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1

Implementation of computerized physician order entry in National Guard hospitals: Assessment of critical success factors  

PubMed Central

Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the needs, process and experience of implementing a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system in a leading healthcare organization in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: The National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA) deployed the CPOE in a pilot department, which was the intensive care unit (ICU) in order to assess its benefits and risks and to test the system. After the CPOE was implemented in the ICU area, a survey was sent to the ICU clinicians to assess their perception on the importance of 32 critical success factors (CSFs) that was acquired from the literature. The project team also had several meetings to gather lessons learned from the pilot project in order to utilize them for the expansion of the project to other NGHA clinics and hospitals. Results: The results of the survey indicated that the selected CSFs, even though they were developed with regard to international settings, are very much applicable for the pilot area. The top three CSFs rated by the survey respondents were: The “before go-live training”, the adequate clinical resources during implementation, and the ordering time. After the assessment of the survey and the lessons learned from the pilot project, NGHA decided that the potential benefits of the CPOE are expected to be greater the risks expected. The project was then expanded to cover all NGHA clinics and hospitals in a phased approach. Currently, the project is in its final stages and expected to be completed by the end of 2011. Conclusion: The role of CPOE systems is very important in hospitals in order to reduce medication errors and to improve the quality of care. In spite of their great benefits, many studies suggest that a high percentage of these projects fail. In order to increase the chances of success and due to the fact that CPOE is a clinical system, NGHA implemented the system first in a pilot area in order to test the system without putting patients at risk and to learn from mistakes before expanding the system to other areas. As a result of the pilot project, NGHA developed a list of CSFs to increase the likelihood of project success for the expansion of the system to other clinics and hospitals. The authors recommend a future study for the CPOE implementation to be done that covers the implementation in all the four NGHA hospitals. The results of the study can then be generalized to other hospitals in Saudi Arabia. PMID:22175042

Altuwaijri, Majid M.; Bahanshal, Abdullah; Almehaid, Mona

2011-01-01

2

78 FR 11676 - Notice of Inventory Completion: National Guard Bureau/A7AN, Air National Guard, Joint Base...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Guard Bureau/A7AN, Air National Guard, Joint Base Andrews, MD AGENCY: National Park...National Guard Bureau, Air National Guard, Joint Base Andrews, MD, has completed an inventory...National Guard Bureau, Air National Guard, Joint Base Andrews, MD. Repatriation of...

2013-02-19

3

Successful Army National Guard units: A guard perspective  

SciTech Connect

This project sought to identify factors contributing to a healthy Army National Guard (ARNG) unit. Its results were intended to contribute to a computerized forecasting model under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model, the ARNG Regional Recruiting Potential Model (RRPM), forecasts locations of successful new or modified Guard units. The study was expected to enhance the understanding of what constituents a healthy Guard unit. A Delphi approach was used to define criteria for healthy Guard units and to elicit rankings of those criteria. Two sets of telephone interviews were conducted with a sample of 102 individuals-two battalion-level administrative officers, or their equivalents, in each state in Washington, DC. During these telephone calls, the phrase unit supportability'' was used to express the notion of a healthy unit. The first set of interviews obtained background information and respondents' ideas of the criteria that lead to unit supportability and to a lack of supportability. The data were analyzed to develop a list of ten criteria for unit supportability. In the second interview, the same respondents were asked to rank those criteria in order of importance.

Wolfe, A.K.; Saulsbury, J.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Schexanayder, S.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

1991-10-01

4

Successful Army National Guard units: A guard perspective  

SciTech Connect

This project sought to identify factors contributing to a healthy Army National Guard (ARNG) unit. Its results were intended to contribute to a computerized forecasting model under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model, the ARNG Regional Recruiting Potential Model (RRPM), forecasts locations of successful new or modified Guard units. The study was expected to enhance the understanding of what constituents a healthy Guard unit. A Delphi approach was used to define criteria for healthy Guard units and to elicit rankings of those criteria. Two sets of telephone interviews were conducted with a sample of 102 individuals-two battalion-level administrative officers, or their equivalents, in each state in Washington, DC. During these telephone calls, the phrase ``unit supportability`` was used to express the notion of a healthy unit. The first set of interviews obtained background information and respondents` ideas of the criteria that lead to unit supportability and to a lack of supportability. The data were analyzed to develop a list of ten criteria for unit supportability. In the second interview, the same respondents were asked to rank those criteria in order of importance.

Wolfe, A.K.; Saulsbury, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexanayder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1991-10-01

5

Continued on next page COLORADO NATIONAL GUARD TUITION ADJUSTMENT FORM  

E-print Network

Continued on next page COLORADO NATIONAL GUARD TUITION ADJUSTMENT FORM Indicate the term for which you are requesting the Colorado National Guard Tuition Adjustment: Term Year Certification for the semester without right to appeal. Colorado National Guard tuition adjustment eligibility expires the first

6

National Hospital Discharge Survey  

Cancer.gov

The National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS), which has been conducted annually since 1965, collects data from a sample of approximately 270,000 inpatient records acquired from a national sample of about 500 hospitals. Only hospitals with an average length of stay of fewer than 30 days for all patients, general hospitals, or children's general hospitals are included in the survey. Information collected includes diagnoses, surgical and nonsurgical procedures, prescription and over-the-counter drugs, immunizations, allergy shots, anesthetics, and dietary supplements.

7

32 CFR 161.11 - Benefits for National Guard and Reserve Members of the Uniformed Services.  

... Benefits for National Guard and Reserve Members of the Uniformed Services... Benefits for National Guard and Reserve Members of the Uniformed Services. (a) This section describes the benefits for National Guard and Reserve members...

2014-07-01

8

32 CFR 536.102 - Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act.  

...false Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.102 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.102 Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2014-07-01

9

32 CFR 536.100 - Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.100 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.100 Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2012-07-01

10

32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...full-time National Guard duty, (including...from that duty. The authorizing letter...Air Force National Guard unit's commanding...MTFs may perform the requested...

2011-07-01

11

32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...full-time National Guard duty, (including...from that duty. The authorizing letter...Air Force National Guard unit's commanding...MTFs may perform the requested...

2012-07-01

12

32 CFR 536.102 - Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...true Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.102 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.102 Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2010-07-01

13

32 CFR 536.97 - Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

...false Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.97 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.97 Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. This...

2014-07-01

14

32 CFR 536.96 - Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act. 536.96 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.96 Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2013-07-01

15

32 CFR 536.102 - Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...true Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.102 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.102 Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2012-07-01

16

32 CFR 536.99 - Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...true Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.99 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.99 Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2010-07-01

17

32 CFR 536.100 - Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.100 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.100 Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2010-07-01

18

32 CFR 536.101 - Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.101 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.101 Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2011-07-01

19

32 CFR 536.98 - Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... true Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.98 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.98 Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2011-07-01

20

32 CFR 536.96 - Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...true Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act. 536.96 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.96 Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2012-07-01

21

32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.  

...to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...full-time National Guard duty, (including...from that duty. The authorizing letter...Air Force National Guard unit's commanding...MTFs may perform the requested...

2014-07-01

22

32 CFR 536.101 - Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.101 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.101 Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2010-07-01

23

32 CFR 536.97 - Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...true Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.97 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.97 Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. This...

2012-07-01

24

32 CFR 536.97 - Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...true Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.97 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.97 Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. This...

2010-07-01

25

32 CFR 536.96 - Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...true Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act. 536.96 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.96 Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2011-07-01

26

32 CFR 536.97 - Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...true Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.97 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.97 Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. This...

2011-07-01

27

32 CFR 536.100 - Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.100 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.100 Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2013-07-01

28

32 CFR 536.100 - Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

...Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.100 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.100 Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2014-07-01

29

32 CFR 536.101 - Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.101 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.101 Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2013-07-01

30

32 CFR 536.101 - Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.101 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.101 Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2012-07-01

31

32 CFR 536.102 - Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.102 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.102 Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2013-07-01

32

32 CFR 536.96 - Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act.  

...false Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act. 536.96 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.96 Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2014-07-01

33

32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...full-time National Guard duty, (including...from that duty. The authorizing letter...Air Force National Guard unit's commanding...MTFs may perform the requested...

2010-07-01

34

32 CFR 536.98 - Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... true Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.98 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.98 Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2010-07-01

35

32 CFR 536.98 - Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... true Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.98 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.98 Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2012-07-01

36

32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...full-time National Guard duty, (including...from that duty. The authorizing letter...Air Force National Guard unit's commanding...MTFs may perform the requested...

2013-07-01

37

32 CFR 536.101 - Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

...Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.101 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.101 Settlement authority for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2014-07-01

38

32 CFR 536.102 - Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...true Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.102 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.102 Actions on appeal under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2011-07-01

39

32 CFR 536.100 - Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.100 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.100 Applicable law for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2011-07-01

40

32 CFR 536.99 - Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...true Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.99 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.99 Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2011-07-01

41

32 CFR 536.99 - Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act.  

...false Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.99 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.99 Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2014-07-01

42

32 CFR 536.99 - Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.99 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.99 Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2013-07-01

43

32 CFR 536.98 - Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act.  

... false Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.98 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.98 Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2014-07-01

44

32 CFR 536.97 - Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.97 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.97 Scope for claims under the National Guard Claims Act. This...

2013-07-01

45

32 CFR 536.99 - Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...true Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.99 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.99 Claims not payable under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2012-07-01

46

32 CFR 536.98 - Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act. 536.98 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.98 Claims payable under the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2013-07-01

47

32 CFR 536.96 - Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...true Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act. 536.96 Section...STATES Claims Cognizable Under the National Guard Claims Act § 536.96 Statutory authority for the National Guard Claims Act. The...

2010-07-01

48

Remedial investigation report, Colorado Air National Guard, Buckley Air National Guard Base, Aurora, Colorado; Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Investigation (RI) report describes field activities, presents and evaluates data, and provides recommendations for six sites at the Colorado Air National Guard, Buckley Air National Guard Base (ANGB), Aurora, Colorado. These six sites were identified as potential environmental problem sites during the Preliminary Assessment (Phase I Records Search), and initially studied during two previous Site Inspections (SIs; Phase II, Stage 1, Stage 2) for the National Guard Bureau (NOB) Installation and Restoration Program (IRP). The purpose of an SI is either to confirm or deny the existence of suspected environmental contamination at each site identified during the Preliminary Assessment.

NONE

1995-08-01

49

Exercise and Nutrition Survey of Nevada Air National Guard Members.  

E-print Network

??One hundred seventy-three Nevada Air National Guard members voluntarily participated in this exercise science and nutrition survey-based study. The survey consisted of ten closed-ended questions;… (more)

Demattei, Matthew Antonio

2012-01-01

50

GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY PETITION FOR GEORGIA NATIONAL GUARD MEMBERS OUT-OF-STATE FEE WAIVER  

E-print Network

GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY PETITION FOR GEORGIA NATIONAL GUARD MEMBERS OUT-OF-STATE FEE WAIVER National Guard (GNG), students who are stationed or assigned to Georgia by the National Guard, or students of your or your spouse's/parent's/guardian's Georgia National Guard military orders with unit

Hutcheon, James M.

51

COLORADO NATIONAL GUARD TUITION ADJUSTMENT FORM Indicate the term for which you are requesting the Colorado National Guard Tuition Adjustment: Term Year  

E-print Network

COLORADO NATIONAL GUARD TUITION ADJUSTMENT FORM Indicate the term for which you are requesting the Colorado National Guard Tuition Adjustment: Term Year Certification of this form must be signed classification for the semester without right to appeal. Colorado National Guard tuition adjustment eligibility

Rutledge, Steven

52

COLORADO NATIONAL GUARD TUITION ADJUSTMENT FORM Indicate the term for which you are requesting the Colorado National Guard Tuition Adjustment: Term Year  

E-print Network

COLORADO NATIONAL GUARD TUITION ADJUSTMENT FORM Indicate the term for which you are requesting the Colorado National Guard Tuition Adjustment: Term Year Certification of this form must be signed to appeal. Colorado National Guard tuition adjustment eligibility expires the first term following Colorado

53

3 CFR 8415 - Proclamation 8415 of September 14, 2009. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2009 8415 ...8415 National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2009By the President...commemorating National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, we honor the...

2010-01-01

54

3 CFR 9022 - Proclamation 9022 of September 20, 2013. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...  

...2013. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 9022 ...9022 National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013By the President...as National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week. I call upon...

2014-01-01

55

3 CFR 8564 - Proclamation 8564 of September 17, 2010. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2010. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010 8564 ...8564 National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010By the President...celebrate National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, we honor...

2011-01-01

56

Suicide in the Army National Guard: An Empirical Inquiry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather,…

Griffith, James

2012-01-01

57

The US Army National Guard's Mobile Training Simulators Location and Routing Problem  

E-print Network

#12;The US Army National Guard's Mobile Training Simulators Location and Routing Problem Katta G, NM-88002-5502, e-mail: djang@trac.wsmr.army.mil April 25, 2000 Abstract For training National Guard units, the US Army National Guard will eld 21 combat vehicle training simulators called Mobile Trainers

Murty, Katta G.

58

The US Army National Guard's Mobile Training Simulators Location and Routing Problem  

E-print Network

#12; The US Army National Guard's Mobile Training Simulators Location and Routing Problem Katta G, NM­88002­5502, e­mail: djang@trac.wsmr.army.mil April 25, 2000 Abstract For training National Guard units, the US Army National Guard will field 21 combat vehicle training simulators called Mobile

Murty, Katta G.

59

3 CFR 8715 - Proclamation 8715 of September 16, 2011. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2011. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2011 8715 ...8715 National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2011By the President...Today, their spirit lives on in the Guard and Reserve. The members of...

2012-01-01

60

The Mobilization and Return of Undergraduate Students Serving in the National Guard and Reserves  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some reserve and National Guard personnel are enrolled in college. Much like those who choose not to attend college, reservists and Guard members who are students are challenged by issues of separation from family and employment. However, members of the reserves and National Guard who are college students must also separate from their educational…

Bauman, Mark

2009-01-01

61

78 FR 59153 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 Proclamation 9023--National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2013 Memorandum of September 20, 2013...Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2013 By the President of the United...

2013-09-25

62

Installation restoration program: Community relations plan. Minnesota Air National Guard 148th fighter wing  

SciTech Connect

This Community Relations Plan has been developed as part of the Air National Guard`s Installation Restoration Program for the 148th Fighter Wing, Minnesota Air National Guard, Duluth, Minnesota. The Plan is part of the ongoing commitment by the Air National Guard to keep residents of the Duluth area informed about environmental restoration activities at the Duluth International Airport. The Plan describes the Installation Restoration Program and how it relates to the Minnesota Air National Guard, the environmental issues expressed by local residents, and the actions the Air National Guard will establish to maintain open and effective communications with its Duluth neighbors. The Air National Guard`s Installation Restoration Program is a nationwide effort to identify and resolve environmental problems that may have resulted from past practices or accidents on Air National Guard installations. These practices may have occurred years ago when the Air National Guard had limited knowledge of the environmental consequences associated with accidental spills or routine disposal of waste oils, cleaning solvents, fuels, and other substances.

NONE

1996-05-01

63

Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Training Center, Georgia Army National Guard, Fort Stewart, Georgia. Installation restoration program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard (GAARNG) facility near Hinesville, Georgia, known as the National Guard Training Center (NGTC). Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a priority basis for completing corrective actions (where necessary) in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining previous site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the NGTC. Preliminary assessment site score sheet information is also provided for the NGTC. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of Fort Stewart completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on the NGTC area for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of Fort Stewart.

Not Available

1993-07-01

64

75 FR 58277 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2010 Proclamation 8565--National Farm Safety and Health Week, 2010 Proclamation 8566--National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2010 Presidential Documents Federal...

2010-09-23

65

Decision document for IRP site No. 2, California Air National Guard, 162nd CCGP and 149th CCSQ, North Highlands Air National Guard Station, North Highlands, CA  

SciTech Connect

Decision Document for IRP Site No. 2, California Air National Guard, 162nd CCGP 149th CCSQ. North Highlands Air National Guard Station, North Highlands, CA. The sites were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. This document summarizes the information in the Site Investigation Report and is the official recommendation for No Further Action at the IRP Site.

NONE

1996-02-01

66

5 CFR 831.306 - Service as a National Guard technician before January 1, 1969.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...National Guard technician before January 1, 1969. 831.306 Section 831.306 Administrative...National Guard technician before January 1, 1969. (a) Definitions. In this section...corresponding provision of law) before January 1, 1969. (2) CSRS means the Civil...

2010-01-01

67

33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger zone...National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger...

2010-07-01

68

33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger zone...National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger...

2012-07-01

69

33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...  

...National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger zone...National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger...

2014-07-01

70

33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger zone...National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger...

2011-07-01

71

33 CFR 334.845 - Wisconsin Air National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger zone...National Guard, Volk Field military exercise area located in Lake Michigan offshore from Manitowoc and Sheboygan Counties; danger...

2013-07-01

72

75 FR 78978 - Record of Decision for the 158th Fighter Wing's Proposed Realignment of National Guard Avenue and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Record of Decision for the 158th Fighter Wing's...Realignment of National Guard Avenue and New Main...Vermont Air National Guard, Burlington International...Burlington, Vermont. The ROD states the Air...Statement (EIS) for the Proposed Realignment of National Guard Avenue and New...

2010-12-17

73

SALUTE the KIDS - A Recognition Program For Children of the Army National Guard Soldiers  

E-print Network

SALUTE the KIDS A Recognition Program For Children of the Army National Guard Soldiers By Copyright 2012 Michele L. Rook Submitted to the graduate degree program in Architecture and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial... the Kids: A Recognition Program For Children of Army National Guard Soldiers Michele Rook, M.A Candidate, Design Management 2 Table of Contents Research Question...

Rook, Michele

2012-05-31

74

National Hospital Input Price Index  

PubMed Central

The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 percent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

Freeland, Mark S.; Anderson, Gerard; Schendler, Carol Ellen

1979-01-01

75

Mortality of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sources and rates of mortality of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. National Guard-authorized activities, including military training, caused the death of three of the 94 (3%) kit foxes radiocollared, and do not appear to jeopardize the continued existence of

W. G. Standley; W. H. Berry; T. T. Kato

1992-01-01

76

Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms among National Guard Soldiers Deployed to Iraq: Associations with Parenting Behaviors and Couple Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: In this article, we report findings from a 1-year longitudinal study examining the impact of change in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following combat deployment on National Guard soldiers' perceived parenting and couple adjustment 1 year following return from Iraq. Method: Participants were 468 Army National Guard

Gewirtz, Abigail H.; Polusny, Melissa A.; DeGarmo, David S.; Khaylis, Anna; Erbes, Christopher R.

2010-01-01

77

Couple Adjustment and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in National Guard Veterans of the Iraq War  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relationship adjustment and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were assessed across two time points in a sample of 313 married or partnered National Guard soldiers recently returned from combat duty in Iraq. Structural equation modeling using a four-factor model for PTSD found the latent variable dysphoria (reflecting generalized distress including aspects of emotional numbing and arousal) had the strongest independent

Christopher R. Erbes; Laura A. Meis; Melissa A. Polusny; Jill S. Compton

2011-01-01

78

National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program" is a residential education and training program designed for youth ages 16 to 18 who have dropped out of or been expelled from high school. During the 22-week residential period, participants are offered GED preparation classes and other program services intended to promote positive youth development,…

What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

2010-01-01

79

Making the Transition: Interim Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young people who drop out of high school face long odds of success in a labor market that increasingly values education and skills. This report presents interim results from a rigorous, ongoing evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, which aims to "reclaim the lives of at-risk youth" who have dropped out of high school. ChalleNGe…

Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Dillon, Colleen

2010-01-01

80

Making the Transition: Interim Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation. [Executive Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young people who drop out of high school face long odds of success in a labor market that increasingly values education and skills. This report presents interim results from a rigorous, ongoing evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, which aims to "reclaim the lives of at-risk youth" who have dropped out of high school. ChalleNGe…

Millenky, Megan; Bloom, Dan; Dillon, Colleen

2010-01-01

81

Children of National Guard Troops Deployed in the Global War on Terrorism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined deployment effects in children and spouses of National Guard troops using a longitudinal design to assess 18 children (ages 6 to 17 years) and 13 nondeployed spouses before, during, and after deployment. Both self- and parent reports revealed that children of deployed service personnel experienced emotional and behavioral…

Pfefferbaum, Betty; Houston, J. Brian; Sherman, Michelle D.; Melson, Ashley G.

2011-01-01

82

20 CFR 1002.57 - Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?”  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered âservice in the uniformed...Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?” The National Guard has a dual status. It is a...

2012-04-01

83

20 CFR 1002.57 - Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?”  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered âservice in the uniformed...Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?” The National Guard has a dual status. It is a...

2013-04-01

84

20 CFR 1002.57 - Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?”  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered âservice in the uniformed...Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?” The National Guard has a dual status. It is a...

2011-04-01

85

20 CFR 1002.57 - Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?”  

...Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered âservice in the uniformed...Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?” The National Guard has a dual status. It is a...

2014-04-01

86

20 CFR 1002.57 - Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?”  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered âservice in the uniformed...Is all service as a member of the National Guard considered “service in the uniformed services?” The National Guard has a dual status. It is a...

2010-04-01

87

Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Facility, Installation 25255, Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Rehoboth National Guard Facility (RNGF) in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for ftirther action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the RNGF property, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities under the control of the MAARNG and the past activities contained within that area.

Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

1993-08-01

88

Army National Guard (ARNG) Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) end-user manual  

SciTech Connect

The Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) project is designed to identify and develop programs which automate requirements not included in standard army systems. This includes providing automated interfaces between standard army systems at the National Guard Bureau (NGB) level and at the state/territory level. As part of the OSCAR project, custom software has been installed at NGB to streamline management of major end items. This software allows item managers to provide automated disposition on excess equipment to states operating the Standard Army Retail Supply System Objective (SARSS-O). It also accelerates movement of excess assets to improve the readiness of the Army National Guard (ARNG)--while reducing excess on hand. The purpose of the End-User Manual is to provide direction and guidance to the customer for implementing the ARNG Excess Management Program.

Pelath, R.P. [National Guard Bureau, Arlington, VA (United States)] [National Guard Bureau, Arlington, VA (United States); Rasch, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-12-01

89

Lepidoptera of Fort Indiantown Gap National Guard Training Center, Annville, Pennsylvania  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighty-one species of butterfl ies and two-hundred and thirty-seven spe- cies of moths were identifi ed from Fort Indiantown Gap, a National Guard training facility in south-central Pennsylvania. The Lepidoptera found here include the last remaining population of Speyeria idalia idalia (eastern regal fritillary), as well as the rare Callophrys irus (frosted elfi n), Hesperia leonardus (Leonard's skipper), Datana ranaeceps

Betty Ferster; Betsy Ray Leppo; Mark T. Swartz; Kevina Vulinec; Fred Habegger; Andrew Mehring

2008-01-01

90

Assessment of a postdeployment Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program for National Guard members and supporters.  

PubMed

The Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program (YRRP) was created to meet the needs of National Guard members and their families throughout the deployment cycle. This study examined the perceived utility of the YRRP's delivery of information and assistance during the postdeployment reintegration period by National Guard members and accompanying supporters who were mostly spouses. Over 22 months, from 10 YRRP events, 683 service members and 411 supporters completed questionnaires immediately after the YRRP. We analyzed questions on information and avenues for help, timeliness and concerns related to education, employment, legal, family, and health. Service members and supporters most often endorsed information delivery on education being met (76.8% and 78.2%, respectively) and were least likely to endorse legal information delivery (63.5% and 60%, respectively). Significantly more supporters than service members (p < 0.0001) reported that the YRRP was the first time they learned of available services across all domains. Service members were significantly more likely than supporters to report concerns about education, employment, and health, while supporters were significantly more likely to report concerns about family. Results suggest the YRRP fills gaps in supporter knowledge and provides needed information and resources to most National Guard families 2 to 4 months after a deployment. PMID:25373071

Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Widner, Greg; Shroff, Manan; Matthieu, Monica; Balan, Sundari; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; Price, Rumi K

2014-11-01

91

2014 Hospital National Patient Safety Goals  

E-print Network

2014 Hospital National Patient Safety Goals The purpose of the National Patient Safety Goals is to improve patient safety. The goals focus on problems in health care safety and how to solve them communication NPSG.02.03.01 Identify patient safety risks NPSG.15.01.01 Prevent mistakes in surgery UP.01

Finley Jr., Russell L.

92

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Otis Air National Guard (USAF), Operable Unit 3, Falmouth, MA, September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, lies within the boundaries of the towns of Falmouth, Mashpee, Sandwich, and Bourne. The Area of Contamination (AOC) known as Chemical Spill 3 United States Coast Guard (CS-3 (USCG)) is located on Lee Road, in the south central portion of the MMR. The Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) Installation Restoration Program Office at Otis Air National Guard (ANG) Base, Massachusetts.

NONE

1999-03-01

93

National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) released public-use data files for the 1997 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). The NHAMCS "collect[s] data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital emergency and outpatient departments." The Website for the survey describes methodology and data, provides technical documentation for accessing and manipulating the data, and links users to related reports. The data and documentation for the survey may be downloaded from the Website or from the NCHS FTP server.

94

Installation restoration program. Site investigation report, IRP sites No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. 106th Civil Engineering Flight, New York Air National Guard, Roslyn Air National Guard Station, Roslyn, New York. Volume 3, Appendix H. Site Investigation report  

SciTech Connect

This report is a continuation of the Installation Restoration Program site investigation report for IRP Sites No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 at the Air National Guard, Rosyln, New York. The Sample Delivery Group (SDG) narratives and quality assurance/quality control analytical results of eighteen samples are reported.

NONE

1996-11-01

95

Population trends of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Population trends of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1989 through August 1991. Six semiannual livetrapping sessions and eight scent-station survey sessions were conducted. Livetrapping results and radiotelemetry data were used to calculate minimum population size, density, and distribution. A total of 175 individual

W. H. Berry; W. G. Standley

1992-01-01

96

Blood characteristics of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hematology, serum chemistry, and prevalence of antibodies against selected, pathogens in a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, in 1989 and 1990. Samples from 18 (10 female, 8 male) adult kit foxes were used to establish normal hematology and serum chemistry values for this population. Average values

W. G. Standley; P. M. McCue

1992-01-01

97

Reproduction of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reproduction of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) was investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 38 vixens radiocollared prior to parturition, 12 (32%) were successful in raising pups from conception to the point where pups were observed above ground. No yearling vixens were known tb

K. A. Spencer; W. H. Berry; W. G. Standley; T. P. OFarrell

1992-01-01

98

The Predictive Validity of the PTSD Checklist in a Nonclinical Sample of Combat-Exposed National Guard Troops  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After returning from an extended combat deployment to Iraq, 348 National Guard soldiers were administered the PTSD Checklist (PCL-M), and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) followed, on average, 3 months later by structured diagnostic interviews including the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) for the "Diagnostic and Statistical…

Arbisi, Paul A.; Kaler, Matthew E.; Kehle-Forbes, Shannon M.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Thuras, Paul

2012-01-01

99

Occupational Analysis of Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard Nurses. Final Report for Period January 1974-July 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An occupational survey comparing active duty and Reserve Forces nurses was conducted to support a Nursing Resources Study Group gathering information on current and future nurse requirements. Job inventory booklets were sent to chief nurses at Reserve and Air National Guard locations which were administered during unit training meetings. Returned…

Bergmann, Joseph A.; Smith, Michael C.

100

Lifelong Education Needs for Providing Pastoral Care for Post-Traumatic Stress in South Dakota National Guard Soldiers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Throughout many communities in South Dakota the members of the South Dakota National Guard have been activated to serve in many different parts of the world since 2001. Approximately 20% of these individuals returned to their homes with some degree of PTSD (Hoge, et al., 2004). Pastoral Care has changed since September 11, 2001. The purpose of…

Meirose, William J.

2010-01-01

101

Reserve Training. An Alternative to the Active Army Education Program for National Guard Technicians. Report to Congressional Requesters.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined the Military Education Program (MEP) for Army National Guard technicians. The MEP is an active Army program providing leadership and advanced military occupational specialty technical training. The primary objectives of the study were to determine whether the revised Reserve Component Noncommissioned Officer Education Program is a…

General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of National Security and International Affairs.

102

Reengaging High School Dropouts: Early Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program Evaluation. Full Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

High school dropouts face daunting odds of success in a labor market that increasingly rewards education and skills. This report presents very early results from a rigorous, independent evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, an intensive residential program that aims to "reclaim the lives" of young people ages 16 to 18 who have…

Bloom, Dan; Gardenhire-Crooks, Alissa; Mandsager, Conrad

2009-01-01

103

Anger problems and posttraumatic stress disorder in male and female National Guard and Reserve Service members.  

PubMed

Anger is a common problem among veterans and has been associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study aimed to improve understanding of how anger and PTSD co-occur by examining gender differences and differences by whether the triggering traumatic event is deployment-related vs. civilian-related in current service members. A representative cohort of Reserve and National Guard service personnel (n = 1293) were interviewed to assess for deployment- or civilian-related traumas, PTSD, and anger. The prevalence of self-reported anger problems was estimated among male (n = 1036) and female (n = 257) service members. Log Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to estimate the associations of problems with anger with PTSD and PTSD symptom severity for men and women. Self-reported anger problems were common among male (53.0%) and female (51.3%) service members. Adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) showed associations between anger and PTSD connected to both civilian- and deployment-related traumas (PR were 1.77 (95% CI 1.52-2.05) and 1.85 (95% CI 1.62-2.12), respectively). PTSD symptom severity was also associated with anger. This study was cross-sectional and so a causal relationship between PTSD and anger cannot be established. Problems with anger are common among male and female current Guard and Reserve members. These findings suggest that anger treatment should be made available to current service members and that clinicians should assess anger problems irrespective of gender. Future research should examine the effectiveness of anger treatment protocols by gender. PMID:24755257

Worthen, Miranda; Rathod, Sujit D; Cohen, Gregory; Sampson, Laura; Ursano, Robert; Gifford, Robert; Fullerton, Carol; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer

2014-08-01

104

Preliminary assessment report for Redmond Army National Guard Facility, Installation 53120, Redmond, Washington. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Washington Army National Guard (WAARNG) property in Redmond, Washington. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Redmond ARNG property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) supply/storage of hazardous materials, (2) weapons cleaning, (3) the underground storage tanks (USTs), and (4) the use of herbicides. These ESOs are no longer active because of the closure of OMS 10 activities in 1988.

Ketels, P.; Aggarwal, P.

1993-08-01

105

Obama victorious Democrat's re-election 'about guarding the change' In Florida and nation  

E-print Network

for Obama knocked on more than 300,000 doors in North Florida, Williams said. While Romney supporters could. Alan Williams. "In 2008, it was like the changing of the guard, in 2012, it's about guarding the change are very fired up because they see what is at stake," said the 21-year-old from Cape Canaveral who cast her

Belogay, Eugene A.

106

Corrective measures study report for IRP sites number`s 17, 18, 19 and 21. 148th Fighter Wing, Minnesota Air National Guard, Duluth Air National Guard Base, Duluth, Minnesota  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Measures Study Report for IRP Sites 17, 18,and 21, at Duluth Air National guard Base, Duluth, MN. This study is to screen and evaluate remedial alternatives for remediation of soil and groundwater at IRP sites at Duluth MN. The selected remedial alternative will provide a remedy that is protective of human health and the environment; attains Applicable or Relevant, and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) or cleanup standards set by MPCA.

NONE

1996-03-01

107

Embedded behavioral health providers: an assessment with the Army National Guard.  

PubMed

Although the Army has recently begun the practice of embedding behavioral health care providers (EBHP) in units in an effort to improve soldier well-being, the efficacy of this practice has not been evaluated. This study assesses 1 of the first programs implemented by the military. Using cross-sectional data obtained from a confidential survey of 12 company-level units in the California Army National Guard (n = 1,132), this study examines differences between units with and without EBHPs across a number of measures. Multilevel analysis of behavioral health symptoms, unit climate, perceptions of stigma, and practical barriers to care failed to detect main effects between units with EBHPs relative to those without. However, cross-level interactions were detected between unit EBHP status and soldiers reporting close relationship (e.g., spouse, girlfriend/boyfriend) impairment. Exploratory findings suggest that, among soldiers reporting close relationship impairment, those belonging to units with EBHPs reported significantly lower behavioral health symptoms and significantly more positive unit climates. Based on these limited exploratory finings, this study suggests that EBHPs in reserve units may have a positive effect on a subset of soldiers (i.e., those reporting close relationship impairment). More assessments of embed programs should be conducted, particularly using prospective longitudinal data among randomized units. PMID:24841511

Russell, Dale W; Whalen, Ronald J; Riviere, Lyndon A; Clarke-Walper, Kristina; Bliese, Paul D; Keller, Darc D; Pangelian, Susan I; Thomas, Jeffrey L

2014-08-01

108

Validation of lay-administered mental health assessments in a large Army National Guard cohort.  

PubMed

To report the reliability and validity of key mental health assessments in an ongoing study of the Ohio Army National Guard (OHARNG). The 2616 OHARNG soldiers received hour-long structured telephone surveys including the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) checklist (PCV-C) and Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9). A subset (N?=?500) participated in two hour clinical reappraisals, using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID). The telephone survey assessment for PTSD and for any depressive disorder were both highly specific [92% (standard error, SE 0.01), 83% (SE 0.02)] with moderate sensitivity [54% (SE 0.09), 51% (SE 0.05)]. Other psychopathologies assessed included alcohol abuse [sensitivity 40%, (SE 0.04) and specificity 80% (SE 0.02)] and alcohol dependence [sensitivity, 60% (SE 0.05) and specificity 81% (SE 0.02)].The baseline prevalence estimates from the telephone study suggest alcohol abuse and dependence may be higher in this sample than the general population. Validity and reliability statistics suggest specific, but moderately sensitive instruments. PMID:24615746

Prescott, Marta R; Tamburrino, Marijo; Calabrese, Joseph R; Liberzon, Israel; Slembarski, Renee; Shirley, Edwin; Fine, Thomas; Goto, Toyomi; Wilson, Kimberly; Ganocy, Stephen; Chan, Philip; Derus, Alphonse; Serrano, Mary Beth; Sizemore, James; Kauffman, Jeremy; Galea, Sandro

2014-03-01

109

A specific labor market comparison of male and female willingness to travel: The case of the Army National Guard  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on an examination of gender differences in commuting behavior within the Army National Guard. This labor market provides a more level playing field than most for a direct comparison between male and female willingness to travel. In contrast to other studies, we find that women as a group are willing to travel greater distances, in this particular labor market. 9 refs., 1 fig., 10 tabs.

Daniell, A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Bell, S.E. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Vogt, D.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-01-01

110

Coalitionary mate guarding by male chimpanzees at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cooperative mate guarding by males is unusual in mammals and birds, largely because fertilizations are non-shareable. Chimpanzees\\u000a live in fission-fusion communities that have cores of philopatric males who cooperate in inter-group aggression and in defending\\u000a access to the females in their community. Male contest mating competition is restrained within communities, but single high-ranking\\u000a males sometimes try to mate guard estrous

David P. Watts

1998-01-01

111

Components of secondary traumatic stress in female partners of National Guard and Reservist veterans displaying symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study offers an extensive view of how male National Guardsmen and Reservists' Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms affect their female partners. This study is one of the few that investigates the experience of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) in female partners of National Guard and Reservist veterans. The study included female partners of United States Army National Guardsmen and

Chasity L Kern

2011-01-01

112

Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Among National Guard Soldiers Deployed to Iraq: Associations with Parenting Behaviors and Couple Adjustment  

PubMed Central

Objective This article reports findings from a one-year longitudinal study examining the impact of change in PTSD symptoms following combat deployment on National Guard soldiers’ perceived parenting, and couple adjustment one year following return from Iraq. Method Participants were 468 Army National Guard fathers from a Brigade Combat Team (mean age 36 years; median deployment length 16 months; 89% European American, 5% African American, 6% Hispanic American). Participants completed an in-theater survey one month before returning home from OIF deployment (Time 1), and again, one year post-deployment (Time 2). The PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M; Weathers, Litz, Herman, Huska, & Keane, 1993) was gathered at both times, and two items assessing social support were gathered at baseline only. At Time 2, participants also completed self-report measures of parenting (Alabama Parenting Questionnaire—Short Form; Elgar, Waschbusch, Dadds, & Sigvaldason, 2007), couple adjustment (Dyadic Adjustment Scale-7; Sharpley & Rogers, 1984; Spanier, 1976), parent-child relationship quality (4 items from the Social Adjustment Scale-Self Report; Weissman & Bothwell, 1976), alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test; Babor, Higgins-Biddle, Saunders, & Monteiro, 2001), and items assessing injuries sustained while deployed. Results Structural equation modeling analyses showed that increases in PTSD symptoms were associated with poorer couple adjustment and greater perceived parenting challenges at Time 2 (both at p<.001). Furthermore, PTSD symptoms predicted parenting challenges independent of their impact on couple adjustment. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of investigating and intervening to support parenting and couple adjustment among combat-affected National Guard families. PMID:20873896

Gewirtz, Abigail H.; Polusny, Melissa A.; DeGarmo, David S.; Khaylis, Anna; Erbes, Christopher R.

2011-01-01

113

Installation restoration program. Site investigation report, IRP sites No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. 106th Civil Engineering Flight, New York Air National Guard, Roslyn Air National Guard Station, Roslyn, New York. Volume 2, Appendices A-G. Site Investigation report  

SciTech Connect

This a continuation of the Installation Restoration Program, Site Investigation Report IRP Sites No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 at the New York Air National Guard, Roslyn, New York. The soil boring logs are presented.

NONE

1996-11-01

114

Installation restoration program (IRP). Site investigation report for IRP sites number 1 and number 2. Volume 2: Appendices A-F. 162nd Combat Communications Group and 149th Combat Communications Squadron, California Air National Guard, North Highlands Air National Guard Station, Sacramento, California. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Installation restoration program site investigation of the North Highlands Air National Guard Station, North Highlands California. Report includes the results, conclusion, and recommendations for two sites investigated at the station.

NONE

1995-09-01

115

Bumper guard  

SciTech Connect

A bumper guard is described for protecting a selected portion of an automobile body comprising guard means for covering the selected portion of the automobile body and shaped complementary to the automobile body. A bracket means is attached to the automobile frame for holding the guard means in position on the selected portion of the automobile body. The guard means comprises a V-shaped angle iron adapted to fit over the selected portion of the automobile body. The guard means further comprises a padding secured to the angle iron for interposition between the angle iron and automobile body to thereby protectively separate the angle iron from the automobile body.

Heyman, N.R.

1987-02-10

116

Mortality of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Sources and rates of mortality of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. National Guard-authorized activities, including military training, caused the death of three of the 94 (3%) kit foxes radiocollared, and do not appear to jeopardize the continued existence of the population. Predation by larger carnivores, primarily coyotes (Canis latrans), caused the death of 75% of the 32 radiocollared kit foxes recovered dead for which a cause of death could be determined; vehicle impacts, disease (rabies), poisoning, and shooting were each responsible for the deaths of 6.3%. Adult annual mortality rate was 0.47 and the juvenile mortality rate was 0.80, and both rates are similar to rates reported for kit foxes in other locations. There was no significant difference between male and female mortality rates in either age class. The proportions of dead kit foxes recovered in different habitat types were similar to the availability of the habitat types within the distribution of kit fox on the installation.

Standley, W.G.; Berry, W.H.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

1992-09-01

117

Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-09-01

118

75 FR 22829 - National Environmental Policy Act; Final Environmental Impact Statement on U.S. Coast Guard...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Guard Pacific Area Operations: Districts 11 and 13 AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...that occur in the Coast Guard's District 11 (California) and 13 (Oregon and Washington...unbound format, no larger than 8\\1/2\\ by 11 inches, suitable for copying and...

2010-04-30

119

Increased risk of alcohol dependency in a cohort of National Guard troops with PTSD: a longitudinal study.  

PubMed

Studies show high rates of co-morbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) but there is no consensus on the causal direction of the relationship. Some theories suggest AUD develops as a coping mechanism to manage PTSD symptoms and others that AUD is a vulnerability factor for PTSD. A third hypothesis posits independent developmental pathways stemming from a shared etiology, such as the trauma exposure itself. We examined these hypotheses using longitudinal data on 922 National Guard soldiers, representing a subsample (56%) of a larger pre- and post-deployment cross-sectional study of New Jersey National Guard soldiers deployed to Iraq. Measures included the PTSD Checklist (PCL), DSM-IV-based measures of alcohol use/misuse from the National Household Survey of Drug Use and Health and other concurrent mental health, military and demographic measures. Results showed no effect of pre-deployment alcohol status on subsequent positive screens for new onset PTSD. However, in multivariate models, baseline PTSD symptoms significantly increased the risk of screening positive for new onset alcohol dependence (AD), which rose 5% with each unit increase in PCL score (AOR = 1.05; 95% CI = 1.02-1.07). Results also supported the shared etiology hypothesis, with the risk of a positive screen for AD increasing by 9% for every unit increase in combat exposure after controlling for baseline PTSD status (AOR = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.03-1.15) and, in a subsample with PCL scores <34, by 17% for each unit increase in exposure (AOR = 1.17; 95% CI = 1.05-1.31). These findings have implications for prevention, treatment and compensation policies governing co-morbidity in military veterans. PMID:24332924

Kline, Anna; Weiner, Marc D; Ciccone, Donald S; Interian, Alejandro; St Hill, Lauren; Losonczy, Miklos

2014-03-01

120

National Hospital Discharge and Ambulatory Surgery Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this site offers a host of data on inpatients discharged from non-Federal, short-stay hospitals in the US and the use of ambulatory surgery services. These data include patient characteristics (age and sex, patient disposition, expected sources of payment, etc.), admission and discharge dates, and medical information such as diagnoses and procedures performed. Like other CDC data sites, this is not the easiest to navigate, but diligent users will be rewarded with numerous reports, raw data files, and related documentation.

121

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal imager applied to San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal infrared imaging were used to evaluate the effects of military activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site. The Ground Penetrating Radar was used to identify underground burrows of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) dens in an attempt to evaluate the impact of tracked vehicles on the integrity of kit fox

E. A. Reese; T. T. Kato; W. H. Berry

1992-01-01

122

Habitat, soils, and den use of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Den use patterns, den characteristics, and effects of military training on dens were studied for San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California.Ninety-four radiocollared kit foxes used 1059 dens and 334 buildings as shelter from December 1988, through September 1991. There were 1001 (95%) earthen dens, 57 (5%) culverts, and one den

E. A. Reese; W. G. Standley; W. H. Berry

1992-01-01

123

Combat exposure, psychological symptoms, and marital satisfaction in National Guard soldiers who served in Operation Iraqi Freedom from 2005 to 2006  

Microsoft Academic Search

In current military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, US National Guard (NG) troops are serving longer deployments than ever before. Little is known, however, about how such deployments affect this population of individuals, relative to active component (AC) troops. This study investigated the extent of combat exposure, severity of post-deployment psychological symptoms, and general interpersonal functioning, as well as the

Keith D. Renshaw; Camila S. Rodrigues; David H. Jones

2009-01-01

124

Suicide and War: The Mediating Effects of Negative Mood, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, and Social Support among Army National Guard Soldiers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mediating effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, negative mood, and social support on the relationship of war experiences to suicidality were examined. The research literature suggested a sequence among study scales representing these constructs, which was then tested on survey data obtained from a sample of National Guard

Griffith, James

2012-01-01

125

Critical Needs and Level of Support for the Military Spouse: A Comparative Study of the National Guard and Active Army during the Iraq War  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

National Guard units have been asked to serve in ways never before experienced since the beginning of the Iraq War and throughout the continued war on terror. Multiple deployments, frequent long-term separations from families, communities, and jobs may have far reaching implications. Family Readiness Groups and a climate of support shown by…

Vasilas, Cynthia Nikki

2009-01-01

126

The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form in National Guard Soldiers Screening Positive for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2 RF) was administered to 251 National Guard soldiers who had recently returned from deployment to Iraq. Soldiers were also administered questionnaires to identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). On the basis of responses to the…

Arbisi, Paul A.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Thuras, Paul; Reddy, Madhavi K.

2011-01-01

127

Seoul National University Bundang Hospital's Electronic System for Total Care  

PubMed Central

Objectives Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, which is the first Stage 7 hospital outside of North America, has adopted and utilized an innovative and emerging information technology system to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care. The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce the major components of the SNUBH information system and to describe our progress toward a next-generation hospital information system (HIS). Methods SNUBH opened in 2003 as a fully digital hospital by successfully launching a new HIS named BESTCare, "Bundang hospital Electronic System for Total Care". Subsequently, the system has been continuously improved with new applications, including close-loop medication administration (CLMA), clinical data warehouse (CDW), health information exchange (HIE), and disaster recovery (DR), which have resulted in the achievement of Stage 7 status. Results The BESTCare system is an integrated system for a university hospital setting. BESTCare is mainly composed of three application domains: the core applications, an information infrastructure, and channel domains. The most critical and unique applications of the system, such as the electronic medical record (EMR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support system (CDSS), CLMA, CDW, HIE, and DR applications, are described in detail. Conclusions Beyond our achievement of Stage 7 hospital status, we are currently developing a next-generation HIS with new goals of implementing infrastructure that is flexible and innovative, implementing a patient-centered system, and strengthening the IT capability to maximize the hospital value. PMID:22844650

Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee Hyuck; Lee, Hak Jong; Ha, Kyooseob; Lim, Cheong; Chin, Ho Jun; Yun, Jonghoar; Cho, Eun-Young; Chung, Eunja; Baek, Rong-Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Chul Hee; Lee, Hai-Seok; Byeon, Nam-Soo

2012-01-01

128

Coast Guard  

SciTech Connect

This paper testifies that water pollution by oil remains significant, and noncompliance with federal regulations to prevent oil pollution continues to be great in the four ports GAO visited. Additionally, the impact of the Coast Guard's efforts to reduce oil spill in unknown because the agency does not compile and analyze inspection and spill data needed to make this determination. Further, the Coast Guard has not been inspecting portions of pipes that transport oil between docks and storage tanks. Coast Guard officials now acknowledge this responsibility.

Meed, R.M.

1991-10-01

129

42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...requirements of this subpart, a national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health...

2013-10-01

130

42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...requirements of this subpart, a national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health...

2010-10-01

131

42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...requirements of this subpart, a national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health...

2012-10-01

132

42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.  

...requirements of this subpart, a national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health...

2014-10-01

133

42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...requirements of this subpart, a national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health...

2011-10-01

134

Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, and Perceived Barriers of Colorectal Cancer Screening among Family Physicians in National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh  

PubMed Central

Objectives. The objective of this study is to explore the current knowledge, attitude, and practice of family physicians working in family medicine clinics in National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA), Riyadh, toward colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and to identify the barriers of the screening. Methods. Data were collected using a validated self-administered questionnaire adopted from the National Cancer Institute in USA, customized by adding and eliminating questions to be in line with the institution (NGHA) characteristics. Results. Of the 130 physicians, 56.2% of the physicians were not practicing CRC screening although 94.6% considered CRC screening effective. Board certified physicians had higher knowledge score and were practicing CRC screening more when compared to other physicians. Physicians who reported practicing CRC screening scored more on the knowledge score than those not practicing. Male physicians scored better on attitude score than female physicians. The study found that barriers were cited in higher rates among physicians not practicing CRC screening compared with practicing physicians. Lack of patients' awareness was the most cited barrier. Conclusion. Large percentage of family physicians in this study do not practice CRC screening, despite the knowledge level and the positive attitude. PMID:25328703

2014-01-01

135

Preliminary assessment report for Wayland Army National Guard Armory (former Boston Defense Area Nike Battery 73), Installation 23295, Wayland, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard property near Wayland, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in respond to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining sites activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Wayland Army National Guard Army property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

1993-08-01

136

National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS): 1997 Summary: National Hospital Discharge Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Last month, the NCHS released statistics from its 1997 National Hospital Discharge Survey. The "report presents national estimates of the use of non-Federal, short-stay hospitals in the United States during 1997. Numbers and rates of discharges, diagnoses, and procedures are shown by age and sex." The summary gives average lengths of stays for all discharges, broken down by region, as well as average lengths of stays for selected diagnostic categories, including infant delivery.

Hall, Margaret.; Lawrence, Linda.

137

Predictors of Army National Guard and Reserve members' use of Veteran Health Administration health care after demobilizing from OEF/OIF deployment.  

PubMed

This study described rates and predictors of Army National Guard and Army Reserve members' enrollment in and utilization of Veteran Health Administration (VHA) services in the 365 days following demobilization from an index deployment. We also explored regional and VHA facility variation in serving eligible members in their catchment areas. The sample included 125,434 Army National Guard and 48,423 Army Reserve members who demobilized after a deployment ending between FY 2008 and FY 2011. Demographic, geographic, deployment, and Military Health System eligibility were derived from Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System and "Contingency Tracking System" data. The VHA National Patient Care Databases were used to ascertain VHA utilization and status (e.g., enrollee, TRICARE). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate predictors of VHA utilization as an enrollee in the year following demobilization. Of the study members demobilizing during the observation period, 56.9% of Army National Guard members and 45.7% of Army Reserve members utilized VHA as an enrollee within 12 months. Demographic, regional, health coverage, and deployment-related factors were associated with VHA enrollment and utilization, and significant variation by VHA facility was found. These findings can be useful in the design of specific outreach efforts to improve linkage from the Military Health System to the VHA. PMID:25269126

Harris, Alex H S; Chen, Cheng; Mohr, Beth A; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

2014-10-01

138

77 FR 58295 - National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2012  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...after deployment, these men and women demonstrate the utmost courage...themselves in harm's way while knowing all too well the full cost of...support by ensuring our men and women in uniform--and their families...tribute to the brave men and women who keep our Nation safe...

2012-09-19

139

Reproduction of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

The reproduction of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) was investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 38 vixens radiocollared prior to parturition, 12 (32%) were successful in raising pups from conception to the point where pups were observed above ground. No yearling vixens were known tb be reproductively active. The mean litter size during 1989 - 1991 was 3.0 (n = 21, SE = 0.28) and ranged from one to six pups. Both the proportion of vixens successfully raising pups and the mean litter size observed at Camp Roberts during this study were lower than those reported at other locations. Sex ratios of kit fox pups were male biased two of the three years, but did not differ statistically from 1:1 throughout the study. Whelping was estimated to occur between February 15 and March 5. Results of this study support previous reports that kit foxes are primarily monogamous, although one case of polygamy may have occurred. Both the proportion of dispersing radiocollared juveniles (26%) and the mean dispersal distance (5.9 km) of juveniles at Camp Roberts appeared low compared to other locations.

Spencer, K A; Berry, W H; Standley, W G; O`Farrell, T P

1992-09-01

140

Blood characteristics of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Hematology, serum chemistry, and prevalence of antibodies against selected, pathogens in a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, in 1989 and 1990. Samples from 18 (10 female, 8 male) adult kit foxes were used to establish normal hematology and serum chemistry values for this population. Average values were all within the normal ranges reported for kit foxes in other locations. Three hematology parameters had significant differences between male and female values; males had higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and lower lymphocyte counts. There were no significant differences between serum chemistry values from male and female foxes. Prevalence of antibodies was determined from serum samples from 47 (26 female, 21 male) adult kit foxes and eight (4 female, 4 male) juveniles. Antibodies were detected against five of the eight pathogens tested: canine parvovirus, Toxoplasma gondii Leptospira interrogans, canine distemper virus, and canine hepatitis virus. Antibodies were not detected against Brucella, canis, Coccidioides immitis, or Yersinia pestis.

Standley, W.G.; McCue, P.M.

1992-09-01

141

Fleas of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

A total of 3,241 fleas, representing seven species, were identified from 398 samples collected from San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis), California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi), and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 3,109 fleas collected from kit foxes 95.7% were Echidnophaga gallinacea, 4.0% Pulex irritans, 0.2% Hoplopsyllus anomolus, and 0.1% Odontopsyllus dentatus. One male Ctenocephalides fells was also collected from a kit fox. The 118 fleas collected from California ground squirrels consisted of Hoplopsyllus anomolus (55.9%), Echidnophaga gallinacea (37.3%), and Oropsylla montanus (6.8%). The 14 fleas collected from deer mice were Aetheca wagneri. Based on the distribution and abundance of flea species collected, and the vector efficiency of these fleas, it appears that kit foxes could play a role in the transfer of natural vectors of sylvatic plague between rodent populations, if the bacterium responsible for plague (Yersinia pestis) were present at Camp Roberts. Little information regarding kit fox food habits was evidenced by the distribution and abundance of small mammal flea species collected from kit foxes.

Spencer, K.A.; Egoscue, H.J.

1992-09-01

142

Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed

W. H. Berry; W. G. Standley; T. T. Kato

1992-01-01

143

Cost of Hospitalization and Length of Stay in People with Down Syndrome: Evidence from a National Hospital Discharge Claims Database  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present paper aims to describe the hospitalization profiles which include medical expenses and length of stays, and to determine their possible influencing factors of hospital admission on persons with Down syndrome in Taiwan. We employed a population-based, retrospective analyses used national health insurance hospital discharge data of the…

Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

2011-01-01

144

Cost of hospitalization and length of stay in people with Down syndrome: Evidence from a national hospital discharge claims database  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper aims to describe the hospitalization profiles which include medical expenses and length of stays, and to determine their possible influencing factors of hospital admission on persons with Down syndrome in Taiwan. We employed a population-based, retrospective analyses used national health insurance hospital discharge data of the year 2005 in this study. Subject inclusion criteria included residents of

Wen-Jiu Hung; Lan-Ping Lin; Chia-Ling Wu; Jin-Ding Lin

2011-01-01

145

Installation restoration program. Site investigation report, IRP sites No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3. 106th Civil Engineering Flight, New York Air National Guard, Roslyn Air National Guard Station, Roslyn, New York. Volume 4, appendices I-J. Site Investigation report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the continuation of the Installation Restoration Program Site Investigation report IRP Sites No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3 at the Air National Guard, Roslyn, New York. The chemical analyses results for soil and ground water samples is reported.

NONE

1996-11-01

146

Staging the Nation: Hospitable Performances in Kant’s Anthropology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploring recent developments in theories of hospitality and nationality, this essay considers how Immanuel Kant’s Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View (a text published in 1798 and composed of “popular” lectures delivered to the “general public” from 1772–1796) uses the figure of an “Asiatic Turk” as a placeholder for what I call the proleptic and self?divided character of Kant’s

Peter Melville

2006-01-01

147

NOAA/NMFS Developments NMFS, Coast Guard Strengthen  

E-print Network

NOAA/NMFS Developments NMFS, Coast Guard Strengthen Lacey Act Enforcement The U.S. Coast Guard Guard and NMFS are con- cerned that past efforts to enforce U.S. laws in the Gulf of Mexico have not had was a coordinated effort by the U.S. Coast Guard, Texas Parks and Wildlife De- partment. National Mari ne Fisheries

148

46 CFR 10.409 - Coast Guard-accepted Quality Standard System (QSS) organizations.  

...monitor training on behalf of the Coast Guard, should apply to the National...monitoring training that are equal to the Coast Guard's course approval and oversight...The documentation submitted to the Coast Guard must contain the...

2014-10-01

149

Trends in Inpatient Hospital Deaths: National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2000-2010  

MedlinePLUS

... 2000 and 2005, and for 70% in 2010. Did the length of stay for hospitalizations ending in ... hospital in the years 2000–2010 decreased, as did the rate of hospitalizations ending in death, but ...

150

ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: Dispensing and administration—2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of the 2002 ASHP nation- al survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings that pertain to dispensing and ad- ministration are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1101 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. SMG Market- ing Group, Inc., supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn

CRAIG A. PEDERSEN; PHILIP J. SCHNEIDER; DOUGLAS J. SCHECKELHOFF

151

Hospitalized Younger: A Comparison of a National Sample of Homeless and Housed Inpatient Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Homelessness is associated with high rates of hospitalizations and age-adjusted mortality. Few studies have examined whether homeless people are admitted to the hospital at an earlier age than the general population or for different diagnoses. Methods. We compared the age at admission and the primary discharge diagnoses in a national sample of 43,868 hospitalized veterans. Results. The difference in

Jennifer Adams; Robert. Rosenheck; Lauren. Gee; Catherine L. Seibyl; Margot. Kushel

2007-01-01

152

[Treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma at the National Cancer Center Hospital].  

PubMed

Seventy-nine patients with rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) received treatment at the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1962 and 1985. The patients ranged in age from 4 months to 74 years with a median age of 6 years. Forty-six patients were male and 33 were female. The primary tumor site of RMS was the same as in the previous report. The head and neck region was the most frequent site (40.5%), followed by the extremities (34.1%), genitourinary region (15.2%), trunk (5.1%) and retroperitoneum (5.1%). Histologic types were embryonal RMS in 45 patients, alveolar RMS in 23 patients, pleomorphic RMS in 8 patients and unclassified RMS in 3 patients. As of October 1985, 14 of the 79 patients were still alive. Between 1962 and 1971, 38 patients were not treated by any protocol. After 1972, 41 patients received treatment using a 3 stage-related, multiple-modality program. In the first protocol, chemotherapy consisted of Vincristine, Cyclophosphamide, and Actinomycin-D, and 1 of 18 patients have survived more than 5 years. The cumulative 5-year survival rate of the first protocol was 11.1%. In the second treatment program, which involved Adriamycin in addition to the 3 drugs cited above, 4 of 23 patients have survived more than 5 years. The cumulative 5-year survival rate, 33.2%, was very improved. PMID:3592704

Beppu, Y; Fukuma, H; Chuma, H; Ise, T; Ohira, M

1987-05-01

153

A Comparison of the Human Characteristics of Curriculum Materials Used in an Air National Guard Leadership Development Program with the Characteristics of Students Encountering the Materials: A Study Using the Annehurst Curriculum Classification System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Annehurst Curriculum Classification System (ACCS), a tool for matching individual learners with appropriate curriculum materials, was used with a group of fifty-nine students (Air National Guard officer candidates) and their four instructor-advisors to examine two issues: (1) the applicability of the ACCS in a highly structured,…

French, Russell L.; And Others

154

RepoRt on a MaMMal SuRvey at CaMp Maxey, laMaR County, texaS (texaS aRMy national GuaRd faCility)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mammal survey was conducted of Camp Maxey (Texas Army National Guard training site), Lamar County, Texas, from October 2002 through June 2004. This military installation is located in eastern Texas and is situated at the gradational boundary between the Pineywoods (east) and Blackland Prairies (west). Sherman traps, snap traps, pitfall traps, mist nets, DK-1 and Macabee gopher traps, and

Cody W. EdWards

155

The Coast Guard Comes to Class.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focuses on Sea Partners, by the United States Coast Guard, that enables students to understand how pollution affects the marine environment. Correlates the activities with the National Science Education Standards. (DDR)

Fawcett, Paul

2002-01-01

156

Maternal Clinical Diagnoses and Hospital Variation in the Risk of Cesarean Delivery: Analyses of a National US Hospital Discharge Database  

PubMed Central

Background Cesarean delivery is the most common inpatient surgery in the United States, where 1.3 million cesarean sections occur annually, and rates vary widely by hospital. Identifying sources of variation in cesarean use is crucial to improving the consistency and quality of obstetric care. We used hospital discharge records to examine the extent to which variability in the likelihood of cesarean section across US hospitals was attributable to individual women's clinical diagnoses. Methods and Findings Using data from the 2009 and 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project—a 20% sample of US hospitals—we analyzed data for 1,475,457 births in 1,373 hospitals. We fitted multilevel logistic regression models (patients nested in hospitals). The outcome was cesarean (versus vaginal) delivery. Covariates included diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy, hypertension in pregnancy, hemorrhage during pregnancy or placental complications, fetal distress, and fetal disproportion or obstructed labor; maternal age, race/ethnicity, and insurance status; and hospital size and location/teaching status. The cesarean section prevalence was 22.0% (95% confidence interval 22.0% to 22.1%) among women with no prior cesareans. In unadjusted models, the between-hospital variation in the individual risk of primary cesarean section was 0.14 (95% credible interval 0.12 to 0.15). The difference in the probability of having a cesarean delivery between hospitals was 25 percentage points. Hospital variability did not decrease after adjusting for patient diagnoses, socio-demographics, and hospital characteristics (0.16 [95% credible interval 0.14 to 0.18]). A limitation is that these data, while nationally representative, did not contain information on parity or gestational age. Conclusions Variability across hospitals in the individual risk of cesarean section is not decreased by accounting for differences in maternal diagnoses. These findings highlight the need for more comprehensive or linked data including parity and gestational age as well as examination of other factors—such as hospital policies, practices, and culture—in determining cesarean section use. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:25333943

Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Arcaya, Mariana C.; Subramanian, S. V.

2014-01-01

157

Guard For Fuse Caps  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

L-shaped guard attached to fuse holder. Guard prevents casual tampering with fuses in electrical junction box or fuse block. Protects fuses from being damaged by handling or by rope or string used to secure them. With fuse-cap guard, only responsible people have access to fuses.

Atwell, D. C.

1985-01-01

158

National trends in hospital outcomes among patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome requiring mechanical ventilation.  

PubMed

Several new treatments have been introduced for Guillain-Barré syndrome over the last decade. To assess the impact of these new strategies on outcomes and hospitalization charges among patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome requiring mechanical ventilation, we compared pertinent variables between nationally representative data derived from 1992 and 2002. Compared with patients admitted in 1992, the patients admitted in 2002 showed an increase in hospital charges ($168,600 versus $116,300, P = 0.007), longer hospitalization (52.6 +/- 23.3 versus 40.3 +/- 36.3 days, P = 0.017), and greater in-hospital mortality (11.1% versus 7.6%, P = 0.003). Thus, improvements in therapeutic strategies over that decade are not reflected in mortality, length of hospitalization, or hospital charges in the current study. This outcome may be more reflective of changing patterns of hospitalization rather than relatively futility of new treatments. PMID:18772698

Souayah, Nizar; Nasar, Abu; Suri, M Fareed K; Qureshi, Adnan I

2008-09-01

159

National perspective on in-hospital emergency units in Iraq  

PubMed Central

Background: Hospitals play a crucial role in providing communities with essential medical care during times of disasters. The emergency department is the most vital component of hospitals' inpatient business. In Iraq, at present, there are many casualties that cause a burden of work and the need for structural assessment, equipment updating and evaluation of process. Objective: To examine the current pragmatic functioning of the existing set-up of services of in-hospital emergency departments within some general hospitals in Baghdad and Mosul in order to establish a mechanism for future evaluation for the health services in our community. Methods: A cross-sectional study was employed to evaluate the structure, process and function of six major hospitals with emergency units: four major hospitals in Baghdad and two in Mosul. Results: The six surveyed emergency units are distinct units within general hospitals that serve (collectively) one quarter of the total population. More than one third of these units feature observation unit beds, laboratory services, imaging facilities, pharmacies with safe storage, and ambulatory entrance. Operation room was found only in one hospital's reception and waiting area. Consultation/track area, cubicles for infection control, and discrete tutorial rooms were not available. Patient assessment was performed (although without adequate privacy). The emergency specialist, family medicine specialist and interested general practitioner exist in one-third of the surveyed units. Psychiatrist, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and social work links are not available. The shortage in medication, urgent vaccines and vital facilities is an obvious problem. Conclusions: Our emergency unit's level and standards of care are underdeveloped. The inconsistent process and inappropriate environments need to be reconstructed. The lack of drugs, commodities, communication infrastructure, audit and training all require effective build up. PMID:25003053

Lafta, Riyadh K.; Al-Nuaimi, Maha A.

2013-01-01

160

Abortion a business hurdle for nation's Catholic hospitals.  

PubMed

Abortion is the foremost moral issue for 626 Catholic hospitals nationwide since church teachings prohibit the performance of elective abortions. This and the fact that Catholic hospitals can not do voluntary sterilizations can hinder their ability to get managed care contracts. In some cases a hospital will not join a network because abortions and sterilizations are done in other hospitals in the network. In other cases they have been in plans where abortions are performed in other contract facilities; this does not violate the Catholic church policy since the abortions are not performed in their facility. When a Catholic and secular hospital plan a merger, Catholic ideals seem to take precedence. A Catholic hospital that went bankrupt in Philadelphia, was turned over to investors, and was under no obligation to follow the Catholic church's directives, but did not perform abortions anyway. In Washington state there are merger talks going on between a secular facility and the Franciscan Health System. The cessation of abortion and sterilization services appear to be outweighed by the financial benefits. Besides, these procedures can be performed through other providers in the area. In Michigan similar merger talks may fail because of the abortion issue. The government justice system is investigating and is likely to challenge any merger there. PMID:10294510

Burda, D

1989-08-25

161

Improving mouth guards.  

PubMed

Mouth guards and materials were tested to provide information for a more protective yet more comfortable product. Ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer materials varying in thickness and stiffness were tested for their mechanical, thermal, and water-absorption properties. Thickness was measured before and after fabrication of the mouth guard. During fabrication, thicknesses decreased from 25% to 50% for the custom-fabricated mouth guards and 70% to 99% for the mouth-formed (boil-and-bite), off-the-shelf, over-the-counter mouth guards. The thicker the material is, the greater the resulting energy absorption is. It is therefore essential that the thickness in the occlusal portion of the mouth guard remain optimal after fabrication. A mouth guard with a stiffer insert, which softens at a higher temperature in the occlusal portion, is proposed as a more protective mouth guard. PMID:7990042

Park, J B; Shaull, K L; Overton, B; Donly, K J

1994-10-01

162

3 CFR 8864 - Proclamation 8864 of September 14, 2012. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...military spouses through Joining Forces. With tools like our online Veterans Job Bank, we are connecting veterans to businesses...training they need to find their next job or advance their education and skills. During National Employer Support of the...

2013-01-01

163

Organizational and market factors associated with leadership development programs in hospitals: a national study.  

PubMed

Effective leadership in hospitals is widely recognized as the key to organizational performance. Clinical, financial, and operational performance is increasingly being linked to the leadership practices of hospital managers. Moreover, effective leadership has been described as a means to achieve competitive advantage. Recent environmental forces, including reimbursement changes and increased competition, have prompted many hospitals to focus on building leadership competencies to successfully address these challenges. Using the resource dependence theory as our conceptual framework, we present results from a national study of hospitals examining the association of organizational and market factors with the provision of leadership development program activities, including the presence of a leadership development program, a diversity plan, a program for succession planning, and career development resources. The data are taken from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) 2008 Survey of Hospitals, the Area Resource File, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The results of multilevel logistic regressions of each leadership development program activity on organizational and market factors indicate that hospital size, system and network affiliation, and accreditation are significantly and positively associated with all leadership development program activities. The market factors significantly associated with all leadership development activities include a positive odds ratio for metropolitan statistical area location and a negative odds ratio for the percentage of the hospital's service area population that is female and minority. For-profit hospitals are less likely to provide leadership development program activities. Additional findings are presented, and the implications for hospital management are discussed. PMID:22530292

Kim, Tae Hyun; Thompson, Jon M

2012-01-01

164

Promoting reintegration of National Guard veterans and their partners using a self-directed program of integrative therapies: a pilot study.  

PubMed

This article reports pilot data from phase I of a project to develop and evaluate a self-directed program of integrative therapies for National Guard personnel and significant relationship partners to support reintegration and resilience after return from Iraq or Afghanistan. Data are reported on 43 dyads. Intervention was an integrated multimedia package of guided meditative, contemplative, and relaxation exercises (CD) and instruction in simple massage techniques (DVD) to promote stress reduction and interpersonal connectedness. A repeated measures design with standardized instruments was used to establish stability of baseline levels of relevant mental health domains (day 1, day 30), followed by the intervention and assessments 4 and 8 weeks later. Significant improvements in standardized measures for post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and self-compassion were seen in both veterans and partners; and in stress for partners. Weekly online reporting tracked utilization of guided exercises and massage. Veterans reported significant reductions in ratings of physical pain, physical tension, irritability, anxiety/worry, and depression after massage, and longitudinal analysis suggested declining baseline levels of tension and irritability. Qualitative data from focus groups and implications for continued development and a phase II trial are discussed. PMID:23397692

Collinge, William; Kahn, Janet; Soltysik, Robert

2012-12-01

165

Homecoming of soldiers who are citizens: Re-employment and financial status of returning Army National Guard soldiers from Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF).  

PubMed

This study examined civilian employment among Army National Guard soldiers who had recently returned from Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF). Of specific interest were relationships of re-employment and financial difficulties to several conditions, such as amount of social support during and after deployment, combat exposure, negative feelings during and after deployment, and postdeployment adjustment symptoms. Survey data from the Army's Reintegration Unit Risk Inventory were used (4,546 soldiers in 50 units who were deployed during 2010). Few soldiers reported financial difficulties during deployment (7.1% of the sample) and after having returned (11.8%). Of those who reported postdeployment financial difficulties, nearly one-half had reported such difficulties during deployment, and not having resumed the predeployment job was associated with more postdeployment financial difficulties. Logistic regression analyses showed the relative contribution of the study variables to changed financial status, from deployment to postdeployment. Reported deployment support (e.g., trust in the unit chain-of-command and available support) was associated with decreased financial difficulties. In contrast, increased financial difficulties were associated with having seen others wounded or killed in combat. Other postdeployment experiences, such as feelings of anger and frustration and available support, were associated with increased financial difficulties, in addition to alcohol use, trouble sleeping and suicidal thoughts. Implications of results for policy and practice to lessen financial hardships and job loss associated with deployment are discussed. PMID:24284690

Griffith, James

2015-01-01

166

Prey abundance and food habits of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California  

SciTech Connect

Prey abundance and food habits of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. The sampling methods initially used to assess abundance of prey species resulted in indices too low to be of value. Because of this, the relationship between relative abundance and frequency of occurrence of prey species could not be examined. Six hundred forty-nine fecal samples (scats) were analyzed to determine the frequency of occurrence of prey items. California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) and lagomorphs primarily desert cottontails (Sylvilagus audubonii) and black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) were the most frequently occurring mammalian prey items found in scats (35.0% and 12.2%, respectively). The frequency of occurrence of ground squirrel (but not lagomorph) remains in scats collected from juveniles was significantly higher than in scats collected from adults. The frequency of occurrence of ground squirrel and lagomorph remains in scats collected from males was not significant different than in scats collected from females. There were significant variations in the frequency of ground squirrel remains among the years 1989--1991 and during the June--November periods between 1989 and 1990 and between 1990 and 1991. The frequency of lagomorph remains collected during the June--November period differed significantly among the years 1989--1991 and between 1990 and 1991.

Logan, C.G.; Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; Kato, T.T.

1992-09-01

167

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal imager applied to San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Ground Penetrating Radar and thermal infrared imaging were used to evaluate the effects of military activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site. The Ground Penetrating Radar was used to identify underground burrows of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) dens in an attempt to evaluate the impact of tracked vehicles on the integrity of kit fox dens. The thermal imaging was used to identify kit foxes within the live-fire impact area. The ground penetrating radar equipment was initially unsuccessfull in detecting burrows in the hard, compacted soils. Changes in antenna systems and sampling methods resulted in small improvements, but the data were inadequate to test for effects of military vehicles on dens. Further refinements would have required the intentional destruction of dens, or the redesign of the ground penetrating radar hardware and software. Thermal imaging was useful in observing kit foxes at close range but was not suitable for detecting foxes in the impact area because the images were not clear enough for conclusive species identification.

Reese, E.A.; Kato, T.T.; Berry, W.H.; O'Farrell, T.P.

1992-10-01

168

Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

1992-10-01

169

Law, Politics, and Occupational Consciousness: Industrial Guard Unions in the United States, 1933–1945  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1865 to 1937 industrial guards (or company police) enforced work rules and engaged in anti-union activities. The National Industrial Recovery Act (1933) and the National Labor Relations Act (1935) introduced workplace democratization. The new political climate and federal laws aided unionization and simultaneously encouraged guards to develop a sense of occupational consciousness. Guard unionization during World War II completed

James D. Calder

2010-01-01

170

Assessment of soil and water contaminants from selected locations in and near the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area, Ada County, Idaho, 2001-2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2001, the National Guard Bureau and the U.S. Geological Survey began a project to compile hydrogeologic data and determine presence or absence of soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination at the Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Training Area in southwestern Idaho. Between June 2002 and April 2003, a total of 114 soil, surface-water, ground-water, precipitation, or dust samples were collected from 68 sample sites (65 different locations) in the Orchard Training Area (OTA) or along the vehicle corridor to the OTA. Soil and water samples were analyzed for concentrations of selected total trace metals, major ions, nutrients, explosive compounds, semivolatile organics, and petroleum hydrocarbons. Water samples also were analyzed for concentrations of selected dissolved trace metals and major ions. Distinguishing naturally occurring large concentrations of trace metals, major ions, and nutrients from contamination related to land and water uses at the OTA was difficult. There were no historical analyses for this area to compare with modern data, and although samples were collected from 65 locations in and near the OTA, sampled areas represented only a small part of the complex OTA land-use areas and soil types. For naturally occurring compounds, several assumptions were made?anomalously large concentrations, when tied to known land uses, may indicate presence of contamination; naturally occurring concentrations cannot be separated from contamination concentrations in mid- and lower ranges of data; and smallest concentrations may represent the lowest naturally occurring range of concentrations and (or) the absence of contaminants related to land and water uses. Presence of explosive, semivolatile organic (SVOC), and petroleum hydrocarbon compounds in samples indicates contamination from land and water uses. In areas along the vehicle corridor and major access roads within the OTA, most trace metal, major ion, and nutrient concentrations in soil samples were not in the upper 10th percentile of data, but concentrations of 25 metals, ions, or nutrients were in the upper 10th percentile in a puddle sample near the heavy equipment maneuvering area, MPRC-H. The largest concentrations of tin, ammonia, and nitrite plus nitrate (as nitrogen) in water from the OTA were detected in a sample from this puddle. Petroleum hydrocarbons were the most common contaminant, detected in all soil and surface-water samples. An SVOC, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, a plasticizer, was detected at a site along the vehicle corridor. In Maneuver Areas within the OTA, many soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of cobalt, iron, mercury, titanium, sodium, ammonia, or total phosphorus were detected in 6 of 13 soil samples outside the Tadpole Lake area. The largest concentrations of aluminum, arsenic, beryllium, nickel, selenium, silver, strontium, thallium, vanadium, chloride, potassium, sulfate, and nitrite plus nitrate were detected in soil samples from the Tadpole Lake area. Water from Tadpole Lake contained the largest total concentrations of 19 trace metals, 4 major ions, and 1 nutrient. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 5 soil samples and water from Tadpole Lake. SVOCs related to combustion of fuel or plasticizers were detected in 1 soil sample. Explosive compounds were detected in 1 precipitation sample.In the Impact Area within the OTA, most soil samples contained at least one trace metal, major ion, or nutrient in the upper 10th percentile of data, and the largest concentrations of barium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, or orthophosphate were detected in 6 of the 18 soil samples. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in 4 soil samples, SVOCs in 6 samples, and explosive compounds in 4 samples. In the mobilization and training equipment site (MATES) compound adjacent to the OTA, all soil and water samples contained at lea

Parliman, D.J.

2004-01-01

171

Habitat, soils, and den use of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Den use patterns, den characteristics, and effects of military training on dens were studied for San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California.Ninety-four radiocollared kit foxes used 1059 dens and 334 buildings as shelter from December 1988, through September 1991. There were 1001 (95%) earthen dens, 57 (5%) culverts, and one den in a hollow log. Denentrance dimensions were measured for single entrance dens; the average height was 20 cm, and the average width was 21 cm. Most dens had two to five den entrances, and only 36% of dens found showed sign of fox activity. Dens were found at elevations between 161 and 351 m. The average slope of dens found on hillsides was 19 degrees, and most dens faced the western quadrant. Dens were found over much of the post exceptthe steep southwest portion. More kit fox dens were located in grassland and low to medium density oak woodlands than expected, and fewer dens were located in developed areas and medium to high density oak woodlands than expected. Denning range size was calculated for 16 foxes that were radiocollared at least one year and that were found using only earthen and culvert dens. The average denning range size was 171.0 [plus minus] 24.0 ha. There was no significant difference in male and female average denning range sizes. When buildings used as shelter were included in denning range sizes, there was no significant difference in average denning range size between developed and undeveloped areas. Foxes used 26 of 36 available soil series, and dens were not distributed proportionally among the 36 soil series. Kit fox dens were typically found in well drained soils. Few den entrances were destroyed by military training exercises.

Reese, E.A.; Standley, W.G.; Berry, W.H.

1992-09-01

172

Habitat, soils, and den use of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect

Den use patterns, den characteristics, and effects of military training on dens were studied for San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California.Ninety-four radiocollared kit foxes used 1059 dens and 334 buildings as shelter from December 1988, through September 1991. There were 1001 (95%) earthen dens, 57 (5%) culverts, and one den in a hollow log. Denentrance dimensions were measured for single entrance dens; the average height was 20 cm, and the average width was 21 cm. Most dens had two to five den entrances, and only 36% of dens found showed sign of fox activity. Dens were found at elevations between 161 and 351 m. The average slope of dens found on hillsides was 19 degrees, and most dens faced the western quadrant. Dens were found over much of the post exceptthe steep southwest portion. More kit fox dens were located in grassland and low to medium density oak woodlands than expected, and fewer dens were located in developed areas and medium to high density oak woodlands than expected. Denning range size was calculated for 16 foxes that were radiocollared at least one year and that were found using only earthen and culvert dens. The average denning range size was 171.0 {plus_minus} 24.0 ha. There was no significant difference in male and female average denning range sizes. When buildings used as shelter were included in denning range sizes, there was no significant difference in average denning range size between developed and undeveloped areas. Foxes used 26 of 36 available soil series, and dens were not distributed proportionally among the 36 soil series. Kit fox dens were typically found in well drained soils. Few den entrances were destroyed by military training exercises.

Reese, E.A.; Standley, W.G.; Berry, W.H.

1992-09-01

173

Improvement of the low knowledge, attitude and practice of hepatitis B virus infection among Saudi national guard personnel after educational intervention  

PubMed Central

Background Although the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) was reported to be higher in military personnel than the general population in Saudi Arabia (SA), there is lack of studies assessing HBV awareness among them. The objective was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of HBV infection among military personnel. Methods An intervention design with pre- and post-education KAP questionnaire was completed among National Guard soldiers working in Jeddah during January 2009. Educational intervention was provided through educational leaflets, group and individual discussions, visual show, and a lecture. A score was created from the correct answers to 58 questions. Results A total of 400 male soldiers with mean age 30.7?±?6.1 years completed both questionnaires. The majority had school education (96.8%) and in the lower military ranks (66.0%). Only 19.5% of soldiers reported HBV vaccine intake. The low median and inter-quartile range of the pre-intervention score (16, 6–26) markedly increased after education (to 53, 50–55, p<0.001). The overall improvement of mean KAP score (204%) was also observed in all its component scores; disease nature (272%), methods of transmission (206%), prevention and control (109%), attitude (155%), and practice (192%). The improvement was evident irrespective of socio-demographic characteristics and history of HBV vaccine. KAP scores were significantly associated with higher educational levels, higher monthly income, administrative jobs, and higher job ranks. Conclusion We are reporting a low level of HBV awareness among Saudi military population. The study confirms the need and effectiveness of focused multifaceted educational campaigns among the military population. PMID:23111118

2012-01-01

174

Development of hospital-integrated large-scale PACS in Seoul National University Hospital  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SNUH has started a PACS project with three main goals: to develop a fully hospital-integrated PACS, to develop a cost effective PACS using open systems architecture, and to extend PACS' role to the advanced application such as image guided surgery, multi-media assisted education and research. In order to achieve these goals, we have designed a PACS architecture which takes advantage of client-server computing, high speed communication network, computing power of up-to-date high-end PC, and advanced image compression method. We have installed ATM based communication network in radiology department and in-patient wards, and implemented DICOM compliant acquisition modules, image storage and management servers, and high resolution display workstations based on high-end PC and Microsoft Windows 95 and Windows NT operating systems. The SNUH PACS is in partial scale operation now, and will be expanded to full scale by the end of 1998.

Kim, JongHyo; Yeon, Kyoung M.; Han, Man Chung; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Cho, Han I.

1997-05-01

175

Guarded Fragments with 6.1 The guarded fragment  

E-print Network

Chapter 6 Guarded Fragments with Counting 6.1 The guarded fragment We observed in Ch. 5 . The guarded fragment of first-order logic, G, is defined to be the smallest set of L-formulas satisfying. Lk not involving the equality predicate. We call Gk the k-variable guarded fragment. Thus, multi

Pratt-Hartmann, Ian

176

A comparison of hospital administrative costs in eight nations: US costs exceed all others by far.  

PubMed

A few studies have noted the outsize administrative costs of US hospitals, but no research has compared these costs across multiple nations with various types of health care systems. We assembled a team of international health policy experts to conduct just such a challenging analysis of hospital administrative costs across eight nations: Canada, England, Scotland, Wales, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United States. We found that administrative costs accounted for 25.3 percent of total US hospital expenditures--a percentage that is increasing. Next highest were the Netherlands (19.8 percent) and England (15.5 percent), both of which are transitioning to market-oriented payment systems. Scotland and Canada, whose single-payer systems pay hospitals global operating budgets, with separate grants for capital, had the lowest administrative costs. Costs were intermediate in France and Germany (which bill per patient but pay separately for capital projects) and in Wales. Reducing US per capita spending for hospital administration to Scottish or Canadian levels would have saved more than $150 billion in 2011. This study suggests that the reduction of US administrative costs would best be accomplished through the use of a simpler and less market-oriented payment scheme. PMID:25201663

Himmelstein, David U; Jun, Miraya; Busse, Reinhard; Chevreul, Karine; Geissler, Alexander; Jeurissen, Patrick; Thomson, Sarah; Vinet, Marie-Amelie; Woolhandler, Steffie

2014-09-01

177

[Problems in career planning for novice medical technologists in Japanese national hospitals].  

PubMed

Skills and knowledge regarding many different types of test are required for medical technologists (MTs) to provide accurate information to help doctors and other medical specialists. In order to become an efficient MT, specialized training programs are required. Certification in specialized areas of clinical laboratory sciences or a doctoral degree in medical sciences may help MTs to realize career advancement, a higher earning potential, and expand the options in their career. However, most young MTs in national university hospitals are employed as part-time workers on a three-year contract, which is too short to obtain certifications or a doctoral degree. We have to leave the hospital without expanding our future. We need to take control of our own development in order to enhance our employability within the period. As teaching and training hospitals, national university hospitals in Japan are facing a difficult dilemma in nurturing MTs. I hope, as a novice medical technologist, that at least university hospitals in Japan create an appropriate workplace environment for novice MTs. PMID:23427696

Ogasawara, Shu; Tsutaya, Shoji; Akimoto, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Keiya; Yabaka, Hiroyuki

2012-12-01

178

OnGuard Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the OnGuard website "provides practical tips from the federal government and the technology industry to help you be on guard against Internet fraud, secure your computer, and protect your personal information." Visitors can learn how to avoid online scams, secure their computers, protect kids online and more. On the homepage, users can find useful information divided into subpages for educators, parents, techies, small business owners, the military and kids.

179

The Economic Impact of Hospitalization for Diabetic Foot Infections in a Caribbean Nation  

PubMed Central

Context: Foot infection is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus in the Caribbean. Diabetic foot infections place a heavy burden on health care resources in the Caribbean. Objective: To evaluate the treatment-related costs for diabetic foot infections in a Caribbean nation. Methods: We identified all patients with diabetic foot infections in a 730-bed hospital serving a catchment population of approximately 400,000 persons from June 1, 2011 through July 31, 2012. The following data were collected: details of infection, antibiotic usage, investigations performed, number of physician consultations, details of operative treatment, and duration of hospitalization. Total charges were tallied to determine the final cost for inhospital treatment of diabetic foot infections. Results: There were 446 patients hospitalized with diabetic foot infections, yielding approximately 0.75% annual risk for patients with diabetes to develop foot infections. The mean duration of hospitalization was 22.5 days. Sixteen patients (3.6%) were treated conservatively without an operative procedure and 430 (96.4%) required some form of operative intervention. There were 885 debridements, 193 minor amputations and 60 major amputations, 7102 wound dressings, 2763 wound cultures, and 27,015 glucometer measurements. When the hospital charges were tallied, a total of US $13,922,178 (mean, US $31,216) were spent to treat diabetic foot infections in these 446 patients during 1 year at this hospital. Conclusions: Each year, the government of Trinidad and Tobago spends US $85 million, or 0.4% of their gross domestic product, solely to treat patients hospitalized for diabetic foot infections. With this level of national expenditure and the anticipated increase in the prevalence of diabetes, it is necessary to revive the call for investment in preventive public health strategies. PMID:24626079

Cawich, Shamir O; Islam, Shariful; Hariharan, Seetharaman; Harnarayan, Patrick; Budhooram, Steve; Ramsewak, Shivaa; Naraynsingh, Vijay

2014-01-01

180

Surface-water quantity and quality, aquatic biology, stream geomorphology, and groundwater-flow simulation for National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, 2002-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Base-line and long-term monitoring of water resources of the National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap in south-central Pennsylvania began in 2002. Results of continuous monitoring of streamflow and turbidity and monthly and stormflow water-quality samples from two continuous-record long-term stream sites, periodic collection of water-quality samples from five miscellaneous stream sites, and annual collection of biological data from 2002 to 2005 at 27 sites are discussed. In addition, results from a stream-geomorphic analysis and classification and a regional groundwater-flow model are included. Streamflow at the facility was above normal for the 2003 through 2005 water years and extremely high-flow events occurred in 2003 and in 2004. Water-quality samples were analyzed for nutrients, sediments, metals, major ions, pesticides, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, and explosives. Results indicated no exceedances for any constituent (except iron) above the primary and secondary drinking-water standards or health-advisory levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Iron concentrations were naturally elevated in the groundwater within the watershed because of bedrock lithology. The majority of the constituents were at or below the method detection limit. Sediment loads were dominated by precipitation due to the remnants of Hurricane Ivan in September 2004. More than 60 percent of the sediment load measured during the entire study was transported past the streamgage in just 2 days during that event. Habitat and aquatic-invertebrate data were collected in the summers of 2002-05, and fish data were collected in 2004. Although 2002 was a drought year, 2003-05 were above-normal flow years. Results indicated a wide diversity in invertebrates, good numbers of taxa (distinct organisms), and on the basis of a combination of metrics, the majority of the 27 sites indicated no or slight impairment. Fish-metric data from 25 sites indicated results similar to the invertebrate data. Stream classification based on evolution of the stream channels indicates about 94 percent of the channels were considered to be in equilibrium (type B or C channels), neither aggrading nor eroding. A regional, uncalibrated groundwater-flow model indicated the surface-water and groundwater-flow divides coincided. Because of folding of rock layers, groundwater was under confined conditions and nearly all the water leaves the facility via the streams.

Langland, Michael J.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Chichester, Douglas C.; Bilger, Michael D.; Brightbill, Robin A.

2010-01-01

181

The impact of ongoing national terror on the community of hospital nurses in Israel.  

PubMed

The main goal of this study was to explore the connections between the exposure of nurses in Israel to national terror and the levels of distress experienced due to ongoing terror attacks. The data were collected from 214 nurses from various parts of Israel who work in three types of heath services (mainly hospital departments) and provide help to victims of terror. The nurses reported very high levels of burnout, high levels of stress and medium-to high levels of intrusive memories. Levels of exposure were associated with burnout, intrusive memories and level of stress. More professional attention should be given to hospital nurses who provide care for trauma patients. PMID:23982180

Ron, Pnina; Shamai, Michal

2014-04-01

182

32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602 Section 700.602 National...Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United...

2011-07-01

183

32 CFR 700.307 - Powers with respect to the Coast Guard.  

...2014-07-01 false Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. 700.307 Section 700.307 National...Navy § 700.307 Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. Whenever the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy under...

2014-07-01

184

32 CFR 700.307 - Powers with respect to the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. 700.307 Section 700.307 National...Navy § 700.307 Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. Whenever the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy under...

2010-07-01

185

32 CFR 700.307 - Powers with respect to the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. 700.307 Section 700.307 National...Navy § 700.307 Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. Whenever the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy under...

2013-07-01

186

32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602 Section 700.602 National...Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United...

2010-07-01

187

32 CFR 700.307 - Powers with respect to the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. 700.307 Section 700.307 National...Navy § 700.307 Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. Whenever the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy under...

2012-07-01

188

32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.  

...2014-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602 Section 700.602 National...Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United...

2014-07-01

189

32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602 Section 700.602 National...Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United...

2012-07-01

190

32 CFR 700.602 - The Commandant of the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false The Commandant of the Coast Guard. 700.602 Section 700.602 National...Navy) § 700.602 The Commandant of the Coast Guard. (a) The Commandant of the Coast Guard is the senior officer of the United...

2013-07-01

191

32 CFR 700.307 - Powers with respect to the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. 700.307 Section 700.307 National...Navy § 700.307 Powers with respect to the Coast Guard. Whenever the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy under...

2011-07-01

192

Has cost containment after the National Health Insurance system been successful? Determinants of Taiwan hospital costs.  

PubMed

Taiwan implemented the National Health Insurance system (NHI) in 1995. After the NHI, the insurance coverage expanded and the quality of healthcare improved, however, the healthcare costs significantly escalated. The objective of this study is to determine what factors have direct impact on the increased costs after the NHI. Panel data analysis is used to investigate changes and factors affecting cost containment at Taipei municipal hospitals from 1990 to 2001. The results show that the expansion of insured healthcare coverage (especially to the elderly and the treatment of more complicated types of diseases), and the increased competition (requiring the growth of new technology and the longer average length of stay) are important driving forces behind the increase of hospital costs, directly influenced by the advent of the NHI. Therefore, policymakers should emphasize health prevention activities and disease management programs for the elderly to improve cost containment. In addition, hospital managers should find ways to improve the hospital efficiency (shorten the LOS) to reduce excess services and medical waste. They also need to better understand their market position and acquire suitable new-tech equipment earlier, to be a leader, not a follower. Finally, policymakers should establish related benchmark indices for what drivers up hospital costs (micro-aspect) and to control healthcare expenditures (macro-level). PMID:17949848

Hung, Jung-Hua; Chang, Li

2008-03-01

193

A national study of pressure ulcer prevalence and incidence in acute care hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study sought to establish national benchmarks for pressure ulcer prevalence and incidence among acute care health organizations served by Novation LLC. Setting and subjects: One hundred sixteen acute care facilities from 34 states participated; the sample consisted of 17,560 patients in hospital-based medical-surgical or intensive care units. Instruments: Standardized education kits were provided to each participating site. The

Kathy Whittington; Martha Patrick; Joan L. Roberts

2000-01-01

194

Pediatric perioperative education current practices: a national survey of children's hospitals in the United States.  

PubMed

Identifying existing practices is a first step in the creation of developmentally and culturally effective teaching materials for children and families. This national survey queried two groups to explore current pediatric perioperative education practices: 81 nurses from a perioperative pediatric specialty association and 30 administrators representing leading children's hospitals within the United States. The aim was to improve perioperative care through the design of educational materials from the child's perspective. PMID:23767262

Heckmann, Maura; Beauchesne, Michelle A

2013-05-01

195

A national survey of inpatient medication systems in English NHS hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background Systems and processes for prescribing, supplying and administering inpatient medications can have substantial impact on medication administration errors (MAEs). However, little is known about the medication systems and processes currently used within the English National Health Service (NHS). This presents a challenge for developing NHS-wide interventions to increase medication safety. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional postal census of medication systems and processes in English NHS hospitals to address this knowledge gap. Methods The chief pharmacist at each of all 165 acute NHS trusts was invited to complete a questionnaire for medical and surgical wards in their main hospital (July 2011). We report here the findings relating to medication systems and processes, based on 18 closed questions plus one open question about local medication safety initiatives. Non-respondents were posted another questionnaire (August 2011), and then emailed (October 2011). Results One hundred (61% of NHS trusts) questionnaires were returned. Most hospitals used paper-based prescribing on the majority of medical and surgical inpatient wards (87% of hospitals), patient bedside medication lockers (92%), patients’ own drugs (89%) and ‘one-stop dispensing’ medication labelled with administration instructions for use at discharge as well as during the inpatient stay (85%). Less prevalent were the use of ward pharmacy technicians (62% of hospitals) or pharmacists (58%) to order medications on the majority of wards. Only 65% of hospitals used drug trolleys; 50% used patient-specific inpatient supplies on the majority of wards. Only one hospital had a pharmacy open 24 hours, but all had access to an on-call pharmacist. None reported use of unit-dose dispensing; 7% used an electronic drug cabinet in some ward areas. Overall, 85% of hospitals had a double-checking policy for intravenous medication and 58% for other specified drugs. “Do not disturb” tabards/overalls were routinely used during nurses’ drug rounds on at least one ward in 59% of hospitals. Conclusions Inter- and intra-hospital variations in medication systems and processes exist, even within the English NHS; future research should focus on investigating their potential effects on nurses’ workflow and MAEs, and developing NHS-wide interventions to reduce MAEs. PMID:24572075

2014-01-01

196

Great hospitals of Asia: the Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University College of Medicine.  

PubMed

Established in 1957, the Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University College of Medicine is the one of the oldest neurosurgical departments in Korea. The seven past Chairmen (Bo Sung Sim, Kil Soo Choi, Dae Hee Han, Byung-Kyu Cho, Hyun Jib Kim, Hee-Won Jung, and Dong Gyu Kim) have devoted themselves to the development of the department. The current chair, Chun Kee Chung, assumed the position in July 2010. The current department comprises several clinical programs that encompass the entire spectrum of neurosurgical disorders, with 29 specialized faculty members and care teams in three hospitals: Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH), Boramae Medical Center (BMC), and Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH). The remarkable growth of the department during the last half century made it possible to perform 5,666 operations (3,299 at SNUH, 411 at BMC and 1,860 at SNUBH) during 2009. A total of 1,201 articles authored by faculty members were published in scientific journals between 1958 and 2009, approximately 32% of which were published in international journals. The department is regarded as the "Mecca" of neurosurgery in Korea because of its outstanding achievement and the many distinguished alumni with leadership roles in the academic field. This article traces the clinical, academic, and scientific development of the department, its present activities, and its future direction. PMID:21600472

Kim, Dong Gyu; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Chi Heon; Phi, Ji Hoon

2011-01-01

197

Biological assessment of the effects of activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard training site, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties, California, on the endangered san joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica  

SciTech Connect

Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 imposes several requirements on federal agencies concerning listed threatened and endangered species and their designated critical habitat. Camp Roberts is operated by the California Army National Guard (CA ARNG) with funding from the National Guard Bureau (NGB). Its primary mission to provide a site where military training requirements of the western United States can be met. The presence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) was confirmed in 1960 and the distribution and abundance of the species increased over the next two decades. The Secretary of Interior has not designated any critical habitat for San Joaquin kit fox. The major objective of this Biological Assessment is to provide FWS with sufficient information concerning the possible impacts that routine military training, maintenance and repair activities, and proposed construction projects may have on the San Joaquin kit fox and its essential habitat at Camp Roberts so that formal consultation with NGB and CA ARNG can begin. FWS will use this information as part of the basis for issuing a Biological Opinion which will include an incidental take provision. 45 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1989-12-01

198

Hydrogeologic framework and water quality of the Vermont Army National Guard Ethan Allen Firing Range, northern Vermont, October 2002 through December 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ethan Allen Firing Range of the Vermont Army National Guard is a weapons-testing and training facility in a mountainous region of Vermont that has been in operation for about 80 years. The hydrologic framework and water quality of the facility were assessed between October 2002 and December 2003. As part of the study, streamflow was continuously measured in the Lee River and 24 observation wells were installed at 19 locations in the stratified drift and bedrock aquifers to examine the hydrogeology. Chemical analyses of surface water, ground water, streambed sediment, and fish tissue were collected to assess major ions, trace elements, nutrients, and volatile and semivolatile compounds. Sampling included 5 surface-water sites sampled during moderate and low-flow conditions; streambed-sediment samples collected at the 5 surface-water sites; fish-tissue samples collected at 3 of the 5 surface-water sites; macroinvertebrates collected at 4 of the 5 surface-water sites; and ground-water samples collected from 10 observation wells, and samples collected at all surface- and ground-water sites. The hydrogeologic framework at the Ethan Allen Firing Range is dominated by the upland mountain and valley setting of the site. Bedrock wells yield low to moderate amounts of water (0 to 23 liters per minute). In the narrow river valleys, layered stratified-drift deposits of sand and gravel of up to 18 meters thick fill the Lee River and Mill Brook Valleys. In these deposits, the water table is generally within 3 meters below the land surface and overall ground-water flow is from east to west. Streamflow in the Lee River averaged 0.72 cubic meters per second (25.4 cubic feet per second) between December 2002 and December 2003. Streams are highly responsive to precipitation events in this mountainous environment and a comparison with other nearby watersheds shows that Lee River maintains relatively high streamflow during dry periods. Concentrations of trace elements and nutrients in surface-water samples are well below freshwater-quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Brook-trout samples collected in 1992 and 2003 show trace-metal concentrations have decreased over the past 11 years. concentrations in water samples are well below levels that restrict swimming at all five stream sites at moderate and low-flow conditions and in all observation wells. Comparisons among surface-water, streambed-sediment, and biological samples collected in 2003 to earlier studies at the Ethan Allen Firing Range indicate water-quality conditions are similar or have improved over the past 15 years. Ground water in the stratified-drift aquifers at the facility is well buffered with relatively high alkalinities and pH greater than 6. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, uranium, and zinc were below detection levels in ground-water samples. Barium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, and strontium were the only trace elements detected in ground-water samples. Cobalt and iron were detected at low levels in two wells near Mill Brook, and copper was detected at the detection limit in one of these wells. These same two wells had concentrations of barium and manganese 2 to 10 times greater than other ground-water samples. Concentrations of nutrients are at or below detection levels in most ground-water samples. Volatile organic compounds and semivolatile organic compounds were not detected in any water samples from the Ethan Allen Firing Range.

Clark, Stewart F.; Chalmers, Ann; Mack, Thomas J.; Denner, Jon C.

2005-01-01

199

When the guards guard themselves: Undercover tactics turned inward  

Microsoft Academic Search

The perennial issue of “who guards the guards?” has taken a new turn in the U.S. with the increased use of covert means to ferret out corruption among police, prison guards, prosecutors, defense attorneys and judges. This specialized use is located within the recent general expansion of undercover policing in the United States. Theoretical issues involved in controlling the controllers,

Gary T. Marx

1992-01-01

200

Improved table-saw guard  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Guard makes lighter contact on materials being sawed. Cuts are better controlled, and damages to fragile foam-type materials are reduced. Overhead support makes it possible to perform slot and step cuts, and thick materials are pushed under guard with less force. Guard is transparent plastic enclosure held by side-attached overhead support arm.

Dunn, B. R.; Zebus, P. P.

1980-01-01

201

Guarded recursive datatype constructors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce a notion of guarded recursive (g.r.) datatype constructors, generalizing the notion of recursive datatypes in functional programming languages such as ML and Haskell. We address both theoretical and practical issues resulted from this generalization. On one hand, we design a type system to formalize the notion of g.r. datatype constructors and then prove the soundness of the type

Hongwei Xi; Chiyan Chen; Gang Chen

2003-01-01

202

Coast Guard Firefighting Module  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA and the U.S. Coast Guard are jointly developing a lightweight, helicopter-transportable, completely self-contained firefighting module for combating shipboard and dockside fires. The project draws upon NASA technology in high-capacity rocket engine pumps, lightweight materials and compact packaging.

1977-01-01

203

The two guards problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given a simple polygon in the plane with two distinguished vertices, s and g ,i s it possible for two guards to simultaneously walk along the two boundary chains from s to g in such a way that they are always mutually visible? We decide this question in time O(n logn) and in linear space, where n is the number

Christian Icking; Rolf Klein

1991-01-01

204

The Two Guards Problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Given a simple polygon in the plane with two distinguished vertices, s and g ,i s it possible for two guards to simultaneously walk along the two boundary,chains from s to g in such a way that they are always mutually visible? We decide this question in time O(n logn) and in linear space, where n is the number

Christian Icking; Rolf Klein

1992-01-01

205

Dutch Hospital Drug Formularies: pharmacotherapeutic variation and conservatism, but concurrence with national pharmacotherapeutic guidelines  

PubMed Central

Aims This research examines current hospital drug formularies (HDFs) of all Dutch general hospitals. It assesses the extent to which they recommend the same drugs, the breadth of their coverage in terms of therapeutic areas, drug groups incorporated and individuals drugs included, and their extent of conservatism by considering the year of introduction of the drugs included within groups. Furthermore, it considers the extent to which their recommendations concur and comply with those of national pharmacotherapeutic guidelines and the WHO Essential Drugs List (EDL). Methods Seventy-eight (81%) out of all 96 current Dutch HDFs were received of which 62 were suitable for study. Differences between HDFs and eventual associations with hospital characteristics were researched by statistical testing and case-control studies. To evaluate HDFs' concurrence with national guidelines and compliance with the WHO EDL, nine drug groups were studied in detail: benzodiazepines, calcium channel blockers, ?-adrenoceptor blocking agents, ACE-inhibitors, angiotensin-II inhibitors, NSAIDs, H2-receptor antagonists, 5HT3-antagonists, and H+-pump inhibitors. Concurrence and compliance with national guidelines and the WHO EDL was defined as inclusion of recommended drugs. Non-concurrence was defined as inclusion of nonrecommended drugs. Results The total number of indications addressed and drug groups incorporated within HDFs varied from 28 to 72 (median 56) and from 30 to 123 (median 97), respectively. The total number of individual drug entities (pharmacological substances) included ranged from 239 to 658 (median 430) and the total number of drug products, including all different dosage forms, from 412 to 1121 (median 655). Within drug groups, drug entities first marketed were most frequently included. Teaching hospitals were most likely to include recently marketed drugs. Depending on the drug group, HDFs' concurrence and compliance with national guidelines and the WHO EDL ranged from 35% to 100%. Conclusions Findings indicate that Dutch HDFs are rather uniform in the indications addressed and the drug groups incorporated. However, the number of individual drug entities and drug products included within groups varies considerably. Furthermore, Dutch HDFs are considered rather conservative, as older drugs are favoured over more recent drugs. Generally, with some drug exceptions, Dutch HDFs concur and comply with recommendations in national pharmacotherapeutic guidelines and with the WHO EDL over 90%. PMID:10718781

Fijn, R; Engels, S A G; Brouwers, J R B J; Knaap, R J; De Jong-Van den Berg, L T W

2000-01-01

206

Private hospital accreditation and inducement of care under the ghanaian national insurance scheme  

PubMed Central

The Ghanaian National Health Insurance Scheme pays providers according to the fee for service payment scheme, a method of payment that is likely to encourage inducement of care. The goal of this paper is to test for the presence of supplier induced demand among patients who received care in private, for profit, hospitals accredited to provide care to insured patients. An instrumental variable Poisson estimation was used to compare the demand curves for health care by insured outpatients in the public and private hospitals. The results showed that supplier induced demand existed in the private sector among patients within the ages 18 and 60 years. Impact on cost of care and patients' welfare is discussed. PMID:22827881

2011-01-01

207

Emergency department physician training in Jamaica: a national public hospital survey  

PubMed Central

Background Emergency Department (ED) medical officers are often the first medical responders to emergencies in Jamaica because pre-hospital emergency response services are not universally available. Over the past decade, several new ED training opportunities have been introduced locally. Their precise impact on the health care system in Jamaica has not yet been evaluated. We sought to determine the level of training, qualifications and experience of medical officers employed in public hospital EDs across the nation. Methods A database of all medical officers employed in public hospital EDs was created from records maintained by the Ministry of Health in Jamaica. A specially designed questionnaire was administered to all medical officers in this database. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 10.0. Results There were 160 ED medical officers across Jamaica, of which 47.5% were males and the mean age was 32.3 years (SD +/- 7.1; Range 23–57). These physicians were employed in the EDs for a mean of 2.2 years (SD +/- 2.5; Range 0–15; Median 2.5) and were recent graduates of medical schools (Mean 5.1; SD +/- 5.9; Median 3 years). Only 5.5% of the medical officers had specialist qualifications (grade III/IV), 12.8% were grade II medical officers and 80.5% were grade I house officers or interns. The majority of medical officers had no additional training qualifications: 20.9% were exposed to post-graduate training, 27.9% had current ACLS certification and 10.3% had current ATLS certification. Conclusion The majority of medical officers in public hospital EDs across Jamaica are relatively inexperienced and inadequately trained. Consultant supervision is not available in most public hospital EDs. With the injury epidemic that exists in Jamaica, it is logical that increased training opportunities and resources are required to meet the needs of the population. PMID:18847504

Crandon, Ivor W; Harding, Hyacinth E; Cawich, Shamir O; Williams, Eric W; Williams-Johnson, Jean

2008-01-01

208

Public hospital quality report awareness: evidence from National and Californian Internet searches and social media mentions, 2012  

PubMed Central

Objectives Publicly available hospital quality reports seek to inform consumers of important healthcare quality and affordability attributes, and may inform consumer decision-making. To understand how much consumers search for such information online on one Internet search engine, whether they mention such information in social media and how positively they view this information. Setting and design A leading Internet search engine (Google) was the main focus of the study. Google Trends and Google Adwords keyword analyses were performed for national and Californian searches between 1 August 2012 and 31 July 2013 for keywords related to ‘top hospital’, best hospital’, and ‘hospital quality’, as well as for six specific hospital quality reports. Separately, a proprietary social media monitoring tool was used to investigate blog, forum, social media and traditional media mentions of, and sentiment towards, major public reports of hospital quality in California in 2012. Primary outcome measures (1) Counts of searches for keywords performed on Google; (2) counts of and (3) sentiment of mentions of public reports on social media. Results National Google search volume for 75 hospital quality-related terms averaged 610?700 searches per month with strong variation by keyword and by state. A commercial report (Healthgrades) was more commonly searched for nationally on Google than the federal government's Hospital Compare, which otherwise dominated quality-related search terms. Social media references in California to quality reports were generally few, and commercially produced hospital quality reports were more widely mentioned than state (Office of Statewide Healthcare Planning and Development (OSHPD)), or non-profit (CalHospitalCompare) reports. Conclusions Consumers are somewhat aware of hospital quality based on Internet search activity and social media disclosures. Public stakeholders may be able to broaden their quality dissemination initiatives by advertising on Google or Twitter and using social media interactively with consumers looking for relevant information. PMID:24618223

Huesch, Marco D; Currid-Halkett, Elizabeth; Doctor, Jason N

2014-01-01

209

Laser beam guard clamps  

DOEpatents

A quick insert and release laser beam guard panel clamping apparatus having a base plate mountable on an optical table, a first jaw affixed to the base plate, and a spring-loaded second jaw slidably carried by the base plate to exert a clamping force. The first and second jaws each having a face acutely angled relative to the other face to form a V-shaped, open channel mouth, which enables wedge-action jaw separation by and subsequent clamping of a laser beam guard panel inserted through the open channel mouth. Preferably, the clamping apparatus also includes a support structure having an open slot aperture which is positioned over and parallel with the open channel mouth.

Dickson, Richard K. (Stockton, CA)

2010-09-07

210

Endocytosis in Guard Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stomatal movement requires large and repetitive changes to cell volume and consequently surface\\u000a area. These alterations in surface area are accomplished by addition and removal of plasma membrane\\u000a material. Recent studies of membrane turnover in guard cell protoplasts using electrophysiology and\\u000a fluorescence imaging techniques implicate that exocytosis and endocytosis are sensitive to changes\\u000a in membrane tension. This may provide a regulatory

Ulrike Homann

211

Building an FTP guard  

SciTech Connect

Classified designs usually include lesser classified (including unclassified) components. An engineer working on such a design needs access to the various sub-designs at lower classification levels. For simplicity, the problem is presented with only two levels: high and low. If the low-classification component designs are stored in the high network, they become inaccessible to persons working on a low network. In order to keep the networks separate, the component designs may be duplicated in all networks, resulting in a synchronization problem. Alternatively, they may be stored in the low network and brought into the high network when needed. The latter solution results in the use of sneaker-net (copying the files from the low system to a tape and carrying the tape to a high system) or a file transfer guard. This paper shows how an FTP Guard was constructed and implemented without degrading the security of the underlying B3 platform. The paper then shows how the guard can be extended to an FTP proxy server or an HTTP proxy server. The extension is accomplished by allowing the high-side user to select among items that already exist on the low-side. No high-side data can be directly compromised by the extension, but a mechanism must be developed to handle the low-bandwidth covert channel that would be introduced by the application.

Sands, P.D.

1998-08-01

212

‘Shell shock’ Revisited: An Examination of the Case Records of the National Hospital in London  

PubMed Central

During the First World War the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic, in Queen Square, London, then Britain’s leading centre for neurology, took a key role in the treatment and understanding of shell shock. This paper explores the case notes of all 462 servicemen who were admitted with functional neurological disorders between 1914 and 1919. Many of these were severe or chronic cases referred to the National Hospital because of its acknowledged expertise and the resources it could call upon. Biographical data was collected together with accounts of the patient’s military experience, his symptoms, diagnostic interpretations and treatment outcomes. Analysis of the notes showed that motor syndromes (loss of function or hyperkinesias), often combined with somato-sensory loss, were common presentations. Anxiety and depression as well as vegetative symptoms such as sweating, dizziness and palpitations were also prevalent among this patient population. Conversely, psychogenic seizures were reported much less frequently than in comparable accounts from German tertiary referral centres. As the war unfolded the number of physicians who believed that shell shock was primarily an organic disorder fell as research failed to find a pathological basis for its symptoms. However, little agreement existed among the Queen Square doctors about the fundamental nature of the disorder and it was increasingly categorised as functional disorder or hysteria. PMID:25284893

Linden, Stefanie Caroline; Jones, Edgar

2014-01-01

213

MOBILE GUARDS 3.1. INTRODUCTION  

E-print Network

MOBILE GUARDS 3.1. INTRODUCTION In this chapter we explore an interesting variant of the art chapter, we modify the power of the guard. Specifically, each guard is permitted to "patrol" an interior xy c P. Thus x is covered by the guard if x is visible from some point along the guard's patrol path

O'Rourke, Joseph

214

Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights at Uganda’s national referral hospital  

PubMed Central

Background The realisation of patients’ rights in resource-constrained and patient-burdened public health care settings in Uganda remains an obstacle towards quality health care delivery, health care-seeking behaviour and health outcomes. Although the Uganda Patients’ Charter of 2009 empowers patients to demand quality care, inequitable access and abuse remain common. Aim The study aimed to assess level of awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights amongst patients and health workers (HWs) at Uganda’s national referral hospital, Mulago Hospital in Kampala. Methods A three-phase cross-sectional questionnaire-based descriptive survey was conducted amongst 211 patients, 98 HWs and 16 key informants using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods. The study was conducted in May–June 2012, 2.5 years after the launch of the Uganda Patients’ Charter. Results At least 36.5% of patients faced a challenge regarding their rights whilst seeking health care. Most of the patients (79%) who met a challenge never attempted to demand their rights. Most patients (81.5%) and HWs (69.4%) had never heard of the Uganda Patients’ Charter. Awareness of patients’ rights was significantly higher amongst HWs (70%) than patients (40%) (p < 0.01). Patients’ awareness was associated with education level (?2 = 42.4, p < 0.001), employment status (?2 = 33.6, p < 0.001) and hospital visits (?2 = 3.9, p = 0.048). For HWs it was associated with education level (?2 = 155.6, p < 0.001) and length of service (?2 = 154.5, p <0.001). Patients feel powerless to negotiate for their rights and fear being discriminated against based on their ability to bribe HWs with money to access care, and political, socio-economic and tribal status. Conclusion and recommendations Awareness of, responsiveness to and practice of patients’ rights remains limited at Mulago Hospital. There is a need for urgent implementation of an integrated multilevel, multichannel, patient-centred approach that incorporates social services and addresses intrinsic patient, HW and health system factors to strengthen patients’ rights issues at the hospital. PMID:24563777

Kagoya, Harriet Rachel; Kibuule, Dan; Mitonga-Kabwebwe, Honoré; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Ssempebwa, John C.

2013-01-01

215

49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

2013-10-01

216

49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

2013-10-01

217

49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

2010-10-01

218

49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

2011-10-01

219

49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

2012-10-01

220

49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

2010-10-01

221

49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

2012-10-01

222

49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. ...Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the limits prescribed...

2011-10-01

223

The burden of injuries at the Jigme Dorji Wangchuck National Referral Hospital in Thimphu, Bhutan.  

PubMed

A review of the surgical admission, operating room records, and emergency room consultations for the 2006 was undertaken with the objective of assessing the injury burden at the Jigme Dorji Wangchuck National Referral Hospital in Thimphu. The study revealed that trauma accounted for 20% of all surgical admissions in 2006, out of which the Orthopedic department bore the major chunk of trauma admissions at 61%. Trauma was responsible for more than 5000 disability-adjusted life years lost (DALYs) in 2006. On an average, 2 out of 3 orthopedic procedures were performed for trauma-related conditions. It is hoped that this study will stimulate the local practitioners and policy makers to initiate further studies to build up standardized database on injury burden in Bhutan to facilitate evidence-based decisions by the stakeholders. PMID:22210175

Gosselin, Richard A; Dorji, Sonam; Drukpa, Pakhila

2012-01-01

224

Hospitalization for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in a National Sample of Children with Sickle Cell Disease Before and After PCV7 Licensure  

PubMed Central

Objective To estimate national hospitalization rates for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) before and after the 2000 licensure of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). Procedure We performed a retrospective trend analysis of the 1994-2007 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases. Hospitalizations involving children with SCD and IPD were identified by ICD-9CM code. The primary outcomes, the annual hospitalization rate for IPD in children with SCD and the proportion of hospitalizations for IPD per 100 total SCD hospitalizations, were analyzed using multivariable linear regression and contingency analysis, respectively. Results A total of 1,242 hospitalizations for IPD in SCD patients were identified from 1994-2007, with a mortality rate of 2.4%. The national mean annual rate of IPD hospitalization decreased by 65%, from 131.8 cases/year from 1994-2000 to 45.5 cases/year from 2001-2007 (p=0.001). The national proportion of hospitalizations for IPD per 100 total SCD hospitalizations decreased from 0.4 to 0.15 (p<0.0001) over the same interval. Following PCV7 licensure, the mean annual cumulative hospital days and cumulative hospital charges decreased nationally by 53% and 36%, respectively. Conclusion In a national sample, PCV7 licensure is temporally associated with a nearly three fold reduction in IPD hospitalizations in children with SCD. PMID:21793185

McCavit, Timothy L.; Xuan, Lei; Zhang, Song; Flores, Glenn; Quinn, Charles T.

2012-01-01

225

46 CFR 190.20-35 - Hospital space.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accomodations for Officers, Crew, and Scientific Personnel § 190.20-35 Hospital space. (a) Except...

2012-10-01

226

Evaluation of 515 expressed sequence tags obtained from guard cells of Brassica campestris  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   As an attempt to examine the transcripts expressed in a single cell type and to unveil the physiology of guard cells at the\\u000a molecular level, we generated 515 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from a directional cDNA library constructed from guard-cell\\u000a protoplasts of Brassica campestris L. ssp. pekinensis. A comparative analysis of the guard-cell ESTs against the National Center for

June Myoung Kwak; Sun A Kim; Suk Whan Hong; Hong Gil Nam

1997-01-01

227

Burns mortality and hospitalization time — a prospective statistical study of 352 patients in an Asian National Burn Centre  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective study of 352 patients in an Asian National Burn Centre has been used to develop statistical predictive models for mortality and hospitalization time. The patients are largely of Asian origin. Total burn surface area (% TBSA) and presence of respiratory burns are significant independent predictors of mortality in the multiple logistic regression analysis with an accuracy of 98.3

M. K. Wong; R. C. K. Ngim

1995-01-01

228

Disability and Hospital Care Expenses among National Health Insurance Beneficiaries: Analyses of Population-Based Data in Taiwan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nationwide data were collected concerning inpatient care use and medical expenditure of people with disabilities (N = 937,944) among national health insurance beneficiaries in Taiwan. Data included gender, age, hospitalization frequency and expenditure, healthcare setting and service department, discharge diagnose disease according to the ICD-9-CM…

Lin, Lan-Ping; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Fu-Gong; Lin, Pei-Ying; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

2011-01-01

229

Predictors of extra care among magnesium sulphate treated eclamptic patients at Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background The inclusion of Magnesium Sulphate (MgSO4) as a gold standard in the treatment of eclampsia has substantially reduced incidences of repeated fits, eclamptic morbidity and deaths. However, despite treatment with MgSO4, a proportion of patients need extra medical/nursing attention and prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (ICU). The literature on the underlying factors for the need of extra care in the MgSO4 era is lacking. This study sought to establish predictors of extra care in ICU among eclamptic patients after treatment with MgSO4 at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH). Methods Data were obtained from hospital records of eclamptic patients who were admitted at MNH and treated with MgSO4 from January 1st to December 31st, 2008. Based on set criteria, patients who needed extra care were identified. Analysis was performed using PASW statistics 18 whereby frequencies, cross-tabulations, bivariate and multiple logistic regressions were performed. Results A total of 366 eclamptic patients were admitted and treated with MgSO4 at MNH during a 12 month study period in 2008. Most of these (76%) were referred from district hospitals and132 (36%) met the criteria for extra care in ICU. After adjusting for other variables, the risk of extra care in ICU for patients who were admitted with altered consciousness was double (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.3-4.0) that of the ones admitted in alert state. The risk or need of extra care increased by increasing time to delivery and was doubled (OR = 2.0; 95% CI:1.1-3.7) if it was between 12 and 24 hours and tenfold elevated (OR = 10.0; 95% CI:4.3-23.6) if beyond 24 hours as compared to when time to delivery was less than 12 hours. Abdominal delivery was also independently associated with increased risk compared to vaginal delivery (OR = 2.5; 95%CI: 1.4-4.5). The type of referral and number of fits were associated with extra care in ICU but this association was wholly explained by the clinical status of the patient on admission to MNH and prolonged time lag to delivery. Conclusion We concluded that even with MgSO4 used as the gold standard in the treatment of eclampsia, effective pre-referral care and expedited delivery were crucial in minimizing the need for extra care in ICU. PMID:21635795

2011-01-01

230

Hospital energy performance: New indicators for UK National Health Service estate  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1991 the UK Audit Commission produced energy performance indicators for hospitals based on the type of care provided. However, an analysis of over 100 hospitals throughout the United Kingdom has found the type of care provided to have relatively little effect on the energy performance of hospitals. Although other factors influenced energy use to some degree, the major factor

J. M. Williams; I. P. Knight; A. J. Griffiths

1999-01-01

231

The Minimum Guarding Tree Problem Adrian Dumitrescu  

E-print Network

The Minimum Guarding Tree Problem Adrian Dumitrescu Joseph S. B. Mitchell Pawel Zyli´nski September, a guarding tree for L is a tree contained in the union of the lines in L such that if a mobile guard (agent) runs on the edges of the tree, all lines in L are visited by the guard. Similarly, given a connected

Dumitrescu, Adrian

232

Querying the Guarded Fragment Vince Barany  

E-print Network

Querying the Guarded Fragment Vince B´ar´any Georg Gottlob Martin Otto Abstract Evaluating a boolean conjunctive query q over a guarded first-order theory is equivalent to checking whether ¬q not be guarded, well known results about the decid- ability, complexity, and finite-model property of the guarded

Otto, Martin

233

A national study of the efficiency of hospitals in urban markets.  

PubMed Central

Using a sample of 3,000 urban hospitals, this article examines the contributions of selected hospital characteristics to variations in hospital technical efficiencies, while it accounts for multiple products and inputs, and controls for local environmental variations. Four hospital characteristics are examined: hospital size, membership in a multihospital system, ownership, and payer mix (managed care contracts, percent Medicare, and percent Medicaid). Ownership and percent Medicare are consistently found to be related significantly to hospital efficiency. Within the ownership variable, government hospitals tend to be more efficient and for-profit hospitals less efficient than other hospitals. Higher percentages of Medicare payment are negatively related to efficiency. While not consistently significant across all five of the MSA size categories in which the analyses are conducted, possession of managed care contracts, membership in a multihospital system, and size all are consistently related positively to hospital technical efficiency. These variables are also all significant when the hospitals are examined in a combined analysis. Percent Medicaid was not significant in any of the analyses. Implications for policy and the need for methodological work are discussed. PMID:8428810

Ozcan, Y A; Luke, R D

1993-01-01

234

A&M. Guard house (TAN638), contextual view. Built in 1968. Camera ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

A&M. Guard house (TAN-638), contextual view. Built in 1968. Camera faces south. Guard house controlled access to radioactive waste storage tanks beyond and to left of view. Date: February 4, 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-33-4-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

235

A Resolution Decision Procedure for the Guarded Fragment with Transitive Guards  

E-print Network

A Resolution Decision Procedure for the Guarded Fragment with Transitive Guards Yevgeny Kazakov- cedure for the guarded fragment with transitive guards. Another contri- bution of the paper is a special form. 1 Introduction The guarded fragment GF of first order logic has been introduced by Andr´eka, van

Kazakov, Yevgeny

236

A Resolution Decision Procedure for the Guarded Fragment with Transitive Guards  

E-print Network

A Resolution Decision Procedure for the Guarded Fragment with Transitive Guards Yevgeny Kazakov- cedure for the guarded fragment with transitive guards. Another contri- bution of the paper is a special form. 1 Introduction The guarded fragment GF of #12;rst order logic has been introduced by Andr#19;eka

Kazakov, Yevgeny

237

A Qualitative Exploration of Workarounds Related to the Implementation of National Electronic Health Records in Early Adopter Mental Health Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Aims To investigate the perceptions and reported practices of mental health hospital staff using national hospital electronic health records (EHRs) in order to inform future implementations, particularly in acute mental health settings. Methods Thematic analysis of interviews with a wide range of clinical, information technology (IT), managerial and other staff at two early adopter mental health National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in London, UK, implementing national EHRs. Results We analysed 33 interviews. We first sought out examples of workarounds, such as delayed data entry, entering data in wrong places and individuals using the EHR while logged in as a colleague, then identified possible reasons for the reported workarounds. Our analysis identified four main categories of factors contributing to workarounds (i.e., operational, cultural, organisational and technical). Operational factors included poor system integration with existing workflows and the system not meeting users' perceived needs. Cultural factors involved users' competence with IT and resistance to change. Organisational factors referred to insufficient organisational resources and training, while technical factors included inadequate local technical infrastructure. Many of these factors, such as integrating the EHR system with day-to-day operational processes, staff training and adequate local IT infrastructure, were likely to apply to system implementations in various settings, but we also identified factors that related particularly to implementing EHRs in mental health hospitals, for example: EHR system incompatibility with IT systems used by mental health–related sectors, notably social services; the EHR system lacking specific, mental health functionalities and options; and clinicians feeling unable to use computers while attending to distressed psychiatric patients. Conclusions A better conceptual model of reasons for workarounds should help with designing, and supporting the implementation and adoption of, EHRs for use in hospital mental health settings. PMID:24454678

Ser, Gloria; Robertson, Ann; Sheikh, Aziz

2014-01-01

238

National Trends and In-Hospital Outcomes of Adult Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Receiving Parenteral Nutrition Support.  

PubMed

Background: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are susceptible to protein-calorie malnutrition secondary to decreased oral intake, malabsorption, and increased metabolic expenditure. In this study, we seek to assess the national frequencies of parenteral nutrition (PN) use among hospitalized patients with IBD and to determine their in-hospital outcomes. Methods: We analyzed the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 1988-2006 to determine the frequency of PN usage among patients with UC or CD and to determine their in-hospital outcomes. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors predictive of increased inpatient mortality in this population. Results: From 1988-2006, the annual incidence of PN use among hospitalized patients with CD was 4.29 per 100,000 and among those with UC was 3.80 per 100,000, with trends being relatively stable through the indexed period. The mean length of hospitalization among patients with UC receiving PN was longer compared with patients with CD. Factors predictive of an increased risk for mortality include the following: age >50 years, acute kidney injury, hospital-acquired pneumonia, Clostridium difficile colitis, prolonged postoperative ileus requiring PN use, pulmonary embolism, malnutrition, and patients with UC relative to CD. Conclusion: Traditionally, patients with CD are at a higher risk for developing malnutrition than patients with UC; however, there is a 2-fold higher risk for inpatient mortality and a longer length of hospitalization among patients with UC compared with those with CD. This pattern suggests that the use of PN, particularly among patients with UC, serves as a surrogate marker of higher disease acuity and severity. PMID:24687967

Nguyen, Douglas L; Parekh, Nimisha; Bechtold, Matthew L; Jamal, M Mazen

2014-03-31

239

Framing in policy processes: A case study from hospital planning in the National Health Service in England.  

PubMed

This paper reports from an ethnographic study of hospital planning in England undertaken between 2006 and 2009. We explored how a policy to centralise hospital services was espoused in national policy documents, how this shifted over time and how it was translated in practice. We found that policy texts defined hospital planning as a clinical issue and framed decisions to close hospitals or hospital departments as based on the evidence and necessary to ensure safety. We interpreted this framing as a rhetorical strategy for implementing organisational change in the context of community resistance to service closure and a concomitant policy emphasising the importance of public and patient involvement in planning. Although the persuasive power of the framing was limited, a more insidious form of power was identified in the way the framing disguised the political nature of the issue by defining it as a clinical problem. We conclude by discussing how the clinical rationale constrains public participation in decisions about the delivery and organisation of healthcare and restricts the extent to which alternative courses of action can be considered. PMID:25461877

Jones, Lorelei; Exworthy, Mark

2015-01-01

240

Introduction of a qualitative perinatal audit at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Perinatal death is a devastating experience for the mother and of concern in clinical practice. Regular perinatal audit may identify suboptimal care related to perinatal deaths and thus appropriate measures for its reduction. The aim of this study was to perform a qualitative perinatal audit of intrapartum and early neonatal deaths and propose means of reducing the perinatal mortality rate (PMR). Methods From 1st August, 2007 to 31st December, 2007 we conducted an audit of perinatal deaths (n = 133) with birth weight 1500 g or more at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH). The audit was done by three obstetricians, two external and one internal auditors. Each auditor independently evaluated the cases narratives. Suboptimal factors were identified in the antepartum, intrapartum and early neonatal period and classified into three levels of delay (community, infrastructure and health care). The contribution of each suboptimal factor to adverse perinatal outcome was identified and the case graded according to possible avoidability. Degree of agreement between auditors was assessed by the kappa coefficient. Results The PMR was 92 per 1000 total births. Suboptimal factors were identified in 80% of audited cases and half of suboptimal factors were found to be the likely cause of adverse perinatal outcome and were preventable. Poor foetal heart monitoring during labour was indirectly associated with over 40% of perinatal death. There was a poor to fair agreement between external and internal auditors. Conclusion There are significant areas of care that need improvement. Poor monitoring during labour was a major cause of avoidable perinatal mortality. This type of audit was a good starting point for quality assurance at MNH. Regular perinatal audits to identify avoidable causes of perinatal deaths with feed back to the staff may be a useful strategy to reduce perinatal mortality. PMID:19765312

Kidanto, Hussein L; Mogren, Ingrid; van Roosmalen, Jos; Thomas, Angela N; Massawe, Siriel N; Nystrom, Lennarth; Lindmark, Gunilla

2009-01-01

241

epic2: National evidence-based guidelines for preventing healthcare-associated infections in NHS hospitals in England.  

PubMed

National evidence-based guidelines for preventing healthcare-associated infections (HCAI) in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England were commissioned by the Department of Health (DH) and developed during 1998-2000 by a nurse-led multi-professional team of researchers and specialist clinicians. Following extensive consultation, they were published in January 2001. These guidelines describe the precautions healthcare workers should take in three areas: standard principles for preventing HCAI, which include hospital environmental hygiene, hand hygiene, the use of personal protective equipment, and the safe use and disposal of sharps; preventing infections associated with the use of short-term indwelling urethral catheters; and preventing infections associated with central venous catheters. The evidence for these guidelines was identified by multiple systematic reviews of experimental and non-experimental research and expert opinion as reflected in systematically identified professional, national and international guidelines, which were formally assessed by a validated appraisal process. In 2003, we developed complementary national guidelines for preventing HCAI in primary and community care on behalf of the National Collaborating Centre for Nursing and Supportive Care (National Institute for Healthand Clinical Excellence). A cardinal feature of evidence-based guidelines is that they are subject to timely review in order that new research evidence and technological advances can be identified, appraised and, if shown to be effective in preventing HCAI, incorporated into amended guidelines. Periodically updating the evidence base and guideline recommendations is essential in order to maintain their validity and authority. Consequently, the DH commissioned a review of new evidence published following the last systematic reviews. We have now updated the evidence base for making infection prevention and control recommendations. A critical assessment of the updated evidence indicated that the original epic guidelines published in 2001 remain robust, relevant and appropriate but that adjustments need to be made to some guideline recommendations following a synopsis of the evidence underpinning the guidelines. These updated national guidelines (epic2) provide comprehensive recommendations for preventing HCAI in hospitals and other acute care settings based on the best currently available evidence. Because this is not always the best possible evidence, we have included a suggested agenda for further research in each section of the guidelines. National evidence-based guidelines are broad principles of best practice which need to be integrated into local practice guidelines. To monitor implementation, we have suggested key audit criteria for each section of recommendations. Clinically effective infection prevention and control practice is an essential feature of protecting patients. By incorporating these guidelines into routine daily clinical practice, patient safety can be enhanced and the risk of patients acquiring an infection during episodes of healthcare in NHS hospitals in England can be minimised. PMID:17307562

Pratt, R J; Pellowe, C M; Wilson, J A; Loveday, H P; Harper, P J; Jones, S R L J; McDougall, C; Wilcox, M H

2007-02-01

242

77 FR 19970 - Security Zones; 2012 Republican National Convention, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...operations, the Coast Guard determined that establishing such an area would not be feasible. The Coast Guard expects ample landside demonstration areas to be available. The Coast Guard, on behalf of the 2012 Republican National Convention Public...

2012-04-03

243

77 FR 41688 - Security Zones; 2012 Republican National Convention, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...operations; the Coast Guard determined that establishing such an area would not be feasible. The Coast Guard expects ample landside demonstration areas to be available. The Coast Guard, on behalf of the 2012 Republican National Convention Public...

2012-07-16

244

14. TURNOUT AND MASONRY GUARD WALL 1.5 MILES NORTH OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. TURNOUT AND MASONRY GUARD WALL 1.5 MILES NORTH OF TREE HOUSE SOUTH OF PIERCY, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING SW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

245

IET. Exclusion guard house, 71.8% complete. Camera facing northerly. Pumice ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

IET. Exclusion guard house, 71.8% complete. Camera facing northerly. Pumice block walls, canopy over concrete slabs. Date: October 20, 1954. INEEL negative no. 12541 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

246

46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital...

2010-10-01

247

National Trends in US Hospital Admissions for Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 1999 to 2011  

PubMed Central

IMPORTANCE The increasing intensity of diabetes mellitus management over the past decade may have resulted in lower rates of hyperglycemic emergencies but higher rates of hospital admissions for hypoglycemia among older adults. Trends in these hospitalizations and subsequent outcomes are not known. OBJECTIVE To characterize changes in hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia hospitalization rates and subsequent mortality and readmission rates among older adults in the United States over a 12-year period, and to compare these results according to age, sex, and race. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Retrospective observational study using data from 33 952 331 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years or older from 1999 to 2011. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Hospitalization rates for hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, 30-day and 1-year mortality rates, and 30-day readmission rates. RESULTS A total of 279 937 patients experienced 302 095 hospitalizations for hyperglycemia, and 404 467 patients experienced 429 850 hospitalizations for hypoglycemia between 1999 and 2011. During this time, rates of admissions for hyperglycemia declined by 38.6% (from 114 to 70 admissions per 100 000 person-years), while admissions for hypoglycemia increased by 11.7% (from 94 to 105 admissions per 100 000 person-years). In analyses designed to account for changing diabetes mellitus prevalence, admissions for hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia declined by 55.2% and 9.5%, respectively. Trends were similar across age, sex, and racial subgroups, but hypoglycemia rates were 2-fold higher for older patients (?75 years) when compared with younger patients (65–74 years), and admission rates for both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia were 4-fold higher for black patients compared with white patients. The 30-day and 1-year mortality and 30-day readmission rates improved during the study period and were similar after an index hospitalization for either hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia (5.4%, 17.1%, and 15.3%, respectively, after hyperglycemia hospitalizations in 2010; 4.4%, 19.9%, and 16.3% after hypoglycemia hospitalizations). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Hospital admission rates for hypoglycemia now exceed those for hyperglycemia among older adults. Although admissions for hypoglycemia have declined modestly since 2007, rates among black Medicare beneficiaries and those older than 75 years remain high. Hospital admissions for severe hypoglycemia seem to pose a greater health threat than those for hyperglycemia, suggesting new opportunities for improvement in care of persons with diabetes mellitus. PMID:24838229

Lipska, Kasia J.; Ross, Joseph S.; Wang, Yun; Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Minges, Karl; Karter, Andrew J.; Huang, Elbert S.; Desai, Mayur M.; Gill, Thomas M.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

2014-01-01

248

Hospital staffing, organization, and quality of care: Cross-national findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the effects of nurse staffing and organizational support for nursing care on nurses' dissatisfaction with their jobs, nurse burnout, and nurse reports of quality of patient care in an international sample of hospitals. Design: Multisite cross-sectional survey Setting: Adult acute-care hospitals in the U.S. (Pennsylvania), Canada (Ontario and British Columbia), England and Scotland. Study Participants: 10319 nurses

Linda H. Aiken; Sean P. Clarke; Douglas M. Sloane

2002-01-01

249

Does decreased research funding from the National Institutes of Health to local academic hospitals cause an increase in industry sponsored research funding?  

E-print Network

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been the stalwart of research funding at universities and academic teaching hospitals. However, since the start of the last decade NIH funding has contracted in real terms. ...

Truesdell, John A., Jr. (John Alan)

2011-01-01

250

46 CFR 116.940 - Guards in vehicle spaces.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Guards in vehicle spaces. 116.940 Section 116.940 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 116.940 Guards in vehicle spaces. On a...

2010-10-01

251

33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard ensign has sixteen perpendicular stripes alternate...the hoist halfway. The distinctive emblem of the Coast Guard in blue and white is placed with its center...

2013-07-01

252

46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number means that number assigned...tests and inspections. (b) The Coast Guard number shall be stamped on the...and pressure vessels. (c) The Coast Guard number is comprised of the...

2011-10-01

253

46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number means that number assigned...tests and inspections. (b) The Coast Guard number shall be stamped on the...and pressure vessels. (c) The Coast Guard number is comprised of the...

2012-10-01

254

33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard ensign has sixteen perpendicular stripes alternate...the hoist halfway. The distinctive emblem of the Coast Guard in blue and white is placed with its center...

2011-07-01

255

33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.  

...GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard ensign has sixteen perpendicular stripes alternate...the hoist halfway. The distinctive emblem of the Coast Guard in blue and white is placed with its center...

2014-07-01

256

33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard ensign has sixteen perpendicular stripes alternate...the hoist halfway. The distinctive emblem of the Coast Guard in blue and white is placed with its center...

2012-07-01

257

46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number means that number assigned...tests and inspections. (b) The Coast Guard number shall be stamped on the...and pressure vessels. (c) The Coast Guard number is comprised of the...

2010-10-01

258

33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard ensign has sixteen perpendicular stripes alternate...the hoist halfway. The distinctive emblem of the Coast Guard in blue and white is placed with its center...

2010-07-01

259

46 CFR 50.10-30 - Coast Guard number.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Coast Guard number. (a) The Coast Guard number means that number assigned...tests and inspections. (b) The Coast Guard number shall be stamped on the...and pressure vessels. (c) The Coast Guard number is comprised of the...

2013-10-01

260

Age Distribution of Infection and Hospitalization Among Canadian First Nations Populations During the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We estimated age-standardized ratios of infection and hospitalization among Canadian First Nations (FN) populations and compared their distributions with those estimated for non-FN populations in Manitoba, Canada. Methods. For the spring and fall 2009 waves of the H1N1 pandemic, we obtained daily numbers of laboratory-confirmed and hospitalized cases of H1N1 infection, stratified by 5-year age groups and FN status. We calculated age-standardized ratios with confidence intervals for each wave and compared ratios between age groups in each ethnic group and between the 2 waves for FN and non-FN populations. Results. Incidence and hospitalization ratios in all FN age groups during the first wave were significantly higher than those in non-FN age groups (P?hospitalization ratios in FN populations were higher than or equivalent to ratios in non-FN populations. Our findings support the need to develop targeted prevention and control strategies specifically for vulnerable FN and remote communities. PMID:23237152

Mostaço-Guidolin, Luiz C.; Towers, Sherry M. J.; Buckeridge, David L.

2013-01-01

261

Influenza in Outpatient ILI Case-Patients in National Hospital-Based Surveillance, Bangladesh, 2007–2008  

PubMed Central

Background Recent population-based estimates in a Dhaka low-income community suggest that influenza was prevalent among children. To explore the epidemiology and seasonality of influenza throughout the country and among all age groups, we established nationally representative hospital-based surveillance necessary to guide influenza prevention and control efforts. Methodolgy/Principal Findings We conducted influenza-like illness and severe acute respiratory illness sentinel surveillance in 12 hospitals across Bangladesh during May 2007–December 2008. We collected specimens from 3,699 patients, 385 (10%) which were influenza positive by real time RT-PCR. Among the sample-positive patients, 192 (51%) were type A and 188 (49%) were type B. Hemagglutinin subtyping of type A viruses detected 137 (71%) A/H1 and 55 (29%) A/H3, but no A/H5 or other novel influenza strains. The frequency of influenza cases was highest among children aged under 5 years (44%), while the proportions of laboratory confirmed cases was highest among participants aged 11–15 (18%). We applied kriging, a geo-statistical technique, to explore the spatial and temporal spread of influenza and found that, during 2008, influenza was first identified in large port cities and then gradually spread to other parts of the country. We identified a distinct influenza peak during the rainy season (May–September). Conclusions/Significance Our surveillance data confirms that influenza is prevalent throughout Bangladesh, affecting a wide range of ages and causing considerable morbidity and hospital care. A unimodal influenza seasonality may allow Bangladesh to time annual influenza prevention messages and vaccination campaigns to reduce the national influenza burden. To scale-up such national interventions, we need to quantify the national rates of influenza and the economic burden associated with this disease through further studies. PMID:20041114

Zaman, Rashid Uz; Alamgir, A. S. M.; Rahman, Mustafizur; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Gurley, Emily S.; Sharker, M. Abu Yushuf; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Azim, Tasnim; Fry, Alicia M.; Lindstrom, Stephen; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Xu, Xiyan; Garten, Rebecca J.; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Khan, Salah Uddin; Faruque, Labib Imran; Ameer, Syeda Shegufta; Klimov, Alexander I.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P.

2009-01-01

262

Changing of the Guards: A Framework for Understanding and Improving Entry Guard Selection in Tor  

E-print Network

Changing of the Guards: A Framework for Understanding and Improving Entry Guard Selection in Tor utilizes special nodes called entry guards as each client's long-term entry point into the anonymity network. While the use of entry guards provides clear and well-studied secu- rity benefits, it is unclear

Goldberg, Ian

263

33 CFR 334.783 - Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area. 334.783...783 Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area....

2012-07-01

264

33 CFR 334.783 - Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area. 334.783...783 Arlington Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Mobile, Mobile, Alabama, Coast Guard restricted area....

2013-07-01

265

Some Correlates of Prison Guards' Beliefs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study investigates prison guards' beliefs concerning the prison, the prisoners, and their own. role and the relationships between these beliefs and other variables. Subjects came from four maximum security Israeli prisons (N = 370). Generally, guards' beliefs ate less punitive than could be expected from previous literature. A considerable variance in guards' beliefs is revealed. Three independent factors emerge

Boas Shamir; Amos Drory

1981-01-01

266

Finding the -Guarded Region Domagoj Matijevic  

E-print Network

Finding the -Guarded Region Domagoj Matijevi´c Department of Mathematics, J.J. Strossmayer We are given a finite set of n points (guards) G in the plane R2 and an angle 0 2. A -cone. A point p R2 is called - guarded if every -cone with its apex located at p is non-empty. Furthermore

Matijevic, Domagoj

267

75 FR 79956 - Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Protection for Whistleblowers in the Coast Guard AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...SUMMARY: By this direct final rule, the Coast Guard is amending its ``Coast Guard...or any other member of the Coast Guard, the Coast Guard may now receive...

2010-12-21

268

The National Accreditation Board for Hospital and Health Care Providers accreditation programme in India.  

PubMed

Quality in health care is important as it is directly linked with patient safety. Quality as we know is driven either by regulation or by market demand. Regulation in most developing countries has not been effective, as there is shortage of health care providers and governments have to be flexible. In such circumstances, quality has taken a back seat. Accreditation symbolizes the framework for quality governance of a hospital and is based on optimum standards. Not only is India establishing numerous state of the art hospitals, but they are also experiencing an increase in demand for quality as well as medical tourism. India launched its own accreditation system in 2006, conforming to standards accredited by ISQua. This article shows the journey to accreditation in India and describes the problems encountered by hospitals as well as the benefits it has generated for the industry and patients. PMID:24938026

Gyani, Girdhar J; Krishnamurthy, B

2014-01-01

269

National strategy for mass casualty situations and its effects on the hospital.  

PubMed

A mass-casualty situation (MCS) usually is short in duration and resolves itself. To minimize the risks to patients during MCS, planning is essential. This article summarizes the preparations needed at the hospital level, for a local MCS involving numerous trauma victims arriving to the Emergency Department at a short notice. Experiences and conclusions related to the implementation of the Israeli strategy in one hospital that combines the responsibilities of both the military and civilians are summarized. The Ministry of Health distributes the master MCS plan to each hospital where a local committee adapts it to the specific situation in a format of standing orders. After its approval by the Ministry of Health, an annual inspection is conducted to check the ability of the staff to manage a MCS. A full-scale drill is conducted every second year during which each site's readiness level and the continuity of the flow of care are tested. In building the strategy for treating trauma victims during a MCS, a few assumptions were taken into account. The goal of treatment in a MCS is to deliver an acceptable quality of care while preserving as many lives as is possible. In theory, the capacity of the hospital is its ability to manage a load of patients in the range of 20% of the hospital bed capacity. Planning and drilling are the ways to minimize deviations from the guidelines and to avoid management mistakes. Special attention should be paid to problems related to the initial phase of receiving the first message, outside communication, inside hospital communication, and staff recruitment. Other issues include: free access to the hospital; opening a public information center; and dealing with the media and very important persons (VIPs). A new method for creating the needed MCS plan in the hospital is suggested. It is based upon knowledge of management techniques that used multi-level documents, which are spread via Intranet between the different key figures. Using this method, it is possible to keep the strategy, the source documentation, and reasons for choosing it, as well as immediate release of checklists for each functions. This detailed, time consuming work is worthwhile in the long run, when the benefits of easy updating and better preparedness are apparent. PMID:12357558

Levi, Leon; Michaelson, Moshe; Admi, Hanna; Bregman, David; Bar-Nahor, Ronen

2002-01-01

270

National Trends in Main Causes of Hospitalization: A Multi-Cohort Register Study of the Finnish Working-Age Population, 1976–2010  

PubMed Central

Background The health transition theory argues that societal changes produce proportional changes in causes of disability and death. The aim of this study was to identify long-term changes in main causes of hospitalization in working-age population within a nation that has experienced considerable societal change. Methodology National trends in all-cause hospitalization and hospitalizations for the five main diagnostic categories were investigated in the data obtained from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. The seven-cohort sample covered the period from 1976 to 2010 and consisted of 3,769,356 randomly selected Finnish residents, each cohort representing 25% sample of population aged 18 to 64 years. Principal Findings Over the period of 35 years, the risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases and respiratory diseases decreased. Hospitalization for musculoskeletal diseases increased whereas mental and behavioral hospitalizations slightly decreased. The risk of cancer hospitalization decreased marginally in men, whereas in women an upward trend was observed. Conclusions/Significance A considerable health transition related to hospitalizations and a shift in the utilization of health care services of working-age men and women took place in Finland between 1976 and 2010. PMID:25379723

Kouvonen, Anne; Koskinen, Aki; Varje, Pekka; Kokkinen, Lauri; De Vogli, Roberto; Väänänen, Ari

2014-01-01

271

Risk Factors for Violent Offending in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A National Study of Hospitalized Individuals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about risk factors for violence among individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study uses data from Swedish longitudinal registers for all 422 individuals hospitalized with autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome during 1988-2000 and compares those committing violent or sexual offenses with those who did not. Thirty-one…

Langstrom, Niklas; Grann, Martin; Ruchkin, Vladislav; Sjostedt, Gabrielle; Fazel, Seena

2009-01-01

272

Quality of care for people with dementia in general hospitals: national cross-sectional audit of patient assessment.  

PubMed

There have been recent reports of poor quality care in the National Health Service in the UK, and older people with dementia are particularly vulnerable. This study aims to examine the quality of assessment of people with dementia admitted to hospital. Cross-sectional case-note audit of key physical and psychosocial assessments was carried out in 7,934 people with dementia who were discharged from 206 general hospitals. Most people had no record of a standardised assessment of their cognitive state (56.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 55.8-58.0) or functioning (74.2%, 95% CI = 73.2-75.1). Information from carers was documented in 39.0% of cases (95% CI = 37.9-40.1). There was considerable variation across hospital sites. Key assessments were less likely when people were admitted to surgical wards. Assessments fall well below recommended standards especially with regard to social and cognitive functioning. Problems are particularly marked on surgical wards. PMID:25301908

Souza, Renata; Gandesha, Aarti; Hood, Chloe; Chaplin, Robert; Young, John; Crome, Peter; Crawford, Mike J

2014-10-01

273

First psychiatric hospitalizations in the US military: the National Collaborative Study of Early Psychosis and Suicide (NCSEPS)  

PubMed Central

Background Military samples provide an excellent context to systematically ascertain hospitalization for severe psychiatric disorders. The National Collaborative Study of Early Psychosis and Suicide (NCSEPS), a collaborative study of psychiatric disorders in the US Armed Forces, estimated rates of first hospitalization in the military for three psychiatric disorders : bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia. Method First hospitalizations for BD, MDD and schizophrenia were ascertained from military records for active duty personnel between 1992 and 1996. Rates were estimated as dynamic incidence (using all military personnel on active duty at the midpoint of each year as the denominator) and cohort incidence (using all military personnel aged 18–25 entering active duty between 1992 and 1996 to estimate person-years at risk). Results For all three disorders, 8723 hospitalizations were observed in 8 120 136 person-years for a rate of 10·7/10 000 [95% confidence interval (CI) 10·5–11·0]. The rate for BD was 2·0 (95% CI 1·9–2·1), for MDD, 7·2 (95% CI 7·0–7·3), and for schizophrenia, 1·6 (95% CI 1·5–1·7). Rates for BD and MDD were greater in females than in males [for BD, rate ratio (RR) 2·0, 95% CI 1·7–2·2; for MDD, RR 2·9, 95% CI 2·7–3·1], but no sex difference was found for schizophrenia. Blacks had lower rates than whites of BD (RR 0·8, 95% CI 0·7–0·9) and MDD (RR 0·8, 95% CI 0·8–0·9), but a higher rate of schizophrenia (RR 1·5, 95% CI 1·3–1·7). Conclusions This study underscores the human and financial burden that psychiatric disorders place on the US Armed Forces. PMID:16879759

HERRELL, RICHARD; HENTER, IOLINE D.; MOJTABAI, RAMIN; BARTKO, JOHN J.; VENABLE, DIANE; SUSSER, EZRA; MERIKANGAS, KATHLEEN R.; WYATT, RICHARD J.

2015-01-01

274

How to Guard a Graph?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We initiate the study of the algorithmic foundations of games in which a set of cops has to guard a region in a graph (or\\u000a digraph) against a robber. The robber and the cops are placed on vertices of the graph; they take turns in moving to adjacent\\u000a vertices (or staying). The goal of the robber is to enter the

Fedor V. Fomin; Petr A. Golovach; Alex Hall; Matúš Mihalák; Elias Vicari; Peter Widmayer

275

How to Guard a Graph?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We initiate the study of the algorithmic foundations of games in which a set of cops has to guard a region in a graph (or\\u000a digraph) against a robber. The robber and the cops are placed on vertices of the graph; they take turns in moving to adjacent\\u000a vertices (or staying). The goal of the robber is to enter the

Fedor V. Fomin; Petr A. Golovach; Alexander Hall; Matús Mihalák; Elias Vicari; Peter Widmayer

2008-01-01

276

The Complexity of Guarding Terrains  

E-print Network

A set $G$ of points on a 1.5-dimensional terrain, also known as an $x$-monotone polygonal chain, is said to guard the terrain if any point on the terrain is 'seen' by a point in $G$. Two points on the terrain see each other if and only if the line segment between them is never strictly below the terrain. The minimum terrain guarding problem asks for a minimum guarding set for the given input terrain. We prove that the decision version of this problem is NP-hard. This solves a significant open problem and complements recent positive approximability results for the optimization problem. Our proof uses a reduction from PLANAR 3-SAT. We build gadgets capable of 'mirroring' a consistent variable assignment back and forth across a main valley. The structural simplicity of 1.5-dimensional terrains makes it difficult to build general clause gadgets that do not destroy this assignment when they are evaluated. However, we exploit the structure in instances of PLANAR 3-SAT to find very specific operations involving only...

King, James

2009-01-01

277

A 7-year national survey on bacterial resistance in bronchoalveolar lavage from patients hospitalized in Argentina.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to undertake a nationwide survey on bacterial resistance in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from patients hospitalized in Argentina. A 2-month point prevalence study was conducted twice yearly (April-May and October-November) from 1997 to 2003 by 36 Argentinean centers. Antimicrobial susceptibility data of the potential pathogens recovered from the BAL (samples containing <1% of squamous epithelial cells and bacterial counts >or=10(4) CFU/mL) of inpatients (i.e., >or=48-h hospital length of stay) with suspected hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) were collected on a computerized system (SIR) described previously. The survey was split into 2 periods for comparison purposes, 1997 to 2000 and 2001 to 2003. A total of 752 organisms were included. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent species, followed by Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In both periods, more than a half of the Klebsiella pneumoniae strains displayed a phenotype of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producer. A doubling of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter frequency was shown from the 1st period to the 2nd one (25-48%). More than two-thirds of the S. aureus strains proved to be methicillin resistant in both periods, and a pronounced decrease of resistance rates to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and rifampin was shown in the 2nd period. The present study shows the worrisome increasing bacterial resistance in BAL samples to most available antimicrobial options for treating patients with suspected HAP. Variations over time support the need for systematic tailored surveillance and compel us to establish a rational usage of antimicrobial agents in our country. PMID:17888608

Bantar, Carlos; Famiglietti, Angela; Radice, Marcela; Quinteros, Mirta

2008-01-01

278

Current management of intracerebral haemorrhage in China: a national, multi-centre, hospital register study  

PubMed Central

Background We aimed to examine current practice of the management and secondary prevention of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) in China where the disease is more common than in Western populations. Methods Data on baseline characteristics, management in-hospital and post-stroke, and outcome of ICH patients are from the ChinaQUEST (QUality Evaluation of Stroke Care and Treatment) study, a multi-centre, prospective, 62 hospital registry in China during 2006-07. Results Nearly all ICH patients (n = 1572) received an intravenous haemodiluting agent such as mannitol (96%) or a neuroprotectant (72%), and there was high use of intravenous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) (42%). Neurosurgery was undertaken in 137 (9%) patients; being overweight, having a low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on admission, and Total Anterior Circulation Syndrome (TACS) clinical pattern on admission, were the only baseline factors associated with this intervention in multivariate analyses. Neurosurgery was associated with nearly three times higher risk of death/disability at 3 months post-stroke (odd ratio [OR] 2.60, p < 0.001). Continuation of antihypertensives in-hospital and at 3 and 12 months post-stroke was reported in 732/935 (78%), 775/935 (83%), and 752/935 (80%) living patients with hypertension, respectively. Conclusions The management of ICH in China is characterised by high rates of use of intravenous haemodiluting agents, neuroprotectants, and TCM, and of antihypertensives for secondary prevention. The controversial efficacy of these therapies, coupled with the current lack of treatments of proven benefit, is a call for action for more outcomes based research in ICH. PMID:21276264

2011-01-01

279

Hospitalised osteoporotic vertebral fractures in Spain: Analysis of the national hospital discharge registry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  This population-based study reveals clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of hospitalised osteoporosis-related vertebral\\u000a fractures and indicates an association with a substantial hospital burden in Spain. These data provide a basis for assessing\\u000a the impact of these fractures on the Spanish health-care system and to estimate future care requirements.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  Vertebral fractures (VF) are recognised as the most frequent complication of osteoporosis. Our

C. Bouza; T. López; M. Palma; J. M. Amate

2007-01-01

280

Mate guarding in the swallow Hirundo rustica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The importance of mate guarding by males in the monogamous swallowHirundo rustica was studied by temporarily detaining the males. Mate guarding reduced the frequency of extra-pair copulations and of sexual\\u000a chases involving female mates. Males participated in sexual chases more frequently if they had a non-fertile female. Neighbouring\\u000a males of ‘widowed’ females increased their own mate guarding presumably in response

Anders Pape Møller

1987-01-01

281

Guard cell protoplasts contain acetylcholinesterase activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acetylcholinesterase activity has been detected in extracts of guard cell protoplasts from Vicia faba L. and Nicotiana glauca Graham. Guard cell protoplast homogenates from V. faba exhibited 16.4 and 6.7-fold greater specific activities for acetylthiocholine hydrolysis compared to homogenates of mesophyll cell protoplasts or whole leaves, respectively. Extracts of N. glauca guard cell protoplasts also displayed highest specific activity for

S. Madhavan; Gautam Sarath; Bong Ho Lee; Randall S. Pegden

1995-01-01

282

33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...a) The distinctive emblem of the Coast Guard shall be as follows: On a disc...Guard blue) outline. (c) The Coast Guard emblem is intended primarily for...person who desires to reproduce the Coast Guard emblem for non-Coast Guard...

2013-07-01

283

33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.  

...a) The distinctive emblem of the Coast Guard shall be as follows: On a disc...Guard blue) outline. (c) The Coast Guard emblem is intended primarily for...person who desires to reproduce the Coast Guard emblem for non-Coast Guard...

2014-07-01

284

Resolution Decides the Guarded Fragment Hans de Nivelle  

E-print Network

Resolution Decides the Guarded Fragment Hans de Nivelle April 6, 1998 Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 The Guarded Fragment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 3.2 The Loosely Guarded Fragment for the guarded fragment of ([ANB96]), and for the loosely guarded fragment of ([vBenthem97]). The relevance

Amsterdam, University of

285

33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...a) The distinctive emblem of the Coast Guard shall be as follows: On a disc...Guard blue) outline. (c) The Coast Guard emblem is intended primarily for...person who desires to reproduce the Coast Guard emblem for non-Coast Guard...

2012-07-01

286

33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...a) The distinctive emblem of the Coast Guard shall be as follows: On a disc...Guard blue) outline. (c) The Coast Guard emblem is intended primarily for...person who desires to reproduce the Coast Guard emblem for non-Coast Guard...

2011-07-01

287

Intertwined Epidemics: National Demographic Trends in Hospitalizations for Heroin- and Opioid-Related Overdoses, 1993–2009  

PubMed Central

The historical patterns of opiate use show that sources and methods of access greatly influence who is at risk. Today, there is evidence that an enormous increase in the availability of prescription opiates is fuelling a rise in addiction nationally, drawing in new initiates to these drugs and changing the geography of opiate overdoses. Recent efforts at supply-based reductions in prescription opiates may reduce harm, but addicted individuals may switch to other opiates such as heroin. In this analysis, we test the hypothesis that changes in the rates of Prescription Opiate Overdoses (POD) are correlated with changes in the rate of heroin overdoses (HOD). ICD9 codes from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and population data from the Census were used to estimate overall and demographic specific rates of POD and HOD hospital admissions between 1993 and 2009. Regression models were used to test for linear trends and lagged negative binomial regression models were used to model the interrelationship between POD and HOD hospital admissions. Findings show that whites, women, and middle-aged individuals had the largest increase in POD and HOD rates over the study period and that HOD rates have increased in since 2007. The lagged models show that increases in a hospitals POD predict an increase in the subsequent years HOD admissions by a factor of 1.26 (p<0.001) and that each increase in HOD admissions increase the subsequent years POD by a factor of 1.57 (p<0.001). Our hypothesis of fungibility between prescription opiates and heroin was supported by these analyses. These findings suggest that focusing on supply-based interventions may simply lead to a shift in use to heroin rather minimizing the reduction in harm. The alternative approach of using drug abuse prevention resources on treatment and demand-side reduction is likely to be more productive at reducing opiate abuse related harm. PMID:23405084

Unick, George Jay; Rosenblum, Daniel; Mars, Sarah; Ciccarone, Daniel

2013-01-01

288

Compliance with the National Palestinian Infection Prevention and Control Protocol at Governmental Paediatric Hospitals in Gaza Governorates  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Nosocomial infections are a significant burden for both patients and the healthcare system. For this reason, infection prevention and control (IPC) practices are extremely important. The Palestinian Ministry of Health adopted the national IPC Protocol in 2004. This study aimed to assess the compliance of healthcare providers (HCPs) with the Protocol in three governmental paediatric hospitals in Gaza governorates. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from February to November 2010. Data were collected from a sample of doctors, nurses and physiotherapists (N = 334) using a self-administered questionnaire and observation checklists to record HCP practices and assess the hospital environment. Results: The response rate was 92%. The most important reasons for non-compliance with the IPC Protocol were the absence of an education programme (61.5%), lack of knowledge (52.4%) and the scarcity of required supplies (46.9%). Only 2.3% of respondents had a copy of the IPC Protocol, while 65.8% did not know of its existence. Only 16.9% had participated in training sessions regarding general IPC practices. The observation checklist regarding HCP practices revealed low levels of compliance in hand washing (45.9%), wearing gloves (40.7%) and using antiseptics/disinfectants (49.16%). The health facilities checklist indicated that there was a lack of certain essential equipment and materials, such as covered waste containers and heavy-duty gloves. Conclusion: Due to the lack of HPC knowledge, the authors recommend that the IPC Protocol be made available in all hospitals. In addition, a qualified team should implement intensive IPC education and training programmes and facilities should provide the required equipment and materials. PMID:25097774

Eljedi, Ashraf; Dalo, Shareef

2014-01-01

289

A National Profile Of Patient Safety In U.S. Hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measures based on routinely collected data would be useful to examine the epidemiology of patient safety. Extending previous work, we established the face and con- sensual validity of twenty Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs). We generated a national profile of patient safety by applying these PSIs to the HCUP Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The inci- dence of most nonobstetric PSIs increased with

Patrick S. Romano; Jeffrey J. Geppert; Sheryl Davies; Marlene R. Miller; Anne Elixhauser; Kathryn M. McDonald

2003-01-01

290

Admission to hospital for pneumonia and influenza attributable to 2009 pandemic A/H1N1 Influenza in First Nations communities in three provinces of Canada  

PubMed Central

Background Early reports of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic (pH1N1) indicated that a disproportionate burden of illness fell on First Nations reserve communities. In addition, the impact of the pandemic on different communities may have been influenced by differing provincial policies. We compared hospitalization rates for pneumonia and influenza (P&I) attributable to pH1N1 influenza between residents of First Nations reserve communities and the general population in three Canadian provinces. Methods Hospital admissions were geocoded using administrative claims data from three Canadian provincial data centres to identify residents of First Nations communities. Hospitalizations for P&I during both waves of pH1N1 were compared to the same time periods for the four previous years to establish pH1N1-attributable rates. Results Residents of First Nations communities were more likely than other residents to have a pH1N1-attributable P&I hospitalization (rate ratio [RR] 2.8-9.1). Hospitalization rates for P&I were also elevated during the baseline period (RR 1.5-2.1) compared to the general population. There was an average increase of 45% over the baseline in P&I admissions for First Nations in all 3 provinces. In contrast, admissions overall increased by approximately 10% or less in British Columbia and Manitoba and by 33% in Ontario. Subgroup analysis showed no additional risk for remote or isolated First Nations compared to other First Nations communities in Ontario or Manitoba, with similar rates noted in Manitoba and a reduction in P&I admissions during the pandemic period in remote and isolated First Nations communities in Ontario. Conclusions We found an increased risk for pH1N1-related hospital admissions for First Nations communities in all 3 provinces. Interprovincial differences may be partly explained by differences in age structure and socioeconomic status. We were unable to confirm the assumption that remote communities were at higher risk for pH1N1-associated hospitalizations. The aggressive approach to influenza control in remote and isolated First Nations communities in Ontario may have played a role in limiting the impact of pH1N1 on residents of those communities. PMID:24499143

2013-01-01

291

Predicting risk of hospital and emergency department use for home care elderly persons through a secondary analysis of cross-national data.  

PubMed

BackgroundOlder adults remain the highest utilization group with unplanned visits to emergency departments and hospital admissions. Many have considered what leads to this high utilization and the answers provided have depended upon the independent measures available in the datasets used. This project was designed to further understanding of the reasons for older adult ED visits and admissions to acute care hospitals.MethodsA secondary analysis of data from a cross-national sample of community residing elderly, 60 years of age or older, and most of whom received services from a local home-care program was conducted. The assessment instrument used in this study is the interRAI HC (home care), designed for use in assessing elderly home care recipients. The model specification stage of the study identified the baseline independent variables that do and do not predict the follow-up measure of hospitalization and ED use. Stepwise logistic regression was used next to identify characteristics that best identified elders who subsequently entered a hospital or visited an ED. The items generated from the final multivariate logistic equation using the interRAI home care measures comprise the interRAI Hospital-ED Risk Index.ResultsIndependent measures in three key domains of clinical complications, disease diagnoses and specialized treatments were related to subsequent hospitalization or ED use. Among the eighteen clinical complication measures with higher, meaningful odds ratios are pneumonia, urinary tract infection, fever, chest pain, diarrhea, unintended weight loss, a variety of skin conditions, and subject self-reported poor health. Disease diagnoses with a meaningful relationship with hospital/ED use include coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, cancer, emphysema and renal failure. Specialized treatments with the highest odds ratios were blood transfusion, IV infusion, wound treatment, radiation and dialysis. Two measures, Alzheimer¿s disease and day care appear to have a protective effect for hospitalization/ED use with lower odds ratios.ConclusionsExamination into ¿preventable¿ hospitalizations and re-hospitalizations for older adults who have the highest rates of utilization are occurring beneath an umbrella of assuring the highest quality of care and controlling costs. The interRAI Hospitalization-ED Risk Index offers an effective approach to predicting hospitalization utilization among community dwelling older adults. PMID:25391559

Morris, John N; Howard, Elizabeth P; Steel, Knight; Schreiber, Robert; Fries, Brant E; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Goldman, Beryl

2014-11-14

292

Peer mentors, mobile phone and pills: collective monitoring and adherence in Kenyatta National Hospital's HIV treatment programme  

PubMed Central

In 2006, the Kenyan state joined the international commitment to make antiretroviral treatment free in public health institutions to people infected with HIV. Less than a decade later, treatment has reached over 60% of those who need it in Kenya. This paper, which is based on an in-depth ethnographic case study of the HIV treatment programme at Kenyatta National Hospital, conducted intermittently between 2008 and 2014, examines how HIV-positive peer mentors encourage and track adherence to treatment regimens within and beyond the clinic walls using mobile phones and computer technology. This research into the everyday practices of patient monitoring demonstrates that both surveillance and adherence are collective activities. Peer mentors provide counselling services, follow up people who stray from treatment regimens, and perform a range of other tasks related to patient management and treatment adherence. Despite peer mentors’ involvement in many tasks key to encouraging optimal adherence, their role is rarely acknowledged by co-workers, hospital administrators, or public health officials. Following a biomedical paradigm, adherence at Kenyatta and in Kenya is framed by programme administrators as something individual clients must do and for which they must be held accountable. This framing simultaneously conceals the sociality of adherence and undervalues the work of peer mentors in treatment programmes. PMID:25175291

Moyer, Eileen

2014-01-01

293

Survey of Terrain Guarding and Art Gallery The terrain guarding problem and art gallery problem are two ar-  

E-print Network

Survey of Terrain Guarding and Art Gallery Problems Erik Krohn Abstract The terrain guarding guarding involve guarding a discrete set of points or a continuous set of points on a terrain. The art gallery problem has versions including guarding an entire polygon by a set of discrete points

Krohn, Erik

294

Catering & Hospitality, Serving Food & Drink, Levels 1-3. 2nd Edition. Catering & Hospitality, Reception & Housekeeping, Levels 1-3. Catering & Hospitality, Supervisory Management, Level 3. Catering & Hospitality Management, Level 4. 2nd Edition. National Vocational Qualifications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Britain's National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) are work qualifications that measure what an employee or potential employee can do as well as how much he or she knows and understands about a particular job. Used as written proof of usable workplace skills that can be put to profitable use by an employer, NVQs range from basic Level 1, for…

Business and Technology Education Council, London (England).

295

Pattern of occurrence and treatment of impacted teeth at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Impacted teeth predispose to periodontal disease and dental caries of adjacent teeth resulting in pain, discomfort and loss of function. This study analyzed the pattern of occurrence of impacted teeth, associated symptoms, treatment and complications of treatment in patients who presented at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania. Method This was a crossectional descriptive study which utilized notes and x rays of patients who were treated for impacted teeth at the Oral and Maxillofacial firm in Muhimbili National Hospital over five years, from January 2005 to August 2010. These records were retrieved and examined for the major complaint of the patient at presentation to hospital, demography, impacted tooth, type of impaction (for third molars), treatment offered and complications after treatment. Similar information was collected from all patients with impacted teeth attended in the same centre from 1st September 2010 to 31st August 2011. Results A total of 896 patients (496 males and 400 females) treated for complaints related to impacted teeth were recorded. The male to female ratio was 1.2:1, age range of 16 to 85 years and a mean age of 28.9 years (SD = 9.5). Slightly more than 84% of the patients presented with mandibular third molar impactions. Most (44.7%) of these patients had an impacted lower right third molar followed by those presenting with a lower left third molar impaction (39.7%). In 1.3% of the patients all the four third molars were impacted. Sixty nine (7.7%) patients had impacted upper 3rd molars while 2% had impacted upper canines. Of the mandibular 3rd molar impactions 738 (76%) were mesio-angular type, 87 (8.9%) horizontal type and 69 (7.1%) disto-angular. Patients presented with a variety of complaints. About 85% of the patients presented to hospital due to varying degrees of pain. In 4.9% the detection of the impacted tooth/teeth was coincidental after presenting to hospital for other reasons not related to the impaction. Majority of the patients with impacted mandibular third molars had carious lesions on the impacted teeth, neighbouring tooth or both. Four hundred and five (45.2%) patients had a carious lesion on one of the impacted teeth while 201(22.4%) patients had a carious lesion on the adjacent second molar. In 122 (13.6%) patients both the impacted third molar and the adjacent second molar were carious. In twelve patients who presented with a main complaint of fracture of the angle of the mandible there was an associated impacted 3rd molar. Eight hundred and fifteen (91%) patients with impacted teeth were treated by surgical removal. Among these only 15 (1.8%) had complications that ranged from excessive swellings, trismus and severe pain post operatively. One patient was reported to have fracture of the angle of the mandible sustained during surgical removal of an impacted 48. Conclusions The majority of patients with impacted teeth were young with an almost equal sex distribution. The most commonly impacted teeth were mandibular third molars followed by the maxillary third molars. Patients with impacted teeth reported for health care predominantly because of pain due to dental caries or infection. There is a need of creating appropriate programmes that would further raise peoples’ awareness to regular dental checkups so that appropriate measures are taken before complications arise. PMID:23914842

2013-01-01

296

30 CFR 75.827 - Guarding of trailing cables.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Underground High-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.827 Guarding of trailing cables. (a) Guarding. (1) The high-voltage cable must be guarded in the following...

2010-07-01

297

33 CFR 23.10 - Coast Guard emblem.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...in full color is described as follows: White anchors and white ring all outlined in medium blue (Coast Guard blue), letters and numerals medium blue (Coast Guard blue), white area within ring, shield with medium blue (Coast Guard...

2010-07-01

298

33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...distinctive identification insignia of the Coast Guard consists of a broad diagonal red...stripe and then a blue stripe. The Coast Guard emblem, as described in § 23...red diagonal stripe. (b) The Coast Guard identifying insignia is...

2013-07-01

299

46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES...Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the geographical areas whose...

2011-10-01

300

33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving...

2010-07-01

301

33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving...

2012-07-01

302

33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements. (a) The District Commander is...

2013-07-01

303

33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission pennant. The Coast Guard commission pennant shall have the union part composed of thirteen blue stars in a horizontal line on a white...

2010-07-01

304

33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving...

2011-07-01

305

33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...distinctive identification insignia of the Coast Guard consists of a broad diagonal red...stripe and then a blue stripe. The Coast Guard emblem, as described in § 23...red diagonal stripe. (b) The Coast Guard identifying insignia is...

2010-07-01

306

33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...distinctive identification insignia of the Coast Guard consists of a broad diagonal red...stripe and then a blue stripe. The Coast Guard emblem, as described in § 23...red diagonal stripe. (b) The Coast Guard identifying insignia is...

2012-07-01

307

49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation under § 850.25...own authority. (f) An investigation by the Coast Guard under this section is both an...

2012-10-01

308

76 FR 30575 - Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to clarify the verbiage...related material must be received by the Coast Guard on or before June 27, 2011...public meetings must be received by the Coast Guard on or before June 15,...

2011-05-26

309

46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard Symbol means that impression stamped on the...welding samples. (b) The impression of the Coast Guard Symbol for stamping nameplates and...

2012-10-01

310

33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving...

2013-07-01

311

33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission pennant. The Coast Guard commission pennant shall have the union part composed of thirteen blue stars in a horizontal line on a white...

2011-07-01

312

33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements. (a) The District Commander is...

2010-07-01

313

46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard Symbol means that impression stamped on the...welding samples. (b) The impression of the Coast Guard Symbol for stamping nameplates and...

2010-10-01

314

33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.  

...GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission pennant. The Coast Guard commission pennant shall have the union part composed of thirteen blue stars in a horizontal line on a white...

2014-07-01

315

49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation under § 850.25...own authority. (f) An investigation by the Coast Guard under this section is both an...

2010-10-01

316

46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard Symbol means that impression stamped on the...welding samples. (b) The impression of the Coast Guard Symbol for stamping nameplates and...

2011-10-01

317

46 CFR 90.10-9 - Coast Guard District Commander.  

...10-9 Coast Guard District Commander. This term means an officer of the Coast Guard designated as such by the Commandant to command all Coast Guard activities within the officer's district, which include the inspection,...

2014-10-01

318

33 CFR 23.20 - Coast Guard commission pennant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.20 Coast Guard commission pennant. The Coast Guard commission pennant shall have the union part composed of thirteen blue stars in a horizontal line on a white...

2012-07-01

319

46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES...Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the geographical areas whose...

2010-10-01

320

33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.  

...2014-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements. (a) The District Commander is...

2014-07-01

321

49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation under § 850.25...own authority. (f) An investigation by the Coast Guard under this section is both an...

2013-10-01

322

33 CFR 118.30 - Action by Coast Guard.  

...2014-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 118.30 Section 118.30...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...SIGNALS § 118.30 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving...

2014-07-01

323

46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES...Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the geographical areas whose...

2013-10-01

324

49 CFR 850.30 - Procedures for Coast Guard investigation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...INVESTIGATIONS § 850.30 Procedures for Coast Guard investigation. (a) The Coast Guard conducts an investigation under § 850.25...own authority. (f) An investigation by the Coast Guard under this section is both an...

2011-10-01

325

33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.  

...distinctive identification insignia of the Coast Guard consists of a broad diagonal red...stripe and then a blue stripe. The Coast Guard emblem, as described in § 23...red diagonal stripe. (b) The Coast Guard identifying insignia is...

2014-07-01

326

33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements. (a) The District Commander is...

2012-07-01

327

33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...distinctive identification insignia of the Coast Guard consists of a broad diagonal red...stripe and then a blue stripe. The Coast Guard emblem, as described in § 23...red diagonal stripe. (b) The Coast Guard identifying insignia is...

2011-07-01

328

46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.  

...03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES...Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the geographical areas whose...

2014-10-01

329

46 CFR 50.10-25 - Coast Guard Symbol.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...in This Subchapter § 50.10-25 Coast Guard Symbol. (a) The term Coast Guard Symbol means that impression stamped on the...welding samples. (b) The impression of the Coast Guard Symbol for stamping nameplates and...

2013-10-01

330

76 FR 7123 - Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to update and consolidate...related material must be received by the Coast Guard on or before March 11, 2011...public meetings must be received by the Coast Guard on or before March 1,...

2011-02-09

331

46 CFR 4.03-20 - Coast Guard district.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...03-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES...Definitions § 4.03-20 Coast Guard district. A Coast Guard district is one of the geographical areas whose...

2012-10-01

332

33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements. (a) The District Commander is...

2011-07-01

333

Thermal design of a miniature guarded hot plate apparatus  

SciTech Connect

Under contract from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the authors have developed a prototype design for a miniature guarded hot plate apparatus that can be used to determine the thermal resistance of very small specimens (1 to 3 cm square) of thermal insulation materials at temperatures from {minus}40 C to + 100 C, with the capability to carry out measurements in air, selected gases, or vacuum. The overall design approach for this apparatus has been published previously. In the present paper, the authors provide details concerning the thermal design of the apparatus, including discussions of heater designs to promote temperature uniformity of the hot plate, guard designs to control extraneous heat gains and losses, material selection for the components of the apparatus, and techniques for temperature measurements.

Flynn, D.R.; Gorthala, R. [DRF R and D, Inc., Millwood, VA (United States)

1997-11-01

334

The mechanism of guard cell movement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leaves of higher terrestrial plants have small pores — stomata — responsible for gas exchange. The opening of each stoma results from the osmotic uptake of water by two specialised cells — the guard cells. Because of the involvement in this mechanism of ATPase-proton pumps and active transport of ions across membranes, we have designed an Exploring Guard Cell Movement

M. Marques; J. Arrabaça; I. Chagas

2005-01-01

335

Cytosolic calcium oscillation signaling in guard cell  

Microsoft Academic Search

Calcium signaling has been established to play a very important role in stomatal movements. More and more attentions have now been focused on cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) oscillation in guard cell. It is still not clear how [Ca2+]cyt oscillation occurs and how it is decoded. Another point which attracted a lot of attentions is the relationship between the oscillations in guard

Hui-Min Yang; Xiao-Yan Zhang; Gen-Xuan Wang

2004-01-01

336

Light Induced Guard Cell Sunando Roy  

E-print Network

Light Induced Guard Cell Signaling Sunando Roy #12;Guard cells and the stomata The tradeoff between water and carbon dioxide Roelfsema et. al. New Phytologist (2005) 167: 665 - 691 #12;The Light Signaling features · The blue light signaling carried out through ion channels · The red light signaling occurs

Albert, Réka

337

Guards, Galleries, Fortresses, and the Octoplex  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The art gallery problem asks for the maximum number of stationary guards required to protect the interior of a polygonal art gallery with "n" walls. This article explores solutions to this problem and several of its variants. In addition, some unsolved problems involving the guarding of geometric objects are presented.

Michael, T. S.

2011-01-01

338

Conditions triggering local incident reviews in UK hospital maternity units: A national survey  

PubMed Central

Objectives In countries, such as the UK, where maternal deaths are rare, reviews of other severe complications of pregnancy and the puerperium can provide an additional perspective to help learn lessons to improve future care. The objective of this survey was to identify the types of incidents which triggered local reviews in the UK, in order to inform national safety reporting guidance. Design A national descriptive survey. Setting UK. Participants Consultant-led maternity units. Main outcome measure Seventy-one per cent of maternity units provided an incident review trigger list. The conditions included were classified by two assessors. Incidents that were listed by at least 5% of maternity units were reported and compared with incidents recommended for review by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). Results The conditions covered were highly variable, although those recommended by the RCOG were most highly represented. The most commonly listed conditions that had not been recommended for review by the RCOG included inadequate staffing levels (70%), cardiac arrest (69%) and maternal sepsis (64%). Conclusions Substantial variation exists in the types of incident listed for review by maternity units in the UK. Importantly, some units are not reviewing cases of severe infective complications even though this is a current major concern. Future guidance concerning local serious incident review processes should include how the list of conditions triggering a review should be managed in the light of changing clinical and safety priorities. PMID:25057407

Mohamed-Ahmed, Olaa; McClymont, Charlotte; Knight, Marian

2014-01-01

339

46 CFR 108.210 - Hospital space not required.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...108.210 Section 108.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.210 Hospital...

2012-10-01

340

The evaluation of hospital laboratory information management systems based on the standards of the American National Standard Institute  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Nowadays, modern laboratories are faced with a huge volume of information. One of the goals of the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is to assist in the management of the information generated in the laboratory. This study intends to evaluate the LIMS based on the standards of the American National Standard Institute (ANSI). Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive–analytical study, which had been conducted in 2011, on the LIMSs in use, in the teaching and private hospitals in Isfahan. The data collecting instrument was a checklist, which was made by evaluating three groups of information components namely: ‘System capabilities’, ‘work list functions,’ and ‘reporting’ based on LIS8-A. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 20. Data were analyzed using (relative) frequency, percentage. To compare the data the following statistical tests were used: Leven test, t-test, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Results: The results of the study indicated that the LIMS had a low conformity (30%) with LIS8-A (P = 0.001), with no difference between teaching and private hospitals (P = 0.806). The ANOVA revealed that in terms of conformity with the LIS8-A standard, there was a significant difference between the systems produced by different vendors (P = 0.023). According to the results, a Kowsar system with more than %57 conformity in the three groups of information components had a better conformity to the standard, compared to the other systems. Conclusions: This study indicated that none of the LIMSs had a good conformity to the standard. It seems that system providers did not pay sufficient attention to many of the information components required by the standards when designing and developing their systems. It was suggested that standards from certified organizations and institutions be followed in the design and development process of health information systems. PMID:25077154

Isfahani, Sakineh Saghaeiannejad; Khajouei, Reza; Jahanbakhsh, Maryan; Mirmohamadi, Mahboubeh

2014-01-01

341

Efficacy of hand rubs with a low alcohol concentration listed as effective by a national hospital hygiene society in Europe  

PubMed Central

Background Some national hospital hygiene societies in Europe such as the French society for hospital hygiene (SFHH) have positive lists of disinfectants. Few hand disinfectants with a rather low concentration of ethanol are listed by one society as effective for hygienic hand disinfection with 3 mL in 30 s including a virucidal activity in 30 s or 60 s, but published data allow having doubts. We have therefore evaluated the efficacy of three commonly used hand disinfectants according to EN 1500 and EN 14476. Methods Products 1 (Aniosgel 85 NPC) and 2 (Aniosrub 85 NPC) were based on 70% ethanol, product 3 (ClinoGel derma+) on 60% ethanol and 15% isopropanol (all w/w). They were tested in 3 laboratories according to EN 1500. Three mL were applied for 30 s and compared to the reference treatment of 2 × 3 mL applications of isopropanol 60% (v/v), on hands artificially contaminated with Escherichia coli. Each laboratory used a cross-over design against the reference alcohol with 15 or 20 volunteers. The virucidal activity of the products was evaluated (EN 14476) in one laboratory against adenovirus and poliovirus in different concentrations (80%, 90%, 97%), with different organic loads (none; clean conditions; phosphate-buffered saline) for up to 3 min. Results Product 1 revealed a mean log10-reduction of 3.87 ± 0.79 (laboratory 1) and 4.38 ± 0.87 (laboratory 2) which was significantly lower compared to the reference procedure (4.62 ± 0.89 and 5.00 ± 0.87). In laboratory 3 product 1 was inferior to the reference disinfection (4.06 ± 0.86 versus 4.99 ± 0.90). Product 2 revealed similar results. Product 3 fulfilled the requirements in one laboratory but failed in the two other. None of the three products was able to reduce viral infectivity of both adenovirus and poliovirus by 4 log10 steps in 3 min according to EN 14476. Conclusions Efficacy data mentioned in a positive list published by a society for hospital hygiene should still be regarded with caution if they quite obviously contradict published data on the same or similar products. PMID:23759059

2013-01-01

342

78 FR 69007 - Special Local Regulations; Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to update the list of...annually in the Eleventh Coast Guard District, the Coast Guard proposes to amend...and petty officers of the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard may also be...

2013-11-18

343

Tubular actin filaments in tobacco guard cells.  

PubMed

The dynamic remodeling of actin filaments in guard cells functions in stomatal movement regulation. In our previous study, we found that the stochastic dynamics of guard cell actin filaments play a role in chloroplast movement during stomatal movement. In our present study, we further find that tubular actin filaments are present in tobacco guard cells that express GFP-mouse talin; approximately 2.3 tubular structures per cell with a diameter and height in the range of 1-3 µm and 3-5 µm, respectively. Most of the tubular structures were found to be localized in the cytoplasm near the inner walls of the guard cells. Moreover, the tubular actin filaments altered their localization slowly in the guard cells of static stoma, but showed obvious remodeling, such as breakdown and re-formation, in moving guard cells. Tubular actin filaments were further found to be colocalized with the chloroplasts in guard cells, but their roles in stomatal movement regulation requires further investigation.  PMID:21921692

Chu, Cui-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Hua; Hu, Zi-Ying; Wang, Xiu-Ling

2011-10-01

344

Impact resistance of guards on grinding machines.  

PubMed

Guards on machine tools are meant to protect persons from injuries caused by parts ejected with high kinetic energy from the machine's working zone. With respect to stationary grinding machines, Standard No. EN 13218:2002, therefore, specifies minimum wall thicknesses for guards. These values are mainly based on estimations and experience instead of systematic experimental investigations. This paper shows to what extent simple impact tests with standardizable projectiles can be used as basis for the evaluation of the impact resistance of guards, provided that not only the kinetic energy of the projectiles used but also, among others, their geometry corresponds to the abrasive product fragments to be expected. PMID:22152506

Mewes, Detlef; Mewes, Olaf; Herbst, Peter

2011-01-01

345

Parallel Quality Assessment of Emergency Departments by European Foundation for Quality Management Model and Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation  

PubMed Central

Background European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model is a widely used quality management system (QMS) worldwide, including Iran. Current study aims to verify the quality assessment results of Iranian National Program for Hospital Evaluation (INPHE) based on those of EFQM. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 on a sample of emergency departments (EDs) affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Iran. The standard questionnaire of EFQM (V-2010) was used to gather appropriate data. The results were compared with those of INPHE. MS Excel was used to classify and display the findings. Results: The average assessment score of the EDs based on the INPHE and EFQM model were largely different (i.e. 86.4% and 31%, respectively). In addition, the variation range among five EDs’ scores according to each model was also considerable (22% for EFQM against 7% of INPHE), especially in the EDs with and without prior record of applying QMSs. Conclusion: The INPHE’s assessment results were not confirmed by EFQM model. Moreover, the higher variation range among EDs’ scores using EFQM model could allude to its more differentiation power in assessing the performance comparing with INPHE. Therefore, a need for improvement in the latter drawing on other QMSs’ (such as EFQM) strengths, given the results emanated from its comparison with EFQM seems indispensable. PMID:23967429

IMANI NASAB, Mohammad Hasan; MOHAGHEGH, Bahram; KHALESI, Nader; JAAFARIPOOYAN, Ebrahim

2013-01-01

346

[Noma and HIV infection: apropos of a case at the National Hospital Center in Bobo-Dioulasso (Burkina Faso)].  

PubMed

Noma (Cancrum oris) is a gangrenous stomatitis arising from a periodontal infection and leading to severe soft tissue and bone destruction. The pathology involves numerous factors including local thrombosis, vascularitis, necrotizing gingivitis, immunodeficiency, gram negative and anaerobic infection. It is usually a disease of infants and malnourished children in tropical areas often occurring after a debilitating disease like measles. Recently, cases have been reported in adults especially elderly patients or during immunodeficiency states. Reconstructive surgery is often necessary to deal with destruction and sequel but is rarely accessible in developing countries. We report one case of noma (cancrum oris) in an HIV seropositive patient at the National Hospital in Bobo-Dioulasso. The noma was inaugural of AIDS in a 40 years old labourer coming back from Ivory Coast and no major opportunistic infection was associated. The course was fulminant leading to extensive facial gangrene with recurrent bacterial infections. The disease was fatal in this depressive, malnourished and diarrhoeic patient despite local surgical treatment, prolonged antibiotherapy and supportive care. Pathogenic mechanisms, management and preventive issues are discussed. PMID:11887587

Ki-Zerbo, G A; Guigma, Y

2001-12-01

347

HBV and HCV Coinfection among HIV/AIDS Patients in the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases, Vietnam  

PubMed Central

Aim. To examine prevalence and characterization of HBV and HCV coinfection among HIV/AIDS patients. Methods. This cross-sectional, retrospective study analyzed 724 HIV/AIDS patients in the HIV clinic at the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases (NHTD), from 5/2005 to 4/2011. Results. The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection was 50.3% (364/724), of which HbsAg, HCV, and both of HbsAg, and HCV positivity were 8.4%, 35.4%, and 6.5%, respectively. The cohort (364 patients) with HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection live in the 30 provinces/cities in the North and Central area of Vietnam. We found statistically significant associations between heightened risk of coinfection with HIV and HCV in the age group 30–39 years (P < 0.001), male gender (P < 0.001), never married patients (P < 0.001), patients with a history of injection drug use (P < 0.001), and clinical stages 2–4 (P < 0.001). Coinfection with HBV/HIV was statistically significant associations between heightened risk of marital status (never married) (P < 0.001) and those who reported transmission through sexual intercourse. Conclusion. Coinfection with viral hepatitis is common in HIV patients; further study of the impact and evolution of coinfection is necessary to find effective treatment algorithms. PMID:25580287

Huy, Bùi V?; Vernavong, Kanxay; Kính, Nguy?n V?n

2014-01-01

348

5. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard Official Photograph, 12th Coast Guard District, San Francisco. 1960. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

349

49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

2012-10-01

350

49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

2010-10-01

351

49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

2011-10-01

352

49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141 Transportation...Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than...

2013-10-01

353

33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

2012-07-01

354

33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

2013-07-01

355

33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

2011-07-01

356

33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

2010-07-01

357

33 CFR 143.110 - Guards and rails.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guards and rails. 143.110 Section 143.110 Navigation...OCS Facilities § 143.110 Guards and rails. (a) Except for helicopter landing...openings shall be rimmed with guards and rails or wire mesh fence. The guard rail...

2014-07-01

358

A Tableau Algorithm for the Clique Guarded Fragment  

E-print Network

1 A Tableau Algorithm for the Clique Guarded Fragment Colin Hirsch and Stephan Tobies abstract. We describe a \\modal style" tableau algorithm that decides satis#12;ability for the clique guarded fragment for the generalised tree model prop- erty of the clique guarded fragment. 1 Introduction The Guarded Fragment of #12

Baader, Franz

359

Querying the Guarded Fragment Vince Barany and Georg Gottlob  

E-print Network

Querying the Guarded Fragment Vince B´ar´any and Georg Gottlob Oxford University Computing conjunctive query q over a guarded first-order theory T is equivalent to checking whether (T & not q not be guarded, well known results about the decidability, complexity, and finite-model property of the guarded

Martin, Ralph R.

360

Compliance with a time-out procedure intended to prevent wrong surgery in hospitals: results of a national patient safety programme in the Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Objective To prevent wrong surgery, the WHO ‘Safe Surgery Checklist’ was introduced in 2008. The checklist comprises a time-out procedure (TOP): the final step before the start of the surgical procedure where the patient, surgical procedure and side/site are reviewed by the surgical team. The aim of this study is to evaluate the extent to which hospitals carry out the TOP before anaesthesia in the operating room, whether compliance has changed over time, and to determine factors that are associated with compliance. Design Evaluation study involving observations. Setting Operating rooms of 2 academic, 4 teaching and 12 general Dutch hospitals. Participants A random selection was made from all adult patients scheduled for elective surgery on the day of the observation, preferably involving different surgeons and different procedures. Results Mean compliance with the TOP was 71.3%. Large differences between hospitals were observed. No linear trend was found in compliance during the study period. Compliance at general and teaching hospitals was higher than at academic hospitals. Compliance decreased with the age of the patient, general surgery showed lower compliance in comparison with other specialties and compliance was higher when the team was focused on the TOP. Conclusions Large differences in compliance with the TOP were observed between participating hospitals which can be attributed at least in part to the type of hospital, surgical specialty and patient characteristics. Hospitals do not comply consistently with national guidelines to prevent wrong surgery and further implementation as well as further research into non-compliance is needed. PMID:24993761

van Schoten, Steffie M; Kop, Veerle; de Blok, Carolien; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Groenewegen, Peter P; Wagner, Cordula

2014-01-01

361

29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.  

...devices). (b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used...to keep employees clear of any danger zones: (1) They shall be equipped...13 m) or less above working surfaces shall be guarded to prevent...

2014-07-01

362

29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...devices). (b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used...to keep employees clear of any danger zones: (1) They shall be equipped...13 m) or less above working surfaces shall be guarded to prevent...

2010-07-01

363

29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...devices). (b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used...to keep employees clear of any danger zones: (1) They shall be equipped...13 m) or less above working surfaces shall be guarded to prevent...

2011-07-01

364

29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...devices). (b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used...to keep employees clear of any danger zones: (1) They shall be equipped...13 m) or less above working surfaces shall be guarded to prevent...

2012-07-01

365

29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...devices). (b) General. (1) Danger zones on machines and equipment used...to keep employees clear of any danger zones: (1) They shall be equipped...13 m) or less above working surfaces shall be guarded to prevent...

2013-07-01

366

Finding the theta-Guarded Region  

E-print Network

We are given a finite set of m points (guards) G in the plane R^2 and an angle 0 the plane is called \\theta-guarded if every theta-cone with apex located at p is non-empty. Moreover, the set of all theta-guarded points is called theta-region. We first show how to construct a data structure of O(m * log^2 m) time and space such that in time O(log^3 m) we can compute whether some point p in R^2 is theta-guarded. As a main result of our work we describe the theta-region with only O(m / theta) circular arcs and show a way to compute it.

MatijeviÄ?, Domagoj

2008-01-01

367

Stomatal Patterning and Guard Cell Differentiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere takes place through stomata (singular,\\u000a stoma), which are microscopic valves on the plant epidermis composed of paired guard cells. Stomatal differentiation\\u000a involves a series of asymmetric divisions of precursor cells followed by a single symmetric cell\\u000a division that produces terminally differentiated guard cell pairs. Stomatal development emerged as a model\\u000a system to study how environmental- and

Keiko U. Torii

368

Electrophysiological properties of onion guard cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intracellular electrical recordings in onion (Allium cepa L.) guard cells show that they maintain a membrane potential difference (MPD), inside negative. The MPD of intact cells averaged -72±29 mV (n=45); MPD of cells partially digested with a cellulolytic enzyme, -39±7 mV (n=65). Evidence indicates that the guard cells have two electrically distinct compartments, presumably delimited by the plasmalemma and tonoplast.

W. Moody; E. Zelger

1978-01-01

369

[Variability of stoma's guard cells in Lilium].  

PubMed

It has been revealed, that the parameters of stoma's guard cells in the leaves of some lilies considerably vary depending on plant age, the tier of leaves, and the place of stoma location on a leaf. Lengths of stoma's guard cells in bottom parts of leaves reliably exceeded those lengths in the middle parts in the majority of the hybrids studied. The latter are larger in juvenile plants. PMID:18727407

Labunskaia, N A; Sorokopudova, O A

2008-01-01

370

An in-depth, exploratory assessment of the implementation of the National Health Information System at a district level hospital in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background A well functioning Health Information System (HIS) is crucial for effective and efficient health service delivery. In Tanzania there is a national HIS called Mfumo wa Taarifa za Uendeshaji Huduma za Afya (MTUHA). It comprises a guideline/manual, a series of registers for primary data collection and secondary data books where information from the registers is totalled or used for calculations. Methods A mix of qualitative methods were used. These included key informant interviews; staff interviews; participant observations; and a retrospective analysis of the hospital’s 2010 MTUHA reporting documents and the hospital’s development plan. Results All staff members acknowledged data collection as part of their job responsibilities. However, all had concerns about the accuracy of MTUHA data. Access to training was limited, mathematical capabilities often low, dissemination of MTUHA knowledge within the hospital poor, and a broad understanding of the HIS’s full capabilities lacking. Whilst data collection for routine services functioned reasonably well, filling of the secondary data tools was unsatisfactory. Internal inconsistencies between the different types of data tools were found. These included duplications, and the collection of data that was not further used. Sixteen of the total 72 forms (22.2%) that make up one of the key secondary data books (Hospital data/MTUHA book 2) could not be completed with the information collected in the primary data books. Moreover, the hospital made no use of any of the secondary data. The hospital’s main planning document was its development plan. Only 3 of the 22 indicators in this plan were the same as indicators in MTUHA, the information for 9 more was collected by the MTUHA system but figures had to be extracted and recalculated to fit, while for the remaining 10 indicators no use could be made of MTUHA at all. Conclusion The HIS in Tanzania is very extensive and it could be advisable to simplify it to the core business of data collection for routine services. Alternatively, the more comprehensive, managerial aspects could be sharpened for each type of facility, with a focus upon the hospital level. In particular, hospital planning documents need to be more closely aligned with MTUHA indicators. PMID:24572013

2014-01-01

371

On the complexity of the guarding game  

E-print Network

The guarding game is a game in which several cops try to guard a region in a (directed or undirected) graph against a robber. The robber and the cops are placed on the vertices of the graph; they take turns in moving to adjacent vertices (or staying), cops inside the guarded region, the robber on the remaining vertices (the robber-region). The goal of the robber is to enter the guarded region at a vertex with no cop on it. The problem is to determine whether for a given graph and given number of cops the cops are able to prevent the robber from entering the guarded region. Fomin et al. [Fomin, Golovach, Hall, Mihalak, Vicari, Widmayer: How to Guard a Graph? Algorithmica, DOI: 10.1007/s00453-009-9382-4] proved that the problem is NP-complete when the robber-region is restricted to a tree. Further they prove that is it PSPACE-complete when the robber-region is restricted to a directed acyclic graph, and they ask about the problem complexity for arbitrary graphs. In this paper we prove that for arbitrary graphs ...

Samal, R

2011-01-01

372

Impact of High Risk Drug Use on Hospitalization and Mortality in Older People with and without Alzheimer’s Disease: A National Population Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Background Evidence is lacking about outcomes associated with the cumulative use of anticholinergic and sedative drugs in people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This retrospective cohort study investigated the relationship between cumulative exposure to anticholinergic and sedative drugs and hospitalization and mortality in people with and without AD in Finland. Methods Community-dwelling people aged 65 years and over, with AD on December 31st 2005 (n?=?16,603) and individually matched (n?=?16,603) comparison persons (age, sex, region of residence) were identified by the Social Insurance Institution of Finland. Drug utilization data were extracted from the Finnish National Prescription Register. Exposure to anticholinergic and sedative drugs was defined using the Drug Burden Index (DBI). Hospitalization and mortality data were extracted from national registers. Cox and zero-inflated negative binomial analyses were used to investigate the relationship between DBI and hospitalization and mortality over a one-year follow-up. Results In total, 5.8% of people with AD and 3.7% without AD died during 2006. For every unit increase in DBI, the adjusted hazard ratio for mortality was 1.21 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.09–1.33) among people with AD, and 1.37 (95%CI: 1.20–1.56) among people without AD. Overall, 44.3% of people with AD and 33.4% without AD were hospitalized. When using no DBI exposure as the reference group, the adjusted incidence rate ratio for length of hospital stay among high DBI group (?1) in people with AD was 1.15 (95%CI: 1.05–1.26) and 1.63 (95%CI: 1.41–1.88) in people without AD. Conclusion There is a dose-response relationship between cumulative anticholinergic and sedative drug use and hospitalization and mortality in people with and without AD. PMID:24454696

Gnjidic, Danijela; Hilmer, Sarah N.; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Taipale, Heidi; Koponen, Marjaana; Bell, J. Simon

2014-01-01

373

Record linkage between hospital discharges and mortality registries for motor neuron disease case ascertainment for the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry.  

PubMed

Our objective was to analyse the coverage of hospital discharge data and the mortality registry (MR) of La Rioja to ascertain motor neuron disease (MND) cases to be included in the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry. MND cases that occurred in La Rioja during the period 1996-2011 were selected from hospital discharge data and the MR by means of the International Classification of Diseases. Review of the medical histories was carried out to confirm the causes of death reported. Characteristics of the population with MND were analysed. A total of 133 patients with MND were detected in La Rioja during the period 1996-2011; 30.1% were only recorded in the hospital discharges data, 12.0% only in the MR, and 57.9% were recorded by both databases. Medical records revealed a miscoding of patients who had been diagnosed with progressive supranuclear palsy but were recorded in the MR with an MND code. In conclusion, the hospital discharges data and the MR appear to be complementary and are valuable databases for the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry when MNDs are properly codified. Nevertheless, it would be advisable to corroborate the validity of the MR as data source since the miscoding of progressive supranuclear palsy has been corrected. PMID:24641576

Ruiz, Elena; Ramalle-Gómara, Enrique; Quiñones, Carmen

2014-06-01

374

Rural and Urban Hospitals' Role in Providing Inpatient Care, 2010  

MedlinePLUS

... CDC/NCHS, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2010. How did rural hospital inpatients differ from urban hospital inpatients ... CDC/NCHS, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2010. How did patients' first-listed diagnoses differ in rural and ...

375

National trends in rates of death and hospital admissions related to acute myocardial infarction, heart failure and stroke, 1994–2004  

PubMed Central

Background Rates of death from cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases have been steadily declining over the past few decades. Whether such declines are occurring to a similar degree for common disorders such as acute myocardial infarction, heart failure and stroke is uncertain. We examined recent national trends in mortality and rates of hospital admission for these 3 conditions. Methods We analyzed mortality data from Statistic Canada’s Canadian Mortality Database and data on hospital admissions from the Canadian Institute for Health Information’s Hospital Morbidity Database for the period 1994–2004. We determined age- and sex-standardized rates of death and hospital admissions per 100 000 population aged 20 years and over as well as in-hospital case-fatality rates. Results The overall age- and sex-standardized rate of death from cardiovascular disease in Canada declined 30.0%, from 360.6 per 100 000 in 1994 to 252.5 per 100 000 in 2004. During the same period, the rate fell 38.1% for acute myocardial infarction, 23.5% for heart failure and 28.2% for stroke, with improvements observed across most age and sex groups. The age- and sex-standardized rate of hospital admissions decreased 27.6% for stroke and 27.2% for heart failure. The rate for acute myocardial infarction fell only 9.2%. In contrast, the relative decline in the inhospital case-fatality rate was greatest for acute myocardial infarction (33.1%; p < 0.001). Much smaller relative improvements in case-fatality rates were noted for heart failure (8.1%) and stroke (8.9%). Interpretation The rates of death and hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure and stroke in Canada changed at different rates over the 10-year study period. Awareness of these trends may guide future efforts for health promotion and health care planning and help to determine priorities for research and treatment. PMID:19546444

Tu, Jack V.; Nardi, Lorelei; Fang, Jiming; Liu, Juan; Khalid, Laila; Johansen, Helen

2009-01-01

376

Drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a national referral hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia  

PubMed Central

Background and objective There are no recent data on the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB) in Cambodia. We aim to describe TB drug resistance amongst adults with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection in a national referral hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Design Between 22 November 2007 and 30 November 2009, clinical specimens from HIV-infected patients suspected of having TB underwent routine microscopy, Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, and drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory and clinical data were collected for patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures. Results M. tuberculosis was cultured from 236 HIV-infected patients. Resistance to any first-line TB drug occurred in 34.7% of patients; 8.1% had multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB). The proportion of MDR TB amongst new patients and previously treated patients was 3.7 and 28.9%, respectively (p<0.001). The diagnosis of MDR TB was made after death in 15.8% of patients; in total 26.3% of patients with MDR TB died. The diagnosis of TB was established by culture of extra-pulmonary specimens in 23.6% of cases. Conclusions There is significant resistance to first-line TB drugs amongst new and previously treated TB–HIV co-infected patients in Phnom Penh. These data suggest that the prevalence of DR TB in Cambodia may be higher than previously recognised, particularly amongst HIV-infected patients. Additional prevalence studies are needed. This study also illustrates the feasibility and utility of analysis of non-respiratory specimens in the diagnosis of TB, even in low-resource settings, and suggests that extra-pulmonary specimens should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms. PMID:25623609

Walls, Genevieve; Bulifon, Sophie; Breysse, Serge; Daneth, Thol; Bonnet, Maryline; Hurtado, Northan; Molfino, Lucas

2015-01-01

377

The Clickable Guard Cell: Electronically Linked Model of Guard Cell Signal Transduction Pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guard cells are located in the leaf epidermis and pairwise surround stomatal pores, which allow CO2 influx for photosynthetic carbon fixation and water loss via transpiration to the atmosphere. Signal transduction mechanisms in guard cells integrate a multitude of different stimuli to modulate stomatal aperture. Stomata open in response to light. In response to drought stress, plants synthesize the hormone

Pascal Mäser; Nathalie Leonhardt; Julian I. Schroeder

2003-01-01

378

159. ARAIII Guard house (ARA609). Shows west and north elevation, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

159. ARA-III Guard house (ARA-609). Shows west and north elevation, floor plan, and section details. Aerojet-general 880-area/GCRE-609-A-1. Date: February 1958. Ineel index code no. 063-0609-00-013-103683. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

379

13. MASONRY GUARD WALL AND CONCRETE CRIBBING. ROAD VIEW 1.5 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. MASONRY GUARD WALL AND CONCRETE CRIBBING. ROAD VIEW 1.5 MILES NORTH OF TREE HOUSE. SOUTH OF PIERCY, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING SE. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

380

Double-blind evaluation of the DKL LifeGuard Model 2  

SciTech Connect

On March 20, 1998, Sandia National Laboratories performed a double-blind test of the DKL LifeGuard human presence detector and tracker. The test was designed to allow the device to search for individuals well within the product`s published operational parameters. The Test Operator of the DKL LifeGuard was provided by the manufacturer and was a high-ranking member of DKL management. The test was developed and implemented to verify the performance of the device as specified by the manufacturer. The device failed to meet its published specifications and it performed no better than random chance.

Murray, D.W.; Spencer, F.W.; Spencer, D.D.

1998-05-01

381

Hospitality Management Hospitality Management  

E-print Network

of the global hospitality industry. Academic Offerings HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR Students pursuing programs in other areas of study may choose a minor Service Operations 4 OR NSD 225 Nutrition in Health 3 12 credits needed: HPM 300 Selected Topics: Advanced

McConnell, Terry

382

In?Hospital Mortality Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results From the National Inpatient Sample, 2000–2010  

PubMed Central

Background Case?fatality rates in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have significantly decreased; however, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), a risk factor for AMI, has increased. The purposes of the present study were to assess the prevalence and clinical impact of DM among patients hospitalized with AMI and to estimate the impact of important clinical characteristics associated with in?hospital mortality in patients with AMI and DM. Methods and Results We used the National Inpatient Sample to estimate trends in DM prevalence and in?hospital mortality among 1.5 million patients with AMI from 2000 to 2010, using survey data?analysis methods. Clinical characteristics associated with in?hospital mortality were identified using multivariable logistic regression. There was a significant increase in DM prevalence among AMI patients (year 2000, 22.2%; year 2010, 29.6%, Ptrend<0.0001). AMI patients with DM tended to be older and female and to have more cardiovascular risk factors. However, age?standardized mortality decreased significantly from 2000 (8.48%) to 2010 (4.95%) (Ptrend<0.0001). DM remained independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio 1.069, 95% CI 1.051 to 1.087; P<0.0001). The adverse impact of DM on in?hospital mortality was unchanged over time. Decreased death risk over time was greatest among women and elderly patients. Among younger patients of both sexes, there was a leveling off of this decrease in more recent years. Conclusions Despite increasing DM prevalence and disease burden among AMI patients, in?hospital mortality declined significantly from 2000 to 2010. The adverse impact of DM on mortality remained unchanged overall over time but was age and sex dependent. PMID:25158866

Ahmed, Bina; Davis, Herbert T.; Laskey, Warren K.

2014-01-01

383

UCSF Betty Irene Moore Women's Hospital On February 1, 2015, one of the nation's premier medical centers  

E-print Network

's Hospital is designed to treat the whole woman, not just her symptoms, with compassion, innovation imbalances. Exceptional Features: · Onsite helipad to transport pregnant women, babies and children

Derisi, Joseph

384

National survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Belgian hospitals: Detection methods, prevalence trends and infection control measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

A questionnaire survey of Belgian acute care hospitals was conducted to determine the methods used for detection of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA), to estimate the prevalence of this organism during the period 1989–1991 and to describe the infection control measures used locally for limiting its spread. Questionnaires were returned by 144 acute care hospitals, with a coverage of 41 to 72

M. J. Struelens; R. Mertens

1994-01-01

385

Tuberculosis-HIV co-infection among patients admitted at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es salaam, Tanzania.  

PubMed

Data on the clinical presentations and magnitude of tuberculosis (TB)-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection is limited. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and prevalence of TB-HIV co-infection among patients admitted at Muhimbili National Hospital between August 2008 and July 2009 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Of 387 TB patients included, 117 (30.2%) were in the age group 30-39 years. The overall mean age of patients was 38.1 years (range 8 to 86 years) and 216 (55.8%) were male. Two hundred and five (53%) had pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), 58 (15%) had extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) and 124 (32%) had both PTB and EPTB. Common sites of EPTB were pleural cavity 80 (44%), lymph node 31 (17%) and 30 (16.5%) abdomen. Of the 300 TB patients tested for HIV, 175 (58.3%) were HIV-infected and 97 (55.4%) of these were already on antiretroviral therapy (ART) at time of admission. Overall, 104 (26.9%) of the TB patients admitted died. About two thirds of patients who died had PTB. About three quarters (73.1%; N=283) of the patients were discharged home to continue with anti-TB treatment. There was significantly higher proportion of deaths among HIV-infected TB patients (29.1% versus 15.2%) than in the HIV uninfected TB patients (P=0.005). Age was a significant predictor for PTB (OR 0.946, 95% CI 0.917-0.976) while age (OR 1.019, 95% CI 1.002-1.036) and HIV serostatus (OR 2.143, 95% CI 1.313-3.497) were significant risk factors for EPTB. It is concluded that more than half of the patients had PTB and pleural cavity was the most common site of EPTB. TB-HIV co-infected patients had significantly higher mortality than the TB-HIV- uninfected patients. It is recommended to emphasize on the provision of HIV counselling and testing to all TB patients to ensure proper management and timely initiation of ART in TB-HIV co-infected patients in order to improve the outcome and reduce mortality. PMID:24409643

Kamenju, Pili; Aboud, Said

2011-01-01

386

National Veterans Health Administration hospitalizations for syncope compared to acute myocardial infarction, fracture, or pneumonia in community-dwelling elders: outpatient medication and comorbidity profiles.  

PubMed

The authors used 2 national Veterans Health Administration databases to identify outpatient medications and all 30 Elixhauser comorbidities for 2579 unique patients, age 65+ years, hospitalized for syncope in fiscal year 2004. For comparison, we identified other elderly patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (N = 4491), fracture (N = 2797), or pneumonia (N = 9473). The categories of medications included drugs that affect the cardiovascular, central nervous, or the muscular skeletal system. The most notable differences between syncope compared to acute myocardial infarction patients occurred in central nervous system drugs in anticonvulsants/barbiturates, antidepressants, antihistamine/antinauseants, antipsychotics, and cholinesterase inhibitors (P < .0018). Comparing syncope patients with fracture patients, the central nervous medication profile was similar, but the cardiovascular medication profile differed (P < .0018); their hypertension comorbidities also differed (60.45% vs 46.34%); (P < .0016). These findings indicate significant potential associations that warrant further study. Studies linking national outpatient medications to hospitalizations for specific conditions can foster the development of more proactive pharmacovigilance systems. PMID:16707407

French, Dustin D; Campbell, Robert; Spehar, Andrea; Rubenstein, Laurence Z; Accomando, John; Cunningham, Francesca

2006-06-01

387

Measuring the displacement of the movable guard electrode in the new vertical calculable capacitor at NIM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new type vertical calculable capacitor has been built at National Institute of Metrology (NIM) cooperated with National Measurement Institute of Australia (NMIA). The calculable capacitor is the highest accuracy equipment apparatus except the quantum voltage and the quantum resistance in the electromagnetic metrological field. In order to measure the capacitance precisely, the accurate displacement measurement among the two guard electrodes in the calculable capacitor is a pivotal part. This paper describes a method of measuring the displacement of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, and this interferometer is component of two mirrors in two guard electrodes of the calculable capacitor at NIM. One concave reflective mirror, with 5 m radius and 70% reflectivity, is on the top of the bottom fixed guards electrodes. The other planar mirror is placed at the end of the moveable guard electrodes. This Fabry-Perot interferometer employs a home-made lamb-dip stabilization He-Ne laser at 633 nm to measure the displacement of the movable guard electrode. The internal modulation, which is used for laser stabilization, is also employed for locking the Fabry-Perot interferometer. The displacement of the movable guard electrode could be measured, when the Fabry-Perot interferometer is locked to the stabilization laser at two positions respectively. An iodine stabilization He-Ne laser at 633 nm is employed to simultaneously calibrate the wavelength of lamb-dip working laser. A reproducibility of 1.43×10-8(k=3) for the range of 205 mm can be obtained at present, and that is estimated from the experimental results of calculable capacitor.

Wang, Jianbo; Qian, Jin; Liu, Zhongyou; Liu, Xiuying; Lu, Zhuliang; Huang, Lu; Yin, Cong; Li, Tongbao

2014-11-01

388

33 CFR 140.101 - Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors or Minerals Management Service inspectors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...OCS activities is subject to inspection by the Coast Guard. (b) On behalf of the Coast Guard, each fixed OCS facility engaged in OCS...in full compliance with applicable Coast Guard regulations. The Coast Guard marine inspector or the...

2010-07-01

389

33 CFR 165.518 - Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District. 165.518 Section...surface or air asset displaying the Coast Guard insignia. (2) Coast Guard Auxiliary surface asset displaying the Coast Guard Auxiliary insignia....

2010-07-01

390

33 CFR 165.518 - Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District. 165.518 Section...surface or air asset displaying the Coast Guard insignia. (2) Coast Guard Auxiliary surface asset displaying the Coast Guard Auxiliary insignia....

2011-07-01

391

33 CFR 165.518 - Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District. 165.518 Section...surface or air asset displaying the Coast Guard insignia. (2) Coast Guard Auxiliary surface asset displaying the Coast Guard Auxiliary insignia....

2012-07-01

392

46 CFR 30.10-19 - Coast Guard District Commander-TB/ALL.  

...Definitions § 30.10-19 Coast Guard District Commander—TB/ALL. The term Coast Guard District Commander means an officer of the Coast Guard designated as such by the Commandant to command all Coast Guard activities within his district...

2014-10-01

393

46 CFR 30.10-19 - Coast Guard District Commander-TB/ALL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Definitions § 30.10-19 Coast Guard District Commander—TB/ALL. The term Coast Guard District Commander means an officer of the Coast Guard designated as such by the Commandant to command all Coast Guard activities within his district...

2011-10-01

394

33 CFR 165.518 - Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District.  

...false Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District. 165.518 Section...surface or air asset displaying the Coast Guard insignia. (2) Coast Guard Auxiliary surface asset displaying the Coast Guard Auxiliary insignia....

2014-07-01

395

33 CFR 165.518 - Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Security Zone; Waters of the Fifth Coast Guard District. 165.518 Section...surface or air asset displaying the Coast Guard insignia. (2) Coast Guard Auxiliary surface asset displaying the Coast Guard Auxiliary insignia....

2013-07-01

396

46 CFR 10.408 - Coast Guard-accepted training other than approved courses and programs.  

...403 of this subpart. (b) The Coast Guard will accept courses approved and...System (QSS) organization. The Coast Guard maintains a list of training...Guard-accepted QSS organization. The Coast Guard-accepted QSS organization...

2014-10-01

397

46 CFR 30.10-19 - Coast Guard District Commander-TB/ALL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Definitions § 30.10-19 Coast Guard District Commander—TB/ALL. The term Coast Guard District Commander means an officer of the Coast Guard designated as such by the Commandant to command all Coast Guard activities within his district...

2010-10-01

398

46 CFR 107.117 - Coast Guard addresses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...107.117 Section 107.117 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.117 Coast Guard addresses. When approval of...

2011-10-01

399

30 CFR 77.509 - Transformers; installation and guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transformers; installation and guarding. 77...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.509 Transformers; installation and guarding. (a) Transformers shall be of the totally enclosed...

2013-07-01

400

30 CFR 77.509 - Transformers; installation and guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transformers; installation and guarding. 77...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.509 Transformers; installation and guarding. (a) Transformers shall be of the totally enclosed...

2012-07-01

401

30 CFR 77.509 - Transformers; installation and guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transformers; installation and guarding. 77...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.509 Transformers; installation and guarding. (a) Transformers shall be of the totally enclosed...

2011-07-01

402

30 CFR 77.509 - Transformers; installation and guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transformers; installation and guarding. 77...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.509 Transformers; installation and guarding. (a) Transformers shall be of the totally enclosed...

2010-07-01

403

30 CFR 77.509 - Transformers; installation and guarding.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transformers; installation and guarding. 77...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.509 Transformers; installation and guarding. (a) Transformers shall be of the totally enclosed...

2014-07-01

404

30 CFR 77.510 - Resistors; location and guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resistors; location and guarding. 77.510 Section...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.510 Resistors; location and guarding. Resistors, heaters, and rheostats shall be located...

2011-07-01

405

30 CFR 77.510 - Resistors; location and guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistors; location and guarding. 77.510 Section...Electrical Equipment-General § 77.510 Resistors; location and guarding. Resistors, heaters, and rheostats shall be located...

2010-07-01

406

46 CFR 58.01-20 - Machinery guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Machinery guards. 58.01-20 Section 58.01-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY...

2011-10-01

407

Cell block one and southeast guard tower, looking from the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Cell block one and southeast guard tower, looking from the central guard tower, facing southeast (note view also includes cell block ten (left) and cell block nine (right)) - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

408

30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

2013-07-01

409

30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

2010-07-01

410

30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

2012-07-01

411

30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded...

2011-07-01

412

46 CFR 108.223 - Guards on exposed equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Guards on exposed equipment. Each unit must have hand covers, guards, or rails installed on all belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, flywheels or other reciprocating, rotating or moving parts of machinery or equipment normally...

2012-10-01

413

46 CFR 108.223 - Guards on exposed equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Guards on exposed equipment. Each unit must have hand covers, guards, or rails installed on all belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, flywheels or other reciprocating, rotating or moving parts of machinery or equipment normally...

2011-10-01

414

46 CFR 108.223 - Guards on exposed equipment.  

...Guards on exposed equipment. Each unit must have hand covers, guards, or rails installed on all belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, flywheels or other reciprocating, rotating or moving parts of machinery or equipment normally...

2014-10-01

415

46 CFR 108.223 - Guards on exposed equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Guards on exposed equipment. Each unit must have hand covers, guards, or rails installed on all belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, flywheels or other reciprocating, rotating or moving parts of machinery or equipment normally...

2010-10-01

416

46 CFR 108.223 - Guards on exposed equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Guards on exposed equipment. Each unit must have hand covers, guards, or rails installed on all belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, flywheels or other reciprocating, rotating or moving parts of machinery or equipment normally...

2013-10-01

417

33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...66.01-15 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving the...structures or other works which the owners are legally obligated to...maintain and operate as prescribed by the Coast Guard. Class II: Aids to...

2011-07-01

418

46 CFR 28.215 - Guards for exposed hazards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Fish Tender Vessels Engaged in the Aleutian Trade § 28.215 Guards for exposed hazards. (a...space on board a vessel must meet the requirements of this section. (b) Suitable hand covers, guards, or railing must be...

2012-10-01

419

33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...66.01-15 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving the...structures or other works which the owners are legally obligated to...maintain and operate as prescribed by the Coast Guard. Class II: Aids to...

2013-07-01

420

15. GUARD LOCKS VIEWED FROM THE NORTHWEST BANK: SHOWS UPSTREAM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. GUARD LOCKS VIEWED FROM THE NORTHWEST BANK: SHOWS UPSTREAM SIDE. GATEHOUSE ON THE LEFT, ISLAND IN THE CENTER, AND LOCK HOUSE ON THE RIGHT 1976 - Pawtucket Canal, Guard Locks, Lowell, Middlesex County, MA

421

33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...50-25 Eighth Coast Guard District. (a) Description...Lines of demarcation. The two lines of demarcation...intervals in order that the changing conditions...due to settling of banks, the Coast Guard will authorize their...

2013-07-01

422

33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.  

...66.01-15 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving the...structures or other works which the owners are legally obligated to...maintain and operate as prescribed by the Coast Guard. Class II: Aids to...

2014-07-01

423

46 CFR 28.215 - Guards for exposed hazards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Fish Tender Vessels Engaged in the Aleutian Trade § 28.215 Guards for exposed hazards. (a...space on board a vessel must meet the requirements of this section. (b) Suitable hand covers, guards, or railing must be...

2011-10-01

424

33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...66.01-15 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving the...structures or other works which the owners are legally obligated to...maintain and operate as prescribed by the Coast Guard. Class II: Aids to...

2012-07-01

425

33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...66.01-15 Action by Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving the...structures or other works which the owners are legally obligated to...maintain and operate as prescribed by the Coast Guard. Class II: Aids to...

2010-07-01

426

33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...50-25 Eighth Coast Guard District. (a) Description...Lines of demarcation. The two lines of demarcation...intervals in order that the changing conditions...due to settling of banks, the Coast Guard will authorize their...

2011-07-01

427

46 CFR 28.215 - Guards for exposed hazards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Fish Tender Vessels Engaged in the Aleutian Trade § 28.215 Guards for exposed hazards. (a...space on board a vessel must meet the requirements of this section. (b) Suitable hand covers, guards, or railing must be...

2010-10-01

428

46 CFR 28.215 - Guards for exposed hazards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Fish Tender Vessels Engaged in the Aleutian Trade § 28.215 Guards for exposed hazards. (a...space on board a vessel must meet the requirements of this section. (b) Suitable hand covers, guards, or railing must be...

2013-10-01

429

46 CFR 28.215 - Guards for exposed hazards.  

...Fish Tender Vessels Engaged in the Aleutian Trade § 28.215 Guards for exposed hazards. (a...space on board a vessel must meet the requirements of this section. (b) Suitable hand covers, guards, or railing must be...

2014-10-01

430

Hospital-based influenza morbidity and mortality surveillance system for influenza-like illnesses: a comparison with national influenza surveillance systems.  

PubMed

The Hospital-based Influenza Morbidity and Mortality (HIMM) surveillance system is an emergency room (ER)-based influenza surveillance system in Korea that was established in 2011. The system was established under the assumption that integrated clinical and virologic surveillance could be performed rapidly and easily at seven tertiary hospitals' ER. Here, we assessed the correlation between data generated from the HIMM surveillance system and the Korean national influenza surveillance systems during the 2011-2012 influenza season using cross-correlation analysis and found strong correlations. Rapid antigen-test-based HIMM surveillance would predict the start of influenza epidemic earlier than pre-existing influenza-like-illness-based surveillance. PMID:24020512

Seo, Yu Bin; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Cho, Young Duck; Wie, Seong-Heon; Jeong, Hye Won; Kim, Woo Joo

2014-01-01

431

US hospitals violate WHO policy on the distribution of formula sample packs: results of a national survey.  

PubMed

The World Health Organization's International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes, as well as most major medical authorities, opposes hospital-based distribution of free infant formula at discharge. The goal of this cross-sectional telephone survey of 3209 US maternity sites, conducted from 2006 to 2007, was to determine the extent of this practice. It was found that 91% of hospitals distributed formula sample packs, and a trend toward discontinuation of the practice was statistically significant (P < .001). It was concluded that most US hospitals distribute infant formula samples, in violation of the WHO Code and the recommendations of organizations including the US Government Accountability Office, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. PMID:20871089

Merewood, Anne; Grossman, Xena; Cook, John; Sadacharan, Radha; Singleton, Marcella; Peters, Karen; Navidi, Tina

2010-11-01

432

A Cationic Channel in the Guard Cell Tonoplast of  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stomatal movements depend on an osmoregulation process in which swelling or shrinking of the guard cells opens or closes the stomatal pore. lons and water fluxes are an essential aspect of guard cell osmoregulation. Thus far, studies of these fluxes have focused on the guard cell plasma membrane. Cuard cells, however, are a multi-compartment system that includes a prominent vacuole,

Cabriela Amodeo; Ariel Escobar; Eduardo Zeiger

433

1. AERIAL VIEW TO WEST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. AERIAL VIEW TO WEST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING ALL MAJOR BUILDINGS. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard, February 1962. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

434

2. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING ALL MAJOR BUILDINGS. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard, February 1962. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

435

4. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTHEAST OF ENTIRE COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard Official Photograph, 12th District, File No. 62751-22 A.S. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

436

41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Machine guarding. 50-204.5 Section 50-204...Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect...

2012-07-01

437

41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Machine guarding. 50-204.5 Section 50-204...Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect...

2013-07-01

438

41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Machine guarding. 50-204.5 Section 50-204...Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect...

2014-07-01

439

41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Machine guarding. 50-204.5 Section 50-204...Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect...

2011-07-01

440

41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Machine guarding. 50-204.5 Section 50-204...Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect...

2010-07-01

441

50. Elevation view underway, showing "new" coast guard paint scheme ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

50. Elevation view underway, showing "new" coast guard paint scheme and A-frame crane. Note crews quarters expanded over turtle deck at stern. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE SUMAC, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

442

Effects of wrist guard and arrest strategies on impact force  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wrist guards are one of the protective devices widely used for preventing from a distal radius fracture during in-line skating and snowboard-related activities. However, more than half of the people wearing wrist guards sustained a fracture of the wrist on forward falls. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the three factors, materials of wrist guard, fall heights and

S. Z. Lou; H. C. Chen; C. L. Lee; H. C. Wu; J. Y. You

443

16 CFR 1512.9 - Requirements for protective guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...The minimum width of the top area of the chain guard shall be twice the width of the chain in that portion forward of the rear wheel rim. The rear part of the top area may be tapered. The minimum width at the rear of the guard shall be one-half the chain width. Such chain guard shall...

2013-01-01

444

16 CFR 1512.9 - Requirements for protective guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...The minimum width of the top area of the chain guard shall be twice the width of the chain in that portion forward of the rear wheel rim. The rear part of the top area may be tapered. The minimum width at the rear of the guard shall be one-half the chain width. Such chain guard shall...

2012-01-01

445

16 CFR 1512.9 - Requirements for protective guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...The minimum width of the top area of the chain guard shall be twice the width of the chain in that portion forward of the rear wheel rim. The rear part of the top area may be tapered. The minimum width at the rear of the guard shall be one-half the chain width. Such chain guard shall...

2010-01-01

446

16 CFR 1512.9 - Requirements for protective guards.  

...The minimum width of the top area of the chain guard shall be twice the width of the chain in that portion forward of the rear wheel rim. The rear part of the top area may be tapered. The minimum width at the rear of the guard shall be one-half the chain width. Such chain guard shall...

2014-01-01

447

16 CFR 1512.9 - Requirements for protective guards.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...The minimum width of the top area of the chain guard shall be twice the width of the chain in that portion forward of the rear wheel rim. The rear part of the top area may be tapered. The minimum width at the rear of the guard shall be one-half the chain width. Such chain guard shall...

2011-01-01

448

46 CFR 167.40-30 - Guards and rails.  

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guards and rails. 167.40-30 Section 167.40-30...Requirements § 167.40-30 Guards and rails. On nautical school ships all exposed...properly protected with covers, guards, or rails, in order that the danger of...

2014-10-01

449

46 CFR 167.40-30 - Guards and rails.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guards and rails. 167.40-30 Section 167.40-30...Requirements § 167.40-30 Guards and rails. On nautical school ships all exposed...properly protected with covers, guards, or rails, in order that the danger of...

2010-10-01

450

USGS with U.S. and Canadian Coast Guard  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Waiting to board the Canadian helicopter from U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy and visit Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St. Laurent. From left to right: USGS scientist Jonathan Childs, chief scientist for this expedition on Healy; U.S. Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Douglas Petrusa; Canadian Coas...

451

33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33...Provisions § 64.33 Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander...owner. Markings established by the Coast Guard do not relieve the owner's...

2011-07-01

452

33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33...Provisions § 64.33 Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander...owner. Markings established by the Coast Guard do not relieve the owner's...

2012-07-01

453

33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Eleventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-35 ...and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description...b) Line of Demarcation. The line of demarcation...

2010-07-01

454

33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation...BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other Offices § 52.42 Views of...

2012-07-01

455

Guarded execution and branch prediction in dynamic ILP processors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluate the effects of guarded (or conditional, or predicated) execution on the performance of an instruction level parallel processor employing dynamic branch prediction. First, we assess the utility of guarded execution, both qualitatively and quantitatively, using a variety of application programs. Our assessment shows that guarded execution significantly increases the opportunities, for both compiler and dynamic hardware, to extract

Dionisios N. Pnevmatikatos; Gurindar S. Sohi

1994-01-01

456

Guarded Execution and Branch Prediction in Dynamic ILP Processors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluate the effects of guarded (or conditional, or predicated) execution on the performance of an instruc- tion level parallel processor employing dynamic branch prediction. First, we assess the utility of guarded execu- tion, both qualitatively and quantitatively, using a variety of application programs. Our assessment shows that guarded execution significantly increases the opportuni- ties, for both compiler and dynamic

Dionisios N. Pnevmatikatos; Gurindar S. Sohi

457

A Superposition Decision Procedure for the Guarded Fragment with  

E-print Network

A Superposition Decision Procedure for the Guarded Fragment with Equality Authors: Harald Ganzinger or binary predicates are used GF imposes all the quantifiers to be guarded by atomic formulae. #12;Reference: "Guarded Fragments of First Order logic: Perspective for new Description logic" by Erich Gradel. "The

Hillenbrand, Thomas

458

Collector/collector guard ring balancing circuit eliminates edge effects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Circuit in which an emitter is maintained opposite a concentric collector and guard structure is achieved by matching the temperature and potential of the guard with that of the collector over the operating range. This control system is capable of handling up to 100 amperes in the guard circuit and 200 amperes in the collectors circuit.

Lieb, D. P.

1966-01-01

459

33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.  

...2014-07-01 false Eleventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-35 ...and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description...b) Line of Demarcation. The line of demarcation...

2014-07-01

460

33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation...BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other Offices § 52.42 Views of...

2011-07-01

461

33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Eleventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-35 ...and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description...b) Line of Demarcation. The line of demarcation...

2011-07-01

462

33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Eleventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-35 ...and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description...b) Line of Demarcation. The line of demarcation...

2012-07-01

463

33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33...Provisions § 64.33 Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander...owner. Markings established by the Coast Guard do not relieve the owner's...

2010-07-01

464

33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33...Provisions § 64.33 Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander...owner. Markings established by the Coast Guard do not relieve the owner's...

2013-07-01

465

33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.  

...2014-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33...Provisions § 64.33 Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander...owner. Markings established by the Coast Guard do not relieve the owner's...

2014-07-01

466

Highly Acyclic Groups, Hypergraph Covers and the Guarded Fragment  

E-print Network

Highly Acyclic Groups, Hypergraph Covers and the Guarded Fragment MARTIN OTTO Department configurations. We present two applications to the finite model theory of the guarded fragment: a strengthening of the known finite model property for GF and the characterisation of GF as the guarded bisimulation invariant

Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

467

A Tableau Algorithm for the Clique Guarded Fragment Extended Abstract  

E-print Network

A Tableau Algorithm for the Clique Guarded Fragment Extended Abstract Colin Hirsch Mathematische Science RWTH Aachen tobies@cs.rwth-aachen.de 1 Introduction The Guarded Fragment of #12;rst-order logic of bisimulation, and other nice model theoretic properties [1, 4]. The Guarded Fragment (GF) is obtained from full

Baader, Franz

468

The Freedoms of (Guarded) Bisimulation Erich Gradel and Martin Otto  

E-print Network

The Freedoms of (Guarded) Bisimulation Erich Gr¨adel and Martin Otto Abstract We survey different and more powerful variants of guarded logics. An appropriate notion of bisimulation for a logic allows us-theoretic properties of modal and guarded logics, such as the tree model property of modal logics and the fact

Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

469

33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation...BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other Offices § 52.42 Views of...

2010-07-01

470

33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation...BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other Offices § 52.42 Views of...

2013-07-01

471

33 CFR 52.42 - Views of the Coast Guard.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Views of the Coast Guard. 52.42 Section 52.42 Navigation...BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Submissions by the Coast Guard and Other Offices § 52.42 Views of...

2014-07-01

472

Coast Guard's Response to Spilled Oil  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Coast Guard utilizes a number of monitoring detectors, sensors, and techniques to find, recover and identify oil spills. Discussed in this article are in-situ and airborne sensors, systems developed to provide clean-up capability such as air deployable anti-pollution transfer system (ADAPTS), and techniques which will determine the source of a…

Ard, R. W., Jr.

1976-01-01

473

The Mechanism of Guard Cell Movement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Leaves of higher terrestrial plants have small pores--stomata--responsible for gas exchange. The opening of each stoma results from the osmotic uptake of water by two specialised cells--the guard cells. Because of the involvement in this mechanism of ATPase-proton pumps and active transport of ions across membranes, we have designed an Exploring…

Marques, M.; Arrabaca, J.; Chagas, I.

2005-01-01

474

Schools Wrestle with Issue of Armed Guards  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the March 21, 2005, shootings at Red Lake High School that brought to light an issue of whether school security personnel should be armed. Among the what-ifs being asked after the shootings at Red Lake High is one with uncomfortable implications for many school leaders: What if the two security guards posted near the…

Trotter, Andrew

2005-01-01

475

Comparison of Evidence-Based Practice between Physicians and Nurses: A National Survey of Regional Hospitals in Taiwan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Although evidence-based practice (EBP) has been widely investigated, few studies compare physicians and nurses on performance. Methods: A structured questionnaire survey was used to investigate EBP among physicians and nurses in 61 regional hospitals of Taiwan. Valid postal questionnaires were collected from 605 physicians and 551…

Chiu, Ya-Wen; Weng, Yi-Hao; Lo, Heng-Lien; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Shih, Ya-Hui; Kuo, Ken N.

2010-01-01

476

Quality of human-computer interaction - results of a national usability survey of hospital-IT in Germany  

PubMed Central

Background Due to the increasing functionality of medical information systems, it is hard to imagine day to day work in hospitals without IT support. Therefore, the design of dialogues between humans and information systems is one of the most important issues to be addressed in health care. This survey presents an analysis of the current quality level of human-computer interaction of healthcare-IT in German hospitals, focused on the users' point of view. Methods To evaluate the usability of clinical-IT according to the design principles of EN ISO 9241-10 the IsoMetrics Inventory, an assessment tool, was used. The focus of this paper has been put on suitability for task, training effort and conformity with user expectations, differentiated by information systems. Effectiveness has been evaluated with the focus on interoperability and functionality of different IT systems. Results 4521 persons from 371 hospitals visited the start page of the study, while 1003 persons from 158 hospitals completed the questionnaire. The results show relevant variations between different information systems. Conclusions Specialised information systems with defined functionality received better assessments than clinical information systems in general. This could be attributed to the improved customisation of these specialised systems for specific working environments. The results can be used as reference data for evaluation and benchmarking of human computer engineering in clinical health IT context for future studies. PMID:22070880

2011-01-01

477

Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance Version 1.0 08-Sep-2009 BC Singer et al., Lawrence Berkeley National Lab  

E-print Network

was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed (LBNL) Susan Strom, Walter Vernon: Mazzetti Nash Lipsey Burch (San Francisco, CA) Abstract This document describes an energy benchmarking framework for hospitals. The document is organized as follows

478

National Surveillance of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Belgian Hospitals Indicates Rapid Diversification of Epidemic Clones  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Belgium, the proportion of methicillin-resistant strains isolated from patients with Staphylococcus aureus bactere- mia has risen from 23% in 1999 to 28% in 2002 (6). Since 1995, the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) reference laboratory has organized epidemiological surveillance to monitor the evolution of genotypes and of antimicrobial resistance profiles of MRSA strains isolated from hospital- ized patients in Belgium

Olivier Denis; Ariane Deplano; Claire Nonhoff; Raf De Ryck; Ricardo de Mendonca; Sylvianne Rottiers; Raymond Vanhoof; Marc J. Struelens

2004-01-01

479

National Surveillance of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Belgian Hospitals Indicates Rapid Diversification of Epidemic Clones  

PubMed Central

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains (n = 455) collected in 2001 from 100 Belgian hospitals were characterized by molecular typing and by resistance gene distribution to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramins and to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Rapid diversification of MRSA clones, compared with results of previous surveys, was evidenced by the broad geographic distribution of seven major clones belonging to the pandemic MRSA clonal complexes 5, 8, 22, 30, and 45 by multilocus sequence typing. PMID:15328144

Denis, Olivier; Deplano, Ariane; Nonhoff, Claire; De Ryck, Raf; de Mendonça, Ricardo; Rottiers, Sylvianne; Vanhoof, Raymond; Struelens, Marc J.

2004-01-01

480

Prevalence of erectile dysfunction and associated factors among diabetic men attending diabetic clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Introduction There has been an increase in the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in the general population especially among Diabetic patients. This seems to be neglected problem in low-income countries. This study aims at establishing the prevalence of ED and associated risk factors in diabetic patients attended at Diabetic Clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital. Methods A cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted among 312 diabetic patients attending diabetic clinic at Muhimbili National Hospital between May and December 2011. Results More than half (55.1%) of the patients were found to have some form of ED (12.8% had mild dysfunction, 11.5% moderate and 27.9% severe dysfunction). The severity of ED was correlated with increased age. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that ED was significantly predicted by old age (odds ratio (OR) = 7.1, 95% CI 1.2-40.7), evidence of peripheral neuropathy (OR) =5.9, 95% CI 1.6-21.3), and evidence of peripheral vascular disease (OR =2.5, 95% CI 1.2-5.3). Also longer duration of DM was marginally associated with ED (p=0.056). Patients with ED were also more likely to suffer other sexual domains (p<0.001). No lifestyle factor was associated with ED. Conclusion The prevalence of ED is high among DM patients. Interventions aimed at prevention, early diagnosis and detection of DM and its complications, and adherence to treatment to prevent complications should be implemented. Further studies should emphasize on temporal variation to show true causality of DM on erectile dysfunction. PMID:25170371

Mutagaywa, Reuben Kato; Lutale, Janeth; Aboud, Muhsin; Kamala, Benjamin Anathory

2014-01-01

481

American Hospital Directory  

MedlinePLUS

... Sources | Updates | Order Information | Login Quick Search: Quick Search Enter keywords to look up a hospital. Just ... or National Provider Identifier (NPI). Advanced Search: Advanced Search Click the Search button and you will be ...

482

Checking Java Programs via Guarded Commands  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper defines a simple guarded-command--like language and its semantics.The language is used as an intermediate language in generating verification conditionsfor Java. The paper discusses why it is a good idea to generate verificationconditions via an intermediate language, rather than directly.Publication history. This paper appears in Formal Techniques for Java Programs,workshop proceedings. Bart Jacobs, Gary T. Leavens, Peter Muller, and

K. Rustan M. Leino; James B. Saxe; Raymie Stata

1999-01-01

483

On the Restraining Power of Guards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guarded fragments of first-order logic were recently introduced by Andr'eka, vanBenthem and N'emeti; they consist of relational first-order formulae whose quantifiersare appropriately relativized by atoms. These fragments are interesting because theyextend in a natural way many propositional modal logics, because they have usefulmodel-theoretic properties and especially because they are decidable classes that avoidthe usual syntactic restrictions (on the arity of

Erich Gradel; Rwth Aachen

1999-01-01

484

Probabilistic Models for the Guarded Command Language  

Microsoft Academic Search

The two models presented in this paper provide two different semantics for an extensionof Dijkstra's language of guarded commands. The extended language has an additional operator,namely probabilistic choice, which makes it possible to express randomised algorithms.An earlier model by Claire Jones included probabilistic choice but not non-determinism,which meant that it could not be used for the development of algorithms from

He Jifeng; A. Mciver

1995-01-01

485

Speed-Selector Guard For Machine Tool  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple guardplate prevents accidental reversal of direction of rotation or sudden change of speed of lathe, milling machine, or other machine tool. Custom-made for specific machine and control settings. Allows control lever to be placed at only one setting. Operator uses handle to slide guard to engage or disengage control lever. Protects personnel from injury and equipment from damage occurring if speed- or direction-control lever inadvertently placed in wrong position.

Shakhshir, Roda J.; Valentine, Richard L.

1992-01-01

486

On The Restraining Power of Guards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guarded fragments of first-order logic were recently introduced by Andreka, van Benthem and Nemeti; they consist of relational first-order formulae whose quantifiers are appropriately relativized by atoms. These fragments are interesting because they extend in a natural way many propositional modal logics, because they have useful model-theoretic properties and especially because they are decidable classes that avoid the usual syntactic

Erich Grädel

1999-01-01

487

Effect of a national primary care pay for performance scheme on emergency hospital admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: controlled longitudinal study  

PubMed Central

Objective To estimate the impact of a national primary care pay for performance scheme, the Quality and Outcomes Framework in England, on emergency hospital admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs). Design Controlled longitudinal study. Setting English National Health Service between 1998/99 and 2010/11. Participants Populations registered with each of 6975 family practices in England. Main outcome measures Year specific differences between trend adjusted emergency hospital admission rates for incentivised ACSCs before and after the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework scheme and two comparators: non-incentivised ACSCs and non-ACSCs. Results Incentivised ACSC admissions showed a relative reduction of 2.7% (95% confidence interval 1.6% to 3.8%) in the first year of the Quality and Outcomes Framework compared with ACSCs that were not incentivised. This increased to a relative reduction of 8.0% (6.9% to 9.1%) in 2010/11. Compared with conditions that are not regarded as being influenced by the quality of ambulatory care (non-ACSCs), incentivised ACSCs also showed a relative reduction in rates of emergency admissions of 2.8% (2.0% to 3.6%) in the first year increasing to 10.9% (10.1% to 11.7%) by 2010/11. Conclusions The introduction of a major national pay for performance scheme for primary care in England was associated with a decrease in emergency admissions for incentivised conditions compared with conditions that were not incentivised. Contemporaneous health service changes seem unlikely to have caused the sharp change in the trajectory of incentivised ACSC admissions immediately after the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework. The decrease seems larger than would be expected from the changes in the process measures that were incentivised, suggesting that the pay for performance scheme may have had impacts on quality of care beyond the directly incentivised activities. PMID:25389120

Harrison, Mark J; Dusheiko, Mark; Sutton, Matt; Gravelle, Hugh; Doran, Tim

2014-01-01

488

Description of local adaptation of national guidelines and of active feedback for rationalising preoperative screening in patients at low risk from anaesthetics in a French university hospital  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To describe the effect of local adaptation of national guidelines combined with active feedback and organisational analysis on the ordering of preoperative investigations for patients at low risk from anaesthetics. DESIGN: Assessment of preoperative tests ordered over one month, before and after local adaptation of guidelines and feedback of results, combined with an organisational analysis. SETTING: Motivated anaesthetists in 15 surgical wards of Bordeaux University Hospital, Region Aquitain, France. SUBJECTS: 42 anaesthetists, 60 surgeons, and their teams. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number and type of preoperative tests ordered in June 1993 and 1994, and the estimated savings. RESULTS: Of 536 patients at low risk from anaesthetics studied in 1993 before the intervention 80% had at least one preoperative test. Most (70%) tests were ordered by anaesthetists. Twice the number of preoperative tests were ordered than recommended by national guidelines. Organisational analysis indicated lack of organised consultations and communication within teams. Changes implemented included scheduling of anaesthetic consultations; regular formal multidisciplinary meetings for all staff; preoperative ordering decision charts. Of 516 low risk patients studied in 1994 after the intervention only 48% had one or more preoperative tests ordered (p < 0.05). Estimated mean (SD) saving for one year if changes were applied to all patients at low risk from anaesthesia in the hospital 3.04 (1.23) mFF. CONCLUSIONS: A sharp decrease in tests ordered in low risk patients was found. The likely cause was the package of changes that included local adaptation of national guidelines, feedback, and organisational change. PMID:10178152

Capdenat Saint-Martin, S; Michel, P.; Raymond, J. M.; Iskandar, H.; Chevalier, C.; Petitpierre, M. N.; Daubech, L.; Amouretti, M.; Maurette, P.

1998-01-01

489

National Multicenter Study of Predictors and Outcomes of Bacteremia upon Hospital Admission Caused by Enterobacteriaceae Producing Extended-Spectrum ?-Lactamases ?  

PubMed Central

Extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae are pathogens that may lead to a spectrum of clinical syndromes. We aimed to identify predictors and outcomes of ESBL bacteremia upon hospital admission (UHA) in a nationwide prospective study. Thus, a multicenter prospective study was conducted in 10 Israeli hospitals. Adult patients with bacteremia due to Enterobacteriaceae diagnosed within 72 h of hospitalization were included. Patients with ESBL producers (cases) were compared to those with non-ESBL producers (controls), and a 1:1 ratio was attempted in each center. A case-control study to identify predictors and a cohort study to identify outcomes were conducted. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used for analyses. Overall, 447 patients with bacteremia due to Enterobacteriaceae were recruited: 205 cases and 242 controls. Independent predictors of ESBL were increased age, multiple comorbid conditions, poor functional status, recent contact with health care settings, invasive procedures, and prior receipt of antimicrobial therapy. In addition, patients presenting with septic shock and/or multiorgan failure were more likely to have ESBL infections. Patients with ESBL producers suffered more frequently from a delay in appropriate antimicrobial therapy (odds ratio [OR], 4.7; P, <0.001) and had a higher mortality rate (OR, 3.5; P, <0.001). After controlling for confounding variables, both ESBL production (OR, 2.3; P, 9.1) and a delay in adequate therapy (OR, 0.05; P, 0.001) were significant predictors for mortality and other adverse outcomes. We conclude that among patients with bacteremia due to Enterobacteriaceae UHA, those with ESBL producers tend to be older and chronically ill and to have a delay in effective therapy and severe adverse outcomes. Efforts should be directed to improving the detection of patients with ESBL bacteremia UHA and to providing immediate appropriate therapy. PMID:20837757

Marchaim, Dror; Gottesman, Tamar; Schwartz, Orna; Korem, Maya; Maor, Yasmin; Rahav, Galia; Karplus, Rebekah; Lazarovitch, Tsipora; Braun, Eyal; Sprecher, Hana; Lachish, Tamar; Wiener-Well, Yonit; Alon, Danny; Chowers, Michal; Ciobotaro, Pnina; Bardenstein, Rita; Paz, Alona; Potasman, Israel; Giladi, Michael; Schechner, Vered; Schwaber, Mitchell J.; Klarfeld-Lidji, Shiri; Carmeli, Yehuda

2010-01-01

490

The interface between the national tuberculosis control programme and district hospitals in Cameroon: missed opportunities for strengthening the local health system –a multiple case study  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. District hospitals (DHs) play a central role in district-based health systems, and their relation with vertical programmes is very important. Studies on the impact of vertical programmes on DHs are rare. This study aims to fill this gap. Its purpose is to analyse the interaction between the National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTCP) and DHs in Cameroon, especially its effects on the human resources, routine health information system (HIS) and technical capacity at the hospital level. Methods We used a multiple case study methodology. From the Adamaoua Region, we selected two DHs, one public and one faith-based. We collected qualitative and quantitative data through document reviews, semi-structured interviews with district and regional staff, and observations in the two DHs. Results The NTCP trained and supervised staff, designed and provided tuberculosis data collection and reporting tools, and provided anti-tuberculosis drugs, reagents and microscopes to DHs. However, these interventions were limited to the hospital units designated as Tuberculosis Diagnostic and Treatment Centres and to staff dedicated to tuberculosis control activities. The NTCP installed a parallel HIS that bypassed the District Health Services. The DH that performs well in terms of general hospital care and that is well managed was successful in tuberculosis control. Based on the available resources, the two hospitals adapt the organisation of tuberculosis control to their settings. The management teams in charge of the District Health Services are not involved in tuberculosis control. In our study, we identified several opportunities to strengthen the local health system that have been missed by the NTCP and the health system managers. Conclusion Well-managed DHs perform better in terms of tuberculosis control than DHs that are not well managed. The analysis of the effects of the NTCP on the human resources, HIS and technical capacity of DHs indicates that the NTCP supports, rather than strengthens, the local health system. Moreover, there is potential for this support to be enhanced. Positive synergies between the NTCP and district health systems can be achieved if opportunities to strengthen the district health system are seized. The question remains, however, of why managers do not take advantage of the opportunities to strengthen the health system. PMID:23521866

2013-01-01

491

Emerging Infectious Diseases in Free-Ranging Wildlife–Australian Zoo Based Wildlife Hospitals Contribute to National Surveillance  

PubMed Central

Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly originating from wildlife. Many of these diseases have significant impacts on human health, domestic animal health, and biodiversity. Surveillance is the key to early detection of emerging diseases. A zoo based wildlife disease surveillance program developed in Australia incorporates disease information from free-ranging wildlife into the existing national wildlife health information system. This program uses a collaborative approach and provides a strong model for a disease surveillance program for free-ranging wildlife that enhances the national capacity for early detection of emerging diseases. PMID:24787430

Cox-Witton, Keren; Reiss, Andrea; Woods, Rupert; Grillo, Victoria; Baker, Rupert T.; Blyde, David J.; Boardman, Wayne; Cutter, Stephen; Lacasse, Claude; McCracken, Helen; Pyne, Michael; Smith, Ian; Vitali, Simone; Vogelnest, Larry; Wedd, Dion; Phillips, Martin; Bunn, Chris; Post, Lyndel

2014-01-01

492

Exploring ARAC Support of U.S. Coast Guard Planning and Response Capability  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Coast Guard is responsible for the protection of the marine environment from spills of oil and hazardous material. The USCG responsibilities include responding to oil and chemical spills from ships as well as from sources ashore. While responding to a spill, The USCG Marine Safety Offices and Detachments, and the National Strike Force (NSF) depend on interagency support from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and state and local agencies. Currently, the USCG depends on NOAA Scientific Support Coordinators for predicting and assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous material. NOAA has several computer models that the Coast Guard can access in the event of a chemical release into the atmosphere or an in situ oil burn. However, the Department of Energy operates a more powerful modeling system called the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC). Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, ARAC offers a complex multiscale model in a system that is simple for the end user to operate. The applicability of ARAC to Coast Guard operations is the subject of this study.

Baker, M.S.; Baskett, R.; Ellis, J. S.

2001-07-01

493

National Trends over One Decade in Hospitalization for Acute Myocardial Infarction among Spanish Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Cumulative Incidence, Outcomes and Use of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention  

PubMed Central

Background This study aims to describe trends in the rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and use of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in patients with and without type 2 diabetes in Spain, 2001–2010. Methods We selected all patients with a discharge of AMI using national hospital discharge data. Discharges were grouped by diabetes status: type 2 diabetes and no diabetes. In both groups PCIs were identified. The cumulative incidence of discharges attributed to AMI were calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status and year. We calculated length of stay and in-hospital mortality (IHM). Use of PCI was calculated stratified by diabetes status. Multivariate analysis was adjusted by age, sex, year and comorbidity. Results: From 2001 to 2010, 513,517 discharges with AMI were identified (30.3% with type 2 diabetes). The cumulative incidence of discharges due to AMI in diabetics patients increased (56.3 in 2001 to 71 cases per 100,000 in 2004), then decreased to 61.9 in 2010. Diabetic patients had significantly higher IHM (OR, 1.14; 95%CI, 1.05–1.17). The proportion of diabetic patients that underwent PCI increased from 11.9% in 2001 to 41.6% in 2010. Adjusted incidence of discharge in patients with diabetes who underwent PCI increased significantly (IRR, 3.49; 95%CI, 3.30–3.69). The IHM among diabetics patients who underwent a PCI did not change significantly over time. Conclusions AMI hospitalization rates increased initially but declining slowly. From 2001 to 2010 the proportion of diabetic patients who undergo a PCI increased almost four-fold. Older age and more comorbidity may explain why IHM did not improve after a PCI. PMID:24454920

Lopez-de-Andres, Ana; Jimenez-Garcia, Rodrigo; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentin; Jimenez-Trujillo, Isabel; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; de Miguel, Angel Gil; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

2014-01-01

494

Scrub typhus in the northern provinces of Vietnam: an observational study of admissions to a national referral hospital  

PubMed Central

Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of fever in parts of South East and Southern Asia. Little is known about the disease burden in Vietnam. Methods A 2-year observational study of scrub typhus at a tertiary referral hospital in northern Vietnam was carried out. Diagnosis was based on a single serological test in patients with suggestive clinical symptoms. Results Scrub typhus was diagnosed in 3.5% (251/7226) of admissions. Cases occurred throughout the year, with incidence highest in the summer. Although complications were common, mortality was low (1.2%; 3/251). Conclusions These data suggest that scrub typhus is common, with a seasonal distribution in northern Vietnam. PMID:25253616

Nadjm, Behzad; Thuy, Pham T.; Trang, Van D.; Dang Ha, Le; Kinh, Nguyen V.; Wertheim, Heiman F.

2014-01-01

495

Credit BG. View looking north northeast at Guard House and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Credit BG. View looking north northeast at Guard House and entrance to Building 4505 complex. This Guard House was built in 1993 as a portable unit; it replaced an older structure. The Building 4505 complex is surrounded by a security fence. Building 4496 appears to immediate right of view - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Guard House, Northeast of A Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

496

Ion channels in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Despite the availability of many mutants for signal transduction, Arabidopsis thaliana guard cells have so far not been used in electrophysiological research. Problems with the isolation of epidermal strips and\\u000a the small size of A. thaliana guard cells were often prohibiting. In the present study these difficulties were overcome and guard cells were impaled with\\u000a double-barreled microelectrodes. Membrane-potential recordings

M. Rob G. Roelfsema; Hidde B. A. Prins

1997-01-01

497

Self-Aligned Guard Rings For Schottky-Barrier Diodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed self-aligned guard ring increases active area of Schottky-barrier infrared detector. Concept developed for silicide Schottky-barrier diodes in which platinum silicide or iridium silicide Schottky-contacts provide cutoff wavelengths of about 6 or 10 micrometers. Grid of silicon dioxide doped with phosphorus etched on silicon wafer, and phosphorus from grid diffused into substrate, creating n-type guard rings. Silicide layers formed in open areas of grid. Overlap of guard rings and silicide layers small.

Lin, True-Lon

1990-01-01

498

GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GUARD HOUSE AND SOUTH FIRE HOUSE, VICINITY MAP. (Shows the Guard House and Barracks, and South Fire House in relation to nearby roads, railroad tracks, and the piers). Navy Yard, Mare Island, California. P.W. Drawing No. C-1899, approved 1941; file no. 930-C-1. Scale one inch to forty feet. 72 cn x 97 cm. Ink on vellum - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

499

33 CFR 8.1 - Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.1 Section 8...RESERVE § 8.1 Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. (a) The Coast Guard Reserve is a component of the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard Reserve trains...

2010-07-01

500

33 CFR 8.1 - Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.1 Section 8...RESERVE § 8.1 Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. (a) The Coast Guard Reserve is a component of the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard Reserve trains...

2013-07-01