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Sample records for national guard hospital

  1. Successful Army National Guard units: A guard perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A.K.; Saulsbury, J.W.; Schexanayder, S.M.

    1991-10-01

    This project sought to identify factors contributing to a healthy Army National Guard (ARNG) unit. Its results were intended to contribute to a computerized forecasting model under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model, the ARNG Regional Recruiting Potential Model (RRPM), forecasts locations of successful new or modified Guard units. The study was expected to enhance the understanding of what constituents a healthy Guard unit. A Delphi approach was used to define criteria for healthy Guard units and to elicit rankings of those criteria. Two sets of telephone interviews were conducted with a sample of 102 individuals-two battalion-level administrative officers, or their equivalents, in each state in Washington, DC. During these telephone calls, the phrase ``unit supportability`` was used to express the notion of a healthy unit. The first set of interviews obtained background information and respondents` ideas of the criteria that lead to unit supportability and to a lack of supportability. The data were analyzed to develop a list of ten criteria for unit supportability. In the second interview, the same respondents were asked to rank those criteria in order of importance.

  2. Successful Army National Guard units: A guard perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A.K.; Saulsbury, J.W. ); Schexanayder, S.M. )

    1991-10-01

    This project sought to identify factors contributing to a healthy Army National Guard (ARNG) unit. Its results were intended to contribute to a computerized forecasting model under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model, the ARNG Regional Recruiting Potential Model (RRPM), forecasts locations of successful new or modified Guard units. The study was expected to enhance the understanding of what constituents a healthy Guard unit. A Delphi approach was used to define criteria for healthy Guard units and to elicit rankings of those criteria. Two sets of telephone interviews were conducted with a sample of 102 individuals-two battalion-level administrative officers, or their equivalents, in each state in Washington, DC. During these telephone calls, the phrase unit supportability'' was used to express the notion of a healthy unit. The first set of interviews obtained background information and respondents' ideas of the criteria that lead to unit supportability and to a lack of supportability. The data were analyzed to develop a list of ten criteria for unit supportability. In the second interview, the same respondents were asked to rank those criteria in order of importance.

  3. National Hospital Discharge Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS), which has been conducted annually since 1965, collects data from a sample of approximately 270,000 inpatient records acquired from a national sample of about 500 hospitals. Only hospitals with an average length of stay of fewer than 30 days for all patients, general hospitals, or children's general hospitals are included in the survey. Information collected includes diagnoses, surgical and nonsurgical procedures, prescription and over-the-counter drugs, immunizations, allergy shots, anesthetics, and dietary supplements.

  4. 76 FR 58709 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ...our military power, the National Guard and Reserve are vital to our operations...Reserve. The members of our National Guard and Reserve demonstrate the dignity...thanks to the members of the National Guard and Reserve and their...

  5. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel...National Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel...Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard...

  6. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728.25...Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical...Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...

  7. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728.25...Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical...Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...

  8. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728.25...Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical...Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...

  9. Suicide in the Army National Guard: An Empirical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather,…

  10. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Members of Reserve Components, Reserve Officers' Training Corps, Navy and Marine Corps Officer Candidate Programs, and National Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard...

  11. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...pursuant to official orders (Federal status for National Guard) Reserve and National Guard personnel will be reported as...

  12. 3 CFR 8415 - Proclamation 8415 of September 14, 2009. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...September 14, 2009. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2009 8415... Proc. 8415 National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2009By the...the members of the National Guard and Reserve and their...

  13. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...pursuant to official orders (Federal status for National Guard) Reserve and National Guard personnel will be reported as...

  14. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  15. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  16. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  17. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  18. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  19. The “Suicide Guard Rail”: a minimal structural intervention in hospitals reduces suicide jumps

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Jumping from heights is a readily available and lethal method of suicide. This study examined the effectiveness of a minimal structural intervention in preventing suicide jumps at a Swiss general teaching hospital. Following a series of suicide jumps out of the hospital’s windows, a metal guard rail was installed at each window of the high-rise building. Results In the 114?months prior to the installation of the metal guard rail, 10 suicides by jumping out of the hospital’s windows occurred among 119,269 inpatients. This figure was significantly reduced to 2 fatal incidents among 104,435 inpatients treated during the 78?months immediately following the installation of the rails at the hospital’s windows (?2?=?4.34, df?=?1, p?=?.037). Conclusions Even a minimal structural intervention might prevent suicide jumps in a general hospital. Further work is needed to examine the effectiveness of minimal structural interventions in preventing suicide jumps. PMID:22862804

  20. The Mobilization and Return of Undergraduate Students Serving in the National Guard and Reserves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Some reserve and National Guard personnel are enrolled in college. Much like those who choose not to attend college, reservists and Guard members who are students are challenged by issues of separation from family and employment. However, members of the reserves and National Guard who are college students must also separate from their educational…

  1. 78 FR 59153 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ...Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 Proclamation 9023--National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2013 Memorandum of September 20, 2013...Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 By the President of the United...

  2. Suicide in the army national guard: an empirical inquiry.

    PubMed

    Griffith, James

    2012-02-01

    Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather, the primary variables associated with suicide were soldier background characteristics, including age (17-24 years), race (White), and gender (male). Cluster analysis revealed two distinct suicide groups: "careerists" (about one third of all suicides) and "first-termers" (about two thirds of all suicides), each group exhibiting different concurrent behavioral problems. PMID:22288872

  3. Geothermal Retrofit of Illinois National Guard's State headquarters Building

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Mark

    2015-04-27

    The goal of this project was to assess the feasibility of utilizing mine water as a heat sink for a geothermal heat pump system to heat and cool the 74,000 sq. ft. Illinois National Guard State Headquarters’ building in Springfield Illinois. If successful, this type of system would be less expensive to install than a traditional closed loop geothermal (ground source) heat pump system by significantly reducing the size of the well field, thus shortening or eliminate the payback period compared to a conventional system. In the end, a conventional ground loop was used for the project.

  4. 75 FR 58277 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ...National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010 Proclamation 8565--National Farm Safety and Health Week, 2010 Proclamation 8566--National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2010 Presidential Documents Federal...

  5. The US Army National Guard's Mobile Training Simulators Location and Routing Problem

    E-print Network

    Murty, Katta G.

    #12;The US Army National Guard's Mobile Training Simulators Location and Routing Problem Katta G-mail: katta murty@umich.edu, author for correspondence. b US Army Training and Doctrine Analysis Command, WSMR, NM-88002-5502, e-mail: djang@trac.wsmr.army.mil April 25, 2000 Abstract For training National Guard

  6. 75 FR 22829 - National Environmental Policy Act; Final Environmental Impact Statement on U.S. Coast Guard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    .... The Coast Guard published a notice of intent to prepare an EIS in the Federal ] Register (71 FR 14233... SECURITY Coast Guard National Environmental Policy Act; Final Environmental Impact Statement on U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area Operations: Districts 11 and 13 AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...

  7. Response capabilities of the National Guard: a focus on domestic disaster medical response.

    PubMed

    Bochicchio, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The National Guard has a 373-year history of responding to the nation's call to duty for service both at home and abroad (The National Guard Bureau Web site: Available at http://www.ngb.army.mil/default. aspx.). The National Guard (NG) is a constitutionally unique organization (United States Constitution, US Government Printing Office Web site: Available at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/constitution/index.html.). Today's Guard conducts domestic disaster response and civilian assistance missions on a daily basis. Yet, the NG's role, mission, and capabilities are not well-known or understood. The National Response Framework (NRF) places significant responsibility on the local and state disaster planners (Department of Homeland Security: National Response Framework. US Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC, January 2008). The public health professionals are an integral component of the disaster planning community. It is critical that the public health community be knowledgeable of types and capabilities of all the response assets at their disposal. PMID:20349703

  8. 3 CFR 8564 - Proclamation 8564 of September 17, 2010. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...communities, members of the National Guard and Reserve give of themselves...those who serve in the National Guard and Reserve, and we give thanks to...the men and women in the National Guard and Reserve play a vital role in...

  9. 5 CFR 831.306 - Service as a National Guard technician before January 1, 1969.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Service as a National Guard technician...PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT...1969. (2) CSRS means the Civil Service Retirement System. (b)...

  10. Task force St. Bernard: operational issues and medical management of a National Guard disaster response operation.

    PubMed

    Bonnett, Carl J; Schock, Tony R; McVaney, Kevin E; Colwell, Christopher B; Depass, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    After Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast of the United States on 29 August 2005, it became obvious that the country was facing an enormous national emergency. With local resources overwhelmed, governors across the US responded by deploying thousands of National Guard soldiers and airmen. The National Guard has responded to domestic disasters due to natural hazards since its inception, but an event with the magnitude of Hurricane Katrina was unprecedented. The deployment of >900 Army National Guard soldiers to St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana in the aftermath of the Hurricane was studied to present some of the operational issues involved with providing medical support for this type of operation. In doing so, the authors attempt to address some of the larger issues of how the National Guard can be incorporated into domestic disaster response efforts. A number of unforeseen issues with regards to medical operations, medical supply, communication, preventive medicine, legal issues, and interactions with civilians were encountered and are reviewed. A better understanding of the National Guard and how it can be utilized more effectively in future disaster response operations can be developed. PMID:18087915

  11. Learning Without Boundaries: A NASA - National Guard Bureau Distance Learning Partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Susan H.; Chilelli, Christopher J.; Picard, Stephan

    2003-01-01

    With a variety of high-quality live interactive educational programs originating at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas and other space and research centers, the US space agency NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) has a proud track record of connecting with students throughout the world and stimulating their creativity and collaborative skills by teaching them underlying scientific and technological underpinnings of space exploration. However, NASA desires to expand its outreach capability for this type of interactive instruction. In early 2002, NASA and the National Guard Bureau -- using the Guard's nationwide system of state-ofthe-art classrooms and high bandwidth network -- began a collaboration to extend the reach of NASA content and educational programs to more of America's young people. Already, hundreds of elementary, middle, and high school students have visited Guard e-Learning facilities and participated in interactive NASA learning events. Topics have included experimental flight, satellite imagery-interpretation, and Mars exploration. Through this partnership, NASA and the National Guard are enabling local school systems throughout the United States (and, increasingly, the world) to use the excitement of space flight to encourage their students to become passionate about the possibility of one day serving as scientists, mathematicians, technologists, and engineers. At the 54th International Astronautical Conference MAJ Stephan Picard, the guiding visionary behind the Guard's partnership with NASA, and Chris Chilelli, an educator and senior instructional designer at NASA, will share with attendees background on NASA's educational products and the National Guard's distributed learning network; will discuss the unique opportunity this partnership already has provided students and teachers throughout the United States; will offer insights into the formation by government entities of e-Learning partnerships with one another; and will suggest a possible future for the NASA - National Guard Bureau partnership, one potentially to include live multi-party interaction of hundreds of students in several countries with astronauts, scientists, engineers and designers. To inspire the next generation of explorers as only NASA can!

  12. 32 CFR 161.11 - Benefits for National Guard and Reserve Members of the Uniformed Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Table 4 to Part 161—Benefits for National Guard and...members are eligible for benefits as shown in Table 5. Table 5 to Part 161—Benefits for Dependents of National...Stepparent, or Parent by Adoption No 1, 2 2 3...

  13. 75 FR 78978 - Record of Decision for the 158th Fighter Wing's Proposed Realignment of National Guard Avenue and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ...On November 18, 2010, the United States Air Force signed the ROD for the 158th Fighter Wing's Proposed Realignment of National Guard Avenue and New Main Gate Construction, Vermont Air National Guard, Burlington International Airport, South Burlington, Vermont. The ROD states the Air Force decision to implement the preferred alternative (Alternative 1---Realignment of a portion of National......

  14. Staying on Course: Three-Year Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Muller-Ravett, Sara; Broadus, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    High school dropouts face an uphill battle in a labor market that increasingly rewards skills and postsecondary credentials: they are more likely than their peers to need public assistance, be arrested or incarcerated, and less likely to marry. This report presents results from a rigorous evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program,…

  15. Obama victorious Democrat's re-election 'about guarding the change' In Florida and nation

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Obama victorious Democrat's re-election 'about guarding the change' In Florida and nation Written by Jennifer Portman Democrat senior writer Barack Obama swept to victory in 2008, riding into the final days of the campaign, it was not enough to overcome Obama's strategic get-out-the- vote effort

  16. Making the Transition: Interim Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation. [Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Dillon, Colleen

    2010-01-01

    Young people who drop out of high school face long odds of success in a labor market that increasingly values education and skills. This report presents interim results from a rigorous, ongoing evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, which aims to "reclaim the lives of at-risk youth" who have dropped out of high school. ChalleNGe…

  17. Making the Transition: Interim Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Dillon, Colleen

    2010-01-01

    Young people who drop out of high school face long odds of success in a labor market that increasingly values education and skills. This report presents interim results from a rigorous, ongoing evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, which aims to "reclaim the lives of at-risk youth" who have dropped out of high school. ChalleNGe…

  18. 3 CFR 9022 - Proclamation 9022 of September 20, 2013. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proclamation 9022 of September 20, 2013. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 9022 Proclamation 9022 Presidential Documents... the world has ever known. This week, we honor members of the National Guard and Reserve who carry...

  19. Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms among National Guard Soldiers Deployed to Iraq: Associations with Parenting Behaviors and Couple Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewirtz, Abigail H.; Polusny, Melissa A.; DeGarmo, David S.; Khaylis, Anna; Erbes, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this article, we report findings from a 1-year longitudinal study examining the impact of change in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following combat deployment on National Guard soldiers' perceived parenting and couple adjustment 1 year following return from Iraq. Method: Participants were 468 Army National Guard

  20. Maternal and foetal outcome of 206 high risk pregnancy cases in border guard hospital, dhaka.

    PubMed

    Shapla, N R; Islam, M A; Shahida, S M; Parveen, Z; Lipe, Y S

    2015-04-01

    This observational study was carried out to identify the various types of high risk pregnancy and to determine the maternal and foetal outcome. The study was carried out on 206 pregnant high risk women in the Gynecology and Obstetrics department of Border Guard Hospital, Dhaka from January 2012 to December 2012. During mentioned period among 598 pregnant women 206 high risk pregnancy cases were randomly selected. Pregnant women (gestational age from 34 weeks upto 40 weeks) having medical condition and pregnancy related high risk factors were included and uncomplicated pregnancy, pregnancy before 37 weeks, post dated pregnancy were excluded from this study. Data was collected from semi structured history sheet and data analysis done by percentage. High risk pregnant women were grouped into three. Group A and Group B includes pregnant women having medical condition before and during pregnancy respectively. Group C consists of pregnant women had pregnancy related high risk issues. Among 206 high risk pregnancy cases majority 47.57% women had medical condition during pregnancy, 31.55% patient had medical condition before pregnancy. Among them majority 30.58% of the patient suffered from pregnancy induced hypertension, 15.04% patients suffered from gestational Diabetes Mellitus and premature rupture of membranes were 12.13%. In this study majority 43.68% of high risk pregnant patients were in age group of 30-35 years, 19.90% pregnant women were in age group of >35 years and 19.40% were in age group of upto 20 years. Among study groups maximum 65.04% of the patients were multiparous. Among 206 study population 60.19% high risk pregnant women were at term at the time of delivery and 39.8% women delivered their babies preterm. Caesarean section was done in 69.41% of high risk pregnant women. After delivery majority 77.66% women had no complication, only 10.19%, 8.25%, 2.91% and 0.97% high risk pregnant women suffered from fever, UTI, abdominal wound infection and post partum hemorrhage respectively. In this study, among 206 pregnancy cases 91.31% of the neonates had Apgar score >7 and 8.61% neonates had Apgar score <7%, 33.49% neonates had low birth weight and premature 39.80%. During the study period no maternal and neonatal death were observed. PMID:26007267

  1. Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Facility, Installation 25255, Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Rehoboth National Guard Facility (RNGF) in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for ftirther action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the RNGF property, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities under the control of the MAARNG and the past activities contained within that area.

  2. Army National Guard (ARNG) Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) end-user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pelath, R.P.; Rasch, K.A.

    1997-12-01

    The Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) project is designed to identify and develop programs which automate requirements not included in standard army systems. This includes providing automated interfaces between standard army systems at the National Guard Bureau (NGB) level and at the state/territory level. As part of the OSCAR project, custom software has been installed at NGB to streamline management of major end items. This software allows item managers to provide automated disposition on excess equipment to states operating the Standard Army Retail Supply System Objective (SARSS-O). It also accelerates movement of excess assets to improve the readiness of the Army National Guard (ARNG)--while reducing excess on hand. The purpose of the End-User Manual is to provide direction and guidance to the customer for implementing the ARNG Excess Management Program.

  3. SALUTE the KIDS - A Recognition Program For Children of the Army National Guard Soldiers

    E-print Network

    Rook, Michele

    2012-05-31

    the KIDS A Recognition Program For Children of the Army National Guard Soldiers By Copyright 2012 Michele L. Rook Submitted to the graduate degree program in Architecture and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment... to dedicate themselves to our country through the military, but the children don’t have a choice. Children need to be recognized for their sacrifices and time lost. This project will research the need for recognition. Thesis Proposal Salute the Kids: A...

  4. Preliminary assessment report for Kent National Guard Facility (Installation 53065), 24410 Military Road, Kent, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Ketels, P.; Aggarwal, P.; Rose, C.M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Washington Army National Guard property in Kent, Washington. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment.

  5. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Otis Air National Guard (USAF), Operable Unit 3, Falmouth, MA, September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, lies within the boundaries of the towns of Falmouth, Mashpee, Sandwich, and Bourne. The Area of Contamination (AOC) known as Chemical Spill 3 United States Coast Guard (CS-3 (USCG)) is located on Lee Road, in the south central portion of the MMR. The Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) Installation Restoration Program Office at Otis Air National Guard (ANG) Base, Massachusetts.

  6. Coast Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The 11-million gallon Exxon Valdez oil spill highlighted deficiencies in the nation's ability to contain and recover spilled oil. The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 represents a major effort by Congress to address these deficiencies and to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the private sector and the federal government in preventing, preparing for, and responding to oil spills. This report examines the Coast Guard's efforts to avoid unnecessary and wasteful duplication by coordinating with the private sector and others, including federal and state agencies, its plans to buy oil spill response equipment and the new responsibilities the act places on the private sector and the Coast Guard and if these responsibilities call for a shift in emphasis in Coast Guard oil spill response activities.

  7. Line-of-duty injury or illness in an Air National Guard unit.

    PubMed

    Lorich, Michael F; Marshall, Muriel; Walker, William; Clark, Sharon E; Rene, Antonio; Ivanovskis, George

    2002-09-01

    Line-of-duty injuries or illnesses (LODs) suffered by members of Air National Guard units may demonstrate the status of unit safety, unit readiness and deployability, a potentially significant area of unit expenditures, and areas of needed health promotion. This descriptive pilot study was conducted at the unit commander's request to investigate an apparent doubling of the expected number of LODs over a recent quarterly period. Twenty cases were investigated. The vast majority of LODs were musculoskeletal in nature. Decreased fitness level (identified as increased body mass index) among males and increased age were related to increased LODs. Recommendations are given to improve tracking, identify individuals at increased risk, provide pretraining assessment, and institute health promotion focused on musculoskeletal injuries. PMID:12363163

  8. The Predictive Validity of the PTSD Checklist in a Nonclinical Sample of Combat-Exposed National Guard Troops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbisi, Paul A.; Kaler, Matthew E.; Kehle-Forbes, Shannon M.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Thuras, Paul

    2012-01-01

    After returning from an extended combat deployment to Iraq, 348 National Guard soldiers were administered the PTSD Checklist (PCL-M), and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) followed, on average, 3 months later by structured diagnostic interviews including the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) for the "Diagnostic and Statistical…

  9. 3 CFR 8415 - Proclamation 8415 of September 14, 2009. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proclamation 8415 of September 14, 2009. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2009 8415 Proclamation 8415 Presidential Documents... honor at home and in Afghanistan, Iraq, and other regions around the world, and they are willing to...

  10. 3 CFR 8864 - Proclamation 8864 of September 14, 2012. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Proclamation 8864 of September 14, 2012. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2012 8864 Proclamation 8864 Presidential Documents...'s call, and their exceptional service in a post-9/11 world has secured their place alongside...

  11. 3 CFR 8564 - Proclamation 8564 of September 17, 2010. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Proclamation 8564 of September 17, 2010. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010 8564 Proclamation 8564 Presidential Documents..., protect our freedoms around the world, and serve within our borders during times of peace as well...

  12. Staying on Course: Three-Year Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Muller-Ravett, Sara; Broadus, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    High school dropouts face an uphill battle in a labor market that increasingly rewards skills and postsecondary credentials: they are more likely than their peers to need public assistance, be arrested or incarcerated, and less likely to marry. This executive summary summarizes results from a rigorous evaluation of the National Guard Youth…

  13. 3 CFR 8715 - Proclamation 8715 of September 16, 2011. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...million volunteers have worn our country’s uniform over the past 10 years, and thousands have given their lives in Iraq and Afghanistan. Making up nearly half of our military power, the National Guard and Reserve are vital to our operations at home and...

  14. Lifelong Education Needs for Providing Pastoral Care for Post-Traumatic Stress in South Dakota National Guard Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meirose, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout many communities in South Dakota the members of the South Dakota National Guard have been activated to serve in many different parts of the world since 2001. Approximately 20% of these individuals returned to their homes with some degree of PTSD (Hoge, et al., 2004). Pastoral Care has changed since September 11, 2001. The purpose of…

  15. A Study of the Physiological Factors Affecting the Nature of the Adult Learner in the Phoenix Air National Guard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbert, James Brison

    An investigation reviewed current literature in the field of physiological factors affecting the adult learning environment. These findings were compared to the academic learning environment at the Phoenix Air National Guard. The end product was a set of recommendations for management to implement in order to improve the learning climate for the…

  16. Occupational Analysis of Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard Nurses. Final Report for Period January 1974-July 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergmann, Joseph A.; Smith, Michael C.

    An occupational survey comparing active duty and Reserve Forces nurses was conducted to support a Nursing Resources Study Group gathering information on current and future nurse requirements. Job inventory booklets were sent to chief nurses at Reserve and Air National Guard locations which were administered during unit training meetings. Returned…

  17. Reengaging High School Dropouts: Early Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program Evaluation. Full Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Dan; Gardenhire-Crooks, Alissa; Mandsager, Conrad

    2009-01-01

    High school dropouts face daunting odds of success in a labor market that increasingly rewards education and skills. This report presents very early results from a rigorous, independent evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, an intensive residential program that aims to "reclaim the lives" of young people ages 16 to 18 who have…

  18. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan... Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc.... (b) The regulation. (1) During specific, infrequent periods when Military exercises will be...

  19. 33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan... Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc.... (b) The regulation. (1) During specific, infrequent periods when Military exercises will be...

  20. Preliminary assessment report for Redmond Army National Guard Facility, Installation 53120, Redmond, Washington. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ketels, P.; Aggarwal, P.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Washington Army National Guard (WAARNG) property in Redmond, Washington. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Redmond ARNG property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) supply/storage of hazardous materials, (2) weapons cleaning, (3) the underground storage tanks (USTs), and (4) the use of herbicides. These ESOs are no longer active because of the closure of OMS 10 activities in 1988.

  1. Psychiatric distress among spouses of National Guard soldiers prior to combat deployment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mental health functioning of military spouses and intimate partners prior to the combat deployments of their loved ones is poorly studied. Aims Whereas service members and veterans often receive healthcare directly from the military or the Department of Veterans Affairs, family members may be more likely to present in family care settings. An understanding of mental health problems commonly occurring in this population is therefore important. Method National Guard soldiers and their spouses or cohabitating partners (n = 223 couples) were surveyed about mental health symptoms, social functioning and mental health service utilisation one to two months prior to a combat deployment to Afghanistan. Results Screening rates for partner post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, alcohol problems and social impairment were 2.4, 15.3, 3.7 and 10.7%, respectively, and were significantly higher for partners than soldiers with regards to depression and social impairment. The majority of partners screening positive for psychiatric distress did not report utilising mental health services or military support services (i.e. family readiness groups). Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:23997822

  2. Posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and HIV risk behavior among Ohio Army National Guard Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Brandon D L; Prescott, Marta R; Liberzon, Israel; Tamburrino, Marijo B; Calabrese, Joseph R; Galea, Sandro

    2013-02-01

    We examined the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behavior among the Ohio Army National Guard (OHARNG). We analyzed data collected from a sample of OHARNG enlisted between June 2008 and February 2009. Participants completed interviews assessing HIV risk activities defined by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, and were screened for PTSD and MDD based on DSM-IV criteria according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Logistic regression was used to examine the independent and combined effects of PTSD and MDD on past-year HIV risk behavior. Of 2,259 participants, 142 (6.3%) reported at least 1 past-year HIV risk behavior. In adjusted models, relative to soldiers with neither disorder, screening positive for MDD only was associated with HIV risk behavior (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.33, 95% CI = [1.15, 4.71]), whereas PTSD was not significant (AOR = 1.60, 95% CI = [0.80, 3.20]). Participants with both PTSD and depression were most likely to report HIV risk behavior (AOR = 2.75, 95% CI = [1.06, 7.11]). Soldiers with PTSD and MDD may be at greater risk for HIV infection due to increased engagement in HIV risk behavior. Integrated interventions to address mental health problems and reduce HIV risk behavior are in need of development and evaluation. PMID:23417876

  3. Prevalence of mental disorders among high school students in National Guard Housing, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sughayr, Abdulrhman M.; Ferwana, Mazen S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Adolescents experience rapid biological, psychological, and social transitions that can be associated with mental health problems. During the high school period there are also more academic stressors. Objective: (1) To study the prevalence of mental disorders in high school (grade 12) students. (2) To study some related sociodemographic data. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study, using GHQ-28, that included 354 students randomly selected from grade 12 in four high schools – two male and two female high schools – in the National Guard Housing (Iskan), in Kashmalaan (suburb of Riyadh). Results: The overall prevalence of mental disorders was found to be 48% (41% in males and 51% in females); more than 80% of these cases were mild to moderate. Females showed significantly more severe disorders than males (P = 0.017) and students with excellent performance degrees showed a significantly lower rate of mental disorders than others (P = 0.021). However, our study did not show a significant association between psychiatric disorders and other social variables (family size, birth order, and polygamous family) or smoking. Conclusion: The adolescent age groups in our community had high rates of mental disorders, which required more attention from the family, as well as the educational and health institutes in our country. PMID:22518359

  4. A specific labor market comparison of male and female willingness to travel: The case of the Army National Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Daniell, A. ); Bell, S.E. ); Vogt, D.P. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an examination of gender differences in commuting behavior within the Army National Guard. This labor market provides a more level playing field than most for a direct comparison between male and female willingness to travel. In contrast to other studies, we find that women as a group are willing to travel greater distances, in this particular labor market. 9 refs., 1 fig., 10 tabs.

  5. Former warehouse area, site investigation report; Volume 2 (appendices): Buckley Air National Guard Base, Aurura, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-22

    This Site Investigation (SI) Report presents the results of the Former Warehouse Area (FWA) Site Investigation at the Buckley Air National Guard Base (Buckley ANGB or Base) located in Aurora, Colorado. Work was conducted under the Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The purpose of the SI was to confirm the presence and determine the nature of soil and groundwater COPC at the FWA. The FWA SI was accomplished by conducting a sequential environmental field investigation involving a geophysical survey, followed by a drilling and sampling program that included collecting and analyzing soil gas, soil, and groundwater samples within the FWA. This FWA SI report defines the nature of COPC present at the FWA, identifies potential source areas for COPC, and characterizes site geology and hydrogeology. All site investigation activities were conducted in accordance with the Final Former Warehouse Area Site Investigation Work Plan, dated October 4, 1996, prepared by Stone Webster for the Departments of the Army and the Air Force National Guard Bureau. The methods and procedures presented in the Work Plan followed U.S. EPA guidance documents and Air National Guard (ANG) requirements. Detailed background information based on previous investigations conducted at the Buckley ANGB are not presented in this report. Instead, summary information is presented and documents containing the detailed site information are referenced.

  6. Former warehouse area, site investigation report; Volume 1 (report): Buckley Air National Guard Base, Aurura, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-22

    This Site Investigation (SI) Report presents the results of the Former Warehouse Area (FWA) Site Investigation at the Buckley Air National Guard Base (Buckley ANGB or Base) located in Aurora, Colorado. Work was conducted under the Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The purpose of the SI was to confirm the presence and determine the nature of soil and groundwater COPC at the FWA. The FWA SI was accomplished by conducting a sequential environmental field investigation involving a geophysical survey, followed by a drilling and sampling program that included collecting and analyzing soil gas, soil, and groundwater samples within the FWA. This FWA SI report defines the nature of COPC present at the FWA, identifies potential source areas for COPC, and characterizes site geology and hydrogeology. All site investigation activities were conducted in accordance with the Final Former Warehouse Area Site Investigation Work Plan, dated October 4, 1996, prepared by Stone Webster for the Departments of the Army and the Air Force National Guard Bureau. The methods and procedures presented in the Work Plan followed U.S. EPA guidance documents and Air National Guard (ANG) requirements. Detailed background information based on previous investigations conducted at the Buckley ANGB are not presented in this report. Instead, summary information is presented and documents containing the detailed site information are referenced.

  7. Financial Analysis of National University Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Munjae

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper provides information for decision making of the managers and the staff of national university hospitals. Methods In order to conduct a financial analysis of national university hospitals, this study uses reports on the final accounts of 10 university hospitals from 2008 to 2011. Results The results of comparing 2008 and 2011 showed that there was a general decrease in total assets, an increase in liabilities, and a decrease in total medical revenues, with a continuous deficit in many hospitals. Moreover, as national university hospitals have low debt dependence, their management conditions generally seem satisfactory. However, some individual hospitals suffer severe financial difficulties and thus depend on short-term debts, which generally aggravate the profit and loss structure. Various indicators show that the financial state and business performance of national university hospitals have been deteriorating. Conclusion These research findings will be used as important basic data for managers who make direct decisions in this uncertain business environment or by researchers who analyze the medical industry to enable informed decision-making and optimized execution. Furthermore, this study is expected to contribute to raising government awareness of the need to foster and support the national university hospital industry.

  8. NAPPH (National Association of Private Psychiatric Hospitals) statement of principles of psychiatric hospital practice ethics.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    A competitive and dynamic healthcare environment requires that psychiatric hospital administrators and physicians continually monitor their hospital's ability to deliver quality services to their patients. To ensure that hospitals stand for and abide by psychiatric hospital practice ethics, the National Association of Private Psychiatric Hospitals (NAPPH) Board of Trustees has formally approved and distributed to the industry a "Statement of Principles of Psychiatric Hospital Practice Ethics." Adopted at the June 22, 1989, Board meeting, the guidelines not only summarize views long held in the industry, but are a condition of NAPPH membership. Nine critical areas are identified in the NAPPH statement: admissions, advertising, marketing and referral development, resource allocation and appropriateness of care, treatment rendered, patients' rights, family rights and involvement, competition, and financial resources. Central to ethical hospital practice is a moral responsibility--shared among administrators, trustees, physicians and staff--to ensure access to care, quality of care, and fair treatment of patients. NAPPH represents more than 300 private psychiatric hospitals throughout the United States, and the NAPPH mission includes the promotion of high-quality care and treatment, efficient hospital operation, and advocacy for the patients served by its member hospitals. Each NAPPH hospital actively supports the appropriate, safe, and compassionate treatment of the mentally ill. PMID:10296960

  9. 78 FR 42452 - Safety Zone; Kentucky Air National Guard Vessel for Parachute Rescue Jumpmaster Training, Lake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking TFR Temporary Final Rule..., and the use of distress signals of flares, smoke, and water dye during the training operations. DATES... Waterways Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Buffalo; telephone 716-843-9573, email...

  10. Mortality of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Standley, W.G.; Berry, W.H.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-09-01

    Sources and rates of mortality of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. National Guard-authorized activities, including military training, caused the death of three of the 94 (3%) kit foxes radiocollared, and do not appear to jeopardize the continued existence of the population. Predation by larger carnivores, primarily coyotes (Canis latrans), caused the death of 75% of the 32 radiocollared kit foxes recovered dead for which a cause of death could be determined; vehicle impacts, disease (rabies), poisoning, and shooting were each responsible for the deaths of 6.3%. Adult annual mortality rate was 0.47 and the juvenile mortality rate was 0.80, and both rates are similar to rates reported for kit foxes in other locations. There was no significant difference between male and female mortality rates in either age class. The proportions of dead kit foxes recovered in different habitat types were similar to the availability of the habitat types within the distribution of kit fox on the installation.

  11. Seoul National University Bundang Hospital's Electronic System for Total Care

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee Hyuck; Lee, Hak Jong; Ha, Kyooseob; Lim, Cheong; Chin, Ho Jun; Yun, Jonghoar; Cho, Eun-Young; Chung, Eunja; Baek, Rong-Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Chul Hee; Lee, Hai-Seok; Byeon, Nam-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, which is the first Stage 7 hospital outside of North America, has adopted and utilized an innovative and emerging information technology system to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care. The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce the major components of the SNUBH information system and to describe our progress toward a next-generation hospital information system (HIS). Methods SNUBH opened in 2003 as a fully digital hospital by successfully launching a new HIS named BESTCare, "Bundang hospital Electronic System for Total Care". Subsequently, the system has been continuously improved with new applications, including close-loop medication administration (CLMA), clinical data warehouse (CDW), health information exchange (HIE), and disaster recovery (DR), which have resulted in the achievement of Stage 7 status. Results The BESTCare system is an integrated system for a university hospital setting. BESTCare is mainly composed of three application domains: the core applications, an information infrastructure, and channel domains. The most critical and unique applications of the system, such as the electronic medical record (EMR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support system (CDSS), CLMA, CDW, HIE, and DR applications, are described in detail. Conclusions Beyond our achievement of Stage 7 hospital status, we are currently developing a next-generation HIS with new goals of implementing infrastructure that is flexible and innovative, implementing a patient-centered system, and strengthening the IT capability to maximize the hospital value. PMID:22844650

  12. Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

  13. Preliminary assessment report for Fort William Henry Harrison, Montana Army National Guard, Helena, Montana. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    DuWaldt, J.; Meyer, T.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at a Montana Army National Guard (MTARNG) property near Helena, Montana. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort William Henry Harrison property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  14. Bird guard

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Dana M.

    2010-03-02

    The bird guard provides a device to protect electrical insulators comprising a central shaft; a clamp attached to an end of the shaft to secure the device to a transmission tower; a top and bottom cover to shield transmission tower insulators; and bearings to allow the guard to rotate in order to frighten birds away from the insulators.

  15. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The...

  16. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The...

  17. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The...

  18. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The...

  19. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The...

  20. Population trends of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.

    1992-10-01

    Population trends of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1989 through August 1991. Six semiannual livetrapping sessions and eight scent-station survey sessions were conducted. Livetrapping results and radiotelemetry data were used to calculate minimum population size, density, and distribution. A total of 175 individual foxes were trapped 463 times. The number of individuals trapped and minimum population size calculations showed a decline over time. The highest minimum population (109) was observed in winter 1988. Summer 1991 had the lowest minimum population size (45). No evidence was found to indicate that the apparent population decline was a result of military-authorized activities.

  1. Coast Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Meed, R.M.

    1991-10-01

    This paper testifies that water pollution by oil remains significant, and noncompliance with federal regulations to prevent oil pollution continues to be great in the four ports GAO visited. Additionally, the impact of the Coast Guard's efforts to reduce oil spill in unknown because the agency does not compile and analyze inspection and spill data needed to make this determination. Further, the Coast Guard has not been inspecting portions of pipes that transport oil between docks and storage tanks. Coast Guard officials now acknowledge this responsibility.

  2. Cost of Hospitalization and Length of Stay in People with Down Syndrome: Evidence from a National Hospital Discharge Claims Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims to describe the hospitalization profiles which include medical expenses and length of stays, and to determine their possible influencing factors of hospital admission on persons with Down syndrome in Taiwan. We employed a population-based, retrospective analyses used national health insurance hospital discharge data of the…

  3. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850.10 Section 850.10...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard...

  4. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850.10 Section 850.10...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard...

  5. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850.10 Section 850.10...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard...

  6. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850.10 Section 850.10...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard...

  7. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850.10 Section 850.10...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard...

  8. Suicide and War: The Mediating Effects of Negative Mood, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, and Social Support among Army National Guard Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    The mediating effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, negative mood, and social support on the relationship of war experiences to suicidality were examined. The research literature suggested a sequence among study scales representing these constructs, which was then tested on survey data obtained from a sample of National Guard

  9. Critical Needs and Level of Support for the Military Spouse: A Comparative Study of the National Guard and Active Army during the Iraq War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasilas, Cynthia Nikki

    2009-01-01

    National Guard units have been asked to serve in ways never before experienced since the beginning of the Iraq War and throughout the continued war on terror. Multiple deployments, frequent long-term separations from families, communities, and jobs may have far reaching implications. Family Readiness Groups and a climate of support shown by…

  10. Coast Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    GAO found the situation in the Philadelphia and New York ports similar to that in Prince William Sound-neither industry nor the Coast Guard are prepared to respond to major oil spills. This report discusses how this unpreparedness is due to a lack of specificity in the industry and Coast Guard's plan on how to deal with spills of various sizes and Coast Guard authority to require ship owners and operators to have contingency plans or to require changes in existing plans. On the basic of recent experiences, GAO believes that prevention of oil spills rather than responding to them should be the main priority. Experiences in Price William Sound and in Philadelphia, however, show that much needs to be done to improve prevention measures like monitoring and guiding ship movements and using harbor pilots or vessel escorts.

  11. Sound Guard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lubrication technology originally developed for a series of NASA satellites has produced a commercial product for protecting the sound fidelity of phonograph records. Called Sound Guard, the preservative is a spray-on fluid that deposits a microscopically thin protective coating which reduces friction and prevents the hard diamond stylus from wearing away the softer vinyl material of the disc. It is marketed by the Consumer Products Division of Ball Corporation, Muncie, Indiana. The lubricant technology on which Sound Guard is based originated with NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO), an Earth-orbiting satellite designed and built by Ball Brothers Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado, also a division of Ball Corporation. Ball Brothers engineers found a problem early in the OSO program: known lubricants were unsuitable for use on satellite moving parts that would be exposed to the vacuum of space for several months. So the company conducted research on the properties of materials needed for long life in space and developed new lubricants. They worked successfully on seven OSO flights and attracted considerable attention among other aerospace contractors. Ball Brothers now supplies its "Vac Kote" lubricants and coatings to both aerospace and non-aerospace industries and the company has produced several hundred variations of the original technology. Ball Corporation expanded its product line to include consumer products, of which Sound Guard is one of the most recent. In addition to protecting record grooves, Sound Guard's anti-static quality also retards particle accumulation on the stylus. During comparison study by a leading U.S. electronic laboratory, a record not treated by Sound Guard had to be cleaned after 50 plays and the stylus had collected a considerable number of small vinyl particles. The Sound Guard-treated disc was still clean after 100 plays, as was its stylus.

  12. Preliminary assessment report for Wayland Army National Guard Armory (former Boston Defense Area Nike Battery 73), Installation 23295, Wayland, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard property near Wayland, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in respond to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining sites activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Wayland Army National Guard Army property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  13. Reproduction of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, K A; Berry, W H; Standley, W G; O`Farrell, T P

    1992-09-01

    The reproduction of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) was investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 38 vixens radiocollared prior to parturition, 12 (32%) were successful in raising pups from conception to the point where pups were observed above ground. No yearling vixens were known tb be reproductively active. The mean litter size during 1989 - 1991 was 3.0 (n = 21, SE = 0.28) and ranged from one to six pups. Both the proportion of vixens successfully raising pups and the mean litter size observed at Camp Roberts during this study were lower than those reported at other locations. Sex ratios of kit fox pups were male biased two of the three years, but did not differ statistically from 1:1 throughout the study. Whelping was estimated to occur between February 15 and March 5. Results of this study support previous reports that kit foxes are primarily monogamous, although one case of polygamy may have occurred. Both the proportion of dispersing radiocollared juveniles (26%) and the mean dispersal distance (5.9 km) of juveniles at Camp Roberts appeared low compared to other locations.

  14. Blood characteristics of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Standley, W.G.; McCue, P.M.

    1992-09-01

    Hematology, serum chemistry, and prevalence of antibodies against selected, pathogens in a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, in 1989 and 1990. Samples from 18 (10 female, 8 male) adult kit foxes were used to establish normal hematology and serum chemistry values for this population. Average values were all within the normal ranges reported for kit foxes in other locations. Three hematology parameters had significant differences between male and female values; males had higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and lower lymphocyte counts. There were no significant differences between serum chemistry values from male and female foxes. Prevalence of antibodies was determined from serum samples from 47 (26 female, 21 male) adult kit foxes and eight (4 female, 4 male) juveniles. Antibodies were detected against five of the eight pathogens tested: canine parvovirus, Toxoplasma gondii Leptospira interrogans, canine distemper virus, and canine hepatitis virus. Antibodies were not detected against Brucella, canis, Coccidioides immitis, or Yersinia pestis.

  15. Fleas of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, K.A.; Egoscue, H.J.

    1992-09-01

    A total of 3,241 fleas, representing seven species, were identified from 398 samples collected from San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis), California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi), and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 3,109 fleas collected from kit foxes 95.7% were Echidnophaga gallinacea, 4.0% Pulex irritans, 0.2% Hoplopsyllus anomolus, and 0.1% Odontopsyllus dentatus. One male Ctenocephalides fells was also collected from a kit fox. The 118 fleas collected from California ground squirrels consisted of Hoplopsyllus anomolus (55.9%), Echidnophaga gallinacea (37.3%), and Oropsylla montanus (6.8%). The 14 fleas collected from deer mice were Aetheca wagneri. Based on the distribution and abundance of flea species collected, and the vector efficiency of these fleas, it appears that kit foxes could play a role in the transfer of natural vectors of sylvatic plague between rodent populations, if the bacterium responsible for plague (Yersinia pestis) were present at Camp Roberts. Little information regarding kit fox food habits was evidenced by the distribution and abundance of small mammal flea species collected from kit foxes.

  16. Coast Guard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports that about 16,000 oil spills involving the release of more than 46 million gallons of oil took place in U.S. navigable waters in 1988; spills at water-front facilities, where vessels load and unload oil, accounted for about half of the oil spilled. While the Coast Guard acknowledges its responsibility for regulating and inspecting waterfront facilities, it efforts in this area have fallen short because it has not been inspecting portions of intrafacility pipes that transport oil between docks and storage tanks. Water pollution and noncompliance with federal oil pollution prevention regulations continue to be high at waterfront facilities. Yet the Coast Guard cannot determine how effective its inspection program has been in reducing the risk of oil spills because information on program results, such as the types, severity, and frequency of deficiencies found by inspectors, is not compiled an linked with information on the causes of oil spills found by investigators. Until the Coast Guard collects this type of information, it will not be in a position to establish measurable goals.

  17. Trends in Inpatient Hospital Deaths: National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2000-2010

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Has the inpatient hospital death rate decreased for all patients and for those with selected first-listed ... 2010 differ from the length of stay for all hospitalizations? Inpatients who died in the hospital stayed ...

  18. Baseline water-quality characteristics of the Alaska Army National Guard Stewart River Training Area near Nome, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, Josh D.

    2005-01-01

    The Alaska Army National Guard Stewart River Training Area is approximately 23 miles north of Nome on the Seward Peninsula in northwest Alaska. The Stewart River Training Area encompasses much of the Stewart River Basin and a small part of the Snake River Basin. Hydrologic, water-quality, and physical-habitat data were collected at seven surface-water sites within the Stewart River Training Area during the summer runoff months (late-May to early-September) in 2004. Two of the sampling sites selected for this study were on the main stem Stewart River, one at the upstream boundary and one at the downstream boundary of the training area. Continuous hydrologic, precipitation, and water temperature data were collected at these two sites throughout the summer of 2004. Three pond sites, along the upper, middle, and lower reaches of the Stewart River within the training area, were each sampled twice during the summer of 2004 for analysis of water-quality constituents. Two tributaries to the Snake River Basin, Goldbottom Creek and North Fork Snake River, within the Stewart River Training Area boundary, also were sampled twice during the summer of 2004. Water-quality data collected from the Stewart River at the upstream and downstream study sites indicate similar constituent concentrations. Concentrations of most water-quality constituents collected during the summer of 2004 did not exceed standards for drinking water or recreational contact. Analysis of trace-element concentrations in bed sediment samples indicate the threshold effect concentration (below which no adverse effects on organisms is expected) was exceeded for arsenic, chromium, and nickel concentrations at all sample sites within the Stewart River Training Area and cadmium, copper, zinc, and lead concentrations were found to exceed the threshold effect concentration in varying degrees at the sample sites. The probable effect concentration (above which toxic effects on organisms is likely) was exceeded by arsenic concentrations at all sites except the lower pond site. Chromium and nickel concentrations exceeded the probable effect concentration at the upstream Stewart River site and at the North Fork Snake River site.

  19. 49 CFR 850.3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.3 Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation...

  20. 49 CFR 850.3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.3 Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation...

  1. 49 CFR 850.3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.3 Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation...

  2. 49 CFR 850.3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.3 Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation...

  3. 49 CFR 850.3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.3 Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation...

  4. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation...

  5. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation...

  6. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation...

  7. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation...

  8. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation...

  9. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation...

  10. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation...

  11. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation...

  12. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation...

  13. 49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 850.30... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation...

  14. Maternal Clinical Diagnoses and Hospital Variation in the Risk of Cesarean Delivery: Analyses of a National US Hospital Discharge Database

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Arcaya, Mariana C.; Subramanian, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cesarean delivery is the most common inpatient surgery in the United States, where 1.3 million cesarean sections occur annually, and rates vary widely by hospital. Identifying sources of variation in cesarean use is crucial to improving the consistency and quality of obstetric care. We used hospital discharge records to examine the extent to which variability in the likelihood of cesarean section across US hospitals was attributable to individual women's clinical diagnoses. Methods and Findings Using data from the 2009 and 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project—a 20% sample of US hospitals—we analyzed data for 1,475,457 births in 1,373 hospitals. We fitted multilevel logistic regression models (patients nested in hospitals). The outcome was cesarean (versus vaginal) delivery. Covariates included diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy, hypertension in pregnancy, hemorrhage during pregnancy or placental complications, fetal distress, and fetal disproportion or obstructed labor; maternal age, race/ethnicity, and insurance status; and hospital size and location/teaching status. The cesarean section prevalence was 22.0% (95% confidence interval 22.0% to 22.1%) among women with no prior cesareans. In unadjusted models, the between-hospital variation in the individual risk of primary cesarean section was 0.14 (95% credible interval 0.12 to 0.15). The difference in the probability of having a cesarean delivery between hospitals was 25 percentage points. Hospital variability did not decrease after adjusting for patient diagnoses, socio-demographics, and hospital characteristics (0.16 [95% credible interval 0.14 to 0.18]). A limitation is that these data, while nationally representative, did not contain information on parity or gestational age. Conclusions Variability across hospitals in the individual risk of cesarean section is not decreased by accounting for differences in maternal diagnoses. These findings highlight the need for more comprehensive or linked data including parity and gestational age as well as examination of other factors—such as hospital policies, practices, and culture—in determining cesarean section use. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:25333943

  15. [Establishment of national naval hospitals in the XVIII century].

    PubMed

    Kostiukov, A V

    2011-11-01

    The first naval hospitals were established in St. Petersburg, Revel and Kronstadt, Kazan, Revel, Astrakhan and Archangel. The question when the first hospitals were opened is still controversial because of the lack of many documents of those years. Researchers disagree, probably because of the fact that they take into account different timeframes for the project of a hospital corps. Regardless of whether you will find unequivocal, direct evidence for their discoveries in a given year, the value of the old hospital as medical institutions will not change. Much more important is the fact of their education because of intense activity of the domestic fleet. In the creation of naval hospitals as in anything else to take care of the state of preservation, strengthening and restoring the health of personnel, of which largely depended on the readiness of the fleet. PMID:22329177

  16. Final report on testing of ACONF technology for the US Coast Guard National Distress Systems : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Storey, Leanne M.; Byrd, Thomas M., Jr.; Murray, Aaron T.; Ginn, Jerry W.; Symons, Philip C.; Corey, Garth P.

    2005-08-01

    This report documents the results of a six month test program of an Alternative Configuration (ACONF) power management system design for a typical United States Coast Guard (USCG) National Distress System (NDS) site. The USCG/USDOE funded work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories to evaluate the effect of a Sandia developed battery management technology known as ACONF on the performance of energy storage systems at NDS sites. This report demonstrates the savings of propane gas, and the improvement of battery performance when utilizing the new ACONF designs. The fuel savings and battery performance improvements resulting from ACONF use would be applicable to all current NDS sites in the field. The inherent savings realized when using the ACONF battery management design was found to be significant when compared to battery replacement and propane refueling at the remote NDS sites.

  17. Are the nation's hospitals facing a capital crisis?

    PubMed

    Johnsson, J

    1990-07-20

    Are hospitals facing a capital crisis? Wall Street is taking a long, hard look at hospitals' bottom lines--and many analysts don't like what they see. Hospitals' increasing reliance on long-term debt, lower debt-service coverage ratios, and weakening performance indicators all signal a potentially volatile situation for some sectors of the field. Which hospitals are at risk? Experts point to hospitals in Southern California and New York. But others say that hospitals in moderate-size cities with 250 beds and $40 million or more in long-term debt are vulnerable. However, 40 percent of the 600 CEOs who responded to our Hamilton/KSA survey agree that the continued erosion of reimbursement will require a government bailout similar to the savings and loan industry. "A great deal depends on public policy," says Darrel Brownell, executive vice-president and chief financial officer, Memorial Health Services, a two-hospital system based in Long Beach, CA. "The government has the ability to maintain the industry in a stable condition, or it has the ability to force it into a bailout situation." PMID:2370036

  18. Distinct enough? A national examination of Catholic hospital affiliation and patient perceptions of care

    PubMed Central

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Melendez-Torres, G.J.; McHugh, Matthew D.; Wall, Barbra Mann

    2014-01-01

    Background Catholic hospitals play a critical role in the provision of health care in the United States; yet, empirical evidence of patient outcomes in these institutions is practically absent in the literature. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether patient perceptions of care are more favorable in Catholic hospitals as compared with non-Catholic hospitals in a national sample of hospitals. Methodology This cross-sectional secondary analysis used linked data from the 2008 American Hospital Association Annual Survey, the 2008 Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey, the 2008 Medicare Case Mix Index file, and the 2010 Religious Congregations and Membership Study. The study included over 3,400 hospitals nationwide, including 494 Catholic hospitals. Propensity score matching and ordinary least-squares regression models were used to examine the relationship between Catholic affiliation and various HCAHPS measures. Findings Our findings revealed that patients treated in Catholic hospitals appear to rate their hospital experience similar to patients treated in non-Catholic hospitals. Catholic hospitals maintain a very slight advantage above their non-Catholic peers on five HCAHPS measures related to nurse communication, receipt of discharge information, quietness of the room at night, overall rating, and recommendation of the hospital; yet, these differences were minimal. Practice Implications If the survival of Catholic health care services is contingent upon how its provision of care is distinct, administrators of Catholic hospitals must show differences more clearly. Given the great importance of Catholic hospitals to the health of millions of patients in the United States, this study provides Catholic hospitals with a set of targeted areas on which to focus improvement efforts, especially in light of current pay-for-performance initiatives. PMID:23493045

  19. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Otis Air National Guard, (AOC CS-1 (USCG)), Falmouth, MA, September 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, lies within the boundaries of the towns of Falmouth, Mashpee, Sandwich, and Bourne. The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Transmitter Station, designed Area of Contamination (AOC) CS-1 (USCG) is located adjacent to the eastern boundary of the MMR. The NGB, acting as executive agent of the USCG, and USEPA, with concurrence of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, have determined that No Action is necessary to address the contamination at AOC CS-1 (USCG). However, groundwater monitoring will be performed at well WW-7 for a period of five years to provide information over time on the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) detected in this well, and on the sporadic detection of inorganics in groundwater at this AOC.

  20. 46 CFR 14.103 - Addresses of Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...103 Addresses of Coast Guard. (a) U.S. postal mail: U.S. Coast Guard National Maritime Center (NMC-42), 100 Forbes Drive, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25404. (b) Electronic mail: IASKNMC@uscg.mil . (c) World wide web:...

  1. Installation restoration program. Site investigation report, Volume 2. 182 Airlift Wing, Illinois Air National Guard, Greater Peoria Regional Airport, Peoria, Illinois. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Site Investigation Report, Illinois Air National Guard, 182nd Airlift Wing, Greater Peoria Regional Airport, Peoria, Illinois, Volume II - Appendices A-K. This is the second volume of a two volume Site Investigation Report. Three sites (Site 1 - Septic System Filter Beds Site 2 Grassy Area Facility Boundary East of the Aircraft Apron, and Site 3 - Grass Area West of Aircraft Apron and East of Fuel Truck Parking) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. A Remedial Investigation was recommended for the soils at Site 1. No further action was recommended for Site 2 and the soils at Site 3. A groundwater investigation was recommended to identify the source of low concentrations of VOCs in the groundwater.

  2. Installation restoration program. Site investigation report, Volume 1. 182 Airlift Wing, Illinois Air National Guard, Greater Peoria Regional Airport, Peoria, Illinois. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Site Investigation Report, Illinois Air National Guard, 182nd Airlift Wing, Greater Peoria Regional Airport, Peoria, Illinois, Volume I - Text. This is the first volume of a two volume Site Investigation Report. Three sites (Site 1 - Septic System Filter Beds, Site 2 - Grassy Area Along Facility Boundary East of the Aircraft Apron, and Site 3 - Grass Area West of Aircraft Apron and East of Fuel Truck Parking) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. A Remedial Investigation was recommended for the soils at Site 1. No further action was recommended for Site 2 and the soils at Site 3. A groundwater investigation was recommended to identify the source of low concentrations of VOCs in the groundwater.

  3. 46 CFR 4.40-35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 4.40-35 Section 4.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  4. 46 CFR 4.40-30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 4.40-30 Section 4.40-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  5. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  6. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations...Section 4.40-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  7. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  8. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations...Section 4.40-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  9. 46 CFR 4.40-35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 4.40-35 Section 4.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  10. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  11. 46 CFR 4.40-30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 4.40-30 Section 4.40-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  12. 46 CFR 4.40-35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 4.40-35 Section 4.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  13. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations...Section 4.40-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  14. 46 CFR 4.40-35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 4.40-35 Section 4.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  15. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  16. 46 CFR 4.40-30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 4.40-30 Section 4.40-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  17. 46 CFR 4.40-30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 4.40-30 Section 4.40-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  18. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations...Section 4.40-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  19. 46 CFR 4.40-35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 4.40-35 Section 4.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  20. 46 CFR 4.40-30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 4.40-30 Section 4.40-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  1. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations...Section 4.40-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  2. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for...Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation...

  3. Trends in hospital admissions for adverse drug reactions in England: analysis of national hospital episode statistics 1998–2005

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hitesh; Bell, Derek; Molokhia, Mariam; Srishanmuganathan, Janakan; Patel, Mitesh; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem

    2007-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a frequent cause of mortality and morbidity to patients worldwide, with great associated costs to the healthcare providers including the NHS in England. We examined trends in hospital admissions associated with adverse drug reaction in English hospitals and the accuracy of national reporting. Methods Data from the Hospital Episode Statistics database (collected by the Department of Health) was obtained and analysed for all English hospital episodes (1998–2005) using ICD-10 codes with a primary (codes including the words ('drug-induced' or 'due to') or secondary diagnosis of ADR (Y40–59). More detailed analysis was performed for the year 2004–2005 Results Between 1998 and 2005 there were 447 071 ADRs representing 0.50% of total hospital episodes and over this period the number of ADRs increased by 45%. All ADRs with an external code increased over this period. In 2005 the total number of episodes (all age groups) was 13,706,765 of which 76,692 (0.56%) were drug related. Systemic agents, which include anti-neoplastic drugs, were the most implicated class (15.7%), followed by analgesics (11.7%) and cardiovascular drugs (10.1%). There has been a 6 fold increase in nephropathy secondary to drugs and a 65% decline in drug induced extra-pyramidal side effects. 59% of cases involving adverse drug reactions involved patients above 60 years of age. Conclusion ADRs have major public health and economic implications. Our data suggest that national Hospital Episode Statistics in England have recognised limitations and that consequently, admissions associated with adverse drug reactions continue to be under-recorded. External causes of ADR have increased at a greater rate than the increase in total hospital admissions. Improved and more detailed reporting combined with educational interventions to improve the recording of ADRs are needed to accurately monitor the morbidity caused by ADRs and to meaningfully evaluate national initiatives to reduce adverse drug reactions. PMID:17894876

  4. 32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602... States Coast Guard (When Operating as a Service in the Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United States Coast Guard....

  5. 32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602... States Coast Guard (When Operating as a Service in the Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United States Coast Guard....

  6. 32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602... States Coast Guard (When Operating as a Service in the Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United States Coast Guard....

  7. 32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602... States Coast Guard (When Operating as a Service in the Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United States Coast Guard....

  8. 32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602... States Coast Guard (When Operating as a Service in the Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United States Coast Guard....

  9. 3 CFR 9022 - Proclamation 9022 of September 20, 2013. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...families. That is why First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden launched the Joining...Nation secure. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of...the two hundred and thirty-eighth.BARACK...

  10. 75 FR 22829 - National Environmental Policy Act; Final Environmental Impact Statement on U.S. Coast Guard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...law enforcement, national security, search and rescue (SAR), aids to navigation...in the ``Keyword'' box. Click ``Search'' then click on the balloon shape in...USCG-2006-24163'' and click ``Search.'' Click the ``Open Docket...

  11. Hospitals leave national GPOs to create their own competitive contracts.

    PubMed

    1999-10-01

    Hospitals cut better medical/surgical supply deals in smaller, innovative group purchasing networks. Meridian Health System in New Jersey posted an annual $1.5 million savings by renegotiating about a dozen of its supply contracts over the past year. By ditching memberships with the big GPOs and creating its own group purchasing cooperative, administrators there are cutting competitive deals. Find out how they're doing it. PMID:10662118

  12. The Coast Guard Comes to Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawcett, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on Sea Partners, by the United States Coast Guard, that enables students to understand how pollution affects the marine environment. Correlates the activities with the National Science Education Standards. (DDR)

  13. The Impact of National Cultural Differences on Nurses' Acceptance of Hospital Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to explore the influence of national cultural differences on nurses' perceptions of their acceptance of hospital information systems. This study uses the perspective of Technology Acceptance Model; national cultural differences in terms of masculinity/femininity, individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance are incorporated into the Technology Acceptance Model as moderators, whereas time orientation is a control variable on hospital information system acceptance. A quantitative research design was used in this study; 261 participants, US and Taiwan RNs, all had hospital information system experience. Data were collected from November 2013 to February 2014 and analyzed using a t test to compare the coefficients for each moderator. The results show that individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance all exhibit significant difference on hospital information system acceptance; however, both masculinity/femininity and time orientation factors did not show significance. This study verifies that national cultural differences have significant influence on nurses' behavioral intention to use hospital information systems. Therefore, hospital information system providers should emphasize the way in which to integrate different technological functions to meet the needs of nurses from various cultural backgrounds. PMID:25899441

  14. A national system for monitoring the performance of hospitals in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    McNatt, Zahirah; Linnander, Erika; Endeshaw, Abraham; Tatek, Dawit; Conteh, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many countries struggle to develop and implement strategies to monitor hospitals nationally. The challenge is particularly acute in low-income countries where resources for measurement and reporting are scarce. We examined the experience of developing and implementing a national system for monitoring the performance of 130 government hospitals in Ethiopia. Using participatory observation, we found that the monitoring system resulted in more consistent hospital reporting of performance data to regional health bureaus and the federal government, increased transparency about hospital performance and the development of multiple quality-improvement projects. The development and implementation of the system, which required technical and political investment and support, would not have been possible without strong hospital-level management capacity. Thorough assessment of the health sector’s readiness to change and desire to prioritize hospital quality can be helpful in the early stages of design and implementation. This assessment may include interviews with key informants, collection of data about health facilities and human resources and discussion with academic partners. Aligning partners and donors with the government’s vision for quality improvement can enhance acceptability and political support. Such alignment can enable resources to be focused strategically towards one national effort – rather than be diluted across dozens of potentially competing projects. Initial stages benefit from having modest goals and the flexibility for continuous modification and improvement, through active engagement with all stakeholders. PMID:26600614

  15. Efficacy of a post-secondary environmental science education program on the attitude toward science of a group of Mississippi National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, William Bradford, Jr.

    The National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program (ChalleNGe) is a 17 month quasi-military training program authorized by Congress in the 1993 Defense Authorization Bill designed to improve life skills, education levels, and employment potential of 16--18 year old youth who drop out of high school. ChalleNGe is currently operational in 27 states/territories with the focus of this study on the Mississippi National Guard Program operated at Camp Shelby, Mississippi. During the five month residential portion of the program students are guided through an eight step process designed to meet the goals of improving life skills, education levels, and employment potential while ultimately leading to completion of high school equivalency credentials followed by a 12 month mentoring phase to encourage and track progress toward goals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitude toward science of a group of students enrolled in the ChalleNGe Program at Camp Shelby (ChalleNGe). The GED test is administered approximately two months into the residential phase of the program. While the program boasts an overall GED pass rate of nearly 80%, approximately 30--35% of students successfully complete the initial offering of the GED. As high school graduates, these students are offered college courses through William Carey College in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Twenty four students elected to take the Introduction to Environmental Science course and formed the experimental group while 24 other students who passed the GED comprised the control group. Each group was administered the Scientific Attitude Inventory II, a 40 statement instrument with Likert Scale responses, as a pretest. Paired samples t-tests indicated no significant difference in attitude toward science between the experimental and control groups on the pretest. Following the two week Introduction to Environmental Science course for the experimental group, both groups were post tested. As predicted, the attitude toward science of the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the control group. Further investigation into correlation between the length of time students were away from the traditional school prior to starting ChalleNGe, the number of science classes previously taken, and reading scores on the Test of Adult Basic Education revealed no significant relationship. Responses provided by students to each of these three factors was significantly different between the experimental and control groups. In summary, attitude toward science can be positively impacted by short term interventions such as the environmental science course described herein. While the positive impact on attitude toward science caused by this course was the desired outcome of this project, appropriate emphasis should be placed on prevention of dropouts and the accompanying social issues.

  16. Tuberculosis Hospitalization Fees and Bed Utilization in China from 1999 to 2009: The Results of a National Survey of Tuberculosis Specialized Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Mi, Fengling; Liu, Yuhong; Li, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background China is transitioning towards concentrating tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic and treatment services in hospitals, while the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) system will retain important public health functions. Patient expenditure incurred through hospitalization may lead to barriers to TB care or interruption of treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a national survey of TB specialized hospitals to determine hospitalization fees and hospital bed utilization in 1999, 2004, and 2009. Hospitalization of TB patients increased 185.3% from 1999 to 2009. While the average hospitalization fees also increased, the proportion of those fees in relation to GDP per capita decreased. Hospitalization fees differed across the three regions (eastern, central, and western). Using a least standard difference (LSD) paired analysis, in 2004, the difference in hospitalization fees was significant when comparing eastern and central provinces (p<0.001) as well as to western provinces (p<0.001). In 2009, the difference remained statistically significant when comparing eastern province hospitalization fees with central provinces (p<0.001) and western provinces (p = 0.008). In 2004 and 2009, the cost associated with hospitalization as a proportion of GDP per capita was highest in the western region. The average in-patient stay decreased from 33 days in 1999 to 26 and 27 days in 2004 and 2009 respectively. Finally, hospital bed utilization in all three regions increased over this period. Conclusions/Significance Our findings show that both the total number of in-patients and hospitalization fees increased from 1999 to 2009, though the proportion of hospitalization fees to GDP per capita decreased. As diagnostic services move to hospitals, regulatory and monitoring mechanisms should be established, and hospitals should make use of the experience garnered by the CDC system through continued strong collaborations. Infrastructure and social protection mechanisms in high burden areas, such as in the western region, should be strengthened. PMID:26457980

  17. Improving Service Quality in Long-term Care Hospitals: National Evaluation on Long-term Care Hospitals and Employees Perception of Quality Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkyung; Han, Woosok

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate predictors for specific dimensions of service quality perceived by hospital employees in long-term care hospitals. Methods Data collected from a survey of 298 hospital employees in 18 long-term care hospitals were analysed. Multivariate ordinary least squares regression analysis with hospital fixed effects was used to determine the predictors of service quality using respondents’ and organizational characteristics. Results The most significant predictors of employee-perceived service quality were job satisfaction and degree of consent on national evaluation criteria. National evaluation results on long-term care hospitals and work environment also had positive effects on service quality. Conclusion The findings of the study show that organizational characteristics are significant determinants of service quality in long-term care hospitals. Assessment of the extent to which hospitals address factors related to employeeperceived quality of services could be the first step in quality improvement activities. Results have implications for efforts to improve service quality in longterm care hospitals and designing more comprehensive national evaluation criteria. PMID:24159497

  18. Risk of Hospitalization Among Firefighters: The National Health Interview Survey, 1986–1994

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David J.; Fleming, Lora E.; Gomez-Marín, Orlando; LeBlanc, William

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the risk of hospitalization among firefighters. Data were derived from a nationally representative sample of 235 897 employed men from the National Health Interview Survey. Firefighters aged 30 to 39 years were at significantly increased risk for hospitalization relative to other employed men in the same age group (odds ratio = 1.93; 95% confidence interval=1.21, 3.09). Findings from this study and others support the call for longitudinal studies to monitor the health of this high-risk occupational group. PMID:15514232

  19. Guarded Motion for Mobile Robots

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-30

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has created codes that ensure that a robot will come to a stop at a precise, specified distance from any obstacle regardless of the robot's initial speed, its physical characteristics, and the responsiveness of the low-level motor control schema. This Guarded Motion for Mobile Robots system iteratively adjusts the robot's action in response to information about the robot's environment.

  20. Prey abundance and food habits of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, C.G.; Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-09-01

    Prey abundance and food habits of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. The sampling methods initially used to assess abundance of prey species resulted in indices too low to be of value. Because of this, the relationship between relative abundance and frequency of occurrence of prey species could not be examined. Six hundred forty-nine fecal samples (scats) were analyzed to determine the frequency of occurrence of prey items. California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) and lagomorphs primarily desert cottontails (Sylvilagus audubonii) and black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) were the most frequently occurring mammalian prey items found in scats (35.0% and 12.2%, respectively). The frequency of occurrence of ground squirrel (but not lagomorph) remains in scats collected from juveniles was significantly higher than in scats collected from adults. The frequency of occurrence of ground squirrel and lagomorph remains in scats collected from males was not significant different than in scats collected from females. There were significant variations in the frequency of ground squirrel remains among the years 1989--1991 and during the June--November periods between 1989 and 1990 and between 1990 and 1991. The frequency of lagomorph remains collected during the June--November period differed significantly among the years 1989--1991 and between 1990 and 1991.

  1. Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-10-01

    The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

  2. Impact of Deployment-Related Sexual Stressors on Psychiatric Symptoms After Accounting for Predeployment Stressors: Findings From a U.S. National Guard Cohort.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Ethan B; Murdoch, Maureen; Erbes, Christopher R; Arbisi, Paul; Polusny, Melissa A

    2015-08-01

    This study used a longitudinal research design to examine the impact of predeployment stressors and deployment-related sexual stressors on self-reported psychiatric symptoms of U.S. National Guard soldiers returning from deployments to Iraq or Afghanistan. Prior to deployment, participants completed measures of depression and posttraumatic stress symptoms, along with an inventory of predeployment stressor experiences. At 3-months postdeployment, participants (468 men, 60 women) again completed self-report measures of psychiatric symptoms, along with an inventory of sexual stressors experienced during deployment. We compared a cross-sectional model of sexual stressors' impact on psychiatric symptoms, in which only postdeployment reports were considered, to a longitudinal model in which we adjusted for participants' predeployment stressors and psychiatric symptoms. No participants reported sexual assault during deployment, though sexual harassment was common. The cross-sectional model suggested that deployment-related sexual stressors were significantly associated with postdeployment depression (R(2) = .11) and posttraumatic stress symptoms (R(2) = .10). Once predeployment factors were taken into consideration, however, sexual stressors were no longer significant. The results did not support the notion of lasting negative impact for low-level sexual stressors (e.g., sexual harassment) during deployment after predeployment stressors are accounted for. Future studies of sexual stressors should consider longitudinal designs. PMID:26184776

  3. Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal imager applied to San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, E.A.; Kato, T.T.; Berry, W.H.; O'Farrell, T.P.

    1992-10-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal infrared imaging were used to evaluate the effects of military activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site. The Ground Penetrating Radar was used to identify underground burrows of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) dens in an attempt to evaluate the impact of tracked vehicles on the integrity of kit fox dens. The thermal imaging was used to identify kit foxes within the live-fire impact area. The ground penetrating radar equipment was initially unsuccessfull in detecting burrows in the hard, compacted soils. Changes in antenna systems and sampling methods resulted in small improvements, but the data were inadequate to test for effects of military vehicles on dens. Further refinements would have required the intentional destruction of dens, or the redesign of the ground penetrating radar hardware and software. Thermal imaging was useful in observing kit foxes at close range but was not suitable for detecting foxes in the impact area because the images were not clear enough for conclusive species identification.

  4. Feasibility and desirability of web-based mental health screening and individualized education for female OEF/OIF reserve and national guard war veterans.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Anne G; Mengeling, Michelle A; Torner, James C; Smith, Jeffrey L; Franciscus, Carrie L; Erschens, Holly J; Booth, Brenda M

    2013-06-01

    Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Reserve and National Guard (RNG) service members have an increased risk for postdeployment mental health (MH) and readjustment problems, yet most do not access needed care. It is unknown if RNG servicewomen experiencing postdeployment readjustment symptoms are aware these may signify treatable MH concerns or if this knowledge activates care-seeking. The aims of this proof-of-concept study were to determine the feasibility of web-based MH screening for postdeployment MH symptoms to inform individualized psychoeducation, and to assess user perceptions about the online instrument and process, MH care access, and VA and other MH care. A midwestern sample (N = 131) of recently deployed (past 24 months) OEF/OIF RNG Army and Air Force servicewomen participated. High rates of combat experiences (95%) and military sexual trauma (50%) were reported. Positive screens for key symptoms of MH problems were prevalent. One third (31%) of satisfaction survey completers indicated online information reduced discomfort with seeking MH care; 42% reported they would subsequently seek MH assessment. Participants interviewed by telephone indicated that stigma and limited knowledge about women-specific services were key reasons servicewomen do not use MH care. This study demonstrated web-based screenings with individualized psychoeducation are implementable and favorable to RNG servicewomen. PMID:23696367

  5. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers. 488.6 Section 488.6 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES...

  6. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers. 488.6 Section 488.6 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES...

  7. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers. 488.6 Section 488.6 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES...

  8. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers. 488.6 Section 488.6 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES...

  9. An international survey of physicians regarding clinical trials: a comparison between Kyoto University Hospital and Seoul National University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background International clinical trials are now rapidly expanding into Asia. However, the proportion of global trials is higher in South Korea compared to Japan despite implementation of similar governmental support in both countries. The difference in clinical trial environment might influence the respective physicians’ attitudes and experience towards clinical trials. Therefore, we designed a questionnaire to explore how physicians conceive the issues surrounding clinical trials in both countries. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted at Kyoto University Hospital (KUHP) and Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH) in 2008. The questionnaire consisted of 15 questions and 2 open-ended questions on broad key issues relating to clinical trials. Results The number of responders was 301 at KUHP and 398 at SNUH. Doctors with trial experience were 196 at KUHP and 150 at SNUH. Among them, 12% (24/196) at KUHP and 41% (61/150) at SUNH had global trial experience. Most respondents at both institutions viewed clinical trials favorably and thought that conducting clinical trials contributed to medical advances, which would ultimately lead to new and better treatments. The main reason raised as a hindrance to conducting clinical trials was the lack of personnel support and time. Doctors at both university hospitals thought that more clinical research coordinators were required to conduct clinical trials more efficiently. KUHP doctors were driven mainly by pure academic interest or for their desire to find new treatments, while obtaining credits for board certification and co-authorship on manuscripts also served as motivation factors for doctors at SNUH. Conclusions Our results revealed that there might be two different approaches to increase clinical trial activity. One is a social level approach to establish clinical trial infrastructure providing sufficient clinical research professionals. The other is an individual level approach that would provide incentives to encourage doctors to participate in and conduct clinical trials. PMID:24156760

  10. National Hospital Management Portal (NHMP): a framework for e-health implementation.

    PubMed

    Adetiba, E; Eleanya, M; Fatumo, S A; Matthews, V O

    2009-01-01

    Health information represents the main basis for health decision-making process and there have been some efforts to increase access to health information in developing countries. However, most of these efforts are based on the internet which has minimal penetration especially in the rural and sub-urban part of developing countries. In this work, a platform for medical record acquisition via the ubiquitous 2.5G/3G wireless communications technologies is presented. The National Hospital Management Portal (NHMP) platform has a central database at each specific country's national hospital which could be updated/accessed from hosts at health centres, clinics, medical laboratories, teaching hospitals, private hospitals and specialist hospitals across the country. With this, doctors can have access to patients' medical records more easily, get immediate access to test results from laboratories, deliver prescription directly to pharmacists. If a particular treatment can be provided to a patient more effectively in another country, NHMP makes it simpler to organise and carry out such treatment abroad. PMID:20643641

  11. Assessment of soil and water contaminants from selected locations in and near the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area, Ada County, Idaho, 2001-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parliman, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001, the National Guard Bureau and the U.S. Geological Survey began a project to compile hydrogeologic data and determine presence or absence of soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination at the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area in southwestern Idaho. Between June 2002 and April 2003, a total of 114 soil, surface-water, ground-water, precipitation, or dust samples were collected from 68 sample sites (65 different locations) in the Orchard Training Area (OTA) or along the vehicle corridor to the OTA. Soil and water samples were analyzed for concentrations of selected total trace metals, major ions, nutrients, explosive compounds, semivolatile organics, and petroleum hydrocarbons. Water samples also were analyzed for concentrations of selected dissolved trace metals and major ions. Distinguishing naturally occurring large concentrations of trace metals, major ions, and nutrients from contamination related to land and water uses at the OTA was difficult. There were no historical analyses for this area to compare with modern data, and although samples were collected from 65 locations in and near the OTA, sampled areas represented only a small part of the complex OTA land-use areas and soil types. For naturally occurring compounds, several assumptions were made?anomalously large concentrations, when tied to known land uses, may indicate presence of contamination; naturally occurring concentrations cannot be separated from contamination concentrations in mid- and lower ranges of data; and smallest concentrations may represent the lowest naturally occurring range of concentrations and (or) the absence of contaminants related to land and water uses. Presence of explosive, semivolatile organic (SVOC), and petroleum hydrocarbon compounds in samples indicates contamination from land and water uses. In areas along the vehicle corridor and major access roads within the OTA, most trace metal, major ion, and nutrient concentrations in soil samples were not in the upper 10th percentile of data, but concentrations of 25 metals, ions, or nutrients were in the upper 10th percentile in a puddle sample near the heavy equipment maneuvering area, MPRC-H. The largest concentrations of tin, ammonia, and nitrite plus nitrate (as nitrogen) in water from the OTA were detected in a sample from this puddle. Petroleum hydrocarbons were the most common contaminant, detected in all soil and surface-water samples. An SVOC, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, a plasticizer, was detected at a site along the vehicle corridor. In Maneuver Areas within the OTA, many soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of cobalt, iron, mercury, titanium, sodium, ammonia, or total phosphorus were detected in 6 of 13 soil samples outside the Tadpole Lake area. The largest concentrations of aluminum, arsenic, beryllium, nickel, selenium, silver, strontium, thallium, vanadium, chloride, potassium, sulfate, and nitrite plus nitrate were detected in soil samples from the Tadpole Lake area. Water from Tadpole Lake contained the largest total concentrations of 19 trace metals, 4 major ions, and 1 nutrient. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 5 soil samples and water from Tadpole Lake. SVOCs related to combustion of fuel or plasticizers were detected in 1 soil sample. Explosive compounds were detected in 1 precipitation sample.In the Impact Area within the OTA, most soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of barium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, or orthophosphate were detected in 6 of the 18 soil samples. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 4 soil samples, SVOCs in 6 samples, and explosive compounds in 4 samples. In the mobilization and training equipment site (MATES) compound adjacent to the OTA, all soil and water samples contained at lea

  12. Habitat, soils, and den use of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, E.A.; Standley, W.G.; Berry, W.H.

    1992-09-01

    Den use patterns, den characteristics, and effects of military training on dens were studied for San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California.Ninety-four radiocollared kit foxes used 1059 dens and 334 buildings as shelter from December 1988, through September 1991. There were 1001 (95%) earthen dens, 57 (5%) culverts, and one den in a hollow log. Denentrance dimensions were measured for single entrance dens; the average height was 20 cm, and the average width was 21 cm. Most dens had two to five den entrances, and only 36% of dens found showed sign of fox activity. Dens were found at elevations between 161 and 351 m. The average slope of dens found on hillsides was 19 degrees, and most dens faced the western quadrant. Dens were found over much of the post exceptthe steep southwest portion. More kit fox dens were located in grassland and low to medium density oak woodlands than expected, and fewer dens were located in developed areas and medium to high density oak woodlands than expected. Denning range size was calculated for 16 foxes that were radiocollared at least one year and that were found using only earthen and culvert dens. The average denning range size was 171.0 {plus_minus} 24.0 ha. There was no significant difference in male and female average denning range sizes. When buildings used as shelter were included in denning range sizes, there was no significant difference in average denning range size between developed and undeveloped areas. Foxes used 26 of 36 available soil series, and dens were not distributed proportionally among the 36 soil series. Kit fox dens were typically found in well drained soils. Few den entrances were destroyed by military training exercises.

  13. Habitat, soils, and den use of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, E.A.; Standley, W.G.; Berry, W.H.

    1992-09-01

    Den use patterns, den characteristics, and effects of military training on dens were studied for San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California.Ninety-four radiocollared kit foxes used 1059 dens and 334 buildings as shelter from December 1988, through September 1991. There were 1001 (95%) earthen dens, 57 (5%) culverts, and one den in a hollow log. Denentrance dimensions were measured for single entrance dens; the average height was 20 cm, and the average width was 21 cm. Most dens had two to five den entrances, and only 36% of dens found showed sign of fox activity. Dens were found at elevations between 161 and 351 m. The average slope of dens found on hillsides was 19 degrees, and most dens faced the western quadrant. Dens were found over much of the post exceptthe steep southwest portion. More kit fox dens were located in grassland and low to medium density oak woodlands than expected, and fewer dens were located in developed areas and medium to high density oak woodlands than expected. Denning range size was calculated for 16 foxes that were radiocollared at least one year and that were found using only earthen and culvert dens. The average denning range size was 171.0 [plus minus] 24.0 ha. There was no significant difference in male and female average denning range sizes. When buildings used as shelter were included in denning range sizes, there was no significant difference in average denning range size between developed and undeveloped areas. Foxes used 26 of 36 available soil series, and dens were not distributed proportionally among the 36 soil series. Kit fox dens were typically found in well drained soils. Few den entrances were destroyed by military training exercises.

  14. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.10 Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard conducts the...

  15. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a) Records of the Coast Guard made under § 850.30...

  16. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.10 Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard conducts the...

  17. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a) Records of the Coast Guard made under § 850.30...

  18. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.10 Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard conducts the...

  19. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.10 Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard conducts the...

  20. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a) Records of the Coast Guard made under § 850.30...

  1. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a) Records of the Coast Guard made under § 850.30...

  2. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a) Records of the Coast Guard made under § 850.30...

  3. 49 CFR 850.10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 850... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.10 Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. (a) The Coast Guard conducts the...

  4. Length of hospital stay after craniotomy for tumor: a National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

    PubMed

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Liu, Kevin X; Devine, Christopher A; Chavakula, Vamsidhar; Smith, Timothy R; Gormley, William B; Dunn, Ian F

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Although the length of hospital stay is often used as a measure of quality of care, data evaluating the predictors of extended hospital stay after craniotomy for tumor are limited. The goals of this study were to use multivariate regression to examine which preoperative characteristics and postoperative complications predict a prolonged hospital stay and to assess the impact of length of stay on unplanned hospital readmission. METHODS Data were extracted from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from 2007 to 2013. Patients who underwent craniotomy for resection of a brain tumor were included. Stratification was based on length of hospital stay, which was dichotomized by the upper quartile of the interquartile range (IQR) for the entire population. Covariates included patient age, sex, race, tumor histology, comorbidities, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, functional status, preoperative laboratory values, preoperative neurological deficits, operative time, and postoperative complications. Multivariate logistic regression with forward prediction was used to evaluate independent predictors of extended hospitalization. Thereafter, hierarchical multivariate logistic regression assessed the impact of length of stay on unplanned readmission. RESULTS The study included 11,510 patients. The median hospital stay was 4 days (IQR 3-8 days), and 27.7% (n = 3185) had a hospital stay of at least 8 days. Independent predictors of extended hospital stay included age greater than 70 years (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.28%-1.83%, p < 0.001); African American (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.44%-2.14%, p < 0.001) and Hispanic (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.36%-2.08%) race or ethnicity; ASA class 3 (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.34%-1.73%) or 4-5 (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.82%-2.62%) designation; partially (OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.61%-2.35%) or totally dependent (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.95%-5.55%) functional status; insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.16%-1.84%); hematological comorbidities (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.25%-2.24%); and preoperative hypoalbuminemia (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.51%-2.09%, all p ? 0.009). Several postoperative complications were additional independent predictors of prolonged hospitalization including pulmonary emboli (OR 13.75, 95% CI 4.73%-39.99%), pneumonia (OR 5.40, 95% CI 2.89%-10.07%), and urinary tract infections (OR 11.87, 95% CI 7.09%-19.87%, all p < 0.001). The C-statistic of the model based on preoperative characteristics was 0.79, which increased to 0.83 after the addition of postoperative complications. A length of stay after craniotomy for tumor score was created based on preoperative factors significant in regression models, with a moderate correlation with length of stay (p = 0.43, p < 0.001). Extended hospital stay was not associated with differential odds of an unplanned hospital readmission (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.89%-1.06%, p = 0.55). CONCLUSIONS In this NSQIP analysis that evaluated patients who underwent craniotomy for tumor, much of the variance in hospital stay was attributable to baseline patient characteristics, suggesting length of stay may be an imperfect proxy for quality. Additionally, longer hospitalizations were not found to be associated with differential rates of unplanned readmission. PMID:26621410

  5. Surface-water quantity and quality, aquatic biology, stream geomorphology, and groundwater-flow simulation for National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, 2002-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langland, Michael J.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Chichester, Douglas C.; Bilger, Michael D.; Brightbill, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    Base-line and long-term monitoring of water resources of the National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap in south-central Pennsylvania began in 2002. Results of continuous monitoring of streamflow and turbidity and monthly and stormflow water-quality samples from two continuous-record long-term stream sites, periodic collection of water-quality samples from five miscellaneous stream sites, and annual collection of biological data from 2002 to 2005 at 27 sites are discussed. In addition, results from a stream-geomorphic analysis and classification and a regional groundwater-flow model are included. Streamflow at the facility was above normal for the 2003 through 2005 water years and extremely high-flow events occurred in 2003 and in 2004. Water-quality samples were analyzed for nutrients, sediments, metals, major ions, pesticides, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, and explosives. Results indicated no exceedances for any constituent (except iron) above the primary and secondary drinking-water standards or health-advisory levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Iron concentrations were naturally elevated in the groundwater within the watershed because of bedrock lithology. The majority of the constituents were at or below the method detection limit. Sediment loads were dominated by precipitation due to the remnants of Hurricane Ivan in September 2004. More than 60 percent of the sediment load measured during the entire study was transported past the streamgage in just 2 days during that event. Habitat and aquatic-invertebrate data were collected in the summers of 2002-05, and fish data were collected in 2004. Although 2002 was a drought year, 2003-05 were above-normal flow years. Results indicated a wide diversity in invertebrates, good numbers of taxa (distinct organisms), and on the basis of a combination of metrics, the majority of the 27 sites indicated no or slight impairment. Fish-metric data from 25 sites indicated results similar to the invertebrate data. Stream classification based on evolution of the stream channels indicates about 94 percent of the channels were considered to be in equilibrium (type B or C channels), neither aggrading nor eroding. A regional, uncalibrated groundwater-flow model indicated the surface-water and groundwater-flow divides coincided. Because of folding of rock layers, groundwater was under confined conditions and nearly all the water leaves the facility via the streams.

  6. A national, cross-sectional survey of children's hospital-based safety resource centres

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, Sadiqa; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Seaver Hill, Karen; Arbogast, Kristy B; Gittelman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the location, staffing, clientele, safety product disbursement patterns, education provided and sustainability of safety resource centres (SRCs) in US children's hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was distributed to children's hospital-based SRC directors. Survey categories included: funding sources, customer base, items sold, items given free of charge, education provided and directors’ needs. Results 32/38 (84.2%) SRC sites (affiliated with 30 hospitals) completed the survey. SRCs were in many hospital locations including lobby (28.1%), family resource centres (12.5%), gift shop/retail space (18.8%), mobile units (18.8%) and patient clinics (12.5%). 19% of respondents reported that their SRC was financially self-sustainable. Sales to patients predominated (mean of 44%); however, hospital employees made up a mean of 20% (range 0–60%) of sales. 78.1% of SRCs had products for children with special healthcare needs. Documentation kept at SRC sites included items purchased (96.9%), items given free of charge (65.6%) and customer demographics (50%). 56.3% of SRCs provided formal injury prevention education classes. The SRCs’ directors’ most important needs were finances (46.9%), staffing (50%) and space (46.9%). All of the directors were ‘somewhat interested’ or ‘very interested’ in each of the following: creation of a common SRC listserv, national SRC data bank and multisite SRC research platform. Conclusions SRCs are located in many US children's hospitals, and can be characterised as heterogeneous in location, products sold, data kept and ability to be financially sustained. Further research is needed to determine best practices for SRCs to maximise their impact on injury prevention. PMID:24667383

  7. A national survey of hospital directors' views about the importance of various chaplain roles: differences among disciplines and types of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Flannelly, Kevin J; Handzo, George F; Galek, Kathleen; Weaver, Andrew J; Overvold, Jon A

    2006-01-01

    A national random sample of hospital directors was asked to rate the importance of seven categories of chaplain roles and functions: 246 nursing directors, 267 social services directors, 307 medical directors, and 611 pastoral care directors. All four groups rated end-of-life care, prayer, and emotional support as being between very important and extremely important. Other roles, including consultation, advocacy, community outreach, and religious services and rituals were rated significantly less important. Significant differences were found across disciplines and hospital settings (general, psychiatric, etc.). Medical directors rated most chaplain roles lower than other directors did, and directors in psychiatric hospitals rated all roles, except religious services/rituals, lower than their counterparts in other types of hospitals. The importance that directors accorded to all the chaplain roles examined was also influenced by their own spirituality and religiosity, as well as the religious affiliation of their institution. PMID:17059111

  8. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  9. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  10. 49 CFR 850.3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation... (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.3 Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and...

  11. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  12. 49 CFR 850.3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation... (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.3 Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and...

  13. 49 CFR 850.3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation... (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.3 Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and...

  14. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  15. 49 CFR 850.3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation... (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.3 Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and...

  16. 49 CFR 850.3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation... (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.3 Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and...

  17. 49 CFR 850.25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MARINE CASUALTY INVESTIGATIONS § 850.25 Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. (a) If the Board does...

  18. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a)...

  19. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a)...

  20. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a)...

  1. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a)...

  2. 49 CFR 850.35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 850.35 Section...NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD COAST GUARD-NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.35 Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. (a)...

  3. Department directors' perceptions of the roles and functions of hospital chaplains: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Flannelly, Kevin J; Galek, Kathleen; Bucchino, John; Handzo, George F; Tannenbaum, Helen P

    2005-01-01

    A national survey of hospital directors of medicine, nursing, social services, and pastoral care was conducted to obtain opinions about the importance of various chaplain roles. On average, directors in all four disciplines rated three of the seven chaplain roles (grief and death, prayer, and emotional support) to be "very" to "extremely" important. Most of the others roles were rated between "moderately" and "very" important (religious services-rituals consultation and advocacy, community liaison-outreach). Several significant differences were found among disciplines, as physicians rated the importance of most chaplains' roles lower than did other disciplines. Overall, there was a tendency for directors in smaller hospitals, especially those with fewer than 100 patients, to place less importance on most of the chaplain roles investigated here. PMID:16425698

  4. Private hospital accreditation and inducement of care under the ghanaian national insurance scheme

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Ghanaian National Health Insurance Scheme pays providers according to the fee for service payment scheme, a method of payment that is likely to encourage inducement of care. The goal of this paper is to test for the presence of supplier induced demand among patients who received care in private, for profit, hospitals accredited to provide care to insured patients. An instrumental variable Poisson estimation was used to compare the demand curves for health care by insured outpatients in the public and private hospitals. The results showed that supplier induced demand existed in the private sector among patients within the ages 18 and 60 years. Impact on cost of care and patients' welfare is discussed. PMID:22827881

  5. Hospital costs of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated in intensive care; a single centre evaluation using the national tariff-based system

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, J; Easton, S; Naik, V; Lockie, C; Brett, S J; Stümpfle, R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is a scarcity of literature reporting hospital costs for treating out of hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) survivors, especially within the UK. This is essential for assessment of cost-effectiveness of interventions necessary to allow just allocation of resources within the National Health Service. We set out primarily to calculate costs stratified against hospital survival and neurological outcomes. Secondarily, we estimated cost effectiveness based on estimates of survival and utility from previous studies to calculate costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Setting We performed a single centre (London) retrospective review of in-hospital costs of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after OOHCA over 18?months from January 2011 (following widespread introduction of targeted temperature management and primary percutaneous intervention). Participants Of 69 successive patients admitted over an 18-month period, survival and cerebral performance category (CPC) outcomes were obtained from review of databases and clinical notes. The Trust finance department supplied ICU and hospital costs using the Payment by Results UK system. Results Of those patients with ROSC admitted to ICU, survival to hospital discharge (any CPC) was 33/69 (48%) with 26/33 survivors in CPC 1–2 at hospital discharge. Cost per survivor to hospital discharge (including total cost of survivors and non-survivors) was £50?000, cost per CPC 1–2 survivor was £65?000. Cost and length of stay of CPC 1–2 patients was considerably lower than CPC 3–4 patients. The majority of the costs (69%) related to intensive care. Estimated cost per CPC 1–2 survivor per QALY was £16?000. Conclusions The costs of in-hospital patient care for ICU admissions following ROSC after OOHCA are considerable but within a reasonable threshold when assessed from a QALY perspective. PMID:25838503

  6. Dutch Hospital Drug Formularies: pharmacotherapeutic variation and conservatism, but concurrence with national pharmacotherapeutic guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Fijn, R; Engels, S A G; Brouwers, J R B J; Knaap, R J; De Jong-Van den Berg, L T W

    2000-01-01

    Aims This research examines current hospital drug formularies (HDFs) of all Dutch general hospitals. It assesses the extent to which they recommend the same drugs, the breadth of their coverage in terms of therapeutic areas, drug groups incorporated and individuals drugs included, and their extent of conservatism by considering the year of introduction of the drugs included within groups. Furthermore, it considers the extent to which their recommendations concur and comply with those of national pharmacotherapeutic guidelines and the WHO Essential Drugs List (EDL). Methods Seventy-eight (81%) out of all 96 current Dutch HDFs were received of which 62 were suitable for study. Differences between HDFs and eventual associations with hospital characteristics were researched by statistical testing and case-control studies. To evaluate HDFs' concurrence with national guidelines and compliance with the WHO EDL, nine drug groups were studied in detail: benzodiazepines, calcium channel blockers, ?-adrenoceptor blocking agents, ACE-inhibitors, angiotensin-II inhibitors, NSAIDs, H2-receptor antagonists, 5HT3-antagonists, and H+-pump inhibitors. Concurrence and compliance with national guidelines and the WHO EDL was defined as inclusion of recommended drugs. Non-concurrence was defined as inclusion of nonrecommended drugs. Results The total number of indications addressed and drug groups incorporated within HDFs varied from 28 to 72 (median 56) and from 30 to 123 (median 97), respectively. The total number of individual drug entities (pharmacological substances) included ranged from 239 to 658 (median 430) and the total number of drug products, including all different dosage forms, from 412 to 1121 (median 655). Within drug groups, drug entities first marketed were most frequently included. Teaching hospitals were most likely to include recently marketed drugs. Depending on the drug group, HDFs' concurrence and compliance with national guidelines and the WHO EDL ranged from 35% to 100%. Conclusions Findings indicate that Dutch HDFs are rather uniform in the indications addressed and the drug groups incorporated. However, the number of individual drug entities and drug products included within groups varies considerably. Furthermore, Dutch HDFs are considered rather conservative, as older drugs are favoured over more recent drugs. Generally, with some drug exceptions, Dutch HDFs concur and comply with recommendations in national pharmacotherapeutic guidelines and with the WHO EDL over 90%. PMID:10718781

  7. Predictive Factors of Hospital Mortality Due to Myocardial Infarction: A Multilevel Analysis of Iran's National Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh; Sajjadi, Homeira; Sadeghi, Mehraban

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding failure to establish the statistical presuppositions for analysis of the data by conventional approaches, hierarchical structure of the data as well as the effect of higher-level variables, this study was conducted to determine the factors independently associated with hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in Iran using a multilevel analysis. Methods: This study was a national, hospital-based, and cross-sectional study. In this study, the data of 20750 new MI patients between April, 2012 and March, 2013 in Iran were used. The hospital mortality due to MI was considered as the dependent variable. The demographic data, clinical and behavioral risk factors at the individual level and environmental data were gathered. Multilevel logistic regression models with Stata software were used to analyze the data. Results: Within 1-year of study, the frequency (%) of hospital mortality within 30 days of admission was derived 2511 (12.1%) patients. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of mortality with (95% confidence interval [CI]) was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5–2.8) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3–1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.4) for female gender, and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1–1.3) for humidity, all of which were considered as risk factors of mortality. But, OR of mortality was 0.7 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.7–0.8) and 0.5 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4–0.6) were considered as protective factors of mortality. Conclusions: Individual risk factors had independent effects on the hospital mortality due to MI. Variables in the province level had no significant effect on the outcome of MI. Increasing access and quality to treatment could reduce the mortality due to MI.

  8. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355... Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs... distance between the gage line of a frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face,...

  9. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355... Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs... distance between the gage line of a frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face,...

  10. Public hospital quality report awareness: evidence from National and Californian Internet searches and social media mentions, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Huesch, Marco D; Currid-Halkett, Elizabeth; Doctor, Jason N

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Publicly available hospital quality reports seek to inform consumers of important healthcare quality and affordability attributes, and may inform consumer decision-making. To understand how much consumers search for such information online on one Internet search engine, whether they mention such information in social media and how positively they view this information. Setting and design A leading Internet search engine (Google) was the main focus of the study. Google Trends and Google Adwords keyword analyses were performed for national and Californian searches between 1 August 2012 and 31 July 2013 for keywords related to ‘top hospital’, best hospital’, and ‘hospital quality’, as well as for six specific hospital quality reports. Separately, a proprietary social media monitoring tool was used to investigate blog, forum, social media and traditional media mentions of, and sentiment towards, major public reports of hospital quality in California in 2012. Primary outcome measures (1) Counts of searches for keywords performed on Google; (2) counts of and (3) sentiment of mentions of public reports on social media. Results National Google search volume for 75 hospital quality-related terms averaged 610?700 searches per month with strong variation by keyword and by state. A commercial report (Healthgrades) was more commonly searched for nationally on Google than the federal government's Hospital Compare, which otherwise dominated quality-related search terms. Social media references in California to quality reports were generally few, and commercially produced hospital quality reports were more widely mentioned than state (Office of Statewide Healthcare Planning and Development (OSHPD)), or non-profit (CalHospitalCompare) reports. Conclusions Consumers are somewhat aware of hospital quality based on Internet search activity and social media disclosures. Public stakeholders may be able to broaden their quality dissemination initiatives by advertising on Google or Twitter and using social media interactively with consumers looking for relevant information. PMID:24618223

  11. Analysis of Emergency Department Visits for Palpitations (From the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey)

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Marc A.; Mower, William R.; Kanzaria, HemalK.; Hoffman, Jerome R.; Buch, Eric F.; Sun, Benjamin C.

    2014-01-01

    Palpitations is a common complaint among emergency department (ED) patients, with etiologies ranging from benign to life-threatening. We analyzed the ED component of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 2001 through 2010 for visits with a chief complaint of palpitations, and calculated nationally representative weighted estimates for prevalence, demographic characteristics, and admission rates. ED and hospital discharge diagnoses were tabulated and categorized, and recursive partitioning was used to identify factors associated with admission. An estimated 684,000 visits had a primary reason for visit of “palpitations” representing a national prevalence of 5.8 per 1,000 ED visits (0.58%; 95% CI 0.52% to 0.64%). Females and non-Hispanic whites were responsible for the majority of visits. A cardiac diagnosis made up 34% of all ED diagnoses. The overall admission rate was 24.6% (95% CI 21.2% to 28.1%), with higher rates seen in the Midwest and Northeast compared to the West. Survey-weighted recursive partitioning revealed several factors associated with admission including age over 50 years, male sex, cardiac ED diagnosis, tachycardia, hypertension, and Medicare insurance. In conclusion, palpitations are responsible for a significant minority of ED visits and are associated with a cardiac diagnosis roughly one third of the time. This was associated with a relatively high admission rate, although significant regional variation in these rates exists. PMID:24698469

  12. Management of postoperative pain: experience of the Niamey National Hospital, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Chaibou, Maman Sani; Sanoussi, Samuila; Sani, Rachid; Toudou, Nouhou A; Daddy, Hadjara; Madougou, Moussa; Abdou, Idrissa; Abarchi, Habibou; Chobli, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the management of postoperative pain at the Niamey National Hospital. Methods A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care at the Niamey National Hospital from March to June, 2009. Data collected included age, sex, literacy, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, type of anesthesia, type of surgery, postoperative analgesics used, and the cost of analgesics. Three types of pain assessment scale were used depending on the patient’s ability to describe his or her pain: the verbal rating scale (VRS), the numerical rating scale (NRS), or the visual analog scale (VAS). Patients were evaluated during the first 48 hours following surgery. Results The sample included 553 patients. The VRS was used for the evaluation of 72% of patients, the NRS for 14.4%, and the VAS for 13.6%. Of the VRS group, 33.9%, 8.3%, and 2.1% rated their pain as 3 or 4 out of 4 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the NRS group, 33.8%, 8.8%, and 2.5% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. For the VAS group, 29.3%, 5.4%, and 0% rated their pain as greater than 7 out of 10 at 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively, respectively. Conclusion Postoperative pain assessment and management in developing countries has not been well described. Poverty, illiteracy, and inadequate training of physicians and other health personnel contribute to the underutilization of postoperative analgesia. Analysis of the results gathered at the Niamey National Hospital gives baseline data that can be the impetus to increase training in pain management and to establish standardized protocols. PMID:23271923

  13. Coast Guard Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Coast Guard are jointly developing a lightweight, helicopter-transportable, completely self-contained firefighting module for combating shipboard and dockside fires. The project draws upon NASA technology in high-capacity rocket engine pumps, lightweight materials and compact packaging.

  14. Hydrogeologic framework and water quality of the Vermont Army National Guard Ethan Allen Firing Range, northern Vermont, October 2002 through December 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Stewart F.; Chalmers, Ann; Mack, Thomas J.; Denner, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    The Ethan Allen Firing Range of the Vermont Army National Guard is a weapons-testing and training facility in a mountainous region of Vermont that has been in operation for about 80 years. The hydrologic framework and water quality of the facility were assessed between October 2002 and December 2003. As part of the study, streamflow was continuously measured in the Lee River and 24 observation wells were installed at 19 locations in the stratified drift and bedrock aquifers to examine the hydrogeology. Chemical analyses of surface water, ground water, streambed sediment, and fish tissue were collected to assess major ions, trace elements, nutrients, and volatile and semivolatile compounds. Sampling included 5 surface-water sites sampled during moderate and low-flow conditions; streambed-sediment samples collected at the 5 surface-water sites; fish-tissue samples collected at 3 of the 5 surface-water sites; macroinvertebrates collected at 4 of the 5 surface-water sites; and ground-water samples collected from 10 observation wells, and samples collected at all surface- and ground-water sites. The hydrogeologic framework at the Ethan Allen Firing Range is dominated by the upland mountain and valley setting of the site. Bedrock wells yield low to moderate amounts of water (0 to 23 liters per minute). In the narrow river valleys, layered stratified-drift deposits of sand and gravel of up to 18 meters thick fill the Lee River and Mill Brook Valleys. In these deposits, the water table is generally within 3 meters below the land surface and overall ground-water flow is from east to west. Streamflow in the Lee River averaged 0.72 cubic meters per second (25.4 cubic feet per second) between December 2002 and December 2003. Streams are highly responsive to precipitation events in this mountainous environment and a comparison with other nearby watersheds shows that Lee River maintains relatively high streamflow during dry periods. Concentrations of trace elements and nutrients in surface-water samples are well below freshwater-quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Brook-trout samples collected in 1992 and 2003 show trace-metal concentrations have decreased over the past 11 years. concentrations in water samples are well below levels that restrict swimming at all five stream sites at moderate and low-flow conditions and in all observation wells. Comparisons among surface-water, streambed-sediment, and biological samples collected in 2003 to earlier studies at the Ethan Allen Firing Range indicate water-quality conditions are similar or have improved over the past 15 years. Ground water in the stratified-drift aquifers at the facility is well buffered with relatively high alkalinities and pH greater than 6. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, uranium, and zinc were below detection levels in ground-water samples. Barium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, and strontium were the only trace elements detected in ground-water samples. Cobalt and iron were detected at low levels in two wells near Mill Brook, and copper was detected at the detection limit in one of these wells. These same two wells had concentrations of barium and manganese 2 to 10 times greater than other ground-water samples. Concentrations of nutrients are at or below detection levels in most ground-water samples. Volatile organic compounds and semivolatile organic compounds were not detected in any water samples from the Ethan Allen Firing Range.

  15. Establishment of National Laboratory Standards in Public and Private Hospital Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    ANJARANI, Soghra; SAFADEL, Nooshafarin; DAHIM, Parisa; AMINI, Rana; MAHDAVI, Saeed; MIRAB SAMIEE, Siamak

    2013-01-01

    In September 2007 national standard manual was finalized and officially announced as the minimal quality requirements for all medical laboratories in the country. Apart from auditing laboratories, Reference Health Laboratory has performed benchmarking auditing of medical laboratory network (surveys) in provinces. 12th benchmarks performed in Tehran and Alborz provinces, Iran in 2010 in three stages. We tried to compare different processes, their quality and accordance with national standard measures between public and private hospital laboratories. The assessment tool was a standardized checklist consists of 164 questions. Analyzing process show although in most cases implementing the standard requirements are more prominent in private laboratories, there is still a long way to complete fulfillment of requirements, and it takes a lot of effort. Differences between laboratories in public and private sectors especially in laboratory personnel and management process are significant. Probably lack of motivation, plays a key role in obtaining less desirable results in laboratories in public sectors. PMID:23514840

  16. ‘Shell shock’ Revisited: An Examination of the Case Records of the National Hospital in London

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Stefanie Caroline; Jones, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    During the First World War the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic, in Queen Square, London, then Britain’s leading centre for neurology, took a key role in the treatment and understanding of shell shock. This paper explores the case notes of all 462 servicemen who were admitted with functional neurological disorders between 1914 and 1919. Many of these were severe or chronic cases referred to the National Hospital because of its acknowledged expertise and the resources it could call upon. Biographical data was collected together with accounts of the patient’s military experience, his symptoms, diagnostic interpretations and treatment outcomes. Analysis of the notes showed that motor syndromes (loss of function or hyperkinesias), often combined with somato-sensory loss, were common presentations. Anxiety and depression as well as vegetative symptoms such as sweating, dizziness and palpitations were also prevalent among this patient population. Conversely, psychogenic seizures were reported much less frequently than in comparable accounts from German tertiary referral centres. As the war unfolded the number of physicians who believed that shell shock was primarily an organic disorder fell as research failed to find a pathological basis for its symptoms. However, little agreement existed among the Queen Square doctors about the fundamental nature of the disorder and it was increasingly categorised as functional disorder or hysteria. PMID:25284893

  17. Biological assessment of the effects of activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard training site, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties, California, on the endangered san joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 imposes several requirements on federal agencies concerning listed threatened and endangered species and their designated critical habitat. Camp Roberts is operated by the California Army National Guard (CA ARNG) with funding from the National Guard Bureau (NGB). Its primary mission to provide a site where military training requirements of the western United States can be met. The presence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) was confirmed in 1960 and the distribution and abundance of the species increased over the next two decades. The Secretary of Interior has not designated any critical habitat for San Joaquin kit fox. The major objective of this Biological Assessment is to provide FWS with sufficient information concerning the possible impacts that routine military training, maintenance and repair activities, and proposed construction projects may have on the San Joaquin kit fox and its essential habitat at Camp Roberts so that formal consultation with NGB and CA ARNG can begin. FWS will use this information as part of the basis for issuing a Biological Opinion which will include an incidental take provision. 45 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Laser beam guard clamps

    DOEpatents

    Dickson, Richard K. (Stockton, CA)

    2010-09-07

    A quick insert and release laser beam guard panel clamping apparatus having a base plate mountable on an optical table, a first jaw affixed to the base plate, and a spring-loaded second jaw slidably carried by the base plate to exert a clamping force. The first and second jaws each having a face acutely angled relative to the other face to form a V-shaped, open channel mouth, which enables wedge-action jaw separation by and subsequent clamping of a laser beam guard panel inserted through the open channel mouth. Preferably, the clamping apparatus also includes a support structure having an open slot aperture which is positioned over and parallel with the open channel mouth.

  19. Breath tests sustainability in hospital settings: cost analysis and reimbursement in the Italian National Health System.

    PubMed

    Volpe, M; Scaldaferri, F; Ojetti, V; Poscia, A

    2013-01-01

    The high demand of Breath Tests (BT) in many gastroenterological conditions in time of limited resources for health care systems, generates increased interest in cost analysis from the point of view of the delivery of services to better understand how use the money to generate value. This study aims to measure the cost of C13 Urea and other most utilized breath tests in order to describe key aspects of costs and reimbursements looking at the economic sustainability for the hospital. A hospital based cost-analysis of the main breath tests commonly delivery in an ambulatory setting is performed. Mean salary for professional nurses and gastroenterologists, drugs/preparation used and disposable materials, purchase and depreciation of the instrument and the testing time was used to estimate the cost, while reimbursements are based on the 2013 Italian National Health System ambulatory pricelist. Variables that could influence the model are considered in the sensitivity analyses. The mean cost for C13--Urea, Lactulose and Lactose BT are, respectively, Euros 30,59; 45,20 and 30,29. National reimbursement often doesn't cover the cost of the analysis, especially considering the scenario with lower number of exam. On the contrary, in high performance scenario all the reimbursement could cover the cost, except for the C13 Urea BT that is high influenced by the drugs cost. However, consideration about the difference between Italian Regional Health System ambulatory pricelist are done. Our analysis shows that while national reimbursement rates cover the costs of H2 breath testing, they do not cover sufficiently C13 BT, particularly urea breath test. The real economic strength of these non invasive tests should be considered in the overall organization of inpatient and outpatient clinic, accounting for complete diagnostic pathway for each gastrointestinal disease. PMID:24443075

  20. 46 CFR 4.40-30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 4.40-30 Section 4.40-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  1. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  2. 46 CFR 4.40-35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 4.40-35 Section 4.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  3. 46 CFR 4.40-30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 4.40-30 Section 4.40-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  4. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures. 4.40-3 Section 4.40-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National...

  5. 46 CFR 4.40-10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 4.40-10 Section 4.40-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  6. 32 CFR 700.307 - Powers with respect to the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. 700.307... of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy § 700.307 Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. Whenever the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy under Section 3 of Title 14, United States Code,...

  7. 46 CFR 4.40-10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 4.40-10 Section 4.40-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  8. 46 CFR 4.40-10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 4.40-10 Section 4.40-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  9. 46 CFR 4.40-10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 4.40-10 Section 4.40-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  10. 32 CFR 700.307 - Powers with respect to the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. 700.307... of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy § 700.307 Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. Whenever the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy under Section 3 of Title 14, United States Code,...

  11. 46 CFR 4.40-30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 4.40-30 Section 4.40-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  12. 32 CFR 700.307 - Powers with respect to the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. 700.307... of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy § 700.307 Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. Whenever the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy under Section 3 of Title 14, United States Code,...

  13. 46 CFR 4.40-30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 4.40-30 Section 4.40-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  14. 46 CFR 4.40-35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 4.40-35 Section 4.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  15. 46 CFR 4.40-35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 4.40-35 Section 4.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  16. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  17. 46 CFR 4.40-30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. 4.40-30 Section 4.40-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  18. 32 CFR 700.307 - Powers with respect to the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. 700.307... of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy § 700.307 Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. Whenever the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy under Section 3 of Title 14, United States Code,...

  19. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures. 4.40-3 Section 4.40-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National...

  20. 32 CFR 700.307 - Powers with respect to the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. 700.307... of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy § 700.307 Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. Whenever the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy under Section 3 of Title 14, United States Code,...

  1. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  2. 46 CFR 4.40-35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 4.40-35 Section 4.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  3. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures. 4.40-3 Section 4.40-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National...

  4. 46 CFR 4.40-10 - Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Preliminary investigation by the Coast Guard. 4.40-10 Section 4.40-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  5. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  6. 46 CFR 4.40-35 - Records of the Coast Guard and the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Records of the Coast Guard and the Board. 4.40-35 Section 4.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety Board Marine...

  7. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures. 4.40-3 Section 4.40-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National...

  8. 46 CFR 4.40-3 - Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Relationship to Coast Guard marine investigation regulations and procedures. 4.40-3 Section 4.40-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National...

  9. 46 CFR 4.40-25 - Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard marine casualty investigation for the Board. 4.40-25 Section 4.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Coast Guard-National Transportation Safety...

  10. Biomaterials use in Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda: Access and affordability.

    PubMed

    Bakwatanisa, Bosco; Enywaku, Alfred; Kiwanuka, Martin; Lamunu, Claire; Mbowa, Nicholas; Mukiibi, Denis; Namayega, Catherine; Ngabirano, Beryl; Ntambi, Henry; Reichert, William

    2016-01-01

    Students in Biomaterials BBE3102 at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda were assigned semester long group projects in the first semester of the 2014-15 academic year to determine the biomaterials type and usage in Mulago National Referral Hospital, which is emblematic of large public hospitals across East Africa. Information gathering was conducted through student interviews with Mulago physicians because there were no archival records. The students divided themselves into seven project groups covering biomaterials use in the areas of wound closure, dental and oral surgery, cardiology, burn care, bone repair, ophthalmology and total joint replacement. As in the developed world, the majority of biomaterials used in Mulago are basic wound closure materials, dental materials, and bone fixation materials, all of which are comparatively inexpensive, easy to store, and readily available from either the government or local suppliers; however, there were significant issues with the implant supply chain, affordability, and patient compliance and follow-up in cases where specialty expertise and expensive implants were employed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 104-112, 2016. PMID:26190587

  11. Evaluation of the Department of Neurosurgery of the Seoul National University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Neurosurgery (DNS) of the Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH), belongs to the largest and oldest such institutions in Korea. Because of its growing reputation it is hardly surprising that the DNS draws visitor and scholars for clinical education and academic exchange from far beyond Korea. I myself visited the SNUH in February and March 2013. During this time I composed this evaluation in which I compare the DNS to my home Department at the Johannes Gutenberg-University in Mainz/Germany, as well as the situation of Neurosurgery in Korea and Germany in general. In the first part this evaluation summarizes data concerning equipment, staff and organizational structure, as well as educational and scientific issues of the DNS. In the second part some issues of interest are discussed in special regard to the corresponding practices in Germany. PMID:23908698

  12. The Implications of the National Minimum Wage for Training Practices and Skill Utilisation in the United Kingdom Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Gill; Williams, Steve; Adam-Smith, Derek

    2003-01-01

    Two key issues thrown up by the 1999 introduction of the National Minimum Wage (NMW) in the United Kingdom are its likely impact on employers' training practices in low paying sectors of the economy and the implications for skills. Based on a study of the hospitality industry, this article assesses the limited significance of the differential,…

  13. Disability and Hospital Care Expenses among National Health Insurance Beneficiaries: Analyses of Population-Based Data in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Fu-Gong; Lin, Pei-Ying; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    Nationwide data were collected concerning inpatient care use and medical expenditure of people with disabilities (N = 937,944) among national health insurance beneficiaries in Taiwan. Data included gender, age, hospitalization frequency and expenditure, healthcare setting and service department, discharge diagnose disease according to the ICD-9-CM…

  14. Hospitalization for Hypoglycemia in Japanese Diabetic Patients: A Retrospective Study Using a National Inpatient Database, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Sako, Akahito; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Goto, Atsushi; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to elucidate the epidemiology, patient demographics, and clinical outcomes of hospitalization for hypoglycemia in diabetic patients using a Japanese large-scale database.We conducted a retrospective study using a national inpatient database of acute care hospitals in Japan. Diabetic patients ages ?15 years with hypoglycemia as a main diagnosis for hospitalization were eligible. We estimated the annual number of hospitalizations in Japan and compared the annual admission rate by age and treatment groups. We also analyzed the association between patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality.Among 22.7 million discharge records from July 2008 and March 2013, a total of 25,071 patients were eligible. The mean age was 73.4 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 22.3? kg/m(2). The estimated annual hospitalization for hypoglycemia in Japan was ?20,000. Annual admission rates for hypoglycemia per 1000 diabetic patients and 1000 diabetic patients receiving insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents were 2.1 and 4.1, respectively. Patients <40 years and >70 years old were at a higher risk of hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was 3.8%, and risk factors associated with poor survival were male sex, older age, lower bed capacity, community hospital, low BMI, coma at admission, and higher Charlson Comorbidity Index.To prevent severe hypoglycemia that leads to death and complications, individualized and careful glycemic control are important, especially in very old or young patients and in those with comorbid conditions or low BMI. PMID:26107672

  15. National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Designation and 30-day Mortality for Hospitalized, Immunocompromised Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Friese, Christopher R.; Silber, Jeffrey H.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To examine 30-day mortality and NCI designation for cancer patients who are immunocompromised and hospitalized. Method Secondary analysis of1998 and 1999hospital claims, cancer registry and vital statistics (n=10,370) linked to survey and administrative data from160 Pennsylvania hospitals. Logistic regression models estimated the effects of NCI designation on the likelihood of 30-day mortality. Results NCI-designated centers were associated with a 33% reduction in the likelihood of death, after adjusting for patient, hospital, and nursing characteristics. Conclusions Immunocompromised cancer patients have lower mortality in NCI-designated hospitals. Identification and adoption of care processes from these institutions may improve mortality. PMID:20504224

  16. User inspection of National Taiwan University Hospital's telehealth care information system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei Hsuan; Chen, Chi-Huang; Chen, Hui-Te; Shu, Che-Hsuan; Lin, Feng-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Van; Li, Hao-Jhun; Wu, Yuan-Ting; Lai, Feipei

    2010-01-01

    The telehealth care system has been important in the healthcare world for several decades; however, Taiwan only began work on telehealth care this past year. This paper outlines the effectiveness of the telehealth care system developed by the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). The usability of the integrated telehealth care system was analyzed through of heuristic evaluation and its usefulness. By using the heuristic evaluation form as developed by Nielsen, it is possible to examine the telehealth care system from the user's perspective. In addition, in assessing the usefulness through lists of criteria, system developers can determine the pros and the cons of the database. Ultimately, the heuristic evaluation revealed several violations on the system, but are not prohibitive to the development of such as system. Similarly, evaluation of the usefulness comes out positive; despite the fact that the suggested changes proposed by the users can be said are the main weaknesses of the system. With some improvements, the telehealth care system can be used efficiently in NTUH's healthcare system. PMID:21095791

  17. Posttransfusion Haematocrit Equilibration: Timing Posttransfusion Haematocrit Check in Neonates at the National Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Audu, L. I.; Otuneye, A. T.; Mairami, A. B.; Mshelia, L. J.; Nwatah, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaemia is a common morbidity in the NICU and often requires transfusion of packed red blood cells. Haematocrit equilibration following red cell transfusion occurs over time ultimately resulting in a stable packed cell volume (PCV). Knowledge of this equilibration process is pertinent in the accurate timing of posttransfusion (PT) PCV. We conducted a prospective study to determine an appropriate timing for PT PCV estimation on 47 stable anaemic babies at the Neonatal Unit of National Hospital, Abuja. Values of PCV were determined before transfusion and at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours posttransfusion. Forty of the recruited neonates and young infants were analyzed. Their gestational age range was 26 to 40 weeks. 1-hour PT PCV (48.5% ± 5.5%) was similar to the 6-hour PT PCV (47.8% ± 5.6%) P = 0.516, but both were significantly different from the 12-hour (46.8% ± 5.9%), 24-hour (45.9 ± 5.8%), and 48-hour (45.4% ± 6.2%) PT PCVs. The 12-hour PT PCV was similar to the 24-hour and 48-hour PT PCVs (P = 0.237 and 0.063, resp.). We concluded that, in stable nonhaemorrhaging and nonhaemolysing young infants, the estimated timing of haematocrit equilibration and, consequently, posttransfusion PCV is 12 hours after red blood cell transfusion. PMID:25861284

  18. Antiepileptic drugs prescription utilization behavior and direct costs of treatment in a national hospital of India

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Ahsan; Tripathi, Manjari; Khanam, R.; Vohora, Divya

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The present study evaluated the direct costs of active epilepsy and looked at the pattern of drug prescription and utilization in epileptic patients visiting the neuroscience centre of a national hospital of India. Materials and Methods: A total of 134 epileptic patients were studied over a period of 4 months. Patients demography, commonly prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), socioeconomic status, direct costs, response ratio (RR) for newer drugs, and quality of life (QOLIE-10) was evaluated. Results and Discussion: We found a higher percentage of male patients (67.9%) as compared with females. Most of the patients were in the age group 11–30 years and majority of them (39.6%) belonged to lower middle group. A higher percentage (68.7) of drugs was prescribed as polytherapy. Higher monthly cost was observed for some of the newer AEDs including the lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and lacosamide as compared with older drugs. Among the newer drugs, clobazam had the lowest cost. RR was calculated for 12 patients out of which 8 had a RR < –0.50. The QOL domains, following conventional or newer drugs, were not much affected. Conclusion: The study indicates an increasing trend toward clinical usage of newer AEDs, increasing trend of poly-therapy with significant escalations in the cost of therapy. PMID:23349595

  19. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

  20. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

  1. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

  2. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

  3. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

  4. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

  5. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

  6. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

  7. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

  8. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

  9. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.143... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the...

  10. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.143... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the...

  11. A Qualitative Exploration of Workarounds Related to the Implementation of National Electronic Health Records in Early Adopter Mental Health Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ser, Gloria; Robertson, Ann; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate the perceptions and reported practices of mental health hospital staff using national hospital electronic health records (EHRs) in order to inform future implementations, particularly in acute mental health settings. Methods Thematic analysis of interviews with a wide range of clinical, information technology (IT), managerial and other staff at two early adopter mental health National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in London, UK, implementing national EHRs. Results We analysed 33 interviews. We first sought out examples of workarounds, such as delayed data entry, entering data in wrong places and individuals using the EHR while logged in as a colleague, then identified possible reasons for the reported workarounds. Our analysis identified four main categories of factors contributing to workarounds (i.e., operational, cultural, organisational and technical). Operational factors included poor system integration with existing workflows and the system not meeting users' perceived needs. Cultural factors involved users' competence with IT and resistance to change. Organisational factors referred to insufficient organisational resources and training, while technical factors included inadequate local technical infrastructure. Many of these factors, such as integrating the EHR system with day-to-day operational processes, staff training and adequate local IT infrastructure, were likely to apply to system implementations in various settings, but we also identified factors that related particularly to implementing EHRs in mental health hospitals, for example: EHR system incompatibility with IT systems used by mental health–related sectors, notably social services; the EHR system lacking specific, mental health functionalities and options; and clinicians feeling unable to use computers while attending to distressed psychiatric patients. Conclusions A better conceptual model of reasons for workarounds should help with designing, and supporting the implementation and adoption of, EHRs for use in hospital mental health settings. PMID:24454678

  12. 46 CFR 190.20-35 - Hospital space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accomodations for Officers, Crew, and Scientific Personnel § 190.20-35 Hospital space. (a) Except...

  13. 2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building (Building 90), administration and clinical hospital building (Building 88), and hospital building (Building 91) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, 4101 South Fourth Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  14. Prevalence and Characterization of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Mulago National Referral Hospital, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Okoche, Deogratius; Asiimwe, Benon B.; Katabazi, Fred Ashaba; Kato, Laban; Najjuka, Christine F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Carbapenemases have increasingly been reported in enterobacteriaceae worldwide. Most carbapenemases are plasmid encoded hence resistance can easily spread. Carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae are reported to cause mortality in up to 50% of patients who acquire bloodstream infections. We set out to determine the burden of carbapenem resistance as well as establish genes encoding for carbapenemases in enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates obtained from Mulago National Referral Hospital, Uganda. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a total of 196 clinical isolates previously collected from pus swabs, urine, blood, sputum, tracheal aspirates, cervical swabs, endomentrial aspirates, rectal swabs, Vaginal swabs, ear swabs, products of conception, wound biopsy and amniotic fluid. All isolates were subjected to phenotypic carbapenemase screening using Boronic acid-based inhibition, Modified Hodge and EDTA double combined disk test. In addition, all the isolates were subjected to PCR assay to confirm presence of carbapenemase encoding genes. Results The study found carbapenemase prevalence of 22.4% (44/196) in the isolates using phenotypic tests, with the genotypic prevalence slightly higher at 28.6% (56/196). Over all, the most prevalent gene was blaVIM (21,10.7%), followed by blaOXA-48 (19, 9.7%), blaIMP (12, 6.1%), blaKPC (10, 5.1%) and blaNDM-1 (5, 2.6%). Among 56 isolates positive for 67 carbapenemase encoding genes, Klebsiella pneumonia was the species with the highest number (52.2%). Most 32/67(47.7%) of these resistance genes were in bacteria isolated from pus swabs. Conclusion There is a high prevalence of carbapenemases and carbapenem-resistance encoding genes among third generation cephalosporins resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Uganda, indicating a danger of limited treatment options in this setting in the near future. PMID:26284519

  15. Involving the patient to ask about hospital hand hygiene: a National Patient Safety Agency feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Pittet, D; Panesar, S S; Wilson, K; Longtin, Y; Morris, T; Allan, V; Storr, J; Cleary, K; Donaldson, L

    2011-04-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) affect at least 300,000 patients annually in the UK and represent a significant, yet largely preventable, burden to healthcare systems. Hand hygiene by healthcare workers (HCWs) is the leading prevention measure, but compliance with good practice is generally low. The UK National Patient Safety Agency surveyed the public, inpatients, and HCWs, particularly frontline clinical staff and infection control nurses, in five acute care hospitals to determine whether they agreed that a greater level of involvement and engagement with patients would contribute to increased compliance with hand hygiene and reduce HAIs. Fifty-seven percent (302/530) of the public were unlikely to question doctors on the cleanliness of their hands as they assumed that they had already cleaned them. Forty-three percent (90/210) of inpatients considered that HCWs should know to clean their hands and trusted them to do so, and 20% (42/210) would not want HCWs to think that they were questioning their professional ability to do their job correctly. Most HCWs surveyed (178/254, 71%) said that HAI could be reduced to a greater or lesser degree if patients asked HCWs if they had cleaned their hands before touching them. Inviting patients to remind HCWs about hand hygiene through the provision of individual alcohol-based hand-rub containers and actively supporting an 'It's OK to ask' attitude were perceived as the most useful interventions by both patients and HCWs. However, further work is required to refute the myth among HCWs that patient involvement undermines the doctor- or HCW-patient relationship. PMID:21236515

  16. Patient satisfaction and non-UK educated nurses: a cross-sectional observational study of English National Health Service Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Peter; Sloane, Douglas M; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Ball, Jane E; Aiken, Linda H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether patient satisfaction with nursing care in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England is associated with the proportion of non-UK educated nurses providing care. Design Cross-sectional analysis using data from the 2010 NHS Adult Inpatient Survey merged with data from nurse and hospital administrator surveys. Logistic regression models with corrections for clustering were used to determine whether the proportions of non-UK educated nurses were significantly related to patient satisfaction before and after taking account of other hospital, nursing and patient characteristics. Setting 31 English NHS trusts. Participants 12?506 patients 16?years of age and older with at least one overnight stay that completed a satisfaction survey; 2962 bedside care nurses who completed a nurse survey; and 31 NHS trusts. Main outcome measure Patient satisfaction. Results The percentage of non-UK educated nurses providing bedside hospital care, which ranged from 1% to 52% of nurses, was significantly associated with patient satisfaction. After controlling for potential confounding factors, each 10-point increase in the percentage of non-UK educated nurses diminished the odds of patients reporting good or excellent care by 12% (OR=0.88), and decreased the odds of patients agreeing that they always had confidence and trust in nurses by 13% (OR=0.87). Other indicators of patient satisfaction also revealed lower satisfaction in hospitals with higher percentages of non-UK educated nurses. Conclusions Use of non-UK educated nurses in English NHS hospitals is associated with lower patient satisfaction. Importing nurses from abroad to substitute for domestically educated nurses may negatively impact quality of care. PMID:26634400

  17. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...access hospitals; or clinic, rehabilitation agency, or public health agency providers of outpatient physical therapy, occupational therapy or speech pathology services may provide reasonable assurance to CMS that it requires the...

  18. National Trends in the Use of Inpatient Hospitalization for Combined Abdominoplasty and Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shaterian, Ashkaun; Masoomi, Hossein; B Martin, Jenna; Paydar, Keyianoosh; A. Wirth, Garrett

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Combined procedures involving elective breast surgery at the time of abdominoplasty are frequently performed procedures in aesthetic plastic surgery. While found to be safe outpatient procedures, many surgeons elect to perform combined abdominoplasty/breast surgery as inpatient surgery. This study was performed to explore the practice of performing the combined procedure as an inpatient in the United States. METHODS The Nationwide Inpatient Sample database was evaluated using ICD-9CM procedural codes to identify hospitalizations where patients underwent abdominoplasty combined with breast surgery. We trended the frequency of this combined procedure, and evaluated the rate of acute post-operative complications, length of inpatient hospitalization, and total hospital charges. RESULTS Between 2004 and 2011, 29,235 combined abdominoplasty/breast procedures were performed as inpatient in United States. The rate of major post-operative complications in the acute hospitalization period was 1.12% and included CVA (0.02%), respiratory failure (0.6%), pneumonia (0.3%), VTE (0.1%), and myocardial infarction (0.1%). Hospitalization averaged 1.8 days and resulted in $31,177 of hospital charges. The demographics of the combined procedure transitioned as i) frequency of inpatient surgeries decreased, ii) percent of patients >50 yr increased, and iii) hospital charges increased from 2004 to 2011. CONCLUSION A significant number of surgeons are performing combined abdominoplasty and elective breast surgery as inpatient procedures in United States. The combined surgery is safe but is associated with small risk of major post-operative complications. A short inpatient hospitalization may be beneficial for high-risk patients interested in combined procedures, but must be analyzed against the rising costs of inpatient surgery. PMID:26284180

  19. Does decreased research funding from the National Institutes of Health to local academic hospitals cause an increase in industry sponsored research funding?

    E-print Network

    Truesdell, John A., Jr. (John Alan)

    2011-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been the stalwart of research funding at universities and academic teaching hospitals. However, since the start of the last decade NIH funding has contracted in real terms. ...

  20. Profile of women presenting for abortions in Singapore at the National University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kuldip; Fong, Y F; Loh, S Y

    2002-07-01

    The study was conducted to profile women seeking abortions at the National University Hospital, with particular interest in the trend of teenage pregnancies with the aim of identifying risk factors for late presentation for abortions. All patients who underwent an abortion at our center from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2000 were recruited. Data were entered into a prepared questionnaire during the mandatory pre-abortion counseling sessions and completed at the 6-week post-abortion follow-up. This was then keyed into a database (SPSS Version 10), and the results were analyzed. Multivariate analysis was used in identifying risk factors associated with late presentation for abortions. Chi-square analysis of variables was used where relevant. A total of 1370 women presented for induced abortions during the period of study. The mean age of women was 29.6 years. Most women were either homemakers (35.3%) or semi-skilled workers (28.5%) with at least a secondary school education (58.3%). The majority were married (75.5%). There was a significant trend in the proportion of single women seeking abortions, from 18.3% in 1996 to 27.8% in 2000 (p < 0.05). At the same time, the proportion of women presenting for repeat abortions also increased from 13.8% in 1996 to 33.2% in 2000 (p < 0.05). Teenage abortions made up 117 (8.5%) of the study group, of which 95% were single women. Significant proportions (52.1%) were students at the time of abortion. In contrast to women above 20 years of age, pregnant teenagers were more likely not to have used any contraception (67.1% vs. 37.3%) and more likely to present late for abortion (18.8% vs. 10.4%). Teenage pregnancies are a major risk factor for late presentation for abortions. This emphasizes the need for availability and easy access to early abortion counseling, and the need for sex education with use of contraception starting in schools, to reduce abortions among teenagers. PMID:12169380

  1. National Trends in Main Causes of Hospitalization: A Multi-Cohort Register Study of the Finnish Working-Age Population, 1976–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kouvonen, Anne; Koskinen, Aki; Varje, Pekka; Kokkinen, Lauri; De Vogli, Roberto; Väänänen, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Background The health transition theory argues that societal changes produce proportional changes in causes of disability and death. The aim of this study was to identify long-term changes in main causes of hospitalization in working-age population within a nation that has experienced considerable societal change. Methodology National trends in all-cause hospitalization and hospitalizations for the five main diagnostic categories were investigated in the data obtained from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. The seven-cohort sample covered the period from 1976 to 2010 and consisted of 3,769,356 randomly selected Finnish residents, each cohort representing 25% sample of population aged 18 to 64 years. Principal Findings Over the period of 35 years, the risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases and respiratory diseases decreased. Hospitalization for musculoskeletal diseases increased whereas mental and behavioral hospitalizations slightly decreased. The risk of cancer hospitalization decreased marginally in men, whereas in women an upward trend was observed. Conclusions/Significance A considerable health transition related to hospitalizations and a shift in the utilization of health care services of working-age men and women took place in Finland between 1976 and 2010. PMID:25379723

  2. Melanoma in the Italian Population and Regional Environmental Influences: A National Retrospective Survey on 2001–2008 Hospitalization Records

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, Prisco; Neglia, Cosimo; Falco, Andrea; Rivezzi, Matteo; Agnello, Nadia; Argentiero, Alberto; Chitano, Giovanna; Distante, Chiara; Della Rosa, Giulia; Vinci, Giorgia; De Donno, Antonella; Distante, Alessandro; Romanini, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the burden of regional environmental factors influencing the incidence of Melanoma in the Italian population and overcome the problem of partial population coverage by local cancer registries and thematic archives. Methods: We analyzed the Italian national hospitalization records from 2001 to 2008 provided by the Ministry of Health, excluding hospital re-admissions of the same patients, in order to assess the occurrence of Melanoma over a 8-year period. Data were presented by age groups (absolute number of cases from 20 to ?80 years old) and per Region (rates per 100,000 inhabitants) for each year. Results: The overall number of new hospitalizations due to malignant Melanoma increased by 16.8% from 2001 (n = 4846) to 2008 (n = 5823), with the rate per 100,000 inhabitants passing from 10.5 to almost 12.0 at a national level. The majority of new diagnoses of malignant Melanoma was observed in two age groups: 61–70 years old (from 979 in 2001 up to 1209 in 2008, corresponding to 15.1 and 18.1 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively) and 71–80 years old (from 954 in 2001 up to 1141 in 2008, corresponding to 19.5 and 21.8 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively). The number of hospitalizations due to Melanoma increased in all age groups with the only exception of the youngest patients aged 20–30 years old. The highest increases over the 8-year period were observed in people aged ?81 years old (+34%), 61–70 years old (+20%) and surprisingly in the age group 31–40 years old (+17%). Southern Regions showed lower hospitalization rates compared to Northern Italy and Region Lazio. The highest increases between 2001 and 2008 were observed in Trentino/Alto Adige, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Valla d’Aosta and Veneto Region. Conclusions: Hospitalizations due to malignant Melanoma in Italy seem to be influenced by environmental or population-related factors showing a decreasing incidence rate from the Northern to Southern Regions. PMID:26251915

  3. The National Accreditation Board for Hospital and Health Care Providers accreditation programme in India.

    PubMed

    Gyani, Girdhar J; Krishnamurthy, B

    2014-01-01

    Quality in health care is important as it is directly linked with patient safety. Quality as we know is driven either by regulation or by market demand. Regulation in most developing countries has not been effective, as there is shortage of health care providers and governments have to be flexible. In such circumstances, quality has taken a back seat. Accreditation symbolizes the framework for quality governance of a hospital and is based on optimum standards. Not only is India establishing numerous state of the art hospitals, but they are also experiencing an increase in demand for quality as well as medical tourism. India launched its own accreditation system in 2006, conforming to standards accredited by ISQua. This article shows the journey to accreditation in India and describes the problems encountered by hospitals as well as the benefits it has generated for the industry and patients. PMID:24938026

  4. National Estimates of Noncanine Bite and Sting Injuries Treated in US Hospital Emergency Departments, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ricky; Mack, Karin; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Proescholdbell, Scott; Annest, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Injuries resulting from contact with animals and insects are a significant public health concern. This study quantifies nonfatal bite and sting injuries by noncanine sources using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System–All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP). Methods The NEISS-AIP is an ongoing nationally representative surveillance system used to monitor all types and causes of injuries treated in US hospital emergency departments (EDs). Cases were coded by trained hospital coders using information from medical records on animal and insect sources of bite and sting injuries being treated. Data were weighted to produce national annualized estimates, percentages, and rates based on the US population. Results From 2001 to 2010 an estimated 10.1 million people visited EDs for noncanine bite and sting injuries, based on an unweighted case count of 169,010. This translates to a rate of 340.1 per 100,000 people (95% CI, 232.9–447.3). Insects accounted for 67.5% (95% CI, 45.8–89.2) of bite and sting injuries, followed by arachnids 20.8% (95% CI, 13.8–27.9). The estimated number of ED visits for bedbug bite injuries increased more than 7-fold—from 2156 visits in 2007 to 15,945 visits in 2010. Conclusions This study provides an update of national estimates of noncanine bite and sting injuries and describes the diversity of animal exposures based on a national sample of EDs. Treatment of nonfatal bite and sting injuries are costly to society. Direct medical and work time lost translates to an estimated $7.5 billion annually. PMID:24433776

  5. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... prescribed in the following table— Class of track Guard check gageThe distance between the gage line of a... to the gage line 2, may not be less than— Guard face gageThe distance between guard lines 1,...

  6. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... prescribed in the following table— Class of track Guard check gageThe distance between the gage line of a... to the gage line 2, may not be less than— Guard face gageThe distance between guard lines 1,...

  7. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... prescribed in the following table— Class of track Guard check gageThe distance between the gage line of a... to the gage line 2, may not be less than— Guard face gageThe distance between guard lines 1,...

  8. Language, Literacy and Numeracy in National Training Packages: Case Studies in Aged Care and Hospitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Christine; Brand, Jennie Bickmore

    The implementation and effectiveness of the inclusion of literacy and numeracy in industry training packages was examined in case studies of three programs in Western Australia. Two were certificate programs in cooking and food and beverage as specified in the hospitality training package, and the third was an aged care program based on the…

  9. 33 CFR 5.59 - Medical treatment and hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical treatment and hospitalization. 5.59 Section 5.59 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.59 Medical treatment and hospitalization. When any member of...

  10. 33 CFR 5.59 - Medical treatment and hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medical treatment and hospitalization. 5.59 Section 5.59 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.59 Medical treatment and hospitalization. When any member of...

  11. 33 CFR 5.59 - Medical treatment and hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical treatment and hospitalization. 5.59 Section 5.59 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.59 Medical treatment and hospitalization. When any member of...

  12. 33 CFR 5.59 - Medical treatment and hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical treatment and hospitalization. 5.59 Section 5.59 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.59 Medical treatment and hospitalization. When any member of...

  13. Reduction Mammoplasty in a Developing Country: A 10-year Review (2001-2010) at the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu

    PubMed Central

    Isiguzo, Chimaobi; Ogbonnaya, Sunday Iheuko; Udezue, Anthonia O

    2015-01-01

    Context: Large breast is a major problem because of associated symptomatology and aesthetic concerns. Reduction mammoplasty (RM) resolves the symptom and at the same time improves the aesthetic appearance of the breast, hence improving self-esteem and social integration. Aims: To describe the pattern of RM in a hospital in the developing world and its impact on postgraduate surgical training. Settings and Design: A retrospective review of all the RMs done in the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu (a major plastic surgery training center in Nigeria) over a ten-year period (2001–2010), in the developing country of Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: All RMs done in the hospital were reviewed after retrieving their records from operation register and medical records department. Fifteen (15) cases were retrieved and analyzed. Data Analysis: Data was analyzed with Microsoft excel 2007. Results: Average age of female patients who had RM was 26.5 years and 83.3% were single. The most common complaint was abnormally large breast (macromastia). Inferior pedicle technique was commonly used. Conclusions: The results of RM are remarkable as it impact positively on the quality of life of the patients. However, the level of awareness about the availability of this service is still low in the region as shown by few cases done over the period of review and this impacts negatively on the training. The need for public awareness cannot be overemphasized. PMID:25838761

  14. A&M. Guard house (TAN638), contextual view. Built in 1968. Camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Guard house (TAN-638), contextual view. Built in 1968. Camera faces south. Guard house controlled access to radioactive waste storage tanks beyond and to left of view. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-4-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. A healthier future for all Australians: an overview of the final report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Christine C

    2009-10-01

    After extensive community and health industry consultation, the final report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission, A healthier future for all Australians, was presented to the Australian Government on 30 June 2009. The reform agenda aims to tackle major access and equity issues that affect health outcomes for people now; redesign our health system so that it is better positioned to respond to emerging challenges; and create an agile, responsive and self-improving health system for long-term sustainability. The 123 recommendations are grouped in four themes: Taking responsibility: supporting greater individual and collective action to build good health and wellbeing. Connecting care: delivering comprehensive care for people over their lifetime, by strengthening primary health care, reshaping hospitals, improving subacute care, and opening up greater consumer choice and competition in aged care services. Facing inequities: taking action to tackle the causes and impact of health inequities, focusing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people in rural and remote areas, and access to mental health and dental services. Driving quality performance: having leadership and systems to achieve the best use of people, resources and knowledge, including "one health system" with national leadership and local delivery, revised funding arrangements, and changes to health workforce education, training and practice. PMID:19807629

  16. Health service delay among pulmonary tuberculosis patients presenting to a National Referral Hospital, Kampala, Uganda: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kansiime, Catherine; Kiwuwa, Stephen M; Levi, Mugenyi; Asiimwe, Benon B; Katamba, Achilles

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Delay in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is common in many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Timely diagnosis of active tuberculosis is crucial in minimizing morbidity and mortality in the community as well as nosocomial transmission in health care facilities. This study aimed at determining factors associated with health service delay in the diagnosis and initiation of treatment among new PTB patients presenting to the National Referral Hospital-Mulago. Methods This was a cross-sectional study among eligible new PTB patients presenting at the National referral TB treatment center Mulago hospital, between March to May 2009. The patients were consecutively recruited and interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire to assess socio- demographic and health service factors. Multivariate logistic regression using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals was done. Results Two hundred and sixty six newly diagnosed PTB patients were enrolled, of which 65.4% experienced health systems delay. The median health service delay was 9days (IQR=8-19). Factors associated with health service delay were: 1n-patient (OR= 4.68, 95% CI: 1.91-11.45), secondary as highest level of education attained (OR= 3.56, 95% CI: 1.18-10.74), primary as highest level of education attained (OR= 6.70, 95% CI: 2.13-21.02), presence of fever (OR= 3.28, 95% CI: 1.05-10.79), and patient delay at health facility (OR= 5.01, 95% CI: 1.33-18.9). Conclusion The study found a significant proportion of Health service delay among pulmonary tuberculosis patients presenting at the referral hospital. Being an in-patient and having fever as a symptom of tuberculosis needs further attention in order to have timely diagnosis. There is need for awareness on TB especially that most of the TB symptoms present like other febrile illnesses such as malaria and needs consideration when patients present to a health facility. PMID:24198882

  17. National Trends in Hospitalizations for Patients With Single-Ventricle Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Tabtabai, Sara; DeFaria Yeh, Doreen; Stefanescu, Ada; Kennedy, Kevin; Yeh, Robert W; Bhatt, Ami B

    2015-09-01

    Patients with single-ventricle (SV) anatomy now live to adulthood. Little is known about the cost of care and outcomes for patients with SV anatomy, especially those who develop heart failure (HF) cared for in adult hospitals in the United States. We analyzed the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2000 to 2011 for patients >14 years admitted to adult hospitals with the International Classifications of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes for SV anatomy. Demographics, outcomes, co-morbidities, and cost were assessed. From 2000 to 2011, the number of SV admissions was stable with a trend toward increased cost per admission over time. Coexistent hypertension, obesity, and liver, pulmonary, and renal diseases significantly increased over time. The most common reason for admission was atrial arrhythmia followed by HF. Patients with SV with HF had significantly higher inhospital mortality, length of stay, and more medical co-morbidities than those with SV and without HF. In conclusion, the cohort of patients with SV admitted to adult hospitals has changed in the modern era. Patients with SV have medical co-morbidities including renal and liver diseases, hypertension, and obesity at a surprisingly young age. Aggressive and proactive management of HF and arrhythmia may reduce cost of care for this challenging population. Patients with SV with HF have particularly high mortality, more medical co-morbidities, and increased cost of care and deserve more focused attention to improve outcomes. PMID:26100589

  18. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917...Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a) Definition...b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees...

  19. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917...Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a) Definition...b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees...

  20. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917...Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a) Definition...b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees...

  1. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917...Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a) Definition...b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees...

  2. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917...Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a) Definition...b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees...

  3. The orthopaedic error index: development and application of a novel national indicator for assessing the relative safety of hospital care using a cross-sectional approach

    PubMed Central

    Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Carson-Stevens, Andrew; Javad, Sundas; Patel, Bhavesh; Parry, Gareth; Donaldson, Liam J; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Orthopaedic Error Index for hospitals aims to provide the first national assessment of the relative safety of provision of orthopaedic surgery. Design Cross-sectional study (retrospective analysis of records in a database). Setting The National Reporting and Learning System is the largest national repository of patient-safety incidents in the world with over eight million error reports. It offers a unique opportunity to develop novel approaches to enhancing patient safety, including investigating the relative safety of different healthcare providers and specialties. Participants We extracted all orthopaedic error reports from the system over 1?year (2009–2010). Outcome measures The Orthopaedic Error Index was calculated as a sum of the error propensity and severity. All relevant hospitals offering orthopaedic surgery in England were then ranked by this metric to identify possible outliers that warrant further attention. Results 155 hospitals reported 48?971 orthopaedic-related patient-safety incidents. The mean Orthopaedic Error Index was 7.09/year (SD 2.72); five hospitals were identified as outliers. Three of these units were specialist tertiary hospitals carrying out complex surgery; the remaining two outlier hospitals had unusually high Orthopaedic Error Indexes: mean 14.46 (SD 0.29) and 15.29 (SD 0.51), respectively. Conclusions The Orthopaedic Error Index has enabled identification of hospitals that may be putting patients at disproportionate risk of orthopaedic-related iatrogenic harm and which therefore warrant further investigation. It provides the prototype of a summary index of harm to enable surveillance of unsafe care over time across institutions. Further validation and scrutiny of the method will be required to assess its potential to be extended to other hospital specialties in the UK and also internationally to other health systems that have comparable national databases of patient-safety incidents. PMID:24270831

  4. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917.151 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a...) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees shall be guarded. (2) Where chips and...

  5. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917.151 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a...) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees shall be guarded. (2) Where chips and...

  6. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917.151 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a...) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees shall be guarded. (2) Where chips and...

  7. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917.151 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a...) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees shall be guarded. (2) Where chips and...

  8. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917.151 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a...) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees shall be guarded. (2) Where chips and...

  9. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... distance between the gage line of a frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across the track at right angles to the gage line,2 may not be less than— Guard face gage The...

  10. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... distance between the gage line of a frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across the track at right angles to the gage line,2 may not be less than— Guard face gage The...

  11. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... distance between the gage line of a frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face, measured across the track at right angles to the gage line, 2 may not be less than— Guard face gage—The...

  12. Social inequalities and women's satisfaction with childbirth care in Brazil: a national hospital-based survey.

    PubMed

    d'Orsi, Eleonora; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Diniz, Carmen Simone Grilo; Aguiar, Janaina Marques de; Gusman, Christine Ranier; Torres, Jacqueline Alves; Angulo-Tuesta, Antonia; Rattner, Daphne; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira

    2014-08-01

    The objective is to identify factors associated with women's satisfaction towards the care provided by the health professionals during hospital assisted delivery and identify how those factors influence their general levels of satisfaction. The cohort hospital based study was carried out in connection with the Birth in Brazil research. 15,688 women were included, interviewed at home, through the phone, from March 2011 to February 2012. All the variables that compose the professional/pregnant woman relationship (waiting time, respect, privacy, clarity of explanations, possibility of asking questions and participating in the decisions) and schooling remained independently associated with general satisfaction towards delivery care, in the adjusted model. The white women assisted in the southeastern and southern regions of the country, by the private sector and with a companion present gave a better evaluation of the care provided. Women value the way in which they are assisted by the health professionals, and there are inequalities in the way they are treated based on skin color, geographic region and financial situation. PMID:25167175

  13. Intertwined Epidemics: National Demographic Trends in Hospitalizations for Heroin- and Opioid-Related Overdoses, 1993–2009

    PubMed Central

    Unick, George Jay; Rosenblum, Daniel; Mars, Sarah; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The historical patterns of opiate use show that sources and methods of access greatly influence who is at risk. Today, there is evidence that an enormous increase in the availability of prescription opiates is fuelling a rise in addiction nationally, drawing in new initiates to these drugs and changing the geography of opiate overdoses. Recent efforts at supply-based reductions in prescription opiates may reduce harm, but addicted individuals may switch to other opiates such as heroin. In this analysis, we test the hypothesis that changes in the rates of Prescription Opiate Overdoses (POD) are correlated with changes in the rate of heroin overdoses (HOD). ICD9 codes from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and population data from the Census were used to estimate overall and demographic specific rates of POD and HOD hospital admissions between 1993 and 2009. Regression models were used to test for linear trends and lagged negative binomial regression models were used to model the interrelationship between POD and HOD hospital admissions. Findings show that whites, women, and middle-aged individuals had the largest increase in POD and HOD rates over the study period and that HOD rates have increased in since 2007. The lagged models show that increases in a hospitals POD predict an increase in the subsequent years HOD admissions by a factor of 1.26 (p<0.001) and that each increase in HOD admissions increase the subsequent years POD by a factor of 1.57 (p<0.001). Our hypothesis of fungibility between prescription opiates and heroin was supported by these analyses. These findings suggest that focusing on supply-based interventions may simply lead to a shift in use to heroin rather minimizing the reduction in harm. The alternative approach of using drug abuse prevention resources on treatment and demand-side reduction is likely to be more productive at reducing opiate abuse related harm. PMID:23405084

  14. Catering & Hospitality, Serving Food & Drink, Levels 1-3. 2nd Edition. Catering & Hospitality, Reception & Housekeeping, Levels 1-3. Catering & Hospitality, Supervisory Management, Level 3. Catering & Hospitality Management, Level 4. 2nd Edition. National Vocational Qualifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business and Technology Education Council, London (England).

    Britain's National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) are work qualifications that measure what an employee or potential employee can do as well as how much he or she knows and understands about a particular job. Used as written proof of usable workplace skills that can be put to profitable use by an employer, NVQs range from basic Level 1, for…

  15. Guards 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    -amp configuration to eliminate crosstalk amongst several signals collected simultaneously through the DAQ board. ................................................................................................ 51? Figure 29 Hexapod robot simulates tripod walking... Signal response from six sensors on robotic roach show offset cycles between the two tripod systems. Sensor 2 later showed slight problems with adhesion on the roach, which caused the decay in the signal...

  16. US Coast Guard organization for response to oil and hazardous chemical discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroch, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    The authority, organization, responsibilities and marine pollution prevention and control activities of the US Coast Guard and its National Response Team, Regional Response Teams, and Emergency Port Task Forces are discussed.

  17. IET. Exclusion guard house, 71.8% complete. Camera facing northerly. Pumice ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Exclusion guard house, 71.8% complete. Camera facing northerly. Pumice block walls, canopy over concrete slabs. Date: October 20, 1954. INEEL negative no. 12541 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 1. General view of guard house and entrance to Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of guard house and entrance to Coast Guard Base from La Putilla Street, looking southwest - U.S. Coast Guard Base, San Juan, Guard House, La Puntilla Finalle, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  19. Peer mentors, mobile phone and pills: collective monitoring and adherence in Kenyatta National Hospital's HIV treatment programme

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Kenyan state joined the international commitment to make antiretroviral treatment free in public health institutions to people infected with HIV. Less than a decade later, treatment has reached over 60% of those who need it in Kenya. This paper, which is based on an in-depth ethnographic case study of the HIV treatment programme at Kenyatta National Hospital, conducted intermittently between 2008 and 2014, examines how HIV-positive peer mentors encourage and track adherence to treatment regimens within and beyond the clinic walls using mobile phones and computer technology. This research into the everyday practices of patient monitoring demonstrates that both surveillance and adherence are collective activities. Peer mentors provide counselling services, follow up people who stray from treatment regimens, and perform a range of other tasks related to patient management and treatment adherence. Despite peer mentors’ involvement in many tasks key to encouraging optimal adherence, their role is rarely acknowledged by co-workers, hospital administrators, or public health officials. Following a biomedical paradigm, adherence at Kenyatta and in Kenya is framed by programme administrators as something individual clients must do and for which they must be held accountable. This framing simultaneously conceals the sociality of adherence and undervalues the work of peer mentors in treatment programmes. PMID:25175291

  20. 33 CFR 334.783 - Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area. 334.783...783 Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area....

  1. Reliability and validity of the American Hospital Association's national longitudinal survey of health information technology adoption

    PubMed Central

    Everson, Jordan; Lee, Shoou-Yih D; Friedman, Charles P

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the internal consistency, construct validity, and criterion validity of a battery of items measuring information technology (IT) adoption, included in the American Hospital Association (AHA) IT Supplement Survey. Methods We analyzed the 2012 release of the AHA IT Supplement Survey. We performed reliability analysis using Cronbach's ? and part-whole correlations, construct validity analysis using principal component analysis (PCA), and criterion validity analysis by assessing the items’ sensitivity and specificity of predicting attestation to Medicare Meaningful Use (MU). Results Twenty-eight items of the 31-item instrument and five of six functionality subcategories defined by the AHA all produced reliable scales (?’s between 0.833 and 0.958). PCA mostly confirmed the AHA's categorization of functionalities; however, some items loaded only weakly onto the factor most associated with their survey category, and one category loaded onto two separate factors. The battery of items was a valid predictor of attestation to MU, producing a sensitivity of 0.82 and a specificity of 0.72. Discussion The battery of items performed well on most indices of reliability and validity. However, they lack some components of ideal survey design, leaving open the possibility that respondents are not responding independently to each item in the survey. Despite measuring only a portion of the objectives required for attestation to MU, the items are a moderately sensitive and specific predictor of attestation. Conclusions The analyzed instrument exhibits satisfactory reliability and validity. PMID:24623194

  2. Survey of perinatal hepatitis B virus transmission after Korean National Prevention Program in a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Ju Seung; Lee, Jong Joon; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Suk Young; Kwon, Oh Sang; Kim, Yun Soo; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Ju Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The Ministry of Health and Welfare and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in South Korea have been organizing hepatitis B virus (HBV) vertical infection prevention projects since July 2002. In this single-institute study, the results of surveys conducted in target mothers who delivered babies in a tertiary hospital were investigated and analyzed. Methods Of the 9,281 mothers and their 9,824 neonates born between July 2002 and December 2012, 308 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive mothers and their 319 neonates were selected for this study, and their records were analyzed retrospectively. Results A total of 308 mothers were HBsAg-positive, with an HBV prevalence of 3.32% (308/9,281). There were 319 neonates born to these HBsAg-positive mothers, and 252 were confirmed to as either HBsAg-positive or -negative. Four were confirmed as HBsAg-positive, with a 1.59% (4/252) HBV vertical infection rate. All the mothers of neonates who had an HBV vertical infection were hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive. Among the HBsAg-positive neonates, three were HBeAg-positive and had an HBV DNA titer of 1.0 × 108 copies/mL. Conclusions The HBV prevalence of mothers was 3.32% (308/9,281), and their vertical infection rate was 1.59% (4/252). Thus, the South Korean HBV vertical infection prevention projects are effective, and, accordingly, HBV prevalence in South Korea is expected to decrease continuously. PMID:24851065

  3. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of...

  4. Efficacy of hand rubs with a low alcohol concentration listed as effective by a national hospital hygiene society in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Some national hospital hygiene societies in Europe such as the French society for hospital hygiene (SFHH) have positive lists of disinfectants. Few hand disinfectants with a rather low concentration of ethanol are listed by one society as effective for hygienic hand disinfection with 3 mL in 30 s including a virucidal activity in 30 s or 60 s, but published data allow having doubts. We have therefore evaluated the efficacy of three commonly used hand disinfectants according to EN 1500 and EN 14476. Methods Products 1 (Aniosgel 85 NPC) and 2 (Aniosrub 85 NPC) were based on 70% ethanol, product 3 (ClinoGel derma+) on 60% ethanol and 15% isopropanol (all w/w). They were tested in 3 laboratories according to EN 1500. Three mL were applied for 30 s and compared to the reference treatment of 2 × 3 mL applications of isopropanol 60% (v/v), on hands artificially contaminated with Escherichia coli. Each laboratory used a cross-over design against the reference alcohol with 15 or 20 volunteers. The virucidal activity of the products was evaluated (EN 14476) in one laboratory against adenovirus and poliovirus in different concentrations (80%, 90%, 97%), with different organic loads (none; clean conditions; phosphate-buffered saline) for up to 3 min. Results Product 1 revealed a mean log10-reduction of 3.87 ± 0.79 (laboratory 1) and 4.38 ± 0.87 (laboratory 2) which was significantly lower compared to the reference procedure (4.62 ± 0.89 and 5.00 ± 0.87). In laboratory 3 product 1 was inferior to the reference disinfection (4.06 ± 0.86 versus 4.99 ± 0.90). Product 2 revealed similar results. Product 3 fulfilled the requirements in one laboratory but failed in the two other. None of the three products was able to reduce viral infectivity of both adenovirus and poliovirus by 4 log10 steps in 3 min according to EN 14476. Conclusions Efficacy data mentioned in a positive list published by a society for hospital hygiene should still be regarded with caution if they quite obviously contradict published data on the same or similar products. PMID:23759059

  5. 76 FR 66313 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ...Guard [USCG-2011-0975] National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting...SUMMARY: The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC...Guard, on matters affecting national maritime security. Agenda of Meeting As a...

  6. Rural and Urban Hospitals' Role in Providing Inpatient Care, 2010

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC/NCHS, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2010. How did rural hospital inpatients differ from urban hospital inpatients ... CDC/NCHS, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2010. How did patients' first-listed diagnoses differ in rural and ...

  7. Hypnotics and the Occurrence of Bone Fractures in Hospitalized Dementia Patients: A Matched Case-Control Study Using a National Inpatient Database

    PubMed Central

    Tamiya, Hiroyuki; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matusi, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Ogawa, Sumito; Akishita, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventing falls and bone fractures in hospital care is an important issue in geriatric medicine. Use of hypnotics is a potential risk factor for falls and bone fractures in older patients. However, data are lacking on the association between use of hypnotics and the occurrence of bone fracture. Methods We used a national inpatient database including 1,057 hospitals in Japan and included dementia patients aged 50 years or older who were hospitalized during a period of 12 months between April 2012 and March 2013. The primary outcome was the occurrence of bone fracture during hospitalization. Use of hypnotics was compared between patients with and without bone fracture in this matched case-control study. Results Of 140,494 patients, 830 patients suffered from in-hospital fracture. A 1:4 matching with age, sex and hospital created 817 cases with fracture and 3,158 matched patients without fracture. With adjustment for the Charlson comorbidity index, emergent admission, activities of daily living, and scores for level walking, a higher occurrence of fractures were seen with short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics (odds ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.19–1.73; P<0.001), ultrashort-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (1.66; 1.37–2.01; P<0.001), hydroxyzine (1.45; 1.15–1.82, P=0.001), risperidone and perospirone (1.37; 1.08–1.73; P=0.010). Other drug groups were not significantly associated with the occurrence of in-hospital fracture. Conclusions Short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics and ultrashort-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotics may increase risk of bone fracture in hospitalized dementia patients. PMID:26061231

  8. Compliance with a time-out procedure intended to prevent wrong surgery in hospitals: results of a national patient safety programme in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van Schoten, Steffie M; Kop, Veerle; de Blok, Carolien; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Groenewegen, Peter P; Wagner, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prevent wrong surgery, the WHO ‘Safe Surgery Checklist’ was introduced in 2008. The checklist comprises a time-out procedure (TOP): the final step before the start of the surgical procedure where the patient, surgical procedure and side/site are reviewed by the surgical team. The aim of this study is to evaluate the extent to which hospitals carry out the TOP before anaesthesia in the operating room, whether compliance has changed over time, and to determine factors that are associated with compliance. Design Evaluation study involving observations. Setting Operating rooms of 2 academic, 4 teaching and 12 general Dutch hospitals. Participants A random selection was made from all adult patients scheduled for elective surgery on the day of the observation, preferably involving different surgeons and different procedures. Results Mean compliance with the TOP was 71.3%. Large differences between hospitals were observed. No linear trend was found in compliance during the study period. Compliance at general and teaching hospitals was higher than at academic hospitals. Compliance decreased with the age of the patient, general surgery showed lower compliance in comparison with other specialties and compliance was higher when the team was focused on the TOP. Conclusions Large differences in compliance with the TOP were observed between participating hospitals which can be attributed at least in part to the type of hospital, surgical specialty and patient characteristics. Hospitals do not comply consistently with national guidelines to prevent wrong surgery and further implementation as well as further research into non-compliance is needed. PMID:24993761

  9. Hospitals on the path to accountable care: highlights from a 2011 national survey of hospital readiness to participate in an accountable care organization.

    PubMed

    Audet, Anne-Marie J; Kenward, Kevin; Patel, Shreya; Joshi, Maulik S

    2012-08-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are forming in communities across the country. In ACOs, health care providers take responsibility for a defined patient popu­lation, coordinate their care across settings, and are held jointly accountable for the quality and cost of care. This issue brief reports on results from a survey that assesses hospitals' readiness to participate in ACOs. Results show we are at the beginning of the ACO adop­tion curve. As of September 2011, only 13 percent of hospital respondents reported partici­pating in an ACO or planning to participate within a year, while 75 percent reported not considering participation at all. Survey results indicate that physician-led ACOs are the second most common governance model, far exceeding payer-led models, highlighting an encouraging paradigm shift away from acute care and toward primary care. Findings also point to significant gaps, including the infrastructure needed to take on financial risks and to manage population health. PMID:22928221

  10. Task-Shifting and Quality of HIV Testing Services: Experiences from a National Reference Hospital in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Mwangala, Sheila; Moland, Karen M.; Nkamba, Hope C.; Musonda, Kunda G.; Monze, Mwaka; Musukwa, Katoba K.; Fylkesnes, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Background With new testing technologies, task-shifting and rapid scale-up of HIV testing services in high HIV prevalence countries, assuring quality of HIV testing is paramount. This study aimed to explore various cadres of providers’ experiences in providing HIV testing services and their understanding of elements that impact on quality of service in Zambia. Methods Sixteen in-depth interviews and two focus group discussions were conducted with HIV testing service providers including lay counselors, nurses and laboratory personnel at purposively selected HIV testing sites at a national reference hospital in Lusaka. Qualitative content analysis was adopted for data analysis. Results Lay counselors and nurses reported confidentiality and privacy to be greatly compromised due to limited space in both in- and out-patient settings. Difficulties in upholding consent were reported in provider-initiated testing in in-patient settings. The providers identified non-adherence to testing procedures, high workload and inadequate training and supervision as key elements impacting on quality of testing. Difficulties related to testing varied by sub-groups of providers: lay counselors, in finger pricking and obtaining adequate volumes of specimen; non-laboratory providers in general, in interpreting invalid, false-negative and false-positive results. The providers had been participating in a recently established national HIV quality assurance program, i.e. proficiency testing, but rarely received site supervisory visits. Conclusion Task-shifting coupled with policy shifts in service provision has seriously challenged HIV testing quality, protection of confidentiality and the process of informed consent. Ways to better protect confidentiality and informed consent need careful attention. Training, supervision and quality assurance need strengthening tailored to the needs of the different cadres of providers. PMID:26605800

  11. Parallel Quality Assessment of Emergency Departments by European Foundation for Quality Management Model and Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    IMANI NASAB, Mohammad Hasan; MOHAGHEGH, Bahram; KHALESI, Nader; JAAFARIPOOYAN, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    Background European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model is a widely used quality management system (QMS) worldwide, including Iran. Current study aims to verify the quality assessment results of Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation (INPHE) based on those of EFQM. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 on a sample of emergency departments (EDs) affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Iran. The standard questionnaire of EFQM (V-2010) was used to gather appropriate data. The results were compared with those of INPHE. MS Excel was used to classify and display the findings. Results: The average assessment score of the EDs based on the INPHE and EFQM model were largely different (i.e. 86.4% and 31%, respectively). In addition, the variation range among five EDs’ scores according to each model was also considerable (22% for EFQM against 7% of INPHE), especially in the EDs with and without prior record of applying QMSs. Conclusion: The INPHE’s assessment results were not confirmed by EFQM model. Moreover, the higher variation range among EDs’ scores using EFQM model could allude to its more differentiation power in assessing the performance comparing with INPHE. Therefore, a need for improvement in the latter drawing on other QMSs’ (such as EFQM) strengths, given the results emanated from its comparison with EFQM seems indispensable. PMID:23967429

  12. HBV and HCV Coinfection among HIV/AIDS Patients in the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huy, Bùi V?; Vernavong, Kanxay; Kính, Nguy?n V?n

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To examine prevalence and characterization of HBV and HCV coinfection among HIV/AIDS patients. Methods. This cross-sectional, retrospective study analyzed 724 HIV/AIDS patients in the HIV clinic at the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases (NHTD), from 5/2005 to 4/2011. Results. The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection was 50.3% (364/724), of which HbsAg, HCV, and both of HbsAg, and HCV positivity were 8.4%, 35.4%, and 6.5%, respectively. The cohort (364 patients) with HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection live in the 30 provinces/cities in the North and Central area of Vietnam. We found statistically significant associations between heightened risk of coinfection with HIV and HCV in the age group 30-39 years (P < 0.001), male gender (P < 0.001), never married patients (P < 0.001), patients with a history of injection drug use (P < 0.001), and clinical stages 2-4 (P < 0.001). Coinfection with HBV/HIV was statistically significant associations between heightened risk of marital status (never married) (P < 0.001) and those who reported transmission through sexual intercourse. Conclusion. Coinfection with viral hepatitis is common in HIV patients; further study of the impact and evolution of coinfection is necessary to find effective treatment algorithms. PMID:25580287

  13. HBV and HCV Coinfection among HIV/AIDS Patients in the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Huy, Bùi V?; Vernavong, Kanxay; Kính, Nguy?n V?n

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To examine prevalence and characterization of HBV and HCV coinfection among HIV/AIDS patients. Methods. This cross-sectional, retrospective study analyzed 724 HIV/AIDS patients in the HIV clinic at the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases (NHTD), from 5/2005 to 4/2011. Results. The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection was 50.3% (364/724), of which HbsAg, HCV, and both of HbsAg, and HCV positivity were 8.4%, 35.4%, and 6.5%, respectively. The cohort (364 patients) with HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection live in the 30 provinces/cities in the North and Central area of Vietnam. We found statistically significant associations between heightened risk of coinfection with HIV and HCV in the age group 30–39 years (P < 0.001), male gender (P < 0.001), never married patients (P < 0.001), patients with a history of injection drug use (P < 0.001), and clinical stages 2–4 (P < 0.001). Coinfection with HBV/HIV was statistically significant associations between heightened risk of marital status (never married) (P < 0.001) and those who reported transmission through sexual intercourse. Conclusion. Coinfection with viral hepatitis is common in HIV patients; further study of the impact and evolution of coinfection is necessary to find effective treatment algorithms. PMID:25580287

  14. Guards, Galleries, Fortresses, and the Octoplex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, T. S.

    2011-01-01

    The art gallery problem asks for the maximum number of stationary guards required to protect the interior of a polygonal art gallery with "n" walls. This article explores solutions to this problem and several of its variants. In addition, some unsolved problems involving the guarding of geometric objects are presented.

  15. Light Induced Guard Cell Sunando Roy

    E-print Network

    Albert, Réka

    Light Induced Guard Cell Signaling Sunando Roy #12;Guard cells and the stomata The tradeoff between water and carbon dioxide Roelfsema et. al. New Phytologist (2005) 167: 665 - 691 #12;The Light Signaling features · The blue light signaling carried out through ion channels · The red light signaling occurs

  16. Systems Engineering of Coast Guard Aviator Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Eugene R.; Caro, Paul W.

    This paper describes a total-program application of the systems engineering concept of the U.S. Coast Guard aviation training programs. The systems approach used treats all aspects of the training to produce the most cost-effective integration of academic, synthetic, and flight training for the production of graduate Coast Guard aviators. The…

  17. 46 CFR 108.210 - Hospital space not required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hospital space not required. 108.210 Section 108.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.210 Hospital space not required. (a) The hospital space required under...

  18. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard...

  19. 78 FR 74048 - Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Fireworks Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Fireworks Events AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to amend several permanent safety zones located in the Eleventh Coast Guard District that are...

  20. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard...

  1. 76 FR 53329 - Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is updating and consolidating the list of marine events occurring annually within the Eleventh Coast Guard District. These...

  2. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard...

  3. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard...

  4. 75 FR 79956 - Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 53 RIN 1625-AB33 Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Direct final rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: By this direct final rule, the Coast Guard is amending its ``Coast Guard Whistleblower Protection'' regulations to conform...

  5. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard...

  6. 76 FR 30575 - Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... regulated area. DATES: Comments and related material must be received by the Coast Guard on or before...

  7. U.S. Coast Guard and Florida Power & Light Successfully Implement a Multi-Site UESC Project

    SciTech Connect

    2013-05-01

    As the largest component of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), more than 42,000 active-duty members of the U.S. Coast Guard safeguard the nation’s maritime interests. Consequently, Coast Guard facilities represent about 60 percent of the DHS shore energy use portfolio. Under the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA) and Executive Order 13423, the Coast Guard has reduced its facility energy intensity year-on-year, achieving a fiscal year (FY) 2012 reduction of 28.6 percent from a FY 2003 baseline.

  8. Excessive working hours and health complaints among hospital physicians: a study based on a national sample of hospital physicians in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Judith; Gerber, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine correlations between excessively long working hours and subjectively experienced somatic health complaints among hospital physicians. Methods: Quantitative data were collected as part of the survey “Working life, Lifestyle and Health of Hospital Physicians in Germany 2006” using self-reporting questionnaires. The individually experienced health was assessed on the basis of Zerssen’s [1] list of somatic complaints. The indicator of excessively long working hours was defined as 10 or more working hours per working day and 6 or more on-call shifts a month among full-time employees. The net sample consisted of 3295 randomly selected physicians from 515 hospitals. Results: The response rate was 58% (n=1917). Physicians with excessively long working hours (19%) had significantly higher sum score of health complaints (p=0.0001) and significantly increased mental and physical fatigue symptoms (feeling faint, languor, uneasiness, heavy legs, excessive need for sleep, trembling; p=0.0001 to 0.047), mood changes (irritability, brooding; p=0.008 to 0.014), gastrointestinal (nausea, loss of weight; p=0.0001 to 0.014) and heart disorders (lumpy sensation in the throat, chest pain; p=0.0001 to 0.042). When the sum score of health complaints was controlled for selected confounders, being female (B=-3.44, p=0.0001) and having excessively long working hours (B=2.76, p=0.0001) were significantly correlated with health complaints. In a separate gender analysis, being exposed to excessively long working hours remained a significant predictor for health complaints among both females (B=3.78, p=0.001) and males (B=2.28, p=0.004). Conclusions: Excessively long working hours are associated with an increased risk of health complaints. Reducing working hours may be the first step to improving physicians' health. PMID:19675717

  9. Can Patient Safety Incident Reports Be Used to Compare Hospital Safety? Results from a Quantitative Analysis of the English National Reporting and Learning System Data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) collects reports about patient safety incidents in England. Government regulators use NRLS data to assess the safety of hospitals. This study aims to examine whether annual hospital incident reporting rates can be used as a surrogate indicator of individual hospital safety. Secondly assesses which hospital characteristics are correlated with high incident reporting rates and whether a high reporting hospital is safer than those lower reporting hospitals. Finally, it assesses which health-care professionals report more incidents of patient harm, which report more near miss incidents and what hospital factors encourage reporting. These findings may suggest methods for increasing the utility of reporting systems. Methods This study used a mix methods approach for assessing NRLS data. The data were investigated using Pareto analysis and regression models to establish which patients are most vulnerable to reported harm. Hospital factors were correlated with institutional reporting rates over one year to examine what factors influenced reporting. Staff survey findings regarding hospital safety culture were correlated with reported rates of incidents causing harm; no harm and death to understand what barriers influence error disclosure. Findings 5,879,954 incident reports were collected from acute hospitals over the decade. 70.3% of incidents produced no harm to the patient and 0.9% were judged by the reporter to have caused severe harm or death. Obstetrics and Gynaecology reported the most no harm events [OR 1.61(95%CI: 1.12 to 2.27), p<0.01] and pharmacy was the hospital location where most near-misses were captured [OR 3.03(95%CI: 2.04 to 4.55), p<0.01]. Clinicians were significantly more likely to report death than other staff [OR 3.04(95%CI: 2.43 to 3.80) p<0.01]. A higher ratio of clinicians to beds correlated with reduced rate of harm reported [RR = -1.78(95%Cl: -3.33 to -0.23), p = 0.03]. Litigation claims per bed were significantly negatively associated with incident reports. Patient satisfaction and mortality outcomes were not significantly associated with reporting rates. Staff survey responses revealed that keeping reports confidential, keeping staff informed about incidents and giving feedback on safety initiatives increased reporting rates [r = 0.26 (p<0.01), r = 0.17 (p = 0.04), r = 0.23 (p = 0.01), r = 0.20 (p = 0.02)]. Conclusion The NRLS is the largest patient safety reporting system in the world. This study did not demonstrate many hospital characteristics to significantly influence overall reporting rate. There were no association between size of hospital, number of staff, mortality outcomes or patient satisfaction outcomes and incident reporting rate. The study did show that hospitals where staff reported more incidents had reduced litigation claims and when clinician staffing is increased fewer incidents reporting patient harm are reported, whilst near misses remain the same. Certain specialties report more near misses than others, and doctors report more harm incidents than near misses. Staff survey results showed that open environments and reduced fear of punitive response increases incident reporting. We suggest that reporting rates should not be used to assess hospital safety. Different healthcare professionals focus on different types of safety incidents and focusing on these areas whilst creating a responsive, confidential learning environment will increase staff engagement with error disclosure. PMID:26650823

  10. 46 CFR 169.331 - Guards in hazardous locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...169.331 Section 169.331 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.331 Guards in hazardous locations. Each...

  11. 46 CFR 169.331 - Guards in hazardous locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...169.331 Section 169.331 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.331 Guards in hazardous locations. Each...

  12. 46 CFR 169.331 - Guards in hazardous locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...169.331 Section 169.331 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.331 Guards in hazardous locations. Each...

  13. 46 CFR 169.331 - Guards in hazardous locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...169.331 Section 169.331 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.331 Guards in hazardous locations. Each...

  14. 46 CFR 169.331 - Guards in hazardous locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...169.331 Section 169.331 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.331 Guards in hazardous locations. Each...

  15. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...State § 66.01-15 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  16. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...State § 66.01-15 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  17. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard address. The report...

  18. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Provisions § 64.33 Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  19. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Provisions § 64.33 Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  20. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  1. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where...

  2. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15...Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  3. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15...Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  4. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  5. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Provisions § 64.33 Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  6. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...REPORTING Numbering § 173.35 Coast Guard validation sticker. No...

  7. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  8. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where...

  9. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where...

  10. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...REPORTING Numbering § 173.35 Coast Guard validation sticker. No...

  11. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...REPORTING Numbering § 173.35 Coast Guard validation sticker. No...

  12. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  13. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  14. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  15. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast...

  16. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  17. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast...

  18. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard address. The report...

  19. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Provisions § 64.33 Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  20. 33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  1. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  2. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  3. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...REPORTING Numbering § 173.35 Coast Guard validation sticker. No...

  4. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  5. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13...Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  6. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13...Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  7. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard address. The report...

  8. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard address. The report...

  9. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  10. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast...

  11. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  12. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where...

  13. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13...Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  14. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  15. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  16. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  17. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast...

  18. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast...

  19. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  20. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15...Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  1. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...State § 66.01-15 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  2. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...State § 66.01-15 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  3. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...State § 66.01-15 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  4. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13...Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  5. 33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  6. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13...Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  7. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  8. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where...

  9. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  10. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard address. The report...

  11. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15...Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  12. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Provisions § 64.33 Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District...

  13. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  14. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15...Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  15. 33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100.10...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements....

  16. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  17. 33 CFR 173.35 - Coast Guard validation sticker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard validation sticker. 173.35...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...REPORTING Numbering § 173.35 Coast Guard validation sticker. No...

  18. 30 CFR 75.827 - Guarding of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...High-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.827 Guarding of trailing cables. (a) Guarding. (1) The high-voltage cable must be guarded in the following...locations: (i) From the power center cable coupler...

  19. Fluorescence Properties of Guard Cell Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Eduardo; Armond, Paul; Melis, Anastasios

    1981-01-01

    The presence of chloroplasts in guard cells from leaf epidermis, coleoptile, flowers, and albino portions of variegated leaves was established by incident fluorescence microscopy, thus confirming the notion that guard cell chloroplasts are remarkably conserved. Room temperature emission spectra from a few chloroplasts in a single guard cell of Vicia faba showed one major peak at around 683 nanometers. Low-temperature (77 K) emission spectra from peels of albino portions of Chlorophytum comosum leaves and from mesophyll chloroplasts of green parts of the same leaves showed major peaks at around 687 and 733 nanometers, peaks usually attributed to photosystem II and photosystem I pigment systems, respectively. Spectra of peels of V. faba leaves showed similar peaks. However, fluorescence microscopy revealed that the Vicia peels, as well as those from Allium cepa and Tulipa sp., were contaminated with non-guard cell chloroplasts which were practically undetectable under bright field illumination. These observations pose restrictions on the use of epidermal peels as a source of isolated guard cell chloroplasts. Studies on the 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea-sensitive variable fluorescence kinetics of uncontaminated epidermal peels of C. comosum indicated that guard cell chloroplasts operate a normal, photosystem II-dependent, linear electron transport. The above properties in combination with their reported inability to fix CO2 photosynthetically may render the guard cell chloroplasts optimally suited to supply the reducing and high-energy phosphate equivalents needed to sustain active ion transport during stomatal opening in daylight. PMID:16661620

  20. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a national referral hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Walls, Genevieve; Bulifon, Sophie; Breysse, Serge; Daneth, Thol; Bonnet, Maryline; Hurtado, Northan; Molfino, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective There are no recent data on the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB) in Cambodia. We aim to describe TB drug resistance amongst adults with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection in a national referral hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Design Between 22 November 2007 and 30 November 2009, clinical specimens from HIV-infected patients suspected of having TB underwent routine microscopy, Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, and drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory and clinical data were collected for patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures. Results M. tuberculosis was cultured from 236 HIV-infected patients. Resistance to any first-line TB drug occurred in 34.7% of patients; 8.1% had multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB). The proportion of MDR TB amongst new patients and previously treated patients was 3.7 and 28.9%, respectively (p<0.001). The diagnosis of MDR TB was made after death in 15.8% of patients; in total 26.3% of patients with MDR TB died. The diagnosis of TB was established by culture of extra-pulmonary specimens in 23.6% of cases. Conclusions There is significant resistance to first-line TB drugs amongst new and previously treated TB–HIV co-infected patients in Phnom Penh. These data suggest that the prevalence of DR TB in Cambodia may be higher than previously recognised, particularly amongst HIV-infected patients. Additional prevalence studies are needed. This study also illustrates the feasibility and utility of analysis of non-respiratory specimens in the diagnosis of TB, even in low-resource settings, and suggests that extra-pulmonary specimens should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms. PMID:25623609

  1. In?Hospital Mortality Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results From the National Inpatient Sample, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Bina; Davis, Herbert T.; Laskey, Warren K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Case?fatality rates in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have significantly decreased; however, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), a risk factor for AMI, has increased. The purposes of the present study were to assess the prevalence and clinical impact of DM among patients hospitalized with AMI and to estimate the impact of important clinical characteristics associated with in?hospital mortality in patients with AMI and DM. Methods and Results We used the National Inpatient Sample to estimate trends in DM prevalence and in?hospital mortality among 1.5 million patients with AMI from 2000 to 2010, using survey data?analysis methods. Clinical characteristics associated with in?hospital mortality were identified using multivariable logistic regression. There was a significant increase in DM prevalence among AMI patients (year 2000, 22.2%; year 2010, 29.6%, Ptrend<0.0001). AMI patients with DM tended to be older and female and to have more cardiovascular risk factors. However, age?standardized mortality decreased significantly from 2000 (8.48%) to 2010 (4.95%) (Ptrend<0.0001). DM remained independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio 1.069, 95% CI 1.051 to 1.087; P<0.0001). The adverse impact of DM on in?hospital mortality was unchanged over time. Decreased death risk over time was greatest among women and elderly patients. Among younger patients of both sexes, there was a leveling off of this decrease in more recent years. Conclusions Despite increasing DM prevalence and disease burden among AMI patients, in?hospital mortality declined significantly from 2000 to 2010. The adverse impact of DM on mortality remained unchanged overall over time but was age and sex dependent. PMID:25158866

  2. Creating a “culture of research” in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program

    PubMed Central

    St. Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. Methods To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. Limitations The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important component yet often challenging to identify and collect. The model requires a strong emphasis on outreach that challenges hospitals to improve and expand their reach, particularly into underrepresented populations and catchment areas. These efforts build on trust and a referral pipeline within the community which take time and significant commitment to establish. Conclusion The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program experience provides a relevant model to broadly address creating a culture of research in community hospitals that are increasingly networked via systems and consortiums. The strategies used align well with the National Cancer Institute—American Society of Clinical Oncology Accrual Symposium recommendations for patient-/community-, physician-/provider-, and site-/organizational-level approaches to clinical trials; they helped sites achieve organizational culture shifts that enhanced their cancer research programs. The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program hospitals reported that the strategies were challenging to implement yet proved valuable as they provided useful metrics for programmatic assessment, planning, reporting, and growth. While focused on oncology trials, these concepts may be useful within other disease-focused research as well. PMID:25691600

  3. Hospitality Hospitality/Foodservice: TBD

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    Hospitality Management Hospitality/Foodservice: TBD Food Science: TBD Recreation/Tourism: TBD Culinary Arts/Hospitality NTT: TBD SFBS Sustainable Food & Bioenergy Systems Faculty: Alison Harmon & Campus Restaurant Managed By: Gallatin College Program Director/ Hospitality Management Instructor

  4. Hospitals, finance, and health system reform in Britain and the United States, c. 1910-1950: historical revisionism and cross-national comparison.

    PubMed

    Gorsky, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Comparative histories of health system development have been variously influenced by the theoretical approaches of historical institutionalism, political pluralism, and labor mobilization. Britain and the United States have figured significantly in this literature because of their very different trajectories. This article explores the implications of recent research on hospital history in the two countries for existing historiographies, particularly the coming of the National Health Service in Britain. It argues that the two hospital systems initially developed in broadly similar ways, despite the very different outcomes in the 1940s. Thus, applying the conceptual tools used to explain the U.S. trajectory can deepen appreciation of events in Britain. Attention focuses particularly on working-class hospital contributory schemes and their implications for finance, governance, and participation; these are then compared with Blue Cross and U.S. hospital prepayment. While acknowledging the importance of path dependence in shaping attitudes of British bureaucrats toward these schemes, analysis emphasizes their failure in pressure group politics, in contrast to the United States. In both countries labor was also crucial, in the United States sustaining employment-based prepayment and in Britain broadly supporting system reform. PMID:22323233

  5. Implementation and adoption of nationwide electronic health records in secondary care in England: final qualitative results from prospective national evaluation in “early adopter” hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the implementation and adoption of the NHS detailed care records service in “early adopter” hospitals in England. Design Theoretically informed, longitudinal qualitative evaluation based on case studies. Setting 12 “early adopter” NHS acute hospitals and specialist care settings studied over two and a half years. Data sources Data were collected through in depth interviews, observations, and relevant documents relating directly to case study sites and to wider national developments that were perceived to impact on the implementation strategy. Data were thematically analysed, initially within and then across cases. The dataset consisted of 431 semistructured interviews with key stakeholders, including hospital staff, developers, and governmental stakeholders; 590 hours of observations of strategic meetings and use of the software in context; 334 sets of notes from observations, researchers’ field notes, and notes from national conferences; 809 NHS documents; and 58 regional and national documents. Results Implementation has proceeded more slowly, with a narrower scope and substantially less clinical functionality than was originally planned. The national strategy had considerable local consequences (summarised under five key themes), and wider national developments impacted heavily on implementation and adoption. More specifically, delays related to unrealistic expectations about the capabilities of systems; the time needed to build, configure, and customise the software; the work needed to ensure that systems were supporting provision of care; and the needs of end users for training and support. Other factors hampering progress included the changing milieu of NHS policy and priorities; repeatedly renegotiated national contracts; different stages of development of diverse NHS care records service systems; and a complex communication process between different stakeholders, along with contractual arrangements that largely excluded NHS providers. There was early evidence that deploying systems resulted in important learning within and between organisations and the development of relevant competencies within NHS hospitals. Conclusions Implementation of the NHS Care Records Service in “early adopter” sites proved time consuming and challenging, with as yet limited discernible benefits for clinicians and no clear advantages for patients. Although our results might not be directly transferable to later adopting sites because the functionalities we evaluated were new and untried in the English context, they shed light on the processes involved in implementing major new systems. The move to increased local decision making that we advocated based on our interim analysis has been pursued and welcomed by the NHS, but it is important that policymakers do not lose sight of the overall goal of an integrated interoperable solution. PMID:22006942

  6. Factors associated with major structural birth defects among newborns delivered at Muhimbili National Hospital and Municipal Hospitals in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania 2011 – 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kishimba, Rogath Saika; Mpembeni, Rose; Mghamba, Janneth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ninety-four percent of all birth defects and 95% of deaths due to the birth defects occur in low and middle income countries, Tanzania among them. In Tanzania there are currently limited birth defects prevention strategies in place due to limited information on factors associated with the occurrence of birth defects. Methods We conducted a case control study that included newborns born from October, 2011 through February, 2012 at 4 participating hospitals. A case was defined as any newborn of a Dar es salaam resident with a neural tube defect, orofacial clefts, limb reduction defects or musculo-skeletal defects (SBD) born during the study period. A control was defined as the next three newborns (delivered after the case) without birth defects. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analysis were done using Epi Info version 3.5.1. Results A total of 400 newborns participated in the study, 100 cases and 300 controls. Factors associated with higher odds of a SBD included maternal fever (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.99; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14-3.52), maternal hypertension (AOR = 3.99; 95% CI: 1.67-9.54), and low birth weight (AOR = 3.48; 95% CI: 1.77-6.85). Antimalarial use during pregnancy was protective (AOR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.28-0.84). Folic acid supplementation was protective only in bivariate analysis (OR = 0.56; 95% CI: 0.32-0.96). Conclusion Maternal fever, hypertension, and low birth weight are associated with higher odds of SBD. Antimalarial use during pregnancy was associated with lower odds of SBD. Early screening of pregnant mothers for hypertension and other causes of low birth weight may reduce SBD in Dar Es Salaam. PMID:26525082

  7. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

  8. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

  9. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

  10. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

  11. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

  12. 46 CFR 169.331 - Guards in hazardous locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guards in hazardous locations. 169.331 Section 169.331 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.331 Guards in hazardous locations. Each exposed...

  13. 46 CFR 169.331 - Guards in hazardous locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Guards in hazardous locations. 169.331 Section 169.331 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.331 Guards in hazardous locations. Each exposed...

  14. 46 CFR 169.331 - Guards in hazardous locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guards in hazardous locations. 169.331 Section 169.331 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.331 Guards in hazardous locations. Each exposed...

  15. 46 CFR 169.331 - Guards in hazardous locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guards in hazardous locations. 169.331 Section 169.331 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.331 Guards in hazardous locations. Each exposed...

  16. 46 CFR 169.331 - Guards in hazardous locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards in hazardous locations. 169.331 Section 169.331 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.331 Guards in hazardous locations. Each exposed...

  17. 46 CFR 108.223 - Guards on exposed equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guards on exposed equipment. 108.223 Section 108.223 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.223 Guards on exposed equipment. Each unit must have hand covers, guards, or rails...

  18. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.10 Coast Guard emblem. (a) The...

  19. 46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard number. 50.10-30 Section 50.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-30 Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number...

  20. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173.83 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Number § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where the Coast Guard is the...

  1. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173.83 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Number § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where the Coast Guard is the...

  2. 2. General view of guard house and entrance to Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. General view of guard house and entrance to Coast Guard Base from La Putilla Street, with view of Motor Pool (Building 122) on right side looking west - U.S. Coast Guard Base, San Juan, Guard House, La Puntilla Finalle, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  3. 46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard number. 50.10-30 Section 50.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-30 Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number...

  4. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20 Section 23.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission...

  5. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12 Section 23.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.12 Coast Guard identifying...

  6. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20 Section 23.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission...

  7. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.10 Coast Guard emblem. (a) The...

  8. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173.83 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Number § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where the Coast Guard is the...

  9. 46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard district. 4.03-20 Section 4.03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the...

  10. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20 Section 23.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission...

  11. The U.S. Coast Guard Academy Curricula; An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Theodore R.; And Others

    This report presents the results of research that had as its objective the evaluation of the curricula of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Over 125 Coast Guard officers and men were interviewed to gather detailed background information about the Coast Guard, the Coast Guard Academy, and job requirements of Academy graduates. These data were developed…

  12. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other...

  13. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  14. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173.83 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Number § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where the Coast Guard is the...

  15. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  16. 46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard number. 50.10-30 Section 50.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-30 Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number...

  17. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20 Section 23.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission...

  18. 46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard district. 4.03-20 Section 4.03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the...

  19. 46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard number. 50.10-30 Section 50.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-30 Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number...

  20. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  1. 5. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard Official Photograph, 12th Coast Guard District, San Francisco. 1960. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12 Section 23.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.12 Coast Guard identifying...

  3. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.10 Coast Guard emblem. (a) The...

  4. 76 FR 7123 - Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to update and consolidate the list of marine events occurring annually within the Eleventh Coast...

  5. 46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard district. 4.03-20 Section 4.03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the...

  6. 33 CFR 173.83 - Availability of Coast Guard forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Availability of Coast Guard forms. 173.83 Section 173.83 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Number § 173.83 Availability of Coast Guard forms. In a State where the Coast Guard is the...

  7. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12 Section 23.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.12 Coast Guard identifying...

  8. 46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard district. 4.03-20 Section 4.03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the...

  9. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.10 Coast Guard emblem. (a) The...

  10. 46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard district. 4.03-20 Section 4.03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the...

  11. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12 Section 23.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.12 Coast Guard identifying...

  12. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other...

  13. 33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard commission pennant. 23.20 Section 23.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission...

  14. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  15. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other...

  16. 46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard Symbol. 50.10-25 Section 50.10-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard...

  17. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12 Section 23.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.12 Coast Guard identifying...

  18. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other...

  19. 46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard number. 50.10-30 Section 50.10-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-30 Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number...

  20. 33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other...

  1. 76 FR 17782 - Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... the Coast Guard'' in the Federal Register. (75 FR 79956). That rule broadens the whistleblower... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 53 RIN 1625-AB33 Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Direct final rule; confirmation of effective date. SUMMARY: On December...

  2. 33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard emblem. 23.10 Section 23.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.10 Coast Guard emblem. (a) The...

  3. 46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or...

  4. 46 CFR 177.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 177.940 Section 177.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a...

  5. 46 CFR 177.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 177.940 Section 177.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a...

  6. 46 CFR 177.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 177.940 Section 177.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a...

  7. 46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or...

  8. 46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or...

  9. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at... conductors are less than 7 feet above the rail, they shall be guarded at all points where persons work...

  10. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at... conductors are less than 7 feet above the rail, they shall be guarded at all points where persons work...

  11. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at... conductors are less than 7 feet above the rail, they shall be guarded at all points where persons work...

  12. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than three-eighths of an inch. (b) If...

  13. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than three-eighths of an inch. (b) If...

  14. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than three-eighths of an inch. (b) If...

  15. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than three-eighths of an inch. (b) If...

  16. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than three-eighths of an inch. (b) If...

  17. 46 CFR 177.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 177.940 Section 177.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a...

  18. 46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or...

  19. 46 CFR 177.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 177.940 Section 177.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a...

  20. 46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a vessel authorized to carry one or...