. How many guards need to be stationed in the gallery so as to protect all of the rooms in our gallery? Notice that if a guard is stationed at a door, he will be able

  7. Homecoming of soldiers who are citizens: Re-employment and financial status of returning Army National Guard soldiers from Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF).

    PubMed

    Griffith, James

    2015-01-01

    This study examined civilian employment among Army National Guard soldiers who had recently returned from Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF). Of specific interest were relationships of re-employment and financial difficulties to several conditions, such as amount of social support during and after deployment, combat exposure, negative feelings during and after deployment, and postdeployment adjustment symptoms. Survey data from the Army's Reintegration Unit Risk Inventory were used (4,546 soldiers in 50 units who were deployed during 2010). Few soldiers reported financial difficulties during deployment (7.1% of the sample) and after having returned (11.8%). Of those who reported postdeployment financial difficulties, nearly one-half had reported such difficulties during deployment, and not having resumed the predeployment job was associated with more postdeployment financial difficulties. Logistic regression analyses showed the relative contribution of the study variables to changed financial status, from deployment to postdeployment. Reported deployment support (e.g., trust in the unit chain-of-command and available support) was associated with decreased financial difficulties. In contrast, increased financial difficulties were associated with having seen others wounded or killed in combat. Other postdeployment experiences, such as feelings of anger and frustration and available support, were associated with increased financial difficulties, in addition to alcohol use, trouble sleeping and suicidal thoughts. Implications of results for policy and practice to lessen financial hardships and job loss associated with deployment are discussed. PMID:24284690

  8. Promoting Reintegration of National Guard Veterans and Their Partners Using a Self-Directed Program of Integrative Therapies: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Collinge, William; Kahn, Janet; Soltysik, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This article reports pilot data from phase I of a project to develop and evaluate a self-directed program of integrative therapies for National Guard personnel and significant relationship partners to support reintegration and resilience after return from Iraq or Afghanistan. Data are reported on 43 dyads. Intervention was an integrated multimedia package of guided meditative, contemplative, and relaxation exercises (CD) and instruction in simple massage techniques (DVD) to promote stress reduction and interpersonal connectedness. A repeated measures design with standardized instruments was used to establish stability of baseline levels of relevant mental health domains (day 1, day 30), followed by the intervention and assessments 4 and 8 weeks later. Significant improvements in standardized measures for post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and self-compassion were seen in both veterans and partners; and in stress for partners. Weekly online reporting tracked utilization of guided exercises and massage. Veterans reported significant reductions in ratings of physical pain, physical tension, irritability, anxiety/worry, and depression after massage, and longitudinal analysis suggested declining baseline levels of tension and irritability. Qualitative data from focus groups and implications for continued development and a phase II trial are discussed. PMID:23397692

  9. Combat exposure, psychological symptoms, and marital satisfaction in National Guard soldiers who served in Operation Iraqi Freedom from 2005 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Keith D; Rodrigues, Camila S; Jones, David H

    2009-01-01

    In current military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, US National Guard (NG) troops are serving longer deployments than ever before. Little is known, however, about how such deployments affect this population of individuals, relative to active component (AC) troops. This study investigated the extent of combat exposure, severity of post-deployment psychological symptoms, and general interpersonal functioning, as well as the interrelationships of these variables, in 50 NG soldiers who served a 12-month deployment in Iraq from 2005 to 2006. The results indicate that combat exposure and post-deployment post-traumatic stress symptoms in this sample are greater than those in NG veterans of past military operations, and similar to those of full-time soldiers in current operations. Furthermore, the patterns of interrelationships between combat exposure, psychological symptoms, and interpersonal variables were similar to those detected in prior research on AC troops. These results suggest that NG veterans of current military operations may require similar services as active duty veterans. Given that NG troops are less integrated into the military structure, specific outreach efforts may be needed to help NG veterans to receive such services. PMID:18785032

  10. Assessment of soil and water contaminants from selected locations in and near the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area, Ada County, Idaho, 2001-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parliman, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001, the National Guard Bureau and the U.S. Geological Survey began a project to compile hydrogeologic data and determine presence or absence of soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination at the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area in southwestern Idaho. Between June 2002 and April 2003, a total of 114 soil, surface-water, ground-water, precipitation, or dust samples were collected from 68 sample sites (65 different locations) in the Orchard Training Area (OTA) or along the vehicle corridor to the OTA. Soil and water samples were analyzed for concentrations of selected total trace metals, major ions, nutrients, explosive compounds, semivolatile organics, and petroleum hydrocarbons. Water samples also were analyzed for concentrations of selected dissolved trace metals and major ions. Distinguishing naturally occurring large concentrations of trace metals, major ions, and nutrients from contamination related to land and water uses at the OTA was difficult. There were no historical analyses for this area to compare with modern data, and although samples were collected from 65 locations in and near the OTA, sampled areas represented only a small part of the complex OTA land-use areas and soil types. For naturally occurring compounds, several assumptions were made?anomalously large concentrations, when tied to known land uses, may indicate presence of contamination; naturally occurring concentrations cannot be separated from contamination concentrations in mid- and lower ranges of data; and smallest concentrations may represent the lowest naturally occurring range of concentrations and (or) the absence of contaminants related to land and water uses. Presence of explosive, semivolatile organic (SVOC), and petroleum hydrocarbon compounds in samples indicates contamination from land and water uses. In areas along the vehicle corridor and major access roads within the OTA, most trace metal, major ion, and nutrient concentrations in soil samples were not in the upper 10th percentile of data, but concentrations of 25 metals, ions, or nutrients were in the upper 10th percentile in a puddle sample near the heavy equipment maneuvering area, MPRC-H. The largest concentrations of tin, ammonia, and nitrite plus nitrate (as nitrogen) in water from the OTA were detected in a sample from this puddle. Petroleum hydrocarbons were the most common contaminant, detected in all soil and surface-water samples. An SVOC, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, a plasticizer, was detected at a site along the vehicle corridor. In Maneuver Areas within the OTA, many soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of cobalt, iron, mercury, titanium, sodium, ammonia, or total phosphorus were detected in 6 of 13 soil samples outside the Tadpole Lake area. The largest concentrations of aluminum, arsenic, beryllium, nickel, selenium, silver, strontium, thallium, vanadium, chloride, potassium, sulfate, and nitrite plus nitrate were detected in soil samples from the Tadpole Lake area. Water from Tadpole Lake contained the largest total concentrations of 19 trace metals, 4 major ions, and 1 nutrient. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 5 soil samples and water from Tadpole Lake. SVOCs related to combustion of fuel or plasticizers were detected in 1 soil sample. Explosive compounds were detected in 1 precipitation sample.In the Impact Area within the OTA, most soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of barium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, or orthophosphate were detected in 6 of the 18 soil samples. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 4 soil samples, SVOCs in 6 samples, and explosive compounds in 4 samples. In the mobilization and training equipment site (MATES) compound adjacent to the OTA, all soil and water samples contained at lea

  11. Improvement of the low knowledge, attitude and practice of hepatitis B virus infection among Saudi national guard personnel after educational intervention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) was reported to be higher in military personnel than the general population in Saudi Arabia (SA), there is lack of studies assessing HBV awareness among them. The objective was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of HBV infection among military personnel. Methods An intervention design with pre- and post-education KAP questionnaire was completed among National Guard soldiers working in Jeddah during January 2009. Educational intervention was provided through educational leaflets, group and individual discussions, visual show, and a lecture. A score was created from the correct answers to 58 questions. Results A total of 400 male soldiers with mean age 30.7?±?6.1 years completed both questionnaires. The majority had school education (96.8%) and in the lower military ranks (66.0%). Only 19.5% of soldiers reported HBV vaccine intake. The low median and inter-quartile range of the pre-intervention score (16, 6–26) markedly increased after education (to 53, 50–55, p<0.001). The overall improvement of mean KAP score (204%) was also observed in all its component scores; disease nature (272%), methods of transmission (206%), prevention and control (109%), attitude (155%), and practice (192%). The improvement was evident irrespective of socio-demographic characteristics and history of HBV vaccine. KAP scores were significantly associated with higher educational levels, higher monthly income, administrative jobs, and higher job ranks. Conclusion We are reporting a low level of HBV awareness among Saudi military population. The study confirms the need and effectiveness of focused multifaceted educational campaigns among the military population. PMID:23111118

  12. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a)...

  13. Implementation of Antimicrobial Stewardship Policies in U.S. Hospitals: Findings from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Herzig, Carolyn T. A.; Larson, Elaine L.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Perencevich, Eli N.; Stone, Patricia W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the use of antimicrobial stewardship policies and to investigate factors associated with implementation in a national sample of acute care hospitals. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. PARTICIPANTS Infection Control Directors from acute care hospitals participating in the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). METHODS An online survey was conducted in the Fall of 2011. A subset of hospitals also provided access to their 2011 NHSN annual survey data. RESULTS Responses were received from 1,015 hospitals (30% response rate). The majority of hospitals (64%) reported the presence of a policy; use of antibiograms and antimicrobial restriction policies were most frequently utilized (83% and 65%, respectively). Respondents from larger, urban, teaching hospitals and those that are part of a system that shares resources were more likely to report a policy in place (P < .01). Hospitals located in California were more likely to have policy in place than in hospitals located in other states (P = .014). CONCLUSION This study provides a snapshot of the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship policies in place in U.S. hospitals and suggests that statewide efforts in California are achieving their intended effect. Further research is needed to identify factors that foster the adoption of these policies. PMID:25695166

  14. Trends in hospital admissions for adverse drug reactions in England: analysis of national hospital episode statistics 1998–2005

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hitesh; Bell, Derek; Molokhia, Mariam; Srishanmuganathan, Janakan; Patel, Mitesh; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem

    2007-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a frequent cause of mortality and morbidity to patients worldwide, with great associated costs to the healthcare providers including the NHS in England. We examined trends in hospital admissions associated with adverse drug reaction in English hospitals and the accuracy of national reporting. Methods Data from the Hospital Episode Statistics database (collected by the Department of Health) was obtained and analysed for all English hospital episodes (1998–2005) using ICD-10 codes with a primary (codes including the words ('drug-induced' or 'due to') or secondary diagnosis of ADR (Y40–59). More detailed analysis was performed for the year 2004–2005 Results Between 1998 and 2005 there were 447 071 ADRs representing 0.50% of total hospital episodes and over this period the number of ADRs increased by 45%. All ADRs with an external code increased over this period. In 2005 the total number of episodes (all age groups) was 13,706,765 of which 76,692 (0.56%) were drug related. Systemic agents, which include anti-neoplastic drugs, were the most implicated class (15.7%), followed by analgesics (11.7%) and cardiovascular drugs (10.1%). There has been a 6 fold increase in nephropathy secondary to drugs and a 65% decline in drug induced extra-pyramidal side effects. 59% of cases involving adverse drug reactions involved patients above 60 years of age. Conclusion ADRs have major public health and economic implications. Our data suggest that national Hospital Episode Statistics in England have recognised limitations and that consequently, admissions associated with adverse drug reactions continue to be under-recorded. External causes of ADR have increased at a greater rate than the increase in total hospital admissions. Improved and more detailed reporting combined with educational interventions to improve the recording of ADRs are needed to accurately monitor the morbidity caused by ADRs and to meaningfully evaluate national initiatives to reduce adverse drug reactions. PMID:17894876

  15. Rebels Guarding Supply Trains 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    , because it was a special visit - I was coming from another country - the guards delayed my admission. I waited and waited. When they finally allowed me enter, I was very anxious. The visiting room was a large hall with columns in the center. What I saw... rank positions as prisons guards as part of their promotion inside the military. Therefore, even though torture was not an established part of the experience of prison, it was used as a threat, because inmates knew they could be sent to be tortured...

  16. Surface-water quantity and quality, aquatic biology, stream geomorphology, and groundwater-flow simulation for National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, 2002-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langland, Michael J.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Chichester, Douglas C.; Bilger, Michael D.; Brightbill, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    Base-line and long-term monitoring of water resources of the National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap in south-central Pennsylvania began in 2002. Results of continuous monitoring of streamflow and turbidity and monthly and stormflow water-quality samples from two continuous-record long-term stream sites, periodic collection of water-quality samples from five miscellaneous stream sites, and annual collection of biological data from 2002 to 2005 at 27 sites are discussed. In addition, results from a stream-geomorphic analysis and classification and a regional groundwater-flow model are included. Streamflow at the facility was above normal for the 2003 through 2005 water years and extremely high-flow events occurred in 2003 and in 2004. Water-quality samples were analyzed for nutrients, sediments, metals, major ions, pesticides, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, and explosives. Results indicated no exceedances for any constituent (except iron) above the primary and secondary drinking-water standards or health-advisory levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Iron concentrations were naturally elevated in the groundwater within the watershed because of bedrock lithology. The majority of the constituents were at or below the method detection limit. Sediment loads were dominated by precipitation due to the remnants of Hurricane Ivan in September 2004. More than 60 percent of the sediment load measured during the entire study was transported past the streamgage in just 2 days during that event. Habitat and aquatic-invertebrate data were collected in the summers of 2002-05, and fish data were collected in 2004. Although 2002 was a drought year, 2003-05 were above-normal flow years. Results indicated a wide diversity in invertebrates, good numbers of taxa (distinct organisms), and on the basis of a combination of metrics, the majority of the 27 sites indicated no or slight impairment. Fish-metric data from 25 sites indicated results similar to the invertebrate data. Stream classification based on evolution of the stream channels indicates about 94 percent of the channels were considered to be in equilibrium (type B or C channels), neither aggrading nor eroding. A regional, uncalibrated groundwater-flow model indicated the surface-water and groundwater-flow divides coincided. Because of folding of rock layers, groundwater was under confined conditions and nearly all the water leaves the facility via the streams.

  17. Coast Guard Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Coast Guard are jointly developing a lightweight, helicopter-transportable, completely self-contained firefighting module for combating shipboard and dockside fires. The project draws upon NASA technology in high-capacity rocket engine pumps, lightweight materials and compact packaging.

  18. A Modified Splash Guard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Ranjit; Eskola, Phillip

    1996-06-01

    During the solvent removal phase of chromatographic separation of organic mixtures using flash chromatography, the problem of vigorous silica-gel splashing is often encountered. In this article we describe a simple solution that we have devised to alleviate this problem. We constructed a splash guard adapter which results in the full recovery of the splashed silica-gel.

  19. National trends in utilization and in-hospital outcomes of bariatric surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George Darby Pope; John D. Birkmeyer; Samuel R. G. Finlayson

    2002-01-01

    In view of recent enthusiasm for surgery to treat morbid obesity, we examined national changes in utilization and in-hospital\\u000a outcomes of bariatric surgery over time. With the use of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) codes, we identified\\u000a all bariatric procedures (n=12,203) performed on adults from 1990 to 1997 in hospitals participating in the Nationwide Inpatient\\u000a Sample. We then applied sampling

  20. The Impact of National Cultural Differences on Nurses' Acceptance of Hospital Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to explore the influence of national cultural differences on nurses' perceptions of their acceptance of hospital information systems. This study uses the perspective of Technology Acceptance Model; national cultural differences in terms of masculinity/femininity, individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance are incorporated into the Technology Acceptance Model as moderators, whereas time orientation is a control variable on hospital information system acceptance. A quantitative research design was used in this study; 261 participants, US and Taiwan RNs, all had hospital information system experience. Data were collected from November 2013 to February 2014 and analyzed using a t test to compare the coefficients for each moderator. The results show that individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance all exhibit significant difference on hospital information system acceptance; however, both masculinity/femininity and time orientation factors did not show significance. This study verifies that national cultural differences have significant influence on nurses' behavioral intention to use hospital information systems. Therefore, hospital information system providers should emphasize the way in which to integrate different technological functions to meet the needs of nurses from various cultural backgrounds. PMID:25899441

  1. Building an FTP guard

    SciTech Connect

    Sands, P.D.

    1998-08-01

    Classified designs usually include lesser classified (including unclassified) components. An engineer working on such a design needs access to the various sub-designs at lower classification levels. For simplicity, the problem is presented with only two levels: high and low. If the low-classification component designs are stored in the high network, they become inaccessible to persons working on a low network. In order to keep the networks separate, the component designs may be duplicated in all networks, resulting in a synchronization problem. Alternatively, they may be stored in the low network and brought into the high network when needed. The latter solution results in the use of sneaker-net (copying the files from the low system to a tape and carrying the tape to a high system) or a file transfer guard. This paper shows how an FTP Guard was constructed and implemented without degrading the security of the underlying B3 platform. The paper then shows how the guard can be extended to an FTP proxy server or an HTTP proxy server. The extension is accomplished by allowing the high-side user to select among items that already exist on the low-side. No high-side data can be directly compromised by the extension, but a mechanism must be developed to handle the low-bandwidth covert channel that would be introduced by the application.

  2. Improving Service Quality in Long-term Care Hospitals: National Evaluation on Long-term Care Hospitals and Employees Perception of Quality Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkyung; Han, Woosok

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate predictors for specific dimensions of service quality perceived by hospital employees in long-term care hospitals. Methods Data collected from a survey of 298 hospital employees in 18 long-term care hospitals were analysed. Multivariate ordinary least squares regression analysis with hospital fixed effects was used to determine the predictors of service quality using respondents’ and organizational characteristics. Results The most significant predictors of employee-perceived service quality were job satisfaction and degree of consent on national evaluation criteria. National evaluation results on long-term care hospitals and work environment also had positive effects on service quality. Conclusion The findings of the study show that organizational characteristics are significant determinants of service quality in long-term care hospitals. Assessment of the extent to which hospitals address factors related to employeeperceived quality of services could be the first step in quality improvement activities. Results have implications for efforts to improve service quality in longterm care hospitals and designing more comprehensive national evaluation criteria. PMID:24159497

  3. Women's secure hospital services: national bed numbers and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Harty, Mari; Somers, Nadia; Bartlett, Annie

    2012-01-01

    A mapping exercise as part of a pathway study of women in secure psychiatric services in the England and Wales was conducted. It aimed to (i) establish the extent and range of secure service provision for women nationally and (ii) establish the present and future care needs and pathways of care of women mentally disordered offenders (MDO) currently in low, medium and enhanced medium secure care. The study identified 589 medium secure beds, 46 enhanced medium secure beds (WEMSS) and 990 low secure beds for women nationally. Of the 589 medium secure beds, the majority (309, 52%) are in the NHS and under half (280, 48%) are in the independent sector (IS). The distribution of low secure beds is in the opposite direction, the majority (745, 75%) being in the IS and 254 (25%) in the NHS. Medium secure provision for women has grown over the past decade, but comparative data for low secure provision are not available. Most women are now in single sex facilities although a small number of mixed sex units remain. The findings have implications for the future commissioning of secure services for women. PMID:23236263

  4. Motor vehicle injuries in childhood: a hospital-based study in Saudi Arabia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2006-01-01

    Motor vehicles are a major cause of injury-related deaths in children and may also result in temporary or permanent disability. A retrospective analysis of the medical charts of children aged 12 years and younger, who were involved in motor vehicle injuries during a 10-year period, was undertaken. All children who were admitted and treated at King Fahad National Guard Hospital, Riyadh

  5. Profile of women presenting for abortions in Singapore at the National University Hospital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kuldip Singh; Y. F. Fong; S. Y. Loh

    2002-01-01

    The study was conducted to profile women seeking abortions at the National University Hospital, with particular interest in the trend of teenage pregnancies with the aim of identifying risk factors for late presentation for abortions. All patients who underwent an abortion at our center from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2000 were recruited. Data were entered into a prepared

  6. The impact of ongoing national terror on the community of hospital nurses in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ron, Pnina; Shamai, Michal

    2014-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore the connections between the exposure of nurses in Israel to national terror and the levels of distress experienced due to ongoing terror attacks. The data were collected from 214 nurses from various parts of Israel who work in three types of heath services (mainly hospital departments) and provide help to victims of terror. The nurses reported very high levels of burnout, high levels of stress and medium-to high levels of intrusive memories. Levels of exposure were associated with burnout, intrusive memories and level of stress. More professional attention should be given to hospital nurses who provide care for trauma patients. PMID:23982180

  7. Second messengers in guard cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. P. Leckie; M. R. McAinsh; L. Montgomery; A. J. Priestley; I. Staxen; A. A. R. Webb; A. M. Hetherington

    1998-01-01

    elements also operate in plant cells will be reviewed in this paper. This discussion will focus primarily on the Experimental investigations of stomatal guard cells role of such molecules in stomatal guard cell signal have provided valuable insights into the mechanisms transduction with particular emphasis on the Ca2+ mobil- which may underlie signalling in plants. To date a izing, NAD+

  8. Activity-based funding for National Health Service hospitals in England: managers’ experience and expectations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Sussex; Shelley Farrar

    2009-01-01

    Activity-based funding of hospital services has been introduced progressively since 2003 in the National Health Service (NHS)\\u000a in England, under the name ‘Payment by Results’ (PbR). It represents a major change from previous funding arrangements based\\u000a on annual “block” payments for large bundles of services. We interviewed senior local NHS managers about their experience\\u000a and expectations of the impact of

  9. A national, cross-sectional survey of children's hospital-based safety resource centres

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, Sadiqa; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Seaver Hill, Karen; Arbogast, Kristy B; Gittelman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the location, staffing, clientele, safety product disbursement patterns, education provided and sustainability of safety resource centres (SRCs) in US children's hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was distributed to children's hospital-based SRC directors. Survey categories included: funding sources, customer base, items sold, items given free of charge, education provided and directors’ needs. Results 32/38 (84.2%) SRC sites (affiliated with 30 hospitals) completed the survey. SRCs were in many hospital locations including lobby (28.1%), family resource centres (12.5%), gift shop/retail space (18.8%), mobile units (18.8%) and patient clinics (12.5%). 19% of respondents reported that their SRC was financially self-sustainable. Sales to patients predominated (mean of 44%); however, hospital employees made up a mean of 20% (range 0–60%) of sales. 78.1% of SRCs had products for children with special healthcare needs. Documentation kept at SRC sites included items purchased (96.9%), items given free of charge (65.6%) and customer demographics (50%). 56.3% of SRCs provided formal injury prevention education classes. The SRCs’ directors’ most important needs were finances (46.9%), staffing (50%) and space (46.9%). All of the directors were ‘somewhat interested’ or ‘very interested’ in each of the following: creation of a common SRC listserv, national SRC data bank and multisite SRC research platform. Conclusions SRCs are located in many US children's hospitals, and can be characterised as heterogeneous in location, products sold, data kept and ability to be financially sustained. Further research is needed to determine best practices for SRCs to maximise their impact on injury prevention. PMID:24667383

  10. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers...services; critical access hospitals; or clinic, rehabilitation...for requirements concerning hospitals accredited by JCAHO or AOA...survey, together with any information related to the survey...

  11. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers...services; critical access hospitals; or clinic, rehabilitation...for requirements concerning hospitals accredited by JCAHO or AOA...survey, together with any information related to the survey...

  12. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers...services; critical access hospitals; or clinic, rehabilitation...for requirements concerning hospitals accredited by JCAHO or AOA...survey, together with any information related to the survey...

  13. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers...services; critical access hospitals; or clinic, rehabilitation...for requirements concerning hospitals accredited by JCAHO or AOA...survey, together with any information related to the survey...

  14. Private hospital accreditation and inducement of care under the ghanaian national insurance scheme

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Ghanaian National Health Insurance Scheme pays providers according to the fee for service payment scheme, a method of payment that is likely to encourage inducement of care. The goal of this paper is to test for the presence of supplier induced demand among patients who received care in private, for profit, hospitals accredited to provide care to insured patients. An instrumental variable Poisson estimation was used to compare the demand curves for health care by insured outpatients in the public and private hospitals. The results showed that supplier induced demand existed in the private sector among patients within the ages 18 and 60 years. Impact on cost of care and patients' welfare is discussed. PMID:22827881

  15. Department directors' perceptions of the roles and functions of hospital chaplains: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Flannelly, Kevin J; Galek, Kathleen; Bucchino, John; Handzo, George F; Tannenbaum, Helen P

    2005-01-01

    A national survey of hospital directors of medicine, nursing, social services, and pastoral care was conducted to obtain opinions about the importance of various chaplain roles. On average, directors in all four disciplines rated three of the seven chaplain roles (grief and death, prayer, and emotional support) to be "very" to "extremely" important. Most of the others roles were rated between "moderately" and "very" important (religious services-rituals consultation and advocacy, community liaison-outreach). Several significant differences were found among disciplines, as physicians rated the importance of most chaplains' roles lower than did other disciplines. Overall, there was a tendency for directors in smaller hospitals, especially those with fewer than 100 patients, to place less importance on most of the chaplain roles investigated here. PMID:16425698

  16. Activity-based funding for National Health Service hospitals in England: managers' experience and expectations.

    PubMed

    Sussex, Jonathan; Farrar, Shelley

    2009-05-01

    Activity-based funding of hospital services has been introduced progressively since 2003 in the National Health Service (NHS) in England, under the name 'Payment by Results' (PbR). It represents a major change from previous funding arrangements based on annual "block" payments for large bundles of services. We interviewed senior local NHS managers about their experience and expectations of the impact of PbR. A high degree of 'NHS solidarity' was apparent, and competition between NHS hospitals was muted. PbR has been introduced against a background of numerous other efficiency incentives, and managers did not detect a further PbR-specific boost to efficiency. No impact on care quality, either positive or negative, is yet evident. PMID:18679733

  17. Dutch Hospital Drug Formularies: pharmacotherapeutic variation and conservatism, but concurrence with national pharmacotherapeutic guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Fijn, R; Engels, S A G; Brouwers, J R B J; Knaap, R J; De Jong-Van den Berg, L T W

    2000-01-01

    Aims This research examines current hospital drug formularies (HDFs) of all Dutch general hospitals. It assesses the extent to which they recommend the same drugs, the breadth of their coverage in terms of therapeutic areas, drug groups incorporated and individuals drugs included, and their extent of conservatism by considering the year of introduction of the drugs included within groups. Furthermore, it considers the extent to which their recommendations concur and comply with those of national pharmacotherapeutic guidelines and the WHO Essential Drugs List (EDL). Methods Seventy-eight (81%) out of all 96 current Dutch HDFs were received of which 62 were suitable for study. Differences between HDFs and eventual associations with hospital characteristics were researched by statistical testing and case-control studies. To evaluate HDFs' concurrence with national guidelines and compliance with the WHO EDL, nine drug groups were studied in detail: benzodiazepines, calcium channel blockers, ?-adrenoceptor blocking agents, ACE-inhibitors, angiotensin-II inhibitors, NSAIDs, H2-receptor antagonists, 5HT3-antagonists, and H+-pump inhibitors. Concurrence and compliance with national guidelines and the WHO EDL was defined as inclusion of recommended drugs. Non-concurrence was defined as inclusion of nonrecommended drugs. Results The total number of indications addressed and drug groups incorporated within HDFs varied from 28 to 72 (median 56) and from 30 to 123 (median 97), respectively. The total number of individual drug entities (pharmacological substances) included ranged from 239 to 658 (median 430) and the total number of drug products, including all different dosage forms, from 412 to 1121 (median 655). Within drug groups, drug entities first marketed were most frequently included. Teaching hospitals were most likely to include recently marketed drugs. Depending on the drug group, HDFs' concurrence and compliance with national guidelines and the WHO EDL ranged from 35% to 100%. Conclusions Findings indicate that Dutch HDFs are rather uniform in the indications addressed and the drug groups incorporated. However, the number of individual drug entities and drug products included within groups varies considerably. Furthermore, Dutch HDFs are considered rather conservative, as older drugs are favoured over more recent drugs. Generally, with some drug exceptions, Dutch HDFs concur and comply with recommendations in national pharmacotherapeutic guidelines and with the WHO EDL over 90%. PMID:10718781

  18. Prevalence of smoking among patients treated in NHS hospitals in England in 2010/2011: a national audit.

    PubMed

    Szatkowski, L; Murray, R; Hubbard, R; Agrawal, S; Huang, Y; Britton, J

    2015-05-01

    Using data from The Health Improvement Network and Hospital Episode Statistics, we investigate smoking prevalence, number of smokers treated and opportunities for cessation intervention among patients treated in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England from April 2010 to March 2011. Our results show that approximately 1.1 million smokers are treated in English hospitals each year, receiving a total of 2.6 million episodes of care. These findings suggest that delivering smoking cessation as a routine component of hospital care, as recommended by recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance, could achieve marked reductions in the prevalence of smoking and improve the cost-effectiveness of NHS hospitals. PMID:25385425

  19. Management of postoperative pain: experience of the Niamey National Hospital, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Chaibou, Maman Sani; Sanoussi, Samuila; Sani, Rachid; Toudou, Nouhou A; Daddy, Hadjara; Madougou, Moussa; Abdou, Idrissa; Abarchi, Habibou; Chobli, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the management of postoperative pain at the Niamey National Hospital. Methods A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care at the Niamey National Hospital from March to June, 2009. Data collected included age, sex, literacy, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, type of anesthesia, type of surgery, postoperative analgesics used, and the cost of analgesics. Three types of pain assessment scale were used depending on the patient’s ability to describe his or her pain: the verbal rating scale (VRS), the numerical rating scale (NRS), or the visual analog scale (VAS). Patients were evaluated during the first 48 hours following surgery. Results The sample included 553 patients. The VRS was used for the evaluation of 72% of patients, the NRS for 14.4%, and the VAS for 13.6%. Of the VRS group, 33.9%, 8.3%, and 2.1% rated their pain as 3 or 4 out of 4 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the NRS group, 33.8%, 8.8%, and 2.5% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the VAS group, 29.3%, 5.4%, and 0% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. Conclusion Postoperative pain assessment and management in developing countries has not been well described. Poverty, illiteracy, and inadequate training of physicians and other health personnel contribute to the underutilization of postoperative analgesia. Analysis of the results gathered at the Niamey National Hospital gives baseline data that can be the impetus to increase training in pain management and to establish standardized protocols. PMID:23271923

  20. The guard.me@UWindsor plan is a comprehensive insurance policy that is designed for University of Windsor's International students

    E-print Network

    , doctor or hospital visits, and for all claims information simply logon to www.guard.me/uwindsor/, select INFORMATION? Call the emergency assistance number located on the back of your ID Card. Multi-lingual help.guard.me/uwindsor/ select "My Claim" and follow the easy instructions. POLICY INFORMATION: Please see over for a Summary

  1. Biological aging and social characteristics: gerontology, the Baltimore city hospitals, and the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Wook

    2013-01-01

    The intramural gerontological research program in the National Institutes of Health underwent a substantial growth after its creation within the precincts of the Baltimore City Hospitals in 1940. This paper analyzes its development and the associated problems of its early years. Gerontologists aimed at improving the social and economic life of the elderly through scientific research. With this aim in mind, they conducted various investigations using the indigent aged patients of the Baltimore City Hospitals. Yet the scientists of aging, who hoped to eliminate negative social factors that might bias their research and heighten the confusion between pathology and aging per se, eventually stopped using these patients in the hospital as human subjects. Instead they sought educated affluent subjects in order to eliminate the impact of poverty. By doing so, however, they introduced a new source of social bias to their work, especially within the novel project begun in 1958, the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. This article thus examines the context of the development of gerontologists' research by analyzing their agenda, institutional environment, and research subjects in the 1940s and the 1950s. PMID:23229081

  2. Helper, Guard or Mediator? Teachers' Space for Action in "The Cultural Rucksack," a Norwegian National Program for Arts and Culture in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Arts encounters in schools are often portrayed as encounters between art/artists and children. However, in such encounters, teachers are most often involved. The study presented discusses teachers' experiences with and space for action within The Cultural Rucksack; a national program for arts and culture in Norwegian schools. Observations and…

  3. 45 CFR 60.12 - Information which hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Information which hospitals must request from the...Data Bank § 60.12 Information which hospitals must request from the...b) Failure to request information. Any hospital which does not...

  4. 45 CFR 60.17 - Information which hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Information which hospitals must request from the...Data Bank § 60.17 Information which hospitals must request from the...b) Failure to request information. Any hospital which does not...

  5. 45 CFR 60.12 - Information which hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Information which hospitals must request from the...Data Bank § 60.12 Information which hospitals must request from the...b) Failure to request information. Any hospital which does not...

  6. 45 CFR 60.12 - Information which hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Information which hospitals must request from the...Data Bank § 60.12 Information which hospitals must request from the...b) Failure to request information. Any hospital which does not...

  7. 45 CFR 60.17 - Information which hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Information which hospitals must request from the...Data Bank § 60.17 Information which hospitals must request from the...b) Failure to request information. Any hospital which does not...

  8. Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights at Uganda’s national referral hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kagoya, Harriet Rachel; Kibuule, Dan; Mitonga-Kabwebwe, Honoré; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Ssempebwa, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The realisation of patients’ rights in resource-constrained and patient-burdened public health care settings in Uganda remains an obstacle towards quality health care delivery, health care-seeking behaviour and health outcomes. Although the Uganda Patients’ Charter of 2009 empowers patients to demand quality care, inequitable access and abuse remain common. Aim The study aimed to assess level of awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights amongst patients and health workers (HWs) at Uganda’s national referral hospital, Mulago Hospital in Kampala. Methods A three-phase cross-sectional questionnaire-based descriptive survey was conducted amongst 211 patients, 98 HWs and 16 key informants using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods. The study was conducted in May–June 2012, 2.5 years after the launch of the Uganda Patients’ Charter. Results At least 36.5% of patients faced a challenge regarding their rights whilst seeking health care. Most of the patients (79%) who met a challenge never attempted to demand their rights. Most patients (81.5%) and HWs (69.4%) had never heard of the Uganda Patients’ Charter. Awareness of patients’ rights was significantly higher amongst HWs (70%) than patients (40%) (p < 0.01). Patients’ awareness was associated with education level (?2 = 42.4, p < 0.001), employment status (?2 = 33.6, p < 0.001) and hospital visits (?2 = 3.9, p = 0.048). For HWs it was associated with education level (?2 = 155.6, p < 0.001) and length of service (?2 = 154.5, p <0.001). Patients feel powerless to negotiate for their rights and fear being discriminated against based on their ability to bribe HWs with money to access care, and political, socio-economic and tribal status. Conclusion and recommendations Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights remains limited at Mulago Hospital. There is a need for urgent implementation of an integrated multilevel, multichannel, patient-centred approach that incorporates social services and addresses intrinsic patient, HW and health system factors to strengthen patients’ rights issues at the hospital. PMID:24563777

  9. A Scalable Multi-tier Architecture for the National Taiwan University Hospital Information System based on HL7 Standard

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. H. Yang; Po-hsun Cheng; C. H. Yang; Feipei Lai; Chuen-Liang Chen; H. H. Lee; K. P. Hsu; Chi-Huang Chen; C. T. Tan; Y. S. Sun

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the successful experiences of National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH) in moving from IBM Mainframe to connected networking computer systems. We use multi-tier architecture and HL7 standard to implement our new outpatient hospital information system (HIS). The NTUH HIS is a complex environment with several operating systems, databases, and information systems. We adopt service-oriented architecture (SOA) to reduce

  10. GALLERIES AND LIGHT MATCHINGS: FAT COOPERATIVE GUARDS

    E-print Network

    Urrutia, Jorge

    'Informatique Université du Québec ŕ Hull Hull, Québec and Ivan Rival and Jorge Urrutia Department of Computer Science MATCHINGS I. FAT COOPERATIVE GUARDS by Jurek Czyzowicz, Ivan Rival and Jorge Urrutia How many guards

  11. Dying in two acute hospitals: would usual care meet Australian national clinical standards?

    PubMed

    Clark, Katherine; Byfieldt, Naomi; Green, Malcolm; Saul, Peter; Lack, Jill; Philips, Jane L

    2014-05-01

    The Australian Commission for Quality and Safety in Health Care (ACQSHC) has articulated 10 clinical standards with the aim of improving the consistency of quality healthcare delivery. Currently, the majority of Australians die in acute hospitals. But despite this, no agreed standard of care exists to define the minimum standard of care that people should accept in the final hours to days of life. As a result, there is limited capacity to conduct audits that focus on the gap between current care and recommended care. There is, however, accumulating evidence in the end of life literature to define which aspects of care are likely to be considered most important to those people facing imminent death. These themes offer standards against which to conduct audits. This is very apt given the national recommendation that healthcare should be delivered in the context of considering people's wishes while always treating people with dignity and respect. PMID:24589365

  12. Evaluation of the Department of Neurosurgery of the Seoul National University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Neurosurgery (DNS) of the Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH), belongs to the largest and oldest such institutions in Korea. Because of its growing reputation it is hardly surprising that the DNS draws visitor and scholars for clinical education and academic exchange from far beyond Korea. I myself visited the SNUH in February and March 2013. During this time I composed this evaluation in which I compare the DNS to my home Department at the Johannes Gutenberg-University in Mainz/Germany, as well as the situation of Neurosurgery in Korea and Germany in general. In the first part this evaluation summarizes data concerning equipment, staff and organizational structure, as well as educational and scientific issues of the DNS. In the second part some issues of interest are discussed in special regard to the corresponding practices in Germany. PMID:23908698

  13. Guarded fragments with constants Balder ten Cate

    E-print Network

    Amsterdam, University of

    the guarded fragment to the loosely guarded fragment and showing that the latter is still decidable. Gr¨adel as guards, and subsequently proved the following: Theorem 1 (Gr¨adel [7]) The satisfiability problem no constants (function symbols of positive arity were already excluded). Furthermore, Gr¨adel suggests in his

  14. Some Correlates of Prison Guards' Beliefs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boas Shamir; Amos Drory

    1981-01-01

    The study investigates prison guards' beliefs concerning the prison, the prisoners, and their own. role and the relationships between these beliefs and other variables. Subjects came from four maximum security Israeli prisons (N = 370). Generally, guards' beliefs ate less punitive than could be expected from previous literature. A considerable variance in guards' beliefs is revealed. Three independent factors emerge

  15. Does hospital procedure-specific volume affect treatment costs? A national study of knee replacement surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, B; Culler, S D; Freund, D A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The long-run cost savings potential of private sector reform efforts, such as selective contracts with providers, depends in part on the relationship between procedure-specific volume and average hospital resources that are consumed in treating patients associated with that specific procedure. Study examines a model that estimates the relationship between hospital procedure-specific volume and average hospital treatment costs, using an elective surgical procedure as an example. DATA SOURCES: Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MedPAR) files for 1989 for hospitalizations in which a Medicare beneficiary received a knee replacement (KR) surgery during 1989. Hospital information was obtained from the American Hospital Association's 1989 Annual Survey. All patient-level data were aggregated to the hospital level to create a data file, with the hospital as the unit of observation. STUDY DESIGN: This study used administrative claims data and regression analysis to estimate the effect of hospital procedure-specific volume on average hospital treatment costs of patients receiving KR surgery. We also examined the stability of the volume-cost relationship across hospitals of different sizes. PRINCIPAL FINDING: The average treatment costs associated with KR surgery are inversely related to a hospital's KR volume in the regression equation estimated using all hospitals performing KR surgery. The inverse relationship between cost and volume is found to be robust for different-size hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: The potential cost savings associated with performing KR surgery at incrementally higher hospital volume level can amount to as much as 10 percent of the hospital's average treatment cost. However, the incremental cost savings associated with increased patient volume depends on the hospital's current volume level and its size. PMID:9685119

  16. 14. TURNOUT AND MASONRY GUARD WALL 1.5 MILES NORTH OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. TURNOUT AND MASONRY GUARD WALL 1.5 MILES NORTH OF TREE HOUSE SOUTH OF PIERCY, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING SW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  17. Regulation of Opioid Drugs in Thai Government Hospitals: Thailand National Survey 2012

    PubMed Central

    Thongkhamcharoen, Rojanasak; Phungrassami, Temsak; Atthakul, Narumol

    2014-01-01

    Context: Palliative care in Thailand was not well developed in the past. Previous studies showed that the actual prescription of opioids was underutilized in palliative care by physicians compared with the estimated opioid need of patients. However, there were no studies regarding the regulation of opioids in Thailand. Aims: To provide an up-to-date overview of the role of multidisciplinary teams in the regulation of opioids in Thai government hospitals. Settings and Design: A questionnaire survey study was conducted from January to April 2012. Materials and Methods: The questionnaire was distributed to entire population of government hospitals in Thailand and all private hospitals in Bangkok. There were 975 hospitals, including 93 private hospitals in Bangkok and 882 government hospitals. Statistical analysis used: Results are presented as a frequency and percentage. Results: Special opioid prescription forms must be signed by doctors for all opioid prescriptions. Three-fourths of hospitals totally prohibited prescribing oral opioids by palliative care Advance Practice Nurses. Pharmacists were permitted to correct the technical errors on a prescription of oral morphine only after notifying the prescribing doctor in nearly 60% of hospitals. In terminal patients who could not go to the hospitals, caregivers were permitted to collect the opioids on behalf of patients in nearly 80% of hospitals. Conclusion: Our results illustrate that the regulation of opioids in government hospitals is mainly dependent on physician judgment. Patients can only receive oral morphine at a hospital pharmacy. PMID:24600176

  18. Implementing smoking bans in American hospitals: results of a national survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel R Longo; Mary M Feldman; Robin L Kruse; Ross C Brownson; Gregory F Petroski; John E Hewett

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVESTo determine how well hospitals complied with the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) tobacco control standards, which required banning smoking in hospital buildings; to explore issues involved in developing and implementing smoking bans; and to ascertain the perceived success of the policies.DESIGNPostal survey conducted January through June 1994.PARTICIPANTSStratified random sample of American hospitals surveyed by JCAHO (n

  19. Hospitalization for Hypoglycemia in Japanese Diabetic Patients: A Retrospective Study Using a National Inpatient Database, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Sako, Akahito; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Goto, Atsushi; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to elucidate the epidemiology, patient demographics, and clinical outcomes of hospitalization for hypoglycemia in diabetic patients using a Japanese large-scale database.We conducted a retrospective study using a national inpatient database of acute care hospitals in Japan. Diabetic patients ages ?15 years with hypoglycemia as a main diagnosis for hospitalization were eligible. We estimated the annual number of hospitalizations in Japan and compared the annual admission rate by age and treatment groups. We also analyzed the association between patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality.Among 22.7 million discharge records from July 2008 and March 2013, a total of 25,071 patients were eligible. The mean age was 73.4 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 22.3?kg/m. The estimated annual hospitalization for hypoglycemia in Japan was ?20,000. Annual admission rates for hypoglycemia per 1000 diabetic patients and 1000 diabetic patients receiving insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents were 2.1 and 4.1, respectively. Patients <40 years and >70 years old were at a higher risk of hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was 3.8%, and risk factors associated with poor survival were male sex, older age, lower bed capacity, community hospital, low BMI, coma at admission, and higher Charlson Comorbidity Index.To prevent severe hypoglycemia that leads to death and complications, individualized and careful glycemic control are important, especially in very old or young patients and in those with comorbid conditions or low BMI. PMID:26107672

  20. Implementation Issues of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure and Its Case Study for a Physician's Round at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Kim, Taegi; Kim, Jon Soo; Baek, Rong-Min; Suh, Chang Suk; Chung, Chin Youb

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The cloud computing-based virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) allows access to computing environments with no limitations in terms of time or place such that it can permit the rapid establishment of a mobile hospital environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the empirical issues to be considered when establishing a virtual mobile environment using VDI technology in a hospital setting and to examine the utility of the technology with an Apple iPad during a physician's rounds as a case study. Methods Empirical implementation issues were derived from a 910-bed tertiary national university hospital that recently launched a VDI system. During the physicians' rounds, we surveyed patient satisfaction levels with the VDI-based mobile consultation service with the iPad and the relationship between these levels of satisfaction and hospital revisits, hospital recommendations, and the hospital brand image. Thirty-five inpatients (including their next-of-kin) and seven physicians participated in the survey. Results Implementation issues pertaining to the VDI system arose with regard to the highly availability system architecture, wireless network infrastructure, and screen resolution of the system. Other issues were related to privacy and security, mobile device management, and user education. When the system was used in rounds, patients and their next-of-kin expressed high satisfaction levels, and a positive relationship was noted as regards patients' decisions to revisit the hospital and whether the use of the VDI system improved the brand image of the hospital. Conclusions Mobile hospital environments have the potential to benefit both physicians and patients. The issues related to the implementation of VDI system discussed here should be examined in advance for its successful adoption and implementation. PMID:23346476

  1. There's No Other Hospital Like It U. S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health

    E-print Network

    Services university of the Health Sciences and the Department of Defense to find new ways to diagnoseThere's No Other Hospital Like It U. S. Department of Health and Human Services · National assessment of the needs of our institute colleagues so that the most appropriate, highest quality clinical

  2. Disability and Hospital Care Expenses among National Health Insurance Beneficiaries: Analyses of Population-Based Data in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Fu-Gong; Lin, Pei-Ying; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    Nationwide data were collected concerning inpatient care use and medical expenditure of people with disabilities (N = 937,944) among national health insurance beneficiaries in Taiwan. Data included gender, age, hospitalization frequency and expenditure, healthcare setting and service department, discharge diagnose disease according to the ICD-9-CM…

  3. Burns mortality and hospitalization time — a prospective statistical study of 352 patients in an Asian National Burn Centre

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. K. Wong; R. C. K. Ngim

    1995-01-01

    A prospective study of 352 patients in an Asian National Burn Centre has been used to develop statistical predictive models for mortality and hospitalization time. The patients are largely of Asian origin. Total burn surface area (% TBSA) and presence of respiratory burns are significant independent predictors of mortality in the multiple logistic regression analysis with an accuracy of 98.3

  4. A national study of the efficiency of hospitals in urban markets.

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Y A; Luke, R D

    1993-01-01

    Using a sample of 3,000 urban hospitals, this article examines the contributions of selected hospital characteristics to variations in hospital technical efficiencies, while it accounts for multiple products and inputs, and controls for local environmental variations. Four hospital characteristics are examined: hospital size, membership in a multihospital system, ownership, and payer mix (managed care contracts, percent Medicare, and percent Medicaid). Ownership and percent Medicare are consistently found to be related significantly to hospital efficiency. Within the ownership variable, government hospitals tend to be more efficient and for-profit hospitals less efficient than other hospitals. Higher percentages of Medicare payment are negatively related to efficiency. While not consistently significant across all five of the MSA size categories in which the analyses are conducted, possession of managed care contracts, membership in a multihospital system, and size all are consistently related positively to hospital technical efficiency. These variables are also all significant when the hospitals are examined in a combined analysis. Percent Medicaid was not significant in any of the analyses. Implications for policy and the need for methodological work are discussed. PMID:8428810

  5. The evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Canadian hospitals: 5 years of national surveillance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew E. Simor; Marianna Ofner-Agostini; Elizabeth Bryce; Karen Green; Allison McGeer; Michael Mulvey; Shirley Paton

    Background: To better understand the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphy- lococcus aureus (MRSA) in Canadian hospitals, surveillance has been con- ducted in sentinel hospitals across the country since 1995. We report the results of the first 5 years of the program. Methods: For each newly identified inpatient with MRSA, medical records were re- viewed for demographic and clinical data. Isolates were

  6. Framing in policy processes: a case study from hospital planning in the National Health Service in England.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lorelei; Exworthy, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports from an ethnographic study of hospital planning in England undertaken between 2006 and 2009. We explored how a policy to centralise hospital services was espoused in national policy documents, how this shifted over time and how it was translated in practice. We found that policy texts defined hospital planning as a clinical issue and framed decisions to close hospitals or hospital departments as based on the evidence and necessary to ensure safety. We interpreted this framing as a rhetorical strategy for implementing organisational change in the context of community resistance to service closure and a concomitant policy emphasising the importance of public and patient involvement in planning. Although the persuasive power of the framing was limited, a more insidious form of power was identified in the way the framing disguised the political nature of the issue by defining it as a clinical problem. We conclude by discussing how the clinical rationale constrains public participation in decisions about the delivery and organisation of healthcare and restricts the extent to which alternative courses of action can be considered. PMID:25461877

  7. Introduction of a qualitative perinatal audit at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kidanto, Hussein L; Mogren, Ingrid; van Roosmalen, Jos; Thomas, Angela N; Massawe, Siriel N; Nystrom, Lennarth; Lindmark, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    Background Perinatal death is a devastating experience for the mother and of concern in clinical practice. Regular perinatal audit may identify suboptimal care related to perinatal deaths and thus appropriate measures for its reduction. The aim of this study was to perform a qualitative perinatal audit of intrapartum and early neonatal deaths and propose means of reducing the perinatal mortality rate (PMR). Methods From 1st August, 2007 to 31st December, 2007 we conducted an audit of perinatal deaths (n = 133) with birth weight 1500 g or more at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH). The audit was done by three obstetricians, two external and one internal auditors. Each auditor independently evaluated the cases narratives. Suboptimal factors were identified in the antepartum, intrapartum and early neonatal period and classified into three levels of delay (community, infrastructure and health care). The contribution of each suboptimal factor to adverse perinatal outcome was identified and the case graded according to possible avoidability. Degree of agreement between auditors was assessed by the kappa coefficient. Results The PMR was 92 per 1000 total births. Suboptimal factors were identified in 80% of audited cases and half of suboptimal factors were found to be the likely cause of adverse perinatal outcome and were preventable. Poor foetal heart monitoring during labour was indirectly associated with over 40% of perinatal death. There was a poor to fair agreement between external and internal auditors. Conclusion There are significant areas of care that need improvement. Poor monitoring during labour was a major cause of avoidable perinatal mortality. This type of audit was a good starting point for quality assurance at MNH. Regular perinatal audits to identify avoidable causes of perinatal deaths with feed back to the staff may be a useful strategy to reduce perinatal mortality. PMID:19765312

  8. Guards, Galleries, Fortresses, and the Octoplex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, T. S.

    2011-01-01

    The art gallery problem asks for the maximum number of stationary guards required to protect the interior of a polygonal art gallery with "n" walls. This article explores solutions to this problem and several of its variants. In addition, some unsolved problems involving the guarding of geometric objects are presented.

  9. Systems Engineering of Coast Guard Aviator Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Eugene R.; Caro, Paul W.

    This paper describes a total-program application of the systems engineering concept of the U.S. Coast Guard aviation training programs. The systems approach used treats all aspects of the training to produce the most cost-effective integration of academic, synthetic, and flight training for the production of graduate Coast Guard aviators. The…

  10. Chlorophyll and Photosynthesis in Stomatal Guard Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. W. Yemm; A. J. Willis

    1954-01-01

    INVESTIGATIONS in this laboratory carried out by different techniques from those of Shaw and MacLachlan give direct support to their recent statements1 with regard to the presence of chlorophyll in stomatal guard cells and the ability of these cells to assimilate carbon dioxide by photosynthesis. Measurements of light absorption made on intact plastids in the living guard cells of leaves

  11. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35 Section 173...Numbering § 173.35 Coast Guard validation sticker. No person may operate...by the Coast Guard unless it has the validation sticker issued with the...

  12. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35 Section 173...Numbering § 173.35 Coast Guard validation sticker. No person may operate...by the Coast Guard unless it has the validation sticker issued with the...

  13. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35 Section 173...Numbering § 173.35 Coast Guard validation sticker. No person may operate...by the Coast Guard unless it has the validation sticker issued with the...

  14. 75 FR 79956 - Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 53 [USCG-2009-0239] RIN 1625-AB33 Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Direct final rule; request for...

  15. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...in full color is described as follows: White anchors and white ring all outlined in medium blue (Coast Guard blue), letters and numerals medium blue (Coast Guard blue), white area within ring, shield with medium blue (Coast Guard...

  16. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...in full color is described as follows: White anchors and white ring all outlined in medium blue (Coast Guard blue), letters and numerals medium blue (Coast Guard blue), white area within ring, shield with medium blue (Coast Guard...

  17. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...in full color is described as follows: White anchors and white ring all outlined in medium blue (Coast Guard blue), letters and numerals medium blue (Coast Guard blue), white area within ring, shield with medium blue (Coast Guard...

  18. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...in full color is described as follows: White anchors and white ring all outlined in medium blue (Coast Guard blue), letters and numerals medium blue (Coast Guard blue), white area within ring, shield with medium blue (Coast Guard...

  19. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...in full color is described as follows: White anchors and white ring all outlined in medium blue (Coast Guard blue), letters and numerals medium blue (Coast Guard blue), white area within ring, shield with medium blue (Coast Guard...

  20. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Provisions § 64.33 Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  1. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast...

  2. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where...

  3. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13...Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  4. 33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  5. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15...Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  6. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  7. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  8. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard address. The report...

  9. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  10. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...State § 66.01-15 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  11. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...services; critical access hospitals; or clinic, rehabilitation agency, or public health agency providers of outpatient physical therapy, occupational therapy or speech pathology services may provide reasonable assurance to CMS that it requires the...

  12. Hospital staffing, organization, and quality of care: Cross-national findings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda H. Aiken; Sean P. Clarke; Douglas M. Sloane

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of nurse staffing and organizational support for nursing care on nurses' dissatisfaction with their jobs, nurse burnout, and nurse reports of quality of patient care in an international sample of hospitals. Design: Multisite cross-sectional survey Setting: Adult acute-care hospitals in the U.S. (Pennsylvania), Canada (Ontario and British Columbia), England and Scotland. Study Participants: 10319 nurses

  13. 2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building (Building 90), administration and clinical hospital building (Building 88), and hospital building (Building 91) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, 4101 South Fourth Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  14. Thermal design of a miniature guarded hot plate apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, D.R.; Gorthala, R. [DRF R and D, Inc., Millwood, VA (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Under contract from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the authors have developed a prototype design for a miniature guarded hot plate apparatus that can be used to determine the thermal resistance of very small specimens (1 to 3 cm square) of thermal insulation materials at temperatures from {minus}40 C to + 100 C, with the capability to carry out measurements in air, selected gases, or vacuum. The overall design approach for this apparatus has been published previously. In the present paper, the authors provide details concerning the thermal design of the apparatus, including discussions of heater designs to promote temperature uniformity of the hot plate, guard designs to control extraneous heat gains and losses, material selection for the components of the apparatus, and techniques for temperature measurements.

  15. Influenza in Outpatient ILI Case-Patients in National Hospital-Based Surveillance, Bangladesh, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Rashid Uz; Alamgir, A. S. M.; Rahman, Mustafizur; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Gurley, Emily S.; Sharker, M. Abu Yushuf; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Azim, Tasnim; Fry, Alicia M.; Lindstrom, Stephen; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Xu, Xiyan; Garten, Rebecca J.; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Khan, Salah Uddin; Faruque, Labib Imran; Ameer, Syeda Shegufta; Klimov, Alexander I.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent population-based estimates in a Dhaka low-income community suggest that influenza was prevalent among children. To explore the epidemiology and seasonality of influenza throughout the country and among all age groups, we established nationally representative hospital-based surveillance necessary to guide influenza prevention and control efforts. Methodolgy/Principal Findings We conducted influenza-like illness and severe acute respiratory illness sentinel surveillance in 12 hospitals across Bangladesh during May 2007–December 2008. We collected specimens from 3,699 patients, 385 (10%) which were influenza positive by real time RT-PCR. Among the sample-positive patients, 192 (51%) were type A and 188 (49%) were type B. Hemagglutinin subtyping of type A viruses detected 137 (71%) A/H1 and 55 (29%) A/H3, but no A/H5 or other novel influenza strains. The frequency of influenza cases was highest among children aged under 5 years (44%), while the proportions of laboratory confirmed cases was highest among participants aged 11–15 (18%). We applied kriging, a geo-statistical technique, to explore the spatial and temporal spread of influenza and found that, during 2008, influenza was first identified in large port cities and then gradually spread to other parts of the country. We identified a distinct influenza peak during the rainy season (May–September). Conclusions/Significance Our surveillance data confirms that influenza is prevalent throughout Bangladesh, affecting a wide range of ages and causing considerable morbidity and hospital care. A unimodal influenza seasonality may allow Bangladesh to time annual influenza prevention messages and vaccination campaigns to reduce the national influenza burden. To scale-up such national interventions, we need to quantify the national rates of influenza and the economic burden associated with this disease through further studies. PMID:20041114

  16. Hospital contacts with infection and risk of schizophrenia: a population-based cohort study with linkage of Danish national registers.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Philip R; Benros, Michael E; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-11-01

    Infections and immune responses have been suggested to play an important role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Several studies have reported associations between maternal infections during pregnancy and the child's risk of schizophrenia; however, infection during childhood and adolescence unrelated to maternal infection during pregnancy has not been studied to nearly the same extent and the results are far from conclusive. Data were drawn from 2 population-based registers, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and the Danish National Hospital Register. We used a historical population-based cohort design and selected all individuals born in Denmark between 1981 and 1996 (n = 843 390). We identified all individuals with a first-time hospital contact with schizophrenia from 1991 through 2010. Out of the 3409 individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, a total of 1549 individuals had had a hospital contact with infection before their schizophrenia diagnosis (45%). Our results indicate that individuals who have had a hospital contact with infection are more likely to develop schizophrenia (relative risk [RR] = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.32-1.51) than individuals who had not had such a hospital contact. Bacterial infection was the type of infection that was associated with the highest risk of schizophrenia (RR = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.47-1.82). Our study does not exclude that a certain type of infection may have a specific effect; yet, it does suggest that schizophrenia is associated with a wide range of infections. This association may be due to inflammatory responses affecting the brain or genetic and environmental risk factors aggregating in families. PMID:24379444

  17. The development of a national surveillance system for monitoring blood use and inventory levels at sentinel hospitals in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y A; Kim, H H; Joung, U S; Kim, C Y; Shin, Y H; Lee, S W; Kim, H J

    2010-04-01

    We developed a web-based program for a national surveillance system to determine baseline data regarding the supply and demand of blood products at sentinel hospitals in South Korea. Sentinel hospitals were invited to participate in a 1-month pilot-test. The data for receipts and exports of blood from each hospital information system were converted into comma-separated value files according to a specific conversion rule. The daily data from the sites could be transferred to the web-based program server using a semi-automated submission procedure: pressing a key allowed the program to automatically compute the blood inventory level as well as other indices including the minimal inventory ratio (MIR), ideal inventory ratio (IIR), supply index (SI) and utilisation index (UI). The national surveillance system was referred to as the Korean Blood Inventory Monitoring System (KBIMS) and the web-based program for KBIMS was referred to as the Blood Inventory Monitoring System (BMS). A total of 30 256 red blood cell (RBC) units were submitted as receipt data, however, only 83% of the receipt data were submitted to the BMS server as export data (25 093 RBC units). Median values were 2.67 for MIR, 1.08 for IIR, 1.00 for SI, 0.88 for UI and 5.33 for the ideal inventory day. The BMS program was easy to use and is expected to provide a useful tool for monitoring hospital inventory levels. This information will provide baseline data regarding the supply and demand of blood products in South Korea. PMID:20015060

  18. Risk Factors for Violent Offending in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A National Study of Hospitalized Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langstrom, Niklas; Grann, Martin; Ruchkin, Vladislav; Sjostedt, Gabrielle; Fazel, Seena

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about risk factors for violence among individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study uses data from Swedish longitudinal registers for all 422 individuals hospitalized with autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome during 1988-2000 and compares those committing violent or sexual offenses with those who did not. Thirty-one…

  19. Monitoring and Reducing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections: A National Survey of State Hospital Associations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Murphy; Dale M. Needham; Christine Goeschel; Eddy Fan; Sara E. Cosgrove; Peter J. Pronovost

    2010-01-01

    Central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) acquired in health care institutions are common and costly. A novel monitoring and prevention program dramatically reduced CLABSIs across one state. The extent to which other states have adopted similar efforts is unknown. State hospital associations were surveyed regarding their efforts to address these infections. All 50 responding associations endorsed the importance of improving patient

  20. 77 FR 5463 - Safety Zones; Annually Recurring Marine Events in Coast Guard Southeastern New England Captain of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ...Search'' then click on the balloon shape in the ``Actions'' column...races, parades, swim events, air shows, and fireworks displays...6.2 RI National Guard Air Event Type: Air Show. Show. Date: One...

  1. 5. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard Official Photograph, 12th Coast Guard District, San Francisco. 1960. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. The U.S. Coast Guard Academy Curricula; An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Theodore R.; And Others

    This report presents the results of research that had as its objective the evaluation of the curricula of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Over 125 Coast Guard officers and men were interviewed to gather detailed background information about the Coast Guard, the Coast Guard Academy, and job requirements of Academy graduates. These data were developed…

  3. 16 CFR 1511.3 - Guard or shield requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Guard or shield requirements. 1511.3 Section 1511...FOR PACIFIERS § 1511.3 Guard or shield requirements. (a) Performance requirements...pacifiers with non-circular guards or shields, align the major axis of the guard...

  4. 16 CFR 1511.3 - Guard or shield requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guard or shield requirements. 1511.3 Section 1511...FOR PACIFIERS § 1511.3 Guard or shield requirements. (a) Performance requirements...pacifiers with non-circular guards or shields, align the major axis of the guard...

  5. 16 CFR 1511.3 - Guard or shield requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Guard or shield requirements. 1511.3 Section 1511...FOR PACIFIERS § 1511.3 Guard or shield requirements. (a) Performance requirements...pacifiers with non-circular guards or shields, align the major axis of the guard...

  6. Stomatal Patterning and Guard Cell Differentiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keiko U. Torii

    Gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere takes place through stomata (singular,\\u000a stoma), which are microscopic valves on the plant epidermis composed of paired guard cells. Stomatal differentiation\\u000a involves a series of asymmetric divisions of precursor cells followed by a single symmetric cell\\u000a division that produces terminally differentiated guard cell pairs. Stomatal development emerged as a model\\u000a system to study how environmental- and

  7. Reduction Mammoplasty in a Developing Country: A 10-year Review (2001-2010) at the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu

    PubMed Central

    Isiguzo, Chimaobi; Ogbonnaya, Sunday Iheuko; Udezue, Anthonia O

    2015-01-01

    Context: Large breast is a major problem because of associated symptomatology and aesthetic concerns. Reduction mammoplasty (RM) resolves the symptom and at the same time improves the aesthetic appearance of the breast, hence improving self-esteem and social integration. Aims: To describe the pattern of RM in a hospital in the developing world and its impact on postgraduate surgical training. Settings and Design: A retrospective review of all the RMs done in the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu (a major plastic surgery training center in Nigeria) over a ten-year period (2001–2010), in the developing country of Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: All RMs done in the hospital were reviewed after retrieving their records from operation register and medical records department. Fifteen (15) cases were retrieved and analyzed. Data Analysis: Data was analyzed with Microsoft excel 2007. Results: Average age of female patients who had RM was 26.5 years and 83.3% were single. The most common complaint was abnormally large breast (macromastia). Inferior pedicle technique was commonly used. Conclusions: The results of RM are remarkable as it impact positively on the quality of life of the patients. However, the level of awareness about the availability of this service is still low in the region as shown by few cases done over the period of review and this impacts negatively on the training. The need for public awareness cannot be overemphasized. PMID:25838761

  8. Trends in the incidence and treatment of necrotizing soft tissue infections: an analysis of the National Hospital Discharge Survey.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Ali M; Best, Matthew J; Francis, Cameron S; Allan, Bassan J; Askari, Morad; Panthaki, Zubin J

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections are a rare but potentially fatal condition of the soft tissues caused by virulent, toxin-producing bacteria. In the United States, there is an estimated annual incidence of 0.04 cases per 1000 annually, but previous estimates of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had the incidence at 500 to 1500 cases yearly. Early reports of mortality were variable with rates ranging from 46 to 76% but outcomes have been improving over time. The National Hospital Discharge Survey was analyzed to study current trends in the demographics, incidence, use, and mortality of patients diagnosed with necrotizing soft tissue infections. The authors analyzed the 1999, 2002, and 2007 National Hospital Discharge Survey by using a sampling weighting method. A total of 13,648 cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections were identified in 2007. This represents an increase from 12,153 cases in 2002 and 6612 cases in 1999. In the 9 years from 1999 to 2007 the gross incidence of necrotizing soft tissue infections more than doubled. Hospital stay was essentially unchanged within study years, at 16 days. Mean age increased from approximately 50 years in 1999 to 54 years in 2007. Further, mortality went from 10.45% in 1999 to 9.75% in the 2007 survey. The population-adjusted incidence rate increased 91% in the studied years. Rising use of immunosupression, exponential growth in the incidence of obesity, and type 2 diabetes could be a major contributing factor. The mortality rate is far below the rate in reports published from as early as 20 years ago, and at 9.75% compares with modern case series, but is a more accurate measure of mortality in this condition. PMID:25144805

  9. A Resolution Decision Procedure for the Guarded Fragment with Transitive Guards

    E-print Network

    Kazakov, Yevgeny

    ) containing all free variables of F . The guarded fragment is decidable in 2EXPTIME (Gradel 1999 introduced by van Benthem (1997) to capture the until operator in temporal logics; Gradel & Walukiewicz be safely integrated into the guarded fragment was answered negatively by Gradel (1999). He proved

  10. A Resolution Decision Procedure for the Guarded Fragment with Transitive Guards

    E-print Network

    Kazakov, Yevgeny

    ) containing all free variables of F. The guarded fragment is decidable in 2EXPTIME (Gr¨adel 1999) and inherits introduced by van Benthem (1997) to capture the until operator in temporal logics; Gr¨adel & Walukiewicz be safely integrated into the guarded fragment was answered negatively by Gr¨adel (1999). He proved

  11. GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S82 Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, GuardWatch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S82 - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, On ridge above Tunnel CE-1, on Prime Road on ridge above Tunnel B-11, & on ridge above Tunnel C-17, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S84 Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, GuardWatch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S84 - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, On ridge above Tunnel CE-1, on Prime Road on ridge above Tunnel B-11, & on ridge above Tunnel C-17, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S68 Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, GuardWatch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S68 - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, On ridge above Tunnel C-11, on Prime Road on ridge above Tunnel B-5, & on ridge above Tunnel D-14, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Sleeping and working hours of residents at a national university hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Taoda, Kazushi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kitahara, Teruyo; Nishiyama, Katsuo

    2008-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the status of time spent working and sleeping by resident doctors before the introduction of the New Training System for Residents in Japan. A time-budget survey was conducted over a 4-wk period on 102 residents at the Shiga University of Medical Science Hospital, and the response rate among residents was 76% of a total of 2,722 person-days. The average number of hours spent sleeping was the lowest and spent in the hospital including commuting time was the highest in residents of the surgery department, at 4.4 h and 18.9 h, respectively. Forty percent of residents reported dozing off at work, with the incidence rate being highest in residents of the surgery department (0.7 times/person-day). Dozing appeared to occur in response to the lack of sleep and fatigue, since the same residents slept longer on nights before days they reported not dozing off than on nights before days when they did doze off. Strong correlations were observed between the number of sleeping and working hours and between working hours and the number of patients in a resident's care. In order to maintain high standards of training and to get sufficient sleep it is therefore necessary for residents to manage their work and the number of patients in their care. PMID:19088411

  15. Social inequalities and women's satisfaction with childbirth care in Brazil: a national hospital-based survey.

    PubMed

    d'Orsi, Eleonora; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Diniz, Carmen Simone Grilo; Aguiar, Janaina Marques de; Gusman, Christine Ranier; Torres, Jacqueline Alves; Angulo-Tuesta, Antonia; Rattner, Daphne; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira

    2014-08-01

    The objective is to identify factors associated with women's satisfaction towards the care provided by the health professionals during hospital assisted delivery and identify how those factors influence their general levels of satisfaction. The cohort hospital based study was carried out in connection with the Birth in Brazil research. 15,688 women were included, interviewed at home, through the phone, from March 2011 to February 2012. All the variables that compose the professional/pregnant woman relationship (waiting time, respect, privacy, clarity of explanations, possibility of asking questions and participating in the decisions) and schooling remained independently associated with general satisfaction towards delivery care, in the adjusted model. The white women assisted in the southeastern and southern regions of the country, by the private sector and with a companion present gave a better evaluation of the care provided. Women value the way in which they are assisted by the health professionals, and there are inequalities in the way they are treated based on skin color, geographic region and financial situation. PMID:25167175

  16. The national database of hospital-based cancer registries: a nationwide infrastructure to support evidence-based cancer care and cancer control policy in Japan.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Takahiro; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Shibata, Akiko; Emori, Yoshiko; Nishimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the current status of cancer care is essential for effective cancer control and high-quality cancer care. To address the information needs of patients and physicians in Japan, hospital-based cancer registries are operated in 397 hospitals designated as cancer care hospitals by the national government. These hospitals collect information on all cancer cases encountered in each hospital according to precisely defined coding rules. The Center for Cancer Control and Information Services at the National Cancer Center supports the management of the hospital-based cancer registry by providing training for tumor registrars and by developing and maintaining the standard software and continuing communication, which includes mailing lists, a customizable web site and site visits. Data from the cancer care hospitals are submitted annually to the Center, compiled, and distributed as the National Cancer Statistics Report. The report reveals the national profiles of patient characteristics, route to discovery, stage distribution, and first-course treatments of the five major cancers in Japan. A system designed to follow up on patient survival will soon be established. Findings from the analyses will reveal characteristics of designated cancer care hospitals nationwide and will show how characteristics of patients with cancer in Japan differ from those of patients with cancer in other countries. The database will provide an infrastructure for future clinical and health services research and will support quality measurement and improvement of cancer care. Researchers and policy-makers in Japan are encouraged to take advantage of this powerful tool to enhance cancer control and their clinical practice. PMID:23448800

  17. Risk factors for violent offending in autism spectrum disorder: a national study of hospitalized individuals.

    PubMed

    Lĺngström, Niklas; Grann, Martin; Ruchkin, Vladislav; Sjöstedt, Gabrielle; Fazel, Seena

    2009-08-01

    Little is known about risk factors for violence among individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study uses data from Swedish longitudinal registers for all 422 individuals hospitalized with autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome during 1988-2000 and compares those committing violent or sexual offenses with those who did not. Thirty-one individuals with ASD (7%) were convicted of violent nonsexual crimes and two of sexual offenses. Violent individuals with ASD are more often male and diagnosed with Asperger syndrome rather than autistic disorder. Furthermore, comorbid psychotic and substance use disorders are associated with violent offending. We conclude that violent offending in ASD is related to similar co-occurring psychopathology as previously found among violent individuals without ASD. Although this study does not answer whether ASDs are associated with increased risk of violent offending compared with the general population, careful risk assessment and management may be indicated for some individuals with Asperger syndrome. PMID:18701743

  18. Compliance with the National Palestinian Infection Prevention and Control Protocol at Governmental Paediatric Hospitals in Gaza Governorates

    PubMed Central

    Eljedi, Ashraf; Dalo, Shareef

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Nosocomial infections are a significant burden for both patients and the healthcare system. For this reason, infection prevention and control (IPC) practices are extremely important. The Palestinian Ministry of Health adopted the national IPC Protocol in 2004. This study aimed to assess the compliance of healthcare providers (HCPs) with the Protocol in three governmental paediatric hospitals in Gaza governorates. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from February to November 2010. Data were collected from a sample of doctors, nurses and physiotherapists (N = 334) using a self-administered questionnaire and observation checklists to record HCP practices and assess the hospital environment. Results: The response rate was 92%. The most important reasons for non-compliance with the IPC Protocol were the absence of an education programme (61.5%), lack of knowledge (52.4%) and the scarcity of required supplies (46.9%). Only 2.3% of respondents had a copy of the IPC Protocol, while 65.8% did not know of its existence. Only 16.9% had participated in training sessions regarding general IPC practices. The observation checklist regarding HCP practices revealed low levels of compliance in hand washing (45.9%), wearing gloves (40.7%) and using antiseptics/disinfectants (49.16%). The health facilities checklist indicated that there was a lack of certain essential equipment and materials, such as covered waste containers and heavy-duty gloves. Conclusion: Due to the lack of HPC knowledge, the authors recommend that the IPC Protocol be made available in all hospitals. In addition, a qualified team should implement intensive IPC education and training programmes and facilities should provide the required equipment and materials. PMID:25097774

  19. Peer mentors, mobile phone and pills: collective monitoring and adherence in Kenyatta National Hospital's HIV treatment programme

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Kenyan state joined the international commitment to make antiretroviral treatment free in public health institutions to people infected with HIV. Less than a decade later, treatment has reached over 60% of those who need it in Kenya. This paper, which is based on an in-depth ethnographic case study of the HIV treatment programme at Kenyatta National Hospital, conducted intermittently between 2008 and 2014, examines how HIV-positive peer mentors encourage and track adherence to treatment regimens within and beyond the clinic walls using mobile phones and computer technology. This research into the everyday practices of patient monitoring demonstrates that both surveillance and adherence are collective activities. Peer mentors provide counselling services, follow up people who stray from treatment regimens, and perform a range of other tasks related to patient management and treatment adherence. Despite peer mentors’ involvement in many tasks key to encouraging optimal adherence, their role is rarely acknowledged by co-workers, hospital administrators, or public health officials. Following a biomedical paradigm, adherence at Kenyatta and in Kenya is framed by programme administrators as something individual clients must do and for which they must be held accountable. This framing simultaneously conceals the sociality of adherence and undervalues the work of peer mentors in treatment programmes. PMID:25175291

  20. Predictors of unfavorable outcomes following deep brain stimulation for movement disorders and the effect of hospital case volume on outcomes: an analysis of 33, 642 patients across 234 US hospitals using the National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample from 2002 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Kalakoti, Piyush; Ahmed, Osama; Bollam, Papireddy; Missios, Symeon; Wilden, Jessica; Nanda, Anil

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT With limited data available on association of risk factors and effect of hospital case volume on outcomes following deep brain stimulation (DBS), the authors attempted to identify these associations using a large population-based database. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who underwent DBS for 3 primary movement disorders: Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia from 2002 to 2011 using the National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. Using national estimates, the authors identified associations of patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and hospital characteristics on short-term postoperative outcomes following DBS. Additionally, effect of hospital volume on unfavorable outcomes was investigated. RESULTS Overall, 33, 642 patients underwent DBS for 3 primary movement disorders across 234 hospitals in the US. The mean age of the cohort was 63.42 ± 11.31 years and 36% of patients were female. The inpatients' postoperative risks were 5.9% for unfavorable discharge, 10.2% for prolonged length of stay, 14.6% for high-end hospital charges, 0.5% for wound complications, 0.4% for cardiac complications, 1.8% for venous thromboembolism, and 5.5% for neurological complications, including those arising from an implanted nervous system device. Compared with low-volume centers, odds of having an unfavorable discharge, prolonged LOS, high-end hospital charges, wound, and cardiac complications were significantly lower in the high-volume and medium-volume centers. CONCLUSIONS The authors' study provides individualized estimates of the risks of postoperative complications based on patient demographics and comorbidities and hospital characteristics, which could potentially be used as an adjunct for risk stratification for patients undergoing DBS. PMID:26030704

  1. An analysis of guard cell motion 

    E-print Network

    Wu, Hsin-i

    1977-01-01

    AN ANALYSIS OF GUARD CELL MOTION A Thesis by BSIN-I WU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December, 1977 Ma]or Sub]ect: Industrial... Engineering AN ANALYSIS OF GUARD CELL MOTION A Thesis by HSIN-I WU Approved as to style and content by: L. Curry (I. En. ) Newton C. Ellis (I. En. ) c' eter J. H. Sharpe (B. E. ) Dar d J. Ha tfiel (Math) December 1977 I &'(2(i& R) ABSTRACT...

  2. Classification of patients based on their evaluation of hospital outcomes: cluster analysis following a national survey in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A general trend towards positive patient-reported evaluations of hospitals could be taken as a sign that most patients form a homogeneous, reasonably pleased group, and consequently that there is little need for quality improvement. The objective of this study was to explore this assumption by identifying and statistically validating clusters of patients based on their evaluation of outcomes related to overall satisfaction, malpractice and benefit of treatment. Methods Data were collected using a national patient-experience survey of 61 hospitals in the 4 health regions in Norway during spring 2011. Postal questionnaires were mailed to 23,420 patients after their discharge from hospital. Cluster analysis was performed to identify response clusters of patients, based on their responses to single items about overall patient satisfaction, benefit of treatment and perception of malpractice. Results Cluster analysis identified six response groups, including one cluster with systematically poorer evaluation across outcomes (18.5% of patients) and one small outlier group (5.3%) with very poor scores across all outcomes. One-Way ANOVA with post-hoc tests showed that most differences between the six response groups on the three outcome items were significant. The response groups were significantly associated with nine patient-experience indicators (p?hospitals. More research on patient clustering in patient evaluation is needed, as well as standardization of methodology to increase comparability across studies. PMID:23433450

  3. 13. MASONRY GUARD WALL AND CONCRETE CRIBBING. ROAD VIEW 1.5 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. MASONRY GUARD WALL AND CONCRETE CRIBBING. ROAD VIEW 1.5 MILES NORTH OF TREE HOUSE. SOUTH OF PIERCY, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING SE. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  4. Smoking behaviour predicts tobacco control attitudes in a high smoking prevalence hospital: A cross-sectional study in a Portuguese teaching hospital prior to the national smoking ban

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have investigated attitudes to and compliance with smoking bans, but few have been conducted in healthcare settings and none in such a setting in Portugal. Portugal is of particular interest because the current ban is not in line with World Health Organization recommendations for a "100% smoke-free" policy. In November 2007, a Portuguese teaching-hospital surveyed smoking behaviour and tobacco control (TC) attitudes before the national ban came into force in January 2008. Methods Questionnaire-based cross-sectional study, including all eligible staff. Sample: 52.9% of the 1, 112 staff; mean age 38.3 ± 9.9 years; 65.9% females. Smoking behaviour and TC attitudes and beliefs were the main outcomes. Bivariable analyses were conducted using chi-squared and MacNemar tests to compare categorical variables and Mann-Whitney tests to compare medians. Multilogistic regression (MLR) was performed to identify factors associated with smoking status and TC attitudes. Results Smoking prevalence was 40.5% (95% CI: 33.6-47.4) in males, 23.5% (95% CI: 19.2-27.8) in females (p < 0.001); 43.2% in auxiliaries, 26.1% in nurses, 18.9% among physicians, and 34.7% among other non-health professionals (p = 0.024). The findings showed a very high level of agreement with smoking bans, even among smokers, despite the fact that 70.3% of the smokers smoked on the premises and 76% of staff reported being frequently exposed to second-hand smoke (SHS). In addition 42.8% reported that SHS was unpleasant and 28.3% admitted complaining. MLR showed that smoking behaviour was the most important predictor of TC attitudes. Conclusions Smoking prevalence was high, especially among the lower socio-economic groups. The findings showed a very high level of support for smoking bans, despite the pro-smoking environment. Most staff reported passive behaviour, despite high SHS exposure. This and the high smoking prevalence may contribute to low compliance with the ban and low participation on smoking cessation activities. Smoking behaviour had greater influence in TC attitudes than health professionals' education. Our study is the first in Portugal to identify potential predictors of non-compliance with the partial smoking ban, further emphasising the need for a 100% smoke-free policy, effective enforcement and public health education to ensure compliance and promote social norm change. PMID:21943400

  5. 1. GUARD RESIDENCE, GARAGE, NORTHWEST FRONT AND NORTHEAST SIDE LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GUARD RESIDENCE, GARAGE, NORTHWEST FRONT AND NORTHEAST SIDE LOOKING SOUTH - Union Ranger District Compound, Garage-Guard Residence, Fronting State Highway 203, at West edge of Union, Union, Union County, OR

  6. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

  7. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

  8. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

  9. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

  10. 33 CFR 142.87 - Guarding of deck openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guarding of deck openings. 142.87 Section 142.87 Navigation and...Workplace Conditions § 142.87 Guarding of deck openings. Openings in decks accessible to personnel must be...

  11. 30 CFR 57.14112 - Construction and maintenance of guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...14112 Construction and maintenance of guards. (a) Guards shall be constructed and maintained to— (1) Withstand the vibration, shock, and wear to which they will be subjected during normal operation; and (2) Not create a hazard by their...

  12. 30 CFR 56.14112 - Construction and maintenance of guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...14112 Construction and maintenance of guards. (a) Guards shall be constructed and maintained to— (1) Withstand the vibration, shock, and wear to which they will be subjected during normal operation; and (2) Not create a hazard by their...

  13. 46 CFR 64.37 - Valve and fitting guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards...fitting guard. Each valve and fitting must be protected from mechanical damage by— (a) The tank; (b) A tank saddle;...

  14. 46 CFR 64.37 - Valve and fitting guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards...fitting guard. Each valve and fitting must be protected from mechanical damage by— (a) The tank; (b) A tank saddle;...

  15. 46 CFR 64.37 - Valve and fitting guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards...fitting guard. Each valve and fitting must be protected from mechanical damage by— (a) The tank; (b) A tank saddle;...

  16. 16 CFR 1512.9 - Requirements for protective guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.9 Requirements...protective guards. (a) Chain guard. Bicycles having a single front sprocket...introduced from the chain side of the bicycle in any direction within 45° from a...

  17. S316, GUARD TOWER ON KOLEKOLE PASS RD. Naval Magazine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    S316, GUARD TOWER ON KOLEKOLE PASS RD. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, Off Dent Road & on Kolekole Road near north boundary of installation, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. S316, GUARD TOWER INTERIOR. Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    S316, GUARD TOWER INTERIOR. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, Off Dent Road & on Kolekole Road near north boundary of installation, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Double-blind evaluation of the DKL LifeGuard Model 2

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, D.W.; Spencer, F.W.; Spencer, D.D.

    1998-05-01

    On March 20, 1998, Sandia National Laboratories performed a double-blind test of the DKL LifeGuard human presence detector and tracker. The test was designed to allow the device to search for individuals well within the product`s published operational parameters. The Test Operator of the DKL LifeGuard was provided by the manufacturer and was a high-ranking member of DKL management. The test was developed and implemented to verify the performance of the device as specified by the manufacturer. The device failed to meet its published specifications and it performed no better than random chance.

  20. Coast Guard's Response to Spilled Oil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ard, R. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The Coast Guard utilizes a number of monitoring detectors, sensors, and techniques to find, recover and identify oil spills. Discussed in this article are in-situ and airborne sensors, systems developed to provide clean-up capability such as air deployable anti-pollution transfer system (ADAPTS), and techniques which will determine the source of a…

  1. Schools Wrestle with Issue of Armed Guards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the March 21, 2005, shootings at Red Lake High School that brought to light an issue of whether school security personnel should be armed. Among the what-ifs being asked after the shootings at Red Lake High is one with uncomfortable implications for many school leaders: What if the two security guards posted near the…

  2. General Education at the Coast Guard Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, William A.

    In seeking the most effective presentation of the liberal arts in curricula such as the heavily technical and professional curricula at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, which leave little room for general education, general education course design must capture the imagination of students and motivate them for continuing self-education. Development of…

  3. Variations in U.S. Pediatric Burn Injury Hospitalizations Using the National Burn Repository Data

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, C. Bradley; Rivara, Frederick P.; Klein, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of population-specific variation in pediatric burn injuries is essential to the development of effective prevention strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine the etiology of pediatric burn injury considering age and race categories using the National Burn Repository. The authors reviewed the records of all pediatric patients (age <18 years) in the American Burn Association's National Burn Registry injured between 1995 and 2007. The authors compared patient and injury characteristics across race, age, etiology, and payor status. A total of 46,582 patients were included in this study. The etiology of burn injury varied by both age and race. Populations of color were younger, constituting 53.8% of patients younger than 5 years, whereas 53.9% of the total study population identified as Caucasian. Scald etiology was disproportionately less common in patients identifying as Caucasian (39.9 vs 61.4%, P <.001), and scald was a common etiology in older children identifying as African American, Asian, and Hispanic. Inhalation injuries were also higher in patients identifying as Native American (5.4%), Hispanic (4.2%), and African American (3.7%). Pediatric burn injury etiology varies with age and race. These data should encourage careful consideration of race, age, and other differences in formulating the most effective, population-specific prevention and outreach strategies. PMID:20628307

  4. Conditions triggering local incident reviews in UK hospital maternity units: A national survey

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Ahmed, Olaa; McClymont, Charlotte; Knight, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In countries, such as the UK, where maternal deaths are rare, reviews of other severe complications of pregnancy and the puerperium can provide an additional perspective to help learn lessons to improve future care. The objective of this survey was to identify the types of incidents which triggered local reviews in the UK, in order to inform national safety reporting guidance. Design A national descriptive survey. Setting UK. Participants Consultant-led maternity units. Main outcome measure Seventy-one per cent of maternity units provided an incident review trigger list. The conditions included were classified by two assessors. Incidents that were listed by at least 5% of maternity units were reported and compared with incidents recommended for review by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). Results The conditions covered were highly variable, although those recommended by the RCOG were most highly represented. The most commonly listed conditions that had not been recommended for review by the RCOG included inadequate staffing levels (70%), cardiac arrest (69%) and maternal sepsis (64%). Conclusions Substantial variation exists in the types of incident listed for review by maternity units in the UK. Importantly, some units are not reviewing cases of severe infective complications even though this is a current major concern. Future guidance concerning local serious incident review processes should include how the list of conditions triggering a review should be managed in the light of changing clinical and safety priorities. PMID:25057407

  5. What Prison Guards Think: A Profile of the Illinois Force

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James B. Jacobs

    1978-01-01

    This article examines the results of a survey conducted among 929 in- service Illinois prison guards between July 1974 and October 1975. A demographic profile of the Illinois guards reveals the age, race, education, experience, and cultural background of the force as a whole. Question naire data reveal the prison guards' attitudes toward their career, the nature of the job,

  6. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35 Section 173...Numbering § 173.35 Coast Guard validation sticker. No person may use a vessel...by the Coast Guard unless it has the validation sticker issued with the certificate...

  7. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35 Section 173...Numbering § 173.35 Coast Guard validation sticker. No person may use a vessel...by the Coast Guard unless it has the validation sticker issued with the certificate...

  8. USGS with U.S. and Canadian Coast Guard

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Waiting to board the Canadian helicopter from U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy and visit Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent. From left to right: USGS scientist Jonathan Childs, chief scientist for this expedition on Healy; U.S. Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Douglas Petrusa; Canadian Coas...

  9. 1. AERIAL VIEW TO WEST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW TO WEST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING ALL MAJOR BUILDINGS. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard, February 1962. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. 4. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard Official Photograph, 12th District, File No. 62751-22 A.S. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. 2. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING ALL MAJOR BUILDINGS. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard, February 1962. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. Family moves and depression among Coast Guard wives.

    PubMed

    McGarigal, Alyssa; Jablonski, Jessica; Ferri, Christine; Lester, David

    2009-12-01

    A comparison of 78 Coast Guard wives' and 30 firefighters' wives' scores on Zung's self-rating scale for depression showed no differences, but the Coast Guard wives had more often been prescribed antidepressants. Scores on a scale to assess the negative effects of moving were positively associated with current depression for the Coast Guard wives. PMID:20099556

  13. 46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 90.10-9 Section 90.10-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...This Subchapter § 90.10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  14. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Machine guarding. 50-204.5 Section 50-204...Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect...

  15. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Machine guarding. 50-204.5 Section 50-204...Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect...

  16. Parenteral analgesic and sedative use among ED patients in the United States: Combined results from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) 1992-1997

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark A. Hostetler; Peggy Auinger; Peter G. Szilagyi

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study was to describe parenteral analgesic and sedative (PAS) use among patients treated in US emergency departments (EDs). Data representing 6 consecutive years (1992-1997) from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) were combined and analyzed. Patients were identified as having received PAS if they received fentanyl, ketamine, meperidine, methohexital, midazolam, morphine, nitrous oxide, or

  17. Incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage: an Australian national hospital morbidity database analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Leon; Morgan, Michael Kerin

    2012-05-01

    Incidences of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in Australia have been reported in regional studies with variable rates. We investigated the national SAH rate and evaluated the trend over the 10 years from 1998 to 2008. The crude SAH incidence, not related to trauma or arteriovenous malformation, was estimated at 10.3 cases per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.2-10.4). Females have a higher incidence of SAH (12.5 cases per 100,000; 95% CI: 12.3-12.8) compared to males (8.0 cases per 100,000; 95% CI: 7.8-8.3), with age-adjusted incidence increases with increasing age for both sexes. Less than 10% of SAH occurred in the first three decades of life. The peak age group for patients to experience SAH was between 45 years and 64 years, accounting for almost 45% of the overall annual SAH admissions. Aneurysms located in the anterior circulation were a more common source of rupture compared to those located in the posterior circulation (rate ratio 3.9; 95% CI: 3.6-4.2). Contrary to contemporary observations in the literature, we did not observe a decline in the incidence of SAH during this specified study period. PMID:22326203

  18. Hypnotics and the Occurrence of Bone Fractures in Hospitalized Dementia Patients: A Matched Case-Control Study Using a National Inpatient Database

    PubMed Central

    Tamiya, Hiroyuki; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matusi, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Ogawa, Sumito; Akishita, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventing falls and bone fractures in hospital care is an important issue in geriatric medicine. Use of hypnotics is a potential risk factor for falls and bone fractures in older patients. However, data are lacking on the association between use of hypnotics and the occurrence of bone fracture. Methods We used a national inpatient database including 1,057 hospitals in Japan and included dementia patients aged 50 years or older who were hospitalized during a period of 12 months between April 2012 and March 2013. The primary outcome was the occurrence of bone fracture during hospitalization. Use of hypnotics was compared between patients with and without bone fracture in this matched case-control study. Results Of 140,494 patients, 830 patients suffered from in-hospital fracture. A 1:4 matching with age, sex and hospital created 817 cases with fracture and 3,158 matched patients without fracture. With adjustment for the Charlson comorbidity index, emergent admission, activities of daily living, and scores for level walking, a higher occurrence of fractures were seen with short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics (odds ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.19–1.73; P<0.001), ultrashort-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (1.66; 1.37–2.01; P<0.001), hydroxyzine (1.45; 1.15–1.82, P=0.001), risperidone and perospirone (1.37; 1.08–1.73; P=0.010). Other drug groups were not significantly associated with the occurrence of in-hospital fracture. Conclusions Short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics and ultrashort-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotics may increase risk of bone fracture in hospitalized dementia patients. PMID:26061231

  19. Compliance with a time-out procedure intended to prevent wrong surgery in hospitals: results of a national patient safety programme in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van Schoten, Steffie M; Kop, Veerle; de Blok, Carolien; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Groenewegen, Peter P; Wagner, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prevent wrong surgery, the WHO ‘Safe Surgery Checklist’ was introduced in 2008. The checklist comprises a time-out procedure (TOP): the final step before the start of the surgical procedure where the patient, surgical procedure and side/site are reviewed by the surgical team. The aim of this study is to evaluate the extent to which hospitals carry out the TOP before anaesthesia in the operating room, whether compliance has changed over time, and to determine factors that are associated with compliance. Design Evaluation study involving observations. Setting Operating rooms of 2 academic, 4 teaching and 12 general Dutch hospitals. Participants A random selection was made from all adult patients scheduled for elective surgery on the day of the observation, preferably involving different surgeons and different procedures. Results Mean compliance with the TOP was 71.3%. Large differences between hospitals were observed. No linear trend was found in compliance during the study period. Compliance at general and teaching hospitals was higher than at academic hospitals. Compliance decreased with the age of the patient, general surgery showed lower compliance in comparison with other specialties and compliance was higher when the team was focused on the TOP. Conclusions Large differences in compliance with the TOP were observed between participating hospitals which can be attributed at least in part to the type of hospital, surgical specialty and patient characteristics. Hospitals do not comply consistently with national guidelines to prevent wrong surgery and further implementation as well as further research into non-compliance is needed. PMID:24993761

  20. Relationship between mean daily ambient temperature range and hospital admissions for schizophrenia: Results from a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tzu-I; Chen, Mu-Jean; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Lung, Shih-Chun; Su, Huey-Jen

    2011-12-01

    Environmental temperature is known to correlate with schizophrenia, but little is known about the association with changes in temperature. This 12-year study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the mean daily range of ambient temperature and schizophrenia admissions in a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients in Taiwan. Meteorological data provided by the Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan were interpolated to create representative estimates. Psychiatric inpatient admissions in all hospitals with medical services enrolled in the current health care insurance system were retrieved from the 1996-2007 Psychiatric Inpatient Medical Claim dataset of the National Health Insurance Research Database. Generalized linear models with Poisson distributions were used to analyze the impact of mean diurnal change of temperature on schizophrenia admissions, controlling for internal correlations and demographic covariates. The daily temperature range varied between 1.7°C and 12.1°C (1st to 99th percentile). The relative risk of schizophrenia admission was significantly increased at a temperature range of 3.2°C (10th percentile), and the maximum was at 12.1°C (99th percentile); however, no such association was found with schizoaffective disorder. When restricted to the capital and largest city, the effects of temperature range were prominent and may correlate with temperature itself. The joint effect of temperature and temperature range was associated with elevated risk, particularly at cooler temperatures. A positive correlation was found between increasing temperature range and schizophrenia admissions. The increase in morbidity at high percentiles suggests that the increasing dynamics of temperature range are a valid reflection of risk, highlighting the need for precautionary action. PMID:22018962

  1. Hospitals on the path to accountable care: highlights from a 2011 national survey of hospital readiness to participate in an accountable care organization.

    PubMed

    Audet, Anne-Marie J; Kenward, Kevin; Patel, Shreya; Joshi, Maulik S

    2012-08-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are forming in communities across the country. In ACOs, health care providers take responsibility for a defined patient popu­lation, coordinate their care across settings, and are held jointly accountable for the quality and cost of care. This issue brief reports on results from a survey that assesses hospitals' readiness to participate in ACOs. Results show we are at the beginning of the ACO adop­tion curve. As of September 2011, only 13 percent of hospital respondents reported partici­pating in an ACO or planning to participate within a year, while 75 percent reported not considering participation at all. Survey results indicate that physician-led ACOs are the second most common governance model, far exceeding payer-led models, highlighting an encouraging paradigm shift away from acute care and toward primary care. Findings also point to significant gaps, including the infrastructure needed to take on financial risks and to manage population health. PMID:22928221

  2. Parallel Quality Assessment of Emergency Departments by European Foundation for Quality Management Model and Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    IMANI NASAB, Mohammad Hasan; MOHAGHEGH, Bahram; KHALESI, Nader; JAAFARIPOOYAN, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    Background European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model is a widely used quality management system (QMS) worldwide, including Iran. Current study aims to verify the quality assessment results of Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation (INPHE) based on those of EFQM. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 on a sample of emergency departments (EDs) affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Iran. The standard questionnaire of EFQM (V-2010) was used to gather appropriate data. The results were compared with those of INPHE. MS Excel was used to classify and display the findings. Results: The average assessment score of the EDs based on the INPHE and EFQM model were largely different (i.e. 86.4% and 31%, respectively). In addition, the variation range among five EDs’ scores according to each model was also considerable (22% for EFQM against 7% of INPHE), especially in the EDs with and without prior record of applying QMSs. Conclusion: The INPHE’s assessment results were not confirmed by EFQM model. Moreover, the higher variation range among EDs’ scores using EFQM model could allude to its more differentiation power in assessing the performance comparing with INPHE. Therefore, a need for improvement in the latter drawing on other QMSs’ (such as EFQM) strengths, given the results emanated from its comparison with EFQM seems indispensable. PMID:23967429

  3. HBV and HCV Coinfection among HIV/AIDS Patients in the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Huy, Bůi V?; Vernavong, Kanxay; Kính, Nguy?n V?n

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To examine prevalence and characterization of HBV and HCV coinfection among HIV/AIDS patients. Methods. This cross-sectional, retrospective study analyzed 724 HIV/AIDS patients in the HIV clinic at the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases (NHTD), from 5/2005 to 4/2011. Results. The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection was 50.3% (364/724), of which HbsAg, HCV, and both of HbsAg, and HCV positivity were 8.4%, 35.4%, and 6.5%, respectively. The cohort (364 patients) with HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection live in the 30 provinces/cities in the North and Central area of Vietnam. We found statistically significant associations between heightened risk of coinfection with HIV and HCV in the age group 30–39 years (P < 0.001), male gender (P < 0.001), never married patients (P < 0.001), patients with a history of injection drug use (P < 0.001), and clinical stages 2–4 (P < 0.001). Coinfection with HBV/HIV was statistically significant associations between heightened risk of marital status (never married) (P < 0.001) and those who reported transmission through sexual intercourse. Conclusion. Coinfection with viral hepatitis is common in HIV patients; further study of the impact and evolution of coinfection is necessary to find effective treatment algorithms. PMID:25580287

  4. Speed-Selector Guard For Machine Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakhshir, Roda J.; Valentine, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Simple guardplate prevents accidental reversal of direction of rotation or sudden change of speed of lathe, milling machine, or other machine tool. Custom-made for specific machine and control settings. Allows control lever to be placed at only one setting. Operator uses handle to slide guard to engage or disengage control lever. Protects personnel from injury and equipment from damage occurring if speed- or direction-control lever inadvertently placed in wrong position.

  5. The Clickable Guard Cell, Version II: Interactive Model of Guard Cell Signal Transduction Mechanisms and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, June M.; Mäser, Pascal; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2008-01-01

    Guard cells are located in the leaf epidermis and pairs of guard cells surround and form stomatal pores, which regulate CO2 influx from the atmosphere into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation. Stomatal guard cells also regulate water loss of plants via transpiration to the atmosphere. Signal transduction mechanisms in guard cells integrate a multitude of different stimuli to modulate stomatal apertures. Stomata open in response to light. Stomata close in response to drought stress, elevated CO2, ozone and low humidity. In response to drought, plants synthesize the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) that triggers closing of stomatal pores. Guard cells have become a highly developed model system for dissecting signal transduction mechanisms in plants and for elucidating how individual signaling mechanisms can interact within a network in a single cell. Many new findings have been made in the last few years. This chapter is an update of an electronic interactive chapter in the previous edition of The Arabidopsis Book (Mäser et al. 2003). Here we focus on mechanisms for which genes and mutations have been characterized, including signaling components for which there is substantial signaling, biochemical and genetic evidence. Ion channels have been shown to represent targets of early signal transduction mechanisms and provide functional signaling and quantitative analysis points to determine where and how mutations affect branches within the guard cell signaling network. Although a substantial number of genes and proteins that function in guard cell signaling have been identified in recent years, there are many more left to be identified and the protein-protein interactions within this network will be an important subject of future research. A fully interactive clickable electronic version of this publication can be accessed at the following web site: http://www-biology.ucsd.edu/labs/schroeder/clickablegc2/. The interactive clickable version includes the following features: Figure 1. Model for the roles of ion channels in ABA signaling.Figure 2. Blue light signaling pathways in guard cells.Figure 3. ABA signaling pathways in guard cells. Figure 1 is linked to explanations that appear upon mouse-over. Figure 2 and Figure 3 are clickable and linked to info boxes, which in turn are linked to TAIR, to relevant abstracts in PubMed, and to updated background explanations from Schroeder et al (2001), used with permission of Annual Reviews of Plant Biology. PMID:22303239

  6. An in-depth, exploratory assessment of the implementation of the National Health Information System at a district level hospital in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A well functioning Health Information System (HIS) is crucial for effective and efficient health service delivery. In Tanzania there is a national HIS called Mfumo wa Taarifa za Uendeshaji Huduma za Afya (MTUHA). It comprises a guideline/manual, a series of registers for primary data collection and secondary data books where information from the registers is totalled or used for calculations. Methods A mix of qualitative methods were used. These included key informant interviews; staff interviews; participant observations; and a retrospective analysis of the hospital’s 2010 MTUHA reporting documents and the hospital’s development plan. Results All staff members acknowledged data collection as part of their job responsibilities. However, all had concerns about the accuracy of MTUHA data. Access to training was limited, mathematical capabilities often low, dissemination of MTUHA knowledge within the hospital poor, and a broad understanding of the HIS’s full capabilities lacking. Whilst data collection for routine services functioned reasonably well, filling of the secondary data tools was unsatisfactory. Internal inconsistencies between the different types of data tools were found. These included duplications, and the collection of data that was not further used. Sixteen of the total 72 forms (22.2%) that make up one of the key secondary data books (Hospital data/MTUHA book 2) could not be completed with the information collected in the primary data books. Moreover, the hospital made no use of any of the secondary data. The hospital’s main planning document was its development plan. Only 3 of the 22 indicators in this plan were the same as indicators in MTUHA, the information for 9 more was collected by the MTUHA system but figures had to be extracted and recalculated to fit, while for the remaining 10 indicators no use could be made of MTUHA at all. Conclusion The HIS in Tanzania is very extensive and it could be advisable to simplify it to the core business of data collection for routine services. Alternatively, the more comprehensive, managerial aspects could be sharpened for each type of facility, with a focus upon the hospital level. In particular, hospital planning documents need to be more closely aligned with MTUHA indicators. PMID:24572013

  7. Inter-hospital transportation of patients with severe acute respiratory failure on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation - national and international experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Lindén; K. Palmér; J. Reinhard; R. Westman; H. Ehrén; T. Granholm; B. Frenckner

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the experiences and results from inter-hospital transportation of patients with acute respiratory failure on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Design: Observational, descriptive study. Setting: Tertiary referral center in a University Hospital. Subjects and methods: When standard ECMO criteria were fulfilled and the patient considered too unstable for a conventional transport, the mobile ECMO team cannulated the patient for

  8. Hospitality in hospitals?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denver Severt; Taryn Aiello; Shannon Elswick; Cheryl Cyr

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore an organization-wide philosophy of hospitality in a hospital setting. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An exploratory case study method approach matched the research purpose. First, a hospitality centric philosophy (HCP) was defined from the literature review. Next, a triangulation of unstructured visits, structured visits and key informant interviews is used to further explore

  9. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a national referral hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Walls, Genevieve; Bulifon, Sophie; Breysse, Serge; Daneth, Thol; Bonnet, Maryline; Hurtado, Northan; Molfino, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective There are no recent data on the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB) in Cambodia. We aim to describe TB drug resistance amongst adults with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection in a national referral hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Design Between 22 November 2007 and 30 November 2009, clinical specimens from HIV-infected patients suspected of having TB underwent routine microscopy, Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, and drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory and clinical data were collected for patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures. Results M. tuberculosis was cultured from 236 HIV-infected patients. Resistance to any first-line TB drug occurred in 34.7% of patients; 8.1% had multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB). The proportion of MDR TB amongst new patients and previously treated patients was 3.7 and 28.9%, respectively (p<0.001). The diagnosis of MDR TB was made after death in 15.8% of patients; in total 26.3% of patients with MDR TB died. The diagnosis of TB was established by culture of extra-pulmonary specimens in 23.6% of cases. Conclusions There is significant resistance to first-line TB drugs amongst new and previously treated TB–HIV co-infected patients in Phnom Penh. These data suggest that the prevalence of DR TB in Cambodia may be higher than previously recognised, particularly amongst HIV-infected patients. Additional prevalence studies are needed. This study also illustrates the feasibility and utility of analysis of non-respiratory specimens in the diagnosis of TB, even in low-resource settings, and suggests that extra-pulmonary specimens should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms. PMID:25623609

  10. Nasal carriage rate of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus among at National Medical College Teaching Hospital, Birgunj, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shakya, B; Shrestha, S; Mitra, T

    2010-03-01

    Present study was conducted to assess the nasal carriage rate of methicilin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among patients, visitors/patient attendants and healthcare personnel at National Medical College Teaching Hospital, Birgunj, Nepal. A total of 112 nasal swabs (patients: 31, visitors/patient attendants: 61, and healthcare personnel: 20) were subjected to bacteriological investigation following standard protocol. S. aureus isolates were identified by mannitol fermentation and coagulase positivity. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed by Kirby-Bauer's disc diffusion method on Muller-Hinton agar medium. S. aureus was isolated in 14 (12.5%) of participants (M: 11.3%, F: 13.6%). Highest nasal colonization rate was found among healthcare personnel (25.0%) followed by the visitors/patient attendants (13.1%) and the patients (3.2%) (P>0.05). Highest positive rate was observed in the age group d"14 years (33.3%), followed by 15 to 50 years (13.2%) and >50 years (5.6%) (P>0.05). Out of 14 S. aureus isolates, 57.1% were methicillin resistant, prevalence rate of MRSA among total subjects being 7.1%. MRSA prevalence rate were 5.6% and 8.5% in total male and female participants, respectively (P>0.05). Highest MRSA prevalence rate was among health-care personnel (10.0%), followed by visitors/patient attendants (8.2%) and the patients (3.2%) (P>0.05). All MRSA isolates were resistant to Ampicillin, followed by Cephalexin (37.5%), Ciprofloxacin (37.5%), Tetracycline (37.5%), Gentamycin (25.0%), Erythromycin (0.0%) and Vancomycin (0.0%). High rate of nasal MRSA carriage rate found in this study indicates the need for standard infection control to prevent MRSA transmission. PMID:20677605

  11. The conceptual approach to quantitative modeling of guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Blatt, Michael R.; Hills, Adrian; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Yizhou; Papanatsiou, Maria; Lew, Vigilio L.

    2013-01-01

    Much of the 70% of global water usage associated with agriculture passes through stomatal pores of plant leaves. The guard cells, which regulate these pores, thus have a profound influence on photosynthetic carbon assimilation and water use efficiency of plants. We recently demonstrated how quantitative mathematical modeling of guard cells with the OnGuard modeling software yields detail sufficient to guide phenotypic and mutational analysis. This advance represents an all-important step toward applications in directing “reverse-engineering” of guard cell function for improved water use efficiency and carbon assimilation. OnGuard is nonetheless challenging for those unfamiliar with a modeler’s way of thinking. In practice, each model construct represents a hypothesis under test, to be discarded, validated or refined by comparisons between model predictions and experimental results. The few guidelines set out here summarize the standard and logical starting points for users of the OnGuard software. PMID:23221747

  12. Performance Ratio Analysis: A National Study on Iranian Hospitals Affiliated to Ministry of Health and Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    BASTANI, Peivand; VATANKHAH, Soudabeh; SALEHI, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to present and compare Iranian hospitals` performance applying ratio analysis technique. Methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted to present an instant image of 139 Iranian hospitals` performance status applying ratio analysis as one of the non parametric technical efficiency assessment methods in 2008. Data was collected using nine dimensional questionnaires supported by world wide web to achieve main hospital ratios. Final analysis was performed applying classic statistics and relevant statistical tests on significant level of 0.05. Results: Four hospital performance indicators were estimated in the studied hospitals as follows: Bed turnover rate (BTR) was fluctuated from 64.5 to 114.8 times for hospitals located in rich and poor areas respectively. Moreover Bed Interval Rate (BIT) was calculated 1.36 versus 2.4 in the poor and rich areas. Average length of stay (ALS) was computed 1.82 for the poor regions but 3.27 for the rich ones furthermore, a positive statistical significant correlation was seen between ALS and the hospital size (P=0.001, r=0.28). Average bed occupancy rate (BOR) was 57.8% and its variation was from 31.4% to 64.5% depending on the hospital size so that there was a positive statistical significant relationship between the hospital size and BOR (P=0.006, r=0.32). Conclusion: Regarding that BOR, ALS, BTR and BIT along with mortality rates are mentioned as the most considerable performance indicators, applying analytic frameworks more than considering single and raw indicators are severely recommended.

  13. Comparison of soccer shin guards in preventing tibia fracture.

    PubMed

    Francisco, A C; Nightingale, R W; Guilak, F; Glisson, R R; Garrett, W E

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a number of shin guards in protecting against tibia fracture in soccer players. A secondary purpose was to determine the relationship between the material and structural differences in shin guard design and the protection provided. Twenty-three commercially available shin guards were tested on a model leg containing a synthetic tibia that had been calibrated against human cadaver specimens. Each guard was categorized into one of four material types: plastic (N = 9), fiberglass (N = 6), compressed air (N = 4), and Kevlar (N = 4). The maximum combined force at the ends of the tibia, the principal strain on the posterior side of the tibia, and the contact time of the impact were measured using a drop track impact simulation. Shin guards provided significant protection from tibia fracture at all drop heights. The average guard reduced force by 11% to 17% and strain by 45% to 51% compared with the unguarded leg. At the higher drop heights, material composition and structural characteristics of the shin guards showed significant differences in protective abilities. These findings indicate that all shin guards provide some measure of protection against tibia fracture, although the level of protection may vary significantly among the different guards. PMID:10751000

  14. National survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Belgian hospitals: Detection methods, prevalence trends and infection control measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Struelens; R. Mertens

    1994-01-01

    A questionnaire survey of Belgian acute care hospitals was conducted to determine the methods used for detection of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA), to estimate the prevalence of this organism during the period 1989–1991 and to describe the infection control measures used locally for limiting its spread. Questionnaires were returned by 144 acute care hospitals, with a coverage of 41 to 72

  15. Lacking chloroplasts in guard cells of crumpled leaf attenuates stomatal opening: both guard cell chloroplasts and mesophyll contribute to guard cell ATP levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Wei; Li, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Lu; Yang, Hai-Qiang; Han, Xue-Fei; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Shang, Zhong-Lin; Asano, Tomoya; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Zhang, Chun-Guang; Chen, Yu-Ling

    2014-09-01

    Controversies regarding the function of guard cell chloroplasts and the contribution of mesophyll in stomatal movements have persisted for several decades. Here, by comparing the stomatal opening of guard cells with (crl-ch) or without chloroplasts (crl-no ch) in one epidermis of crl (crumpled leaf) mutant in Arabidopsis, we showed that stomatal apertures of crl-no ch were approximately 65-70% those of crl-ch and approximately 50-60% those of wild type. The weakened stomatal opening in crl-no ch could be partially restored by imposing lower extracellular pH. Correspondingly, the external pH changes and K(+) accumulations following fusicoccin (FC) treatment were greatly reduced in the guard cells of crl-no ch compared with crl-ch and wild type. Determination of the relative ATP levels in individual cells showed that crl-no ch guard cells contained considerably lower levels of ATP than did crl-ch and wild type after 2?h of white light illumination. In addition, guard cell ATP levels were lower in the epidermis than in leaves, which is consistent with the observed weaker stomatal opening response to white light in the epidermis than in leaves. These results provide evidence that both guard cell chloroplasts and mesophyll contribute to the ATP source for H(+) extrusion by guard cells. PMID:24506786

  16. Creating a “culture of research” in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program

    PubMed Central

    St. Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. Methods To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. Limitations The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important component yet often challenging to identify and collect. The model requires a strong emphasis on outreach that challenges hospitals to improve and expand their reach, particularly into underrepresented populations and catchment areas. These efforts build on trust and a referral pipeline within the community which take time and significant commitment to establish. Conclusion The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program experience provides a relevant model to broadly address creating a culture of research in community hospitals that are increasingly networked via systems and consortiums. The strategies used align well with the National Cancer Institute—American Society of Clinical Oncology Accrual Symposium recommendations for patient-/community-, physician-/provider-, and site-/organizational-level approaches to clinical trials; they helped sites achieve organizational culture shifts that enhanced their cancer research programs. The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program hospitals reported that the strategies were challenging to implement yet proved valuable as they provided useful metrics for programmatic assessment, planning, reporting, and growth. While focused on oncology trials, these concepts may be useful within other disease-focused research as well. PMID:25691600

  17. National survey on cholecystectomy related bile duct injury--public health and financial aspects in Belgian hospitals--1997.

    PubMed

    Van de Sande, St; Bossens, M; Parmentier, Y; Gigot, J F

    2003-04-01

    Public health and financial aspects of cholecystectomy related bile duct injury (BDI) are highlighted in a National Cholecystectomy Survey carried out through 'datamining' the Federal State Medical Records Summaries and Financial Summaries of all Belgian hospitals in 1997. All cancer diagnoses, children < or = 10 years, cholecystectomies performed as an abdominal co-procedure or patients having undergone other non-related surgery were excluded from the study. 10.595 laparoscopic (LC) and 1.033 open cholecystectomies (OC) as well as 137 secondary BDI treatments (LC/OC) were included in the survey (total 11.765). Both LC and OC groups turned out to be significantly different as to distribution of patient's age and APR-DRG severity classes. Composite criteria in terms of ICD-9-CM and billing codes were elaborated to classify: 1) primary, intra-operatively detected and treated BDI (N = 30), 2) primary delayed BDI treatments (N = 38), 3) secondary BDI treatments (N = 137), 4) non-BDI abdomino-surgical complications (N = 119), 4) uneventful laparoscopic (N = 7.476) and 5) uneventful open cholecystectomy (N = 681). Complication rates, community costs of LC and OC groups, incidence of preoperative ERCP and/or intra-operative cholangiography as well as interventions for complications were studied. Incidence of cholecystectomy related BDI was 0.37% in LC, 2.81% in OC and 0.58% overall. Average costs amounted to [symbol: see text] 1.721 for uneventful LC, [symbol: see text] 2.924 for uneventful OC, [symbol: see text] 7.250 for primary, intra-operatively detected and immediately treated BDI [symbol: see text] 9.258 for primary delayed BDI treatments, [symbol: see text] 6.076 for secondary BDI treatments and [symbol: see text] 10.363 for non-BDI abdomino-surgical complications. In conclusion BDI with cholecystectomy reveals to be a serious complication increasing the overall average cost factor ninefold if not detected intra-operatively, in which case the raise is only fourfold. As a consequence BDI should be avoided by all means. In this respect 4 crucial surgical guidelines are emphasised. PMID:12768860

  18. Exploring ARAC Support of U.S. Coast Guard Planning and Response Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.S.; Baskett, R.; Ellis, J. S.

    2001-07-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard is responsible for the protection of the marine environment from spills of oil and hazardous material. The USCG responsibilities include responding to oil and chemical spills from ships as well as from sources ashore. While responding to a spill, The USCG Marine Safety Offices and Detachments, and the National Strike Force (NSF) depend on interagency support from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and state and local agencies. Currently, the USCG depends on NOAA Scientific Support Coordinators for predicting and assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous material. NOAA has several computer models that the Coast Guard can access in the event of a chemical release into the atmosphere or an in situ oil burn. However, the Department of Energy operates a more powerful modeling system called the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC). Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, ARAC offers a complex multiscale model in a system that is simple for the end user to operate. The applicability of ARAC to Coast Guard operations is the subject of this study.

  19. Implementation and adoption of nationwide electronic health records in secondary care in England: final qualitative results from prospective national evaluation in “early adopter” hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the implementation and adoption of the NHS detailed care records service in “early adopter” hospitals in England. Design Theoretically informed, longitudinal qualitative evaluation based on case studies. Setting 12 “early adopter” NHS acute hospitals and specialist care settings studied over two and a half years. Data sources Data were collected through in depth interviews, observations, and relevant documents relating directly to case study sites and to wider national developments that were perceived to impact on the implementation strategy. Data were thematically analysed, initially within and then across cases. The dataset consisted of 431 semistructured interviews with key stakeholders, including hospital staff, developers, and governmental stakeholders; 590 hours of observations of strategic meetings and use of the software in context; 334 sets of notes from observations, researchers’ field notes, and notes from national conferences; 809 NHS documents; and 58 regional and national documents. Results Implementation has proceeded more slowly, with a narrower scope and substantially less clinical functionality than was originally planned. The national strategy had considerable local consequences (summarised under five key themes), and wider national developments impacted heavily on implementation and adoption. More specifically, delays related to unrealistic expectations about the capabilities of systems; the time needed to build, configure, and customise the software; the work needed to ensure that systems were supporting provision of care; and the needs of end users for training and support. Other factors hampering progress included the changing milieu of NHS policy and priorities; repeatedly renegotiated national contracts; different stages of development of diverse NHS care records service systems; and a complex communication process between different stakeholders, along with contractual arrangements that largely excluded NHS providers. There was early evidence that deploying systems resulted in important learning within and between organisations and the development of relevant competencies within NHS hospitals. Conclusions Implementation of the NHS Care Records Service in “early adopter” sites proved time consuming and challenging, with as yet limited discernible benefits for clinicians and no clear advantages for patients. Although our results might not be directly transferable to later adopting sites because the functionalities we evaluated were new and untried in the English context, they shed light on the processes involved in implementing major new systems. The move to increased local decision making that we advocated based on our interim analysis has been pursued and welcomed by the NHS, but it is important that policymakers do not lose sight of the overall goal of an integrated interoperable solution. PMID:22006942

  20. Mate-guarding constrains feeding activity but not energetic status of wild male long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Girard-Buttoz, Cédric; Heistermann, Michael; Rahmi, Erdiansyah; Marzec, Anna; Agil, Muhammad; Fauzan, Panji Ahmad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Mate-guarding is an important determinant of male reproductive success in a number of species. Little is known however about the constraints of this behaviour, e.g. the associated energetic costs. We investigated these costs in long-tailed macaques where alpha males mate guard females to a lesser extent than predicted by the priority of access model. The study was carried out during two mating periods on three wild groups living in the Gunung Leuser National Park, Indonesia. We combined behavioural observations on males' locomotion and feeding activity, GPS records of distance travelled and non-invasive measurements of urinary C-peptide (UCP), a physiological indicator of male energetic status. Mate-guarding led to a decrease in feeding time and fruit consumption suggesting a reduced intake of energy. At the same time, vertical locomotion was reduced, which potentially saved energy. These findings, together with the fact that we did not find an effect of mate-guarding on UCP levels, suggest that energy intake and expenditure was balanced during mate-guarding in our study males. Mate-guarding thus seems to not be energetically costly under all circumstances. Given that in strictly seasonal rhesus macaques, high-ranking males lose physical condition over the mating period, we hypothesise that the energetic costs of mate-guarding vary inter-specifically depending on the degree of seasonality and that males of non-strictly seasonal species might be better adapted to maintain balanced energetic condition year-round. Finally, our results illustrate the importance of combining behavioural assessments of both energy intake and expenditure with physiological measures when investigating energetic costs of behavioural strategies. PMID:24659851

  1. Design and evaluation of deer guards for Florida Key Deer 

    E-print Network

    Sebesta, Jason Daryl

    2000-01-01

    , deer guard prototypes were constructed and tested within a deer-holding facility at the Welder Wildlife Foundation Refuge near Sinton, Texas. Wild-trapped Texas white-tailed deer (O. v. tenanus) were used as test animals. Deer-guard prototypes were...

  2. Dynamic Guard Bandwidth Scheme for Wireless Broadband Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wee-seng Soh; Hyong S. Kim

    2001-01-01

    In future wireless broadband networks, bandwidth demands could fluctuate abruptly due to movement of high data rate users. Dynamic bandwidth reservation plays a key rule in ensuring that mobile calls are not disrupted after they are admitted into the network. We propose a dynamic guard bandwidth scheme that adapts the amount of guard bandwidth in both wired and wireless links

  3. 22. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTH OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTH OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING BUILDING H AT LEFT AND BUILDING F AT UPPER LEFT. 30X24 inch black and white silver gelatin print. Photographers unknown. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, Warehouse, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. 21. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHWEST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHWEST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING BUILDING F AT RIGHT AND BUILDING H (HAER No. CA-329-B) AT UPPER LEFT. 30X24 inch black and white silver gelatin print. Photographers unknown. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, Warehouse, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. U.S. Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Operations

    E-print Network

    Kuligowski, Bob

    U.S. Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Operations 10 June 2009 CDR Lisa Mack #12;Overview Operating, Waterways & Coastal Security Defense Readiness #12;Polar Icebreaker Fleet POLAR STAR, POLAR SEA and HEALY sovereignty, and a range of Coast Guard statutory missions to be required in the future. Polar icebreaker

  6. 33 CFR 165.1339 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington. 165...165.1339 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington. ...is involved in a Coast Guard training exercise while such vessel is transiting...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1339 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington. 165...165.1339 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington. ...is involved in a Coast Guard training exercise while such vessel is transiting...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1711 - Security Zones; Waters of the Seventeenth Coast Guard District

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Zones; Waters of the Seventeenth Coast Guard District 165.1711 Section...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Limited Access Areas Seventeenth Coast Guard District § 165.1711...

  9. 78 FR 36664 - Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display, Currituck Sound; Corolla, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket Number...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display, Currituck Sound; Corolla, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...

  10. 46 CFR 42.05-25 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District...Section 42.05-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...This Subchapter § 42.05-25 Coast Guard District Commander or...

  11. 33 CFR 1.01-50 - Delegation to District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 1.01-50 Section...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District. The Commandant...

  12. 33 CFR 8.1 - Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.1 Section 8.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD RESERVE § 8.1 Functions...

  13. 33 CFR 54.07 - Service of notice upon designated Coast Guard official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Service of notice upon designated Coast Guard official. 54.07 Section...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Service of notice upon designated Coast Guard official. The notice and...

  14. 78 FR 38829 - Special Local Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0387...Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of...

  15. 78 FR 39595 - Safety Zone, Fifth Coast Guard District Firework Display, Pagan River; Smithfield, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0473...1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Fifth Coast Guard District Firework Display, Pagan River; Smithfield, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...

  16. 77 FR 31183 - Safety Zone, Temporary Change for Recurring Fireworks Display Within the Fifth Coast Guard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2012-0097...Fireworks Display Within the Fifth Coast Guard District, Pamlico River and Tar River; Washington, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...

  17. 33 CFR 8.5 - Regulations for the Coast Guard Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Regulations for the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.5 Section 8.5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD RESERVE § 8.5...

  18. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Certificate of Number § 173.81 Coast Guard forms for numbering and...

  19. 33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.51...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...125.51 Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. (a)...

  20. 46 CFR 4.07-45 - Foreign units of Coast Guard, investigation by.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Foreign units of Coast Guard, investigation by. 4.07-45 Section 4.07-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...4.07-45 Foreign units of Coast Guard, investigation by....

  1. 33 CFR 165.518 - Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District. 165.518 Section...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...and Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.518...

  2. 77 FR 31803 - Safety Zone for Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display Currituck Sound; Corolla, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket Number...1625-AA00 Safety Zone for Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display Currituck Sound; Corolla, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  3. 33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...125.12 Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a)...

  4. 77 FR 14703 - Safety Zone, Temporary Change for Recurring Fireworks Display Within the Fifth Coast Guard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2012-0097...Fireworks Display Within the Fifth Coast Guard District, Pamlico River and Tar River; Washington, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  5. 33 CFR 96.470 - How does the Coast Guard terminate an organization's authorization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false How does the Coast Guard terminate an organization's authorization...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...S. § 96.470 How does the Coast Guard terminate an organization's...

  6. 33 CFR 140.101 - Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors or Minerals Management Service inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors or Minerals...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Inspections § 140.101 Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors or...

  7. 76 FR 69634 - Safety Zone; Temporary Change for Recurring Fireworks Display Within the Fifth Coast Guard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2011-0978...Fireworks Display Within the Fifth Coast Guard District, Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...

  8. 78 FR 35756 - Special Local Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0398...Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of...

  9. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District...Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard District Commander or...

  10. 33 CFR 125.17 - Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.17...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...125.17 Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards....

  11. 33 CFR 125.11 - Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.11...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...VESSELS § 125.11 Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card. The...

  12. 78 FR 40399 - Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays, Delaware River; Philadelphia, PA.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0493...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays, Delaware...Philadelphia, PA. AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...

  13. 78 FR 32219 - Safety Zone, Temporary Change for Recurring Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays, Middle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket Number...Temporary Change for Recurring Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays, Middle...Baltimore County, MD AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  14. 46 CFR 2.95-1 - Certificates or documents issued by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Certificates or documents issued by Coast Guard. 2.95-1 Section 2.95-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Certificates or documents issued by Coast Guard. (a) Certificates or...

  15. 78 FR 38837 - Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays, Barnegat Bay; Barnegat Township, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0431...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays, Barnegat...Barnegat Township, NJ AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...

  16. 33 CFR 66.05-20 - Coast Guard-State agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 66.05-20...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...to Navigation § 66.05-20 Coast Guard-State agreements....

  17. 33 CFR 173.79 - Expiration of Coast Guard certificate of number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Expiration of Coast Guard certificate of number. 173...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Number § 173.79 Expiration of Coast Guard certificate of number. A...

  18. 32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602 Section 700.602...OFFICIAL RECORDS The United States Coast Guard (When Operating as a Service in...700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of...

  19. 33 CFR 1.20-1 - Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...GENERAL PROVISIONS Testimony by Coast Guard Personnel and Production of...

  20. 77 FR 39174 - Safety Zone, Temporary Change for Recurring Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2012-0227...Temporary Change for Recurring Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays, Cavalier...Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...

  1. 33 CFR 8.3 - Organization of the Coast Guard Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Organization of the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.3 Section 8.3 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD RESERVE § 8.3...

  2. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(1):145153, Spring 2009 Deer guards and bump gates for excluding

    E-print Network

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 3(1):145­153, Spring 2009 Deer guards and bump gates for excluding white-tailed deer from fenced resources KURT C. VERCAUTEREN, USDA/APHIS/Wildlife Services' National Wildlife Collins, CO 80521, USA Abstract: White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) causing damage

  3. Discriminant analysis of game-related statistics between basketball guards, forwards and centres in three professional leagues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jaime Sampaio; Manuel Janeira; Sergio Ibáńez; Alberto Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was to examine the differences in game-related statistics between basketball guards, forwards and centres playing in three professional leagues: National Basketball Association (NBA, superior level) in the USA, Associación de Clubs de Baloncesto (ACB, one of the best European leagues) in Spain and Liga de Clubes de Basquetebol (LCB, inferior level) in Portugal. We

  4. Guide to Choosing a Hospital

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How hospitals’ rates of readmission and 30-day mortality (death) rates for certain conditions compare with the national rate. • How each hospital uses outpatient medical imaging tests (like CT scans ...

  5. Comparison of Evidence-Based Practice between Physicians and Nurses: A National Survey of Regional Hospitals in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Ya-Wen; Weng, Yi-Hao; Lo, Heng-Lien; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Shih, Ya-Hui; Kuo, Ken N.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Although evidence-based practice (EBP) has been widely investigated, few studies compare physicians and nurses on performance. Methods: A structured questionnaire survey was used to investigate EBP among physicians and nurses in 61 regional hospitals of Taiwan. Valid postal questionnaires were collected from 605 physicians and 551…

  6. Harnessing a Nation's Linguistic Competence: Identifying and Addressing Needs for LOTE in the Tourism and Hospitality Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Shirley; Hatoss, Aniko

    2003-01-01

    Reports research that aimed to identify the foreign language and cross-cultural skill needs of workers in the tourism and hospitality industry in Australia and to develop foreign language competencies for use in industry training packages. Provides evidence for the need for foreign language skills in the industry and gives an account of the…

  7. Quality of human-computer interaction - results of a national usability survey of hospital-IT in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Due to the increasing functionality of medical information systems, it is hard to imagine day to day work in hospitals without IT support. Therefore, the design of dialogues between humans and information systems is one of the most important issues to be addressed in health care. This survey presents an analysis of the current quality level of human-computer interaction of healthcare-IT in German hospitals, focused on the users' point of view. Methods To evaluate the usability of clinical-IT according to the design principles of EN ISO 9241-10 the IsoMetrics Inventory, an assessment tool, was used. The focus of this paper has been put on suitability for task, training effort and conformity with user expectations, differentiated by information systems. Effectiveness has been evaluated with the focus on interoperability and functionality of different IT systems. Results 4521 persons from 371 hospitals visited the start page of the study, while 1003 persons from 158 hospitals completed the questionnaire. The results show relevant variations between different information systems. Conclusions Specialised information systems with defined functionality received better assessments than clinical information systems in general. This could be attributed to the improved customisation of these specialised systems for specific working environments. The results can be used as reference data for evaluation and benchmarking of human computer engineering in clinical health IT context for future studies. PMID:22070880

  8. Utilization and Expenditure of Hospital Admission in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder: National Health Insurance Claims Database Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Lai, Chia-Im

    2011-01-01

    There were not many studies to provide information on health access and health utilization of people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The present study describes a general profile of hospital admission and the medical cost among people with ASD, and to analyze the determinants of medical cost. A retrospective study was employed to analyze…

  9. A New Guarded Hot Plate Designed for Thermal-Conductivity Measurements at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoarnec, V.; Hameury, J.; Hay, B.

    2015-03-01

    The Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais has developed a new guarded hot-plate apparatus operating from to in the thermal-conductivity range from to . This facility has been specifically designed for measuring medium thermal-conductivity materials at high temperature on square specimens (100 mm side), which are easier to machine than circular ones. The hot plate and cold plates are similar with a metering section independent from the guard ring. The specimens are laterally isolated by an air gap of 4 mm width and can be instrumented by temperature sensors in order to reduce effects of thermal contact resistances between the specimens and the heating plates. Measurements have been performed on certified reference materials and on "calibrated" materials. Relative deviations between thermal conductivities measured and reference values are less than 5 % in the operating range.

  10. An optimal guarding scheme for thermal conductivity measurement using a guarded cut-bar technique, part 1 experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Changhu [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Jensen, Colby [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Folsom, Charles [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Ban, Heng [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Marshall, Douglas W. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the guarded cut-bar technique, a guard surrounding the measured sample and reference (meter) bars is temperature controlled to carefully regulate heat losses from the sample and reference bars. Guarding is typically carried out by matching the temperature profiles between the guard and the test stack of sample and meter bars. Problems arise in matching the profiles, especially when the thermal conductivitiesof the meter bars and of the sample differ, as is usually the case. In a previous numerical study, the applied guarding condition (guard temperature profile) was found to be an important factor in measurement accuracy. Different from the linear-matched or isothermal schemes recommended in literature, the optimal guarding condition is dependent on the system geometry and thermal conductivity ratio of sample to meter bar. To validate the numerical results, an experimental study was performed to investigate the resulting error under different guarding conditions using stainless steel 304 as both the sample and meter bars. The optimal guarding condition was further verified on a certified reference material, pyroceram 9606, and 99.95% pure iron whose thermal conductivities are much smaller and much larger, respectively, than that of the stainless steel meter bars. Additionally, measurements are performed using three different inert gases to show the effect of the insulation effective thermal conductivity on measurement error, revealing low conductivity, argon gas, gives the lowest error sensitivity when deviating from the optimal condition. The result of this study provides a general guideline for the specific measurement method and for methods requiring optimal guarding or insulation.

  11. Job Number: 45638649 Company Name: Army National Guard

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    Repayment Program (up to $50,000, for existing loans) Healthcare Benefits Available #12;Requirements High School Diploma or GED (If you do not have a diploma or GED, you may still apply - ask a Recruiter about recruiter for the most up-to-date information. #12;

  12. Natural Heritage Inventory of Buckley Air National Guard Base,

    E-print Network

    ) ..................................................................................................................9 Black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus..........................................................................8 FIGURE 2: APPROXIMATE LOCATIONS OF THE BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOG TOWNS AND BURROWING OWL COLONIES

  13. Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and Their Association With Hospital Mortality Among Patients With First Myocardial Infarction (from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction)

    PubMed Central

    Canto, John G.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Rogers, William J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Frederick, Paul D.; French, William J.; Gibson, C. Michael; Pollack, Charles V.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Zalenski, Robert J.; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J.; Greenland, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined associations between atherosclerotic risk factors and short-term mortality after first myocardial infarction (MI). Histories of 5 traditional atherosclerotic risk factors at presentation (diabetes, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, and family history of premature heart disease) and hospital mortality were examined among 542,008 patients with first MIs in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (1994 to 2006). On initial MI presentation, history of hypertension (52.3%) was most common, followed by smoking (31.3%). The least common risk factor was diabetes (22.4%). Crude mortality was highest in patients with MI with diabetes (11.9%) and hypertension (9.8%) and lowest in those with smoking histories (5.4%) and dyslipidemia (4.6%). The inclusion of 5 atherosclerotic risk factors in a stepwise multivariate model contributed little toward predicting hospital mortality over age alone (C-statistic = 0.73 and 0.71, respectively). After extensive multivariate adjustments for clinical and sociodemographic factors, patients with MI with diabetes had higher odds of dying (odds ratio [OR] 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20 to 1.26) than those without diabetes and similarly for hypertension (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.11). Conversely, family history (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.73), dyslipidemia (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.64), and smoking (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.88) were associated with decreased mortality (C-statistic = 0.82 for the full model). In conclusion, in the setting of acute MI, histories of diabetes and hypertension are associated with higher hospital mortality, but the inclusion of atherosclerotic risk factors in models of hospital mortality does not improve predictive ability beyond other major clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. PMID:22840346

  14. National Trends in Hospital Readmission Rates among Medicare Fee-for-Service Survivors of Mitral Valve Surgery, 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, John A.; Wang, Yun; Murugiah, Karthik; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Cooper, Zack; Hashim, Sabet; Nuti, Sudhakar V.; Spatz, Erica; Desai, Nihar; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Older patients who undergo mitral valve surgery (MVS) have high 1-year survival rates, but little is known about the experience of survivors. Our objective was to determine trends in 1-year hospital readmission rates and length of stay (LOS) in these individuals. Methods We included 100% of Medicare Fee-for-Service patients ?65 years of age who underwent MVS between 1999–2010 and survived to 1 year (N = 146,877). We used proportional hazards regression to analyze the post-MVS 1-year readmission rate in each year, mean hospital LOS (after index admission), and readmission rates by subgroups (age, sex, race). Results The 1-year survival rate among patients undergoing MVS was 81.3%. Among survivors, 49.1% experienced a hospital readmission within 1 year. The post-MVS 1-year readmission rate declined from 1999–2010 (49.5% to 46.9%, P<0.01), and mean hospital LOS decreased from 6.2 to 5.3 (P<0.01). Readmission rates were highest in oldest patients, but declined in all age subgroups (65–74: 47.4% to 44.4%; 75–84: 51.4% to 49.2%, ?85: 56.4% to 50.0%, all P<0.01). There were declines in women and men (women: 51.7% to 50.8%, P<0.01; men: 46.9% to 43.0%, P<0.01), and in whites and patients of other race, but not in blacks (whites: 49.0% to 46.2%, P<0.01; other: 55.0% to 48.9%, P<0.01; blacks: 58.1% to 59.0%, P = 0.18). Conclusions Among older adults surviving MVS to 1 year, slightly fewer than half experience a hospital readmission. There has been a modest decline in both the readmission rate and LOS over time, with worse outcomes in women and blacks. PMID:26147225

  15. Exploring emergent properties in cellular homeostasis using OnGuard to model K+ and other ion transport in guard cells???

    PubMed Central

    Blatt, Michael R.; Wang, Yizhou; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Hills, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the nature and characteristics of transport across eukaryotic membranes are so complex as to defy intuitive understanding. In these circumstances, quantitative mathematical modeling is an essential tool, both to integrate detailed knowledge of individual transporters and to extract the properties emergent from their interactions. As the first, fully integrated and quantitative modeling environment for the study of ion transport dynamics in a plant cell, OnGuard offers a unique tool for exploring homeostatic properties emerging from the interactions of ion transport, both at the plasma membrane and tonoplast in the guard cell. OnGuard has already yielded detail sufficient to guide phenotypic and mutational studies, and it represents a key step toward ‘reverse engineering’ of stomatal guard cell physiology, based on rational design and testing in simulation, to improve water use efficiency and carbon assimilation. Its construction from the HoTSig libraries enables translation of the software to other cell types, including growing root hairs and pollen. The problems inherent to transport are nonetheless challenging, and are compounded for those unfamiliar with conceptual ‘mindset’ of the modeler. Here we set out guidelines for the use of OnGuard and outline a standardized approach that will enable users to advance quickly to its application both in the classroom and laboratory. We also highlight the uncanny and emergent property of OnGuard models to reproduce the ‘communication’ evident between the plasma membrane and tonoplast of the guard cell. PMID:24268743

  16. Prevalence of erectile dysfunction and associated factors among diabetic men attending diabetic clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mutagaywa, Reuben Kato; Lutale, Janeth; Aboud, Muhsin; Kamala, Benjamin Anathory

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There has been an increase in the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in the general population especially among Diabetic patients. This seems to be neglected problem in low-income countries. This study aims at establishing the prevalence of ED and associated risk factors in diabetic patients attended at Diabetic Clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital. Methods A cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted among 312 diabetic patients attending diabetic clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital between May and December 2011. Results More than half (55.1%) of the patients were found to have some form of ED (12.8% had mild dysfunction, 11.5% moderate and 27.9% severe dysfunction). The severity of ED was correlated with increased age. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that ED was significantly predicted by old age (odds ratio (OR) = 7.1, 95% CI 1.2-40.7), evidence of peripheral neuropathy (OR) =5.9, 95% CI 1.6-21.3), and evidence of peripheral vascular disease (OR =2.5, 95% CI 1.2-5.3). Also longer duration of DM was marginally associated with ED (p=0.056). Patients with ED were also more likely to suffer other sexual domains (p<0.001). No lifestyle factor was associated with ED. Conclusion The prevalence of ED is high among DM patients. Interventions aimed at prevention, early diagnosis and detection of DM and its complications, and adherence to treatment to prevent complications should be implemented. Further studies should emphasize on temporal variation to show true causality of DM on erectile dysfunction. PMID:25170371

  17. Status report : guard containment CFD analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-03-03

    Under the auspices of the CEA Cadarache/ANL-US I-NERI project a comprehensive investigation has been made of improvements to the Gen-IV GFR safety case over that of the GCFR safety case twenty five years ago. In particular, it has been concluded and agreed upon [1] that the GFR safety approach for the passive removal of decay heat in a protected depressurization accident with total loss of electric power needs to be different from that taken for the HTRs. The HTR conduction cooldown to the vessel wall boundary mode for an economically attractive core is not feasible in the case of the GFR because the high power densities (100kW/1 compared to 5 kW/1 for pebble bed thermal reactor) require decay heat fluxes well beyond those achievable by the heat conduction and radiation heat transfer mode. A set of alternative novel design options has been evaluated for potential passive safety mechanisms unique to the GFR. In summary, from a technological risk viewpoint and R&D planning, the option which has been identified is the block/plate-based or a pin-based reactor with a secondary guard containment/vessel around the primary vessel to maintain the primary system pressure at a high enough level which would allow primary system natural convection removal of core generated decay heat to be effective. Dedicated emergency decay heat exchangers would have to be connected in a 'failure-proof' configuration to the primary system and have natural convection capability all the way to the ultimate heat sink. What has been collaboratively agreed upon and selected for further development is the natural convection option with a block/plate or pin type derated core and a hybrid passive/active approach.[2] The guard containment will be utilized but it will be sized for an LWR containment range backup pressure (5-7 bars) with an initial pressure of 1 bar. The assessment has shown that a significantly higher back pressure is required for total natural convection driven removal of significant decay heat levels at GFR target power densities. The lower back-up pressure, plus whatever natural convection is available at this pressure, will be utilized to significantly reduce the blower power of the active DHR system sized to remove 2-3% decay power. The objective is to be able to have such low power requirements so that power supplies such as batteries without the need for startup, can be utilized. This lower back-up pressure should be sufficient to support natural convection removal of 0.5% decay heat which occurs at {approx}24 hrs. So there should be no more need for active systems/power supply after the initial period of one day. Furthermore, since there will be a decay of the after-heat from 2-3% to 0.5% in this time period, credit should be taken in probability space for loss of active systems during the 24 hours. The safety approach will then be a probabilistic one. In the future discussions with the regulatory authorities the approach which will then be taken is that this class of decay heat removal accidents should be treated in combination with the PRA rather than solely through deterministic calculations. Work is now ongoing in the U.S.-France I-NERI GFR project to further evaluate this hybrid passive/active approach to heat removal for depressurized decay heat accidents. The objective of the analysis documented in this report is to provide information on local and global temperature, pressure and flow distributions in the guard containment , during steady state, and reactor vessel depressurization conditions due to a small break in the reactor vessel bottom control rod drive system. This is for the 2400 MWt plant option. The results should lead to improved guard containment designs and enhanced margin for safety criteria.

  18. (Selected aspects of guard-cell biochemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1990-06-21

    Synopsis of progress on current grant. The studies were proposed for five years. The proposal was funded for three years, and I am pleased to report that the proposed experiments have been conducted, in essence, although some protocols were altered as the work unfolded. We found that Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulates in guard cells before it does in other leaf cells during stress imposition. This is an important result that eliminates a long-standing objection to unequivocal assignment of a role to ABA in stress-related decrease in stomatal conductance. We also followed the kinetics of ABA following relief of stress. In a published manuscript, we report values for protoplasts. The results did not permit a conclusion as to the cellular source of ABA. We did not detect physiological isoforms and therefore did not search for phosphorylation or aggregation states. We have been successful in measuring plant cytoplasmic malate concentration, though not in Crassula, which presented intractable technical difficulties. These results lead me to the heretical general conclusion that malate inhibition is not the major single factor that regulates phosphoenolpyruvate. 48 refs., 8 figs.

  19. 16. SITE BUILDING 010 SENTRY POST LOOKING AT GUARD BUILDING. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. SITE BUILDING 010- SENTRY POST -LOOKING AT GUARD BUILDING. VIEW IS LOOKING NORTH 45° WEST OUTWARD FROM INTERIOR PARKING LOT AREA. - Cape Cod Air Station, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  20. 30 CFR 57.12034 - Guarding around lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12034 Guarding around lights. Portable extension lights, and other lights that...

  1. 30 CFR 56.12034 - Guarding around lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12034 Guarding around lights. Portable extension lights, and other lights that by their location present a...

  2. 30 CFR 56.12034 - Guarding around lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12034 Guarding around lights. Portable extension lights, and other lights that by their location present a...

  3. 30 CFR 57.12034 - Guarding around lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12034 Guarding around lights. Portable extension lights, and other lights that...

  4. Within compound, from Guard Tower, looking north Beale Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, from Guard Tower, looking north - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  5. PARTS WASHING ALTERNATIVES STUDY - UNITED STATES COAST GUARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report has been written to assist the United States Coast Guard (USCG) industrial managers in determining the most cost effective and environmentally acceptable parts washing alternatives for their specific applications. An; evaluation was conducted on four different cleane...

  6. PARTS WASHING ALTERNATIVES STUDY - UNITED STATES COAST GUARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report has been written to assist the United States Coast Guard (USCG) industrial managers in determining the most cost effective and environmentally acceptable parts washing alternatives for their specific applications. n evaluation was conducted on four different cleaners ...

  7. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...following are some of the machines which usually require point of operation guarding: Guillotine cutters. Shears. Alligator shears. Power presses. Milling machines. Power saws. Jointers. Portable power tools. Forming rolls and...

  8. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...following are some of the machines which usually require point of operation guarding: Guillotine cutters. Shears. Alligator shears. Power presses. Milling machines. Power saws. Jointers. Portable power tools. Forming rolls and...

  9. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...following are some of the machines which usually require point of operation guarding: Guillotine cutters. Shears. Alligator shears. Power presses. Milling machines. Power saws. Jointers. Portable power tools. Forming rolls and...

  10. 46 CFR 58.01-20 - Machinery guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-20 Machinery guards. Gears, couplings, flywheels and all machinery capable of injuring personnel shall be provided with adequate covers or...

  11. 46 CFR 58.01-20 - Machinery guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-20 Machinery guards. Gears, couplings, flywheels and all machinery capable of injuring personnel shall be provided with adequate covers or...

  12. 46 CFR 58.01-20 - Machinery guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-20 Machinery guards. Gears, couplings, flywheels and all machinery capable of injuring personnel shall be provided with adequate covers or...

  13. 46 CFR 58.01-20 - Machinery guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-20 Machinery guards. Gears, couplings, flywheels and all machinery capable of injuring personnel shall be provided with adequate covers or...

  14. 46 CFR 58.01-20 - Machinery guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-20 Machinery guards. Gears, couplings, flywheels and all machinery capable of injuring personnel shall be provided with adequate covers or...

  15. Cytochemical and cytofluorometric evidence for guard cell photosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, K.C.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence for photosynthetic linear electron transport in guard cells was obtained with two sensitive methods of high spacial resolution. Light-dependent diaminobenzidine oxidation (an indicator of PSI) and DCMU-sensitive, light-dependent thiocarbamyl nitroblue tetrazolium reduction (an indicator of PSII) were observed in guard cell plastids of Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya using electron microscopic cytochemical procedures. DCMU-sensitive Chl a fluorescence induction (an indicator of PSII) was detected in individual guard cell pairs of Vicia faba L. cv Longpod using an ultramicrofluorometer. At least for these species, we conclude these results are proof for the presence of PSII in guard cell chloroplasts, which until now has been somewhat controversial. 31 references, 2 figures.

  16. 12. Bottom and side planking at stern, showing chine guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Bottom and side planking at stern, showing chine guard (to the right in photo) and copper ice sheathing on starboard side. - Two-Sail Bateau E. C. COLLIER, Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, Mills Street, Saint Michaels, Talbot County, MD

  17. Ozone inhibits guard cell K+ channels implicated in stomatal opening.

    PubMed

    Torsethaugen, G; Pell, E J; Assmann, S M

    1999-11-01

    Ozone (O3) deleteriously affects organisms ranging from humans to crop plants, yet little is understood regarding the underlying mechanisms. In plants, O3 decreases CO2 assimilation, but whether this could result from direct O3 action on guard cells remained unknown. Potassium flux causes osmotically driven changes in guard cell volume that regulate apertures of associated microscopic pores through which CO2 is supplied to the photosynthetic mesophyll tissue. We show in Vicia faba that O3 inhibits (i) guard cell K+ channels that mediate K+ uptake that drives stomatal opening; (ii) stomatal opening in isolated epidermes; and (iii) stomatal opening in leaves, such that CO2 assimilation is reduced without direct effects of O3 on photosynthetic capacity. Direct O3 effects on guard cells may have ecological and agronomic implications for plant productivity and for response to other environmental stressors including drought. PMID:10557363

  18. Integration of Transpiration Rate, Photosynthesis, Abscisic-Acid Signaling, and Guard-Cell Gene Expression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Danielle M. Sherdan

    2007-01-01

    Guard cells in the leaf epidermis regulate transpiration rate (E) and carbon dioxide uptake by adjusting stomatal aperture size. Sucrose (suc) is a recent product of photosynthesis that accumulates around guard cells during transpiration. Similarly, abscisic acid (ABA) is a potent regulator of guard cell physiology that can be transported to guard cells via the transpiration stream. I tested the

  19. 33 CFR 1.26-10 - Sales to Coast Guard Auxiliary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Sales to Coast Guard Auxiliary. 1.26-10 Section 1.26-10... § 1.26-10 Sales to Coast Guard Auxiliary. (a) The provisions of Title 14...Coast Guard to furnish the Coast Guard Auxiliary such items as flags, pennants,...

  20. Male songbirds provide indirect parental care by guarding females during incubation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bradley C. Fedy; Thomas E. Martin

    2009-01-01

    Across many taxa, guarding of fertile mates is a widespread tactic that enhances paternity assurance. However, guarding of mates can also occur during the nonfertile period, and the fitness benefits of this behavior are unclear. Male songbirds, for example, sometimes guard nonfertile females during foraging recesses from incubation. We hypothesized that guarding postreproductive mates may have important, but unrecognized, benefits

  1. Design and evaluation of a low thermal electromotive force guarded scanner for resistance measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dean G. Jarrett; James A. Marshall; Thomas A. Marshall; Ronald F. Dziuba

    1999-01-01

    The design and testing of a low thermal electromotive force guarded scanner, developed to provide completely guarded switching when used with actively guarded resistance bridge networks, is described. The design provides a continuous guard circuit trace on the scanner circuit boards that surrounds the relay contacts and protects the measurement circuit from leakages to ground. Modification to the circuit boards

  2. Mate guarding and frequent in-pair copulation in humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Todd K. Shackelford; Aaron T. Goetz; Faith E. Guta; David P. Schmitt

    2006-01-01

    Cuckoldry is an adaptive problem faced by parentally investing males of socially monogamous species (e.g., humans and many\\u000a avian species). Mate guarding and frequent in-pair copulation (IPC) may have evolved as anti-cuckoldry tactics in avian species\\u000a and in humans. In some avian species, the tactics are used concurrently, with the result that mate guarding behaviors and IPC frequency are correlated

  3. 22. AERIAL VIEW OF SOUTH PART OF THE COAST GUARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. AERIAL VIEW OF SOUTH PART OF THE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING PART OF BUILDING H IN THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER (DOES NOT SHOW BUILDING F). 30X24 inch black and white silver gelatin print. Photographer unknown. Date unknown. 304 - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, Bachelor Officer Quarters, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, M.Y.

    1995-10-17

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

  5. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, M.Y.

    1996-08-13

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

  6. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, Michel Y. (Ithaca, NY)

    1995-01-01

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

  7. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, Michel Y. (Ithaca, NY)

    1996-01-01

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

  8. 77 FR 26024 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ...Guard [USCG-2011-0975] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee AGENCY...2012, a notice announcing a National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...meet in closed session at the National Maritime Intelligence Center and in open...

  9. 75 FR 82039 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ...Guard [USCG-2010-1005] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting...SUMMARY: The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...discuss various issues relating to national maritime security. This meeting will be...

  10. 75 FR 38536 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ...Guard [USCG-2010-0586] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting...SUMMARY: The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...discuss various issues relating to national maritime security. This meeting will be...

  11. Effect of a national primary care pay for performance scheme on emergency hospital admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: controlled longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Mark J; Dusheiko, Mark; Sutton, Matt; Gravelle, Hugh; Doran, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the impact of a national primary care pay for performance scheme, the Quality and Outcomes Framework in England, on emergency hospital admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs). Design Controlled longitudinal study. Setting English National Health Service between 1998/99 and 2010/11. Participants Populations registered with each of 6975 family practices in England. Main outcome measures Year specific differences between trend adjusted emergency hospital admission rates for incentivised ACSCs before and after the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework scheme and two comparators: non-incentivised ACSCs and non-ACSCs. Results Incentivised ACSC admissions showed a relative reduction of 2.7% (95% confidence interval 1.6% to 3.8%) in the first year of the Quality and Outcomes Framework compared with ACSCs that were not incentivised. This increased to a relative reduction of 8.0% (6.9% to 9.1%) in 2010/11. Compared with conditions that are not regarded as being influenced by the quality of ambulatory care (non-ACSCs), incentivised ACSCs also showed a relative reduction in rates of emergency admissions of 2.8% (2.0% to 3.6%) in the first year increasing to 10.9% (10.1% to 11.7%) by 2010/11. Conclusions The introduction of a major national pay for performance scheme for primary care in England was associated with a decrease in emergency admissions for incentivised conditions compared with conditions that were not incentivised. Contemporaneous health service changes seem unlikely to have caused the sharp change in the trajectory of incentivised ACSC admissions immediately after the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework. The decrease seems larger than would be expected from the changes in the process measures that were incentivised, suggesting that the pay for performance scheme may have had impacts on quality of care beyond the directly incentivised activities. PMID:25389120

  12. American Hospital Association

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    Founded in 1898, the American Hospital Association (AHA) is the national umbrella organization that represents a wide range of hospitals and health care networks. While some of the siteâ??s contents are designed for health care professionals and executives, the general public and some scholars will find some of the features, such as their quarterly reports on the latest in hospital trends, quite valuable. A good place to start is the Resource Center section of the site, which contains helpful guides to locating the information on the site itself. There are a number of free resources available here, such as a fact sheet about Americaâ??s hospitals and studies, including â??The State of Americaâ??s Hospitals: Taking the Pulseâ?ť and â??Costs of Caring: Sources of Growth in Spending for Hospital Careâ?ť.

  13. [Human fasciolasis and gastrointestinal compromise: study of 277 patients in the Cayetano Heredia National Hospital (1970-2002)].

    PubMed

    Torres, Gilberto Blancas; Iwashita, Angélica Terashima; Vargas, Ciro Maguińa; Luján, Luis Vera; Bianchi, Humberto Alvarez; Casanova, Raúl Tello

    2004-01-01

    This is a retrospective and descriptive review of 277 patients suffering fasciolasis. These patients were seen in Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia between 1970-2002; 240 (86.6%) developed the chronic phase and 37 (13.3%) the acute form. Group aged 20-29 years were the most affected (24%). The main places infected were the interandean valleys of Lima, Ancash and Junin. The 277 patients the main symptoms were: abdominal pain in 236, nausea/vomiting in 106 and diarrhea in 100. Hepatomegaly in 56, pallor in 44 and fever in 23 were the main physical findings. 47% (80/169) suffered eosinophilia, 46% (38/82) had an increase of alkaline phosphatase and 31% (52/169) anemia. PMID:15241493

  14. [Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutics aspects of snakebites in the Gabriel-Touré and Kati national hospitals of Mali: a ten-year retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Dramé, B S I; Diarra, A; Diani, N; Dabo, A

    2012-08-01

    A retrospective study has been performed on snakebites from January 1993 to December 2002 in the national hospitals Gabriel-Touré, in Bamako, and Kati. It aimed to establish a synthesis of epidemiological, clinical, and therapeutic aspects from snakebites. Eight hundred thirty-two snakebites were recorded during this period. Men were mostly represented: 72 versus 28% of women. The average age was 28 ± 18 years. Farmers were most affected (28%). Most bites occurred between 16 and 20 hours, during the fieldwork and pasture in 44% cases. Lower limbs (73.8%) were more involved than hands (25.8%). Although the type of snake has not been determined, the clinical picture was that of viper syndrome, the severity of which was assessed by the grade of bleeding, edema, renal involvement (15.8%), and neurological disorders (13.3%). Antivenom was administered to 40.6% of patients whose case fatality rate was 2.8%, whereas it was 8.1% in its absence. The case fatality rate associated with serum therapy varied according to the antivenin, 1.5% with the antivenoms manufactured in Europe and 4% with those manufactured in Asia. Five parturients had a favorable outcome with antivenom. The initial management was carried out by traditional healers in 49.7% of cases. The annual case fatality rate decreased gradually from 12% in 1995 to 3% in 2002. The incidence of snakebite is greatly underestimated in hospitals because of inadequate records. PMID:22707257

  15. Early Outcomes of Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: First Preliminary Report of National Hospital Organization Network Study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Nobuhiro; Onohara, Toshihiro; Akaiwa, Keiichi; Kei, Jyunichi; Okamoto, Minoru; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Shimoe, Yasushi; Nakai, Mikizou; Okada, Masahiro; Takahashi, Toshiki; Suhara, Hitoshi; Kasashima, Fuminari; Endo, Masamitsu; Nishina, Takeshi; Furuyama, Tadashi; Ueno, Yoichirou

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Patients and Methods: In order to assess the early outcomes of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the Japanese population, a total of 183 patients who had EVAR at eight medical centers of the National Hospital Organization were retrospectively reviewed and registered. The mean number of registered cases in each center was 23 ± 17 (4–50 cases). Patient characteristics were male sex, 84%; mean age, 77 years; age ? 80 years, 40%. Results: In-hospital mortality was one case (0.5%). Endoleaks were observed at the end of the procedure in 35 patients (19%: type I: n = 4, II: n = 22, III, n = 3, IV: n = 6). Early morbidity included delayed wound healing or infection (n = 7), deterioration of renal dysfunction (n = 3), stroke (n = 2), postoperative bleeding (n = 2), gastrointestinal complications (n = 2), and peripheral thromboembolism (n = 2). Eleven late deaths included one of unknown cause and six cardiovascular causes at a mean follow up of 1.0 year. Survival rates of freedom from all causes of death and from aneurysm-related death at one year were 95.4% ± 1.7% and 99.5% ± 0.5%, respectively. Interpretation: Although registered patients carry a variety of risks, early outcomes were satisfactory. EVAR is an acceptable alternative treatment modality for treating AAA. PMID:23555456

  16. The evolution of epilepsy theory and practice at the National Hospital for the Relief and Cure of Epilepsy, Queen Square between 1860 and 1910.

    PubMed

    Shorvon, Simon

    2014-02-01

    In the years between 1860 and 1910, a revolution in epilepsy theory and practice occurred. The National Hospital for the Relief and Cure of the Paralysed and the Epileptic at Queen Square in London was at the center of this revolution. A series of remarkable physicians and surgeons were appointed to the staff. The four greatest were John Hughlings Jackson, Sir David Ferrier, Sir Victor Horsley, and Sir William Gowers. Their lasting contribution to epilepsy is discussed. Other physicians who made notable contributions to epilepsy were Jabez Spence Ramskill, Charles Eduard Brown-Séquard, Charles Bland Radcliffe, Sir John Russell Reynolds, Sir Edward Henry Sieveking, Walter Stacy Colman, and William Aldren Turner. At the hospital in this period, amongst the lasting contributions to epilepsy were the following: the development of a new conceptual basis of epilepsy, the development of a theory of the physiological structure of the nervous system in relation to epilepsy, the demonstration and investigation of cortical localization of epileptic activity, the establishment of the principle of focal epilepsy and the description of focal seizure types, the discovery of the first effective drug treatment for epilepsy (bromide therapy, indeed one of the first effective drug treatments in the whole of neurology), and the performance of the first surgical operation for epilepsy. This paper is based on the 2013 Gowers Memorial Lecture, delivered in May 2013. PMID:24239432

  17. Quality of life among patients living with epilepsy attending the neurology clinic at kenyatta national hospital, Nairobi, Kenya: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most of the studies on epilepsy in Kenya and indeed the sub-Saharan region of Africa mainly focus on prevalence, psychiatric profile, and factors associated with increased seizure burden. This being the first Kenyan and sub-Saharan African study assessing quality of life among people living with epilepsy, it will identify their ‘intangible’ needs and enable evidence-based intervention that would ultimately lead to a comprehensive management and better outcome. Methods Design: A cross-sectional comparative study, using the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire, a socio-demographic questionnaire, seizure burden and characteristics, drug and treatment profile questionnaires and the Mini-Mental state examination, among PLWE and those accompanying them, herein referred to as the normal healthy controls, attending the neurology clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. Setting and subjects: Study was carried out between October 2006 and February 2007 at the neurology clinic in the hospital where three hundred consecutive subjects who satisfied the inclusion criteria and gave consent were recruited. Statistical tests used: Descriptive statistics were used to compute means, standard deviations as well as frequencies. Significance of associations was tested using the Chi square test statistic (x2), an independent samples t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a step-wise (forward) regression analysis. A p?National Hospital was significantly impaired and lower than that of the normal controls accompanying them. A comprehensive epilepsy management program is recommended to address this problem and its associated risk factors for the people living with epilepsy in Kenya. PMID:23777194

  18. Implementation of the presence of companions during hospital admission for childbirth: data from the Birth in Brazil national survey.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Carmen Simone Grilo; d'Orsi, Eleonora; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira; Torres, Jacqueline Alves; Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos; Schneck, Camilla A; Lansky, Sônia; Teixeira, Neuma Zamariano Fanaia; Rance, Susanna; Sandall, Jane

    2014-08-01

    Robust evidence of the benefits of continuous support during childbirth led to the recommendation that it should be offered for all women. In Brazil, it has been guaranteed by law since 2005, but scarce data on implementation is available. We aimed to estimate the frequency and associated socio-demographic, obstetric and institutional predictors of women having companionship during childbirth in the Birth in Brazil survey. Descriptive statistical analysis was done for the characterization of companions (at different moments of hospital stay), maternal and institutional factors; associations were investigated in bivariate and multivariate models. We found that 24.5% of women had no companion at all, 18.8% had continuous companionship and 56.7% had partial companionship. Independent predictors of having no or partial companionship at birth were: lower income and education, brown color of skin, using the public sector, multiparity, and vaginal delivery. Implementation of companionship was associated with having an appropriate environment, and clear institution al rules about women's rights to companionship. PMID:25167174

  19. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in the stomatal response to CO2 will investigate downstream targets of the CO2 response. Success in characterizing a zeaxanthin-dependent CO2 sensing mechanism in guard cells will significantly enhance our understanding of stomatal function and CO2 sensing in plants cells. Further characterization of guard cells acclimation to CO2 should enrich our understanding of plant acclimations and adaptations to their environment, and of possible effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on the vegetation.

  20. OnGuard, a Computational Platform for Quantitative Kinetic Modeling of Guard Cell Physiology1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hills, Adrian; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R.; Lew, Virgilio L.

    2012-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells play a key role in gas exchange for photosynthesis while minimizing transpirational water loss from plants by opening and closing the stomatal pore. Foliar gas exchange has long been incorporated into mathematical models, several of which are robust enough to recapitulate transpirational characteristics at the whole-plant and community levels. Few models of stomata have been developed from the bottom up, however, and none are sufficiently generalized to be widely applicable in predicting stomatal behavior at a cellular level. We describe here the construction of computational models for the guard cell, building on the wealth of biophysical and kinetic knowledge available for guard cell transport, signaling, and homeostasis. The OnGuard software was constructed with the HoTSig library to incorporate explicitly all of the fundamental properties for transporters at the plasma membrane and tonoplast, the salient features of osmolite metabolism, and the major controls of cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentration and pH. The library engenders a structured approach to tier and interrelate computational elements, and the OnGuard software allows ready access to parameters and equations ‘on the fly’ while enabling the network of components within each model to interact computationally. We show that an OnGuard model readily achieves stability in a set of physiologically sensible baseline or Reference States; we also show the robustness of these Reference States in adjusting to changes in environmental parameters and the activities of major groups of transporters both at the tonoplast and plasma membrane. The following article addresses the predictive power of the OnGuard model to generate unexpected and counterintuitive outputs. PMID:22635116

  1. Biomechanical efficiency of wrist guards as a shock isolator.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Il-Kyu; Kim, Kyu-Jung; Kaufman, Kenton R; Cooney, William P; An, Kai-Nan

    2006-04-01

    Despite the use of wrist guards during skate- and snowboard activities, fractures still occur at the wrist or at further proximal locations of the forearm. The main objectives of this study were to conduct a human subject testing under simulated falling conditions for measurement of the impact force on the hand, to model wrist guards as a shock isolator, to construct a linear mass-spring-damper model for quantification of the impact force attenuation (Q-ratio) and energy absorption (S-ratio), and to determine whether wrist guards play a role of an efficient shock isolator. While the falling direction (forward and backward) significantly influenced the impact responses, use of wrist guards provided minimal improvements in the Q- and S-ratios. It was suggested based on the results under the submaximal loading conditions that protective functions of the common wrist guard design could be enhanced with substantial increase in the damping ratio so as to maximize the energy absorption. This would bring forth minor deterioration in the impact force attenuation but significant increase in the energy absorption by 19%, which would help better protection against fall-related injuries of the upper extremity. PMID:16524335

  2. AvantGuard: exploring the distribution of autonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Dov

    2005-05-01

    Every war introduces a new round of tactics and technologies. Our present war might be characterized as a confrontation between the Suicide Bomber and the Unmanned Air Vehicle. AvantGuard models this confrontation and exposes it to study. It is a computer game in which UAVs are used to protect a convoy in hostile urban terrain. Adversaries hide among the residents and prepare an ambush. The operator directs small UAVs and studies the resulting sensor stream. He must find the ambush before the convoy arrives. AvantGuard serves those who seek to improve the effectiveness of the UAV mission. It is an instrument with which researchers can measure performance as they develop new systems. AvantGuard is particularly designed to study the interplay of human supervisor and autonomous UAVs. Its cognitive challenges are organized into distinct tasks. For each task, the autonomy level of the UAV is set independently. Calibrated to established standards, results are easily compared to one another and to the findings of other researchers. By addressing real-world problems, such as battlefield constraints on bandwidth and the limits of machine vision, AvantGuard presents a credible approach to mission simulation, training and eventual execution. By employing sophisticated game techniques, AvantGuard advances an innovative design. By considering the post-combat role of the military, it prepares an instrument to advance the goals of peace as well as those of war.

  3. United States Coast Guard portable salvage computer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.J.

    1986-07-01

    The US Coast Guard's interest in marine salvage arises from its responsibility under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act and other laws dealing with oil spills. At vessel stranding situations, which could result in significant environmental damage through the release of oil or hazardous chemicals, the Coast Guard is represented by an On-Scene Coordinator (OSC), who must evaluate whether or not appropriate salvage techniques are applied to the stranded vessel by commercial salvors. To assist the OSC, who may not be trained in marine salvage, and other Coast Guard personnel assigned to such salvage operations, a portable salvage computer has been programmed to accomplish salvage calculations in a user-friendly manner. In this final report, the development of the salvage program and selection of a portable computer are described along with results of field testing with actual stranding situations.

  4. ILC TARGET WHEEL RIM FRAGMENT/GUARD PLATE IMPACT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hagler, L

    2008-07-17

    A positron source component is needed for the International Linear Collider Project. The leading design concept for this source is a rotating titanium alloy wheel whose spokes rotate through an intense localized magnetic field. The system is composed of an electric motor, flexible motor/drive-shaft coupling, stainless steel drive-shaft, two Plumber's Block tapered roller bearings, a titanium alloy target wheel, and electromagnet. Surrounding the target wheel and magnet is a steel frame with steel guarding plates intended to contain shrapnel in case of catastrophic wheel failure. Figure 1 is a layout of this system (guard plates not shown for clarity). This report documents the FEA analyses that were performed at LLNL to help determine, on a preliminary basis, the required guard plate thickness for three potential plate steels.

  5. Building relationships with families in the NICU: exploring the guarded alliance.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J M

    2001-12-01

    Extremely low-birthweight infants and their families experience prolonged hospitalization in the newborn intensive care unit (NICU). Prolonged hospitalization is particularly stressful for the family, leading to distress in most aspects of their lives, including separation of parents from each other and from other family members, a need for increased psychological support, and increased economic concerns. Based on these characteristics, these families appear to have needs more similar to that of families caring for chronically ill members. Indeed, this initial hospitalization may be the prelude to coping and surviving with a chronic illness for many of these children and families. This article proposes the adaption of "guarded alliance" as a framework for developing relationships and providing care to families in the NICU. This framework was derived from research with families of the chronically ill. Supportive research is used to justify the adoption of this framework for interactions with families in the NICU. In addition, linkages to family-centered care principles in critical care settings are also discussed. PMID:11785579

  6. 42 CFR 412.212 - National rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...product of— (1) The national average standardized amount...from time to time) of the national rate computed under...hospital wage level in the geographic area of the hospital compared to the national average hospital wage...

  7. A hospital capital price index.

    PubMed

    Hall, E M; Jacobs, P

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a price index for hospital equipment. Based on 10 years of hospital capital acquisition data from a large teaching hospital, equipment acquisitions were categorized and weights derived for each category. Using national producer price indexes for each of these categories, a national hospital equipment index was derived for 1981 to 1991. Forecasts for 1991 and 1992 were then made. The resulting index indicated that price movements of our hospital capital equipment index were very similar to the Implicit Gross Domestic Product Deflator, an index that measures price changes for the nation's Gross Domestic Product. However, because of the relative importance of several categories of equipment (scientific instruments, computers), more widespread data on hospital equipment expenditure patterns would be desirable in order to validate these results. PMID:1936655

  8. Rural hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Andrea; Slifkin, Rebecca; Schur, Claudia; Cheung, Karen; Baernholdt, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    The 340B Drug Pricing Program has the potential to reduce outpatient pharmaceutical costs for qualifying hospitals—hut many rural hospital administrators are unaware of their organization’s eligibility. PMID:18637547

  9. GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS. Navy Department, Bureau ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards 7 Docks, Navy Yard, Mare Island, California. Albert F. Roller, Architect, San Francisco, CA H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 3 of 15, accompanying contract no. 4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 14, 1941; file no. 930-CR-5. Scale one eigth inch to one foot. 73 cm x 129 cm. Black line print - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  10. The occlusal guard: a simplified technique for fabrication and equilibration.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, John; Hottel, Timothy L; Siegel, Sharon C; Brandt, Robert; Silva, Gladston

    2013-01-01

    Hard occlusal guards have been used effectively to treat myofacial pain originating from parafunctional activities. Also, they can protect the natural dentition when it opposes porcelain restorations, help to evaluate changes in occlusal vertical dimension during full mouth rehabilitation, minimize further tooth loss in patients with abfraction lesions, and redirect occlusal loads more favorably onto dental implant-supported prostheses. A simplified technique is described to fabricate a properly designed wax model of an occlusal guard that can be processed in acrylic in the same manner used to construct a complete denture. PMID:23649575

  11. GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, SECTIONS AND DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Navy Yard, Mare Island, CA. H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 7 of 15, accompanying specification Noy-4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 7, 1941. Yards & Docks drawing no. 160692; P.W. (Public Works) drawing no. 10388-31; file no. 930-CR-7. Scale three eighths inch to one foot. 73 cm x 129 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  12. GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, ROOF FRAMING DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS, ROOF FRAMING DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Navy Yard, Mare Island, CA. H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 9 of 15, accompanying specification Noy-4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 7, 1941. Yards & Docks drawing no. 160694; P.W. (Public Works) drawing no. 10388-33; file no. 930-S-4. Scale three eighths inch to one foot. 73 cm x 129 cm. Black line print - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  13. Staffing and resource adequacy strongly related to RNs’ assessment of patient safety: a national study of RNs working in acute-care hospitals in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Smeds Alenius, Lisa; Tishelman, Carol; Runesdotter, Sara; Lindqvist, Rikard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although registered nurses (RNs) are central in patient care, we have not found prior research that specifically addresses how RNs assess the safety of patient care at their workplace and how factors in RNs’ work environment are related to their assessments. This study aims to address these issues. Methods 9236 RNs working with inpatient care in 79 acute-care hospitals in Sweden completed a national population-based survey, including Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index—Revised and items from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Correlation coefficients (Pearson and Spearman) and proportional odds regression were used for analysis. Results Nursing work environment factors were strongly related to RNs’ assessments of patient safety. RNs’ perception of having adequate staffing and resources improved their assessment of patient safety by at least two and a half times (OR 2.74 CI 2.52 to 2.97). RNs with a higher level of involvement in direct patient care gave a better patient safety grade than RNs with a more supervisory role. Most, but not all, patient safety culture items were related to RNs’ assessed patient safety grade. We found that work experience seemed to have no influence on RNs’ patient safety assessment. Conclusions While previous research emphasises patient-to-nurse ratios in strengthening patient safety practices, this study complements this by emphasising RNs’ own perception of having enough staff and resources to provide quality nursing care, as well as having good collegial nurse–physician relations and the presence of visible and competent nursing leadership—all factors highly related to RNs’ assessment of the safety of patient care at their workplace. PMID:24125740

  14. Effect of Improved access to Antiretroviral Therapy on clinical characteristics of patients enrolled in the HIV care and treatment clinic, at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabina F. Mugusi; Julius C. Mwita; Joel M. Francis; Said Aboud; Muhammad Bakari; Eric A. Aris; Andrew B. Swai; Ferdinand M. Mugusi; Kisali Pallangyo; Eric Sandstrom

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sub-Saharan Africa has been severely affected by the HIV and AIDS pandemic. Global efforts at improving care and treatment has included scaling up use of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In Tanzania, HIV care and treatment program, including the provision of free ART started in 2004 with a pilot program at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam. This study describes

  15. 76 FR 28795 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security United States Coast Guard-024 Auxiliary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ...Security United States Coast Guard-024 Auxiliary Database System of Records AGENCY: Privacy...Security/United States Coast Guard-024 Auxiliary Database (AUXDATA) System of Records...element, the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary. As a result of the biennial...

  16. 76 FR 49500 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security United States Coast Guard-020 Substance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ...United States Coast Guard--020 Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Program...United States Coast Guard--020 Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Program...United States Coast Guard's Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment...

  17. 46 CFR 159.007-7 - Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. 159...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT... Production Inspection and Tests of Approved Equipment and Materials...for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action....

  18. 46 CFR 159.007-7 - Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. 159...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT... Production Inspection and Tests of Approved Equipment and Materials...for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action....

  19. 46 CFR 159.007-7 - Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. 159...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT... Production Inspection and Tests of Approved Equipment and Materials...for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action....

  20. 46 CFR 159.007-7 - Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. 159...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT... Production Inspection and Tests of Approved Equipment and Materials...for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action....

  1. 46 CFR 159.007-7 - Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. 159...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT... Production Inspection and Tests of Approved Equipment and Materials...for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action....

  2. 33 CFR 187.313 - Must a State honor a prior State title, Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...State honor a prior State title, Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...State honor a prior State title, Coast Guard documentation, and foreign...

  3. 33 CFR 96.450 - What happens if the Coast Guard disapproves an organization's request to be authorized?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false What happens if the Coast Guard disapproves an organization's...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...96.450 What happens if the Coast Guard disapproves an...

  4. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Limited Access Areas Seventh Coast Guard District § 165.776...

  5. 33 CFR 20.1309 - Admissibility of respondents' criminal records and records with the Coast Guard before entry of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...criminal records and records with the Coast Guard before entry of findings and conclusions...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS OF THE COAST GUARD Supplementary Evidentiary...

  6. 76 FR 12982 - Policy for Guidelines for Coast Guard Evaluations of Compliance With the U.S. Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [Docket No. USCG-2011-0104] Policy for Guidelines for Coast Guard Evaluations of Compliance With...Normal Operation of Vessels AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  7. 46 CFR 153.809 - Procedures for having the Coast Guard examine a vessel for a Certificate of Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Procedures for having the Coast Guard examine a vessel for a Certificate... Section 153.809 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...809 Procedures for having the Coast Guard examine a vessel for a...

  8. 33 CFR 96.490 - What further obligations exist for an organization if the Coast Guard terminates its authorization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...exist for an organization if the Coast Guard terminates its authorization...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...exist for an organization if the Coast Guard terminates its...

  9. 46 CFR 44.01-10 - Approval by Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, of special service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Approval by Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, of special service. 44.01-10...Section 44.01-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Approval by Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, of special service....

  10. 78 FR 54168 - Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events; Clarksville Riverfest; Cumberland River 125.0...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0742] RIN 1625-AA08 Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events...0; Clarksville, TN AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  11. 78 FR 22777 - Special Local Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District; St. Croix...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0161...Recurring Marine Events in the Seventh Coast Guard District; St. Croix, U.S.V.I. AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  12. 75 FR 67032 - Security Zone; U.S. Coast Guard BSU Seattle, Pier 36, Seattle, WA; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2010-0021...1625-AA87 Security Zone; U.S. Coast Guard BSU Seattle, Pier 36, Seattle, WA; Correction AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule;...

  13. 46 CFR 154.151 - Procedures for having the Coast Guard examine a vessel for a Certificate of Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Procedures for having the Coast Guard examine a vessel for a Certificate... Section 154.151 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...151 Procedures for having the Coast Guard examine a vessel for a...

  14. DIFERENCIAS EN LAS ESTADÍSTICAS DE JUEGO ENTRE BASES, ALEROS Y PÍVOTS EN BALONCESTO FEMENINO Differences between women's basketball guards, forwards and centres through game-related statistics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miguel Ángel Gómez Ruano; Alberto Lorenzo Calvo; Enrique Ortega Toro; Jaime Sampaio; Sergio-José Ibáńez Godoy

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the differences in game-related statistics between basketball guards, forwards and centres from the WNBA League (professional league in fe- male basketball in USA, organized by the Women National Bas- ketball Association). The sample was gathered from the WNBA boxscores from the 2005 season (n= 215 games), selecting an amount of 75

  15. Books or Guards? Charter School Security Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAngelis, Karen J.; Brent, Brian O.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the costs charter schools incur to foster security--a vexing phenomenon when one considers policymakers' and parents' seemingly high and growing want for school safety. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics and Texas, we reveal how much charter schools spend on security, how they put these resources to…

  16. External ocular surface bacterial isolates and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among pre-operative cataract patients at Mulago National Hospital in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endophthalmitis is a severe complication of cataract surgery which leads to high ocular morbidity and visual loss even with antibiotic treatment. Bacterial ocular floras are the implicated causative agents. This study was undertaken to evaluate the external ocular surface bacterial isolates and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among pre-operative cataract patients at Mulago National Hospital. Methods This cross sectional study enrolled consecutively 131 patients scheduled for routine cataract surgery in the Department of Ophthalmology at Mulago National Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Eyelid margin and conjunctival swabs were collected and processed using standard microbiological procedures to identify bacterial isolates and their respective antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Results Of 131 patients involved (mean age 63.3?±?14.5 years), 54.2% (71/131) were females. The eyelid margin and conjunctival samples were culture positive in 59.5% (78/138) and 45.8% (60/138) respectively. The most common organisms identified were Coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS) [65.9% (91/138)] and Staphylococcus aureus [21.0% (29/138)]. CoNS showed the highest resistance to tetracycline (58.2%, 53/91) and erythromycin (38.5%, 35/91), whereas in S. aureus the resistance to tetracycline and erythromycin were 55.2% (16/29) and 31.0% (9/29) respectively. Methicillin resistant CoNS (MRS) and Methicillin resistance S. aureus (MRSA) were 31.9% (29/91) and 27.6% (8/29) respectively. There were low resistance rates for CoNS, S. aureus and other bacterial isolates to ciprofloxacin (11.1%-24.2%), gentamicin (5.6-31.0%), tobramycin (17.2% -25.3%) and vancomycin (0.0%). Conclusion CoNS and S. aureus are the most common bacterial isolates found on the external ocular surface of the pre-operative cataract patients. Ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, tobramycin and vancomycin showed the lowest resistance rates to all bacterial isolates, therefore may be used to reduce bacteria load in the conjunctiva sac among cataract patients prior to surgery. PMID:24238071

  17. 30 CFR 57.12023 - Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. 57...and Underground § 57.12023 Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. Electrical connections and resistor grids that...

  18. 30 CFR 56.12023 - Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. 56... Electricity § 56.12023 Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. Electrical connections and resistor grids that...

  19. 76 FR 35169 - Validation of Merchant Mariners' Vital Information and Issuance of Coast Guard Merchant Mariner's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 46 CFR Part 10 [Docket No. USCG-2004-17455] RIN 1625-AA85 Validation of Merchant Mariners' Vital Information and Issuance of Coast Guard Merchant Mariner's Licenses and Certificates of...

  20. 29 CFR 1910.23 - Guarding floor and wall openings and holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Guarding floor and wall openings and holes. 1910.23 Section 1910... § 1910.23 Guarding floor and wall openings and holes. (a) Protection for floor openings. (1) Every stairway floor...

  1. 76 FR 13508 - Ninth Coast Guard District Sector Realignment; Northern Lake Michigan and Lake Huron

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ...Ninth Coast Guard District Sector Realignment; Northern Lake Michigan and Lake Huron AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final Rule...reflect the realignment of boundaries shared among Sector Lake Michigan, Sector Detroit, and Sector Sault Ste....

  2. 77 FR 26229 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ...Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United States...waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of...

  3. 77 FR 42652 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ...Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United States...waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of...

  4. 77 FR 1710 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ...Guard [USCG-2011-0975] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee AGENCY...2012, a notice announcing a National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...and forward progress regarding multiple maritime security initiatives. If you have...

  5. 76 FR 25702 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ...USCG-2011-0310] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee...SUMMARY: The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee...affecting the offshore oil and gas industry and assists the Coast Guard...presentation at the International Maritime Organization (IMO)....

  6. UNITED STATES AIR FORCE OUTSIDE THE NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION

    E-print Network

    UNITED STATES AIR FORCE OUTSIDE THE NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION BENEFIT PROGRAM): ____________ City (Residence): __________________________State: _______________ Zip Code: ________________ Air Force (Commercial): (___)____________________ Are you (circle one): Air Force Active Duty Air National Guard Active

  7. Patient evaluation of hospital outcomes: an analysis of open-ended comments from extreme clusters in a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Hilde Hestad; Bjertnćs, Řyvind Andresen; Skudal, Kjersti Eeg

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A recent study identified patients in six distinct response groups based on their evaluations of outcomes related to overall satisfaction, malpractice and benefit of treatment. This study validates the response clusters by analysing and comparing open-ended comments from the extreme positive and extreme negative response groups. Design Qualitative content analysis. Setting Data from open-ended comment fields provided by patients who completed a national patient-experience survey carried out in Norway in 2011. 10?514 patients responded to the questionnaire and 3233 provided comments. A random sample of 50 open-ended comments from respondents representing cluster 1 (‘excellent services’), cluster 5 (‘services have clear improvement needs’) and outliers (‘very poor services’) was reviewed. Results 3 distinct patient profiles were identified. More than half of the comments in cluster 1 included descriptions of positive healthcare experiences, one addressed patient safety issues. Only 1 of the comments in cluster 5 was positive, and 12 were related to safety. All comments from the outliers were negative, and more than three-quarters reported experiences related to malpractice or adverse events. Recurring themes did not differ significantly between the three respondent groups, but significant differences were found for the descriptions and severity of the experiences. Conclusions Patients in negative response groups had distinct and much poorer healthcare descriptions than those in the extreme positive group, supporting the interpretation of quality differences between these groups. Further research should assess ways of combining statistical cluster information and qualitative comments, which could be used for local quality improvement and public reporting. PMID:24879826

  8. The Freedoms of (Guarded) Bisimulation Erich Gradel and Martin Otto

    E-print Network

    Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

    The Freedoms of (Guarded) Bisimulation Erich Gr¨adel and Martin Otto Abstract We survey different available for checking satisfia- bility and for evaluating formulae. Erich Gr¨adel RWTH Aachen University, e;2 Erich Gr¨adel and Martin Otto 1 Introduction Bisimulation equivalence is one of the leading themes

  9. A Tableau Algorithm for the Clique Guarded Fragment

    E-print Network

    Baader, Franz

    variant of bisim- ulation, and other nice model theoretic properties (Andr#19;eka et al. 1998, Gradel fragment (CGF) (Gradel 1999a), for which decidability, invariance under clique guarded bisimulation, and some other properties have been shown in (Gradel 1999a). SuĂ?ce to say that both LGF and CGF properly

  10. Guarded needle for ``charge injection'' measurement and Grace Ge Jiangb)

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Guarded needle for ``charge injection'' measurement Yang Caoa) and Grace Ge Jiangb) Electrical a high-field region of localized high carrier mobility during the formation of a space-charge limited high-field carrier mobility in dielectrics provides insight into transport phenomena and high

  11. Complementary Roles for Primate Frontal and Parietal Cortex in Guarding

    E-print Network

    Nieder, Andreas

    Neuron Article Complementary Roles for Primate Frontal and Parietal Cortex in Guarding Working and Gottlieb, 2013). These studies collectively suggest that attentional filtering per- formance in primates or rather restricted to particular situations. Specifically, it is unknown whether prefrontal sup- pression

  12. Guard tower structural design concept for perimeter security systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Risse

    1983-01-01

    Facilities that require outdoor perimeter sensor fields to furnish perimeter penetration alarms can often benefit by the inclusion of manned guard towers in the total security plan. Acquisition and maintenance costs of closed circuit television to provide adequate visual assessment may be too costly and perhaps tower personnel could perform other functions such as monitoring vehicles or personnel in the

  13. 30 CFR 75.827 - Guarding of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Underground High-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.827 Guarding of trailing...10 feet outby the last strain clamp on the continuous mining machine; and, (iii) At any location where the cable could...

  14. VIEW ALONG FLIGHT LINE FROM SECURITY GUARD TOWER (BUILDING 30631, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW ALONG FLIGHT LINE FROM SECURITY GUARD TOWER (BUILDING 30631, LOOKING TOWARD FB-1 11A AIRCRAFT SHELTERS (BUILDINGS 3066, 3067,3068,3069,3071,3072,3073,3074,3076). VIEW TO SOUTHEAST - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, U.S. Route 9, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  15. Within compound, looking northwest, Power Plant (Building 5761) and Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, looking northwest, Power Plant (Building 5761) and Guard Tower (Building 5762) to left, Electrical Substation to right - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  16. Within compound, looking southwest, Guard Tower (Building 5762) and Technical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, looking southwest, Guard Tower (Building 5762) and Technical Equipment Building (Building 5760) - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  17. Guarding Art Galleries: The Extra Cost for Sculptures Is Linear

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louigi Addario-berry; Omid Amini; Jean-sébastien Sereni; Stéphan Thomassé

    2008-01-01

    Art gallery problems are, broadly speaking, the study of the relation between the shapes of regions in the plane and the number of points needed to guard them. These problems have been extensively studied over the last decade and have found different type of applications in practical situation. Normally the number of sides of a polygon or the general shape

  18. Sample Lesson Plan Machine Guarding 1 Lesson Plan

    E-print Network

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Sample Lesson Plan ­ Machine Guarding 1 Lesson Plan General Industry Outreach Training Program (10 of increasing concern. Step 1: Planning the Lesson · Instructional Materials. 1. PowerPoint presentation. 2 to [number] participants. 4. Incorporate active participation in each lesson. 5. Provide a quiz or short

  19. Within compound, from Guard Tower (Building 5762), looking southwest, Technical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, from Guard Tower (Building 5762), looking southwest, Technical Equipment Building (Building 5760) to left, Microwave Tower (associated with Building 5769) and Civil Engineering Storage Building (Building 5766) to left - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  20. Mesophyll photosynthesis and guard cell metabolism impacts on stomatal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Tracy; Simkin, Andrew J; Kelly, Gilor; Granot, David

    2014-09-01

    Stomata control gaseous fluxes between the internal leaf air spaces and the external atmosphere. Guard cells determine stomatal aperture and must operate to ensure an appropriate balance between CO2 uptake for photosynthesis (A) and water loss, and ultimately plant water use efficiency (WUE). A strong correlation between A and stomatal conductance (gs ) is well documented and often observed, but the underlying mechanisms, possible signals and metabolites that promote this relationship are currently unknown. In this review we evaluate the current literature on mesophyll-driven signals that may coordinate stomatal behaviour with mesophyll carbon assimilation. We explore a possible role of various metabolites including sucrose and malate (from several potential sources; including guard cell photosynthesis) and new evidence that improvements in WUE have been made by manipulating sucrose metabolism within the guard cells. Finally we discuss the new tools and techniques available for potentially manipulating cell-specific metabolism, including guard and mesophyll cells, in order to elucidate mesophyll-derived signals that coordinate mesophyll CO2 demands with stomatal behaviour, in order to provide a mechanistic understanding of these processes as this may identify potential targets for manipulations in order to improve plant WUE and crop yield. PMID:25077787

  1. US COAST GUARD/EPA EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM JURISDICTIONAL BOUNDARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This line coverage represents the United States Coast Guard(USCG)/Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9 Geographic/Jurisdictional Boundary located in California. The boundary was determined from the text description provided in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region...

  2. Educating Coast Guard Officers. Technical Report 5-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, William A.

    This paper lays out a set of general principles and philosophical assumptions for an educational program for Coast Guard officers. The central theme is the assumption that decision-making in a broad range of contexts is the key feature that characterizes the function of commissioned officers. The concept of educating future officers to make such…

  3. 1. GENERAL VIEW, TAKEN FROM EAST. GUARD HOUSE (Bldg. No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW, TAKEN FROM EAST. GUARD HOUSE (Bldg. No. 759) ON EXTREME LEFT, QUARTERMASTER STOREHOUSE AND OFFICE (Bldg. No. 757) IN CENTER, QUARTERMASTER STOREHOUSE (Bldg. No. 915) ON EXTREME RIGHT, STABLES (Bldg. Nos. 916 and 917) BEHIND AND SLIGHTLY TO LEFT OF Bldg. No. 915. - Fort Lawton, Discovery Park, Seattle, King County, WA

  4. An overview of the AMC WWMCCS CAT Guard

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Vick

    1992-01-01

    The US Air Force Air Mobility Command (AMC) World Wide Military Command and Control System (WWMCCS) Crisis Action Team (CAT) Guard (WCG) system provides a multilevel secure electronic interface between AMC's Top Secret System High Command and Control Information System and AMC's Secret System High CAT Global Decision Support System. The functional capabilities of the AMC WCG are summarized. Its

  5. Reduction of guard interval by impulse compression for DMT modulation on twisted pair cables

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Romed Schur; Joachim Speidel; Ralf Angerbauer

    2000-01-01

    In multicarrier modulation schemes like orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) or discrete multi tone (DMT) a guard interval represented by a cyclic prefix is inserted between successive multicarrier symbols in order to reduce intersymbol interference (ISI). The length of the guard interval is determined by the length of the channel impulse response (CIR). For a fixed guard interval, the longer

  6. Guard cell biochemistry: response to environmental stimuli causing changes in gas exchange. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-25

    Progress is reported in research on the biochemistry of guard cells. Methods for the isolation of guard cell protoplasts have been developed. Aqueous two-phase polymer systems for isolating cells, organelles and macromolecules were investigated. Ultramicrofluorometry of NAD(P)H was developed. An attempt has been made to measure abscisic acid in guard cells. (ACR)

  7. 76 FR 25548 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ...Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard...for Coast Guard Use of Force Training exercises. This safety zone will be established...and/or helicopters taking part in the exercise. Unauthorized persons or vessels...

  8. U.S. Coast Guard cutter personnel on Sweetbriar train their fire ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Coast Guard cutter personnel on Sweetbriar train their fire hoses on a burning pleasure boat in an Alaskan harbor. A U.S. Coast Guard rigid-hull inflatable helps with the fire-fighting effort - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter SWEETBRIER, Cordova, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  9. 33 CFR 173.85 - Fees levied by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Fees levied by the Coast Guard. 173.85 Section 173.85 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...173.85 Fees levied by the Coast Guard. (a) In a State where...

  10. Isolation of a strong Arabidopsis guard cell promoter and its potential as a research tool

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingzhen Yang; Alex Costa; Nathalie Leonhardt; Robert S Siegel; Julian I Schroeder

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A common limitation in guard cell signaling research is that it is difficult to obtain consistent high expression of transgenes of interest in Arabidopsis guard cells using known guard cell promoters or the constitutive 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. An additional drawback of the 35S promoter is that ectopically expressing a gene throughout the organism could cause pleiotropic effects.

  11. Organic Acid and Potassium Accumulation in Guard Cells during Stomatal Opening

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William H. Outlaw; Oliver H. Lowry

    1977-01-01

    Leaflets of Vicia faba L. with either open or closed stomata were quick-frozen and freeze-dried. Individual guard cell pairs and pure samples of palisade parenchyma, spongy parenchyma, and epidermis lacking guard cells were dissected from the leaflets, weighed, and assayed for organic acids or K+. K+ was measured by a new enzymatic method. In guard cells of open stomata, as

  12. [Pro general hospital].

    PubMed

    Carreras-González, E; Marruecos-Sant, L

    2010-04-01

    Trauma operative systems were created in United States to optimize polytrauma patients' treatment. These systems include prehospital polytrauma care. They determine hospital requirements to treat this kind of patients, standardize physicians' training and implement hospital registries. Initially, this system was applied only in monographic centers. However, trauma services of General Hospitals that fulfill the requirements were authorized progressively by the American Surgery Academy to fulfill this function. This is the model followed in Europe at present. Accreditation requires the qualification of the stay, with specific health care resources and a detailed trauma program. The director is responsible for organizing the creation of the trauma teams, operating 24h, for teaching, protocols and guides and the coordination of pre-hospital emergency groups. In Spain, there is an extensive network of tertiary hospitals that have trauma programs and their consequent accreditation could make it possible to take advantage of their existing resources. An accreditation system should be elaborated in order to homogenize professional training in trauma emergencies and to create a National Polytraumatic Registry. The high level of technology of these hospitals and of their human resources that include all the medical, surgical specialties and central services provide an added value. Care to the trauma patients is complex and multidisciplinary. Thus, we believe that General Hospitals, within a traumas program, are the best setting to offer it with excellent conditions. PMID:19942318

  13. Health-related quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs at National Referral Hospitals in Uganda: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a devastating disorder that impacts on patients’ quality of life, irrespective of use of anti epileptic drugs (AEDs). This study estimates the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its associated predictors among epilepsy patients receiving AEDs. Methods A total of 175 epilepsy patients already receiving AED for at least 3 months were randomly selected and interviewed from mental clinics at Mulago and Butabika national referral hospitals in Uganda between May - July 2011. A HRQOL index, the primary outcome, was constructed using items from Quality Of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaires. The internal consistency and adequacy of these items was also computed using Cronbach's alpha and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin tests. Partial correlations were used to evaluate the contribution of the health dimensions (mental, psychological, social, physical functioning and emotional well being) and, multiple linear regressions to determine factors independently associated with HRQOL. Results Just about half of the respondents (54%) were males, and nearly two thirds (62%) had received AEDs for at least 12 months. The average age was 26.6 years (SD?=?11.1). The overall HRQOL mean score was 58 (SD?=?13) on a scale of 0–100. The average scores of different dimensions or subscales ranged from 41 (physical) to 65 (psychological). At least three quarters (75%) of all subscales had good internal consistency and adequacy. The largest variations in the overall HRQOL were explained by social and mental functioning; each accounting for about 30% of the difference in the HRQOL but seizure control features explained a little (6%) variation. Factors negatively associated with HRQOL were poly-therapy (-1.16, p?=?0.01) and frequency of seizures (-2.29, p?=?0.00). Other factors associated with overall HRQOL included drug side effects, sex, marital status and education. Duration on AEDs was not a significant predictor of HRQOL. Conclusion The HRQOL for epilepsy patients on AEDs is very low. The predictors of low HRQOL were socio factors (marital status, education) and drug side effects, frequency of seizure, and type of therapy. PMID:24725904

  14. PROJECTION OF HOSPITAL AND CLINIC HEALTH CARE RISK WASTE GENERATION QUANTITIES AND TREATMENT CAPACITIES FOR THE SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY IMPLEMENTATION PROJECT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROGERS DEC; MOLEFE S; GCWENSA Q

    This paper addresses the need for quantitative data for planning health care risk waste (HCRW) management from hospitals and clinics in South Africa. Quantitative estimates of HCRW generation and treatment capacity are determined for hospitals and clinics so that: 1) provincial tenders can be prepared and assessed, even if there is no previous recording of masses of HCRW, 2) the

  15. GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS; SECOND FLOOR PLAN AND DOOR FRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS; SECOND FLOOR PLAN AND DOOR FRAME AND WINDOW DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Navy Yard, Mar Island, CA. Albert F. Roller, Architect, San Francisco, CA. H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 2 of 15, accompanying specification Noy-4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 14, 1941. Yards & Docks drawing no. 160687; P.W. (Public Works) drawing no. 10388-26; file no. 930-CR-4. Scale one eighth inch to one foot (floor plan) and 3 inches to one foot (details). 73 cm x 129 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  16. Isolation of a strong Arabidopsis guard cell promoter and its potential as a research tool

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yingzhen; Costa, Alex; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Siegel, Robert S; Schroeder, Julian I

    2008-01-01

    Background A common limitation in guard cell signaling research is that it is difficult to obtain consistent high expression of transgenes of interest in Arabidopsis guard cells using known guard cell promoters or the constitutive 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. An additional drawback of the 35S promoter is that ectopically expressing a gene throughout the organism could cause pleiotropic effects. To improve available methods for targeted gene expression in guard cells, we isolated strong guard cell promoter candidates based on new guard cell-specific microarray analyses of 23,000 genes that are made available together with this report. Results A promoter, pGC1(At1g22690), drove strong and relatively specific reporter gene expression in guard cells including GUS (beta-glucuronidase) and yellow cameleon YC3.60 (GFP-based calcium FRET reporter). Reporter gene expression was weaker in immature guard cells. The expression of YC3.60 was sufficiently strong to image intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in guard cells of intact plants and resolved spontaneous calcium transients in guard cells. The GC1 promoter also mediated strong reporter expression in clustered stomata in the stomatal development mutant too-many-mouths (tmm). Furthermore, the same promoter::reporter constructs also drove guard cell specific reporter expression in tobacco, illustrating the potential of this promoter as a method for high level expression in guard cells. A serial deletion of the promoter defined a guard cell expression promoter region. In addition, anti-sense repression using pGC1 was powerful for reducing specific GFP gene expression in guard cells while expression in leaf epidermal cells was not repressed, demonstrating strong cell-type preferential gene repression. Conclusion The pGC1 promoter described here drives strong reporter expression in guard cells of Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. It provides a potent research tool for targeted guard cell expression or gene silencing. It is also applicable to reduce specific gene expression in guard cells, providing a method for circumvention of limitations arising from genetic redundancy and lethality. These advances could be very useful for manipulating signaling pathways in guard cells and modifying plant performance under stress conditions. In addition, new guard cell and mesophyll cell-specific 23,000 gene microarray data are made publicly available here. PMID:18284694

  17. Nontraumatic dental condition-related visits to emergency departments on weekdays, weekends and night hours: findings from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care survey

    PubMed Central

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Fischer, Melissa Christine; Sadeghi, Saba Noori; Xiang, Qun; Szabo, Aniko

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the rates of nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC)-related emergency department (ED) visits are higher during the typical working hours of dental offices and lower during night hours, as well as the associated factors. Methods We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 1997 through 2007 using multivariate binary and polytomous logistic regression adjusted for survey design to determine the effect of predictors on specified outcome variables. Results Overall, 4,726 observations representing 16.4 million NTDC-related ED visits were identified. Significant differences in rates of NTDC-related ED visits were observed with 40%–50% higher rates during nonworking hours and 20% higher rates on weekends than the overall average rate of 170 visits per hour. Compared with 19–33 year olds, subjects < 18 years old had significantly higher relative rates of NTDC-related ED visits during nonworking hours [relative rate ratio (RRR) = 1.6 to 1.8], whereas those aged 73 and older had lower relative rates during nonworking hours (RRR = 0.4; overall P = 0.0005). Compared with those having private insurance, Medicaid and self-pay patients had significantly lower relative rates of NTDC visits during nonworking and night hours (RRR = 0.6 to 0.7, overall P < 0.0003). Patients with a dental reason for visit were overrepresented during the night hours (RRR = 1.3; overall P = 0.04). Conclusion NTDC-related visits to ED occurred at a higher rate during nonworking hours and on weekends and were significantly associated with age, patient-stated reason for visit and payer type. PMID:24039453

  18. Peripheral Arterial Disease among Adult Diabetic Patients Attending a Large Outpatient Diabetic Clinic at a National Referral Hospital in Uganda: A Descriptive Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mwebaze, Raymond Mbayo; Kibirige, Davis

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is one of the recognised diabetic macro vascular complications. It is a marker of generalised systemic atherosclerosis and is closely associated with symptomatic coronary and cerebrovascular disease, hence significant morbidity and mortality. Among African adult diabetic populations, screening and diagnosis of PAD is frequently suboptimal. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated clinical factors of PAD in adult ambulatory diabetic patients attending the outpatient diabetic clinic of Mulago national referral and teaching hospital, Kampala Uganda. Methods In this descriptive cross sectional study, 146 ambulatory adult diabetic patients were studied. Information about their socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, fasting lipid profile status, blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and presence of albuminuria was collected using a pre tested questionnaire. Measurement of ankle brachial index (ABI) to assess for PAD, defined as a ratio less than 0.9 was performed using a portable 5–10 MHz Doppler device. Clinical factors associated with PAD were determined by comparing specific selected characteristics in patients with PAD and those without. Results The mean age/standard deviation of the study participants was 53.9/12.4 years with a male predominance (75, 51.4%). PAD was prevalent in 57 (39%) study participants. Of these, 34 (59.6%) had symptomatic PAD. The noted clinical factors associated with PAD in this study population were presence of symptoms of intermittent claudication and microalbuminuria. Conclusions This study documents a high prevalence of PAD among adult ambulatory Ugandan diabetic patients. Aggressive screening for PAD using ABI measurement in adult diabetic patients should be emphasised in Uganda especially in the presence of symptoms of intermittent claudication and microalbuminuria. PMID:25133533

  19. Topographic and location map of Bonita Point Coast Guard and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Topographic and location map of Bonita Point Coast Guard and lighthouse station, June 1940, this drawing shows the Bonita Ridge access road retaining wall and general conditions at Fort Barry and Bonita Ridge (upper left) before the construction of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  20. Perfect equalization for DMT systems without guard interval

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steffen Trautmann; Norbert J. Fliege

    2002-01-01

    We propose a new, low-complexity frequency-domain equalizer for discrete multitone (DMT) systems, which, in the absence of a guard interval, utilizes existing redundancy in the frequency-domain to completely eliminate intersymbol and interchannel interference. A perfect reconstruction condition is derived for the noise-free case leading to a sparse equalizer matrix structure. It is furthermore shown that under realistic scenarios minimum mean

  1. Guarded evaluation: pushing power management to logic synthesis\\/design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vivek Tiwari; Sharad Malik; Pranav Ashar

    1995-01-01

    The need to reduce the power consumption of the nextgeneration of digital systems is clearly recognized. Atthe system level, power management is a very powerfultechnique and delivers large and unambiguous savings.This paper describes the development and application ofalgorithms that use ideas similar to power management,but that are applicable to logic level synthesis\\/design.The proposed approach is termed guarded evaluation.The main idea

  2. Automatic CCTV surveillance-towards the VIRTUAL GUARD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Thiel

    1999-01-01

    The VIRTUAL GUARD is a general-purpose computer-based CCTV surveillance system for detecting potential criminal activity in public areas. The system monitors all activity in the surveillance area, the vast majority of which is people innocently going about their normal business. It will alarm when the observed activities of particular pedestrians and vehicles match any of the pre-defined suspicious behaviour criteria

  3. Automatic CCTV surveillance-towards the VIRTUAL GUARD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Thiel

    2000-01-01

    The VIRTUAL GUARD is a general-purpose computer-based CCTV surveillance system for detecting potential criminal activity in public areas. The system monitors all activity in the surveillance area, the vast majority of which is people innocently going about their normal business. It will alarm when the observed activities of particular pedestrians and vehicles match any of the pre-defined “suspicious behaviour criteria”

  4. Transpiration Rate. An Important Factor Controlling the Sucrose Content of the Guard Cell Apoplast of Broad Bean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William H. Outlaw

    2001-01-01

    Evaporation of water from the guard cell wall concentrates apoplastic solutes. We hypothesize that this phenomenon provides two mechanisms for responding to high transpiration rates. First, apoplastic abscisic acid is concentrated in the guard cell wall. Second, by accumulating in the guard cell wall, apoplastic sucrose (Suc) provides a direct osmotic feedback to guard cells. As a means of testing

  5. Gate control: guard cell regulation by microbial stress.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Deirdre H; Kopischke, Michaela; Robatzek, Silke

    2014-09-01

    Terrestrial plants rely on stomata, small pores in the leaf surface, for photosynthetic gas exchange and transpiration of water. The stomata, formed by a pair of guard cells, dynamically increase and decrease their volume to control the pore size in response to environmental cues. Stresses can trigger similar or opposing movements: for example, drought induces closure of stomata, whereas many pathogens exploit stomata and cause them to open to facilitate entry into plant tissues. The latter is an active process as stomatal closure is part of the plant's immune response. Stomatal research has contributed much to clarify the signalling pathways of abiotic stress, but guard cell signalling in response to microbes is a relatively new area of research. In this article, we discuss present knowledge of stomatal regulation in response to microbes and highlight common points of convergence, and differences, compared to stomatal regulation by abiotic stresses. We also expand on the mechanisms by which pathogens manipulate these processes to promote disease, for example by delivering effectors to inhibit closure or trigger opening of stomata. The study of pathogen effectors in stomatal manipulation will aid our understanding of guard cell signalling. PMID:25040778

  6. Public and private maternal health service capacity and patient flows in southern Tanzania: using a geographic information system to link hospital and national census data

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Patrik; Henke, Stefanie; Sušac, Katharina; Kisanga, Oberlin M. E.; Baumgarten, Inge; Kynast-Wolf, Gisela; Ramroth, Heribert; Marx, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Strategies to improve maternal health in low-income countries are increasingly embracing partnership approaches between public and private stakeholders in health. In Tanzania, such partnerships are a declared policy goal. However, implementation remains challenging as unfamiliarity between partners and insufficient recognition of private health providers prevail. This hinders cooperation and reflects the need to improve the evidence base of private sector contribution. Objective To map and analyse the capacities of public and private hospitals to provide maternal health care in southern Tanzania and the population reached with these services. Design A hospital questionnaire was applied in all 16 hospitals (public n=10; private faith-based n=6) in 12 districts of southern Tanzania. Areas of inquiry included selected maternal health service indicators (human resources, maternity/delivery beds), provider-fees for obstetric services and patient turnover (antenatal care, births). Spatial information was linked to the 2002 Population Census dataset and a geographic information system to map patient flows and socio-geographic characteristics of service recipients. Results The contribution of faith-based organizations (FBOs) to hospital maternal health services is substantial. FBO hospitals are primarily located in rural areas and their patient composition places a higher emphasis on rural populations. Also, maternal health service capacity was more favourable in FBO hospitals. We approximated that 19.9% of deliveries in the study area were performed in hospitals and that the proportion of c-sections was 2.7%. Mapping of patient flows demonstrated that women often travelled far to seek hospital care and where catchment areas of public and FBO hospitals overlap. Conclusions We conclude that the important contribution of FBOs to maternal health services and capacity as well as their emphasis on serving rural populations makes them promising partners in health programming. Inclusive partnerships could increase integration of FBOs into the public health care system and improve coordination and use of scarce resources. PMID:24433944

  7. Design of round-robin tests with guarded\\/calibrated hot boxes, guarded hot plates, and heat flow meters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. J. Powell; E. L. Bales

    1983-01-01

    Design and procedures for three round-robin tests of thermal insulation materials are described. The first, sponsored by ASTM Committee C-16 on Thermal Insulation, was intended to produce calibration and precision and accuracy data for ASTM Test for Thermal Conductance and Transmittance of Built-Up Sections by Means of the Guarded Hot Box (C 236) and a draft ASTM standard for a

  8. [Smarter hospital care].

    PubMed

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Papadopoulos, Niki E; Legemate, Dink A

    2014-01-01

    The quality of hospital care is being questioned. This calls for decisions and innovations both in terms of care process and content. Innovations do not always have the desired effect and are often insufficiently supported by scientific evidence. The adoption and application of evidence-based principles in the organization as well as in the content of healthcare are therefore pivotal, not only for care professionals, but for hospital managers and decision makers as well. Implementation of these ideas appears most successful when conducted on different levels: national, strategic, tactical, and operational, and in educational as well as clinical settings. PMID:24893809

  9. Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students' expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

  10. Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students` expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

  11. Design of round-robin tests with guarded/calibrated hot boxes, guarded hot plates, and heat flow meters

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, F.J.; Bales, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    Design and procedures for three round-robin tests of thermal insulation materials are described. The first, sponsored by ASTM Committee C-16 on Thermal Insulation, was intended to produce calibration and precision and accuracy data for ASTM Test for Thermal Conductance and Transmittance of Built-Up Sections by Means of the Guarded Hot Box (C 236) and a draft ASTM standard for a calibrated hot box test. The second, sponsored by International Standards Organization Technical Committee 163 on Thermal Insulation, covered guarded hot plate and heat flow meter tests of thermal resistance of thick thermal insulation materials, and was intended to produce calibration and precision and accuracy data for ISO specifications for such tests and those of each of the 22 participating countries - in the United States, ASTM Test for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Guarded Hot Plate (C 177) and ASTM Test for Steady-State Thermal Transmission properties by Means of Heat Flow Meter (C 518). The third round-robin test involved tests of glass-fiber insulating material and was sponsored by ASTM Subcommittee C16.30 on Thermal Measurement and the Mineral Insulation Manufacturers Association.

  12. Layout guidelines to minimize latchup in CMOS circuits using guard rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obiomon, Pamela Holland

    This research provides guidelines for selecting, implementing and testing guard structures. To provide these guidelines structural differences of existing guard structures have been explored and the influence of the guard structure layout on CMOS latchup has been investigated. There are only two types of guard structures: majority carrier and minority carrier, but there are over twenty-five choices and numerous ways of implementing each choice to minimize latchup. Majority and minority carrier guard structures can be located (a) in the substrate, (b) near the emitting source, (c) surrounding the emitter, (d) near the well edge, (e) surrounding the well edge, or (f) in various positions inside the well. A chip designer must select the appropriate type of guard structure, make decisions to select an appropriate location and determine an optimal guard width for a particular application. The rules for using guard structures are far from universal, and determining which guard structure to implement can be a difficult task for a less experienced designer. The guidelines presented in this research will assist the less experienced designer in making decisions as to which guard structure to select, where to locate the structure within a CMOS layout, and how to test the for latchup immunity of the CMOS design.

  13. Microtubules are essential for guard-cell function in Vicia and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, William; Ehrhardt, David; Briggs, Winslow

    2012-05-01

    Radially arranged cortical microtubules are a prominent feature of guard cells. Guard cells expressing GFP-tubulin showed consistent changes in the appearance of microtubules when stomata opened or closed. Guard cells showed fewer microtubule structures as stomata closed, whether induced by transfer to darkness, ABA, hydrogen peroxide, or sodium hydrogen carbonate. Guard cells kept in the dark (closed stomata) showed increases in microtubule structures and stomatal aperture on light treatment. GFP-EB1, marking microtubule growing plus ends, showed no change in number of plus ends or velocity of assembly on stomatal closure. Since the number of growing plus ends and the rate of plus-end growth did not change when microtubule structure numbers declined, microtubule instability and/or rearrangement must be responsible for the apparent loss of microtubules. Guard cells with closed stomata showed more cytosolic GFP-fluorescence than those with open stomata as cortical microtubules became disassembled, although with a large net loss in total fluorescence. Microtubule-targeted drugs blocked guard-cell function in Vicia and Arabidopsis. Oryzalin disrupted guard-cell microtubules and prevented stomatal opening and taxol stabilized guard-cell microtubules and delayed stomatal closure. Gas exchange measurements indicated that the transgenes for fluorescent-labeled proteins did not disrupt normal stomatal function. These dynamic changes in guard-cell microtubules combined with our inhibitor studies provide evidence for an active role of microtubules in guard-cell function. PMID:22402260

  14. Emergency department visits and hospitalizations by tube-fed nursing home residents with varying degrees of cognitive impairment: a national study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous studies indicate that the use of feeding tubes (FT) in persons with advanced cognitive impairment (CI) does not improve clinical outcomes or survival, and results in higher rates of hospitalization and emergency department (ED) visits. It is not clear, however, whether such risk varies by resident level of CI and whether these ED visits and hospitalizations are potentially preventable. The objective of this study was to determine the rates of ED visits, hospitalizations and potentially preventable ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) ED visits and ACS hospitalizations for long-stay NH residents with FTs at differing levels of CI. Methods We linked Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services inpatient & outpatient administrative claims and beneficiary eligibility data with Minimum Data Set (MDS) resident assessment data for nursing home residents with feeding tubes in a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries residing in US nursing facilities in 2006 (n?=?3479). Severity of CI was measured using the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS) and categorized into 4 groups: None/Mild (CPS?=?0-1, MMSE?=?22-25), Moderate (CPS?=?2-3, MMSE?=?15-19), Severe (CPS?=?4-5, MMSE?=?5-7) and Very Severe (CPS?=?6, MMSE?=?0-4). ED visits, hospitalizations, ACS ED visits and ACS hospitalizations were ascertained from inpatient and outpatient administrative claims. We estimated the risk ratio of each outcome by CI level using over-dispersed Poisson models accounting for potential confounding factors. Results Twenty-nine percent of our cohort was considered “comatose” and “without any discernible consciousness”, suggesting that over 20,000 NH residents in the US with feeding tubes are non-interactive. Approximately 25% of NH residents with FTs required an ED visit or hospitalization, with 44% of hospitalizations and 24% of ED visits being potentially preventable or for an ACS condition. Severity of CI had a significant effect on rates of ACS ED visits, but little effect on ACS hospitalizations. Conclusions ED visits and hospitalizations are common in cognitively impaired tube-fed nursing home residents and a substantial proportion of ED visits and hospitalizations are potentially preventable due to ACS conditions. PMID:24650076

  15. Hospitality Management APPLIED SCIENCES AND ARTS

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    , and vibrant metropolitan location, we attract millions of national and international visitors each yearFact Sheet Hospitality Management COLLEGE OF APPLIED SCIENCES AND ARTS Department of Hospitality Management Where better to study hospitality management than in the heart of Silicon Valley, San Jose

  16. Patterns of injury in hospitalized terrorist victims

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kobi Peleg; Limor Aharonson-Daniel; Michael Michael; S. C Shapira

    2003-01-01

    Acts of terror increase the demand for acute care. This article describes the pattern of injury of terror victims hospitalized at 9 acute-care hospitals in Israel during a 15-month period of terrorism. To characterize patients hospitalized as a result of terror injuries, we compared terror casualties with other injuries regarding severity, outcome, and service utilization. Using data from the National

  17. [Marianne in hospital].

    PubMed

    Weium, Frode

    2003-12-23

    In 1948 Norwegian architect and author Odd Brochmann (1909-92) published his popular children's book Marianne in hospital (Marianne pĺ sykehus). Two years later the book was filmed on the initiative of the Ministry of Social Affairs. This article considers the question of what were the purposes of the film. Officially, it was presented as an attempt to teach children not to be afraid of hospitals. However, in internal notes and letters the health authorities stressed that the film should be an educational film about the social benefits and health services of the welfare state. Furthermore, I will argue that the film was the result of a wish to present the nation's modern hospital care and, by way of conclusion, discuss the characterisation of the film as educational. PMID:14691510

  18. Challenges of caring for children with mental disorders: Experiences and views of caregivers attending the outpatient clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam - Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is estimated that world-wide up to 20?% of children suffer from debilitating mental illness. Mental disorders that pose a significant concern include learning disorders, hyperkinetic disorders (ADHD), depression, psychosis, pervasive development disorders, attachment disorders, anxiety disorders, conduct disorder, substance abuse and eating disorders. Living with such children can be very stressful for caregivers in the family. Therefore, determination of challenges of living with these children is important in the process of finding ways to help or support caregivers to provide proper care for their children. The purpose of this study was to explore the psychological and emotional, social, and economic challenges that parents or guardians experience when caring for mentally ill children and what they do to address or deal with them. Methodology A qualitative study design using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions was applied. The study was conducted at the psychiatric unit of Muhimbili National Hospital in Tanzania. Two focus groups discussions (FGDs) and 8 in-depth interviews were conducted with caregivers who attended the psychiatric clinic with their children. Data analysis was done using content analysis. Results The study revealed psychological and emotional, social, and economic challenges caregivers endure while living with mentally ill children. Psychological and emotional challenges included being stressed by caring tasks and having worries about the present and future life of their children. They had feelings of sadness, and inner pain or bitterness due to the disturbing behaviour of the children. They also experienced some communication problems with their children due to their inability to talk. Social challenges were inadequate social services for their children, stigma, burden of caring task, lack of public awareness of mental illness, lack of social support, and problems with social life. The economic challenges were poverty, child care interfering with various income generating activities in the family, and extra expenses associated with the child’s illness. Conclusion Caregivers of mentally ill children experience various psychological and emotional, social, and economic challenges. Professional assistance, public awareness of mental illnesses in children, social support by the government, private sector, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are important in addressing these challenges. PMID:22559084

  19. Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-11-12

    Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

  20. The social environment affects mate guarding behavior in Japanese beetles, Popillia japonica

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Yoriko; Kruse, Kipp C.; Switzer, Paul V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the social environment on post-copulatory mate guarding duration in Japanese beetles, (Popillia japonica Newman), was examined in a laboratory experiment. The mate guarding durations of beetles in different sex ratios and densities were observed for 10 hours. Guarding duration was longer when females were larger, suggesting the presence of ‘cryptic’ male mate choice. Densities, but not sex ratio, affected the duration of guarding bouts, with males guarding for longer at higher densities. This result implies that males increase their guarding duration under conditions in which their female may be likely to be encountered by other males. The lack of a sex ratio effect on the duration of guarding bouts is consistent with other studies on this species that indicate males have difficulty distinguishing females from males. Consequently, because the sex ratio on food plants is typically male-biased, a paired male may react just to density, treating surrounding individuals as if they were mostly males. The total amount of time males spent guarding was lower at lower densities and at male-biased sex ratios; this suggests that after ceasing to guard one female, males were less able to find a subsequent mate under these conditions. PMID:16341250

  1. New approaches to the biology of stomatal guard cells.

    PubMed

    Negi, Juntaro; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Kusumi, Kensuke; Iba, Koh

    2014-02-01

    CO2 acts as an environmental signal that regulates stomatal movements. High CO2 concentrations reduce stomatal aperture, whereas low concentrations trigger stomatal opening. In contrast to our advanced understanding of light and drought stress responses in guard cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying stomatal CO2 sensing and signaling are largely unknown. Leaf temperature provides a convenient indicator of transpiration, and can be used to detect mutants with altered stomatal control. To identify genes that function in CO2 responses in guard cells, CO2-insensitive mutants were isolated through high-throughput leaf thermal imaging. The isolated mutants are categorized into three groups according to their phenotypes: (i) impaired in stomatal opening under low CO2 concentrations; (ii) impaired in stomatal closing under high CO2 concentrations; and (iii) impaired in stomatal development. Characterization of these mutants has begun to yield insights into the mechanisms of stomatal CO2 responses. In this review, we summarize the current status of the field and discuss future prospects. PMID:24104052

  2. Evidence for a persistent, major excess in all cause admissions to hospital in children with type-1 diabetes: results from a large Welsh national matched community cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Adrian; Thayer, Daniel; Harvey, John N; Luzio, Stephen; Atkinson, Mark D; French, Robert; Warner, Justin T; Dayan, Colin M; Wong, Susan F; Gregory, John W

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the excess in admissions associated with type1 diabetes in childhood. Design Matched-cohort study using anonymously linked hospital admission data. Setting Brecon Group Register of new cases of childhood diabetes in Wales linked to hospital admissions data within the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage Databank. Population 1577 Welsh children (aged between 0 and 15?years) from the Brecon Group Register with newly-diagnosed type-1 diabetes between 1999–2009 and 7800 population controls matched on age, sex, county, and deprivation, randomly selected from the local population. Main outcome measures Difference in all-cause hospital admission rates, 30-days post-diagnosis until 31 May 2012, between participants and controls. Results Children with type-1 diabetes were followed up for a total of 12?102 person years and were at 480% (incidence rate ratios, IRR 5.789, (95% CI 5.34 to 6.723), p<0.0001) increased risk of hospital admission in comparison to matched controls. The highest absolute excess of admission was in the age group of 0–5?years, with a 15.4% (IRR 0.846, (95% CI 0.744 to 0.965), p=0.0061) reduction in hospital admissions for every 5-year increase in age at diagnosis. A trend of increasing admission rates in lower socioeconomic status groups was also observed, but there was no evidence of a differential rate of admissions between men and women when adjusted for background risk. Those receiving outpatient care at large centres had a 16.1% (IRR 0.839, (95% CI 0.709 to 0.990), p=0.0189) reduction in hospital admissions compared with those treated at small centres. Conclusions There is a large excess of hospital admissions in paediatric patients with type-1 diabetes. Rates are highest in the youngest children with low socioeconomic status. Factors influencing higher admission rates in smaller centres (eg, “out of hours resources”) need to be explored with the aim of targeting modifiable influences on admission rates. PMID:25869680

  3. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  4. A Forgotten Sector; The Training of Ancillary Staff in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Duncan N.

    A study was made, in England and Wales, of training needs of hospital ancillary staff; it concentrated on a group of hospitals in each of six Hospital Regions. In addition, information was collected at the national level and brief visits were made in other regions. Findings showed large differences in staffing between hospitals of similar types,…

  5. Infectious Disease Hospitalizations Among Infants in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krista L. Yorita; Robert C. Holman; James J. Sejvar; Claudia A. Steiner; Lawrence B. Schonberger

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study describes the burden and epidemiologic features of infectious disease hospitalizations among infants in the United States. METHODS. Hospitalizations with an infectious disease listed as a primary diagnosis for infants (1 year of age) in the United States during 2003 were examined by using the Kids' Inpatient Database. National estimates of infectious disease hospitalizations, hospitalization rates, and various

  6. A national case-crossover analysis of the short-term effect of PM2.5 on hospitalizations and mortality in subjects with diabetes and neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes and neurological disorders are a growing burden among the elderly, and may also make them more susceptible to particulate air matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 ?g (PM2.5). The same biological responses thought to effect cardiovascular disease through air pollution-mediated systemic oxidative stress, inflammation and cerebrovascular dysfunction could also be relevant for diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. Methods We conducted multi-site case-crossover analyses of all-cause deaths and of hospitalizations for diabetes or neurological disorders among Medicare enrollees (>65 years) during the period 1999 to 2010 in 121 US communities. We examined whether 1) short-term exposure to PM2.5 increases the risk of hospitalization for diabetes or neurological disorders, and 2) the association between short-term exposure to PM2.5 and all-cause mortality is modified by having a previous hospitalization of diabetes or neurological disorders. Results We found that short term exposure to PM2.5 is significantly associated with an increase in hospitalization risks for diabetes (1.14% increase, 95% CI: 0.56, 1.73 for a 10 ?g/m3 increase in the 2 days average), and for Parkinson’s disease (3.23%, 1.08, 5.43); we also found an increase in all-cause mortality risks (0.64%, 95% CI: 0.42, 0.85), but we didn’t find that hospitalization for diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases modifies the association between short term exposure to PM2.5 and all-cause mortality. Conclusion We found that short-term exposure to fine particles increased the risk of hospitalizations for Parkinson’s disease and diabetes, and of all-cause mortality. While the association between short term exposure to PM2.5 and mortality was higher among Medicare enrollees that had a previous admission for diabetes and neurological disorders than among Medicare enrollees that did not had a prior admission for these diseases, the effect modification was not statistically significant. We believe that these results provide useful insights regarding the mechanisms by which particles may affect the brain. A better understanding of the mechanisms will enable the development of new strategies to protect individuals at risk and to reduce detrimental effects of air pollution on the nervous system. PMID:24886318

  7. 78 FR 55214 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ...Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement...O.R.T.) boat races to be held on the Neches River in Orange, TX from 3 p.m. on September 20, 2013, through 6...

  8. 77 FR 47519 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ...Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement...Regulations for the S.P.O.R.T. Power Boat Neches River in Orange, TX from 3 p.m. on September 21, 2012, through 6...

  9. Increased parental care cost for nest-guarding fish in a lake with hyperabundant nest predators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geoffrey B. Steinhart; Melissa E. Sandrene; Stephanie Weaver; Roy A. Stein; Elizabeth A. Marschalla

    2005-01-01

    Although parental care increases offspring survival, providing care is costly, reducing parental growth and survival and, thereby, compromising future reproductive success. To determine if an exotic benthic predator might be affecting parental care by nest-guarding smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), we compared nest-guarding behavior and energy expenditures in two systems, one with a hyperabundant recently introduced predator, the round goby (Neogobious

  10. 33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12 Section 125...TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.12 Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) The...

  11. 33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12 Section 125...TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.12 Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) The...

  12. 33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12 Section 125...TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.12 Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) The...

  13. 33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12 Section 125...TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.12 Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) The...

  14. A Comparative Study of the Arabidopsis thaliana Guard-Cell Transcriptome and Its Modulation by Sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Bates, George W.; Rosenthal, David M.; Sun, Jindong; Chattopadhyay, Maitreyi; Peffer, Emily; Yang, Jing; Ort, Donald R.; Jones, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Microarray analysis was performed on RNA isolated from guard cells that were manually dissected from leaves of Arabidopsis. By pooling our data with those of two earlier studies on Arabidopsis guard cell protoplasts, we provide a robust view of the guard-cell transcriptome, which is rich in transcripts for transcription factors, signaling proteins, transporters, and carbohydrate-modifying enzymes. To test the hypothesis that photosynthesis-derived sugar signals guard cells to adjust stomatal opening, we determined the profile of genes expressed in guard cells from leaves that had been treated with sucrose. The results revealed that expression of 440 genes changed in guard cells in response to sucrose. Consistent with this hypothesis, these genes encoded cellular functions for photosynthesis and transport of sugars, water, amino acids, and ions. Plants of T-DNA insertion lines for 50 genes highly responsive to sucrose were examined for defects in guard cell function. Twelve genes not previously known to function in guard cells were shown to be important in leaf conductance, water-use efficiency, and/or stomate development. Of these, three are of particular interest, having shown effects in nearly every test of stomatal function without a change in stomatal density: TPS5 (At4g17770), a TRAF domain-containing protein (At1g65370), and a WD repeat–containing protein (At1g15440). PMID:23185391

  15. 29 CFR 1915.73 - Guarding of deck openings and edges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Guarding of deck openings and edges. 1915.73 Section 1915...Surfaces § 1915.73 Guarding of deck openings and edges. (a) The provisions...vicinity of flush manholes and other small openings of comparable size in the deck and...

  16. GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S84 WITH RANGE POLE Naval Magazine Lualualei, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S84 WITH RANGE POLE - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, On ridge above Tunnel CE-1, on Prime Road on ridge above Tunnel B-11, & on ridge above Tunnel C-17, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Analysis of abscisic acid responsive proteins in Brassica napus guard cells by multiplexed isobaric tagging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mengmeng Zhu; Brigitte Simons; Ning Zhu; David G. Oppenheimer; Sixue Chen

    2010-01-01

    Guard cells, which form stomata on the leaf epidermis, play important roles in plant gas exchange and defense against pathogens. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone that can be induced by drought and leads to stomatal closure. Guard cells have been a premier model system for studying ABA signal transduction. Despite significant progress on the identification of molecular components in

  18. Verifying the Soundness of Resource Analysis for LogicGuard Monitors

    E-print Network

    Verifying the Soundness of Resource Analysis for LogicGuard Monitors Revised Version Temur KutsiaGuard Monitors. RISC Technical report, December 5, 2013) we described a static analysis to determine whether language that monitors a single stream. Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 The Core Language and Resource Analysis

  19. Verifying the Soundness of Resource Analysis for LogicGuard Monitors

    E-print Network

    Schneider, Carsten

    Verifying the Soundness of Resource Analysis for LogicGuard Monitors Part 1 Temur Kutsia Wolfgang In a companion paper (Wolfgang Schreiner, Temur Kutsia. A Resource Analysis for Log- icGuard Monitors. RISC language that monitors a single stream. Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 The Core Language and Resource Analysis

  20. Reconstruction of the guard walls of locks on the Oka River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. M. Tavrizov

    1989-01-01

    Conclusions The guard walls of the locks in the form of a continuous vertical wall of Larsen steel sheet pile anchored by metal rods to reinforced-concrete anchor slabs under favorable geological conditions (absence of rocks and very bouldery soils) are quickly and easily constructed. They are durable, economical, and simple to operate. A shortcoming of such guard walls is that

  1. K+ transport properties of K+ channels in the plasma membrane of Vicia faba guard cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JULIAN I. SCHROEDER

    1988-01-01

    Electrical properties of the plasma membrane of guard cell proto- plasts isolated from stomates of Viciafaba leaves were studied by application of the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. The two types of K § cur- rents that have recently been identified in guard cells may allow efflux of K s dur- ing stomatal closing, and uptake of K +

  2. Redox activity and peroxidase activity associated with the plasma membrane of guard-cell protoplasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Pantoja; C. M. Willmer

    1988-01-01

    Redox systems have been reported in the plasma membrane of numerous cell types and in cells from various species of higher plant. A search for a redox system in the plasma membrane of guard cells was therefore made in efforts to explain how blue light stimulates stomatal opening, a process which is coupled to guard cell H+ efflux and K+

  3. 49 CFR 571.223 - Standard No. 223; Rear impact guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...section. S5.2 Strength and Energy Absorption. When tested under the procedures...at each test location and the energy absorption requirements of S5.2.2 of this...section. S5.2.2 Guard Energy Absorption. A guard, other than a...

  4. 49 CFR 571.223 - Standard No. 223; Rear impact guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...section. S5.2 Strength and Energy Absorption. When tested under the procedures...at each test location and the energy absorption requirements of S5.2.2 of this...section. S5.2.2 Guard Energy Absorption. A guard, other than a...

  5. 49 CFR 571.223 - Standard No. 223; Rear impact guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...section. S5.2 Strength and Energy Absorption. When tested under the procedures...at each test location and the energy absorption requirements of S5.2.2 of this...section. S5.2.2 Guard Energy Absorption. A guard, other than a...

  6. MIT SDM Thesis Page 1 A System Theoretic Safety Analysis of U.S. Coast Guard

    E-print Network

    Leveson, Nancy

    Analysis Boards (MAB) in accordance with Coast Guard aviation policy. A MAB iJon Hickey MIT SDM Thesis Page 1 A System Theoretic Safety Analysis of U.S. Coast Guard Aviation and to distribute publicly paper and electronic copies of this thesis document in whole or in part in any medium now

  7. The Coast Guard's CAI Approach to Basic Math and Reading Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glidden, William C.; And Others

    To meet the remedial-instructional needs of its recruits, the Coast Guard developed a basic skills program, entitled the Basic Educational Enrichment Program (BEEP), at its recruit training center in Cape May, New Jersey. Objectives of the program were to ensure that all graduates of Coast Guard recruit training possess at least eighth-grade…

  8. Altered volatile profile associated with precopulatory mate guarding attracts spider mite males.

    PubMed

    Oku, Keiko; Weldegergis, Berhane T; Poelman, Erik H; De Jong, Peter W; Dicke, Marcel

    2015-02-01

    Proximate factors affecting animal behavior include stimuli generated by conspecifics. In spider mites of the genus Tetranychus (Acari: Tetranychidae), males guard pre-reproductive quiescent females, because only the first mating results in fertilization. In a dual-choice experiment, more adult males of T. urticae were attracted to females guarded by a male than to solitary females. Because spider mites are known to perceive volatiles, we hypothesized that guarded and solitary females differ in the volatile blends emitted. To test this hypothesis, headspace volatiles of guarded females, solitary females, and solitary males were collected, respectively. GC/MS analysis detected octanal, methyl salicylate, ethyl 4-ethoxybenzoate, and methyl cis-dihydrojasmonate in all of the groups. Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA) of the blends clearly discriminated guarded females from solitary females, supporting our hypothesis. Individual compounds did not show significant difference in emission rates for guarded females vs. solitary females, suggesting that differences lay in the total blend composition. OPLS-DA did not discriminate between the blends emitted by guarded females and solitary males. In conclusion, the differences in the volatile blends are likely to mediate male discrimination between guarded and solitary females. PMID:25612522

  9. Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard General of the Air Force/Army

    E-print Network

    Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard O-10 General of the Air Force/Army (Reserved Lieutenant O-2 First Lieutenant Lieutenant Junior Grade O-1 Second Lieutenant Ensign Air Force Army Marine Warrant Officer 5 Air Force Army Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard E-9 Chief Master Sergeant of the Air

  10. Calcium channels activated by hydrogen peroxide mediate abscisic acid signalling in guard cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhen-Ming Pei; Yoshiyuki Murata; Gregor Benning; Sébastien Thomine; Birgit Klüsener; Gethyn J. Allen; Erwin Grill; Julian I. Schroeder

    2000-01-01

    Drought is a major threat to agricultural production. Plants synthesize the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) in response to drought, triggering a signalling cascade in guard cells that results in stomatal closure, thus reducing water loss. ABA triggers an increase in cytosolic calcium in guard cells ([Ca2+]cyt) that has been proposed to include Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. However, direct

  11. The Dynamic Changes of Tonoplasts in Guard Cells Are Important for Stomatal Movement in Vicia faba

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xin-Qi Gao; Chun-Guang Li; Peng-Cheng Wei; Xin-Yan Zhang; Jia Chen; Xue-Chen Wang

    2005-01-01

    Stomatal movement is important for plants to exchange gas with environment. The regulation of stomatal movement allows optimizing photosynthesis and transpiration. Changes in vacuolar volume in guard cells are known to participate in this regulation. However, little has been known about the mechanism underlying the regulation of rapid changes in guard cell vacuolar volume. Here, we report that dynamic changes

  12. Actin Filaments in Mature Guard Cells Are Radially Distributed and lnvolved in Stomatal Movement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moonjeong Kim; Peter K. Hepler; Soon-Ok Eun; Kwon Soo Ha; Youngsook Lee

    Stomatal movements, which regulate gas exchange in plants, involve pronounced changes in the shape and volume of the guard cell. To test whether the changes are regulated by actin filaments, we visualized microfilaments in mature guard cells and examined the effects of actin antagonists on stomatal movements. Immunolo- calization on fixed cells and microinjection of fluorescein isothio- cyanate-phalloidin into living

  13. Guard Cells Elongate: Relationship of Volume and Surface Area during Stomatal Movement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tobias Meckel; Lars Gall; Stefan Semrau; Ulrike Homann; Gerhard Thiel

    2007-01-01

    Stomata in the epidermis of photosynthetically active plant organs are formed by pairs of guard cells, which create a pore, to facilitate CO2 and water exchange with the environment. To control this gas exchange, guard cells actively change their volume and, consequently, surface area to alter the aperture of the stomatal pore. Due to the limited elasticity of the plasma

  14. Nest guarding from observation blinds: strategy for improving Puerto Rican parrot nest success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of 17 yr of nestguarding from observation blinds for increasing reproductive success of the endangered Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata) is described. As personnel and time allowed, active nests were guarded part-time during the nest site exploration and selection s stage of the breeding cycle, and part-time to full-time when a nest contained eggs or chicks. Biologists identified nine categories of threat to the success of parrot nests. Since 1973, a minimum of 20 nests, which otherwise would have failed, successfully produced fledglings as a direct result of nest guarding and intervention. Nest success averaged 66% with nest guarding compared to an estimated 38% without guarding. Nest guarding from blinds can help maintain a wild population of a critically endangered species while other management techniques are being developed to stimulate population growth.

  15. Male songbirds provide indirect parental care by guarding females during incubation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedy, B.C.; Martin, T.E.

    2009-01-01

    Across many taxa, guarding of fertile mates is a widespread tactic that enhances paternity assurance. However, guarding of mates can also occur during the nonfertile period, and the fitness benefits of this behavior are unclear. Male songbirds, for example, sometimes guard nonfertile females during foraging recesses from incubation. We hypothesized that guarding postreproductive mates may have important, but unrecognized, benefits by enhancing female foraging efficiency, thereby increasing time spent incubating eggs. We tested the hypothesis in 2 songbird species by examining female behavior during natural and experimentally induced absences of males. Male absence caused increased vigilance in foraging females that decreased their efficiency and resulted in less time spent incubating eggs. Male guarding of nonfertile females can thus provide a previously unrecognized form of indirect parental care.

  16. A wall and edge guarded hot box for thermal transmittance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gatland, S.D. II; Miller, R.G. [Center for Applied Engineering, Inc., St. Petersburg, FL (United States). Materials Testing Services; Goss, W.P. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Baumgardner, R.L. [Rollin Inc., Stroudsburg, PA (United States); Williams, R.G. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom)

    1997-11-01

    A unique guarded hot box designed for thermal testing of fenestration products incorporates several new design concepts from guarded hot plates, namely wall and edge guards, is described in detail. The wall and edge guarded hot box was built to meet the test methodologies specified in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test Methods C 236-89, Standard Test Method for Measuring the Steady-State Thermal Performance of Building Assemblies by Means of a Guarded Hot Box, C 976-90, Standard Test Method for Measuring the Steady-State Thermal Performance of Building Assemblies by Means of a Calibrated Hot Box and C 1199-91, Standard Test Method for Measuring the Steady-State Thermal Transmittance of Fenestration Systems Using Hot Box Methods. Calibration test results for the box wall and specimen frame flanking are presented. Results from calibration transfer standard tests are compared with theoretical calculations and discussed.

  17. Guard cell biochemistry: response to environmental stimuli causing changes in gas exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Our understanding of how the light reactions of photosynthesis influence carbon metabolism in guard cells is rudimentary. This state of affairs is understandable; reliable reports of PS II in guard cells were published only two years ago. At this point, I wish to warn against complacency in drawing strict analogies between guard cell chloroplast function and that in other cells. In general, guard cell chloroplasts and their mesophyll counterparts differ in morphology, for example, the guard cell organelles are smaller, less abundant, and paler, have fewer thylakoids/granna, have areas of peripheral reticulum, and contain relatively more starch. One biochemical difference underlying these morphological ones has already been identified (fluorescence kinetics). 107 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Syndromic approach to treatment of snake bite in Sri Lanka based on results of a prospective national hospital-based survey of patients envenomed by identified snakes.

    PubMed

    Ariaratnam, Christeine A; Sheriff, Mohamed H Rezvi; Arambepola, Carukshi; Theakston, R David G; Warrell, David A

    2009-10-01

    Of 860 snakes brought to 10 hospitals in Sri Lanka with the patients they had bitten, 762 (89%) were venomous. Russell's vipers (Daboia russelii) and hump-nosed pit vipers (Hypnale hypnale) were the most numerous and H. hypnale was the most widely distributed. Fifty-one (6%) were misidentified by hospital staff, causing inappropriate antivenom treatment of 13 patients. Distinctive clinical syndromes were identified to aid species diagnosis in most cases of snake bite in Sri Lanka where the biting species is unknown. Diagnostic sensitivities and specificities of these syndromes for envenoming were 78% and 96% by Naja naja, 66% and 100% by Bungarus caeruleus, 14% and 100% by Daboia russelii, and 10% and 97% by Hypnale hypnale, respectively. Although only polyspecific antivenoms are used in Sri Lanka, species diagnosis remains important to anticipate life-threatening complications such as local necrosis, hemorrhage and renal and respiratory failure and to identify likely victims of envenoming by H. hypnale who will not benefit from existing antivenoms. The technique of hospital-based collection, labeling and preservation of dead snakes brought by bitten patients is recommended for rapid assessment of a country's medically-important herpetofauna. PMID:19815895

  19. 33 CFR 149.10 - Where can I obtain a list of Coast Guard-approved equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...list of Coast Guard-approved equipment? 149.10 Section 149... DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT General § 149.10 Where...list of Coast Guard-approved equipment? Where equipment in...

  20. 33 CFR 149.10 - Where can I obtain a list of Coast Guard-approved equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...list of Coast Guard-approved equipment? 149.10 Section 149... DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT General § 149.10 Where...list of Coast Guard-approved equipment? Where equipment in...