Sample records for national guard hospital

  1. Successful Army National Guard units: A guard perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A.K.; Saulsbury, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexanayder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1991-10-01

    This project sought to identify factors contributing to a healthy Army National Guard (ARNG) unit. Its results were intended to contribute to a computerized forecasting model under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model, the ARNG Regional Recruiting Potential Model (RRPM), forecasts locations of successful new or modified Guard units. The study was expected to enhance the understanding of what constituents a healthy Guard unit. A Delphi approach was used to define criteria for healthy Guard units and to elicit rankings of those criteria. Two sets of telephone interviews were conducted with a sample of 102 individuals-two battalion-level administrative officers, or their equivalents, in each state in Washington, DC. During these telephone calls, the phrase ``unit supportability`` was used to express the notion of a healthy unit. The first set of interviews obtained background information and respondents` ideas of the criteria that lead to unit supportability and to a lack of supportability. The data were analyzed to develop a list of ten criteria for unit supportability. In the second interview, the same respondents were asked to rank those criteria in order of importance.

  2. Successful Army National Guard units: A guard perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A.K.; Saulsbury, J.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Schexanayder, S.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This project sought to identify factors contributing to a healthy Army National Guard (ARNG) unit. Its results were intended to contribute to a computerized forecasting model under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model, the ARNG Regional Recruiting Potential Model (RRPM), forecasts locations of successful new or modified Guard units. The study was expected to enhance the understanding of what constituents a healthy Guard unit. A Delphi approach was used to define criteria for healthy Guard units and to elicit rankings of those criteria. Two sets of telephone interviews were conducted with a sample of 102 individuals-two battalion-level administrative officers, or their equivalents, in each state in Washington, DC. During these telephone calls, the phrase unit supportability'' was used to express the notion of a healthy unit. The first set of interviews obtained background information and respondents' ideas of the criteria that lead to unit supportability and to a lack of supportability. The data were analyzed to develop a list of ten criteria for unit supportability. In the second interview, the same respondents were asked to rank those criteria in order of importance.

  3. National Hospital Discharge Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS), which has been conducted annually since 1965, collects data from a sample of approximately 270,000 inpatient records acquired from a national sample of about 500 hospitals. Only hospitals with an average length of stay of fewer than 30 days for all patients, general hospitals, or children's general hospitals are included in the survey. Information collected includes diagnoses, surgical and nonsurgical procedures, prescription and over-the-counter drugs, immunizations, allergy shots, anesthetics, and dietary supplements.

  4. Suicide in the Army National Guard: An Empirical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather,…

  5. PRIORITY PREREGISTRATION FOR ACTIVE DUTY, VETERANS, RESERVISTS AND VIRGINIA NATIONAL GUARD SERVICE MEMBERS

    E-print Network

    29a PRIORITY PREREGISTRATION FOR ACTIVE DUTY, VETERANS, RESERVISTS AND VIRGINIA NATIONAL GUARD, veterans, reservists and Virginia National Guard members. Old Dominion University wishes to facilitate, students will be granted a priority registration time slot. Veterans receiving federal VA educational

  6. 78 FR 59153 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ...Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 Proclamation 9023--National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2013 Memorandum of September 20, 2013...Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 By the President of the United...

  7. Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Training Center, Georgia Army National Guard, Fort Stewart, Georgia. Installation restoration program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard (GAARNG) facility near Hinesville, Georgia, known as the National Guard Training Center (NGTC). Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a priority basis for completing corrective actions (where necessary) in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining previous site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the NGTC. Preliminary assessment site score sheet information is also provided for the NGTC. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of Fort Stewart completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on the NGTC area for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of Fort Stewart.

  8. 75 FR 58277 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ...National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010 Proclamation 8565--National Farm Safety and Health Week, 2010 Proclamation 8566--National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2010 Presidential Documents Federal...

  9. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Members of Reserve Components, Reserve Officers' Training Corps, Navy and Marine Corps Officer Candidate Programs, and National Guard Personnel § 728.25...

  10. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Members of Reserve Components, Reserve Officers' Training Corps, Navy and Marine Corps Officer Candidate Programs, and National Guard Personnel § 728.25...

  11. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Members of Reserve Components, Reserve Officers' Training Corps, Navy and Marine Corps Officer Candidate Programs, and National Guard Personnel § 728.25...

  12. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Members of Reserve Components, Reserve Officers' Training Corps, Navy and Marine Corps Officer Candidate Programs, and National Guard Personnel § 728.25...

  13. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Members of Reserve Components, Reserve Officers' Training Corps, Navy and Marine Corps Officer Candidate Programs, and National Guard Personnel § 728.25...

  14. SALUTE the KIDS - A Recognition Program For Children of the Army National Guard Soldiers

    E-print Network

    Rook, Michele

    2012-05-31

    SALUTE the KIDS A Recognition Program For Children of the Army National Guard Soldiers By Copyright 2012 Michele L. Rook Submitted to the graduate degree program in Architecture and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial... the Kids: A Recognition Program For Children of Army National Guard Soldiers Michele Rook, M.A Candidate, Design Management 2 Table of Contents Research Question...

  15. Learning Without Boundaries: A NASA - National Guard Bureau Distance Learning Partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Susan H.; Chilelli, Christopher J.; Picard, Stephan

    2003-01-01

    With a variety of high-quality live interactive educational programs originating at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas and other space and research centers, the US space agency NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) has a proud track record of connecting with students throughout the world and stimulating their creativity and collaborative skills by teaching them underlying scientific and technological underpinnings of space exploration. However, NASA desires to expand its outreach capability for this type of interactive instruction. In early 2002, NASA and the National Guard Bureau -- using the Guard's nationwide system of state-ofthe-art classrooms and high bandwidth network -- began a collaboration to extend the reach of NASA content and educational programs to more of America's young people. Already, hundreds of elementary, middle, and high school students have visited Guard e-Learning facilities and participated in interactive NASA learning events. Topics have included experimental flight, satellite imagery-interpretation, and Mars exploration. Through this partnership, NASA and the National Guard are enabling local school systems throughout the United States (and, increasingly, the world) to use the excitement of space flight to encourage their students to become passionate about the possibility of one day serving as scientists, mathematicians, technologists, and engineers. At the 54th International Astronautical Conference MAJ Stephan Picard, the guiding visionary behind the Guard's partnership with NASA, and Chris Chilelli, an educator and senior instructional designer at NASA, will share with attendees background on NASA's educational products and the National Guard's distributed learning network; will discuss the unique opportunity this partnership already has provided students and teachers throughout the United States; will offer insights into the formation by government entities of e-Learning partnerships with one another; and will suggest a possible future for the NASA - National Guard Bureau partnership, one potentially to include live multi-party interaction of hundreds of students in several countries with astronauts, scientists, engineers and designers. To inspire the next generation of explorers as only NASA can!

  16. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.845 Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area...

  17. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.845 Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area...

  18. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.845 Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area...

  19. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.845 Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area...

  20. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.845 Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area...

  1. Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms among National Guard Soldiers Deployed to Iraq: Associations with Parenting Behaviors and Couple Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewirtz, Abigail H.; Polusny, Melissa A.; DeGarmo, David S.; Khaylis, Anna; Erbes, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this article, we report findings from a 1-year longitudinal study examining the impact of change in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following combat deployment on National Guard soldiers' perceived parenting and couple adjustment 1 year following return from Iraq. Method: Participants were 468 Army National Guard

  2. Mortality of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. G. Standley; W. H. Berry; T. P. OFarrell; T. T. Kato

    1992-01-01

    Sources and rates of mortality of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. National Guard-authorized activities, including military training, caused the death of three of the 94 (3%) kit foxes radiocollared, and do not appear to jeopardize the continued existence of

  3. Making the Transition: Interim Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation. [Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Dillon, Colleen

    2010-01-01

    Young people who drop out of high school face long odds of success in a labor market that increasingly values education and skills. This report presents interim results from a rigorous, ongoing evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, which aims to "reclaim the lives of at-risk youth" who have dropped out of high school. ChalleNGe…

  4. Making the Transition: Interim Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Dillon, Colleen

    2010-01-01

    Young people who drop out of high school face long odds of success in a labor market that increasingly values education and skills. This report presents interim results from a rigorous, ongoing evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, which aims to "reclaim the lives of at-risk youth" who have dropped out of high school. ChalleNGe…

  5. 32 CFR 536.97 - Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...or destruction of property. (a) Soldiers of the Army National Guard (ARNG...authority of a state code. (1) When ARNG soldiers perform active duty, they are under...federal funds. For claims purposes, those soldiers are treated as active duty...

  6. 32 CFR 536.97 - Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...or destruction of property. (a) Soldiers of the Army National Guard (ARNG...authority of a state code. (1) When ARNG soldiers perform active duty, they are under...federal funds. For claims purposes, those soldiers are treated as active duty...

  7. 32 CFR 536.97 - Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...or destruction of property. (a) Soldiers of the Army National Guard (ARNG...authority of a state code. (1) When ARNG soldiers perform active duty, they are under...federal funds. For claims purposes, those soldiers are treated as active duty...

  8. 32 CFR 536.97 - Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...or destruction of property. (a) Soldiers of the Army National Guard (ARNG...authority of a state code. (1) When ARNG soldiers perform active duty, they are under...federal funds. For claims purposes, those soldiers are treated as active duty...

  9. 32 CFR 536.97 - Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...or destruction of property. (a) Soldiers of the Army National Guard (ARNG...authority of a state code. (1) When ARNG soldiers perform active duty, they are under...federal funds. For claims purposes, those soldiers are treated as active duty...

  10. Children of National Guard Troops Deployed in the Global War on Terrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Houston, J. Brian; Sherman, Michelle D.; Melson, Ashley G.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined deployment effects in children and spouses of National Guard troops using a longitudinal design to assess 18 children (ages 6 to 17 years) and 13 nondeployed spouses before, during, and after deployment. Both self- and parent reports revealed that children of deployed service personnel experienced emotional and behavioral…

  11. Obama victorious Democrat's re-election 'about guarding the change' In Florida and nation

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Obama victorious Democrat's re-election 'about guarding the change' In Florida and nation Written by Jennifer Portman Democrat senior writer Barack Obama swept to victory in 2008, riding into the final days of the campaign, it was not enough to overcome Obama's strategic get-out-the- vote effort

  12. ABR, Inc KPMG LLP Alaska Air National Guard Mikunda, Cottrell & Co

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Diane

    ABR, Inc KPMG LLP Alaska Air National Guard Mikunda, Cottrell & Co Alaska Airlines NANA Management Services Alaska Anvil Incorp. NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Alaska Center for Energy and Power New Northwest Broadcasters Alaska Earth Sciences, Inc Northern Alaska Tour Company Alaska Interstate

  13. Staying on Course: Three-Year Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Muller-Ravett, Sara; Broadus, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    High school dropouts face an uphill battle in a labor market that increasingly rewards skills and postsecondary credentials: they are more likely than their peers to need public assistance, be arrested or incarcerated, and less likely to marry. This report presents results from a rigorous evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program,…

  14. Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Facility, Installation 25255, Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Rehoboth National Guard Facility (RNGF) in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for ftirther action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the RNGF property, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities under the control of the MAARNG and the past activities contained within that area.

  15. National Hospital Input Price Index

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Anderson, Gerard; Schendler, Carol Ellen

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 percent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  16. National hospital input price index.

    PubMed

    Freeland, M S; Anderson, G; Schendler, C E

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 per cent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  17. Lepidoptera of Fort Indiantown Gap National Guard Training Center, Annville, Pennsylvania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Betty Ferster; Betsy Ray Leppo; Mark T. Swartz; Kevina Vulinec; Fred Habegger; Andrew Mehring

    2008-01-01

    Eighty-one species of butterfl ies and two-hundred and thirty-seven spe- cies of moths were identifi ed from Fort Indiantown Gap, a National Guard training facility in south-central Pennsylvania. The Lepidoptera found here include the last remaining population of Speyeria idalia idalia (eastern regal fritillary), as well as the rare Callophrys irus (frosted elfi n), Hesperia leonardus (Leonard's skipper), Datana ranaeceps

  18. Risk factors for post-deployment posttraumatic stress disorder in national guard/reserve service members.

    PubMed

    Tracie Shea, M; Reddy, Madhavi K; Tyrka, Audrey R; Sevin, Elizabeth

    2013-12-30

    Identification of factors that increase risk for PTSD in military personnel following deployments is critical to early intervention and prevention. The study tested hypothesized main and moderating risk factors for PTSD in National Guard/Reserve members deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Members of the National Guard/Reserves (n=238) completed diagnostic interviews and measures of risk factors at a post-deployment assessment conducted an average of four and a half months following return from deployment. Hierarchical multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test hypotheses. Higher levels of combat exposure, life and family concerns during deployment, and post-deployment social support independently predicted PTSD. Life/family concerns during deployment and perceived adequacy of training and preparation were significant moderators of the association between combat exposure and PTSD. Among those with higher levels of both combat exposure and life and family stress, 27% had PTSD in contrast to 3% of those with high exposure but lower levels of such stress during deployment. In addition to combat exposure, life and family stress during deployment is a particularly important predictor of PTSD. The findings highlight the importance of identifying and addressing such stress. PMID:24054062

  19. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened rather than how satisfied they were with treatment can elucidate the problems that exist and so enable them to be solved. PMID:7819893

  20. Stationwide environmental baseline survey and related environmental factors, Ontario Air National Guard Station, California

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-11-26

    This Environmental Baseline Survey (EBS) has been prepared to document the environmental condition of real property at Ontario Air National Guard Station (ANGS), California, resulting from the storage, release, and disposal of hazardous substances and petroleum products and their derivatives over the installations history. This EBS is also used by the Air Force to meet its obligations under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 United States Code Section 9620(h), as amended by the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) (Public Law 102-426). Table ES-1 list all uncontaminated property based on information obtained through a records search, interviews, and visual site inspections at Ontario ANGS. Figure ES-1 depicts their respective locations.

  1. Baseline prevalence of Axis I diagnosis in the Ohio Army National Guard.

    PubMed

    Tamburrino, Marijo B; Chan, Philip; Prescott, Marta; Calabrese, Joseph; Liberzon, Israel; Slembarski, Renee; Shirley, Edwin; Fine, Thomas; Goto, Toyomi; Wilson, Kimberly; Derus, Alphonse; Ganocy, Stephen; Beth Serrano, Mary; Galea, Sandro

    2015-03-30

    The goal of this study is to determine the pre-existing lifetime and current prevalence of DSM-IV Axis I disorders within the Ohio Army National Guard (OHARNG). Data was analyzed from the clinical subsample of the Ohio Army National Guard Mental Health Initiative (OHARNG MHI). Five hundred participants were provided with an in-depth clinical assessment using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR (SCID). Logistic regression examined the relationship between Axis I disorders and the number of deployments and gender. Prevalence of at least one DSM-IV lifetime disorder was 66.2%; substance use disorders were 52.2%, followed by mood disorders (30.0%) and anxiety disorders (22.0%). Prevalence of at least one current disorder was 24.8%; anxiety disorders (13.2%), mood disorders (7.6%), and substance use disorders (7.0%) were most frequent. Number of deployments was associated with PTSD (OR=8.27, 95% CI 2.10-32.59, p=0.003), alcohol use disorder (OR=1.77, 95% CI 1.07-2.92, p=0.025), and any substance use disorder (OR=1.85, 95% CI 1.12-3.05, p=0.016). Gender (OR=2.02, 95% CI 1.10-3.73, p=0.024) was associated with any mood disorder. The results provide baseline information on the most prevalent mental disorders within the OHARNG. PMID:25623021

  2. 2014 Hospital National Patient Safety Goals

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    communication NPSG.02.03.01 Identify patient safety risks NPSG.15.01.01 Prevent mistakes in surgery UP.012014 Hospital National Patient Safety Goals The purpose of the National Patient Safety Goals is to improve patient safety. The goals focus on problems in health care safety and how to solve them

  3. Reengaging High School Dropouts: Early Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program Evaluation. Full Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Dan; Gardenhire-Crooks, Alissa; Mandsager, Conrad

    2009-01-01

    High school dropouts face daunting odds of success in a labor market that increasingly rewards education and skills. This report presents very early results from a rigorous, independent evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, an intensive residential program that aims to "reclaim the lives" of young people ages 16 to 18 who have…

  4. The Predictive Validity of the PTSD Checklist in a Nonclinical Sample of Combat-Exposed National Guard Troops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbisi, Paul A.; Kaler, Matthew E.; Kehle-Forbes, Shannon M.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Thuras, Paul

    2012-01-01

    After returning from an extended combat deployment to Iraq, 348 National Guard soldiers were administered the PTSD Checklist (PCL-M), and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) followed, on average, 3 months later by structured diagnostic interviews including the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) for the "Diagnostic and Statistical…

  5. Lifelong Education Needs for Providing Pastoral Care for Post-Traumatic Stress in South Dakota National Guard Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meirose, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout many communities in South Dakota the members of the South Dakota National Guard have been activated to serve in many different parts of the world since 2001. Approximately 20% of these individuals returned to their homes with some degree of PTSD (Hoge, et al., 2004). Pastoral Care has changed since September 11, 2001. The purpose of…

  6. Reproduction of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Spencer; W. H. Berry; W. G. Standley; T. P. OFarrell

    1992-01-01

    The reproduction of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) was investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 38 vixens radiocollared prior to parturition, 12 (32%) were successful in raising pups from conception to the point where pups were observed above ground. No yearling vixens were known tb

  7. Blood characteristics of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. G. Standley; P. M. McCue

    1992-01-01

    Hematology, serum chemistry, and prevalence of antibodies against selected, pathogens in a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, in 1989 and 1990. Samples from 18 (10 female, 8 male) adult kit foxes were used to establish normal hematology and serum chemistry values for this population. Average values

  8. Population trends of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Berry; W. G. Standley

    1992-01-01

    Population trends of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1989 through August 1991. Six semiannual livetrapping sessions and eight scent-station survey sessions were conducted. Livetrapping results and radiotelemetry data were used to calculate minimum population size, density, and distribution. A total of 175 individual

  9. Staying on Course: Three-Year Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Muller-Ravett, Sara; Broadus, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    High school dropouts face an uphill battle in a labor market that increasingly rewards skills and postsecondary credentials: they are more likely than their peers to need public assistance, be arrested or incarcerated, and less likely to marry. This executive summary summarizes results from a rigorous evaluation of the National Guard Youth…

  10. Occupational Analysis of Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard Nurses. Final Report for Period January 1974-July 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergmann, Joseph A.; Smith, Michael C.

    An occupational survey comparing active duty and Reserve Forces nurses was conducted to support a Nursing Resources Study Group gathering information on current and future nurse requirements. Job inventory booklets were sent to chief nurses at Reserve and Air National Guard locations which were administered during unit training meetings. Returned…

  11. Children of National Guard troops: a pilot study of deployment, patriotism, and media coverage.

    PubMed

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Jacobs, Anne K; Houston, J Brian

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory pilot study examined the psychosocial effects of the war in Iraq, patriotism, and attention to war-related media coverage in the children of National Guard troops across phases of parental deployment--pre deployment, during deployment, and post deployment. Participants included 11 children, ages 8 to 18 years. Data collected in each deployment phase included demographics, the Behavior Assessment System for Children, (Second Edition, BASC-2), patriotism (national identity, uncritical patriotism, and constructive patriotism), and attention to war-related media coverage. School problems and emotional symptoms were significantly higher during deployment than post deployment. National identity and constructive patriotism increased and uncritical patriotism decreased post deployment from levels during deployment. Uncritical patriotism correlated positively with emotional symptoms and correlated negatively with personal adjustment. Constructive patriotism correlated positively with emotional symptoms and with internalizing problems. Greater attention to war-related media coverage correlated with uncritical patriotism, and attention to internet coverage correlated with constructive patriotism. Attention to media coverage was linked to greater emotional and behavioral problems and was negatively correlated with personal adjustment. The results of this pilot study identified relationships of both patriotism and attention to media coverage with children's emotional and behavioral status and personal adjustment suggesting areas for future investigation. PMID:24558700

  12. Preliminary assessment report for Redmond Army National Guard Facility, Installation 53120, Redmond, Washington. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ketels, P.; Aggarwal, P.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Washington Army National Guard (WAARNG) property in Redmond, Washington. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Redmond ARNG property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) supply/storage of hazardous materials, (2) weapons cleaning, (3) the underground storage tanks (USTs), and (4) the use of herbicides. These ESOs are no longer active because of the closure of OMS 10 activities in 1988.

  13. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) released public-use data files for the 1997 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). The NHAMCS "collect[s] data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital emergency and outpatient departments." The Website for the survey describes methodology and data, provides technical documentation for accessing and manipulating the data, and links users to related reports. The data and documentation for the survey may be downloaded from the Website or from the NCHS FTP server.

  14. How do they compare?: an assessment of predeployment fitness in the Arizona National Guard.

    PubMed

    Warr, Bradley J; Alvar, Brent A; Dodd, Daniel J; Heumann, Kristin J; Mitros, Melanie R; Keating, Christopher J; Swan, Pamela D

    2011-11-01

    Currently, there is a paucity of literature that describes physical fitness levels in deploying service members. There has been no data collected that evaluate the Army National Guard or Reserves. This descriptive study will provide physical fitness data for soldiers in the Arizona National Guard (AZNG), allowing for a comparison between the active and reserve components. Sixty soldiers from the AZNG were tested before deployment. Body composition was measured by using air displacement plethysmography. Flexibility testing included the sit and reach (SNR), trunk extension (TE), and shoulder elevation (SE) assessments. Muscular strength was determined by the completion of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) bench press and back squat. Muscular endurance was determined by the completion of the Army push-up (P/U) and sit-up (S/U) test. Muscular power was assessed by the completion of the Wingate cycle test and the standing broad jump (SBJ). Cardiorespiratory fitness was determined by the completion of a VO2peak test. The AZNG soldiers demonstrated a fat mass of 22.7 ± 8.9%, SNR, TE, and SE of 30.0 ± 8.9, 117.1 ± 25.2, and 145.5 ± 50.3 cm, 1RM bench press and back squat of 82.2 ± 29.9 and 104.6 ± 29.0 kg, P/U and S/U of 50 ± 18 and 53 ± 14 reps, peak power of 660.9 ± 177.8 W, SBJ of 191.8 ± 28.4 cm, and VO2peak of 48.9 ± 8.8 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1). This is the first study that provides descriptive data for physical fitness in a reserve component. The data demonstrate that these AZNG soldiers are relatively fit and have comparable results to their active duty counterparts. This descriptive data will provide military leadership a better understanding of the condition of soldiers before deployment and will assist them in better preparing soldiers for future conflicts. PMID:21969079

  15. Embedded behavioral health providers: an assessment with the Army National Guard.

    PubMed

    Russell, Dale W; Whalen, Ronald J; Riviere, Lyndon A; Clarke-Walper, Kristina; Bliese, Paul D; Keller, Darc D; Pangelian, Susan I; Thomas, Jeffrey L

    2014-08-01

    Although the Army has recently begun the practice of embedding behavioral health care providers (EBHP) in units in an effort to improve soldier well-being, the efficacy of this practice has not been evaluated. This study assesses 1 of the first programs implemented by the military. Using cross-sectional data obtained from a confidential survey of 12 company-level units in the California Army National Guard (n = 1,132), this study examines differences between units with and without EBHPs across a number of measures. Multilevel analysis of behavioral health symptoms, unit climate, perceptions of stigma, and practical barriers to care failed to detect main effects between units with EBHPs relative to those without. However, cross-level interactions were detected between unit EBHP status and soldiers reporting close relationship (e.g., spouse, girlfriend/boyfriend) impairment. Exploratory findings suggest that, among soldiers reporting close relationship impairment, those belonging to units with EBHPs reported significantly lower behavioral health symptoms and significantly more positive unit climates. Based on these limited exploratory finings, this study suggests that EBHPs in reserve units may have a positive effect on a subset of soldiers (i.e., those reporting close relationship impairment). More assessments of embed programs should be conducted, particularly using prospective longitudinal data among randomized units. PMID:24841511

  16. Coalitionary mate guarding by male chimpanzees at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David P. Watts

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative mate guarding by males is unusual in mammals and birds, largely because fertilizations are non-shareable. Chimpanzees\\u000a live in fission-fusion communities that have cores of philopatric males who cooperate in inter-group aggression and in defending\\u000a access to the females in their community. Male contest mating competition is restrained within communities, but single high-ranking\\u000a males sometimes try to mate guard estrous

  17. A specific labor market comparison of male and female willingness to travel: The case of the Army National Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Daniell, A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Bell, S.E. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Vogt, D.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an examination of gender differences in commuting behavior within the Army National Guard. This labor market provides a more level playing field than most for a direct comparison between male and female willingness to travel. In contrast to other studies, we find that women as a group are willing to travel greater distances, in this particular labor market. 9 refs., 1 fig., 10 tabs.

  18. Fleas of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Spencer; H. J. Egoscue

    1992-01-01

    A total of 3,241 fleas, representing seven species, were identified from 398 samples collected from San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis), California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi), and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 3,109 fleas collected from kit foxes 95.7% were Echidnophaga gallinacea, 4.0% Pulex

  19. Medium temperature thermal desorption soil remediation case study - Selfridge Air National Guard Base, Mt. Clemens, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Flemingloss, K. (Carlo Environmental Technologies, Inc., Clinton Township, MI (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Carlo Environmental Technologies, Inc., (CET) was contracted by the Selfridge Air National Guard base (SANG) to remove an abandoned underground storage tank (UST) farm and remediate the contaminated soil using thermal desorption technology. The first phase of this project was to remove fourteen 25,000 gal underground storage tanks that had been installed during the 1930's, including all ancillary equipment at the facility. The USTs had been used to store aviation fuels, including both av-gas and jet fuels. The tank-removal project disclosed over 5000 yd[sup 3] of contaminated soil in the tank excavation pit, and excavation continued until analytical sampling demonstrated that the perimeter was within the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) Act 307 Type B cleanup criteria (state superfund act). The contaminated soil was trucked to a remote location on the base property for the thermal remediation. CET employed its Cedarapids 64MT thermal desorption plant to treat the contaminated soils from the tank removal site. These soils were predominantly clays, and the contamination included BTEX compounds up to 5 parts per million (ppm), and PNA compounds per 100 ppm. The medium temperature thermal desorption process, which heats the contaminated soil to approximately 850[degrees]F was successful in removing BTEX and PNA contamination from the soil (to levels below MDNR Type B cleanup criteria). The vapor stream from the desorption process was then filtered to minimize particulate emissions, and the contaminant compounds were then destroyed in the thermal oxidizer section of the process, at temperatures up to 1800[degrees]F. The remediated soil was returned to the original excavation as clean compacted fill material. With the use of the thermal desorption technology, CET remediated the site to MDNR cleanup standards, recycled the soils from the site, and eliminated off-site disposal liability for SANG.

  20. Components of secondary traumatic stress in female partners of National Guard and Reservist veterans displaying symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chasity L Kern

    2011-01-01

    This study offers an extensive view of how male National Guardsmen and Reservists' Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms affect their female partners. This study is one of the few that investigates the experience of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) in female partners of National Guard and Reservist veterans. The study included female partners of United States Army National Guardsmen and

  1. Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Among National Guard Soldiers Deployed to Iraq: Associations with Parenting Behaviors and Couple Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Gewirtz, Abigail H.; Polusny, Melissa A.; DeGarmo, David S.; Khaylis, Anna; Erbes, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This article reports findings from a one-year longitudinal study examining the impact of change in PTSD symptoms following combat deployment on National Guard soldiers’ perceived parenting, and couple adjustment one year following return from Iraq. Method Participants were 468 Army National Guard fathers from a Brigade Combat Team (mean age 36 years; median deployment length 16 months; 89% European American, 5% African American, 6% Hispanic American). Participants completed an in-theater survey one month before returning home from OIF deployment (Time 1), and again, one year post-deployment (Time 2). The PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M; Weathers, Litz, Herman, Huska, & Keane, 1993) was gathered at both times, and two items assessing social support were gathered at baseline only. At Time 2, participants also completed self-report measures of parenting (Alabama Parenting Questionnaire—Short Form; Elgar, Waschbusch, Dadds, & Sigvaldason, 2007), couple adjustment (Dyadic Adjustment Scale-7; Sharpley & Rogers, 1984; Spanier, 1976), parent-child relationship quality (4 items from the Social Adjustment Scale-Self Report; Weissman & Bothwell, 1976), alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test; Babor, Higgins-Biddle, Saunders, & Monteiro, 2001), and items assessing injuries sustained while deployed. Results Structural equation modeling analyses showed that increases in PTSD symptoms were associated with poorer couple adjustment and greater perceived parenting challenges at Time 2 (both at p<.001). Furthermore, PTSD symptoms predicted parenting challenges independent of their impact on couple adjustment. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of investigating and intervening to support parenting and couple adjustment among combat-affected National Guard families. PMID:20873896

  2. Ohio Air National guard, 178th Fighter Group, Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport, Springfield, Ohio. Final site investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-07-26

    Site Investigation Report, Ohio Air National Guard, 178 Fighter Group, Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport, Springfield, Ohio, Text. This is the first volume of a three volume site investigation report. Five sites (Site 1 - Fire Training Area No. 1, Site 2 - Fire Training Area No. 2, Site 3. Leach Field, Site 4 - POL Storage Area, and Site 5 - Ramp Drainage Ditch) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. No further action was recommended for any of the five sites under current land use.

  3. Bird guard

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Dana M. (Armour, SD)

    2010-03-02

    The bird guard provides a device to protect electrical insulators comprising a central shaft; a clamp attached to an end of the shaft to secure the device to a transmission tower; a top and bottom cover to shield transmission tower insulators; and bearings to allow the guard to rotate in order to frighten birds away from the insulators.

  4. Mortality of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Standley, W.G.; Berry, W.H.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-09-01

    Sources and rates of mortality of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. National Guard-authorized activities, including military training, caused the death of three of the 94 (3%) kit foxes radiocollared, and do not appear to jeopardize the continued existence of the population. Predation by larger carnivores, primarily coyotes (Canis latrans), caused the death of 75% of the 32 radiocollared kit foxes recovered dead for which a cause of death could be determined; vehicle impacts, disease (rabies), poisoning, and shooting were each responsible for the deaths of 6.3%. Adult annual mortality rate was 0.47 and the juvenile mortality rate was 0.80, and both rates are similar to rates reported for kit foxes in other locations. There was no significant difference between male and female mortality rates in either age class. The proportions of dead kit foxes recovered in different habitat types were similar to the availability of the habitat types within the distribution of kit fox on the installation.

  5. Preliminary assessment report for Fort William Henry Harrison, Montana Army National Guard, Helena, Montana. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    DuWaldt, J.; Meyer, T.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at a Montana Army National Guard (MTARNG) property near Helena, Montana. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort William Henry Harrison property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  6. Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

  7. Increased risk of alcohol dependency in a cohort of National Guard troops with PTSD: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Kline, Anna; Weiner, Marc D; Ciccone, Donald S; Interian, Alejandro; St Hill, Lauren; Losonczy, Miklos

    2014-03-01

    Studies show high rates of co-morbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) but there is no consensus on the causal direction of the relationship. Some theories suggest AUD develops as a coping mechanism to manage PTSD symptoms and others that AUD is a vulnerability factor for PTSD. A third hypothesis posits independent developmental pathways stemming from a shared etiology, such as the trauma exposure itself. We examined these hypotheses using longitudinal data on 922 National Guard soldiers, representing a subsample (56%) of a larger pre- and post-deployment cross-sectional study of New Jersey National Guard soldiers deployed to Iraq. Measures included the PTSD Checklist (PCL), DSM-IV-based measures of alcohol use/misuse from the National Household Survey of Drug Use and Health and other concurrent mental health, military and demographic measures. Results showed no effect of pre-deployment alcohol status on subsequent positive screens for new onset PTSD. However, in multivariate models, baseline PTSD symptoms significantly increased the risk of screening positive for new onset alcohol dependence (AD), which rose 5% with each unit increase in PCL score (AOR = 1.05; 95% CI = 1.02-1.07). Results also supported the shared etiology hypothesis, with the risk of a positive screen for AD increasing by 9% for every unit increase in combat exposure after controlling for baseline PTSD status (AOR = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.03-1.15) and, in a subsample with PCL scores <34, by 17% for each unit increase in exposure (AOR = 1.17; 95% CI = 1.05-1.31). These findings have implications for prevention, treatment and compensation policies governing co-morbidity in military veterans. PMID:24332924

  8. Population trends of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.

    1992-10-01

    Population trends of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1989 through August 1991. Six semiannual livetrapping sessions and eight scent-station survey sessions were conducted. Livetrapping results and radiotelemetry data were used to calculate minimum population size, density, and distribution. A total of 175 individual foxes were trapped 463 times. The number of individuals trapped and minimum population size calculations showed a decline over time. The highest minimum population (109) was observed in winter 1988. Summer 1991 had the lowest minimum population size (45). No evidence was found to indicate that the apparent population decline was a result of military-authorized activities.

  9. Military unit support, postdeployment social support, and PTSD symptoms among active duty and National Guard soldiers deployed to Iraq.

    PubMed

    Han, Sohyun C; Castro, Frank; Lee, Lewina O; Charney, Meredith E; Marx, Brian P; Brailey, Kevin; Proctor, Susan P; Vasterling, Jennifer J

    2014-06-01

    Research suggests that military unit support and community postdeployment social support are associated with fewer PTSD symptoms following military deployment. This study extended prior research by examining the associations among predeployment unit support and PTSD symptoms before Iraq deployment as well as unit support, PTSD symptoms, and postdeployment social support after deployment among 835 U.S. Army and 173 National Guard soldiers. Multiple regression analyses indicated that predeployment unit support was not significantly associated with postdeployment PTSD severity in either group of soldiers, whereas higher unit support during deployment was significantly associated with lower postdeployment PTSD severity among active duty soldiers only. Among both groups, higher levels of postdeployment social support were associated with lower levels of postdeployment PTSD symptom severity. These findings suggest that postdeployment social support is a particularly strong buffer against postdeployment PTSD symptoms among both groups of soldiers whereas the effects of unit support may be limited. PMID:24846492

  10. WWC Quick Review of the Report "Reengaging High School Dropouts: Early Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program Evaluation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The study examined whether participating in the "National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program", a quasi-military residential/mentoring program for dropouts, improved the educational and other outcomes of at-risk youth. The study analyzed data on about 1,000 16- to 18-year-old high school dropouts enrolled in 10 ChalleNGe programs throughout the…

  11. Prey abundance and food habits of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. G. Logan; W. H. Berry; W. G. Standley; T. T. Kato

    1992-01-01

    Prey abundance and food habits of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. The sampling methods initially used to assess abundance of prey species resulted in indices too low to be of value. Because of this, the relationship between relative abundance and

  12. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form in National Guard Soldiers Screening Positive for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbisi, Paul A.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Thuras, Paul; Reddy, Madhavi K.

    2011-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2 RF) was administered to 251 National Guard soldiers who had recently returned from deployment to Iraq. Soldiers were also administered questionnaires to identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). On the basis of responses to the…

  13. Suicide and War: The Mediating Effects of Negative Mood, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, and Social Support among Army National Guard Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    The mediating effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, negative mood, and social support on the relationship of war experiences to suicidality were examined. The research literature suggested a sequence among study scales representing these constructs, which was then tested on survey data obtained from a sample of National Guard

  14. Habitat, soils, and den use of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. Reese; W. G. Standley; W. H. Berry

    1992-01-01

    Den use patterns, den characteristics, and effects of military training on dens were studied for San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California.Ninety-four radiocollared kit foxes used 1059 dens and 334 buildings as shelter from December 1988, through September 1991. There were 1001 (95%) earthen dens, 57 (5%) culverts, and one den

  15. Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal imager applied to San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. Reese; T. T. Kato; W. H. Berry

    1992-01-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal infrared imaging were used to evaluate the effects of military activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site. The Ground Penetrating Radar was used to identify underground burrows of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) dens in an attempt to evaluate the impact of tracked vehicles on the integrity of kit fox

  16. The combined use of Skype and the STORZ CMAC video laryngoscope in field intubation training with the Nebraska National Air Guard.

    PubMed

    Boedeker, Ben H; Bernhagen, Mary; Miller, David J; Miljkovic, Nikola; Kuper, Gail M; Murray, W Bosseau

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using Skype technology in basic manikin intubation instruction of Nebraska National Air Guard personnel at a Casualty Training Exercise. Results show that the Skype monitor provided clear sound and visualization of the airway view to the trainees and the combination of VoIP technology and videolaryngoscopy for intubation training was highly valued by study participants. PMID:21335766

  17. Sound Guard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lubrication technology originally developed for a series of NASA satellites has produced a commercial product for protecting the sound fidelity of phonograph records. Called Sound Guard, the preservative is a spray-on fluid that deposits a microscopically thin protective coating which reduces friction and prevents the hard diamond stylus from wearing away the softer vinyl material of the disc. It is marketed by the Consumer Products Division of Ball Corporation, Muncie, Indiana. The lubricant technology on which Sound Guard is based originated with NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO), an Earth-orbiting satellite designed and built by Ball Brothers Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado, also a division of Ball Corporation. Ball Brothers engineers found a problem early in the OSO program: known lubricants were unsuitable for use on satellite moving parts that would be exposed to the vacuum of space for several months. So the company conducted research on the properties of materials needed for long life in space and developed new lubricants. They worked successfully on seven OSO flights and attracted considerable attention among other aerospace contractors. Ball Brothers now supplies its "Vac Kote" lubricants and coatings to both aerospace and non-aerospace industries and the company has produced several hundred variations of the original technology. Ball Corporation expanded its product line to include consumer products, of which Sound Guard is one of the most recent. In addition to protecting record grooves, Sound Guard's anti-static quality also retards particle accumulation on the stylus. During comparison study by a leading U.S. electronic laboratory, a record not treated by Sound Guard had to be cleaned after 50 plays and the stylus had collected a considerable number of small vinyl particles. The Sound Guard-treated disc was still clean after 100 plays, as was its stylus.

  18. 77 FR 58295 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ...exceptional service in a post-9/11 world has secured their place alongside the greatest...VOW to Hire Heroes Act, which created new tax credits to encourage employers to hire...Reserve Week, let us pay tribute to the brave men and women who keep our Nation...

  19. Reproduction of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, K A; Berry, W H; Standley, W G; O`Farrell, T P

    1992-09-01

    The reproduction of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) was investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 38 vixens radiocollared prior to parturition, 12 (32%) were successful in raising pups from conception to the point where pups were observed above ground. No yearling vixens were known tb be reproductively active. The mean litter size during 1989 - 1991 was 3.0 (n = 21, SE = 0.28) and ranged from one to six pups. Both the proportion of vixens successfully raising pups and the mean litter size observed at Camp Roberts during this study were lower than those reported at other locations. Sex ratios of kit fox pups were male biased two of the three years, but did not differ statistically from 1:1 throughout the study. Whelping was estimated to occur between February 15 and March 5. Results of this study support previous reports that kit foxes are primarily monogamous, although one case of polygamy may have occurred. Both the proportion of dispersing radiocollared juveniles (26%) and the mean dispersal distance (5.9 km) of juveniles at Camp Roberts appeared low compared to other locations.

  20. Fleas of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, K.A.; Egoscue, H.J.

    1992-09-01

    A total of 3,241 fleas, representing seven species, were identified from 398 samples collected from San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis), California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi), and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 3,109 fleas collected from kit foxes 95.7% were Echidnophaga gallinacea, 4.0% Pulex irritans, 0.2% Hoplopsyllus anomolus, and 0.1% Odontopsyllus dentatus. One male Ctenocephalides fells was also collected from a kit fox. The 118 fleas collected from California ground squirrels consisted of Hoplopsyllus anomolus (55.9%), Echidnophaga gallinacea (37.3%), and Oropsylla montanus (6.8%). The 14 fleas collected from deer mice were Aetheca wagneri. Based on the distribution and abundance of flea species collected, and the vector efficiency of these fleas, it appears that kit foxes could play a role in the transfer of natural vectors of sylvatic plague between rodent populations, if the bacterium responsible for plague (Yersinia pestis) were present at Camp Roberts. Little information regarding kit fox food habits was evidenced by the distribution and abundance of small mammal flea species collected from kit foxes.

  1. Predictors of Army National Guard and Reserve members' use of Veteran Health Administration health care after demobilizing from OEF/OIF deployment.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alex H S; Chen, Cheng; Mohr, Beth A; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

    2014-10-01

    This study described rates and predictors of Army National Guard and Army Reserve members' enrollment in and utilization of Veteran Health Administration (VHA) services in the 365 days following demobilization from an index deployment. We also explored regional and VHA facility variation in serving eligible members in their catchment areas. The sample included 125,434 Army National Guard and 48,423 Army Reserve members who demobilized after a deployment ending between FY 2008 and FY 2011. Demographic, geographic, deployment, and Military Health System eligibility were derived from Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System and "Contingency Tracking System" data. The VHA National Patient Care Databases were used to ascertain VHA utilization and status (e.g., enrollee, TRICARE). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate predictors of VHA utilization as an enrollee in the year following demobilization. Of the study members demobilizing during the observation period, 56.9% of Army National Guard members and 45.7% of Army Reserve members utilized VHA as an enrollee within 12 months. Demographic, regional, health coverage, and deployment-related factors were associated with VHA enrollment and utilization, and significant variation by VHA facility was found. These findings can be useful in the design of specific outreach efforts to improve linkage from the Military Health System to the VHA. PMID:25269126

  2. Support for hospital-based HIV testing and counseling: a national survey of hospital marketing executives.

    PubMed Central

    Boscarino, J A; Steiber, S R

    1995-01-01

    Today, hospitals are involved extensively in social marketing and promotional activities. Recently, investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that routine testing of hospital patients for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) could identify more than 100,000 patients with previously unrecognized HIV infections. Several issues are assessed in this paper. These include hospital support for voluntary HIV testing and AIDS education and the impact that treating AIDS patients has on the hospital's image. Also tested is the hypothesis that certain hospitals, such as for-profit institutions and those outside the AIDS epicenters, would be less supportive of hospital-based AIDS intervention strategies. To assess these issues, a national random sample of 193 executives in charge of hospital marketing and public relations were surveyed between December 1992 and January 1993. The survey was part of an ongoing annual survey of hospitals and included questions about AIDS, health education, marketing, patient satisfaction, and hospital planning. Altogether, 12.4 percent of executives indicated their hospital had a reputation for treating AIDS patients. Among hospitals without an AIDS reputation, 34.1 percent believed developing one would be harmful to the hospital's image, in contrast to none in hospitals that had such a reputation (chi 2 = 11.676, df = 1, P = .0006). Although 16.6 percent did not know if large-scale HIV testing should be implemented, a near majority (47.7 percent) expressed some support. In addition, 15 percent reported that HIV-positive physicians on the hospital's medical staff should not be allowed to practice medicine, but 32.1 percent indicated that they should.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7638335

  3. Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Berry; W. G. Standley; T. T. Kato

    1992-01-01

    The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed

  4. Effects of Repeated Deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan on the Health of New Jersey Army National Guard Troops: Implications for Military Readiness

    PubMed Central

    Falca-Dodson, Maria; Sussner, Bradley; Ciccone, Donald S.; Chandler, Helena; Callahan, Lanora; Losonczy, Miklos

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the effects of prior military service in Iraq or Afghanistan on the health of New Jersey Army National Guard members preparing for deployment to Iraq. Methods. We analyzed anonymous, self-administered predeployment surveys from 2543 National Guard members deployed to Iraq in 2008. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to measure the effects of prior service in Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom [OEF]) or Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom [OIF]) on mental and physical health. Results. Nearly 25% of respondents reported at least 1 previous OEF or OIF deployment. Previously deployed soldiers were more than 3 times as likely as soldiers with no previous deployments to screen positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.59, 5.24) and major depression (AOR = 3.07; 95% CI = 1.81, 5.19), more than twice as likely to report chronic pain (AOR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.78, 2.72) and more than 90% more likely to score below the general population norm on physical functioning (AOR = 1.94; 95% CI = 1.51, 2.48). Conclusions. Repeated OEF and OIF deployments may adversely affect the military readiness of New Jersey National Guard combat soldiers. PMID:20019304

  5. National Hospital Discharge and Ambulatory Surgery Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this site offers a host of data on inpatients discharged from non-Federal, short-stay hospitals in the US and the use of ambulatory surgery services. These data include patient characteristics (age and sex, patient disposition, expected sources of payment, etc.), admission and discharge dates, and medical information such as diagnoses and procedures performed. Like other CDC data sites, this is not the easiest to navigate, but diligent users will be rewarded with numerous reports, raw data files, and related documentation.

  6. Seoul National University Bundang Hospital's Electronic System for Total Care

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee Hyuck; Lee, Hak Jong; Ha, Kyooseob; Lim, Cheong; Chin, Ho Jun; Yun, Jonghoar; Cho, Eun-Young; Chung, Eunja; Baek, Rong-Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Chul Hee; Lee, Hai-Seok; Byeon, Nam-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, which is the first Stage 7 hospital outside of North America, has adopted and utilized an innovative and emerging information technology system to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care. The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce the major components of the SNUBH information system and to describe our progress toward a next-generation hospital information system (HIS). Methods SNUBH opened in 2003 as a fully digital hospital by successfully launching a new HIS named BESTCare, "Bundang hospital Electronic System for Total Care". Subsequently, the system has been continuously improved with new applications, including close-loop medication administration (CLMA), clinical data warehouse (CDW), health information exchange (HIE), and disaster recovery (DR), which have resulted in the achievement of Stage 7 status. Results The BESTCare system is an integrated system for a university hospital setting. BESTCare is mainly composed of three application domains: the core applications, an information infrastructure, and channel domains. The most critical and unique applications of the system, such as the electronic medical record (EMR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support system (CDSS), CLMA, CDW, HIE, and DR applications, are described in detail. Conclusions Beyond our achievement of Stage 7 hospital status, we are currently developing a next-generation HIS with new goals of implementing infrastructure that is flexible and innovative, implementing a patient-centered system, and strengthening the IT capability to maximize the hospital value. PMID:22844650

  7. Baseline water-quality characteristics of the Alaska Army National Guard Stewart River Training Area near Nome, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, Josh D.

    2005-01-01

    The Alaska Army National Guard Stewart River Training Area is approximately 23 miles north of Nome on the Seward Peninsula in northwest Alaska. The Stewart River Training Area encompasses much of the Stewart River Basin and a small part of the Snake River Basin. Hydrologic, water-quality, and physical-habitat data were collected at seven surface-water sites within the Stewart River Training Area during the summer runoff months (late-May to early-September) in 2004. Two of the sampling sites selected for this study were on the main stem Stewart River, one at the upstream boundary and one at the downstream boundary of the training area. Continuous hydrologic, precipitation, and water temperature data were collected at these two sites throughout the summer of 2004. Three pond sites, along the upper, middle, and lower reaches of the Stewart River within the training area, were each sampled twice during the summer of 2004 for analysis of water-quality constituents. Two tributaries to the Snake River Basin, Goldbottom Creek and North Fork Snake River, within the Stewart River Training Area boundary, also were sampled twice during the summer of 2004. Water-quality data collected from the Stewart River at the upstream and downstream study sites indicate similar constituent concentrations. Concentrations of most water-quality constituents collected during the summer of 2004 did not exceed standards for drinking water or recreational contact. Analysis of trace-element concentrations in bed sediment samples indicate the threshold effect concentration (below which no adverse effects on organisms is expected) was exceeded for arsenic, chromium, and nickel concentrations at all sample sites within the Stewart River Training Area and cadmium, copper, zinc, and lead concentrations were found to exceed the threshold effect concentration in varying degrees at the sample sites. The probable effect concentration (above which toxic effects on organisms is likely) was exceeded by arsenic concentrations at all sites except the lower pond site. Chromium and nickel concentrations exceeded the probable effect concentration at the upstream Stewart River site and at the North Fork Snake River site.

  8. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS): 1997 Summary: National Hospital Discharge Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hall, Margaret.

    Last month, the NCHS released statistics from its 1997 National Hospital Discharge Survey. The "report presents national estimates of the use of non-Federal, short-stay hospitals in the United States during 1997. Numbers and rates of discharges, diagnoses, and procedures are shown by age and sex." The summary gives average lengths of stays for all discharges, broken down by region, as well as average lengths of stays for selected diagnostic categories, including infant delivery.

  9. Installation restoration program. Site investigation report. Ohio Air National Guard, 178th Fighter Group, Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport, Springfield, Ohio. Appendices. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Site Investigation Report, Ohio Air National Guard, 178 Fighter Group, Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport, Springfield, Ohio, Text. This is the second volume of a three volume site investigation report. Five sites (Site 1 - Fire Training Area No. 1, Site 2 - Fire Training Area No. 2, Site 3 - Leach Field, Site 4 - POL Storage Area, and Site 5 - Ramp Drainage Ditch) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. No further action was recommended for any of the five sites under current land use.

  10. Installation restoration program. Site investigation report. Ohio Air National Guard, 178th Fighter Group, Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport, Springfield, Ohio. Appendices. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Site Investigation Report, Ohio Air National Guard, 178 Fighter Group, Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport Springfield, Ohio, Text. This is the third volume fo a three volume site investigation report. Five sites(Site 1 - Fire Training Area No. 1, Site 2 - Fire Training Area No. 2, Site 3 - Leach Field, Site 4 -POL Storage Area, and; Site - Ramp Drainage Ditch) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. No further action was recommended for any of the five sites under current land use.

  11. Installation restoration program final remedial investigation report IRP sites 8 and 10. 151st air refueling group Utah Air National Guard, Salt Lake City, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the results from a Remedial Investigation (RI) for two sites at the Utah Air National Guard (UANG) Base located in Salt Lake City, Utah. The two sites investigated are identified as Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site 8, a former underground storage tank (UST) location, and IRP Site 10, an existing petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL) yard. The RI was conducted as outlined in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan prepared by Stone Webster and submitted to and approved by the ANG in May 1993. The field work associated with the RI was performed in June, July, and August 1995.

  12. Acute myocardial infarction incidence and hospital mortality: routinely collected national data versus linkage of national registers

    PubMed Central

    Koek, Huberdina L.; Kardaun, Jan W. P. F.; Gevers, Evelien; de Bruin, Agnes; Reitsma, Joannes B.; Grobbee, Diederick E.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objective To compare levels of and trends in incidence and hospital mortality of first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) based on routinely collected hospital morbidity data and on linked registers. Cases taken from routine hospital data are a mix of patients with recurrent and first events, and double counting occurs when cases are admitted for an event several times during 1 year. By linkage of registers, recurrent events and double counts can be excluded. Study Design and Setting In 1995 and 2000, 28,733 and 25,864 admissions for AMI were registered in the Dutch national hospital discharge register. Linkage with the population register yielded 21,565 patients with a first AMI in 1995 and 20,414 in 2000. Results In 1995 and 2000, the incidence based on the hospital register was higher than based on the linked registers in men (22% and 23% higher) and women (18% and 20% higher). In both years, hospital mortality based on the hospital register and on linked registers was similar. The decline in incidence between 1995 and 2000 was comparable whether based on standard hospital register data or linked data (18% and 20% in men, 15% and 17% in women). Similarly, the decline in hospital mortality was comparable using either approach (11% and 9% in both men and women). Conclusion Although the incidence based on routine hospital data overestimates the actual incidence of first AMI based on linked registers, hospital mortality and trends in incidence and hospital mortality are not changed by excluding recurrent events and double counts. Since trends in incidence and hospital mortality of AMI are often based on national routinely collected data, it is reassuring that our results indicate that findings from such studies are indeed valid and not biased because of recurrent events and double counts. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10654-007-9174-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17828438

  13. Cost of Hospitalization and Length of Stay in People with Down Syndrome: Evidence from a National Hospital Discharge Claims Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims to describe the hospitalization profiles which include medical expenses and length of stays, and to determine their possible influencing factors of hospital admission on persons with Down syndrome in Taiwan. We employed a population-based, retrospective analyses used national health insurance hospital discharge data of the…

  14. Final report on testing of ACONF technology for the US Coast Guard National Distress Systems : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Storey, Leanne M.; Byrd, Thomas M., Jr.; Murray, Aaron T.; Ginn, Jerry W.; Symons, Philip C. (Electrochemical Engineering Consultants, Inc., Morgan Hill, CA); Corey, Garth P.

    2005-08-01

    This report documents the results of a six month test program of an Alternative Configuration (ACONF) power management system design for a typical United States Coast Guard (USCG) National Distress System (NDS) site. The USCG/USDOE funded work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories to evaluate the effect of a Sandia developed battery management technology known as ACONF on the performance of energy storage systems at NDS sites. This report demonstrates the savings of propane gas, and the improvement of battery performance when utilizing the new ACONF designs. The fuel savings and battery performance improvements resulting from ACONF use would be applicable to all current NDS sites in the field. The inherent savings realized when using the ACONF battery management design was found to be significant when compared to battery replacement and propane refueling at the remote NDS sites.

  15. Coast Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    In the wake of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound, Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, thereby activating the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund. This fund had been set up four years earlier with the proviso that no money could be spent until the enactment of comprehensive oil spill legislation. Passage of the Oil Pollution Act, which significantly expanded the nation's oil spill prevention and response activities, meant that funds became available to federal agencies for the cost of oil spill prevention and response activities. This report provides information on the fund's receipts and disbursements as of March 31, 1991, and the status of activities under way to fully implement the provisions of the Act concerning the fund, including the development of regulations.

  16. 45 CFR 60.17 - Information which hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank. 60.17 Section 60...GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL PRACTITIONER DATA BANK Disclosure of Information by the National Practitioner Data Bank § 60.17...

  17. 45 CFR 60.17 - Information which hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank. 60.17 Section 60...GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL PRACTITIONER DATA BANK Disclosure of Information by the National Practitioner Data Bank § 60.17...

  18. The Coast Guard Comes to Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawcett, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on Sea Partners, by the United States Coast Guard, that enables students to understand how pollution affects the marine environment. Correlates the activities with the National Science Education Standards. (DDR)

  19. Nosocomial Infections at Kenyatta National Hospital Intensive-Care Unit in Nairobi, Kenya

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. W. W. Ngumi

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the common bacteria isolated from patients, antibiotics used, sensitivity patterns, therapeutic procedures and cleaning protocols practised in Kenyatta National Hospital Intensive-Care Unit (ICU). Kenyatta National Hospital is a 1,800-bed referral and tertiary-care hospital which is also the Teaching University Hospital. The ICU has 20 beds. Two members of staff, a consultant and

  20. RepoRt on a MaMMal SuRvey at CaMp Maxey, laMaR County, texaS (texaS aRMy national GuaRd faCility)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cody W. EdWards

    A mammal survey was conducted of Camp Maxey (Texas Army National Guard training site), Lamar County, Texas, from October 2002 through June 2004. This military installation is located in eastern Texas and is situated at the gradational boundary between the Pineywoods (east) and Blackland Prairies (west). Sherman traps, snap traps, pitfall traps, mist nets, DK-1 and Macabee gopher traps, and

  1. Trends in Inpatient Hospital Deaths: National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2000-2010

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Has the inpatient hospital death rate decreased for all patients and for those with selected first-listed ... 2010 differ from the length of stay for all hospitalizations? Inpatients who died in the hospital stayed ...

  2. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army...

  3. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army...

  4. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army...

  5. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army...

  6. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army...

  7. 3 CFR 9022 - Proclamation 9022 of September 20, 2013. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...families. That is why First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden launched the Joining...Nation secure. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America...the two hundred and thirty-eighth.BARACK...

  8. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: Dispensing and administration—2002

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CRAIG A. PEDERSEN; PHILIP J. SCHNEIDER; DOUGLAS J. SCHECKELHOFF

    Results of the 2002 ASHP nation- al survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings that pertain to dispensing and ad- ministration are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1101 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. SMG Market- ing Group, Inc., supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn

  9. National hospital ratings systems share few common scores and may generate confusion instead of clarity.

    PubMed

    Austin, J Matthew; Jha, Ashish K; Romano, Patrick S; Singer, Sara J; Vogus, Timothy J; Wachter, Robert M; Pronovost, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Attempts to assess the quality and safety of hospitals have proliferated, including a growing number of consumer-directed hospital rating systems. However, relatively little is known about what these rating systems reveal. To better understand differences in hospital ratings, we compared four national rating systems. We designated "high" and "low" performers for each rating system and examined the overlap among rating systems and how hospital characteristics corresponded with performance on each. No hospital was rated as a high performer by all four national rating systems. Only 10 percent of the 844 hospitals rated as a high performer by one rating system were rated as a high performer by any of the other rating systems. The lack of agreement among the national hospital rating systems is likely explained by the fact that each system uses its own rating methods, has a different focus to its ratings, and stresses different measures of performance. PMID:25732492

  10. 3 CFR 8864 - Proclamation 8864 of September 14, 2012. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...exceptional service in a post-9/11 world has secured their place alongside the...VOW to Hire Heroes Act, which created new tax credits to encourage employers to...Reserve Week, let us pay tribute to the brave men and women who keep our Nation...

  11. Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-10-01

    The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

  12. Drug-positive rates for the Army from fiscal years 1991 to 2000 and for the National Guard from Fiscal years 1997 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Bruins, Mark R; Okano, Catherine K; Lyons, Timothy P; Lukey, Brian J

    2002-05-01

    This article examines the positive rate by drug for all urinalysis specimens tested by the U.S. Army from fiscal year 1991 (FY91) to FY00 and for the Army National Guard (NG) from FY97 to FY00. The average positive rate for the Army from FY91 to FY00 was 0.84%. In FY00, the Army rate reached a 10-year high of 1.04%. From FY97 to FY00, the NG positive rate declined from 3.4% to 2.16% but was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the Army rate during the same period. Marijuana and cocaine are the most abused drugs for both the Army and NG. The positive rate for marijuana in the Army from FY91 to FY00 was 0.51%, and the cocaine rate was 0.19%. The NG marijuana-positive rate from FY97 to FY00 was 1.70%, and the cocaine rate was 0.51%. The positive rate for all other drugs of abuse tested was less than 0.3% for both the Army and NG during the same periods. The overall positive rate for the Army and NG are below those estimated (6.3%) in the civilian population. PMID:12053845

  13. Prey abundance and food habits of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, C.G.; Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-09-01

    Prey abundance and food habits of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. The sampling methods initially used to assess abundance of prey species resulted in indices too low to be of value. Because of this, the relationship between relative abundance and frequency of occurrence of prey species could not be examined. Six hundred forty-nine fecal samples (scats) were analyzed to determine the frequency of occurrence of prey items. California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) and lagomorphs primarily desert cottontails (Sylvilagus audubonii) and black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) were the most frequently occurring mammalian prey items found in scats (35.0% and 12.2%, respectively). The frequency of occurrence of ground squirrel (but not lagomorph) remains in scats collected from juveniles was significantly higher than in scats collected from adults. The frequency of occurrence of ground squirrel and lagomorph remains in scats collected from males was not significant different than in scats collected from females. There were significant variations in the frequency of ground squirrel remains among the years 1989--1991 and during the June--November periods between 1989 and 1990 and between 1990 and 1991. The frequency of lagomorph remains collected during the June--November period differed significantly among the years 1989--1991 and between 1990 and 1991.

  14. Homecoming of soldiers who are citizens: Re-employment and financial status of returning Army National Guard soldiers from Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF).

    PubMed

    Griffith, James

    2015-01-01

    This study examined civilian employment among Army National Guard soldiers who had recently returned from Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF). Of specific interest were relationships of re-employment and financial difficulties to several conditions, such as amount of social support during and after deployment, combat exposure, negative feelings during and after deployment, and postdeployment adjustment symptoms. Survey data from the Army's Reintegration Unit Risk Inventory were used (4,546 soldiers in 50 units who were deployed during 2010). Few soldiers reported financial difficulties during deployment (7.1% of the sample) and after having returned (11.8%). Of those who reported postdeployment financial difficulties, nearly one-half had reported such difficulties during deployment, and not having resumed the predeployment job was associated with more postdeployment financial difficulties. Logistic regression analyses showed the relative contribution of the study variables to changed financial status, from deployment to postdeployment. Reported deployment support (e.g., trust in the unit chain-of-command and available support) was associated with decreased financial difficulties. In contrast, increased financial difficulties were associated with having seen others wounded or killed in combat. Other postdeployment experiences, such as feelings of anger and frustration and available support, were associated with increased financial difficulties, in addition to alcohol use, trouble sleeping and suicidal thoughts. Implications of results for policy and practice to lessen financial hardships and job loss associated with deployment are discussed. PMID:24284690

  15. Neonatal telephone consultations in the National Maternity Hospital.

    PubMed

    Travers, C P; Murphy, J F A

    2014-09-01

    Details of telephone consultations concerning infants were recorded prospectively over a two month period in the National Maternity Hospital (NMH). There were one hundred and forty-six calls recorded. One hundred and sixteen (79.5%) calls were from mothers. The average age of the infants was twenty-eight days. Eighty (54.8%) calls were answered by Nursing Staff while the remainder were taken by Doctors. There were thirty-nine (26.7%) calls relating to the gastrointestinal system. There were twenty-seven (18.5%) calls regarding infants with respiratory concerns. The next most common problem was irritability followed by calls concerning jaundice, rashes and umbilical issues. Fifty-five (37.7%) callers were given home care advice or reassurance. Thirty-six (24.7%) were advised to attend a Paediatric Emergency Department (ED). GP visits and Baby Clinic appointments were advised for twenty-four (16.4%) and twenty-three (15.8%) infants respectively while six (4.1%) of the callers were directed to attend NMH immediately. PMID:25282972

  16. The Israel National Hospital Discharge Register: an essential component of data driven healthcare.

    PubMed

    Haklai, Ziona; Mostovoy, Dmitry; Gordon, Ethel-Sherry; Karger, Jean Chaim; Reichert, Assa

    2014-01-01

    The Israel National Hospital Discharge Register (INHDR) is an essential section of healthcare data. It includes record for each admission to hospital wards during the last twenty years, and the data are increasing by digitally updated information from hospitals on continually a monthly or quarterly basis. The register contains encrypted patient identity number, admission number, demographic and geographic data, hospitalization data, diagnoses, procedures and accounting data. The goal of the register is to measure medical and surgical services in hospitals, to compare hospital activity among regions, gender and age and population groups within the country and among other countries, to analyse the difference between periods. This large-scale hospital data helps in planning of the hospital services, analysing the health status of the population, disease and injury surveillance, and helps in performance of quality indicators. It assists decision makers at the Ministry of Health (MOH) in their daily and on-going missions. PMID:24743078

  17. Assessment of soil and water contaminants from selected locations in and near the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area, Ada County, Idaho, 2001-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parliman, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001, the National Guard Bureau and the U.S. Geological Survey began a project to compile hydrogeologic data and determine presence or absence of soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination at the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area in southwestern Idaho. Between June 2002 and April 2003, a total of 114 soil, surface-water, ground-water, precipitation, or dust samples were collected from 68 sample sites (65 different locations) in the Orchard Training Area (OTA) or along the vehicle corridor to the OTA. Soil and water samples were analyzed for concentrations of selected total trace metals, major ions, nutrients, explosive compounds, semivolatile organics, and petroleum hydrocarbons. Water samples also were analyzed for concentrations of selected dissolved trace metals and major ions. Distinguishing naturally occurring large concentrations of trace metals, major ions, and nutrients from contamination related to land and water uses at the OTA was difficult. There were no historical analyses for this area to compare with modern data, and although samples were collected from 65 locations in and near the OTA, sampled areas represented only a small part of the complex OTA land-use areas and soil types. For naturally occurring compounds, several assumptions were made?anomalously large concentrations, when tied to known land uses, may indicate presence of contamination; naturally occurring concentrations cannot be separated from contamination concentrations in mid- and lower ranges of data; and smallest concentrations may represent the lowest naturally occurring range of concentrations and (or) the absence of contaminants related to land and water uses. Presence of explosive, semivolatile organic (SVOC), and petroleum hydrocarbon compounds in samples indicates contamination from land and water uses. In areas along the vehicle corridor and major access roads within the OTA, most trace metal, major ion, and nutrient concentrations in soil samples were not in the upper 10th percentile of data, but concentrations of 25 metals, ions, or nutrients were in the upper 10th percentile in a puddle sample near the heavy equipment maneuvering area, MPRC-H. The largest concentrations of tin, ammonia, and nitrite plus nitrate (as nitrogen) in water from the OTA were detected in a sample from this puddle. Petroleum hydrocarbons were the most common contaminant, detected in all soil and surface-water samples. An SVOC, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, a plasticizer, was detected at a site along the vehicle corridor. In Maneuver Areas within the OTA, many soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of cobalt, iron, mercury, titanium, sodium, ammonia, or total phosphorus were detected in 6 of 13 soil samples outside the Tadpole Lake area. The largest concentrations of aluminum, arsenic, beryllium, nickel, selenium, silver, strontium, thallium, vanadium, chloride, potassium, sulfate, and nitrite plus nitrate were detected in soil samples from the Tadpole Lake area. Water from Tadpole Lake contained the largest total concentrations of 19 trace metals, 4 major ions, and 1 nutrient. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 5 soil samples and water from Tadpole Lake. SVOCs related to combustion of fuel or plasticizers were detected in 1 soil sample. Explosive compounds were detected in 1 precipitation sample.In the Impact Area within the OTA, most soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of barium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, or orthophosphate were detected in 6 of the 18 soil samples. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 4 soil samples, SVOCs in 6 samples, and explosive compounds in 4 samples. In the mobilization and training equipment site (MATES) compound adjacent to the OTA, all soil and water samples contained at lea

  18. Gender differences in the risk and protective factors associated with PTSD: a prospective study of National Guard troops deployed to Iraq.

    PubMed

    Kline, Anna; Ciccone, Donald S; Weiner, Marc; Interian, Alejandro; St Hill, Lauren; Falca-Dodson, Maria; Black, Christopher M; Losonczy, Miklos

    2013-01-01

    This study examines gender differences in post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and PTSS risk/protective factors among soldiers deployed to Iraq. We pay special attention to two potentially modifiable military factors, military preparedness and unit cohesion, which may buffer the deleterious psychological effects of combat. Longitudinal data were collected on 922 New Jersey National Guard soldiers (91 women) deployed to Iraq in 2008. Anonymous surveys administered at pre- and post-deployment included the PTSD Checklist (PCL), the Unit Support Scale, and a preparedness scale adapted from the Iowa Gulf War Study. Bivariate analyses and hierarchical multiple regression were used to identify predictors of PTSS and their explanatory effects on the relationship between gender and PTSS. Women had a higher prevalence of probable post-deployment PTSD than men (18.7% vs. 8.7%; OR = 2.45; CI [1.37, 4.37]) and significantly higher post-deployment PTSS (33.73 vs. 27.37; p = .001). While there were no gender differences in combat exposure, women scored higher on pre-deployment PTSS (26.9 vs. 23.1; p ? .001) and lower on military preparedness (1.65 vs. 2.41; p ? .001) and unit cohesion (32.5 vs. 38.1; p ? .001). In a multivariate model, controlling for all PTSS risk/resilience factors reduced the gender difference as measured by the unstandardized Beta (B) by 45%, with 18% uniquely attributable to low cohesion and low preparedness. In the fully controlled model, gender remained a significant predictor of PTSS but the effect size was small (d = .26). Modifiable military institutional factors may account for much of the increased vulnerability of women soldiers to PTSD. PMID:23965264

  19. Improvement of the low knowledge, attitude and practice of hepatitis B virus infection among Saudi national guard personnel after educational intervention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) was reported to be higher in military personnel than the general population in Saudi Arabia (SA), there is lack of studies assessing HBV awareness among them. The objective was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of HBV infection among military personnel. Methods An intervention design with pre- and post-education KAP questionnaire was completed among National Guard soldiers working in Jeddah during January 2009. Educational intervention was provided through educational leaflets, group and individual discussions, visual show, and a lecture. A score was created from the correct answers to 58 questions. Results A total of 400 male soldiers with mean age 30.7?±?6.1 years completed both questionnaires. The majority had school education (96.8%) and in the lower military ranks (66.0%). Only 19.5% of soldiers reported HBV vaccine intake. The low median and inter-quartile range of the pre-intervention score (16, 6–26) markedly increased after education (to 53, 50–55, p<0.001). The overall improvement of mean KAP score (204%) was also observed in all its component scores; disease nature (272%), methods of transmission (206%), prevention and control (109%), attitude (155%), and practice (192%). The improvement was evident irrespective of socio-demographic characteristics and history of HBV vaccine. KAP scores were significantly associated with higher educational levels, higher monthly income, administrative jobs, and higher job ranks. Conclusion We are reporting a low level of HBV awareness among Saudi military population. The study confirms the need and effectiveness of focused multifaceted educational campaigns among the military population. PMID:23111118

  20. Are the nation's hospitals facing a capital crisis?

    PubMed

    Johnsson, J

    1990-07-20

    Are hospitals facing a capital crisis? Wall Street is taking a long, hard look at hospitals' bottom lines--and many analysts don't like what they see. Hospitals' increasing reliance on long-term debt, lower debt-service coverage ratios, and weakening performance indicators all signal a potentially volatile situation for some sectors of the field. Which hospitals are at risk? Experts point to hospitals in Southern California and New York. But others say that hospitals in moderate-size cities with 250 beds and $40 million or more in long-term debt are vulnerable. However, 40 percent of the 600 CEOs who responded to our Hamilton/KSA survey agree that the continued erosion of reimbursement will require a government bailout similar to the savings and loan industry. "A great deal depends on public policy," says Darrel Brownell, executive vice-president and chief financial officer, Memorial Health Services, a two-hospital system based in Long Beach, CA. "The government has the ability to maintain the industry in a stable condition, or it has the ability to force it into a bailout situation." PMID:2370036

  1. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures... PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine Casualty Investigations §...

  2. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures... PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine Casualty Investigations §...

  3. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures... PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine Casualty Investigations §...

  4. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures... PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine Casualty Investigations §...

  5. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures... PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine Casualty Investigations §...

  6. National perspective on in-hospital emergency units in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Lafta, Riyadh K.; Al-Nuaimi, Maha A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hospitals play a crucial role in providing communities with essential medical care during times of disasters. The emergency department is the most vital component of hospitals' inpatient business. In Iraq, at present, there are many casualties that cause a burden of work and the need for structural assessment, equipment updating and evaluation of process. Objective: To examine the current pragmatic functioning of the existing set-up of services of in-hospital emergency departments within some general hospitals in Baghdad and Mosul in order to establish a mechanism for future evaluation for the health services in our community. Methods: A cross-sectional study was employed to evaluate the structure, process and function of six major hospitals with emergency units: four major hospitals in Baghdad and two in Mosul. Results: The six surveyed emergency units are distinct units within general hospitals that serve (collectively) one quarter of the total population. More than one third of these units feature observation unit beds, laboratory services, imaging facilities, pharmacies with safe storage, and ambulatory entrance. Operation room was found only in one hospital's reception and waiting area. Consultation/track area, cubicles for infection control, and discrete tutorial rooms were not available. Patient assessment was performed (although without adequate privacy). The emergency specialist, family medicine specialist and interested general practitioner exist in one-third of the surveyed units. Psychiatrist, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and social work links are not available. The shortage in medication, urgent vaccines and vital facilities is an obvious problem. Conclusions: Our emergency unit's level and standards of care are underdeveloped. The inconsistent process and inappropriate environments need to be reconstructed. The lack of drugs, commodities, communication infrastructure, audit and training all require effective build up. PMID:25003053

  7. Implementation of Antimicrobial Stewardship Policies in U.S. Hospitals: Findings from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Herzig, Carolyn T. A.; Larson, Elaine L.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Perencevich, Eli N.; Stone, Patricia W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the use of antimicrobial stewardship policies and to investigate factors associated with implementation in a national sample of acute care hospitals. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. PARTICIPANTS Infection Control Directors from acute care hospitals participating in the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). METHODS An online survey was conducted in the Fall of 2011. A subset of hospitals also provided access to their 2011 NHSN annual survey data. RESULTS Responses were received from 1,015 hospitals (30% response rate). The majority of hospitals (64%) reported the presence of a policy; use of antibiograms and antimicrobial restriction policies were most frequently utilized (83% and 65%, respectively). Respondents from larger, urban, teaching hospitals and those that are part of a system that shares resources were more likely to report a policy in place (P < .01). Hospitals located in California were more likely to have policy in place than in hospitals located in other states (P = .014). CONCLUSION This study provides a snapshot of the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship policies in place in U.S. hospitals and suggests that statewide efforts in California are achieving their intended effect. Further research is needed to identify factors that foster the adoption of these policies. PMID:25695166

  8. Surface-water quantity and quality, aquatic biology, stream geomorphology, and groundwater-flow simulation for National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, 2002-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langland, Michael J.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Chichester, Douglas C.; Bilger, Michael D.; Brightbill, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    Base-line and long-term monitoring of water resources of the National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap in south-central Pennsylvania began in 2002. Results of continuous monitoring of streamflow and turbidity and monthly and stormflow water-quality samples from two continuous-record long-term stream sites, periodic collection of water-quality samples from five miscellaneous stream sites, and annual collection of biological data from 2002 to 2005 at 27 sites are discussed. In addition, results from a stream-geomorphic analysis and classification and a regional groundwater-flow model are included. Streamflow at the facility was above normal for the 2003 through 2005 water years and extremely high-flow events occurred in 2003 and in 2004. Water-quality samples were analyzed for nutrients, sediments, metals, major ions, pesticides, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, and explosives. Results indicated no exceedances for any constituent (except iron) above the primary and secondary drinking-water standards or health-advisory levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Iron concentrations were naturally elevated in the groundwater within the watershed because of bedrock lithology. The majority of the constituents were at or below the method detection limit. Sediment loads were dominated by precipitation due to the remnants of Hurricane Ivan in September 2004. More than 60 percent of the sediment load measured during the entire study was transported past the streamgage in just 2 days during that event. Habitat and aquatic-invertebrate data were collected in the summers of 2002-05, and fish data were collected in 2004. Although 2002 was a drought year, 2003-05 were above-normal flow years. Results indicated a wide diversity in invertebrates, good numbers of taxa (distinct organisms), and on the basis of a combination of metrics, the majority of the 27 sites indicated no or slight impairment. Fish-metric data from 25 sites indicated results similar to the invertebrate data. Stream classification based on evolution of the stream channels indicates about 94 percent of the channels were considered to be in equilibrium (type B or C channels), neither aggrading nor eroding. A regional, uncalibrated groundwater-flow model indicated the surface-water and groundwater-flow divides coincided. Because of folding of rock layers, groundwater was under confined conditions and nearly all the water leaves the facility via the streams.

  9. Body weight, weight perceptions and food intake patterns. A cross-sectional study among male recruits in the Norwegian National Guard

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Young men tend to have a low intake of vegetables and fruit. Unfortunately, this group is difficult to reach with health information. Furthermore, knowledge about weight perceptions and the relationship to food behaviour among young men is scant. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between BMI, health and weight perceptions and food intake patterns among young men in the military. Methods Data were collected with a 4-day food diary among 578 male recruits (age 18-26, mean 19.7) in the Norwegian National Guard (response rate 78%), in addition to a questionnaire, including questions about health and weight perceptions, and food frequency when still living at home. Weight and height were objectively measured. Food patterns were explored with principal component analysis, based on the diary data. A multivariate linear regression analysis determined the association between BMI and food patterns, and attitudes to health and slenderness, adjusting for smoking, physical activity and phase of data collection. Results Twenty eight percent of the recruits were overweight/obese (BMI > 25 kg/m2). Two-thirds meant that it is important for them to be slender, and these recruits reported more of both light (p = 0.025) and hard (p = 0.016) physical activity than the others. It was a positive association between the recruits' food frequency at home, and the amount of intake in the military camp for several food items. A principal component analysis identified three distinct food patterns, loading on 1) plant foods, 2) fast food/soft drinks, 3) milk/cereals. Those who stated that it is important for them to be slender, or to have good health, did not have significantly different food intake patterns than the others. BMI was inversely related to scores on the plant food pattern, and positive attitudes to slenderness. Conclusion The majority of the recruits find it important to be slender. This orientation had a bearing on their physical activity pattern, but less on the food intake pattern. The data also indicate that subjects with high intakes of plant foods were less likely to have a high BMI than others. It is important to raise awareness of healthy eating in young men. PMID:21595899

  10. Hospital administrators' response to AIDS. Results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Weil, P A; Stam, L M

    1990-05-01

    Executives are just beginning to adapt to the presence of the epidemic. Two-thirds have been involved in AIDS care and these hospitals appear to be in the forefront in developing structural responses and initiating procedures to deal with the disease. Through the use of rating scale analysis, we were able to show a continuum of responses by which hospitals cope with the disease. First, educational efforts are begun, then human resource departments begin to refer employees with AIDS to caregivers. And the most developed response is for hospitals to establish specific policies for employees, ultimately requiring them to report whether or not they have the disease to their supervisor. Executives' attitudes also seem to be affected by whether or not their hospitals have cared for any AIDS patients. In contrast to the contact hypothesis used to explain prejudice, experienced administrators are more authoritarian in reacting to the crisis. For example, more experienced than inexperienced hospital administrators agree that all patients should be routinely tested for AIDS. Our findings are corroborated in a recently reported study of house staff who had been exposed to patients with AIDS. House officers who had cared for a greater number of AIDS patients showed a greater level of concern about acquiring the disease than those with less exposure. Just as experience among house officers serves to produce increasing concern for their personal safety, so too experience on the part of the executives appears to intensify anxiety in their attitudes. Experienced administrators are more likely to advocate specialized facilities for the care of AIDS patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2338844

  11. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.143 ...Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

  12. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355 ...6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

  13. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355 ...6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

  14. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355 ...6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

  15. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.143 ...Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

  16. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.143 ...Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

  17. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355 ...6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

  18. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355 ...6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check...frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across...

  19. National hospital survey of anaerobic culture and susceptibility methods: III.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Goldman, Pamela J; Goldman, Ronald J

    2008-04-01

    To assess the current status of anaerobic bacteriology in the United States, we surveyed, by means of a questionnaire, 150 hospitals selected at random with bed capacities of 200-1000 and we received responses from 98 (65%). Ninety-eight percent processed anaerobic culture specimens with 21% sending them to reference laboratories. Almost all these hospitals processed blood and wound cultures for anaerobes and all used selective media for identification, including BBE (52%), LKV (77%), and PEA (53%) agars. All hospital laboratories attempted identification of blood culture isolates including 80% that attempted speciation. Wound cultures for anaerobic bacteria and sterile site cultures were also processed for anaerobes by almost all labs. Identification of B. fragilis group species to species level was performed only in 56% of labs always and 37% sometimes. Preformed enzyme kits were used by 66% of labs and 30% used special potency disks for identification. Susceptibility testing was performed in-house by 21% of hospital labs and sent out to reference labs an additional 20%. Susceptibility testing was attempted for all blood culture isolates by both hospital (21% of total labs) and reference laboratories, but only performed by 17% for sterile body site and 14% of the time for wound isolates. Etest was used most often followed by broth microdilution. No labs used the agar dilution or disk elution methods. The antimicrobials most often tested in hospital labs, predicated on the commercial panel used, were penicillin/ampicillin and clindamycin (15/18; 83%; 15% of total labs), metronidazole (16/18; 89%; 16% of total labs) and cefotetan and ampicillin/sulbactam (12/18; 67%; 12% of total labs), piperacillin/tazobactam (7/18; 39%; 7% of total labs), cefoxitin (9/18; 50%), imipenem (8/18; 44%), and chloramphenicol (6/18; 33%). Our current survey suggests that while many labs are processing anaerobic cultures, especially blood cultures, the identification of isolates and the performance of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of isolates are in disarray and in dire need of improvement. PMID:18291689

  20. Incidence of “never events” among weekend admissions versus weekday admissions to US hospitals: national analysis

    PubMed Central

    Attenello, Frank J; Cen, Steven Y; Ng, Alvin; Kim-Tenser, May; Sanossian, Nerses; Amar, Arun P; Mack, William J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between weekend admission to hospital and 11 hospital acquired conditions recently considered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid as “never events” for which resulting healthcare costs are not reimbursed. Design National analysis. Setting US Nationwide Inpatient Sample discharge database. Participants 351 million patients discharged from US hospitals, 2002-10. Main outcome measures Univariate rates and multivariable likelihood of hospital acquired conditions among patients admitted on weekdays versus weekends, as well as the impacts of these events on prolonged length of stay and total inpatient charges. Results From 2002 to 2010, 351?170?803 patients were admitted to hospital, with 19% admitted on a weekend. Hospital acquired conditions occurred at an overall frequency of 4.1% (5.7% among weekend admissions versus 3.7% among weekday admissions). Adjusting for patient and hospital cofactors the probability of having one or more hospital acquired conditions was more than 20% higher in weekend admissions compared with weekday admissions (odds ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.24 to 1.26, P<0.01). Hospital acquired conditions have a negative impact on both hospital charges and length of stay. At least one hospital acquired condition was associated with an 83% (1.83, 1.77 to 1.90, P<0.01) likelihood of increased charges and 38% likelihood of prolonged length of stay (1.38, 1.36 to 1.41, P<0.01). Conclusion Weekend admission to hospital is associated with an increased likelihood of hospital acquired condition, cost, and length of stay. Future protocols and staffing regulations must be tailored to the requirements of this high risk subgroup. PMID:25876878

  1. National Survey of Children's Hospitals on Legacy-Making Activities

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Mary S.; Friedman, Debra L.; Gordon, Jessie E.; Gilmer, Mary J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective Many hospitals offer legacy-building activities for children with serious illnesses or their family members, yet legacy-making has received little empirical attention. This descriptive cross-sectional study examined healthcare provider perceptions of legacy-making activities (e.g., memory books) currently offered by hospitals to pediatric patients and their families. Methods Healthcare providers in seventy-seven (100%) teaching children's hospitals across the United States completed an electronic survey. Results Nearly all providers surveyed reported offering legacy-making activities to ill children and their families, with patients and families usually completing the activity together. Most activities were offered before a patient died and when cure is no longer being sought. Perceived outcomes included benefit to bereaved families and a tangible memento of their deceased child. Conclusion Legacy-making may enhance life and decrease suffering for dying children and their families. Healthcare professionals can facilitate opportunities for children and their families to build legacies. Additional research is needed to examine activities across different age groups and conditions, the best time to offer such activities, and associations with positive and negative outcomes for ill children, their family members, and the bereaved. PMID:22577785

  2. Decision Procedures for Guarded Logics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erich Grädel; Rwth Aachen

    Different variants of guarded logics (a powerful generalization of modal logics) are surveyed and the recent decidability\\u000a result for guarded fixed point logic (obtained in joint work with I. Walukiewicz) is explained. The exposition given here\\u000a emphasizes the tree model property of guarded logics: every satisfiable sentence has a model of bounded tree width.

  3. Factors associated with poor hospital mortality rates after the national health insurance program.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li

    2015-03-01

    The study examined whether hospital mortality rates have improved since National Health Insurance (NHI) in Taiwan and what factors affect the hospital mortality rates. The related hospital data were collected from databases belonging to the NHI Annual Statistics Information. In addition, panel data analysis and stepwise regression are used to indicate the determinants of hospital mortality rates from 1995 to 2008. The evidence shows that mortality rates have not improved since the NHI; competition, the elderly, family income, the poor, the number of clinical departments, length of stay, new technology, public hospitals and family medical expenses-all affect mortality rates. Moreover, longer length of stay, increase in the number of elderly and low-income families, and inequality of resource allocation have led to high mortality rates. Policy makers first have to realize what drives them to change and then set the benchmarks for their improvement. PMID:22500032

  4. Hydrogeologic framework and water quality of the Vermont Army National Guard Ethan Allen Firing Range, northern Vermont, October 2002 through December 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Stewart F.; Chalmers, Ann; Mack, Thomas J.; Denner, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    The Ethan Allen Firing Range of the Vermont Army National Guard is a weapons-testing and training facility in a mountainous region of Vermont that has been in operation for about 80 years. The hydrologic framework and water quality of the facility were assessed between October 2002 and December 2003. As part of the study, streamflow was continuously measured in the Lee River and 24 observation wells were installed at 19 locations in the stratified drift and bedrock aquifers to examine the hydrogeology. Chemical analyses of surface water, ground water, streambed sediment, and fish tissue were collected to assess major ions, trace elements, nutrients, and volatile and semivolatile compounds. Sampling included 5 surface-water sites sampled during moderate and low-flow conditions; streambed-sediment samples collected at the 5 surface-water sites; fish-tissue samples collected at 3 of the 5 surface-water sites; macroinvertebrates collected at 4 of the 5 surface-water sites; and ground-water samples collected from 10 observation wells, and samples collected at all surface- and ground-water sites. The hydrogeologic framework at the Ethan Allen Firing Range is dominated by the upland mountain and valley setting of the site. Bedrock wells yield low to moderate amounts of water (0 to 23 liters per minute). In the narrow river valleys, layered stratified-drift deposits of sand and gravel of up to 18 meters thick fill the Lee River and Mill Brook Valleys. In these deposits, the water table is generally within 3 meters below the land surface and overall ground-water flow is from east to west. Streamflow in the Lee River averaged 0.72 cubic meters per second (25.4 cubic feet per second) between December 2002 and December 2003. Streams are highly responsive to precipitation events in this mountainous environment and a comparison with other nearby watersheds shows that Lee River maintains relatively high streamflow during dry periods. Concentrations of trace elements and nutrients in surface-water samples are well below freshwater-quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Brook-trout samples collected in 1992 and 2003 show trace-metal concentrations have decreased over the past 11 years. concentrations in water samples are well below levels that restrict swimming at all five stream sites at moderate and low-flow conditions and in all observation wells. Comparisons among surface-water, streambed-sediment, and biological samples collected in 2003 to earlier studies at the Ethan Allen Firing Range indicate water-quality conditions are similar or have improved over the past 15 years. Ground water in the stratified-drift aquifers at the facility is well buffered with relatively high alkalinities and pH greater than 6. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, uranium, and zinc were below detection levels in ground-water samples. Barium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, and strontium were the only trace elements detected in ground-water samples. Cobalt and iron were detected at low levels in two wells near Mill Brook, and copper was detected at the detection limit in one of these wells. These same two wells had concentrations of barium and manganese 2 to 10 times greater than other ground-water samples. Concentrations of nutrients are at or below detection levels in most ground-water samples. Volatile organic compounds and semivolatile organic compounds were not detected in any water samples from the Ethan Allen Firing Range.

  5. Laser beam guard clamps

    DOEpatents

    Dickson, Richard K. (Stockton, CA)

    2010-09-07

    A quick insert and release laser beam guard panel clamping apparatus having a base plate mountable on an optical table, a first jaw affixed to the base plate, and a spring-loaded second jaw slidably carried by the base plate to exert a clamping force. The first and second jaws each having a face acutely angled relative to the other face to form a V-shaped, open channel mouth, which enables wedge-action jaw separation by and subsequent clamping of a laser beam guard panel inserted through the open channel mouth. Preferably, the clamping apparatus also includes a support structure having an open slot aperture which is positioned over and parallel with the open channel mouth.

  6. Standard practices for computerized clinical decision support in community hospitals: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, James L; Sittig, Dean F; Wright, Adam; McMullen, Carmit; Bates, David W

    2012-01-01

    Objective Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) with clinical decision support (CDS) can help hospitals improve care. Little is known about what CDS is presently in use and how it is managed, however, especially in community hospitals. This study sought to address this knowledge gap by identifying standard practices related to CDS in US community hospitals with mature CPOE systems. Materials and Methods Representatives of 34 community hospitals, each of which had over 5?years experience with CPOE, were interviewed to identify standard practices related to CDS. Data were analyzed with a mix of descriptive statistics and qualitative approaches to the identification of patterns, themes and trends. Results This broad sample of community hospitals had robust levels of CDS despite their small size and the independent nature of many of their physician staff members. The hospitals uniformly used medication alerts and order sets, had sophisticated governance procedures for CDS, and employed staff to customize CDS. Discussion The level of customization needed for most CDS before implementation was greater than expected. Customization requires skilled individuals who represent an emerging manpower need at this type of hospital. Conclusion These results bode well for robust diffusion of CDS to similar hospitals in the process of adopting CDS and suggest that national policies to promote CDS use may be successful. PMID:22707744

  7. Improving Service Quality in Long-term Care Hospitals: National Evaluation on Long-term Care Hospitals and Employees Perception of Quality Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkyung; Han, Woosok

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate predictors for specific dimensions of service quality perceived by hospital employees in long-term care hospitals. Methods Data collected from a survey of 298 hospital employees in 18 long-term care hospitals were analysed. Multivariate ordinary least squares regression analysis with hospital fixed effects was used to determine the predictors of service quality using respondents’ and organizational characteristics. Results The most significant predictors of employee-perceived service quality were job satisfaction and degree of consent on national evaluation criteria. National evaluation results on long-term care hospitals and work environment also had positive effects on service quality. Conclusion The findings of the study show that organizational characteristics are significant determinants of service quality in long-term care hospitals. Assessment of the extent to which hospitals address factors related to employeeperceived quality of services could be the first step in quality improvement activities. Results have implications for efforts to improve service quality in longterm care hospitals and designing more comprehensive national evaluation criteria. PMID:24159497

  8. A nationally representative survey of hospital malnutrition: the Italian PIMAI (Project: Iatrogenic MAlnutrition in Italy) study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucio Lucchin; Amleto D’Amicis; Maria Gabriella Gentile; Nino Carlo Battistini; Maria Antonia Fusco; Augusta Palmo; Maurizio Muscaritoli; Franco Contaldo; Emanuele Cereda

    2009-01-01

    Hospital malnutrition is high in every country it was investigated, but no nationally representative prevalence study, considering\\u000a potential geographical interfering factors, has yet been performed. We designed a multidisciplinary, cross-sectional, nation-wide\\u000a survey: the PIMAI study (Project: Iatrogenic MAlnutrition in Italy). Adult (>18 years old) patient inclusion was managed on\\u000a a four-strata randomisation model according to sex and age (<65 and

  9. Prevalence study of hospital-acquired infections in 14 Greek hospitals: planning from the local to the national surveillance level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Gikas; J. Pediaditis; J. A. Papadakis; J. Starakis; S. Levidiotou; P. Nikolaides; G. Kioumis; E. Maltezos; M. Lazanas; E. Anevlavis; M. Roubelaki; Y. Tselentis

    2002-01-01

    A prevalence study of hospital-acquired infections (HAI) was carried out in 14 of 112 Greek hospitals (15.7%), scattered throughout Greece. Five of seven Greek university hospitals and nine regional hospitals participated in the one-day study, and 3925 hospitalized patients (10.5% of the total hospital beds in Greece) were recorded. The aim of this project was to organize a surveillance of

  10. National Trends in Incidence Rates of Hospitalization for Stroke in Children With Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCavit, Timothy L.; Xuan, Lei; Zhang, Song; Flores, Glenn; Quinn, Charles T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The success of primary stroke prevention for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) throughout the United States is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to generate national incidence rates of hospitalization for stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) before and after publication of the Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP trial) in 1998. Procedure We performed a retrospective trend analysis of the 1993–2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample and Kids’ Inpatient Databases. Hospitalizations for SCD patients 0–18 years old with stroke were identified by ICD-9CM code. The primary outcome, the trend in annual incidence rate of hospitalization for stroke in children with SCD, was analyzed by linear regression. Incidence rates of hospitalization for stroke before and after 1998 were compared by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results From 1993 to 2009, 2,024 hospitalizations were identified for stroke. Using the mean annual incidence rate of hospitalization for stroke from 1993 to 1998 as the baseline, the rate decreased from 1993 to 2009 (point estimate = ?0.022/100 patient years [95% CI, ?0.039, ?0.005], P = 0.027). The mean annual incidence rate of hospitalization stroke decreased by 45% from 0.51 per 100 patient years in 1993–1998 to 0.28 per 100 patient years in 1999–2009 (P = 0.008). Total hospital days and charges attributed to stroke also decreased by 45% and 24%, respectively. Conclusions After publication of the STOP trial and hydroxyurea licensure in 1998, the incidence of hospitalization for stroke in children with SCD decreased across the United States, suggesting that primary stroke prevention has been effective nationwide, but opportunity for improvement remains. PMID:23151905

  11. [Problems in career planning for novice medical technologists in Japanese national hospitals].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Shu; Tsutaya, Shoji; Akimoto, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Keiya; Yabaka, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Skills and knowledge regarding many different types of test are required for medical technologists (MTs) to provide accurate information to help doctors and other medical specialists. In order to become an efficient MT, specialized training programs are required. Certification in specialized areas of clinical laboratory sciences or a doctoral degree in medical sciences may help MTs to realize career advancement, a higher earning potential, and expand the options in their career. However, most young MTs in national university hospitals are employed as part-time workers on a three-year contract, which is too short to obtain certifications or a doctoral degree. We have to leave the hospital without expanding our future. We need to take control of our own development in order to enhance our employability within the period. As teaching and training hospitals, national university hospitals in Japan are facing a difficult dilemma in nurturing MTs. I hope, as a novice medical technologist, that at least university hospitals in Japan create an appropriate workplace environment for novice MTs. PMID:23427696

  12. A comparison of hospital administrative costs in eight nations: US costs exceed all others by far.

    PubMed

    Himmelstein, David U; Jun, Miraya; Busse, Reinhard; Chevreul, Karine; Geissler, Alexander; Jeurissen, Patrick; Thomson, Sarah; Vinet, Marie-Amelie; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2014-09-01

    A few studies have noted the outsize administrative costs of US hospitals, but no research has compared these costs across multiple nations with various types of health care systems. We assembled a team of international health policy experts to conduct just such a challenging analysis of hospital administrative costs across eight nations: Canada, England, Scotland, Wales, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United States. We found that administrative costs accounted for 25.3 percent of total US hospital expenditures--a percentage that is increasing. Next highest were the Netherlands (19.8 percent) and England (15.5 percent), both of which are transitioning to market-oriented payment systems. Scotland and Canada, whose single-payer systems pay hospitals global operating budgets, with separate grants for capital, had the lowest administrative costs. Costs were intermediate in France and Germany (which bill per patient but pay separately for capital projects) and in Wales. Reducing US per capita spending for hospital administration to Scottish or Canadian levels would have saved more than $150 billion in 2011. This study suggests that the reduction of US administrative costs would best be accomplished through the use of a simpler and less market-oriented payment scheme. PMID:25201663

  13. An international survey of physicians regarding clinical trials: a comparison between Kyoto University Hospital and Seoul National University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background International clinical trials are now rapidly expanding into Asia. However, the proportion of global trials is higher in South Korea compared to Japan despite implementation of similar governmental support in both countries. The difference in clinical trial environment might influence the respective physicians’ attitudes and experience towards clinical trials. Therefore, we designed a questionnaire to explore how physicians conceive the issues surrounding clinical trials in both countries. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted at Kyoto University Hospital (KUHP) and Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH) in 2008. The questionnaire consisted of 15 questions and 2 open-ended questions on broad key issues relating to clinical trials. Results The number of responders was 301 at KUHP and 398 at SNUH. Doctors with trial experience were 196 at KUHP and 150 at SNUH. Among them, 12% (24/196) at KUHP and 41% (61/150) at SUNH had global trial experience. Most respondents at both institutions viewed clinical trials favorably and thought that conducting clinical trials contributed to medical advances, which would ultimately lead to new and better treatments. The main reason raised as a hindrance to conducting clinical trials was the lack of personnel support and time. Doctors at both university hospitals thought that more clinical research coordinators were required to conduct clinical trials more efficiently. KUHP doctors were driven mainly by pure academic interest or for their desire to find new treatments, while obtaining credits for board certification and co-authorship on manuscripts also served as motivation factors for doctors at SNUH. Conclusions Our results revealed that there might be two different approaches to increase clinical trial activity. One is a social level approach to establish clinical trial infrastructure providing sufficient clinical research professionals. The other is an individual level approach that would provide incentives to encourage doctors to participate in and conduct clinical trials. PMID:24156760

  14. The Economic Impact of Hospitalization for Diabetic Foot Infections in a Caribbean Nation

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O; Islam, Shariful; Hariharan, Seetharaman; Harnarayan, Patrick; Budhooram, Steve; Ramsewak, Shivaa; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Context: Foot infection is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus in the Caribbean. Diabetic foot infections place a heavy burden on health care resources in the Caribbean. Objective: To evaluate the treatment-related costs for diabetic foot infections in a Caribbean nation. Methods: We identified all patients with diabetic foot infections in a 730-bed hospital serving a catchment population of approximately 400,000 persons from June 1, 2011 through July 31, 2012. The following data were collected: details of infection, antibiotic usage, investigations performed, number of physician consultations, details of operative treatment, and duration of hospitalization. Total charges were tallied to determine the final cost for inhospital treatment of diabetic foot infections. Results: There were 446 patients hospitalized with diabetic foot infections, yielding approximately 0.75% annual risk for patients with diabetes to develop foot infections. The mean duration of hospitalization was 22.5 days. Sixteen patients (3.6%) were treated conservatively without an operative procedure and 430 (96.4%) required some form of operative intervention. There were 885 debridements, 193 minor amputations and 60 major amputations, 7102 wound dressings, 2763 wound cultures, and 27,015 glucometer measurements. When the hospital charges were tallied, a total of US $13,922,178 (mean, US $31,216) were spent to treat diabetic foot infections in these 446 patients during 1 year at this hospital. Conclusions: Each year, the government of Trinidad and Tobago spends US $85 million, or 0.4% of their gross domestic product, solely to treat patients hospitalized for diabetic foot infections. With this level of national expenditure and the anticipated increase in the prevalence of diabetes, it is necessary to revive the call for investment in preventive public health strategies. PMID:24626079

  15. Strategies for Improving the Data Quality in National Hospital Discharge Data System: a Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, Zahra; Ahmadi, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: National hospital discharge data system can play a critical role in community health assessment, disease surveillance, strategic planning, policymaking, service quality control, and research. Moreover, the quality of hospital discharge data affects the usefulness of the data and is one of the prerequisites for effective utilization of the data. Thus, the present study aimed to identify the necessary actions for improving the data quality in the national hospital discharge data system and present a model for Iran based on the experiences of England, Canada, and New Zealand. Methods: In doing so, the measures performed in these countries were investigated. The related data were organized in six categories of standards and procedures, training and coordination with the users, assurance from the capability of the system’s software, data modification, data quality control, and documentation and reporting the data quality. According to the gathered data, the primary model was designed. Then, the model was assessed using a two-round Delphi technique by 33 and 31 experts, respectively. Conclusion: According to the findings, a model was presented in order to improve the data quality of Iran’s national hospital discharge data system. PMID:24554802

  16. Clinical encounters between nurses and First Nations women in a Western Canadian hospital.

    PubMed

    Browne, Annette J

    2007-05-01

    Based on findings from an ethnographic study, this paper explores the sociopolitical context of nurses' encounters with First Nations women in a Western Canadian hospital. Data were collected using in-depth interviews and participant observation of clinical encounters involving nurses and First Nations women who were in-patients in the hospital. Four themes in the data are discussed: relating across presumed "cultural differences"; constructing the Other; assumptions influencing clinical practice; and responding to routine patient requests. The findings illustrate how discourses and assumptions about Aboriginal people, culture, and presumed differences can become interwoven into routine clinical encounters. These results highlight the importance of analyzing health-care encounters in light of the wider sociopolitical and historical forces that give rise to racialization, culturalism and Othering, and underscore the need for critical awareness of these issues among nurses and other heath-care providers. PMID:17395350

  17. Tobacco control policies in hospitals before and after the implementation of a national smoking ban in Catalonia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Cristina; Fu, Marcela; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; Ballbč, Montse; Puig, Montse; García, Montse; Carabasa, Esther; Saltó, Esteve; Fernández, Esteve

    2009-01-01

    Background Diverse projects and guidelines to assist hospitals towards the attainment of comprehensive smoke-free policies have been developed. In 2006, Spain government passed a new smoking ban that reinforce tobacco control policies and banned completely smoking in hospitals. This study assesses the progression of tobacco control policies in the Catalan Network of Smoke-free Hospitals before and after a comprehensive national smoking ban. Methods We used the Self-Audit Questionnaire of the European Network for Smoke-free Hospitals to score the compliance of 9 policy standards (global score = 102). We used two cross-sectional surveys to evaluate tobacco control policies before (2005) and after the implementation of a national smoking ban (2007) in 32 hospitals of Catalonia, Spain. We compared the means of the overall score in 2005 and 2007 according to the type of hospital, the number of beds, the prevalence of tobacco consumption, and the number of years as a smoke-free hospital. Results The mean of the implementation score of tobacco control policies was 52.4 (95% CI: 45.4–59.5) in 2005 and 71.6 (95% CI: 67.0–76.2) in 2007 with an increase of 36.7% (p < 0.01). The hospitals with greater improvement were general hospitals (48% increase; p < 0.01), hospitals with > 300 beds (41.1% increase; p < 0.01), hospitals with employees' tobacco consumption prevalence 35–39% (72.2% increase; p < 0.05) and hospitals that had recently implemented smoke-free policies (74.2% increase; p < 0.01). Conclusion The national smoking ban appears to increase tobacco control activities in hospitals combined with other non-bylaw initiatives such as the Smoke-free Hospital Network. PMID:19473549

  18. A national, cross-sectional survey of children's hospital-based safety resource centres

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, Sadiqa; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Seaver Hill, Karen; Arbogast, Kristy B; Gittelman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the location, staffing, clientele, safety product disbursement patterns, education provided and sustainability of safety resource centres (SRCs) in US children's hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was distributed to children's hospital-based SRC directors. Survey categories included: funding sources, customer base, items sold, items given free of charge, education provided and directors’ needs. Results 32/38 (84.2%) SRC sites (affiliated with 30 hospitals) completed the survey. SRCs were in many hospital locations including lobby (28.1%), family resource centres (12.5%), gift shop/retail space (18.8%), mobile units (18.8%) and patient clinics (12.5%). 19% of respondents reported that their SRC was financially self-sustainable. Sales to patients predominated (mean of 44%); however, hospital employees made up a mean of 20% (range 0–60%) of sales. 78.1% of SRCs had products for children with special healthcare needs. Documentation kept at SRC sites included items purchased (96.9%), items given free of charge (65.6%) and customer demographics (50%). 56.3% of SRCs provided formal injury prevention education classes. The SRCs’ directors’ most important needs were finances (46.9%), staffing (50%) and space (46.9%). All of the directors were ‘somewhat interested’ or ‘very interested’ in each of the following: creation of a common SRC listserv, national SRC data bank and multisite SRC research platform. Conclusions SRCs are located in many US children's hospitals, and can be characterised as heterogeneous in location, products sold, data kept and ability to be financially sustained. Further research is needed to determine best practices for SRCs to maximise their impact on injury prevention. PMID:24667383

  19. Criminal Manifestations of Dementia Patients: Report from the National Forensic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Chu, Kon; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Choi, Sang-Sub; Lee, Sang Kun

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Some dementia patients have profound behavioral and psychological symptoms which might cause legal violation. We illustrate clinical and criminal characteristics of dementia patients who had been incarcerated because of criminal activity. Methods The National Forensic Hospital is the only hospital-based correctional facility in the Republic of Korea which incarcerates criminals with psychiatric or neurological disease. Between May 2008 and April 2009, those patients who had been diagnosed with dementia in the National Forensic Hospital were included in the study. We reviewed their medical and legal reports. Results There were 7 dementia patients out of 752 patients, including 2 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, 1 vascular dementia patient, and 4 patients with alcohol-related dementia. Criminal behavior included simple larceny by the 2 AD patients, and multiple violent crimes in a drunken state by the other 5 patients. Conclusions This study reported diverse criminal behaviors among dementia patients. Inebriation may be related to violent criminal behavior among some dementia patients. PMID:22279449

  20. National estimates of nonfatal injuries treated in hospital emergency departments--United States, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-05-01

    On July 1, 2000, the Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was expanded to collect data on all types and external causes of nonfatal injuries and poisonings treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments (EDs). This augmented system, called NEISS All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP), is a collaborative effort between CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control and CPSC. This report presents annualized national estimates using NEISS-AIP data obtained during July 1-September 30, 2000, which indicate that approximately 31,000,000 persons were treated for nonfatal injuries in EDs in 2000. Although most of the injuries were unintentional, an estimated 1,973,000 were violence-related. Data from NEISS-AIP can be used for monitoring temporal trends in nonfatal injuries by mechanism and intent of injury. PMID:11465904

  1. Barriers to healthy eating by National Health Service (NHS) hospital doctors in the hospital setting: results of a cross-sectional survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Winston; Carol Johnson; Sue Wilson

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With high levels of obesity and related illness, improving the health of the nation is a major public health concern. This study aimed to identify factors that prevent healthy eating among doctors, and that are associated with satisfaction with catering services. FINDINGS: Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 328 NHS doctors working in two NHS Trusts with on-site hospital canteen. Questionnaire

  2. National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH): results of the national audit of adult epilepsy in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Peter A; Kirkham, Jamie J; Marson, Anthony G; Pearson, Mike G

    2015-01-01

    Objectives About 100?000 people present to hospitals each year in England with an epileptic seizure. How they are managed is unknown; thus, the National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH) set out to assess prior care, management of the acute event and follow-up of these patients. This paper describes the data from the second audit conducted in 2013. Setting 154 emergency departments (EDs) across the UK. Participants Data from 4544 attendances (median age of 45?years, 57% men) showed that 61% had a prior diagnosis of epilepsy, 12% other neurological problems and 22% were first seizure cases. Each ED identified 30 consecutive adult cases presenting due to a seizure. Primary and secondary outcome measures Details were recorded of the patient's prior care, management at hospital and onward referral to neurological specialists onto an online database. Descriptive results are reported at national level. Results Of those with epilepsy, 498 (18%) were on no antiepileptic drug therapy and 1330 (48%) were on monotherapy. Assessments were often incomplete and witness histories were sought in only 759 (75%) of first seizure patients, 58% were seen by a senior doctor and 57% were admitted. For first seizure patients, advice on further seizure management was given to 264 (27%) and only 55% were referred to a neurologist or epilepsy specialist. For each variable, there was wide variability among sites that was not explicable. For the sites who partook in both audits, there was a trend towards better care in 2013, but this was small and dwarfed by the intersite variability. Conclusions These results have parallels with the Sentinel Audit of Stroke performed a decade earlier. There is wide intersite variability in care covering the entire care pathway, and a need for better organised and accessible care for these patients. PMID:25829372

  3. Prevalence of smoking among patients treated in NHS hospitals in England in 2010/2011: a national audit.

    PubMed

    Szatkowski, L; Murray, R; Hubbard, R; Agrawal, S; Huang, Y; Britton, J

    2015-05-01

    Using data from The Health Improvement Network and Hospital Episode Statistics, we investigate smoking prevalence, number of smokers treated and opportunities for cessation intervention among patients treated in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England from April 2010 to March 2011. Our results show that approximately 1.1 million smokers are treated in English hospitals each year, receiving a total of 2.6 million episodes of care. These findings suggest that delivering smoking cessation as a routine component of hospital care, as recommended by recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance, could achieve marked reductions in the prevalence of smoking and improve the cost-effectiveness of NHS hospitals. PMID:25385425

  4. Analysis of emergency department visits for palpitations (from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey).

    PubMed

    Probst, Marc A; Mower, William R; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Hoffman, Jerome R; Buch, Eric F; Sun, Benjamin C

    2014-05-15

    Palpitations is a common complaint in patients who visit the emergency department (ED), with causes ranging from benign to life threatening. We analyzed the ED component of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 2001 through 2010 for visits with a chief complaint of palpitations and calculated nationally representative weighted estimates for prevalence, demographic characteristics, and admission rates. ED and hospital discharge diagnoses were tabulated and categorized, and recursive partitioning was used to identify factors associated with admission. An estimated 684,000 visits had a primary reason for visit of "palpitations" representing a national prevalence of 5.8 per 1,000 ED visits (0.58%, 95% confidence interval 0.52 to 0.64). Women and non-Hispanic whites were responsible for most visits. A cardiac diagnosis made up 34% of all ED diagnoses. The overall admission rate was 24.6% (95% confidence interval 21.2 to 28.1), with higher rates seen in the Midwest and Northeast compared with the West. Survey-weighted recursive partitioning revealed several factors associated with admission including age >50 years, male gender, cardiac ED diagnosis, tachycardia, hypertension, and Medicare insurance. In conclusion, palpitations are responsible for a significant minority of ED visits and are associated with a cardiac diagnosis roughly 1/3 of the time. This was associated with a relatively high admission rate, although significant regional variation in these rates exists. PMID:24698469

  5. Hospital costs of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated in intensive care; a single centre evaluation using the national tariff-based system

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, J; Easton, S; Naik, V; Lockie, C; Brett, S J; Stümpfle, R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is a scarcity of literature reporting hospital costs for treating out of hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) survivors, especially within the UK. This is essential for assessment of cost-effectiveness of interventions necessary to allow just allocation of resources within the National Health Service. We set out primarily to calculate costs stratified against hospital survival and neurological outcomes. Secondarily, we estimated cost effectiveness based on estimates of survival and utility from previous studies to calculate costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Setting We performed a single centre (London) retrospective review of in-hospital costs of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after OOHCA over 18?months from January 2011 (following widespread introduction of targeted temperature management and primary percutaneous intervention). Participants Of 69 successive patients admitted over an 18-month period, survival and cerebral performance category (CPC) outcomes were obtained from review of databases and clinical notes. The Trust finance department supplied ICU and hospital costs using the Payment by Results UK system. Results Of those patients with ROSC admitted to ICU, survival to hospital discharge (any CPC) was 33/69 (48%) with 26/33 survivors in CPC 1–2 at hospital discharge. Cost per survivor to hospital discharge (including total cost of survivors and non-survivors) was Ł50?000, cost per CPC 1–2 survivor was Ł65?000. Cost and length of stay of CPC 1–2 patients was considerably lower than CPC 3–4 patients. The majority of the costs (69%) related to intensive care. Estimated cost per CPC 1–2 survivor per QALY was Ł16?000. Conclusions The costs of in-hospital patient care for ICU admissions following ROSC after OOHCA are considerable but within a reasonable threshold when assessed from a QALY perspective. PMID:25838503

  6. Helper, Guard or Mediator? Teachers' Space for Action in "The Cultural Rucksack," a Norwegian National Program for Arts and Culture in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Arts encounters in schools are often portrayed as encounters between art/artists and children. However, in such encounters, teachers are most often involved. The study presented discusses teachers' experiences with and space for action within The Cultural Rucksack; a national program for arts and culture in Norwegian schools. Observations and…

  7. Establishment of national laboratory standards in public and private hospital laboratories.

    PubMed

    Anjarani, Soghra; Safadel, Nooshafarin; Dahim, Parisa; Amini, Rana; Mahdavi, Saeed; Mirab Samiee, Siamak

    2013-01-01

    In September 2007 national standard manual was finalized and officially announced as the minimal quality requirements for all medical laboratories in the country. Apart from auditing laboratories, Reference Health Laboratory has performed benchmarking auditing of medical laboratory network (surveys) in provinces. 12(th) benchmarks performed in Tehran and Alborz provinces, Iran in 2010 in three stages. We tried to compare different processes, their quality and accordance with national standard measures between public and private hospital laboratories. The assessment tool was a standardized checklist consists of 164 questions. Analyzing process show although in most cases implementing the standard requirements are more prominent in private laboratories, there is still a long way to complete fulfillment of requirements, and it takes a lot of effort. Differences between laboratories in public and private sectors especially in laboratory personnel and management process are significant. Probably lack of motivation, plays a key role in obtaining less desirable results in laboratories in public sectors. PMID:23514840

  8. Establishment of National Laboratory Standards in Public and Private Hospital Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    ANJARANI, Soghra; SAFADEL, Nooshafarin; DAHIM, Parisa; AMINI, Rana; MAHDAVI, Saeed; MIRAB SAMIEE, Siamak

    2013-01-01

    In September 2007 national standard manual was finalized and officially announced as the minimal quality requirements for all medical laboratories in the country. Apart from auditing laboratories, Reference Health Laboratory has performed benchmarking auditing of medical laboratory network (surveys) in provinces. 12th benchmarks performed in Tehran and Alborz provinces, Iran in 2010 in three stages. We tried to compare different processes, their quality and accordance with national standard measures between public and private hospital laboratories. The assessment tool was a standardized checklist consists of 164 questions. Analyzing process show although in most cases implementing the standard requirements are more prominent in private laboratories, there is still a long way to complete fulfillment of requirements, and it takes a lot of effort. Differences between laboratories in public and private sectors especially in laboratory personnel and management process are significant. Probably lack of motivation, plays a key role in obtaining less desirable results in laboratories in public sectors. PMID:23514840

  9. A&M. Guard house (TAN638), contextual view. Built in 1968. Camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Guard house (TAN-638), contextual view. Built in 1968. Camera faces south. Guard house controlled access to radioactive waste storage tanks beyond and to left of view. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-4-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. ‘Shell shock’ Revisited: An Examination of the Case Records of the National Hospital in London

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Stefanie Caroline; Jones, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    During the First World War the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic, in Queen Square, London, then Britain’s leading centre for neurology, took a key role in the treatment and understanding of shell shock. This paper explores the case notes of all 462 servicemen who were admitted with functional neurological disorders between 1914 and 1919. Many of these were severe or chronic cases referred to the National Hospital because of its acknowledged expertise and the resources it could call upon. Biographical data was collected together with accounts of the patient’s military experience, his symptoms, diagnostic interpretations and treatment outcomes. Analysis of the notes showed that motor syndromes (loss of function or hyperkinesias), often combined with somato-sensory loss, were common presentations. Anxiety and depression as well as vegetative symptoms such as sweating, dizziness and palpitations were also prevalent among this patient population. Conversely, psychogenic seizures were reported much less frequently than in comparable accounts from German tertiary referral centres. As the war unfolded the number of physicians who believed that shell shock was primarily an organic disorder fell as research failed to find a pathological basis for its symptoms. However, little agreement existed among the Queen Square doctors about the fundamental nature of the disorder and it was increasingly categorised as functional disorder or hysteria. PMID:25284893

  11. Effect of hospital competition on inequality in health care: evidence from the English National Health Service 2001-2007

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Cookson; Mauro Laudicella

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: There is continuing policy debate about the effects of hospital competition on socio-economic inequalities in health care. Recent pro-competition “quasi market” reforms of the English National Health Service, phased in from 2003, provide a natural experiment to inform this debate. These reforms introduced elements of fixed price competition, driven by patient choice of hospital, into a tax-funded single payer

  12. The Dutch Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio (HSMR) method and cardiac surgery: benchmarking in a national cohort using hospital administration data versus a clinical database

    PubMed Central

    Siregar, S; Pouw, M E; Moons, K G M; Versteegh, M I M; Bots, M L; van der Graaf, Y; Kalkman, C J; van Herwerden, L A; Groenwold, R H H

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the accuracy of data from hospital administration databases and a national clinical cardiac surgery database and to compare the performance of the Dutch hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR) method and the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation, for the purpose of benchmarking of mortality across hospitals. Methods Information on all patients undergoing cardiac surgery between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2010 in 10 centres was extracted from The Netherlands Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery database and the Hospital Discharge Registry. The number of cardiac surgery interventions was compared between both databases. The European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation and hospital standardised mortality ratio models were updated in the study population and compared using the C-statistic, calibration plots and the Brier-score. Results The number of cardiac surgery interventions performed could not be assessed using the administrative database as the intervention code was incorrect in 1.4–26.3%, depending on the type of intervention. In 7.3% no intervention code was registered. The updated administrative model was inferior to the updated clinical model with respect to discrimination (c-statistic of 0.77 vs 0.85, p<0.001) and calibration (Brier Score of 2.8% vs 2.6%, p<0.001, maximum score 3.0%). Two average performing hospitals according to the clinical model became outliers when benchmarking was performed using the administrative model. Conclusions In cardiac surgery, administrative data are less suitable than clinical data for the purpose of benchmarking. The use of either administrative or clinical risk-adjustment models can affect the outlier status of hospitals. Risk-adjustment models including procedure-specific clinical risk factors are recommended. PMID:24334377

  13. Optimal scheduling for replacing perimeter guarding unmanned ...

    E-print Network

    2014-08-20

    Guarding the perimeter of an area in order to detect potential intruders is an important task in a ... Figure 1: Perimeter guarding UAVs; an intrusion of the perimeter segment between UAVs i ..... placement system for UAVs: Analysis and design.

  14. Hospitalization for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in a National Sample of Children with Sickle Cell Disease Before and After PCV7 Licensure

    PubMed Central

    McCavit, Timothy L.; Xuan, Lei; Zhang, Song; Flores, Glenn; Quinn, Charles T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate national hospitalization rates for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) before and after the 2000 licensure of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). Procedure We performed a retrospective trend analysis of the 1994-2007 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases. Hospitalizations involving children with SCD and IPD were identified by ICD-9CM code. The primary outcomes, the annual hospitalization rate for IPD in children with SCD and the proportion of hospitalizations for IPD per 100 total SCD hospitalizations, were analyzed using multivariable linear regression and contingency analysis, respectively. Results A total of 1,242 hospitalizations for IPD in SCD patients were identified from 1994-2007, with a mortality rate of 2.4%. The national mean annual rate of IPD hospitalization decreased by 65%, from 131.8 cases/year from 1994-2000 to 45.5 cases/year from 2001-2007 (p=0.001). The national proportion of hospitalizations for IPD per 100 total SCD hospitalizations decreased from 0.4 to 0.15 (p<0.0001) over the same interval. Following PCV7 licensure, the mean annual cumulative hospital days and cumulative hospital charges decreased nationally by 53% and 36%, respectively. Conclusion In a national sample, PCV7 licensure is temporally associated with a nearly three fold reduction in IPD hospitalizations in children with SCD. PMID:21793185

  15. Dying in two acute hospitals: would usual care meet Australian national clinical standards?

    PubMed

    Clark, Katherine; Byfieldt, Naomi; Green, Malcolm; Saul, Peter; Lack, Jill; Philips, Jane L

    2014-05-01

    The Australian Commission for Quality and Safety in Health Care (ACQSHC) has articulated 10 clinical standards with the aim of improving the consistency of quality healthcare delivery. Currently, the majority of Australians die in acute hospitals. But despite this, no agreed standard of care exists to define the minimum standard of care that people should accept in the final hours to days of life. As a result, there is limited capacity to conduct audits that focus on the gap between current care and recommended care. There is, however, accumulating evidence in the end of life literature to define which aspects of care are likely to be considered most important to those people facing imminent death. These themes offer standards against which to conduct audits. This is very apt given the national recommendation that healthcare should be delivered in the context of considering people's wishes while always treating people with dignity and respect. PMID:24589365

  16. Barriers to and determinants of medication adherence among hypertensive patients attended National Health Service Hospital, Sunderland

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Umair; Shah, Shahjahan; Hameed, Tahir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is a silent killer, a time bomb in both the developed and developing nations of the world. It is one of the most significant risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality resulting from target-organ damage to blood vessels in the heart, brain, kidney and eyes. Adherence to long-term therapy for chronic illnesses like hypertension is an important tool to enhance the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy. Objective: The two objectives of this study were to evaluate the extent and reasons of non-adherence in patients attended National Health Service (NHS) Hospital, Sunderland. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted for 4 months in the out-patient department of NHS Hospital. A total of 200 patients were selected randomly for this study. Morisky's Medication Adherence Scale was used to assess the adherence rate and the reason of non-adherence. Data were entered and analyzed using Microsoft Excel 2010. Results: The overall adherence rate was found to be 79% (n = 158). Adherence rate in females were low was compared with their male counterparts (74.7% vs. 85.7%). The higher rate of adherence was found in age group of 30-40 years (82%, n = 64). The major intentional and non-intentional reason of non-adherence was side-effects and forgetfulness respectively. Conclusion: Overall, more than three-fourth of the hypertensive participants were found to be adherent to their treatment. On the basis of factors associated with non-adherence, it is analyzed that suitable therapy must be designed for patients individually to increase medication adherence and its effectiveness. PMID:24741278

  17. IET. Exclusion guard house, 71.8% complete. Camera facing northerly. Pumice ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Exclusion guard house, 71.8% complete. Camera facing northerly. Pumice block walls, canopy over concrete slabs. Date: October 20, 1954. INEEL negative no. 12541 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Hospitalization, Depression and Dementia in Community-Dwelling Older Americans: Findings from the National Health and Aging Trends Study

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Zivin, Kara; Langa, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of both dementia and depression among community-dwelling older Americans, and to determine if hospitalization is independently associated with dementia or depression in this population. Method This cross-sectional study utilized data from a nationally representative, population-based sample of 7,197 community-dwelling adults ? 65 years old interviewed in 2011 as part of the National Health and Aging Trends Study. Information on hospitalizations was obtained from self or proxy-report. Possible and probable dementia was assessed according to a validated algorithm. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire-2. Results An estimated 3.1 million community-dwelling older Americans may have dementia, and approximately 5.3 million may have substantial depressive symptoms. After adjusting for demographic and social characteristics, medical diagnoses, smoking history, serious falls, and pain symptoms, being hospitalized in the previous year was independently associated with greater odds of probable dementia (odds ratio [OR]: 1.42, 95% confidence interval[95%CI]: 1.16, 1.73) and substantial depressive symptoms (OR: 1.60, 95%CI: 1.29, 1.99). Conclusions Dementia and depression are common in community-dwelling older Americans, and hospitalization is associated with these conditions. Additional research increasing understanding of the bi-directional relationship between hospitalizations, dementia, and depression, along with targeted interventions to reduce hospitalizations, are needed. PMID:24388630

  19. Disability and Hospital Care Expenses among National Health Insurance Beneficiaries: Analyses of Population-Based Data in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Fu-Gong; Lin, Pei-Ying; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    Nationwide data were collected concerning inpatient care use and medical expenditure of people with disabilities (N = 937,944) among national health insurance beneficiaries in Taiwan. Data included gender, age, hospitalization frequency and expenditure, healthcare setting and service department, discharge diagnose disease according to the ICD-9-CM…

  20. The Implications of the National Minimum Wage for Training Practices and Skill Utilisation in the United Kingdom Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Gill; Williams, Steve; Adam-Smith, Derek

    2003-01-01

    Two key issues thrown up by the 1999 introduction of the National Minimum Wage (NMW) in the United Kingdom are its likely impact on employers' training practices in low paying sectors of the economy and the implications for skills. Based on a study of the hospitality industry, this article assesses the limited significance of the differential,…

  1. Holmium Laser Enucleation of Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Seoul National University Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jungbum; Choo, Minsoo; Park, Ji Hyun; Oh, Jin Kyu; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to report the experience acquired at the Seoul National University Hospital with Holmium Laser Enucleation of Prostate (HoLEP), combined with mechanical morcellation for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods A retrospective review was performed on the clinical data of 309 consecutive patients who underwent HoLEP at our institution between July 2008 and June 2010. All patients were evaluated preoperatively for prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound, maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) and quality of life (QoL) score. Peri- and postoperative parameters were evaluated and patients were followed-up at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12- months with the aforementioned investigations. Results The patients' mean age was 68.3 (±6.5) years and mean prostate volume was 55.6 (±23.6) mL. Mean enucleation time was 56.2 (±25.1) minutes, mean morcellation time was 11.3 (±9.5) minutes, and the mean resected weight of the prostate was 20.8 (±16.9) g. The mean catheter indwelling period was 1.9 (±1.7) days and mean hospital stay was 2.9 (±1.5) days. Significant improvement was noted in Qmax, IPSS, and QoL at the 1-year follow-up compared with baseline (P<0.01). At 1 month 17.2% of patients complained of irritative urinary symptoms, which were typically self-limiting within 3 months. Transient stress incontinence was reported in 15.2% of patients. No patient experienced persistent obstructive symptoms that required reoperation. Conclusions Our study showed that HoLEP is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for BPH. PMID:21468284

  2. Implementation Issues of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure and Its Case Study for a Physician's Round at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Kim, Taegi; Kim, Jon Soo; Baek, Rong-Min; Suh, Chang Suk; Chung, Chin Youb

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The cloud computing-based virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) allows access to computing environments with no limitations in terms of time or place such that it can permit the rapid establishment of a mobile hospital environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the empirical issues to be considered when establishing a virtual mobile environment using VDI technology in a hospital setting and to examine the utility of the technology with an Apple iPad during a physician's rounds as a case study. Methods Empirical implementation issues were derived from a 910-bed tertiary national university hospital that recently launched a VDI system. During the physicians' rounds, we surveyed patient satisfaction levels with the VDI-based mobile consultation service with the iPad and the relationship between these levels of satisfaction and hospital revisits, hospital recommendations, and the hospital brand image. Thirty-five inpatients (including their next-of-kin) and seven physicians participated in the survey. Results Implementation issues pertaining to the VDI system arose with regard to the highly availability system architecture, wireless network infrastructure, and screen resolution of the system. Other issues were related to privacy and security, mobile device management, and user education. When the system was used in rounds, patients and their next-of-kin expressed high satisfaction levels, and a positive relationship was noted as regards patients' decisions to revisit the hospital and whether the use of the VDI system improved the brand image of the hospital. Conclusions Mobile hospital environments have the potential to benefit both physicians and patients. The issues related to the implementation of VDI system discussed here should be examined in advance for its successful adoption and implementation. PMID:23346476

  3. Associations of mental, and medical illnesses with against medical advice discharges: the National Hospital Discharge Survey, 1988-2006.

    PubMed

    Tawk, Rima; Freels, Sally; Mullner, Ross

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the association of mental and medical illnesses with the odds for leaving against medical advice (AMA) in a national sample of adult patients who left general hospitals between 1988 and 2006. Leaving AMA was first examined as a function of year and mental illness. Multiple logistic regression analysis was then used to adjust for patient and hospital characteristics when associating mental and major medical diagnoses with AMA discharges. The results indicated that leaving AMA was most strongly associated with mental health problems. However, the impact of mental illness was attenuated after adjusting for medical illnesses, patient and hospital characteristics. The strongest predictors of AMA discharge included being self-pay, having Medicaid insurance, being young and male, and the regional location of the hospital (Northeast). When substance abuse conditions were excluded from the mental illness discharge diagnoses, mental illness had lower odds for leaving AMA. The results may be of value to clinicians, and hospital administrators in helping to profile and target patients at risk for treatment-compliance problems. Prospective primary data collection that would include patient, physician, and hospital variables is recommended. PMID:22057857

  4. Makerere University College of Health Sciences’ role in addressing challenges in health service provision at Mulago National Referral Hospital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irene B Kizza; Joshua Tugumisirize; Raymond Tweheyo; Speciosa Mbabali; Arabat Kasangaki; Edith Nshimye; Juliet Sekandi; Sara Groves; Caitlin E Kennedy

    2011-01-01

    Background  Mulago National Referral Hospital (MNRH), Uganda’s primary tertiary and teaching hospital, and Makerere University College\\u000a of Health Sciences (MakCHS) have a close collaborative relationship. MakCHS students complete clinical rotations at MNRH,\\u000a and MakCHS faculty partner with Mulago staff in clinical care and research. In 2009, as part of a strategic planning process,\\u000a MakCHS undertook a qualitative study to examine care

  5. A national study of the efficiency of hospitals in urban markets.

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Y A; Luke, R D

    1993-01-01

    Using a sample of 3,000 urban hospitals, this article examines the contributions of selected hospital characteristics to variations in hospital technical efficiencies, while it accounts for multiple products and inputs, and controls for local environmental variations. Four hospital characteristics are examined: hospital size, membership in a multihospital system, ownership, and payer mix (managed care contracts, percent Medicare, and percent Medicaid). Ownership and percent Medicare are consistently found to be related significantly to hospital efficiency. Within the ownership variable, government hospitals tend to be more efficient and for-profit hospitals less efficient than other hospitals. Higher percentages of Medicare payment are negatively related to efficiency. While not consistently significant across all five of the MSA size categories in which the analyses are conducted, possession of managed care contracts, membership in a multihospital system, and size all are consistently related positively to hospital technical efficiency. These variables are also all significant when the hospitals are examined in a combined analysis. Percent Medicaid was not significant in any of the analyses. Implications for policy and the need for methodological work are discussed. PMID:8428810

  6. 76 FR 66313 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ...Guard [USCG-2011-0975] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting...SUMMARY: The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...Guard, on matters affecting national maritime security. Agenda of Meeting As a...

  7. Posttransfusion Haematocrit Equilibration: Timing Posttransfusion Haematocrit Check in Neonates at the National Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Audu, L. I.; Otuneye, A. T.; Mairami, A. B.; Mshelia, L. J.; Nwatah, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaemia is a common morbidity in the NICU and often requires transfusion of packed red blood cells. Haematocrit equilibration following red cell transfusion occurs over time ultimately resulting in a stable packed cell volume (PCV). Knowledge of this equilibration process is pertinent in the accurate timing of posttransfusion (PT) PCV. We conducted a prospective study to determine an appropriate timing for PT PCV estimation on 47 stable anaemic babies at the Neonatal Unit of National Hospital, Abuja. Values of PCV were determined before transfusion and at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours posttransfusion. Forty of the recruited neonates and young infants were analyzed. Their gestational age range was 26 to 40 weeks. 1-hour PT PCV (48.5% ± 5.5%) was similar to the 6-hour PT PCV (47.8% ± 5.6%) P = 0.516, but both were significantly different from the 12-hour (46.8% ± 5.9%), 24-hour (45.9 ± 5.8%), and 48-hour (45.4% ± 6.2%) PT PCVs. The 12-hour PT PCV was similar to the 24-hour and 48-hour PT PCVs (P = 0.237 and 0.063, resp.). We concluded that, in stable nonhaemorrhaging and nonhaemolysing young infants, the estimated timing of haematocrit equilibration and, consequently, posttransfusion PCV is 12 hours after red blood cell transfusion.

  8. A Qualitative Exploration of Workarounds Related to the Implementation of National Electronic Health Records in Early Adopter Mental Health Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ser, Gloria; Robertson, Ann; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate the perceptions and reported practices of mental health hospital staff using national hospital electronic health records (EHRs) in order to inform future implementations, particularly in acute mental health settings. Methods Thematic analysis of interviews with a wide range of clinical, information technology (IT), managerial and other staff at two early adopter mental health National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in London, UK, implementing national EHRs. Results We analysed 33 interviews. We first sought out examples of workarounds, such as delayed data entry, entering data in wrong places and individuals using the EHR while logged in as a colleague, then identified possible reasons for the reported workarounds. Our analysis identified four main categories of factors contributing to workarounds (i.e., operational, cultural, organisational and technical). Operational factors included poor system integration with existing workflows and the system not meeting users' perceived needs. Cultural factors involved users' competence with IT and resistance to change. Organisational factors referred to insufficient organisational resources and training, while technical factors included inadequate local technical infrastructure. Many of these factors, such as integrating the EHR system with day-to-day operational processes, staff training and adequate local IT infrastructure, were likely to apply to system implementations in various settings, but we also identified factors that related particularly to implementing EHRs in mental health hospitals, for example: EHR system incompatibility with IT systems used by mental health–related sectors, notably social services; the EHR system lacking specific, mental health functionalities and options; and clinicians feeling unable to use computers while attending to distressed psychiatric patients. Conclusions A better conceptual model of reasons for workarounds should help with designing, and supporting the implementation and adoption of, EHRs for use in hospital mental health settings. PMID:24454678

  9. Evaluation of US rear underride guard regulation for large trucks using real-world crashes.

    PubMed

    Brumbelow, Matthew L; Blanar, Laura

    2010-11-01

    Current requirements for rear underride guards on large trucks are set by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) 223 and 224. The standards have been in place since 1998, but their adequacy has not been evaluated apart from two series of controlled crash tests. The current study used detailed reviews of real-world crashes from the Large Truck Crash Causation Study to assess the ability of guards that comply with certain aspects of the regulation to mitigate passenger vehicle underride. It also evaluated the dangers posed by underride of large trucks that are exempt from guard requirements. For the 115 cases meeting the inclusion criteria, coded data, case narratives, photographs, and measurements were used to examine the interaction between study vehicles. The presence and type of underride guard was determined, and its performance in mitigating underride was categorized. Overall, almost one-half of the passenger vehicles had underride damage classified as severe or catastrophic. These vehicles accounted for 23 of the 28 in which occupants were killed. For the cases involving trailers with underride guards compliant with one or both FMVSS, guard deformation or complete failure was frequent and most commonly due to weak attachments, buckling of the trailer chassis, or bending of the lateral end of the guard under narrow overlap loading. Most of the truck units studied qualified for at least one of the FMVSS exemptions. The two largest groups were trailers with small wheel setbacks and single-unit straight trucks. Dump trucks represented a particularly hazardous category of straight truck. The current study suggests several weaknesses in the rear underride guard regulation. The standard allows too much ground clearance, the quasi-static test conditions allow guard designs that fail in narrow overlap crashes, and certifying guards independent of trailers leads to systems with inadequate attachment and chassis strength. Additionally, the regulation should be expanded to cover a higher percentage of the large truck fleet. PMID:21512906

  10. Framing in policy processes: a case study from hospital planning in the National Health Service in England.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lorelei; Exworthy, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports from an ethnographic study of hospital planning in England undertaken between 2006 and 2009. We explored how a policy to centralise hospital services was espoused in national policy documents, how this shifted over time and how it was translated in practice. We found that policy texts defined hospital planning as a clinical issue and framed decisions to close hospitals or hospital departments as based on the evidence and necessary to ensure safety. We interpreted this framing as a rhetorical strategy for implementing organisational change in the context of community resistance to service closure and a concomitant policy emphasising the importance of public and patient involvement in planning. Although the persuasive power of the framing was limited, a more insidious form of power was identified in the way the framing disguised the political nature of the issue by defining it as a clinical problem. We conclude by discussing how the clinical rationale constrains public participation in decisions about the delivery and organisation of healthcare and restricts the extent to which alternative courses of action can be considered. PMID:25461877

  11. The effect of national guidelines on the implementation of outpatient preoperative evaluation clinics in Dutch hospitals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. C. Lemmens; Klei van W. A; N. S. Klazinga; C. L. G. Rutten; Linge van R. H; K. G. M. Moons; H. E. M. Kerkkamp

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives: Preoperative evaluation performed by anaesthesiologists primarily aims to estimate the risk of perioperative complications and to create opportunities to optimize the patients' condition before surgery. In this study an inventory was made of the current practice of preoperative evaluation in Dutch hospitals. It was estimated how many hospitals had implemented an outpatient preoperative evaluation clinic in 2004.

  12. US Coast Guard Collision at Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. G. McCaughey

    1985-01-01

    The collision between the USCGC Cuyahoga and the motor vessel Santa Cruz II resulted in psychological distress among the Coast Guard crewmen. The US Navy Special Psychiatric Rapid Intervention Team (SPRINT) was activated to provide mental health services to the Coast Guard survivors and others who had been affected by the disaster. The psychiatric records of the 18 survivors were

  13. Self-reported lifetime psychiatric hospitalization histories of jail detainees with mental disorders: Comparison with a non-incarcerated national sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William H. Fisher; Ira K. Packer; Steven M. Banks; David Smith; Lorna J. Simon; Kristen Roy-Bujnowski

    2002-01-01

    Lack of access to hospitalization is an often-cited risk factor for incarceration among persons with severe mental illness. This proposition is examined by comparing self-reports of lifetime psychiatric hospitalization histories of mentally ill jail inmates with data from a national sample of non-incarcerated mentally ill. Roughly 52% of mentally ill jail detainees reported at least one psychiatric hospitalization, a rate

  14. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...in full color is described as follows: White anchors and white ring all outlined in medium blue (Coast Guard blue), letters and numerals medium blue (Coast Guard blue), white area within ring, shield with medium blue (Coast Guard...

  15. 2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building (Building 90), administration and clinical hospital building (Building 88), and hospital building (Building 91) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, 4101 South Fourth Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  16. Does decreased research funding from the National Institutes of Health to local academic hospitals cause an increase in industry sponsored research funding?

    E-print Network

    Truesdell, John A., Jr. (John Alan)

    2011-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been the stalwart of research funding at universities and academic teaching hospitals. However, since the start of the last decade NIH funding has contracted in real terms. ...

  17. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...access hospitals; or clinic, rehabilitation agency, or public health agency providers of outpatient physical therapy, occupational therapy or speech pathology services may provide reasonable assurance to CMS that it requires the providers...

  18. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...access hospitals; or clinic, rehabilitation agency, or public health agency providers of outpatient physical therapy, occupational therapy or speech pathology services may provide reasonable assurance to CMS that it requires the providers...

  19. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...access hospitals; or clinic, rehabilitation agency, or public health agency providers of outpatient physical therapy, occupational therapy or speech pathology services may provide reasonable assurance to CMS that it requires the providers...

  20. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...access hospitals; or clinic, rehabilitation agency, or public health agency providers of outpatient physical therapy, occupational therapy or speech pathology services may provide reasonable assurance to CMS that it requires the providers...

  1. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...access hospitals; or clinic, rehabilitation agency, or public health agency providers of outpatient physical therapy, occupational therapy or speech pathology services may provide reasonable assurance to CMS that it requires the providers...

  2. National Trends in US Hospital Admissions for Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 1999 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lipska, Kasia J.; Ross, Joseph S.; Wang, Yun; Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Minges, Karl; Karter, Andrew J.; Huang, Elbert S.; Desai, Mayur M.; Gill, Thomas M.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The increasing intensity of diabetes mellitus management over the past decade may have resulted in lower rates of hyperglycemic emergencies but higher rates of hospital admissions for hypoglycemia among older adults. Trends in these hospitalizations and subsequent outcomes are not known. OBJECTIVE To characterize changes in hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia hospitalization rates and subsequent mortality and readmission rates among older adults in the United States over a 12-year period, and to compare these results according to age, sex, and race. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Retrospective observational study using data from 33 952 331 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years or older from 1999 to 2011. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Hospitalization rates for hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, 30-day and 1-year mortality rates, and 30-day readmission rates. RESULTS A total of 279 937 patients experienced 302 095 hospitalizations for hyperglycemia, and 404 467 patients experienced 429 850 hospitalizations for hypoglycemia between 1999 and 2011. During this time, rates of admissions for hyperglycemia declined by 38.6% (from 114 to 70 admissions per 100 000 person-years), while admissions for hypoglycemia increased by 11.7% (from 94 to 105 admissions per 100 000 person-years). In analyses designed to account for changing diabetes mellitus prevalence, admissions for hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia declined by 55.2% and 9.5%, respectively. Trends were similar across age, sex, and racial subgroups, but hypoglycemia rates were 2-fold higher for older patients (?75 years) when compared with younger patients (65–74 years), and admission rates for both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia were 4-fold higher for black patients compared with white patients. The 30-day and 1-year mortality and 30-day readmission rates improved during the study period and were similar after an index hospitalization for either hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia (5.4%, 17.1%, and 15.3%, respectively, after hyperglycemia hospitalizations in 2010; 4.4%, 19.9%, and 16.3% after hypoglycemia hospitalizations). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Hospital admission rates for hypoglycemia now exceed those for hyperglycemia among older adults. Although admissions for hypoglycemia have declined modestly since 2007, rates among black Medicare beneficiaries and those older than 75 years remain high. Hospital admissions for severe hypoglycemia seem to pose a greater health threat than those for hyperglycemia, suggesting new opportunities for improvement in care of persons with diabetes mellitus. PMID:24838229

  3. Hospital staffing, organization, and quality of care: Cross-national findings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda H. Aiken; Sean P. Clarke; Douglas M. Sloane

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of nurse staffing and organizational support for nursing care on nurses' dissatisfaction with their jobs, nurse burnout, and nurse reports of quality of patient care in an international sample of hospitals. Design: Multisite cross-sectional survey Setting: Adult acute-care hospitals in the U.S. (Pennsylvania), Canada (Ontario and British Columbia), England and Scotland. Study Participants: 10319 nurses

  4. National trends of incidence, treatment, and hospital charges of isolated C-2 fractures in three different age groups.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Kalakoti, Piyush; Murray, Richard; Nixon, Menarvia; Missios, Symeon; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2015-04-01

    OBJECT Incidence of C-2 fracture is increasing in elderly patients. Patient age also influences decision making in the management of these fractures. There are very limited data on the national trends of incidence, treatment interventions, and resource utilization in patients in different age groups with isolated C-2 fractures. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence, treatment, complications, length of stay, and hospital charges of isolated C-2 fracture in patients in 3 different age groups by using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. methods The data were obtained from NIS from 2002 to 2011. Data on patients with closed fractures of C-2 without spinal cord injury were extracted using ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 805.02. Patients with isolated C-2 fractures were identified by excluding patients with other associated injuries. The cohort was divided into 3 age groups: < 65 years, 65-80 years, and > 80 years. Incidence, treatment characteristics, inpatient/postoperative complications, and hospital charges (mean and total annual charges) were compared between the 3 age groups. RESULTS A total of 10,336 patients with isolated C-2 fractures were identified. The majority of the patients were in the very elderly age group (> 80 years; 42.3%) followed by 29.7% in the 65- to 80-year age group and 28% in < 65-year age group. From 2002 to 2011, the incidence of hospitalization significantly increased in the 65- to 80-year and > 80-year age groups (p < 0.001). However, the incidence did not change substantially in the < 65-year age group (p = 0.287). Overall, 21% of the patients were treated surgically, and 12.2% of the patients underwent nonoperative interventions (halo and spinal traction). The rate of nonoperative interventions significantly decreased over time in all age groups (p < 0.001). Regardless of treatment given, patients in older age groups had a greater risk of inpatient/postoperative complications, nonroutine discharges, and longer hospitalization. The mean hospital charges were significantly higher in older age groups (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS The incidence of hospitalization for isolated C-2 fractures is progressively increasing in older age groups. Simultaneously, there has been a steadily decreasing trend in the preference for nonoperative interventions. Due to more complicated hospital stay, longer hospitalizations, and higher rates of nonroutine discharges, the patients in older age groups seem to have a higher propensity for greater health care resource utilization. PMID:25828495

  5. Fluorescence Properties of Guard Cell Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Eduardo; Armond, Paul; Melis, Anastasios

    1981-01-01

    The presence of chloroplasts in guard cells from leaf epidermis, coleoptile, flowers, and albino portions of variegated leaves was established by incident fluorescence microscopy, thus confirming the notion that guard cell chloroplasts are remarkably conserved. Room temperature emission spectra from a few chloroplasts in a single guard cell of Vicia faba showed one major peak at around 683 nanometers. Low-temperature (77 K) emission spectra from peels of albino portions of Chlorophytum comosum leaves and from mesophyll chloroplasts of green parts of the same leaves showed major peaks at around 687 and 733 nanometers, peaks usually attributed to photosystem II and photosystem I pigment systems, respectively. Spectra of peels of V. faba leaves showed similar peaks. However, fluorescence microscopy revealed that the Vicia peels, as well as those from Allium cepa and Tulipa sp., were contaminated with non-guard cell chloroplasts which were practically undetectable under bright field illumination. These observations pose restrictions on the use of epidermal peels as a source of isolated guard cell chloroplasts. Studies on the 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea-sensitive variable fluorescence kinetics of uncontaminated epidermal peels of C. comosum indicated that guard cell chloroplasts operate a normal, photosystem II-dependent, linear electron transport. The above properties in combination with their reported inability to fix CO2 photosynthetically may render the guard cell chloroplasts optimally suited to supply the reducing and high-energy phosphate equivalents needed to sustain active ion transport during stomatal opening in daylight. PMID:16661620

  6. Impact resistance of guards on grinding machines.

    PubMed

    Mewes, Detlef; Mewes, Olaf; Herbst, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Guards on machine tools are meant to protect persons from injuries caused by parts ejected with high kinetic energy from the machine's working zone. With respect to stationary grinding machines, Standard No. EN 13218:2002, therefore, specifies minimum wall thicknesses for guards. These values are mainly based on estimations and experience instead of systematic experimental investigations. This paper shows to what extent simple impact tests with standardizable projectiles can be used as basis for the evaluation of the impact resistance of guards, provided that not only the kinetic energy of the projectiles used but also, among others, their geometry corresponds to the abrasive product fragments to be expected. PMID:22152506

  7. The development of a national surveillance system for monitoring blood use and inventory levels at sentinel hospitals in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y A; Kim, H H; Joung, U S; Kim, C Y; Shin, Y H; Lee, S W; Kim, H J

    2010-04-01

    We developed a web-based program for a national surveillance system to determine baseline data regarding the supply and demand of blood products at sentinel hospitals in South Korea. Sentinel hospitals were invited to participate in a 1-month pilot-test. The data for receipts and exports of blood from each hospital information system were converted into comma-separated value files according to a specific conversion rule. The daily data from the sites could be transferred to the web-based program server using a semi-automated submission procedure: pressing a key allowed the program to automatically compute the blood inventory level as well as other indices including the minimal inventory ratio (MIR), ideal inventory ratio (IIR), supply index (SI) and utilisation index (UI). The national surveillance system was referred to as the Korean Blood Inventory Monitoring System (KBIMS) and the web-based program for KBIMS was referred to as the Blood Inventory Monitoring System (BMS). A total of 30 256 red blood cell (RBC) units were submitted as receipt data, however, only 83% of the receipt data were submitted to the BMS server as export data (25 093 RBC units). Median values were 2.67 for MIR, 1.08 for IIR, 1.00 for SI, 0.88 for UI and 5.33 for the ideal inventory day. The BMS program was easy to use and is expected to provide a useful tool for monitoring hospital inventory levels. This information will provide baseline data regarding the supply and demand of blood products in South Korea. PMID:20015060

  8. 45 CFR 60.12 - Information which hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank. 60.12 Section...GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL PRACTITIONER DATA BANK FOR ADVERSE INFORMATION...PHYSICIANS AND OTHER HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS Disclosure of Information...

  9. 45 CFR 60.12 - Information which hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank. 60.12 Section...GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL PRACTITIONER DATA BANK FOR ADVERSE INFORMATION...PHYSICIANS AND OTHER HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS Disclosure of Information...

  10. 45 CFR 60.12 - Information which hospitals must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...must request from the National Practitioner Data Bank. 60.12 Section...GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL PRACTITIONER DATA BANK FOR ADVERSE INFORMATION...PHYSICIANS AND OTHER HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS Disclosure of Information...

  11. National Trends in Main Causes of Hospitalization: A Multi-Cohort Register Study of the Finnish Working-Age Population, 1976–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kouvonen, Anne; Koskinen, Aki; Varje, Pekka; Kokkinen, Lauri; De Vogli, Roberto; Väänänen, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Background The health transition theory argues that societal changes produce proportional changes in causes of disability and death. The aim of this study was to identify long-term changes in main causes of hospitalization in working-age population within a nation that has experienced considerable societal change. Methodology National trends in all-cause hospitalization and hospitalizations for the five main diagnostic categories were investigated in the data obtained from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. The seven-cohort sample covered the period from 1976 to 2010 and consisted of 3,769,356 randomly selected Finnish residents, each cohort representing 25% sample of population aged 18 to 64 years. Principal Findings Over the period of 35 years, the risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases and respiratory diseases decreased. Hospitalization for musculoskeletal diseases increased whereas mental and behavioral hospitalizations slightly decreased. The risk of cancer hospitalization decreased marginally in men, whereas in women an upward trend was observed. Conclusions/Significance A considerable health transition related to hospitalizations and a shift in the utilization of health care services of working-age men and women took place in Finland between 1976 and 2010. PMID:25379723

  12. Healthy Lifestyle May Guard Against Dementia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please enable JavaScript. Healthy Lifestyle May Guard Against Dementia Study found seniors who were advised on better ... Preidt Thursday, March 12, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Dementia Exercise for Seniors Healthy Aging WEDNESDAY, March 11, ...

  13. Monitoring and Reducing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections: A National Survey of State Hospital Associations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Murphy; Dale M. Needham; Christine Goeschel; Eddy Fan; Sara E. Cosgrove; Peter J. Pronovost

    2010-01-01

    Central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) acquired in health care institutions are common and costly. A novel monitoring and prevention program dramatically reduced CLABSIs across one state. The extent to which other states have adopted similar efforts is unknown. State hospital associations were surveyed regarding their efforts to address these infections. All 50 responding associations endorsed the importance of improving patient

  14. Language, Literacy and Numeracy in National Training Packages: Case Studies in Aged Care and Hospitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Christine; Brand, Jennie Bickmore

    The implementation and effectiveness of the inclusion of literacy and numeracy in industry training packages was examined in case studies of three programs in Western Australia. Two were certificate programs in cooking and food and beverage as specified in the hospitality training package, and the third was an aged care program based on the…

  15. Risk Factors for Violent Offending in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A National Study of Hospitalized Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langstrom, Niklas; Grann, Martin; Ruchkin, Vladislav; Sjostedt, Gabrielle; Fazel, Seena

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about risk factors for violence among individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study uses data from Swedish longitudinal registers for all 422 individuals hospitalized with autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome during 1988-2000 and compares those committing violent or sexual offenses with those who did not. Thirty-one…

  16. 33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

  17. 33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

  18. 33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

  19. 33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

  20. 33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

  1. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

  2. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

  3. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

  4. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

  5. Reduction Mammoplasty in a Developing Country: A 10-year Review (2001-2010) at the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu

    PubMed Central

    Isiguzo, Chimaobi; Ogbonnaya, Sunday Iheuko; Udezue, Anthonia O

    2015-01-01

    Context: Large breast is a major problem because of associated symptomatology and aesthetic concerns. Reduction mammoplasty (RM) resolves the symptom and at the same time improves the aesthetic appearance of the breast, hence improving self-esteem and social integration. Aims: To describe the pattern of RM in a hospital in the developing world and its impact on postgraduate surgical training. Settings and Design: A retrospective review of all the RMs done in the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu (a major plastic surgery training center in Nigeria) over a ten-year period (2001–2010), in the developing country of Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: All RMs done in the hospital were reviewed after retrieving their records from operation register and medical records department. Fifteen (15) cases were retrieved and analyzed. Data Analysis: Data was analyzed with Microsoft excel 2007. Results: Average age of female patients who had RM was 26.5 years and 83.3% were single. The most common complaint was abnormally large breast (macromastia). Inferior pedicle technique was commonly used. Conclusions: The results of RM are remarkable as it impact positively on the quality of life of the patients. However, the level of awareness about the availability of this service is still low in the region as shown by few cases done over the period of review and this impacts negatively on the training. The need for public awareness cannot be overemphasized.

  6. Trends in the incidence and treatment of necrotizing soft tissue infections: an analysis of the National Hospital Discharge Survey.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Ali M; Best, Matthew J; Francis, Cameron S; Allan, Bassan J; Askari, Morad; Panthaki, Zubin J

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections are a rare but potentially fatal condition of the soft tissues caused by virulent, toxin-producing bacteria. In the United States, there is an estimated annual incidence of 0.04 cases per 1000 annually, but previous estimates of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had the incidence at 500 to 1500 cases yearly. Early reports of mortality were variable with rates ranging from 46 to 76% but outcomes have been improving over time. The National Hospital Discharge Survey was analyzed to study current trends in the demographics, incidence, use, and mortality of patients diagnosed with necrotizing soft tissue infections. The authors analyzed the 1999, 2002, and 2007 National Hospital Discharge Survey by using a sampling weighting method. A total of 13,648 cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections were identified in 2007. This represents an increase from 12,153 cases in 2002 and 6612 cases in 1999. In the 9 years from 1999 to 2007 the gross incidence of necrotizing soft tissue infections more than doubled. Hospital stay was essentially unchanged within study years, at 16 days. Mean age increased from approximately 50 years in 1999 to 54 years in 2007. Further, mortality went from 10.45% in 1999 to 9.75% in the 2007 survey. The population-adjusted incidence rate increased 91% in the studied years. Rising use of immunosupression, exponential growth in the incidence of obesity, and type 2 diabetes could be a major contributing factor. The mortality rate is far below the rate in reports published from as early as 20 years ago, and at 9.75% compares with modern case series, but is a more accurate measure of mortality in this condition. PMID:25144805

  7. A national hospital-based survey of snakes responsible for bites in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Viravan, C; Looareesuwan, S; Kosakarn, W; Wuthiekanun, V; McCarthy, C J; Stimson, A F; Bunnag, D; Harinasuta, T; Warrell, D A

    1992-01-01

    Snakes which had been killed and brought to hospital with the patients they had bitten were collected in 80 district and provincial hospitals throughout 67 provinces in Thailand in order to establish the geographical distribution and relative medical importance of the venomous species. Of the 1631 snakes collected, 1145 were venomous: Malayan pit vipers (Calloselasma rhodostoma), green pit vipers (Trimeresurus albolabris) and Russell's vipers (Daboia russelii) were the most numerous, while T. albolabris, C. rhodostoma and spitting cobras ('Naja atra') were the most widely distributed. In 22 cases, non-venomous species were mistaken for venomous ones and antivenom was used unnecessarily. The Malayan krait (Bungarus candidus) was confused with B. fasciatus in 5 cases and B. fasciatus antivenom was used inappropriately. The study extended the known ranges of most of the medically-important venomous species in Thailand. Correct identification of venomous snakes is especially important in Thailand because the locally-produced antivenoms are monospecific. The technique of hospital-based collection, labelling and preservation of dead snakes brought by bitten patients is recommended when rapid assessment of a country's medically important herpetofauna is required. PMID:1566285

  8. Factors associated with hospital retention of RNs in the New York City Metropolitan Area: an analysis of the 1996, 2000, and 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Peri; Adams, Richard E

    2008-08-01

    The nursing shortage is well documented, and government estimates indicate that shortfalls will worsen in the future. As the largest employer of registered nurses (RNs), hospitals are the most seriously affected by shortages, as they compete with other employment settings for limited nursing resources. Recruitment remains the primary avenue for ensuring staffing levels, but retention is increasingly important as applicant pools shrink because of demographic and employment trends. Effective retention strategies must address the factors that contribute to exodus of RNs from hospitals, as well as isolating the factors that enable RNs to remain in hospital employment. This secondary analysis of the 1996, 2000, and 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses examines the demographic, employment, and educational factors associated with working in hospitals, having full-time status, and holding patient care positions. The findings suggest that hospitals must address nonwork issues to retain nursing personnel. Relevant policy issues are examined and strategies for effective retention are offered. PMID:18509198

  9. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of adults in the hospital: A report of 14?720 cardiac arrests from the National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Ann Peberdy; William Kaye; Joseph P. Ornato; Gregory L. Larkin; Vinay Nadkarni; Mary Elizabeth Mancini; Robert A. Berg; Graham Nichol

    2003-01-01

    The National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (NRCPR) is an American Heart Association (AHA)-sponsored, prospective, multisite, observational study of in-hospital resuscitation. The NRCPR is currently the largest registry of its kind. The purpose of this article is to describe the NRCPR and to provide the first comprehensive, Utstein-based, standardized characterization of in-hospital resuscitation in the United States. All adult (?18 years

  10. Hospitality Management Hospitality Management

    E-print Network

    McConnell, Terry

    Hospitality Management Hospitality Management Norm Faiola, Chair, 315-443-1710 Lyman Hall Faculty PROGRAM The Department of Hospitality Management requires a diversity of skills from many disciplines of the global hospitality industry. Academic Offerings HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR HOSPITALITY

  11. Social inequalities and women's satisfaction with childbirth care in Brazil: a national hospital-based survey.

    PubMed

    d'Orsi, Eleonora; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Diniz, Carmen Simone Grilo; Aguiar, Janaina Marques de; Gusman, Christine Ranier; Torres, Jacqueline Alves; Angulo-Tuesta, Antonia; Rattner, Daphne; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira

    2014-08-01

    The objective is to identify factors associated with women's satisfaction towards the care provided by the health professionals during hospital assisted delivery and identify how those factors influence their general levels of satisfaction. The cohort hospital based study was carried out in connection with the Birth in Brazil research. 15,688 women were included, interviewed at home, through the phone, from March 2011 to February 2012. All the variables that compose the professional/pregnant woman relationship (waiting time, respect, privacy, clarity of explanations, possibility of asking questions and participating in the decisions) and schooling remained independently associated with general satisfaction towards delivery care, in the adjusted model. The white women assisted in the southeastern and southern regions of the country, by the private sector and with a companion present gave a better evaluation of the care provided. Women value the way in which they are assisted by the health professionals, and there are inequalities in the way they are treated based on skin color, geographic region and financial situation. PMID:25167175

  12. The rate and cost of hospital-acquired infections occurring in patients admitted to selected specialties of a district general hospital in England and the national burden imposed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Plowman; N. Graves; M. A. S. Griffin; J. A. Roberts; A. V. Swan; B. Cookson; L. Taylor

    2001-01-01

    Between April 1994 and May 1995 4000 adult patients admitted to selected specialties of a district general hospital were recruited to this study. Hospital-acquired infections presenting during the in-patient stay were identified using previously validated methods of surveillance, and information on daily resource use by both infected and uninfected patients was recorded and estimates of their cost derived. Linear regression

  13. Compliance with the National Palestinian Infection Prevention and Control Protocol at Governmental Paediatric Hospitals in Gaza Governorates

    PubMed Central

    Eljedi, Ashraf; Dalo, Shareef

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Nosocomial infections are a significant burden for both patients and the healthcare system. For this reason, infection prevention and control (IPC) practices are extremely important. The Palestinian Ministry of Health adopted the national IPC Protocol in 2004. This study aimed to assess the compliance of healthcare providers (HCPs) with the Protocol in three governmental paediatric hospitals in Gaza governorates. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from February to November 2010. Data were collected from a sample of doctors, nurses and physiotherapists (N = 334) using a self-administered questionnaire and observation checklists to record HCP practices and assess the hospital environment. Results: The response rate was 92%. The most important reasons for non-compliance with the IPC Protocol were the absence of an education programme (61.5%), lack of knowledge (52.4%) and the scarcity of required supplies (46.9%). Only 2.3% of respondents had a copy of the IPC Protocol, while 65.8% did not know of its existence. Only 16.9% had participated in training sessions regarding general IPC practices. The observation checklist regarding HCP practices revealed low levels of compliance in hand washing (45.9%), wearing gloves (40.7%) and using antiseptics/disinfectants (49.16%). The health facilities checklist indicated that there was a lack of certain essential equipment and materials, such as covered waste containers and heavy-duty gloves. Conclusion: Due to the lack of HPC knowledge, the authors recommend that the IPC Protocol be made available in all hospitals. In addition, a qualified team should implement intensive IPC education and training programmes and facilities should provide the required equipment and materials. PMID:25097774

  14. Peer mentors, mobile phone and pills: collective monitoring and adherence in Kenyatta National Hospital's HIV treatment programme.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Kenyan state joined the international commitment to make antiretroviral treatment free in public health institutions to people infected with HIV. Less than a decade later, treatment has reached over 60% of those who need it in Kenya. This paper, which is based on an in-depth ethnographic case study of the HIV treatment programme at Kenyatta National Hospital, conducted intermittently between 2008 and 2014, examines how HIV-positive peer mentors encourage and track adherence to treatment regimens within and beyond the clinic walls using mobile phones and computer technology. This research into the everyday practices of patient monitoring demonstrates that both surveillance and adherence are collective activities. Peer mentors provide counselling services, follow up people who stray from treatment regimens, and perform a range of other tasks related to patient management and treatment adherence. Despite peer mentors' involvement in many tasks key to encouraging optimal adherence, their role is rarely acknowledged by co-workers, hospital administrators, or public health officials. Following a biomedical paradigm, adherence at Kenyatta and in Kenya is framed by programme administrators as something individual clients must do and for which they must be held accountable. This framing simultaneously conceals the sociality of adherence and undervalues the work of peer mentors in treatment programmes. PMID:25175291

  15. Peer mentors, mobile phone and pills: collective monitoring and adherence in Kenyatta National Hospital's HIV treatment programme

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Kenyan state joined the international commitment to make antiretroviral treatment free in public health institutions to people infected with HIV. Less than a decade later, treatment has reached over 60% of those who need it in Kenya. This paper, which is based on an in-depth ethnographic case study of the HIV treatment programme at Kenyatta National Hospital, conducted intermittently between 2008 and 2014, examines how HIV-positive peer mentors encourage and track adherence to treatment regimens within and beyond the clinic walls using mobile phones and computer technology. This research into the everyday practices of patient monitoring demonstrates that both surveillance and adherence are collective activities. Peer mentors provide counselling services, follow up people who stray from treatment regimens, and perform a range of other tasks related to patient management and treatment adherence. Despite peer mentors’ involvement in many tasks key to encouraging optimal adherence, their role is rarely acknowledged by co-workers, hospital administrators, or public health officials. Following a biomedical paradigm, adherence at Kenyatta and in Kenya is framed by programme administrators as something individual clients must do and for which they must be held accountable. This framing simultaneously conceals the sociality of adherence and undervalues the work of peer mentors in treatment programmes. PMID:25175291

  16. other hospital U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health

    E-print Network

    V I S I O N O U R M I S S I O N The NIH Clinical Center will serve as the nation's premier research to participate in clinical research protocols here. Nearly half of those protocols are natural history studies and maintain an environment that nurtures collaboration and innovation in medical discovery will help sustain

  17. Has cost containment after the National Health Insurance system been successful: Determinants of Taiwan hospital costs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jung-Hua Hung; Li Chang

    2008-01-01

    Taiwan implemented the National Health Insurance system (NHI) in 1995. After the NHI, the insurance coverage expanded and the quality of healthcare improved, however, the healthcare costs significantly escalated. The objective of this study is to determine what factors have direct impact on the increased costs after the NHI. Panel data analysis is used to investigate changes and factors affecting

  18. Catering & Hospitality, Serving Food & Drink, Levels 1-3. 2nd Edition. Catering & Hospitality, Reception & Housekeeping, Levels 1-3. Catering & Hospitality, Supervisory Management, Level 3. Catering & Hospitality Management, Level 4. 2nd Edition. National Vocational Qualifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business and Technology Education Council, London (England).

    Britain's National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) are work qualifications that measure what an employee or potential employee can do as well as how much he or she knows and understands about a particular job. Used as written proof of usable workplace skills that can be put to profitable use by an employer, NVQs range from basic Level 1, for…

  19. [Influenza: a four-year evolution of the pandemic. Prof. Alejandro Posadas National Hospital, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Siciliani, Daniel D; Cabral, Graciela; Pingray, Verónica; Borda, María E; Aranaz, Alicia; Miceli, Isabel N P

    2014-01-01

    As from January to August 2013, epidemiological weeks 1-35 (EW), Influenza incidence, case characteristics, types and subtypes of circulating influenza virus in the Nacional Profesor Alejandro Posadas Hospital were studied, and were compared to incidences during 2009-2012. From late May to the end of August 2013 (EW18-35), an increase was observed in the proportion of patients' visits for respiratory disease, influenza-like illness and hospitalizations due to pneumonia; of 207 cases diagnosed with influenza A virus, 153 were infected by H1N1pdm09, 46 by H3, and eight without subtype. The highest proportion of cases was found in children under five years of age, followed by the group 60-64. The chances of having the illness were three times greater among the group 40-64 years old compared to 15-39 or those older than 64. Mortality, which increased with age, was 7.2%, and the odds of death were six times higher among those older than 64. Vaccination rate among the cases was 11.6%. None of the fatal cases had received the vaccine. After the 2009 pandemic, the proportions of annual patients' visits decreased until 2012; in 2013, an increase of 52.0% during the winter period compared to 2012. The viral circulation started earlier in 2013 compared to previous years. FLU-A(H1N1pdm) was the predominant circulating virus in 2009 and 2013, FLU-A(H3) in 2011, FLU-A(H3) and FLU-B in both 2010 and 2012. PMID:24918665

  20. A&M. Guard house (TAN638). Detail of west facade and front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Guard house (TAN-638). Detail of west facade and front door. Flood light bent below eave. Traffic control signal in view. Camera facing east. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-6-3 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Predominance of multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens causing surgical site infections in Muhimbili national hospital, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) remain a common and widespread problem contributing to a significant morbidity and mortality, attributed partly by the increase in antimicrobial resistance among the etiological agents. This study was done to determine the spectrum of bacterial isolates and their susceptibility patterns causing SSIs at Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania. Methods This descriptive cross sectional study was conducted between September, 2011 and February, 2012. Pus swabs or pus were cultured on blood agar (Oxoid, UK) and MacConkey agar (Oxoid, UK) and incubated aerobically at 37°C for 18–24 hours. Bacterial identification was done using API 20E and VITEK and antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion. Results Of the 100 patients, from whom wound swabs were collected, 90 (90%) had positive aerobic bacterial growth. A total of 147 pathogenic bacteria were isolated, including 114 (77.5%) gram negative and 33(22.5%) gram positive organisms. The most prevalent bacterial species were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16.3%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (12.2%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (10.8%). Of the 18?S. aureus , 8 (44%) were methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and three of them (17%) were carrying both MRSA and induced clindamycin resistance (ICR). Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Enterobacteriaceae were observed in 23 (79.3%) of the 29 isolates tested. Majority of Escherichia coli 12 (92.3%) and K. pneumoniae 11 (69%) isolates were ESBL producers. About 63% (93/147) were multiple-drug resistance (MDR) isolates, and the overall MDR among Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria was 60.6% (20/33) and 61.4%, (73/114), respectively. The prevalence of MDR for E. coli, A. baumannii and P. stuartii was 100% each. Majority (97%) of the Gram negative bacteria were resistant to more than four categories (classes) of antibiotics. Conclusion A high proportion (63%) of the isolates causing SSIs in this tertiary hospital were MDR, of which (90%) were resistant to more than four classes of antibiotics. In the light of these findings, an urgent and significant change in antibiotic prescription policy is required at this National hospital. PMID:25100042

  2. Coast Guard's Response to Spilled Oil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ard, R. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The Coast Guard utilizes a number of monitoring detectors, sensors, and techniques to find, recover and identify oil spills. Discussed in this article are in-situ and airborne sensors, systems developed to provide clean-up capability such as air deployable anti-pollution transfer system (ADAPTS), and techniques which will determine the source of a…

  3. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...crosscut table saws shall be guarded as follows to keep employees clear of any danger zones: (1) They shall be equipped with hoods...table's edge; (4) Radial saws shall be installed so that the cutting head returns to the starting position without rebound when...

  4. The Mechanism of Guard Cell Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, M.; Arrabaca, J.; Chagas, I.

    2005-01-01

    Leaves of higher terrestrial plants have small pores--stomata--responsible for gas exchange. The opening of each stoma results from the osmotic uptake of water by two specialised cells--the guard cells. Because of the involvement in this mechanism of ATPase-proton pumps and active transport of ions across membranes, we have designed an Exploring…

  5. Schools Wrestle with Issue of Armed Guards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the March 21, 2005, shootings at Red Lake High School that brought to light an issue of whether school security personnel should be armed. Among the what-ifs being asked after the shootings at Red Lake High is one with uncomfortable implications for many school leaders: What if the two security guards posted near the…

  6. Smoking behaviour predicts tobacco control attitudes in a high smoking prevalence hospital: A cross-sectional study in a Portuguese teaching hospital prior to the national smoking ban

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have investigated attitudes to and compliance with smoking bans, but few have been conducted in healthcare settings and none in such a setting in Portugal. Portugal is of particular interest because the current ban is not in line with World Health Organization recommendations for a "100% smoke-free" policy. In November 2007, a Portuguese teaching-hospital surveyed smoking behaviour and tobacco control (TC) attitudes before the national ban came into force in January 2008. Methods Questionnaire-based cross-sectional study, including all eligible staff. Sample: 52.9% of the 1, 112 staff; mean age 38.3 ± 9.9 years; 65.9% females. Smoking behaviour and TC attitudes and beliefs were the main outcomes. Bivariable analyses were conducted using chi-squared and MacNemar tests to compare categorical variables and Mann-Whitney tests to compare medians. Multilogistic regression (MLR) was performed to identify factors associated with smoking status and TC attitudes. Results Smoking prevalence was 40.5% (95% CI: 33.6-47.4) in males, 23.5% (95% CI: 19.2-27.8) in females (p < 0.001); 43.2% in auxiliaries, 26.1% in nurses, 18.9% among physicians, and 34.7% among other non-health professionals (p = 0.024). The findings showed a very high level of agreement with smoking bans, even among smokers, despite the fact that 70.3% of the smokers smoked on the premises and 76% of staff reported being frequently exposed to second-hand smoke (SHS). In addition 42.8% reported that SHS was unpleasant and 28.3% admitted complaining. MLR showed that smoking behaviour was the most important predictor of TC attitudes. Conclusions Smoking prevalence was high, especially among the lower socio-economic groups. The findings showed a very high level of support for smoking bans, despite the pro-smoking environment. Most staff reported passive behaviour, despite high SHS exposure. This and the high smoking prevalence may contribute to low compliance with the ban and low participation on smoking cessation activities. Smoking behaviour had greater influence in TC attitudes than health professionals' education. Our study is the first in Portugal to identify potential predictors of non-compliance with the partial smoking ban, further emphasising the need for a 100% smoke-free policy, effective enforcement and public health education to ensure compliance and promote social norm change. PMID:21943400

  7. 30 CFR 75.816 - Guarding of cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...components. (b) Guarding must minimize the possibility of miners contacting the cables and protect the cables from damage. The guarding must be made of grounded metal or nonconductive flame-resistant...

  8. 30 CFR 75.816 - Guarding of cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...components. (b) Guarding must minimize the possibility of miners contacting the cables and protect the cables from damage. The guarding must be made of grounded metal or nonconductive flame-resistant...

  9. 30 CFR 77.509 - Transformers; installation and guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transformers; installation and guarding. 77...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.509 Transformers; installation and guarding. (a) Transformers shall be of the totally enclosed...

  10. Cell block one and southeast guard tower, looking from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block one and southeast guard tower, looking from the central guard tower, facing southeast (note view also includes cell block ten (left) and cell block nine (right)) - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. 30 CFR 77.509 - Transformers; installation and guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transformers; installation and guarding. 77...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.509 Transformers; installation and guarding. (a) Transformers shall be of the totally enclosed...

  12. 30 CFR 77.509 - Transformers; installation and guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transformers; installation and guarding. 77...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.509 Transformers; installation and guarding. (a) Transformers shall be of the totally enclosed...

  13. 30 CFR 77.509 - Transformers; installation and guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transformers; installation and guarding. 77...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.509 Transformers; installation and guarding. (a) Transformers shall be of the totally enclosed...

  14. 30 CFR 77.509 - Transformers; installation and guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transformers; installation and guarding. 77...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.509 Transformers; installation and guarding. (a) Transformers shall be of the totally enclosed...

  15. 46 CFR 107.117 - Coast Guard addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Compliance, U.S. Coast Guard Stop 7501, 2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20593-7501...Engineering Systems, U.S. Coast Guard Stop 7509, 2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE., Washington, DC...

  16. 46 CFR 107.117 - Coast Guard addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Compliance, U.S. Coast Guard Stop 7501, 2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20593-7501...Engineering Systems, U.S. Coast Guard Stop 7509, 2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE., Washington, DC...

  17. 46 CFR 107.117 - Coast Guard addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...107.117 Section 107.117 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.117 Coast Guard addresses. When approval of...

  18. 46 CFR 64.37 - Valve and fitting guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards...fitting guard. Each valve and fitting must be protected from mechanical damage by— (a) The tank; (b) A tank saddle;...

  19. 46 CFR 64.37 - Valve and fitting guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards...fitting guard. Each valve and fitting must be protected from mechanical damage by— (a) The tank; (b) A tank saddle;...

  20. 46 CFR 64.37 - Valve and fitting guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards...fitting guard. Each valve and fitting must be protected from mechanical damage by— (a) The tank; (b) A tank saddle;...

  1. 46 CFR 64.37 - Valve and fitting guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards...fitting guard. Each valve and fitting must be protected from mechanical damage by— (a) The tank; (b) A tank saddle;...

  2. 46 CFR 64.37 - Valve and fitting guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards...fitting guard. Each valve and fitting must be protected from mechanical damage by— (a) The tank; (b) A tank saddle;...

  3. 46 CFR 58.01-20 - Machinery guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Machinery guards. 58.01-20 Section 58...MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-20 Machinery guards. Gears, couplings,...

  4. 46 CFR 58.01-20 - Machinery guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Machinery guards. 58.01-20 Section 58...MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-20 Machinery guards. Gears, couplings,...

  5. 46 CFR 58.01-20 - Machinery guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery guards. 58.01-20 Section 58...MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-20 Machinery guards. Gears, couplings,...

  6. 46 CFR 58.01-20 - Machinery guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Machinery guards. 58.01-20 Section 58...MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-20 Machinery guards. Gears, couplings,...

  7. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

  8. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

  9. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

  10. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

  11. Treatment of Gastric Adenocarcinoma May Differ Among Hospital Types in the United States, a Report from the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Greer; Patel-Parekh, Lina; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Donohue, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The concept that complex surgical procedures should be performed at high-volume centers to improve surgical morbidity and mortality is becoming widely accepted. We wanted to determine if there were differences in the treatment of patients with gastric cancer between community cancer centers and teaching hospitals in the United States. Data from the 2001 Gastric Cancer Patient Care Evaluation Study of the National Cancer Data Base comprising 6,047 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma treated at 691 hospitals were assessed. The mean number of patients treated was larger at teaching hospitals (14/year) when compared to community centers (5–9/year) (p?hospitals and 38% at teaching hospitals (p?hospitals (5.5%) and highest at community hospitals (9.9%) (p?

  12. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Paediatric Hearing Loss: Programme at the Centre for Hearing Intervention and Language Development, National University Hospital, Singapore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynne HY Lim

    The objective is to describe the multidisciplinary management programme at the National University Hospital (NUH) in Singapore for children with hearing impairment (HI). Over 99.95% of babies born at NUH have hearing tested with both otoacoustic emission and automated auditory brainstem response tests by 6 weeks of age. The referral rate to Otolaryngology is 0.5%. Acquired causes of congenital HI

  13. Measuring the displacement of the movable guard electrode in the new vertical calculable capacitor at NIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianbo; Qian, Jin; Liu, Zhongyou; Liu, Xiuying; Lu, Zhuliang; Huang, Lu; Yin, Cong; Li, Tongbao

    2014-11-01

    A new type vertical calculable capacitor has been built at National Institute of Metrology (NIM) cooperated with National Measurement Institute of Australia (NMIA). The calculable capacitor is the highest accuracy equipment apparatus except the quantum voltage and the quantum resistance in the electromagnetic metrological field. In order to measure the capacitance precisely, the accurate displacement measurement among the two guard electrodes in the calculable capacitor is a pivotal part. This paper describes a method of measuring the displacement of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, and this interferometer is component of two mirrors in two guard electrodes of the calculable capacitor at NIM. One concave reflective mirror, with 5 m radius and 70% reflectivity, is on the top of the bottom fixed guards electrodes. The other planar mirror is placed at the end of the moveable guard electrodes. This Fabry-Perot interferometer employs a home-made lamb-dip stabilization He-Ne laser at 633 nm to measure the displacement of the movable guard electrode. The internal modulation, which is used for laser stabilization, is also employed for locking the Fabry-Perot interferometer. The displacement of the movable guard electrode could be measured, when the Fabry-Perot interferometer is locked to the stabilization laser at two positions respectively. An iodine stabilization He-Ne laser at 633 nm is employed to simultaneously calibrate the wavelength of lamb-dip working laser. A reproducibility of 1.43×10-8(k=3) for the range of 205 mm can be obtained at present, and that is estimated from the experimental results of calculable capacitor.

  14. What Prison Guards Think: A Profile of the Illinois Force

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James B. Jacobs

    1978-01-01

    This article examines the results of a survey conducted among 929 in- service Illinois prison guards between July 1974 and October 1975. A demographic profile of the Illinois guards reveals the age, race, education, experience, and cultural background of the force as a whole. Question naire data reveal the prison guards' attitudes toward their career, the nature of the job,

  15. 46 CFR 167.40-30 - Guards and rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards and rails. 167.40-30 Section 167.40-30...Requirements § 167.40-30 Guards and rails. On nautical school ships all exposed...properly protected with covers, guards, or rails, in order that the danger of...

  16. USGS with U.S. and Canadian Coast Guard

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Waiting to board the Canadian helicopter from U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy and visit Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent. From left to right: USGS scientist Jonathan Childs, chief scientist for this expedition on Healy; U.S. Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Douglas Petrusa; Canadian Coas...

  17. 30 CFR 77.400 - Mechanical equipment guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...contacted by persons, and which may cause injury to persons shall be guarded. (b) Overhead belts shall be guarded if the whipping action from a broken line would be hazardous to persons below. (c) Guards at conveyor-drive, conveyor-head,...

  18. 30 CFR 77.400 - Mechanical equipment guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...contacted by persons, and which may cause injury to persons shall be guarded. (b) Overhead belts shall be guarded if the whipping action from a broken line would be hazardous to persons below. (c) Guards at conveyor-drive, conveyor-head,...

  19. Design and evaluation of deer guards for Florida Key Deer

    E-print Network

    Sebesta, Jason Daryl

    2000-01-01

    ) a guard raised off the ground; and, (3) a raised guard with sloped ends. Deer guards were tested at 2 lengths (either 3.6 m or 5.5 m) and had 1.9 cm cross-member spacing. Effectiveness was monitored visually and/or with infrared triggered camera...

  20. 50. Elevation view underway, showing "new" coast guard paint scheme ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Elevation view underway, showing "new" coast guard paint scheme and A-frame crane. Note crews quarters expanded over turtle deck at stern. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE SUMAC, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  1. Using Type Enforcement to Assure a Configurable Guard

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paula Greve; John Hoffman; Richard E. Smith

    1997-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of guard systems for electronic mail, guards tended to be overly specialized and not versatile enough for today's user community. The paper examines the use of type enforcement to create a highly assured yet administrator configurable guard. The administrator must be able to trust that the configuration provided will indeed be followed. This occurs by using

  2. The evaluation of hospital laboratory information management systems based on the standards of the American National Standard Institute

    PubMed Central

    Isfahani, Sakineh Saghaeiannejad; Khajouei, Reza; Jahanbakhsh, Maryan; Mirmohamadi, Mahboubeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, modern laboratories are faced with a huge volume of information. One of the goals of the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is to assist in the management of the information generated in the laboratory. This study intends to evaluate the LIMS based on the standards of the American National Standard Institute (ANSI). Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive–analytical study, which had been conducted in 2011, on the LIMSs in use, in the teaching and private hospitals in Isfahan. The data collecting instrument was a checklist, which was made by evaluating three groups of information components namely: ‘System capabilities’, ‘work list functions,’ and ‘reporting’ based on LIS8-A. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 20. Data were analyzed using (relative) frequency, percentage. To compare the data the following statistical tests were used: Leven test, t-test, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Results: The results of the study indicated that the LIMS had a low conformity (30%) with LIS8-A (P = 0.001), with no difference between teaching and private hospitals (P = 0.806). The ANOVA revealed that in terms of conformity with the LIS8-A standard, there was a significant difference between the systems produced by different vendors (P = 0.023). According to the results, a Kowsar system with more than %57 conformity in the three groups of information components had a better conformity to the standard, compared to the other systems. Conclusions: This study indicated that none of the LIMSs had a good conformity to the standard. It seems that system providers did not pay sufficient attention to many of the information components required by the standards when designing and developing their systems. It was suggested that standards from certified organizations and institutions be followed in the design and development process of health information systems. PMID:25077154

  3. Patient-Safety-Related Hospital Deaths in England: Thematic Analysis of Incidents Reported to a National Database, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Liam J.; Panesar, Sukhmeet S.; Darzi, Ara

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospital mortality is increasingly being regarded as a key indicator of patient safety, yet methodologies for assessing mortality are frequently contested and seldom point directly to areas of risk and solutions. The aim of our study was to classify reports of deaths due to unsafe care into broad areas of systemic failure capable of being addressed by stronger policies, procedures, and practices. The deaths were reported to a patient safety incident reporting system after mandatory reporting of such incidents was introduced. Methods and Findings The UK National Health Service database was searched for incidents resulting in a reported death of an adult over the period of the study. The study population comprised 2,010 incidents involving patients aged 16 y and over in acute hospital settings. Each incident report was reviewed by two of the authors, and, by scrutinising the structured information together with the free text, a main reason for the harm was identified and recorded as one of 18 incident types. These incident types were then aggregated into six areas of apparent systemic failure: mismanagement of deterioration (35%), failure of prevention (26%), deficient checking and oversight (11%), dysfunctional patient flow (10%), equipment-related errors (6%), and other (12%). The most common incident types were failure to act on or recognise deterioration (23%), inpatient falls (10%), healthcare-associated infections (10%), unexpected per-operative death (6%), and poor or inadequate handover (5%). Analysis of these 2,010 fatal incidents reveals patterns of issues that point to actionable areas for improvement. Conclusions Our approach demonstrates the potential utility of patient safety incident reports in identifying areas of service failure and highlights opportunities for corrective action to save lives. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:24959751

  4. Adherence to medication: A nation-wide study from the Children’s Cancer Hospital, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El Malla, Hanan; Ylitalo Helm, Nathalie; Wilderäng, Ulrica; El Sayed Elborai, Yasser; Steineck, Gunnar; Kreicbergs, Ulrika

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate adherence to medical regimen and predictors for non-adherence among children with cancer in Egypt. METHODS: We administered two study specific questionnaires to 304 parents of children diagnosed with cancer at the Children’s Cancer Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, one before the first chemotherapy treatment and the other before the third. The questionnaires were translated to colloquial Egyptian Arabic, and due, to the high illiteracy level in Egypt an interviewer read the questions in Arabic to each parent and registered the answers. Both questionnaires consisted of almost 90 questions each. In addition, a Case Report Form was filled in from the child’s medical journal. The study period consisted of 7 mo (February until September 2008) and we had a participation rate of 97%. Descriptive statistics are presented and Fisher’s exact test was used to check for possible differences between the adherent and non-adherent groups. A P-value below 0.05 was considered significant. Software used was SAS version 9.3 for Windows (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, United States). RESULTS: Two hundred and eighty-one (90%) parents answered the second questionnaire, regarding their child’s adherence behaviour. Approximately two thirds of the children admitted to their third chemotherapy treatment had received medical recommendations upon discharge from the first or second chemotherapy treatment (181/281, 64%). Sixty-eight percent (123/181) of the parents who were given medical recommendations reported that their child did not follow the recommendations. Two main predictors were found for non-adherence: child resistance (111/123, 90%) and inadequate information (100/123, 81%). In the adherent group, 20% of the parents (n = 12/58) reported trust in their child’s doctor while 14 percent 8/58 reported trust in the other health-care professionals. Corresponding numbers for the non-adherent group are 8/123 (7%) for both their child’s doctor and other health-care professionals. Almost all of the parents expressed a lack of optimism towards the treatment (116/121, 96%), yet they reported an intention to continue with the treatment for two main reasons, for the sake of their child’s life (70%) (P = 0.005) and worry that their child would die if they discontinued the treatment (81%) (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Non-adherence to medical regimen is common among children diagnosed with cancer in Egypt, the main reasons being child resistance and inadequate information. PMID:24175183

  5. Makerere University College of Health Sciences’ role in addressing challenges in health service provision at Mulago National Referral Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mulago National Referral Hospital (MNRH), Uganda’s primary tertiary and teaching hospital, and Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) have a close collaborative relationship. MakCHS students complete clinical rotations at MNRH, and MakCHS faculty partner with Mulago staff in clinical care and research. In 2009, as part of a strategic planning process, MakCHS undertook a qualitative study to examine care and service provision at MNRH, identify challenges, gaps, and solutions, and explore how MakCHS could contribute to improving care and service delivery at MNRH. Methods Key informant interviews (n=23) and focus group discussions (n=7) were conducted with nurses, doctors, administrators, clinical officers and other key stakeholders. Interviews and focus groups were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim, and findings were analyzed through collaborative thematic analysis. Results Challenges to care and service delivery at MNRH included resource constraints (staff, space, equipment, and supplies), staff inadequacies (knowledge, motivation, and professionalism), overcrowding, a poorly functioning referral system, limited quality assurance, and a cumbersome procurement system. There were also insufficiencies in the teaching of professionalism and communication skills to students, and patient care challenges that included lack of access to specialized services, risk of infections, and inappropriate medications. Suggestions for how MakCHS could contribute to addressing these challenges included strengthening referral systems and peripheral health center capacity, and establishing quality assurance mechanisms. The College could also strengthen the teaching of professionalism, communication and leadership skills to students, and monitor student training and develop courses that contribute to continuous professional development. Additionally, the College could provide in-service education for providers on professionalism, communication skills, strategies that promote evidence-based practice and managerial leadership skills. Conclusions Although there are numerous barriers to delivery of quality health services at MNRH, many barriers could be addressed by strengthening the relationship between the Hospital and MakCHS. Strategic partnerships and creative use of existing resources, both human and financial, could improve the quality of care and service delivery at MNRH. Improving services and providing more skills training could better prepare MakCHS graduates for leadership roles in other health care facilities, ultimately improving health outcomes throughout Uganda. PMID:21411007

  6. A national infection control evaluation of drug-resistant tuberculosis hospitals in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Farley, J. E.; Tudor, C.; Mphahlele, M.; Franz, K.; Perrin, N. A.; Dorman, S.; Van der Walt, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of infection control (IC) in health care settings with tuberculosis (TB) patients has been highlighted by recent health care-associated outbreaks in South Africa. Objective To conduct operational evaluations of IC in drug-resistant TB settings at a national level. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from June to September 2009 in all multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) facilities in South Africa. Structured interviews with key informants were completed, along with observation of IC practices. Health care workers (HCWs) were asked to complete an anonymous knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) questionnaire. Multilevel modeling was used to take into consideration the relationship between center and HCW level variables. Results Twenty-four M(X)DR-TB facilities (100%) were enrolled. Facility infrastructure and staff adherence to IC recommendations were highly varied between facilities. Key informant interviews were incongruent with direct observation of practices in all settings. A total of 499 HCWs were enrolled in the KAP evaluation. Higher level of clinical training was associated with greater IC knowledge (P < 0.001), more appropriate attitudes (P < 0.001) and less time spent with coughing patients (P < 0.001). IC practices were poor across all disciplines. Conclusion These findings demonstrate a clear need to improve and standardize IC infrastructure in drug-resistant TB settings in South Africa. PMID:22236851

  7. On the Restraining Power of Guards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erich Gradel; Rwth Aachen

    1999-01-01

    Guarded fragments of first-order logic were recently introduced by Andr'eka, vanBenthem and N'emeti; they consist of relational first-order formulae whose quantifiersare appropriately relativized by atoms. These fragments are interesting because theyextend in a natural way many propositional modal logics, because they have usefulmodel-theoretic properties and especially because they are decidable classes that avoidthe usual syntactic restrictions (on the arity of

  8. Checking Java Programs via Guarded Commands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Rustan M. Leino; James B. Saxe; Raymie Stata

    1999-01-01

    This paper defines a simple guarded-command--like language and its semantics.The language is used as an intermediate language in generating verification conditionsfor Java. The paper discusses why it is a good idea to generate verificationconditions via an intermediate language, rather than directly.Publication history. This paper appears in Formal Techniques for Java Programs,workshop proceedings. Bart Jacobs, Gary T. Leavens, Peter Muller, and

  9. Speed-Selector Guard For Machine Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakhshir, Roda J.; Valentine, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Simple guardplate prevents accidental reversal of direction of rotation or sudden change of speed of lathe, milling machine, or other machine tool. Custom-made for specific machine and control settings. Allows control lever to be placed at only one setting. Operator uses handle to slide guard to engage or disengage control lever. Protects personnel from injury and equipment from damage occurring if speed- or direction-control lever inadvertently placed in wrong position.

  10. HBV and HCV Coinfection among HIV/AIDS Patients in the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Huy, Bůi V?; Vernavong, Kanxay; Kính, Nguy?n V?n

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To examine prevalence and characterization of HBV and HCV coinfection among HIV/AIDS patients. Methods. This cross-sectional, retrospective study analyzed 724 HIV/AIDS patients in the HIV clinic at the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases (NHTD), from 5/2005 to 4/2011. Results. The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection was 50.3% (364/724), of which HbsAg, HCV, and both of HbsAg, and HCV positivity were 8.4%, 35.4%, and 6.5%, respectively. The cohort (364 patients) with HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection live in the 30 provinces/cities in the North and Central area of Vietnam. We found statistically significant associations between heightened risk of coinfection with HIV and HCV in the age group 30–39 years (P < 0.001), male gender (P < 0.001), never married patients (P < 0.001), patients with a history of injection drug use (P < 0.001), and clinical stages 2–4 (P < 0.001). Coinfection with HBV/HIV was statistically significant associations between heightened risk of marital status (never married) (P < 0.001) and those who reported transmission through sexual intercourse. Conclusion. Coinfection with viral hepatitis is common in HIV patients; further study of the impact and evolution of coinfection is necessary to find effective treatment algorithms. PMID:25580287

  11. Parallel Quality Assessment of Emergency Departments by European Foundation for Quality Management Model and Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    IMANI NASAB, Mohammad Hasan; MOHAGHEGH, Bahram; KHALESI, Nader; JAAFARIPOOYAN, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    Background European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model is a widely used quality management system (QMS) worldwide, including Iran. Current study aims to verify the quality assessment results of Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation (INPHE) based on those of EFQM. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 on a sample of emergency departments (EDs) affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Iran. The standard questionnaire of EFQM (V-2010) was used to gather appropriate data. The results were compared with those of INPHE. MS Excel was used to classify and display the findings. Results: The average assessment score of the EDs based on the INPHE and EFQM model were largely different (i.e. 86.4% and 31%, respectively). In addition, the variation range among five EDs’ scores according to each model was also considerable (22% for EFQM against 7% of INPHE), especially in the EDs with and without prior record of applying QMSs. Conclusion: The INPHE’s assessment results were not confirmed by EFQM model. Moreover, the higher variation range among EDs’ scores using EFQM model could allude to its more differentiation power in assessing the performance comparing with INPHE. Therefore, a need for improvement in the latter drawing on other QMSs’ (such as EFQM) strengths, given the results emanated from its comparison with EFQM seems indispensable. PMID:23967429

  12. Compliance with a time-out procedure intended to prevent wrong surgery in hospitals: results of a national patient safety programme in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van Schoten, Steffie M; Kop, Veerle; de Blok, Carolien; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Groenewegen, Peter P; Wagner, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prevent wrong surgery, the WHO ‘Safe Surgery Checklist’ was introduced in 2008. The checklist comprises a time-out procedure (TOP): the final step before the start of the surgical procedure where the patient, surgical procedure and side/site are reviewed by the surgical team. The aim of this study is to evaluate the extent to which hospitals carry out the TOP before anaesthesia in the operating room, whether compliance has changed over time, and to determine factors that are associated with compliance. Design Evaluation study involving observations. Setting Operating rooms of 2 academic, 4 teaching and 12 general Dutch hospitals. Participants A random selection was made from all adult patients scheduled for elective surgery on the day of the observation, preferably involving different surgeons and different procedures. Results Mean compliance with the TOP was 71.3%. Large differences between hospitals were observed. No linear trend was found in compliance during the study period. Compliance at general and teaching hospitals was higher than at academic hospitals. Compliance decreased with the age of the patient, general surgery showed lower compliance in comparison with other specialties and compliance was higher when the team was focused on the TOP. Conclusions Large differences in compliance with the TOP were observed between participating hospitals which can be attributed at least in part to the type of hospital, surgical specialty and patient characteristics. Hospitals do not comply consistently with national guidelines to prevent wrong surgery and further implementation as well as further research into non-compliance is needed. PMID:24993761

  13. The Clickable Guard Cell, Version II: Interactive Model of Guard Cell Signal Transduction Mechanisms and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, June M.; Mäser, Pascal; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2008-01-01

    Guard cells are located in the leaf epidermis and pairs of guard cells surround and form stomatal pores, which regulate CO2 influx from the atmosphere into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation. Stomatal guard cells also regulate water loss of plants via transpiration to the atmosphere. Signal transduction mechanisms in guard cells integrate a multitude of different stimuli to modulate stomatal apertures. Stomata open in response to light. Stomata close in response to drought stress, elevated CO2, ozone and low humidity. In response to drought, plants synthesize the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) that triggers closing of stomatal pores. Guard cells have become a highly developed model system for dissecting signal transduction mechanisms in plants and for elucidating how individual signaling mechanisms can interact within a network in a single cell. Many new findings have been made in the last few years. This chapter is an update of an electronic interactive chapter in the previous edition of The Arabidopsis Book (Mäser et al. 2003). Here we focus on mechanisms for which genes and mutations have been characterized, including signaling components for which there is substantial signaling, biochemical and genetic evidence. Ion channels have been shown to represent targets of early signal transduction mechanisms and provide functional signaling and quantitative analysis points to determine where and how mutations affect branches within the guard cell signaling network. Although a substantial number of genes and proteins that function in guard cell signaling have been identified in recent years, there are many more left to be identified and the protein-protein interactions within this network will be an important subject of future research. A fully interactive clickable electronic version of this publication can be accessed at the following web site: http://www-biology.ucsd.edu/labs/schroeder/clickablegc2/. The interactive clickable version includes the following features: Figure 1. Model for the roles of ion channels in ABA signaling.Figure 2. Blue light signaling pathways in guard cells.Figure 3. ABA signaling pathways in guard cells. Figure 1 is linked to explanations that appear upon mouse-over. Figure 2 and Figure 3 are clickable and linked to info boxes, which in turn are linked to TAIR, to relevant abstracts in PubMed, and to updated background explanations from Schroeder et al (2001), used with permission of Annual Reviews of Plant Biology. PMID:22303239

  14. Hospitals on the path to accountable care: highlights from a 2011 national survey of hospital readiness to participate in an accountable care organization.

    PubMed

    Audet, Anne-Marie J; Kenward, Kevin; Patel, Shreya; Joshi, Maulik S

    2012-08-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are forming in communities across the country. In ACOs, health care providers take responsibility for a defined patient popu­lation, coordinate their care across settings, and are held jointly accountable for the quality and cost of care. This issue brief reports on results from a survey that assesses hospitals' readiness to participate in ACOs. Results show we are at the beginning of the ACO adop­tion curve. As of September 2011, only 13 percent of hospital respondents reported partici­pating in an ACO or planning to participate within a year, while 75 percent reported not considering participation at all. Survey results indicate that physician-led ACOs are the second most common governance model, far exceeding payer-led models, highlighting an encouraging paradigm shift away from acute care and toward primary care. Findings also point to significant gaps, including the infrastructure needed to take on financial risks and to manage population health. PMID:22928221

  15. An in-depth, exploratory assessment of the implementation of the National Health Information System at a district level hospital in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A well functioning Health Information System (HIS) is crucial for effective and efficient health service delivery. In Tanzania there is a national HIS called Mfumo wa Taarifa za Uendeshaji Huduma za Afya (MTUHA). It comprises a guideline/manual, a series of registers for primary data collection and secondary data books where information from the registers is totalled or used for calculations. Methods A mix of qualitative methods were used. These included key informant interviews; staff interviews; participant observations; and a retrospective analysis of the hospital’s 2010 MTUHA reporting documents and the hospital’s development plan. Results All staff members acknowledged data collection as part of their job responsibilities. However, all had concerns about the accuracy of MTUHA data. Access to training was limited, mathematical capabilities often low, dissemination of MTUHA knowledge within the hospital poor, and a broad understanding of the HIS’s full capabilities lacking. Whilst data collection for routine services functioned reasonably well, filling of the secondary data tools was unsatisfactory. Internal inconsistencies between the different types of data tools were found. These included duplications, and the collection of data that was not further used. Sixteen of the total 72 forms (22.2%) that make up one of the key secondary data books (Hospital data/MTUHA book 2) could not be completed with the information collected in the primary data books. Moreover, the hospital made no use of any of the secondary data. The hospital’s main planning document was its development plan. Only 3 of the 22 indicators in this plan were the same as indicators in MTUHA, the information for 9 more was collected by the MTUHA system but figures had to be extracted and recalculated to fit, while for the remaining 10 indicators no use could be made of MTUHA at all. Conclusion The HIS in Tanzania is very extensive and it could be advisable to simplify it to the core business of data collection for routine services. Alternatively, the more comprehensive, managerial aspects could be sharpened for each type of facility, with a focus upon the hospital level. In particular, hospital planning documents need to be more closely aligned with MTUHA indicators. PMID:24572013

  16. The influence of psychiatric comorbidity on perioperative outcomes following primary total hip and knee arthroplasty; a 17-year analysis of the National Hospital Discharge Survey database.

    PubMed

    Buller, Leonard T; Best, Matthew J; Klika, Alison K; Barsoum, Wael K

    2015-02-01

    Studies conflict regarding the impact of psychiatric illnesses including depression, anxiety, dementia and schizophrenia on perioperative outcomes following total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA). Psychiatric comorbidity incidence, in-hospital adverse events, discharge disposition, and mortality were assessed for THA or TKA patients between 1990 and 2007 using the US National Hospital Discharge Survey. A cohort representative of 8,379,490 patients was identified and analyzed using multivariable regression analysis. Diagnoses of depression, dementia and schizophrenia were associated with increased odds of adverse events (P<0.001). Schizophrenia and depression were associated with higher odds of perioperative blood transfusion (P<0.001). All psychiatric comorbidities were associated with higher odds of non-routine discharge (P<0.001). Diagnosis of dementia was associated with higher in-hospital mortality (P<0.001). PMID:25267536

  17. Ambulatory care for cancer in the United States: results from two national surveys comparing visits to physicians' offices and hospital outpatient departments.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lisa C.; Tangka, Florence K.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the general population, type of health insurance has been reported to affect the location of ambulatory visits and the content of those visits. We examined where cancer patient visits occurred (physicians' offices or hospital clinics), and whether anticancer therapy is administered or prescribed. METHODS: Cross-sectional study using National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey (NAMCS/NHAMCS) data to characterize ambulatory cancer patient visits from 2001-2003. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with where a cancer patient went for care (office practice versus hospital clinic) and anticancer therapy received. RESULTS: Thirteen percent of patients visited hospital clinics, with the remainder visiting office-based settings. Younger cancer patients and those with Medicaid were more likely to visit hospital clinics compared to older and privately insured cancer patients. Cancer patients with <6 visits in the last year were less likely to be seen in the office setting. Patients with lung cancer, lymphoma/leukemia and melanoma were less likely to have anticancer therapy administered or prescribed compared to breast cancer patients. The uninsured were less likely to have anticancer administered or prescribed compared with the privately insured. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer patients with Medicaid were more likely to visit hospital clinics than privately insured patients. Treatment was associated with cancer type, not where care occurred and health insurance type, though there was a trend for the uninsured and those insured by Medicaid to be less likely to be administered or be prescribed anticancer therapy. PMID:18229771

  18. Hospital use of young children in Switzerland: A nation-wide study based on a complete survey over 4 years

    PubMed Central

    Schoeni-Affolter, Franziska V; Widmer, Marcel; Busato, André

    2008-01-01

    Background Young children are known to be the most frequent hospital users compared to older children and young adults. Therefore, they are an important population from economic and policy perspectives of health care delivery. In Switzerland complete hospitalization discharge records for children [<5 years] of four consecutive years [2002–2005] were evaluated in order to analyze variation in patterns of hospital use. Methods Stationary and outpatient hospitalization rates on aggregated ZIP code level were calculated based on census data provided by the Swiss federal statistical office (BfS). Thirty-seven hospital service areas for children [HSAP] were created with the method of "small area analysis", reflecting user-based health markets. Descriptive statistics and general linear models were applied to analyze the data. Results The mean stationary hospitalization rate over four years was 66.1 discharges per 1000 children. Hospitalizations for respiratory problem are most dominant in young children (25.9%) and highest hospitalization rates are associated with geographical factors of urban areas and specific language regions. Statistical models yielded significant effect estimates for these factors and a significant association between ambulatory/outpatient and stationary hospitalization rates. Conclusion The utilization-based approach, using HSAP as spatial representation of user-based health markets, is a valid instrument and allows assessing the supply and demand of children's health care services. The study provides for the first time estimates for several factors associated with the large variation in the utilization and provision of paediatric health care resources in Switzerland. PMID:19099602

  19. Record linkage between hospital discharges and mortality registries for motor neuron disease case ascertainment for the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Elena; Ramalle-Gómara, Enrique; Quińones, Carmen

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to analyse the coverage of hospital discharge data and the mortality registry (MR) of La Rioja to ascertain motor neuron disease (MND) cases to be included in the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry. MND cases that occurred in La Rioja during the period 1996-2011 were selected from hospital discharge data and the MR by means of the International Classification of Diseases. Review of the medical histories was carried out to confirm the causes of death reported. Characteristics of the population with MND were analysed. A total of 133 patients with MND were detected in La Rioja during the period 1996-2011; 30.1% were only recorded in the hospital discharges data, 12.0% only in the MR, and 57.9% were recorded by both databases. Medical records revealed a miscoding of patients who had been diagnosed with progressive supranuclear palsy but were recorded in the MR with an MND code. In conclusion, the hospital discharges data and the MR appear to be complementary and are valuable databases for the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry when MNDs are properly codified. Nevertheless, it would be advisable to corroborate the validity of the MR as data source since the miscoding of progressive supranuclear palsy has been corrected. PMID:24641576

  20. Tax time is coming, and if you take out Bupa hospital cover under your The Australian National University corporate health plan before June

    E-print Network

    University corporate health plan before June 30, you could avoid the Government's Lifetime Health CoverTax time is coming, and if you take out Bupa hospital cover under your The Australian National out HOspiTALAND eXTrAsBY JUNe 15and choose from1 Of 3 GifTs* AvOiD THe CrUNCH, AND CONTACT BUpA TODAY

  1. Medico-social and socio-demographic factors associated with maternal mortality at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Makokha, A E

    1991-01-01

    To identify the most significant determinants of maternal mortality in Kenya, a prospective study involving 49,335 deliveries occurring at Kenyatta National Hospital from January 1978-87 was conducted. There were 156 maternal deaths in this series, for a maternal mortality rate of 3.2/1000 deliveries. The 5 most frequent causes of death were abortion (24%), hypertensive disease of pregnancy (13%), sepsis (13%), anemia (10%), and cardiac disease (7%). 24% of women who died were age 19 years or under, 27% were 20-24 years, 23% were 25-29 years, and 11% were 30-34 years. The largest percentage (24%) of deaths involved nulliparous women; 16% were to women of parity 5 and above. 28% of the women who died were single, and single women contributed the majority of deaths from abortion. 66% of the women who died had received no prenatal care. The proportion of avoidable deaths was 19% among clinic attenders compared to 29% among non-attenders. Overall, age, parity, and marital status--traditionally regarded as the key factors associated with maternal mortality--vary in their impact, given the cause of death and medical services received. The assumption that high parity is associated with maternal mortality was not confirmed in this study due to the significant number of deaths from abortion that involved single, nulliparous women. In addition, many women who died were in the optimum age group for childbearing, but were more prone to suffer from anemia, hypertension, ectopic pregnancy, and cardiac disease than women over 30 years old. Overall, 126 deaths were considered avoidable. Contributory factors were slowness of surgical management of emergencies, prolonged confinement of women with cardiac disease, and a lack of emergency supplies of blood and drugs for complicated deliveries. PMID:12316813

  2. GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the Guard House and Barracks, and South Fire House in relation to nearby roads, railroad tracks, and the piers). Navy Yard, Mare Island, California. P.W. Drawing No. C-1899, approved 1941; file no. 930-C-1. Scale one inch to forty feet. 72 cn x 97 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  3. Credit BG. View looking north northeast at Guard House and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. View looking north northeast at Guard House and entrance to Building 4505 complex. This Guard House was built in 1993 as a portable unit; it replaced an older structure. The Building 4505 complex is surrounded by a security fence. Building 4496 appears to immediate right of view - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Guard House, Northeast of A Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. IET. Exclusion guard house (TAN621) and unit substation (TAN622). Elevations ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Exclusion guard house (TAN-621) and unit substation (TAN-622). Elevations and floor plan. Also show concrete pad for substation. Ralph M. Parsons 902-4-ANP-621-622-A&S 411. Date: February 1954. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 035-0621-60-693-106968 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Protocol: optimised electrophyiological analysis of intact guard cells from Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Genetic resources available for Arabidopsis thaliana make this species particularly attractive as a model for molecular genetic studies of guard cell homeostasis, transport and signalling, but this facility is not matched by accessible tools for quantitative analysis of transport in the intact cell. We have developed a reliable set of procedures for voltage clamp analysis of guard cells from Arabidopsis leaves. These procedures greatly simplify electrophysiological recordings, extending the duration of measurements and scope for analysis of the predominant K+ and anion channels of intact stomatal guard cells to that achieved previously in work with Vicia and tobacco guard cells. PMID:22559714

  6. Protocol: optimised electrophyiological analysis of intact guard cells from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-Hua; Eisenach, Cornelia; Xu, Xin-Qin; Hills, Adrian; Blatt, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Genetic resources available for Arabidopsis thaliana make this species particularly attractive as a model for molecular genetic studies of guard cell homeostasis, transport and signalling, but this facility is not matched by accessible tools for quantitative analysis of transport in the intact cell. We have developed a reliable set of procedures for voltage clamp analysis of guard cells from Arabidopsis leaves. These procedures greatly simplify electrophysiological recordings, extending the duration of measurements and scope for analysis of the predominant K+ and anion channels of intact stomatal guard cells to that achieved previously in work with Vicia and tobacco guard cells. PMID:22559714

  7. Comparison of soccer shin guards in preventing tibia fracture.

    PubMed

    Francisco, A C; Nightingale, R W; Guilak, F; Glisson, R R; Garrett, W E

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a number of shin guards in protecting against tibia fracture in soccer players. A secondary purpose was to determine the relationship between the material and structural differences in shin guard design and the protection provided. Twenty-three commercially available shin guards were tested on a model leg containing a synthetic tibia that had been calibrated against human cadaver specimens. Each guard was categorized into one of four material types: plastic (N = 9), fiberglass (N = 6), compressed air (N = 4), and Kevlar (N = 4). The maximum combined force at the ends of the tibia, the principal strain on the posterior side of the tibia, and the contact time of the impact were measured using a drop track impact simulation. Shin guards provided significant protection from tibia fracture at all drop heights. The average guard reduced force by 11% to 17% and strain by 45% to 51% compared with the unguarded leg. At the higher drop heights, material composition and structural characteristics of the shin guards showed significant differences in protective abilities. These findings indicate that all shin guards provide some measure of protection against tibia fracture, although the level of protection may vary significantly among the different guards. PMID:10751000

  8. Exploring ARAC Support of U.S. Coast Guard Planning and Response Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.S.; Baskett, R.; Ellis, J. S.

    2001-07-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard is responsible for the protection of the marine environment from spills of oil and hazardous material. The USCG responsibilities include responding to oil and chemical spills from ships as well as from sources ashore. While responding to a spill, The USCG Marine Safety Offices and Detachments, and the National Strike Force (NSF) depend on interagency support from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and state and local agencies. Currently, the USCG depends on NOAA Scientific Support Coordinators for predicting and assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous material. NOAA has several computer models that the Coast Guard can access in the event of a chemical release into the atmosphere or an in situ oil burn. However, the Department of Energy operates a more powerful modeling system called the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC). Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, ARAC offers a complex multiscale model in a system that is simple for the end user to operate. The applicability of ARAC to Coast Guard operations is the subject of this study.

  9. In?Hospital Mortality Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results From the National Inpatient Sample, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Bina; Davis, Herbert T.; Laskey, Warren K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Case?fatality rates in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have significantly decreased; however, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), a risk factor for AMI, has increased. The purposes of the present study were to assess the prevalence and clinical impact of DM among patients hospitalized with AMI and to estimate the impact of important clinical characteristics associated with in?hospital mortality in patients with AMI and DM. Methods and Results We used the National Inpatient Sample to estimate trends in DM prevalence and in?hospital mortality among 1.5 million patients with AMI from 2000 to 2010, using survey data?analysis methods. Clinical characteristics associated with in?hospital mortality were identified using multivariable logistic regression. There was a significant increase in DM prevalence among AMI patients (year 2000, 22.2%; year 2010, 29.6%, Ptrend<0.0001). AMI patients with DM tended to be older and female and to have more cardiovascular risk factors. However, age?standardized mortality decreased significantly from 2000 (8.48%) to 2010 (4.95%) (Ptrend<0.0001). DM remained independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio 1.069, 95% CI 1.051 to 1.087; P<0.0001). The adverse impact of DM on in?hospital mortality was unchanged over time. Decreased death risk over time was greatest among women and elderly patients. Among younger patients of both sexes, there was a leveling off of this decrease in more recent years. Conclusions Despite increasing DM prevalence and disease burden among AMI patients, in?hospital mortality declined significantly from 2000 to 2010. The adverse impact of DM on mortality remained unchanged overall over time but was age and sex dependent. PMID:25158866

  10. National nosocomial infection surveillance system–based study in Iran: Additional hospital stay attributable to nosocomial infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mehrdad Askarian; Narges Rostami Gooran

    2003-01-01

    BackgroundNosocomial infection is a serious health and financial problem. The purpose of this study was to determine the extra hospital stay attributable to nosocomial infections for patients undergoing surgery.

  11. UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women's Hospital On February 1, 2015, one of the nation's premier medical centers

    E-print Network

    Derisi, Joseph

    's Hospital is designed to treat the whole woman, not just her symptoms, with compassion, innovation imbalances. Exceptional Features: · Onsite helipad to transport pregnant women, babies and children

  12. Implementation and adoption of nationwide electronic health records in secondary care in England: final qualitative results from prospective national evaluation in “early adopter” hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the implementation and adoption of the NHS detailed care records service in “early adopter” hospitals in England. Design Theoretically informed, longitudinal qualitative evaluation based on case studies. Setting 12 “early adopter” NHS acute hospitals and specialist care settings studied over two and a half years. Data sources Data were collected through in depth interviews, observations, and relevant documents relating directly to case study sites and to wider national developments that were perceived to impact on the implementation strategy. Data were thematically analysed, initially within and then across cases. The dataset consisted of 431 semistructured interviews with key stakeholders, including hospital staff, developers, and governmental stakeholders; 590 hours of observations of strategic meetings and use of the software in context; 334 sets of notes from observations, researchers’ field notes, and notes from national conferences; 809 NHS documents; and 58 regional and national documents. Results Implementation has proceeded more slowly, with a narrower scope and substantially less clinical functionality than was originally planned. The national strategy had considerable local consequences (summarised under five key themes), and wider national developments impacted heavily on implementation and adoption. More specifically, delays related to unrealistic expectations about the capabilities of systems; the time needed to build, configure, and customise the software; the work needed to ensure that systems were supporting provision of care; and the needs of end users for training and support. Other factors hampering progress included the changing milieu of NHS policy and priorities; repeatedly renegotiated national contracts; different stages of development of diverse NHS care records service systems; and a complex communication process between different stakeholders, along with contractual arrangements that largely excluded NHS providers. There was early evidence that deploying systems resulted in important learning within and between organisations and the development of relevant competencies within NHS hospitals. Conclusions Implementation of the NHS Care Records Service in “early adopter” sites proved time consuming and challenging, with as yet limited discernible benefits for clinicians and no clear advantages for patients. Although our results might not be directly transferable to later adopting sites because the functionalities we evaluated were new and untried in the English context, they shed light on the processes involved in implementing major new systems. The move to increased local decision making that we advocated based on our interim analysis has been pursued and welcomed by the NHS, but it is important that policymakers do not lose sight of the overall goal of an integrated interoperable solution. PMID:22006942

  13. Incidence of respiratory syncytial virus-related hospitalizations in high-risk children: follow-up of a national cohort of infants treated with Palivizumab as RSV prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, Thierry; Rozé, Jean-Christophe; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2002-09-01

    The prophylactic administration of Palivizumab, a monoclonal antibody binding the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein, was recently shown to significantly decrease the incidence of RSV-related hospitalizations among high-risk children (IMpact-RSV trial). While awaiting marketing authorization in France and through a cohort of patients' name-based national program temporarily authorized by the French Drug Agency, a prospective register of all Palivizumab-treated patients in France was set up during the epidemic season 1999-2000. Based on this register, this study was carried out to evaluate the incidence of RSV-related hospitalizations and the safety of prophylaxis among a national cohort of children at high-risk of severe RSV disease. During the study period, guidelines issued by the French Pediatric Society recommended prophylaxis for children either aged less than 6 months at inclusion and born at less than 33 weeks of gestation with a history of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) at 28 days of life, or aged less than 2 years, born at less than 36 weeks of gestation, and having required treatment for BPD over the previous 6 months. Once included in the program, investigators were to prospectively report the clinical and demographic characteristics of children, all hospitalizations, and reasons for the hospitalizations. Five hundred and sixteen children were treated with 1-5 monthly doses. The median gestational age was 28 weeks, and children born at less than 33 weeks of gestation accounted for 88% of the cohort. The prevalence of BPD was 81%. Ninety children were hospitalized for respiratory illness. In 39 children, hospitalizations were attributed to RSV (7.6% of the total cohort). Among those 39 children, 10 (1.9% of the total cohort) required admission into an intensive care unit, and 4 required mechanical ventilation. No deaths or serious adverse events attributable to RSV infection or Palivizumab treatment were reported. We conclude that the RSV-related hospitalization rate in this high-risk cohort was comparable to the rate observed in the subgroup of Palivizumab-prophylaxed children with BPD in the IMpact-RSV trial. PMID:12203846

  14. The Effectiveness of Shin Guards Used by Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Tatar, Yasar; Ramazanoglu, Nusret; Camliguney, Asiye Filiz; Saygi, Evrim Karadag; Cotuk, Hasan Birol

    2014-01-01

    In football, injuries from opponent contact occur commonly in the lower extremities. FIFA the world’s governing body for football requires players to wear shin guards. The aim of this study was to compare the protective effectiveness of polypropylene based shin guards with custom-made carbon fiber ones. Three commercial polypropylene shin guards (Adidas Predator™, Adidas UCL™, and Nike Mercurial™) and two custom-made carbon fiber shin guards were examined. The experimental setup had the following parts: 1) A pendulum attached a load cell at the tip (CAS Corp., Korea) and a fixed prosthetic foot equipped with a cleat to simulate an attacker’s foot. 2) An artificial tibia prepared by condensed foam and reinforced by carbon fibers protected with soft clothing. 3) A multifunctional sensor system (Tekscan Corp., F-Socket System, Turkey) to record the impact on the tibia. In the low impact force trials, only 2.79-9.63 % of the load was transmitted to the sensors. When comparing for mean force, peak force and impulse, both carbon fiber shin guards performed better than the commercial ones (Adidas Predator™, Adidas UCL™, and Nike Mercurial™) (p = 0.000). Based on these same parameters, the Nike Mercurial™ provided better protection than the Adidas Predator™ and the Adidas UCL™ (p = 0.000). In the high impact force trials, only 5.16-10.90 % of the load was transmitted to the sensors. For peak force and impulse, the carbon fiber shin guards provided better protection than all the others. Carbon fiber shin guards possess protective qualities superior to those of commercial polypropylene shin guards. Key Points Shin guards decrease the risk of serious injuries. Carbon shin guards provide sufficient protection against high impact forces. Commercially available Polypropylene based shin guards do not provide sufficient protection against high impact forces. PMID:24570615

  15. Implementing a national program to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infection: a quality improvement collaboration of state hospital associations, academic medical centers, professional societies, and governmental agencies.

    PubMed

    Fakih, Mohamad G; George, Christine; Edson, Barbara S; Goeschel, Christine A; Saint, Sanjay

    2013-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) represents a significant proportion of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The US Department of Health and Human Services issued a plan to reduce HAIs with a target 25% reduction of CAUTI by 2013. Michigan's successful collaborative to reduce unnecessary use of urinary catheters and CAUTI was based on a partnership between diverse hospitals, the state hospital association (SHA), and academic medical centers. Taking the lessons learned from Michigan, we are now spreading this work throughout the 50 states. This national spread leverages the expertise of different groups and organizations for the unified goal of reducing catheter-related harm. The key components of the project are (1) centralized coordination of the effort and dissemination of information to SHAs and hospitals, (2) data collection based on established definitions and approaches, (3) focused guidance on the technical practices that will prevent CAUTI, (4) emphasis on understanding the socioadaptive aspects (both the general, unit-wide issues and CAUTI-specific challenges), and (5) partnering with specialty organizations and governmental agencies who have expertise in the relevant subject area. The work may serve in the future as a model for other large improvement efforts to address other hospital-acquired conditions, such as venous thromboembolism and falls. PMID:24018921

  16. National survey on cholecystectomy related bile duct injury--public health and financial aspects in Belgian hospitals--1997.

    PubMed

    Van de Sande, St; Bossens, M; Parmentier, Y; Gigot, J F

    2003-04-01

    Public health and financial aspects of cholecystectomy related bile duct injury (BDI) are highlighted in a National Cholecystectomy Survey carried out through 'datamining' the Federal State Medical Records Summaries and Financial Summaries of all Belgian hospitals in 1997. All cancer diagnoses, children < or = 10 years, cholecystectomies performed as an abdominal co-procedure or patients having undergone other non-related surgery were excluded from the study. 10.595 laparoscopic (LC) and 1.033 open cholecystectomies (OC) as well as 137 secondary BDI treatments (LC/OC) were included in the survey (total 11.765). Both LC and OC groups turned out to be significantly different as to distribution of patient's age and APR-DRG severity classes. Composite criteria in terms of ICD-9-CM and billing codes were elaborated to classify: 1) primary, intra-operatively detected and treated BDI (N = 30), 2) primary delayed BDI treatments (N = 38), 3) secondary BDI treatments (N = 137), 4) non-BDI abdomino-surgical complications (N = 119), 4) uneventful laparoscopic (N = 7.476) and 5) uneventful open cholecystectomy (N = 681). Complication rates, community costs of LC and OC groups, incidence of preoperative ERCP and/or intra-operative cholangiography as well as interventions for complications were studied. Incidence of cholecystectomy related BDI was 0.37% in LC, 2.81% in OC and 0.58% overall. Average costs amounted to [symbol: see text] 1.721 for uneventful LC, [symbol: see text] 2.924 for uneventful OC, [symbol: see text] 7.250 for primary, intra-operatively detected and immediately treated BDI [symbol: see text] 9.258 for primary delayed BDI treatments, [symbol: see text] 6.076 for secondary BDI treatments and [symbol: see text] 10.363 for non-BDI abdomino-surgical complications. In conclusion BDI with cholecystectomy reveals to be a serious complication increasing the overall average cost factor ninefold if not detected intra-operatively, in which case the raise is only fourfold. As a consequence BDI should be avoided by all means. In this respect 4 crucial surgical guidelines are emphasised. PMID:12768860

  17. Discriminant analysis of game-related statistics between basketball guards, forwards and centres in three professional leagues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jaime Sampaio; Manuel Janeira; Sergio Ibáńez; Alberto Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was to examine the differences in game-related statistics between basketball guards, forwards and centres playing in three professional leagues: National Basketball Association (NBA, superior level) in the USA, Associación de Clubs de Baloncesto (ACB, one of the best European leagues) in Spain and Liga de Clubes de Basquetebol (LCB, inferior level) in Portugal. We

  18. Safety Guards for Machinery. Module SH-34. Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on safety guards for machinery is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module discusses how machinery can be made safer to use by the installation of safety guards. Following the introduction, seven objectives (each keyed to a page in the text) the student is expected to accomplish are listed (e.g.,…

  19. The TALOS project. EU wide robotic border guard system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michal Tanas; Witold Holubowicz; Andrzej Adamczyk; Grzegorz Taberski

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the TALOS project, which is a new way to use autonomous robotic vehicles to strengthen the security of land borders of the European Union. The existing system, based on a network of fixed Border Guard posts and routine patrols of Border Guard officers becomes obsolete and inadequate to counter present-day threats and in addition is economically inefficient.

  20. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Coast Guard commission pennant. The Coast Guard commission pennant shall have the union part composed of thirteen blue stars in a horizontal line on a white field, one-fourth the length of the pennant; the remaining three-fourths shall...

  1. FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, PLANS AND DETAILS. Plan No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, PLANS AND DETAILS. Plan No. 6754-319, dated August 1, 1933. Construction Division, Office of the Constructing Quartermaster - Hamilton Field, Fire Station & Guard House, Southwest corner of Seventh Street & Hangar Avenue, Novato, Marin County, CA

  2. FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS, AND DETAILS. Plan ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRE STATION AND GUARD HOUSE, ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS, AND DETAILS. Plan No. 6754-320, dated August 1, 1933. Constructing Division, Office of the Constructing Quartermaster - Hamilton Field, Fire Station & Guard House, Southwest corner of Seventh Street & Hangar Avenue, Novato, Marin County, CA

  3. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) EXTERIOR AND MISCELLANEOUS DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  4. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  5. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) CELL BLOCK DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  6. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) FIRST AND SECOND FLOOR AND ROOF PLANS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  7. Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of Fire and Guard House with Communication Center in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1940 architectural drawings by Construction Division, Office of the Quartermaster General) FRONT ELEVATION DETAILS - MacDill Air Force Base, Fire & Guard House, 2709 Florida Keys Avenue, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  8. 30 CFR 57.7013 - Covering or guarding drill holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Covering or guarding drill holes. 57.7013 Section 57.7013 Mineral Resources...Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7013 Covering or guarding drill holes. Drill holes large enough to constitute a hazard shall be...

  9. 30 CFR 77.1011 - Drill holes; guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill holes; guarding. 77.1011 Section 77.1011...UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ground Control § 77.1011 Drill holes; guarding. Drill holes large enough to constitute a hazard shall...

  10. 30 CFR 56.7013 - Covering or guarding drill holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Covering or guarding drill holes. 56.7013 Section 56.7013 Mineral Resources...Piercing Drilling § 56.7013 Covering or guarding drill holes. Drill holes large enough to constitute a hazard shall be...

  11. TITLE: THOR GUARD LIGHTNING PREDICTION SYSTEM OBJECTIVE AND

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    1 TITLE: THOR GUARD LIGHTNING PREDICTION SYSTEM OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE: The University has installed a lightning prediction system manufactured by Thor Guard, Inc. at its Boca Raton campus in order to warn of lightning strike exists. Using a series of strategically located horns and strobes, the system is designed

  12. Health among hospital employees in Europe: a cross-national study of the impact of work stress and work control.

    PubMed

    Pisljar, Tjasa; van der Lippe, Tanja; den Dulk, Laura

    2011-03-01

    This article analyses the effect of working conditions on the health of hospital employees across Europe. Hospital employees often have demanding jobs that increase their stress levels and, consequently, their risk of health problems. Work control - typified by employee autonomy and working time flexibility - helps them cope with high levels of work stress. Researchers have traditionally studied the relationship between working conditions, coping strategies and occupational health from an individual perspective. We argue that the individual work-health relationship is closely connected with the social and institutional context. This study explores how work stress and work control influence the health of hospital employees and aims to understand cross-country differences in this respect. Using data on over 1500 hospital employees who participated in the study 'Quality of work and life in a changing Europe' (2007) in eight European countries, we used ordinal regression analyses to test a range of hypotheses. The results show that work stress has a negative effect on the health of hospital employees, while work control is not found to have any effect on their health. Comparative analyses reveal that the effects of working conditions on health vary across European countries. While working overtime is more closely related to poorer health in Eastern European countries, we found evidence of a positive relationship between job autonomy and health in Western Europe only, indicating that circumstances in the working environment have differing effects on employee health in Eastern and Western Europe. PMID:21330025

  13. 33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.51 Section 125.51 Navigation...Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. (a) Any person whose Coast Guard Port Security Card has been stolen, lost, or destroyed...

  14. 33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.51 Section 125.51 Navigation...Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. (a) Any person whose Coast Guard Port Security Card has been stolen, lost, or destroyed...

  15. 33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.51 Section 125.51 Navigation...Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. (a) Any person whose Coast Guard Port Security Card has been stolen, lost, or destroyed...

  16. 33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.51 Section 125.51 Navigation...Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. (a) Any person whose Coast Guard Port Security Card has been stolen, lost, or destroyed...

  17. 33 CFR 125.51 - Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.51 Section 125.51 Navigation...Replacement of lost Coast Guard Port Security Card. (a) Any person whose Coast Guard Port Security Card has been stolen, lost, or destroyed...

  18. 78 FR 37963 - Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display Cape Fear River; Wilmington, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Display Cape Fear River; Wilmington, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...d) Coast Guard Sector North Carolina...Cape Fear River, All...

  19. A system theoretic safety analysis of U.S. Coast Guard aviation mishap involving CG-6505

    E-print Network

    Hickey, Jon (Jon Patrick)

    2012-01-01

    During a 22-month period, between 2008 and 2010, the U.S. Coast Guard experienced seven Class-A aviation mishaps resulting in the loss of 14 Coast Guard aviators and seven Coast Guard aircraft. This represents the highest ...

  20. The Impact of Influenza Vaccinations on the Adverse Effects and Hospitalization Rate in the Elderly: A National Based Study in an Asian Country

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tza-Ta; Huang, Yung-Sung; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Chou, Pesus; Lin, Chun-Hung; Wei, Chang-Kao; Lian, Wei-Chang; Chen, Ting-Chang; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine the risk of adverse effects of special interest in persons vaccinated against seasonal influenza compared with unvaccinated persons aged 65 and above. Methods We retrospectively observed 41,986 vaccinated elderly persons and 50,973 unvaccinated elderly persons in Taiwan from October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009, using the National Health Insurance database. Neurological and autoimmune disorders and one-year hospitalization rates and in-hospital mortality rates were analyzed according to the vaccination status. Propensity score analysis was used to assess the relationship between adverse outcomes, hospitalization rates, and vaccination status. Results 45% of the elderly received influenza vaccination. Multiple logistic regression showed that the probability of being vaccinated was related to more patients visiting for URI symptoms (odds ratio (OR), 1.03; 95% CI, 1.02–1.03), men (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.12–1.17), increased age (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.02–1.03), and more comorbidities (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.17–1.23). There were no statistical differences in neurological and autoimmune diseases between the vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals using propensity score analysis, but vaccinated persons had a reduced hospitalization rate of 19% (odds ratio [OR], 0.81; 95% CI, 0.77–0.84) for the first six-months and 13% for one-year of follow-up (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.85–0.9). Conclusions Based on data from the one-year follow-ups among 93,049 elderly persons in Taiwan, reassuring results for selected neurological and autoimmune diseases were found among the vaccinated individuals after adjusting other factors. Influenza vaccination decreased the risk for hospitalization. Public health strategies must continue to improve the influenza vaccination rate among the elderly with information based upon tangible evidence. PMID:23209714

  1. A New Guarded Hot Plate Designed for Thermal-Conductivity Measurements at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoarnec, V.; Hameury, J.; Hay, B.

    2015-03-01

    The Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais has developed a new guarded hot-plate apparatus operating from to in the thermal-conductivity range from to . This facility has been specifically designed for measuring medium thermal-conductivity materials at high temperature on square specimens (100 mm side), which are easier to machine than circular ones. The hot plate and cold plates are similar with a metering section independent from the guard ring. The specimens are laterally isolated by an air gap of 4 mm width and can be instrumented by temperature sensors in order to reduce effects of thermal contact resistances between the specimens and the heating plates. Measurements have been performed on certified reference materials and on "calibrated" materials. Relative deviations between thermal conductivities measured and reference values are less than 5 % in the operating range.

  2. 78 FR 24124 - National Guard Bureau Privacy Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ...providing the information. Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA). A written assessment...under 5 U.S.C. 552a. Privacy Impact Assessments are required for all information...Department of Defense Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA)''...

  3. An optimal guarding scheme for thermal conductivity measurement using a guarded cut-bar technique, part 1 experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Changhu Xing [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Colby Jensen [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Charles Folsom [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Heng Ban [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Douglas W. Marshall [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the guarded cut-bar technique, a guard surrounding the measured sample and reference (meter) bars is temperature controlled to carefully regulate heat losses from the sample and reference bars. Guarding is typically carried out by matching the temperature profiles between the guard and the test stack of sample and meter bars. Problems arise in matching the profiles, especially when the thermal conductivitiesof the meter bars and of the sample differ, as is usually the case. In a previous numerical study, the applied guarding condition (guard temperature profile) was found to be an important factor in measurement accuracy. Different from the linear-matched or isothermal schemes recommended in literature, the optimal guarding condition is dependent on the system geometry and thermal conductivity ratio of sample to meter bar. To validate the numerical results, an experimental study was performed to investigate the resulting error under different guarding conditions using stainless steel 304 as both the sample and meter bars. The optimal guarding condition was further verified on a certified reference material, pyroceram 9606, and 99.95% pure iron whose thermal conductivities are much smaller and much larger, respectively, than that of the stainless steel meter bars. Additionally, measurements are performed using three different inert gases to show the effect of the insulation effective thermal conductivity on measurement error, revealing low conductivity, argon gas, gives the lowest error sensitivity when deviating from the optimal condition. The result of this study provides a general guideline for the specific measurement method and for methods requiring optimal guarding or insulation.

  4. Utilization and Expenditure of Hospital Admission in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder: National Health Insurance Claims Database Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Lai, Chia-Im

    2011-01-01

    There were not many studies to provide information on health access and health utilization of people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The present study describes a general profile of hospital admission and the medical cost among people with ASD, and to analyze the determinants of medical cost. A retrospective study was employed to analyze…

  5. Harnessing a Nation's Linguistic Competence: Identifying and Addressing Needs for LOTE in the Tourism and Hospitality Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Shirley; Hatoss, Aniko

    2003-01-01

    Reports research that aimed to identify the foreign language and cross-cultural skill needs of workers in the tourism and hospitality industry in Australia and to develop foreign language competencies for use in industry training packages. Provides evidence for the need for foreign language skills in the industry and gives an account of the…

  6. Resistance to mate guarding scale in women: psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Alita J; Fugčre, Madeleine A; Riggs, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    One individual's actions may affect the evolutionary fitness of another individual. Sexually antagonistic coevolution occurs when one partner's behavior decreases the fitness of the other partner (Rice, 1996). This conflict pressures the other partner to counter these disadvantageous actions. Mate guarding is a mate retention tactic aimed at keeping a partner from cheating. Mate guarding may reduce mate choice, especially for extra pair mates. Therefore, some individuals may resist their partner's mate guarding tactics. We developed a scale to measure resistance to mate guarding and tested it in women (N = 1069). Using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), six theoretically sound factors emerged and explained 69% of the variance. Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed strong support for the six original subscales as well as for the overall scale. The subscales had high reliability. The validity of the Resistance to Mate Guarding Scale was also excellent. Women who stated they used more resistance to mate guarding strategies also indicated that they had partners who mate guarded more, were less invested in their relationships, felt their partners were more controlling, had a more avoidant attachment style, and had a more unrestricted sociosexual orientation. PMID:25647785

  7. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  8. General practitioners' and hospital physicians' preference for morphine or oxycodone as first-time choice for a strong opioid: a National Register-based study.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Karen K; Andersen, Stig E; Moreno, Sřren I; Glintborg, Dorte; Thirstrup, Steffen; Aagaard, Lise

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize first-time oxycodone and morphine prescriptions in outpatients by type of prescriber and naivety in regard to strong opioids. All prescriptions for morphine and oxycodone in Denmark reported to the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics in 2010 were analysed. If a patient had not had a prescription filled for the same drug within the last 2 years, the prescription was defined as a first-time prescription. Patients who had not received a prescription for strong opioids for 6 months prior to the date of redemption were classified as strong opioid naive. The odds ratio (OR) was calculated to investigate whether general practitioners (GPs) and hospital physicians had similar preferences for oxycodone over morphine for strong opioid-naive patients. We included 69,110 first-time prescriptions, of which 59,316 (86%) were for strong opioid-naive patients. Opioid-naive patients received 79% of the first-time prescriptions for morphine and 91% of the prescriptions for oxycodone. Hospital physicians had a greater preference for oxycodone over morphine than GPs (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.29-1.39). However, GPs were responsible for approximately 61% of all first-time prescriptions for both oxycodone and morphine for strong opioid-naive patients. In conclusion, oxycodone is to a great extent prescribed as the first-choice strong opioid, and both GPs and hospital physicians seem to contribute to this prescribing pattern of strong opioids to outpatients. PMID:22805172

  9. 78 FR 11676 - Notice of Inventory Completion: National Guard Bureau/A7AN, Air National Guard, Joint Base...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ...deer, and wolf tooth necklace containing drilled canines; 4 drilled canines; 6 bone awls; 9 polished or worked bone tools; 2 polished small mammal mandibles; 1 worked canine; 2 fish spine needles; 1 antler flaker; and...

  10. Disparities in Health Care Delivery and Hospital Outcomes between Non-Saudis and Saudi Nationals Presenting with Acute Coronary Syndromes in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    AlFaleh, Hussam F.; Al Shamiri, Mostafa Q.; Ullah, Anhar; AlHabib, Khalid F; Hersi, Ahmad Salah; AlSaif, Shukri; AlNemer, Khalid; Taraben, Amir; Malik, Asif; Abuosa, Ahmed M; LA, Mimish; Kashour, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Background Saudi Arabia has a non-Saudi workers population. We investigated the differences and similarities of expatriate non-Saudi patients (NS) and Saudi nationals (SN) presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with respect to therapies and clinical outcomes. Methods The study evaluated 2031 of the 5055 ACS patients enrolled in the Saudi Project for Assessment of Acute Coronary Syndrome (SPACE) from 2005 to 2007. Propensity score matching and logistic regression analysis were performed to account for major imbalances in age and sex in the two groups. Results The mean patient age was 56.2±9.8, and 83.5% of the study cohort were male. SN were more likely to have risk factors of atherosclerosis. ST-elevation MI (STEMI) was the most common ACS presentation in NS, while non-ST ACS was more common in SN. The median symptom-to-door time was significantly greater in NS patients (Median 175 min (197) vs. 130 min (167), p=0.027). The only difference in pharmacological therapies between the two groups was that NS were more likely to receive fibrinolytic therapy. NS were less likely than SN to undergo percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI; 32.6% vs. 42.8%, p=0.0001) or primary PCI (7.8% vs. 22.8%, p<0.001). Hospital mortality, cardiogenic shock, and heart failure were significantly higher in NS compared to SN. After adjusting for baseline variables and therapies, the odds ratios for hospital mortality and cardiogenic shock in NS were 2.9 (95% CI 1.5–6.2, p=0.004) and 2.8 (95% CI 1.5–4.9, p<0.001), respectively. Conclusion Our findings indicate disparities in hospital care between NS and SN ACS patients. NS patients had worse hospital outcomes, which may reflect unequal health coverage and access-to-care issues. PMID:25881231

  11. Increase in anaphylaxis-related hospitalizations but no increase in fatalities: An analysis of United Kingdom national anaphylaxis data, 1992-2012

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul J.; Gowland, M. Hazel; Sharma, Vibha; Ierodiakonou, Despo; Harper, Nigel; Garcez, Tomaz; Pumphrey, Richard; Boyle, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of anaphylaxis might be increasing. Data for fatal anaphylaxis are limited because of the rarity of this outcome. Objective We sought to document trends in anaphylaxis admissions and fatalities by age, sex, and cause in England and Wales over a 20-year period. Methods We extracted data from national databases that record hospital admissions and fatalities caused by anaphylaxis in England and Wales (1992-2012) and crosschecked fatalities against a prospective fatal anaphylaxis registry. We examined time trends and age distribution for fatal anaphylaxis caused by food, drugs, and insect stings. Results Hospital admissions from all-cause anaphylaxis increased by 615% over the time period studied, but annual fatality rates remained stable at 0.047 cases (95% CI, 0.042-0.052 cases) per 100,000 population. Admission and fatality rates for drug- and insect sting–induced anaphylaxis were highest in the group aged 60 years and older. In contrast, admissions because of food-triggered anaphylaxis were most common in young people, with a marked peak in the incidence of fatal food reactions during the second and third decades of life. These findings are not explained by age-related differences in rates of hospitalization. Conclusions Hospitalizations for anaphylaxis increased between 1992 and 2012, but the incidence of fatal anaphylaxis did not. This might be due to increasing awareness of the diagnosis, shifting patterns of behavior in patients and health care providers, or both. The age distribution of fatal anaphylaxis varies significantly according to the nature of the eliciting agent, which suggests a specific vulnerability to severe outcomes from food-induced allergic reactions in the second and third decades. PMID:25468198

  12. Prevalence of erectile dysfunction and associated factors among diabetic men attending diabetic clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mutagaywa, Reuben Kato; Lutale, Janeth; Aboud, Muhsin; Kamala, Benjamin Anathory

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There has been an increase in the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in the general population especially among Diabetic patients. This seems to be neglected problem in low-income countries. This study aims at establishing the prevalence of ED and associated risk factors in diabetic patients attended at Diabetic Clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital. Methods A cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted among 312 diabetic patients attending diabetic clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital between May and December 2011. Results More than half (55.1%) of the patients were found to have some form of ED (12.8% had mild dysfunction, 11.5% moderate and 27.9% severe dysfunction). The severity of ED was correlated with increased age. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that ED was significantly predicted by old age (odds ratio (OR) = 7.1, 95% CI 1.2-40.7), evidence of peripheral neuropathy (OR) =5.9, 95% CI 1.6-21.3), and evidence of peripheral vascular disease (OR =2.5, 95% CI 1.2-5.3). Also longer duration of DM was marginally associated with ED (p=0.056). Patients with ED were also more likely to suffer other sexual domains (p<0.001). No lifestyle factor was associated with ED. Conclusion The prevalence of ED is high among DM patients. Interventions aimed at prevention, early diagnosis and detection of DM and its complications, and adherence to treatment to prevent complications should be implemented. Further studies should emphasize on temporal variation to show true causality of DM on erectile dysfunction. PMID:25170371

  13. 75 FR 38536 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ...Guard [USCG-2010-0586] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting...SUMMARY: The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...discuss various issues relating to national maritime security. This meeting will be...

  14. 75 FR 82039 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ...Guard [USCG-2010-1005] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting...SUMMARY: The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...discuss various issues relating to national maritime security. This meeting will be...

  15. 77 FR 1076 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ...Guard [USCG-2011-0975] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting...SUMMARY: The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...discuss various issues relating to national maritime security. This meeting will be...

  16. 77 FR 25721 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ...Guard [USCG-2011-0975] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting...SUMMARY: The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...discuss various issues relating to national maritime security. The meeting will be...

  17. 77 FR 26024 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ...Guard [USCG-2011-0975] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee AGENCY...2012, a notice announcing a National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...meet in closed session at the National Maritime Intelligence Center and in open...

  18. (Selected aspects of guard-cell biochemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1990-06-21

    Synopsis of progress on current grant. The studies were proposed for five years. The proposal was funded for three years, and I am pleased to report that the proposed experiments have been conducted, in essence, although some protocols were altered as the work unfolded. We found that Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulates in guard cells before it does in other leaf cells during stress imposition. This is an important result that eliminates a long-standing objection to unequivocal assignment of a role to ABA in stress-related decrease in stomatal conductance. We also followed the kinetics of ABA following relief of stress. In a published manuscript, we report values for protoplasts. The results did not permit a conclusion as to the cellular source of ABA. We did not detect physiological isoforms and therefore did not search for phosphorylation or aggregation states. We have been successful in measuring plant cytoplasmic malate concentration, though not in Crassula, which presented intractable technical difficulties. These results lead me to the heretical general conclusion that malate inhibition is not the major single factor that regulates phosphoenolpyruvate. 48 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Status report : guard containment CFD analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-03-03

    Under the auspices of the CEA Cadarache/ANL-US I-NERI project a comprehensive investigation has been made of improvements to the Gen-IV GFR safety case over that of the GCFR safety case twenty five years ago. In particular, it has been concluded and agreed upon [1] that the GFR safety approach for the passive removal of decay heat in a protected depressurization accident with total loss of electric power needs to be different from that taken for the HTRs. The HTR conduction cooldown to the vessel wall boundary mode for an economically attractive core is not feasible in the case of the GFR because the high power densities (100kW/1 compared to 5 kW/1 for pebble bed thermal reactor) require decay heat fluxes well beyond those achievable by the heat conduction and radiation heat transfer mode. A set of alternative novel design options has been evaluated for potential passive safety mechanisms unique to the GFR. In summary, from a technological risk viewpoint and R&D planning, the option which has been identified is the block/plate-based or a pin-based reactor with a secondary guard containment/vessel around the primary vessel to maintain the primary system pressure at a high enough level which would allow primary system natural convection removal of core generated decay heat to be effective. Dedicated emergency decay heat exchangers would have to be connected in a 'failure-proof' configuration to the primary system and have natural convection capability all the way to the ultimate heat sink. What has been collaboratively agreed upon and selected for further development is the natural convection option with a block/plate or pin type derated core and a hybrid passive/active approach.[2] The guard containment will be utilized but it will be sized for an LWR containment range backup pressure (5-7 bars) with an initial pressure of 1 bar. The assessment has shown that a significantly higher back pressure is required for total natural convection driven removal of significant decay heat levels at GFR target power densities. The lower back-up pressure, plus whatever natural convection is available at this pressure, will be utilized to significantly reduce the blower power of the active DHR system sized to remove 2-3% decay power. The objective is to be able to have such low power requirements so that power supplies such as batteries without the need for startup, can be utilized. This lower back-up pressure should be sufficient to support natural convection removal of 0.5% decay heat which occurs at {approx}24 hrs. So there should be no more need for active systems/power supply after the initial period of one day. Furthermore, since there will be a decay of the after-heat from 2-3% to 0.5% in this time period, credit should be taken in probability space for loss of active systems during the 24 hours. The safety approach will then be a probabilistic one. In the future discussions with the regulatory authorities the approach which will then be taken is that this class of decay heat removal accidents should be treated in combination with the PRA rather than solely through deterministic calculations. Work is now ongoing in the U.S.-France I-NERI GFR project to further evaluate this hybrid passive/active approach to heat removal for depressurized decay heat accidents. The objective of the analysis documented in this report is to provide information on local and global temperature, pressure and flow distributions in the guard containment , during steady state, and reactor vessel depressurization conditions due to a small break in the reactor vessel bottom control rod drive system. This is for the 2400 MWt plant option. The results should lead to improved guard containment designs and enhanced margin for safety criteria.

  20. How Accurate is the AHRQ Patient Safety Indicator for Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcer in a National Sample of Records?

    PubMed

    Zrelak, Patricia A; Utter, Garth H; Tancredi, Daniel J; Mayer, Lindsay Grogean; Cerese, Julie; Cuny, Joanne; Romano, Patrick S

    2013-10-01

    In 2008, we conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study to determine the test characteristics of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality patient safety indicator (PSI) for hospital-acquired pressure ulcer (PU). We sampled 1,995 inpatient records that met PSI 3 criteria and 4,007 records assigned to 14 DRGs with the highest empirical rates of PSI 3, which did not meet PSI 3 criteria, from 32 U.S. academic hospitals. We estimated the positive predictive value (PPV), sensitivity, and specificity of PSI 3 using both the software version contemporary to the hospitalizations (v3.1) and an approximation of the current version (v4.4). Of records that met PSI 3 version 3.1 criteria, 572 (PPV 28.3%; 95% CI 23.6-32.9%) were true positive. PU that was present on admission (POA) accounted for 76% of the false-positive records. Estimated sensitivity was 48.2% (95% CI 41.0-55.3%) and specificity 71.4% (95% CI 68.3-74.5%). Reclassifying records based on reported POA information and PU stage to approximate version 4.4 of PSI 3 improved sensitivity (78.6%; 95% CI 62.7-94.5%) and specificity (98.0; 95% CI 97.1-98.9%). In conclusion, accounting for POA information and PU staging to approximate newer versions of the PSI software (v4.3) moderately improves validity. PMID:24118246

  1. 30 CFR 75.827 - Guarding of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...moving equipment. (2) Guarding must be constructed using nonconductive flame-resistant material or grounded metal. (b) Suspended...one-quarter inches (41/4 ?) wide; (v) Made of nonconductive material; (vi) Made of material with a...

  2. 30 CFR 75.827 - Guarding of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...moving equipment. (2) Guarding must be constructed using nonconductive flame-resistant material or grounded metal. (b) Suspended...one-quarter inches (41/4 ?) wide; (v) Made of nonconductive material; (vi) Made of material with a...

  3. Heap/stack guard pages using a wakeup unit

    DOEpatents

    Gooding, Thomas M; Satterfield, David L; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2014-04-29

    A method and system for providing a memory access check on a processor including the steps of detecting accesses to a memory device including level-1 cache using a wakeup unit. The method includes invalidating level-1 cache ranges corresponding to a guard page, and configuring a plurality of wakeup address compare (WAC) registers to allow access to selected WAC registers. The method selects one of the plurality of WAC registers, and sets up a WAC register related to the guard page. The method configures the wakeup unit to interrupt on access of the selected WAC register. The method detects access of the memory device using the wakeup unit when a guard page is violated. The method generates an interrupt to the core using the wakeup unit, and determines the source of the interrupt. The method detects the activated WAC registers assigned to the violated guard page, and initiates a response.

  4. 5. INTERIOR VIEW OF GUARD ROOM, LOOKING WEST Fort ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR VIEW OF GUARD ROOM, LOOKING WEST - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-449, West Side of East Twelfth Avenue, Approximately 300' South of East Twelfth Street & East "I" Street, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  5. 4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CORRIDOR, LOOKING WEST TOWARDS GUARD ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CORRIDOR, LOOKING WEST TOWARDS GUARD ROOM - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-449, West Side of East Twelfth Avenue, Approximately 300' South of East Twelfth Street & East "I" Street, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  6. 20. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM THIRD LEVEL GUARD STATION, CELL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM THIRD LEVEL GUARD STATION, CELL BLOCK 'B' IS ON THE LEFT AND CELL BLOCK 'C' IN ON THE RIGHT - Alcatraz, Cell House, Alcatraz Island, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. 9. Building No. 5, Main Building; Building NO. 9, Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Building No. 5, Main Building; Building NO. 9, Guard House (left). Viewed from across corner Lakeside Avenue and Main Street - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  8. 2. Building No. 1, left; Building No. 9, Guard House, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Building No. 1, left; Building No. 9, Guard House, center; Building No. 5, Main Building, right. View from across Main Street - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  9. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...following are some of the machines which usually require point of operation guarding: Guillotine cutters. Shears. Alligator shears. Power presses. Milling machines. Power saws. Jointers. Portable power tools. Forming rolls and...

  10. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...following are some of the machines which usually require point of operation guarding: Guillotine cutters. Shears. Alligator shears. Power presses. Milling machines. Power saws. Jointers. Portable power tools. Forming rolls and...

  11. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...following are some of the machines which usually require point of operation guarding: Guillotine cutters. Shears. Alligator shears. Power presses. Milling machines. Power saws. Jointers. Portable power tools. Forming rolls and...

  12. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...following are some of the machines which usually require point of operation guarding: Guillotine cutters. Shears. Alligator shears. Power presses. Milling machines. Power saws. Jointers. Portable power tools. Forming rolls and...

  13. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...following are some of the machines which usually require point of operation guarding: Guillotine cutters. Shears. Alligator shears. Power presses. Milling machines. Power saws. Jointers. Portable power tools. Forming rolls and...

  14. U.S. Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Operations

    E-print Network

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Continental Shelf Mapping Bathymetry -2003-2004 -2007-2008, planned for 2009 Seismic -Joint Canadian Coast Mapping Coast Guard Missions Logistics ­ Antarctic re-supply Logistics ­ Arctic re-supply Current Missions

  15. 16. GENERAL VIEW SHOWING SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING, COAST GUARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. GENERAL VIEW SHOWING SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING, COAST GUARD LIGHTHOUSE AND RUBBLE IN FOREGROUND - Alcatraz, Cell House, Alcatraz Island, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. 15. GENERAL VEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING BLUFF, COAST GUARD'S HOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. GENERAL VEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING BLUFF, COAST GUARD'S HOUSE, WARDEN'S HOUSE AND RUBBLE IN FOREGROUND - Alcatraz, Cell House, Alcatraz Island, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. 28 CFR 97.14 - Guard-to-prisoner ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR PRIVATE ENTITIES PROVIDING PRISONER...Guard-to-prisoner ratio. Companies covered under this part...prisoners during transportation. Private prisoner transport companies must ensure that at least...

  18. Pampers: The Launch Of Pampers Rash Guard (A)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Parry

    In this case, students must estimate the size of the market for Rash Guard diapers, a disposable diaper designed to treat and prevent diaper rash. In addition, students must evaluate P&G's proposed price for the new diapers.

  19. INTERIOR TOWER ENTRANCE, LOOKING NORTH. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER ENTRANCE, LOOKING NORTH. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  20. Within compound, from Guard Tower, looking north Beale Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, from Guard Tower, looking north - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  1. PARTS WASHING ALTERNATIVES STUDY - UNITED STATES COAST GUARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report has been written to assist the United States Coast Guard (USCG) industrial managers in determining the most cost effective and environmentally acceptable parts washing alternatives for their specific applications. An; evaluation was conducted on four different cleane...

  2. 30 CFR 57.12034 - Guarding around lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12034 Guarding around lights. Portable extension lights, and other lights that...

  3. 30 CFR 56.12034 - Guarding around lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12034 Guarding around lights. Portable extension lights, and other lights that by their location present a...

  4. 30 CFR 56.12034 - Guarding around lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12034 Guarding around lights. Portable extension lights, and other lights that by their location present a...

  5. 30 CFR 57.12034 - Guarding around lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12034 Guarding around lights. Portable extension lights, and other lights that...

  6. Mate guarding and frequent in-pair copulation in humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Todd K. Shackelford; Aaron T. Goetz; Faith E. Guta; David P. Schmitt

    2006-01-01

    Cuckoldry is an adaptive problem faced by parentally investing males of socially monogamous species (e.g., humans and many\\u000a avian species). Mate guarding and frequent in-pair copulation (IPC) may have evolved as anti-cuckoldry tactics in avian species\\u000a and in humans. In some avian species, the tactics are used concurrently, with the result that mate guarding behaviors and IPC frequency are correlated

  7. 22. AERIAL VIEW OF SOUTH PART OF THE COAST GUARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. AERIAL VIEW OF SOUTH PART OF THE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING PART OF BUILDING H IN THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER (DOES NOT SHOW BUILDING F). 30X24 inch black and white silver gelatin print. Photographer unknown. Date unknown. 304 - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, Bachelor Officer Quarters, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. Effect of a national primary care pay for performance scheme on emergency hospital admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: controlled longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Mark J; Dusheiko, Mark; Sutton, Matt; Gravelle, Hugh; Doran, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the impact of a national primary care pay for performance scheme, the Quality and Outcomes Framework in England, on emergency hospital admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs). Design Controlled longitudinal study. Setting English National Health Service between 1998/99 and 2010/11. Participants Populations registered with each of 6975 family practices in England. Main outcome measures Year specific differences between trend adjusted emergency hospital admission rates for incentivised ACSCs before and after the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework scheme and two comparators: non-incentivised ACSCs and non-ACSCs. Results Incentivised ACSC admissions showed a relative reduction of 2.7% (95% confidence interval 1.6% to 3.8%) in the first year of the Quality and Outcomes Framework compared with ACSCs that were not incentivised. This increased to a relative reduction of 8.0% (6.9% to 9.1%) in 2010/11. Compared with conditions that are not regarded as being influenced by the quality of ambulatory care (non-ACSCs), incentivised ACSCs also showed a relative reduction in rates of emergency admissions of 2.8% (2.0% to 3.6%) in the first year increasing to 10.9% (10.1% to 11.7%) by 2010/11. Conclusions The introduction of a major national pay for performance scheme for primary care in England was associated with a decrease in emergency admissions for incentivised conditions compared with conditions that were not incentivised. Contemporaneous health service changes seem unlikely to have caused the sharp change in the trajectory of incentivised ACSC admissions immediately after the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework. The decrease seems larger than would be expected from the changes in the process measures that were incentivised, suggesting that the pay for performance scheme may have had impacts on quality of care beyond the directly incentivised activities. PMID:25389120

  9. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, M.Y.

    1996-08-13

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

  10. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, M.Y.

    1995-10-17

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

  11. 33 CFR 125.11 - Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card. 125.11 Section 125.11 Navigation and...125.11 Form of Coast Guard Port Security Card. The Coast Guard Port Security Card issued by the Coast Guard under the...

  12. Size, operational sex ratio, and mate-guarding success of the carrion beetle, Necrophila americana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tania Tracy Knox; Michelle Pellissier Scott

    2005-01-01

    When male insects guard females until oviposition, the benefits from last-male sperm precedence must outweigh the costs of relinquishing additional fertilizations. The profitability of guarding is increased when males guard large, fecund females and when females are scarce because fewer fertilizations are sacrificed. However, the male reproductive success is not only determined by the profitability of guarding but also by

  13. Size, operational sex ratio, and mate-guarding success of the carrion beetle, Necrophila americana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tania Tracy Knox; Michelle Pellissier Scott

    2006-01-01

    When male insects guard females until oviposition, the benefits from last-male sperm precedence must outweigh the costs of relinquishing additional fertilizations. The profitability of guarding is increased when males guard large, fecund females and when females are scarce because fewer fertilizations are sacrificed. However, the male reproductive success is not only determined by the profitability of guarding but also by

  14. 77 FR 60960 - Safety Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ...Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Coast Guard training exercises in Hood Canal, WA. A safety zone is necessary to ensure...Guard exercises of this type in the Hood Canal, on 28 October 2011, and on 08 May...

  15. Compare Hospitals

    MedlinePLUS

    2014 Leapfrog Hospital Survey Results Now Available Thank you for visiting the Leapfrog Hospital Survey Results Website. These results are based on surveys submitted by hospitals across the country that have demonstrated a commitment ...

  16. American Hospital Association

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    Founded in 1898, the American Hospital Association (AHA) is the national umbrella organization that represents a wide range of hospitals and health care networks. While some of the siteâ??s contents are designed for health care professionals and executives, the general public and some scholars will find some of the features, such as their quarterly reports on the latest in hospital trends, quite valuable. A good place to start is the Resource Center section of the site, which contains helpful guides to locating the information on the site itself. There are a number of free resources available here, such as a fact sheet about Americaâ??s hospitals and studies, including â??The State of Americaâ??s Hospitals: Taking the Pulseâ?ť and â??Costs of Caring: Sources of Growth in Spending for Hospital Careâ?ť.

  17. SPERTI Instrument Cell Building (PER606) elevation; plan of Guard House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SPERT-I Instrument Cell Building (PER-606) elevation; plan of Guard House (PER-607); elevations for Pit Building (PER-605) southwest, southeast, and northeast sides. Earthen shield is mounded between back wall of Instrument Cell Building and the southwest elevation of Pit Building. Detail of filtered louver in door of Instrument Cell Building. Idaho Operations Office PER-605-IDO-3. INEEL index no. 761-0605-00-396-109183 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Emerging Infectious Diseases in Free-Ranging Wildlife–Australian Zoo Based Wildlife Hospitals Contribute to National Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Cox-Witton, Keren; Reiss, Andrea; Woods, Rupert; Grillo, Victoria; Baker, Rupert T.; Blyde, David J.; Boardman, Wayne; Cutter, Stephen; Lacasse, Claude; McCracken, Helen; Pyne, Michael; Smith, Ian; Vitali, Simone; Vogelnest, Larry; Wedd, Dion; Phillips, Martin; Bunn, Chris; Post, Lyndel

    2014-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly originating from wildlife. Many of these diseases have significant impacts on human health, domestic animal health, and biodiversity. Surveillance is the key to early detection of emerging diseases. A zoo based wildlife disease surveillance program developed in Australia incorporates disease information from free-ranging wildlife into the existing national wildlife health information system. This program uses a collaborative approach and provides a strong model for a disease surveillance program for free-ranging wildlife that enhances the national capacity for early detection of emerging diseases. PMID:24787430

  19. National Trends over One Decade in Hospitalization for Acute Myocardial Infarction among Spanish Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Cumulative Incidence, Outcomes and Use of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-de-Andres, Ana; Jimenez-Garcia, Rodrigo; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentin; Jimenez-Trujillo, Isabel; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; de Miguel, Angel Gil; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to describe trends in the rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and use of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in patients with and without type 2 diabetes in Spain, 2001–2010. Methods We selected all patients with a discharge of AMI using national hospital discharge data. Discharges were grouped by diabetes status: type 2 diabetes and no diabetes. In both groups PCIs were identified. The cumulative incidence of discharges attributed to AMI were calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status and year. We calculated length of stay and in-hospital mortality (IHM). Use of PCI was calculated stratified by diabetes status. Multivariate analysis was adjusted by age, sex, year and comorbidity. Results: From 2001 to 2010, 513,517 discharges with AMI were identified (30.3% with type 2 diabetes). The cumulative incidence of discharges due to AMI in diabetics patients increased (56.3 in 2001 to 71 cases per 100,000 in 2004), then decreased to 61.9 in 2010. Diabetic patients had significantly higher IHM (OR, 1.14; 95%CI, 1.05–1.17). The proportion of diabetic patients that underwent PCI increased from 11.9% in 2001 to 41.6% in 2010. Adjusted incidence of discharge in patients with diabetes who underwent PCI increased significantly (IRR, 3.49; 95%CI, 3.30–3.69). The IHM among diabetics patients who underwent a PCI did not change significantly over time. Conclusions AMI hospitalization rates increased initially but declining slowly. From 2001 to 2010 the proportion of diabetic patients who undergo a PCI increased almost four-fold. Older age and more comorbidity may explain why IHM did not improve after a PCI. PMID:24454920

  20. The evolution of epilepsy theory and practice at the National Hospital for the Relief and Cure of Epilepsy, Queen Square between 1860 and 1910.

    PubMed

    Shorvon, Simon

    2014-02-01

    In the years between 1860 and 1910, a revolution in epilepsy theory and practice occurred. The National Hospital for the Relief and Cure of the Paralysed and the Epileptic at Queen Square in London was at the center of this revolution. A series of remarkable physicians and surgeons were appointed to the staff. The four greatest were John Hughlings Jackson, Sir David Ferrier, Sir Victor Horsley, and Sir William Gowers. Their lasting contribution to epilepsy is discussed. Other physicians who made notable contributions to epilepsy were Jabez Spence Ramskill, Charles Eduard Brown-Séquard, Charles Bland Radcliffe, Sir John Russell Reynolds, Sir Edward Henry Sieveking, Walter Stacy Colman, and William Aldren Turner. At the hospital in this period, amongst the lasting contributions to epilepsy were the following: the development of a new conceptual basis of epilepsy, the development of a theory of the physiological structure of the nervous system in relation to epilepsy, the demonstration and investigation of cortical localization of epileptic activity, the establishment of the principle of focal epilepsy and the description of focal seizure types, the discovery of the first effective drug treatment for epilepsy (bromide therapy, indeed one of the first effective drug treatments in the whole of neurology), and the performance of the first surgical operation for epilepsy. This paper is based on the 2013 Gowers Memorial Lecture, delivered in May 2013. PMID:24239432

  1. Scrub typhus in the northern provinces of Vietnam: an observational study of admissions to a national referral hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nadjm, Behzad; Thuy, Pham T.; Trang, Van D.; Dang Ha, Le; Kinh, Nguyen V.; Wertheim, Heiman F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of fever in parts of South East and Southern Asia. Little is known about the disease burden in Vietnam. Methods A 2-year observational study of scrub typhus at a tertiary referral hospital in northern Vietnam was carried out. Diagnosis was based on a single serological test in patients with suggestive clinical symptoms. Results Scrub typhus was diagnosed in 3.5% (251/7226) of admissions. Cases occurred throughout the year, with incidence highest in the summer. Although complications were common, mortality was low (1.2%; 3/251). Conclusions These data suggest that scrub typhus is common, with a seasonal distribution in northern Vietnam. PMID:25253616

  2. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in the stomatal response to CO2 will investigate downstream targets of the CO2 response. Success in characterizing a zeaxanthin-dependent CO2 sensing mechanism in guard cells will significantly enhance our understanding of stomatal function and CO2 sensing in plants cells. Further characterization of guard cells acclimation to CO2 should enrich our understanding of plant acclimations and adaptations to their environment, and of possible effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on the vegetation.

  3. OnGuard, a Computational Platform for Quantitative Kinetic Modeling of Guard Cell Physiology1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hills, Adrian; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R.; Lew, Virgilio L.

    2012-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells play a key role in gas exchange for photosynthesis while minimizing transpirational water loss from plants by opening and closing the stomatal pore. Foliar gas exchange has long been incorporated into mathematical models, several of which are robust enough to recapitulate transpirational characteristics at the whole-plant and community levels. Few models of stomata have been developed from the bottom up, however, and none are sufficiently generalized to be widely applicable in predicting stomatal behavior at a cellular level. We describe here the construction of computational models for the guard cell, building on the wealth of biophysical and kinetic knowledge available for guard cell transport, signaling, and homeostasis. The OnGuard software was constructed with the HoTSig library to incorporate explicitly all of the fundamental properties for transporters at the plasma membrane and tonoplast, the salient features of osmolite metabolism, and the major controls of cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentration and pH. The library engenders a structured approach to tier and interrelate computational elements, and the OnGuard software allows ready access to parameters and equations ‘on the fly’ while enabling the network of components within each model to interact computationally. We show that an OnGuard model readily achieves stability in a set of physiologically sensible baseline or Reference States; we also show the robustness of these Reference States in adjusting to changes in environmental parameters and the activities of major groups of transporters both at the tonoplast and plasma membrane. The following article addresses the predictive power of the OnGuard model to generate unexpected and counterintuitive outputs. PMID:22635116

  4. AvantGuard: exploring the distribution of autonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Dov

    2005-05-01

    Every war introduces a new round of tactics and technologies. Our present war might be characterized as a confrontation between the Suicide Bomber and the Unmanned Air Vehicle. AvantGuard models this confrontation and exposes it to study. It is a computer game in which UAVs are used to protect a convoy in hostile urban terrain. Adversaries hide among the residents and prepare an ambush. The operator directs small UAVs and studies the resulting sensor stream. He must find the ambush before the convoy arrives. AvantGuard serves those who seek to improve the effectiveness of the UAV mission. It is an instrument with which researchers can measure performance as they develop new systems. AvantGuard is particularly designed to study the interplay of human supervisor and autonomous UAVs. Its cognitive challenges are organized into distinct tasks. For each task, the autonomy level of the UAV is set independently. Calibrated to established standards, results are easily compared to one another and to the findings of other researchers. By addressing real-world problems, such as battlefield constraints on bandwidth and the limits of machine vision, AvantGuard presents a credible approach to mission simulation, training and eventual execution. By employing sophisticated game techniques, AvantGuard advances an innovative design. By considering the post-combat role of the military, it prepares an instrument to advance the goals of peace as well as those of war.

  5. Description of Hospitalized Cases of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection on the Basis of the National Hospitalized-Case Surveillance, 2009-2010, Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Tomoe; Sunagawa, Tomimasa; Taniguchi, Kiyosu; Yahata, Yuichiro; Kamiya, Hajime; Yamamoto, Kumi Ueno; Yasui, Yoshinori; Okabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-03-23

    This study reports the epidemiological characteristics of hospitalized cases of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection analyzed on the basis of surveillance data collected from July 24, 2009, the date on which the hospital-based surveillance of influenza cases was implemented in Japan, to September 5, 2010. During the study period, 13,581 confirmed cases were reported. Among those cases with information regarding the reason for hospitalization, 39% were admitted to hospitals for non-therapeutic purposes such as medical observation and laboratory testing. The overall hospitalization rate was 5.8 cases per 100,000 population when cases hospitalized for non-therapeutic purposes were excluded. While those aged under 20 years accounted for over 85% of hospitalized cases, the largest proportion of fatal cases was observed in those aged over 65 years. The overall case fatality rate for all hospitalized cases was 1.5%. The year-round surveillance for hospitalized influenza-like illness cases was launched in 2011, and it was expected that this surveillance system could add value by monitoring changes in the epidemiological characteristics of hospitalized cases of seasonal influenza. PMID:25672359

  6. National Data Buoy Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), part of the National Weather Service, is an agency within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and is supported by personnel and ships of the U.S. Coast Guard. NDBC operates automated observing systems that measure environmental conditions from coastal and remote marine areas. These measurements support the requirements of national and international scope and are used for forecasting, public advisories and warning, and in climate and research programs.

  7. ILC TARGET WHEEL RIM FRAGMENT/GUARD PLATE IMPACT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hagler, L

    2008-07-17

    A positron source component is needed for the International Linear Collider Project. The leading design concept for this source is a rotating titanium alloy wheel whose spokes rotate through an intense localized magnetic field. The system is composed of an electric motor, flexible motor/drive-shaft coupling, stainless steel drive-shaft, two Plumber's Block tapered roller bearings, a titanium alloy target wheel, and electromagnet. Surrounding the target wheel and magnet is a steel frame with steel guarding plates intended to contain shrapnel in case of catastrophic wheel failure. Figure 1 is a layout of this system (guard plates not shown for clarity). This report documents the FEA analyses that were performed at LLNL to help determine, on a preliminary basis, the required guard plate thickness for three potential plate steels.

  8. Books or Guards? Charter School Security Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAngelis, Karen J.; Brent, Brian O.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the costs charter schools incur to foster security--a vexing phenomenon when one considers policymakers' and parents' seemingly high and growing want for school safety. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics and Texas, we reveal how much charter schools spend on security, how they put these resources to…

  9. Production of Guard Cell Protoplasts from Onion and Tobacco 1

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Eduardo; Hepler, Peter K.

    1976-01-01

    Guard cell protoplasts (GCP) from young cotyledons of onion and tobacco were isolated in culture microchambers where optimal isolating and culture conditions could be determined in situ. The digestion course was quantified by following under polarized light the loss of.retardation of the birefringent cellulose of the guard cells. The assay showed that driselase has a 5-fold higher cellulytic activity than cellulysin. Driselase is, however, harmful to the GCP. Calcofluor staining was less adequate for establishing digestion courses because it increases sharply after exposing guard cells to cellulysin. Osmotic conditions were crucial for GCP survival. Onion guard cells fragment in the presence of strong plasmolyticum (>0.45 m) indicating cytoplasmic connections between neighboring guard cells and/or cytoplasmic attachments to the wall. Tobacco guard cells plasmolyzed with 0.7 m mannitol revealed several areas of strong attachment to the wall which resulted in severe damage to the cells. Healthy tobacco GCP are obtained by an initial digestion with 4% (w/v) cellulysin in 0.23 m mannitol for 2 to 3 hours followed by an increase in the osmoticum to 0.7 m to stabilize the forming protoplasts. Onion GCP were obtained by digesting paradermal slices with 4% (w/v) cellulysin in 0.23 m mannitol. Protoplasts can be osmotically released by replacing the enzyme solution with 0.23 m mannitol at early stages of digestion. They are also available after prolonged digestion (6-12 hours). Paradermal slices also yield mesophyll and epidermal cell protoplasts but they can be selectively washed away if a pure preparation of GCP is desired. Onion GCP have been kept alive in a simple culture solution for up to 10 days. Images PMID:16659703

  10. Status recognition of isolator based on SmartGuard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanguo; Wang, Binhai; Wang, Zhenli; Li, Li; Zhang, Jingjing; Li, Yibin

    2013-07-01

    This paper concerns the method for checking the status of isolators and is applied in the sequence control in smart substation based on SmartGuard--a mobile inspection robot for substations. It can recognize the status of an isolator through analyzing its feature. We could get the homography matrix by using the SIFT feature between the template image and new acquired image, then get the range of isolator, finally recognize the status of isolator by image processing. The experiment of results proved that the method could recognize isolator status effectively. The substation realizes one key sequence control system through this technology based SmartGuard.

  11. 77 FR 1710 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ...Guard [USCG-2011-0975] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee AGENCY...2012, a notice announcing a National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...and forward progress regarding multiple maritime security initiatives. If you have...

  12. 76 FR 25702 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ...Guard [USCG-2011-0310] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting...SUMMARY: The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...and presentation at the International Maritime Organization (IMO). Agenda (1)...

  13. 77 FR 17491 - National Offshore Safety Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [Docket...National Offshore Safety Advisory Committee...Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Committee...National Offshore Safety Advisory Committee...and gas offshore industry. These meetings...New Orleans Arts Hotel, 700...

  14. Self-reported use of internet by cervical cancer clients in two National Referral Hospitals in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer remains a devastating disease in Kenya accounting for more than 2000 deaths each year. Lack of information on cervical cancer prevention and management has been attributed to the apathy among women in seeking health interventions. Use of internet-based and mobile e-health tools could increase information access among cervical cancer patients. The objective of the study was; to establish the extent of use of mobile phones and internet by cervical cancer patients in accessing information related to cancer treatment and management.; find out the characteristics of patients associated with internet use and identify barriers faced by the patients in internet use. A cross sectional descriptive survey of 199 cervical patients visiting the two main referral hospitals in Kenya was done. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Findings The average length of illness was 2.43 years (SD ± 3.0). Only 7.5 %( n=15) reported to having used the internet as a source of information. 92.5 %( n=184) did not use internet. With Multiple options, 70.9% did not know how to use a computer, 29.2% did not have access to a computer, 14.6% lacked the money to use computers at the local cyber cafe while other barriers identified accounted for 11.1%. Patients reported that the internet had an important role in the management of cancer of the cervix in health education (17.6%), online consultation (14.6%), booking of patients (13.6%), referrals (8.5%) and collecting data (7%). The 96.5% of the respondents who had access to a mobile phone, recommended mobile phones for health education messages (31.7%), reminder alerts for medication (29.7%) and booking appointments (21.6%). There was a statistically significant association between income of the patients and internet use (p = 0.026) in this study. Conclusions There is low level use of the internet by cervical cancer clients attended in Public referral facilities in Kenya. This was attributed to; lack of knowledge on how to use computers and lack of access to a computer. High level of access to mobile phones was reported. This is an indicator of great potential for use of mobile phones in the management of cervical cancer through short messaging services (sms), without internet connectivity. There is even greater potential to internet use through web access via mobile phones. PMID:23046538

  15. Hospital Hints

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hospital. You will need: Bathrobe and slippers (put your name on each item); most hospitals provide special bed ... medicines , including prescription and over-the-counter drugs Your allergies Names and telephone numbers (home and business) to contact ...

  16. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ... to understand an outbreak, such as in a hospital setting. This test is done by collecting a ...

  17. Highland Hospital Human Resources Policy Manual

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Highland Hospital Human Resources Policy Manual Policy Statements Policy #106 Reviewed: 04/26/12 POLICY: This Policy reaffirms Highland Hospital's commitment to nondiscrimination, equal opportunity/religion, color, national origin, sexual orientation, military status, sex, disability, genetic information

  18. 75 FR 9925 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ...Loether, Chief, National Register of Historic Places/National Historic Landmarks Program. ARIZONA Coconino County Flagstaff Southside...County Arizona Army National Guard Arsenal, 5636...10000123 Lake County Forest-Ivanhoe...

  19. 33 CFR 165.152 - Coast Guard Station Fire Island, Long Island, New York-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Coast Guard Captain of the Port or designated on-scene patrol personnel. On-scene Coast Guard patrol personnel include...S. Coast Guard vessel or other vessel with on-scene patrol personnel aboard, the operator of the...

  20. 77 FR 37318 - Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Sound of Independence; Santa Rosa Sound; Fort...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ...Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Sound of Independence; Santa Rosa Sound; Fort Walton Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Coast Guard will enforce a Safety Zone for the Sound of Independence event in the Santa Rosa...

  1. Membrane Transport and Ca 2+ Oscillations in Guard Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael R. Blatt; Carlos Garcia-Mata; Sergei Sokolovski

    Since the 1980s, work on ion transport and the control of guard cell ion channels has provided a wealth of information that is still unparalleled in plant biology, driven primarily by electrophysiological studies and, more recently, by molecular genetics and cell biology. We know now sufficient detail of all of the major transport pathways at the plasma membrane to encapsulate

  2. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...850.25 using the procedures in 46 CFR 4.01-1 through 4.23-1. (b) The Board may designate a person or persons to participate...additional evidence the Board may acquire under its own authority. (f) An investigation by the Coast Guard under this section is...

  3. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...850.25 using the procedures in 46 CFR 4.01-1 through 4.23-1. (b) The Board may designate a person or persons to participate...additional evidence the Board may acquire under its own authority. (f) An investigation by the Coast Guard under this section is...

  4. Wax combs mediate nestmate recognition by guard honeybees

    E-print Network

    Wenseleers, Tom

    Wax combs mediate nestmate recognition by guard honeybees PATRIZIA D'ETTORRE*, TOM WENSELEERS of colony odour in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. However, many of these studies were conducted). The honeybee, Apis mellifera, is an important model sys- tem for studying nestmate recognition and its

  5. 33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01...67.50-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...nautical mile of Traffic Separation Scheme Los Angeles/Long Beach will also be subject...

  6. 33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01...67.50-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...nautical mile of Traffic Separation Scheme Los Angeles/Long Beach will also be subject...

  7. 33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01...67.50-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...nautical mile of Traffic Separation Scheme Los Angeles/Long Beach will also be subject...

  8. 33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01...67.50-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...nautical mile of Traffic Separation Scheme Los Angeles/Long Beach will also be subject...

  9. 33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01...67.50-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...nautical mile of Traffic Separation Scheme Los Angeles/Long Beach will also be subject...

  10. VIEW OF ENTRY TO HOUSING AREA, SHOWING MARINE GUARD POSTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ENTRY TO HOUSING AREA, SHOWING MARINE GUARD POSTED ON ACACIA ROAD. VIEW FACING NORTH - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. US COAST GUARD/EPA EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM JURISDICTIONAL BOUNDARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This line coverage represents the United States Coast Guard(USCG)/Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9 Geographic/Jurisdictional Boundary located in California. The boundary was determined from the text description provided in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region...

  12. Mate guarding and gallivanting by male hoary marmots ( Marmota caligata )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David P. Barash

    1981-01-01

    Seven years data on the vernal behavior of hoarty marmots, Marmota caligata, suggest that males engage in a two-part reproductive strategy, which consists of guarding their mates against possible copulation with additional males, and also gallivanting — wandering about in search of additional reproductive opportunities for themselves. Data are presented which support seven predictions derived from the assumption that mate

  13. Within compound, from Guard Tower (Building 5762), looking southwest, Technical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, from Guard Tower (Building 5762), looking southwest, Technical Equipment Building (Building 5760) to left, Microwave Tower (associated with Building 5769) and Civil Engineering Storage Building (Building 5766) to left - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  14. Guarded commands, nondeterminacy and formal derivation of programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edsger W. Dijkstra

    1975-01-01

    So-called “guarded commands” are introduced as a building block for alternative and repetitive constructs that allow nondeterministic program components for which at least the activity evoked, but possibly even the final state, is not necessarily uniquely determined by the initial state. For the formal derivation of programs expressed in terms of these constructs, a calculus will be be shown.

  15. Within compound, from Guard Tower, looking southeast, Power Plant (Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, from Guard Tower, looking southeast, Power Plant (Building 5761) to left, Satellite Communications Terminal (Building 5771) center, Supply Warehouse (Building 5768) to left - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  16. Within compound, looking southwest, Guard Tower (Building 5762) and Technical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, looking southwest, Guard Tower (Building 5762) and Technical Equipment Building (Building 5760) - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  17. Within compound, looking northwest, Power Plant (Building 5761) and Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Within compound, looking northwest, Power Plant (Building 5761) and Guard Tower (Building 5762) to left, Electrical Substation to right - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  18. Development of Jumping Mechanism for a Portable Guard Robot

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Byeong-Sang Kim; Ki-Seok Kim; Deog-In Min; Jae-Bok Song

    2008-01-01

    A guard robot should be small-sized and lightweight to increase its portability. In addition, it should be able to overcome relatively high obstacles to cope with different situations. A small two-wheeled robot capable of jumping can satisfy these requirements because the jumping robot can reach a high place more rapidly than other locomotion methods. This research proposes a small robot

  19. 33 CFR 140.101 - Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors or Minerals Management Service inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors or Minerals Management Service inspectors. 140...Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors or Minerals Management Service inspectors. ...activities is subject to inspection by the Minerals Management Service (MMS)....

  20. 46 CFR 10.408 - Coast Guard-accepted training other than approved courses and programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Coast Guard-accepted training other than approved courses and programs...SEAMEN MERCHANT MARINER CREDENTIAL Training Courses and Programs § 10.408 Coast Guard-accepted training other than approved courses and...

  1. 99. Catalog HHistory 1, C.C.C., 23 Guard Rail Construction, Negative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. Catalog H-History 1, C.C.C., 23 Guard Rail Construction, Negative No. P455e (Photographer and date unknown) GUARD RAIL INSTALLATION. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

  2. 76 FR 13508 - Ninth Coast Guard District Sector Realignment; Northern Lake Michigan and Lake Huron

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ...Ninth Coast Guard District Sector Realignment; Northern Lake Michigan and Lake Huron AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final Rule...reflect the realignment of boundaries shared among Sector Lake Michigan, Sector Detroit, and Sector Sault Ste....

  3. 30 CFR 56.12023 - Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. 56.12023 Section 56.12023 Mineral...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. Electrical connections and resistor grids that are difficult or impractical to...

  4. 30 CFR 57.12023 - Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. 57.12023 Section 57.12023 Mineral...Guarding electrical connections and resistor grids. Electrical connections and resistor grids that are difficult or impractical to...

  5. 49 CFR 571.223 - Standard No. 223; Rear impact guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...perpendicular to the longitudinal vertical plane passing through the longitudinal centerline...projected horizontally on a transverse vertical plane. Those installation instructions or...guard width from the vertical longitudinal plane passing through center of the guard;...

  6. Patient evaluation of hospital outcomes: an analysis of open-ended comments from extreme clusters in a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Hilde Hestad; Bjertnćs, Řyvind Andresen; Skudal, Kjersti Eeg

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A recent study identified patients in six distinct response groups based on their evaluations of outcomes related to overall satisfaction, malpractice and benefit of treatment. This study validates the response clusters by analysing and comparing open-ended comments from the extreme positive and extreme negative response groups. Design Qualitative content analysis. Setting Data from open-ended comment fields provided by patients who completed a national patient-experience survey carried out in Norway in 2011. 10?514 patients responded to the questionnaire and 3233 provided comments. A random sample of 50 open-ended comments from respondents representing cluster 1 (‘excellent services’), cluster 5 (‘services have clear improvement needs’) and outliers (‘very poor services’) was reviewed. Results 3 distinct patient profiles were identified. More than half of the comments in cluster 1 included descriptions of positive healthcare experiences, one addressed patient safety issues. Only 1 of the comments in cluster 5 was positive, and 12 were related to safety. All comments from the outliers were negative, and more than three-quarters reported experiences related to malpractice or adverse events. Recurring themes did not differ significantly between the three respondent groups, but significant differences were found for the descriptions and severity of the experiences. Conclusions Patients in negative response groups had distinct and much poorer healthcare descriptions than those in the extreme positive group, supporting the interpretation of quality differences between these groups. Further research should assess ways of combining statistical cluster information and qualitative comments, which could be used for local quality improvement and public reporting. PMID:24879826

  7. An investigation into the level and impact of merger activity amongst hospitals in the UK's National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Cereste, Marco; Doherty, Neil F; Travers, Cheryl J

    2003-01-01

    Since 1990 the National Health Service (NHS) has undergone a sustained period of change. This change has been necessary to prepare the NHS for the task of meeting a demand for services that continues to rise more rapidly than the availability of resources. Anecdotal evidence suggests that one of the most popular ways for trusts to improve their ability to meet demand is through mergers with other trusts. However, little rigorous research has been conducted to assess the extent or effectiveness of this strategy. A research project was, therefore, initiated to better understand the extent and impact of merger activity within the NHS. A questionnaire was developed and distributed to the chief executive, finance director, medical director and human resources director in all the 460 trusts that are currently members of the NHS confederation. In total the survey generated 459 responses out of a possible total of 1,840; an encouraging response rate of 25 per cent. The results of this research provide significant new evidence that "merger mania" has taken hold within the NHS. While 46 per cent of all responding trusts indicated that they had already merged, are actively involved in a merger, proposing to merge or are talking to prospective partners, a further 18.7 per cent of all trusts are forming strategic alliances rather than opting for a full merger. The dominant justification for merging are the beliefs that it will facilitate the reconfiguration of services and ultimately improve patient care. The paper concludes with a discussion of the significance of these results, before making recommendations with regard to their implications for future merger activity within the NHS. PMID:12800277

  8. Prevalence and risk factors for Giardia spp. infection in a large national sample of pet dogs visiting veterinary hospitals in the United States (2003-2009).

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ahmed S; Glickman, Larry T; Camp, Joseph W; Lund, Elizabeth; Moore, George E

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of the prevalence of intestinal infection of dogs with Giardia spp. in the United States vary widely. Risk factors for infection in a large sample of dogs over an extended period of time have not been well characterized. A national, electronic database of medical records was used to estimate the prevalence and identify risk factors for Giardia spp. infection among dogs visiting Banfield Pet Hospital™ located in 43 states in the United States. The overall prevalence of Giardia spp. Infection was 0.44% (95% CI: 0.43-0.45%) in approximately 2.5 million owned dogs who had a fecal flotation test performed from January 2003 to December 2009. A steady decrease in annual prevalence was observed, from a high of 0.61% in 2003 to 0.27% in 2009. Seasonal increases in prevalence were noted during the winter and summer months. Giardia spp. prevalence was highest in the Mountain region, especially Colorado (2.63%; 95% CI: 2.53-2.73%), and in puppies ?0.5 year of age (0.63%; 95% CI: 0.61-0.64%). It was lowest for dogs of mixed breeding compared with pure breeds. Infection risk was 25-30% greater in sexually intact dogs compared to spayed and neutered dogs. PMID:23337331

  9. 33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12 Section 125.12 Navigation...Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) The Coast Guard Port Security Card (Form CG-2514) shall be valid for...

  10. 33 CFR 125.17 - Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.17 Section 125.17 Navigation...Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) Only the following persons may be issued Coast Guard Port Security Cards: (1) Persons regularly employed...

  11. 33 CFR 125.17 - Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.17 Section 125.17 Navigation...Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) Only the following persons may be issued Coast Guard Port Security Cards: (1) Persons regularly employed...

  12. 33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12 Section 125.12 Navigation...Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) The Coast Guard Port Security Card (Form CG-2514) shall be valid for...

  13. 33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12 Section 125.12 Navigation...Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) The Coast Guard Port Security Card (Form CG-2514) shall be valid for...

  14. 33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12 Section 125.12 Navigation...Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) The Coast Guard Port Security Card (Form CG-2514) shall be valid for...

  15. 33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12 Section 125.12 Navigation...Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) The Coast Guard Port Security Card (Form CG-2514) shall be valid for...

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-19 - Coast Guard District Commander-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander-TB/ALL. 30.10-19 Section 30.10-19 Shipping COAST...Definitions § 30.10-19 Coast Guard District Commander—TB/ALL. The term Coast Guard District Commander...

  17. U.S. Coast Guard cutter personnel on Sweetbriar train their fire ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Coast Guard cutter personnel on Sweetbriar train their fire hoses on a burning pleasure boat in an Alaskan harbor. A U.S. Coast Guard rigid-hull inflatable helps with the fire-fighting effort - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter SWEETBRIER, Cordova, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  18. Mate-guarding courtship behaviour: tactics in a changing world Damian O. Elias a, *

    E-print Network

    Elias, Damian Octavio

    Mate-guarding courtship behaviour: tactics in a changing world Damian O. Elias a, * , Senthurran Published online MS. number: A14-00327R Keywords: jumping spider mate guarding mating tactic multiple vibratory signalling Mate guarding is one of the most common tactics in sperm competition. Males

  19. 77 FR 59083 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ...Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, Washington AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...Guard Ready for Operations exercise in Hood Canal, WA that will take place between Oct 16...exercise in the northern part of Hood Canal, WA. During the exercise, tactical...

  20. 77 FR 26699 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ...Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Guard Ready for Operations exercise in Hood Canal, WA that will take place between May 08...exercise in the northern part of Hood Canal, WA. During the exercise, tactical...

  1. Health Manpower in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losee, Garrie J.; Altenderfer, Marion E.

    This is the first in a series of Division of Manpower Intelligence (DMI) reports designed to contribute to a better understanding of health education and training. This report presents national and regional estimates of the numbers of professional, technical, and other personnel employed in hospitals in the United States. Number of employees,…

  2. Hospitality Management Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…

  3. Health-related quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs at National Referral Hospitals in Uganda: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a devastating disorder that impacts on patients’ quality of life, irrespective of use of anti epileptic drugs (AEDs). This study estimates the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its associated predictors among epilepsy patients receiving AEDs. Methods A total of 175 epilepsy patients already receiving AED for at least 3 months were randomly selected and interviewed from mental clinics at Mulago and Butabika national referral hospitals in Uganda between May - July 2011. A HRQOL index, the primary outcome, was constructed using items from Quality Of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaires. The internal consistency and adequacy of these items was also computed using Cronbach's alpha and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin tests. Partial correlations were used to evaluate the contribution of the health dimensions (mental, psychological, social, physical functioning and emotional well being) and, multiple linear regressions to determine factors independently associated with HRQOL. Results Just about half of the respondents (54%) were males, and nearly two thirds (62%) had received AEDs for at least 12 months. The average age was 26.6 years (SD?=?11.1). The overall HRQOL mean score was 58 (SD?=?13) on a scale of 0–100. The average scores of different dimensions or subscales ranged from 41 (physical) to 65 (psychological). At least three quarters (75%) of all subscales had good internal consistency and adequacy. The largest variations in the overall HRQOL were explained by social and mental functioning; each accounting for about 30% of the difference in the HRQOL but seizure control features explained a little (6%) variation. Factors negatively associated with HRQOL were poly-therapy (-1.16, p?=?0.01) and frequency of seizures (-2.29, p?=?0.00). Other factors associated with overall HRQOL included drug side effects, sex, marital status and education. Duration on AEDs was not a significant predictor of HRQOL. Conclusion The HRQOL for epilepsy patients on AEDs is very low. The predictors of low HRQOL were socio factors (marital status, education) and drug side effects, frequency of seizure, and type of therapy. PMID:24725904

  4. National drought atlas developed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Werick; G. E. Willeke; N. B. Guttman; J. R. M. Hosking; J. R. Wallis

    1994-01-01

    A National Drought Atlas for the United States is nearing completion. The idea for the atlas was inspired by the severe droughts that plagued parts of the country from 1987 to 1989, covering much of the Great Plains states, the Ohio Valley, and the southeast. In California, the drought lasted 6 years. In general, water managers were caught off-guard by

  5. 78 FR 43865 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ...at the hearings. Agenda On July 29, 2013 and July 31, 2013, a subset of members from the Commission will tour Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and Ohio Air National Guard Wings at Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base, Springfield Air...

  6. GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS; SECOND FLOOR PLAN AND DOOR FRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD HOUSE AND BARRACKS; SECOND FLOOR PLAN AND DOOR FRAME AND WINDOW DETAILS. Navy Department, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Navy Yard, Mar Island, CA. Albert F. Roller, Architect, San Francisco, CA. H.J. Brunnier, Structural Engineer, Sharon Building, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 2 of 15, accompanying specification Noy-4675. Submitted May 8, 1941, last revised July 14, 1941. Yards & Docks drawing no. 160687; P.W. (Public Works) drawing no. 10388-26; file no. 930-CR-4. Scale one eighth inch to one foot (floor plan) and 3 inches to one foot (details). 73 cm x 129 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  7. FastStats: Hospital Utilization (in Non-Federal Short-Stay Hospitals)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pulmonary Disease Pneumonia Family Life Adoption Marriage and Divorce Health Care and Insurance Access to Health Care ... National Hospital Discharge Survey: 2010 table, Number and rate of hospital discharges [PDF - 46 KB] Procedures performed ...

  8. Calibrated\\/guarded hot-box test facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Miller; E. L. Perrine; P. W. Linehan

    1978-01-01

    A hot-box test facility, in which the equipment is capable of operating in either a calibrated or a guarded mode, is described. The basic design consists of a separate cold box, hot box, specimen frames, refrigeration unit, control and data-acquisition panel, and metered box. Both the hot and cold boxes are insulated with low-density polyurethane foam, with an overall minimum

  9. Coast Guard has new tool to counter tanker oil spills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1970-01-01

    A new system, now in the final stages of development, to remove the oil cargo from a damaged tanker may well be critical for use in averting a major pollution incident. The Coast Guard-developed system basically involves the air-drop of pumping equipment and huge collapsible plastic bags next to a stricken tanker. The oil cargo is transferred to the 500-ton-capacity

  10. Topographic and location map of Bonita Point Coast Guard and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Topographic and location map of Bonita Point Coast Guard and lighthouse station, June 1940, this drawing shows the Bonita Ridge access road retaining wall and general conditions at Fort Barry and Bonita Ridge (upper left) before the construction of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  11. MATE GUARDING AND EXTRA-PAIR PATERNITY IN NORTHERN CARDINALS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID F. WESTNEAT

    We studied patterns of mate guarding and paternity in 21 pairs of Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) nesting in~central_Kentucky. DbJA fingerprinting revealed that five of 37 nestlinas (13.5%) resulted from extra-pair fertilizations (EPFs). Of 19 broods sampled, three (16%)-bad at least one extra-pair young. Although our observations of male cardinals making extra-territorial movements suggest that some males in the population may

  12. Automation of a guarded hot plate thermal conductivity instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.L.

    1980-06-01

    The Thermo-Physics Corporation's GP-1800 guarded hot plate thermal conductivity instrument has been automated using a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP 11/35 minicomputer with an Industrial Control Subsystem Remote. Automation included constructing a hardware link between the instrument and the minicomputer system and designing, writing, and documenting software to perform equipment control, data acquisition, data reduction, and report generation. The software was designed and written so that non-programmers can run the thermal conductivity experiment.

  13. Variation in mating systems of salamanders: mate guarding or territoriality?

    PubMed

    Deitloff, Jennifer; Alcorn, Michael A; Graham, Sean P

    2014-07-01

    Two of the most common mating tactics in vertebrates are mate guarding and territoriality, yet much of the research on these strategies has focused on mating systems in birds, despite novel insights gained from studying less traditional systems. North American stream salamanders that comprise the Eurycea bislineata complex represent an excellent nontraditional system for comparing mating strategies because these species exhibit a continuum of male morphologies, diverse habitat associations, and various potential mating strategies. We studied two species within this complex that exhibit the extremes of this continuum, Eurycea aquatica (robust morph) and Eurycea cirrigera (slender morph). The larger head in males of E. aquatica is due to larger musculature around the jaw and may be associated with aggressive behavior. Therefore, we hypothesized that the robust morphology exhibited by males of E. aquatica provides benefits during either territorial defense or mate defense and that males of E. cirrigera would not exhibit aggression in either scenario. We found that neither species exhibited aggressive behavior to defend a territory. However, in the presence of a female, males of E. aquatica were significantly more aggressive toward intruding males than were males of E. cirrigera. Therefore, mate-guarding behavior occurs in E. aquatica, and the enlarged head of males likely aids in deterring rivals. This is the first demonstration of mate-guarding behavior in a plethodontid, the most speciose family of salamanders. PMID:24802291

  14. Peripheral Arterial Disease among Adult Diabetic Patients Attending a Large Outpatient Diabetic Clinic at a National Referral Hospital in Uganda: A Descriptive Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mwebaze, Raymond Mbayo; Kibirige, Davis

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is one of the recognised diabetic macro vascular complications. It is a marker of generalised systemic atherosclerosis and is closely associated with symptomatic coronary and cerebrovascular disease, hence significant morbidity and mortality. Among African adult diabetic populations, screening and diagnosis of PAD is frequently suboptimal. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated clinical factors of PAD in adult ambulatory diabetic patients attending the outpatient diabetic clinic of Mulago national referral and teaching hospital, Kampala Uganda. Methods In this descriptive cross sectional study, 146 ambulatory adult diabetic patients were studied. Information about their socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, fasting lipid profile status, blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and presence of albuminuria was collected using a pre tested questionnaire. Measurement of ankle brachial index (ABI) to assess for PAD, defined as a ratio less than 0.9 was performed using a portable 5–10 MHz Doppler device. Clinical factors associated with PAD were determined by comparing specific selected characteristics in patients with PAD and those without. Results The mean age/standard deviation of the study participants was 53.9/12.4 years with a male predominance (75, 51.4%). PAD was prevalent in 57 (39%) study participants. Of these, 34 (59.6%) had symptomatic PAD. The noted clinical factors associated with PAD in this study population were presence of symptoms of intermittent claudication and microalbuminuria. Conclusions This study documents a high prevalence of PAD among adult ambulatory Ugandan diabetic patients. Aggressive screening for PAD using ABI measurement in adult diabetic patients should be emphasised in Uganda especially in the presence of symptoms of intermittent claudication and microalbuminuria. PMID:25133533

  15. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in Argentinean women attending two different hospitals prior to the implementation of the National vaccination program

    PubMed Central

    Chouhy, Diego; D’Andrea, Rubén Mamprín; Iglesias, Mercedes; Messina, Analía; Ivancovich, Juan J.; Cerda, Belen; Galimberti, Diana; Bottai, Hebe; Giri, Adriana A.

    2012-01-01

    Cervarix vaccine was included in the National Immunization Program of Argentina in 2011 but data about the local distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women exposed to the virus are scarce. This cross-sectional study determined the prevalence and type distribution of HPV infection in unvaccinated women attending routine gynaecological screening in two public hospitals located in Buenos Aires and Santa Fe, Argentina. Socio-demographic, sexual behaviour and co-factors information was obtained from all participants (Buenos Aires, n=429; Santa Fe, n=433). Cervicovaginal swabs were tested with an MY11/09 primer-based assay and with the CUT primer system targeting mucosal/cutaneous HPVs. Participants from Buenos Aires showed significantly higher rates of HPV infection (52.4% vs. 40.6%), of multiple infections (24.2% vs. 16.4%), and of low-risk (20.3% vs. 13.9%) and high-risk types (44.1% vs. 33.3%) than those from Santa Fe. HPV-66 (Buenos Aires: 17%) and HPV-16 (Santa Fe: 8.5%) were the most prevalent types. Novel HPV-66 putative subtype and variants were identified. Vaccine types 16 and 18 were frequent (Buenos Aires: 13.5%; Santa Fe F: 10.2%) but few participants had co-infections with both (Buenos Aires: 1.4%; Santa Fe: 0.2%). A common risk factor for HPV infection was having a new sexual partner in the last year (Buenos Aires: OR 2.53, p<0.001; Santa Fe: OR 1.85, p=0.04). This study provides valuable baseline data for future assessment of the impact of massive vaccination in Argentina and it underlines the use of additional HPV testing strategies, such as the CUT system, for surveillance and vaccinology. PMID:23296573

  16. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in Argentinean women attending two different hospitals prior to the implementation of the National Vaccination Program.

    PubMed

    Chouhy, Diego; D'Andrea, Rubén Mamprín; Iglesias, Mercedes; Messina, Analía; Ivancovich, Juan J; Cerda, Belen; Galimberti, Diana; Bottai, Hebe; Giri, Adriana A

    2013-04-01

    Cervarix vaccine was included in the National Immunization Program of Argentina in 2011 but data about the local distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women exposed to the virus are scarce. This cross-sectional study determined the prevalence and type distribution of HPV infection in unvaccinated women attending routine gynecological screening in two public hospitals located in Buenos Aires and Santa Fe, Argentina. Socio-demographic, sexual behavior, and co-factors information was obtained from all participants (Buenos Aires, n?=?429; Santa Fe, n?=?433). Cervicovaginal swabs were tested with an MY11/09 primer-based assay and with the CUT primer system targeting mucosal/cutaneous HPVs. Participants from Buenos Aires showed significantly higher rates of HPV infection (52.4% vs. 40.6%), of multiple infections (24.2% vs. 16.4%), and of low-risk (20.3% vs. 13.9%) and high-risk types (44.1% vs. 33.3%) than those from Santa Fe. HPV-66 (Buenos Aires: 17%) and HPV-16 (Santa Fe: 8.5%) were the most prevalent types. Novel HPV-66 putative subtype and variants were identified. Vaccine types 16 and 18 were frequent (Buenos Aires: 13.5%; Santa Fe: 10.2%) but few participants had co-infections with both (Buenos Aires: 1.4%; Santa Fe: 0.2%). A common risk factor for HPV infection was having a new sexual partner in the last year (Buenos Aires: OR 2.53, P?

  17. Motivation and values of hospital consultants in south-east England who work in the national health service and do private practice.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Charlotte; Russell, Jill

    2004-09-01

    In the UK, a small private health care sector has always existed alongside the national health service (NHS). The conventional assumption is that doctors who work as salaried employees of the NHS are guided in their clinical practice by professional values which encourage them to put their patients' interests first. A common suspicion is that doctors undertaking fee-for-service practice in the private sector are motivated by self-interest, with commitment to their patients compromised by consideration for their purse. The great majority of hospital consultants are salaried employees of the NHS, but most also undertake some private practice. This paper uses findings from an interview study of 60 surgeons and physicians engaged in dual practice of this kind to investigate their reasons for working in this way and look at how they reconcile their personal, professional and public sector values and responsibilities with the temptations of the market. The existence of the private sector and their own engagement in it was regarded by almost all respondents as a net benefit, not only to themselves and their private patients, but also to the NHS, so long as they handled it properly. The interviews revealed a complex range of beliefs and assumptions through which these doctors justify their activities and a variety of informal principles for dealing with such conflicts of interest as they acknowledge. Neither their values nor their actions can be adequately explained using generic concepts of professional self-interest or public service values without consideration of what such concepts represented in the specific social, economic, professional and policy context of health care in south-east England at the time of the study. PMID:15210095

  18. Management of snakebite cases by national treatment protocol at Jalpaiguri District Hospital in West Bengal in the year 2010--a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Manab Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Snakebite remains a public health problem in India, occurring most frequently in the summer and rainy seasons. Bites are maximal in lower limbs. Victims are typically male and between 17 and 27 years of age. Children and the elderly have higher mortality. The worst affected states are Kerala, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Orissa, Assam and West Bengal. There was no uniform guideline for treatment of snakebite cases. The five common venomous Indian snakes biting humans are common cobra, krait, Russell's viper, saw scaled viper and the hump nose pit viper. Seventy per cent of all snakebites are non-venomous. Even in bites by venomous snakes, envenomation occurs in only 50% of cases. Immobilisation is much more important than tight ligature, which may cause gangrene. Only a minority need antivenom, which is expensive, short in supply and may cause severe reaction. Antivenom treatment is recommended on the basis of local and systemic signs and symptoms and 20 minutes whole blood clotting test (20WBCT). Delay in starting AVS treatment is the main cause of mortality and morbidity. Skin test is of no value. But antivenom should not be used unless specifically indicated. The "Do it RIGHT" approach of national treatment protocol indicates the initial steps to be taken before reaching a hospital or primary healthcare facility. And it resulted in a 66% decline in the amount of ASV administration and an absolute reduction of mortality by 24%. However first aid treatment of the bitten limb/area with broad-spectrum antibiotics, injection tetanus antitoxin and Supportive treatment with blood transfusion, ventilatory support, anticholinesterase and peritoneal dialysis may also be required. PMID:22315862

  19. Trends in Risk of Stroke in Patients with a Hospital Diagnosis of Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: National Cohort Study in Denmark, 1980–2002

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lars Frost; Ljubica Vukelic Andersen; Peter Vestergaard; Steen Husted; Leif Spange Mortensen

    2006-01-01

    Aim: We examined trends in incidence of stroke of any nature (ischemic and\\/or hemorrhagic) in subjects with a hospital diagnosis of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation or flutter in Denmark from 1980 to 2002 by sex, age and conditions of comorbidity. Methods: We identified all individuals, aged 40–89 years, with an incident hospital diagnosis of atrial fibrillation or flutter and no history

  20. American Hospital Directory

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Outpatient Welcome Understanding and using Free Hospital Profiles Free Hospital Profiles How to look up a hospital ... more than 50 hospitals.) How to see the Free Hospital Profile The Free Hospital Profile is displayed ...

  1. Wire Form Fan Guards -08 Series All wire form fan guards are produced in our ISO 9002 certified facility to assure compliance to our rigid specifications.

    E-print Network

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    Wire Form Fan Guards - 08 Series All wire form fan guards are produced in our ISO 9002 certified facility to assure compliance to our rigid specifications. Available for fan sizes 25mm to 254mm designs are welcomed. FAN ACCESSORIES 08245 (25 mm) 08149 (40 mm) 08148 (50 mm) 08147 (60 mm) 08212 (60 mm

  2. Public and private maternal health service capacity and patient flows in southern Tanzania: using a geographic information system to link hospital and national census data

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Patrik; Henke, Stefanie; Sušac, Katharina; Kisanga, Oberlin M. E.; Baumgarten, Inge; Kynast-Wolf, Gisela; Ramroth, Heribert; Marx, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Strategies to improve maternal health in low-income countries are increasingly embracing partnership approaches between public and private stakeholders in health. In Tanzania, such partnerships are a declared policy goal. However, implementation remains challenging as unfamiliarity between partners and insufficient recognition of private health providers prevail. This hinders cooperation and reflects the need to improve the evidence base of private sector contribution. Objective To map and analyse the capacities of public and private hospitals to provide maternal health care in southern Tanzania and the population reached with these services. Design A hospital questionnaire was applied in all 16 hospitals (public n=10; private faith-based n=6) in 12 districts of southern Tanzania. Areas of inquiry included selected maternal health service indicators (human resources, maternity/delivery beds), provider-fees for obstetric services and patient turnover (antenatal care, births). Spatial information was linked to the 2002 Population Census dataset and a geographic information system to map patient flows and socio-geographic characteristics of service recipients. Results The contribution of faith-based organizations (FBOs) to hospital maternal health services is substantial. FBO hospitals are primarily located in rural areas and their patient composition places a higher emphasis on rural populations. Also, maternal health service capacity was more favourable in FBO hospitals. We approximated that 19.9% of deliveries in the study area were performed in hospitals and that the proportion of c-sections was 2.7%. Mapping of patient flows demonstrated that women often travelled far to seek hospital care and where catchment areas of public and FBO hospitals overlap. Conclusions We conclude that the important contribution of FBOs to maternal health services and capacity as well as their emphasis on serving rural populations makes them promising partners in health programming. Inclusive partnerships could increase integration of FBOs into the public health care system and improve coordination and use of scarce resources. PMID:24433944

  3. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID:24918827

  4. Emergency department visits and hospitalizations by tube-fed nursing home residents with varying degrees of cognitive impairment: a national study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous studies indicate that the use of feeding tubes (FT) in persons with advanced cognitive impairment (CI) does not improve clinical outcomes or survival, and results in higher rates of hospitalization and emergency department (ED) visits. It is not clear, however, whether such risk varies by resident level of CI and whether these ED visits and hospitalizations are potentially preventable. The objective of this study was to determine the rates of ED visits, hospitalizations and potentially preventable ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) ED visits and ACS hospitalizations for long-stay NH residents with FTs at differing levels of CI. Methods We linked Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services inpatient & outpatient administrative claims and beneficiary eligibility data with Minimum Data Set (MDS) resident assessment data for nursing home residents with feeding tubes in a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries residing in US nursing facilities in 2006 (n?=?3479). Severity of CI was measured using the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS) and categorized into 4 groups: None/Mild (CPS?=?0-1, MMSE?=?22-25), Moderate (CPS?=?2-3, MMSE?=?15-19), Severe (CPS?=?4-5, MMSE?=?5-7) and Very Severe (CPS?=?6, MMSE?=?0-4). ED visits, hospitalizations, ACS ED visits and ACS hospitalizations were ascertained from inpatient and outpatient administrative claims. We estimated the risk ratio of each outcome by CI level using over-dispersed Poisson models accounting for potential confounding factors. Results Twenty-nine percent of our cohort was considered “comatose” and “without any discernible consciousness”, suggesting that over 20,000 NH residents in the US with feeding tubes are non-interactive. Approximately 25% of NH residents with FTs required an ED visit or hospitalization, with 44% of hospitalizations and 24% of ED visits being potentially preventable or for an ACS condition. Severity of CI had a significant effect on rates of ACS ED visits, but little effect on ACS hospitalizations. Conclusions ED visits and hospitalizations are common in cognitively impaired tube-fed nursing home residents and a substantial proportion of ED visits and hospitalizations are potentially preventable due to ACS conditions. PMID:24650076

  5. 77 FR 59548 - Special Local Regulation Clearwater Super Boat National Championship Race, Gulf of Mexico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ...Regulation Clearwater Super Boat National Championship Race, Gulf of Mexico; Clearwater, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...during the Clearwater Super Boat National Championship Race. The race is scheduled to take place on Sunday, September...

  6. 78 FR 59819 - Special Local Regulation; Clearwater Super Boat National Championship Race, Gulf of Mexico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ...Regulation; Clearwater Super Boat National Championship Race, Gulf of Mexico; Clearwater, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...during the Clearwater Super Boat National Championship Race. The race is scheduled to take place from 9:30 a.m. to 4...

  7. Weekend admission to hospital has a higher risk of death in the elective setting than in the emergency setting: a retrospective database study of national health service hospitals in England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although acute hospitals offer a twenty-four hour seven day a week service levels of staffing are lower over the weekends and some health care processes may be less readily available over the weekend. Whilst it is thought that emergency admission to hospital on the weekend is associated with an increased risk of death, the extent to which this applies to elective admissions is less well known. We investigated the risk of death in elective and elective patients admitted over the weekend versus the weekdays. Methods Retrospective statistical analysis of routinely collected acute hospital admissions in England, involving all patient discharges from all acute hospitals in England over a year (April 2008-March 2009), using a logistic regression model which adjusted for a range of patient case-mix variables, seasonality and admission over a weekend separately for elective and emergency (but excluding zero day stay emergency admissions discharged alive) admissions. Results Of the 1,535,267 elective admissions, 91.7% (1,407,705) were admitted on the weekday and 8.3% (127,562) were admitted on the weekend. The mortality following weekday admission was 0.52% (7,276/1,407,705) compared with 0.77% (986/127,562) following weekend admission. Of the 3,105,249 emergency admissions, 76.3% (2,369,316) were admitted on the weekday and 23.7% (735,933) were admitted on the weekend. The mortality following emergency weekday admission was 6.53% (154,761/2,369,316) compared to 7.06% (51,922/735,933) following weekend admission. After case-mix adjustment, weekend admissions were associated with an increased risk of death, especially in the elective setting (elective Odds Ratio: 1.32, 95% Confidence Interval 1.23 to 1.41); vs emergency Odds Ratio: 1.09, 95% Confidence Interval 1.05 to 1.13). Conclusions Weekend admission appears to be an independent risk factor for dying in hospital and this risk is more pronounced in the elective setting. Given the planned nature of elective admissions, as opposed to the unplanned nature of emergency admissions, it would seem less likely that this increased risk in the elective setting is attributable to unobserved patient risk factors. Further work to understand the relationship between weekend processes of care and mortality, especially in the elective setting, is required. PMID:22471933

  8. Photocopy of plan (in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit Providence, Warwick, RI), U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering, third district, Sandy Hook L/B Station, Fort Hancock, NJ, boathouse, plot plan, floor plan, elevation. & section., November 8, 1963 Proposed boathouse wharf B, L.A.S. building shown on wharf A - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  9. Photocopy of plan (in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit Providence, Warwick, RI) U.S. Coast Guard, shore maintenance detachment, New York, mooring facilities for 110 WPB's Station Sandy Hook, Middletown Township, New Jersey, civil demolition of wharf & pier E December 22, 1988 detail of framing and decking wharf B - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  10. Photocopy of plan (in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit Providence, Warwick, RI), U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering, third district, Sandy Hook L/B Station, Sandy Hook N.J., buoy hoist installation and bldg alterations, January 3, 1952 Details of 4 ton hoist and building, wharf B - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  11. Photocopy of plan (in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit Providence, Warwick, RI), U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering, third district, Sandy Hook L/B Station showing boat basin plan, circa 1945 Detail of western docking structure - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  12. Photocopy of plan (in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in collection of U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit Providence, Warwick, RI), U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering, third district, marine railway, Sandy Hook Station, Ft. Hancock, Sandy Hook, NJ, repairs, plan sections & framing details, wharf B - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  13. The social environment affects mate guarding behavior in Japanese beetles, Popillia japonica

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Yoriko; Kruse, Kipp C.; Switzer, Paul V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the social environment on post-copulatory mate guarding duration in Japanese beetles, (Popillia japonica Newman), was examined in a laboratory experiment. The mate guarding durations of beetles in different sex ratios and densities were observed for 10 hours. Guarding duration was longer when females were larger, suggesting the presence of ‘cryptic’ male mate choice. Densities, but not sex ratio, affected the duration of guarding bouts, with males guarding for longer at higher densities. This result implies that males increase their guarding duration under conditions in which their female may be likely to be encountered by other males. The lack of a sex ratio effect on the duration of guarding bouts is consistent with other studies on this species that indicate males have difficulty distinguishing females from males. Consequently, because the sex ratio on food plants is typically male-biased, a paired male may react just to density, treating surrounding individuals as if they were mostly males. The total amount of time males spent guarding was lower at lower densities and at male-biased sex ratios; this suggests that after ceasing to guard one female, males were less able to find a subsequent mate under these conditions. PMID:16341250

  14. New Approaches to the Biology of Stomatal Guard Cells

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Juntaro; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Kusumi, Kensuke; Iba, Koh

    2014-01-01

    CO2 acts as an environmental signal that regulates stomatal movements. High CO2 concentrations reduce stomatal aperture, whereas low concentrations trigger stomatal opening. In contrast to our advanced understanding of light and drought stress responses in guard cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying stomatal CO2 sensing and signaling are largely unknown. Leaf temperature provides a convenient indicator of transpiration, and can be used to detect mutants with altered stomatal control. To identify genes that function in CO2 responses in guard cells, CO2-insensitive mutants were isolated through high-throughput leaf thermal imaging. The isolated mutants are categorized into three groups according to their phenotypes: (i) impaired in stomatal opening under low CO2 concentrations; (ii) impaired in stomatal closing under high CO2 concentrations; and (iii) impaired in stomatal development. Characterization of these mutants has begun to yield insights into the mechanisms of stomatal CO2 responses. In this review, we summarize the current status of the field and discuss future prospects. PMID:24104052

  15. Randomized trial of a patient-centered hospital unit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane P Martin; Paula Diehr; Douglas A Conrad; Julie Hunt Davis; Richard Leickly; Edward B Perrin

    1998-01-01

    Patient-centered hospital units have grown out of the national trend to greater consumerism, but few of these units have been evaluated rigorously. We used a randomized controlled trial to compare patient outcomes on the Planetree Model Hospital Unit with other medical-surgical units in the hospital. Planetree patients were significantly more satisfied than controls with their hospital stay, the unit's environment

  16. A Forgotten Sector; The Training of Ancillary Staff in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Duncan N.

    A study was made, in England and Wales, of training needs of hospital ancillary staff; it concentrated on a group of hospitals in each of six Hospital Regions. In addition, information was collected at the national level and brief visits were made in other regions. Findings showed large differences in staffing between hospitals of similar types,…

  17. Infectious Disease Hospitalizations Among Infants in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krista L. Yorita; Robert C. Holman; James J. Sejvar; Claudia A. Steiner; Lawrence B. Schonberger

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study describes the burden and epidemiologic features of infectious disease hospitalizations among infants in the United States. METHODS. Hospitalizations with an infectious disease listed as a primary diagnosis for infants (1 year of age) in the United States during 2003 were examined by using the Kids' Inpatient Database. National estimates of infectious disease hospitalizations, hospitalization rates, and various

  18. Energy audits at 48 hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, E.

    1981-11-01

    Staff at the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted energy audits at 48 hospitals in four states (New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee) between 1978 and 1980. Staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ORAU developed and organized a computerized data base containing information from these audits. This paper describes the ORAU audit process; summarizes the data collected from these audits on hospital characteristics annual energy use, and the audit recommendations; and analyzes the audit data in terms of cost effectiveness, type of recommendations, and the relationship between potential energy saving and characteristics of the individual hospital.

  19. The relationship between national levels of unemployment and the rate of admission to mental hospitals in England and Wales, 1950–1976

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graham Stokes; Raymond Cochrane

    1984-01-01

    Using a retrospective design based on archival data the hypothesis that there exists an inverse relationship between the level of economic activity as indexed by the rate of unemployment and the rate of first admissions to mental hospitals was tested. It was found that between 1950 and 1976 other economic indicators (such as economic growth and expenditure on welfare) had

  20. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…