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Sample records for national orthopaedic hospital

  1. Epsom General Hospital orthopaedic theatre.

    PubMed

    1992-11-01

    The Surrey Section of the London Branch held a very successful meeting on Wednesday 9th September 1992 at which Mr Stephen Kirby BSc, CEng, Director of Estates, gave a talk and tour of the new Private Ward Unit and Ultra Clean Ventilation Theatre at Epsom General Hospital. The new Northey Ward, is a result of the refurbishment of what was a 31 bed section of the Hospital Surgical Block on the 5th floor. The new Ward provides a total of 18 single bed Wards, each complete with bathroom/WC, the Unit also accommodates a 5 bed Day Ward. All the facilities provided are of extremely high standard, which given the very tight building programme, detailed elsewhere, is indicative of the dedication of both the Designers and Contractors who are congratulated on their achievement. With regard to the UCV Theatre the following information was prepared by Aidan Hardy who is a Project Engineer with Epsom General Hospital. We are delighted to be able to print this report for our readers. PMID:10122458

  2. Orthopaedic Timing in Polytrauma in a Second Level Emergency Hospital. An Overrated Problem?

    PubMed

    Dei Giudici, L; Giampaolini, N; Panfighi, A; Marinelli, M; Procaccini, R; Gigante, A

    2015-01-01

    The main concern for orthopaedic treatment in polytrauma has always been the same for almost forty years, which also regards "where" and "when" to proceed; correct surgical timing and correct interpretation of the DCO concept are still being debated. In the last few years, several attempts have been made to classify patients based on their clinical presentation and by trying to figure out which vital parameters are able to predict the patient's outcome. This study evaluated all patients who presented with code red at the Emergency Department of our Hospital, a level II trauma center. For every patient, the following characteristics were noted: sex, age, day of hospitalization, orthopaedic trauma, time to surgery, presence of an associated surgical condition in the fields of general surgery, thoracic surgery, neurosurgery and vascular surgery, cardiac frequency, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, Glasgow Coma Scale and laboratory data. All patients included were divided into subgroups based on orthopaedic surgical timing. Two other subgroups were also identified and analyzed in detail: deceased and weekend traumas. A total of 208 patients were included. Our primary goal was to identify a correlation between the mortality and surgical timing of the orthopaedic procedures; our secondary goal was to recognize, if present, a statistically relevant association between historical, clinical and laboratory data, and mortality rate, defining any possible risk factor. A correlation between mortality and orthopaedic surgical timing was not found. Analyzing laboratory data revealed an interesting correlation between mortality and: blood pressure, platelet count, cardiac frequency, hematocrit, hemoglobin and age. PMID:26312113

  3. Does Admission to Medicine or Orthopaedics Impact a Geriatric Hip Patient’s Hospital Length of Stay?

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Sarah E.; VanHouten, Jacob P.; Lakomkin, Nikita; Ehrenfeld, Jesse; Jahangir, Amir Alex; Boyce, Robert H.; Obremksey, William T.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of our study was to determine the association between admitting service, medicine or orthopaedics, and length of stay (LOS) for a geriatric hip fracture patient. Design Retrospective. Setting Urban level 1 trauma center. Patients/Participants Six hundred fourteen geriatric hip fracture patients from 2000 to 2009. Interventions Orthopaedic surgery for geriatric hip fracture. Main Outcome Measurements Patient demographics, medical comorbidities, hospitalization length, and admitting service. Negative binomial regression used to determine association between LOS and admitting service. Results Six hundred fourteen geriatric hip fracture patients were included in the analysis, of whom 49.2% of patients (n = 302) were admitted to the orthopaedic service and 50.8% (3 = 312) to the medicine service. The median LOS for patients admitted to orthopaedics was 4.5 days compared with 7 days for patients admitted to medicine (P < 0.0001). Readmission was also significantly higher for patients admitted to medicine (n = 92, 29.8%) than for those admitted to orthopaedics (n = 70, 23.1%). After controlling for important patient factors, it was determined that medicine patients are expected to stay about 1.5 times (incidence rate ratio: 1.48, P < 0.0001) longer in the hospital than orthopaedic patients. Conclusions This is the largest study to demonstrate that admission to the medicine service compared with the orthopaedic service increases a geriatric hip fractures patient’s expected LOS. Since LOS is a major driver of cost as well as a measure of quality care, it is important to understand the factors that lead to a longer hospital stay to better allocate hospital resources. Based on the results from our institution, orthopaedic surgeons should be aware that admission to medicine might increase a patient’s expected LOS. PMID:26371621

  4. Orthopaedic Surgery Under National Health Reform: An Analysis of Power, Process, Adaptation, and Leadership: AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Charles D; Adair, Daniel; Bozic, Kevin J; Manning, Blaine T; Saleh, Jamal K; Saleh, Khaled J

    2014-07-01

    Morrison argued that demography, economy, and technology drive the evolution of industries from a formative first-generation state ("First Curve") to a radically different way of doing things ("Second Curve") that is marked by new skills, strategies, and partners. The current health-reform movement in the United States reflects these three key evolutionary trends: surging medical needs of an aging population, dramatic expansion of Medicare spending, and care delivery systems optimized through powerful information technology. Successful transition from a formative first-generation state (First Curve) to a radically different way of doing things (Second Curve) will require new skills, strategies, and partners. In a new world that is value-driven, community-centric (versus hospital-centric), and prevention-focused, orthopaedic surgeons and health-care administrators must form new alliances to reduce the cost of care and improve durable outcomes for musculoskeletal problems. The greatest barrier to success in the Second Curve stems not from lack of empirical support for integrated models of care, but rather from resistance by those who would execute them. Porter's five forces of competitive strategy and the behavioral analysis of change provide insights into the predictable forms of resistance that undermine clinical and economic success in the new environment of care. This paper analyzes the components that will differentiate orthopaedic care provision for the Second Curve. It also provides recommendations for future-focused orthopaedic surgery and health-care administrative leaders to consider as they design newly adaptive, mutually reinforcing, and economically viable musculoskeletal care processes that drive the level of orthopaedic care that our nation deserves-at a cost that it can afford. PMID:24990985

  5. The burden of bone, native joint and soft tissue infections on orthopaedic emergency referrals in a city hospital.

    PubMed

    Howell, A; Parker, S; Tsitskaris, K; Oddy, M J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone, native joint and soft tissue infections are frequently referred to orthopaedic units although their volume as a proportion of the total emergency workload has not been reported previously. Geographic and socioeconomic variation may influence their presentation. The aim of this study was to quantify the burden of such infections on the orthopaedic department in an inner city hospital, determine patient demographics and associated risk factors, and review our current utilisation of specialist services. Methods All cases involving bone, native joint and soft tissue infections admitted under or referred to the orthopaedic team throughout 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Prosthetic joint infections were excluded. Results Almost 15% of emergency admissions and referrals were associated with bone, native joint or soft tissue infection or suspected infection. The cohort consisted of 169 patients with a mean age of 43 years (range: 1-91 years). The most common diagnosis was cellulitis/other soft tissue infection and the mean length of stay was 13 days. Two-thirds of patients (n=112, 66%) underwent an operation. Fifteen per cent of patients were carrying at least one blood borne virus, eleven per cent were alcohol dependent, fifteen per cent were using or had been using intravenous drugs and nine per cent were homeless or vulnerably housed. Conclusions This study has shown that a significant number of patients are admitted for orthopaedic care as a result of infection. These patients are relatively young, with multiple complex medical and social co-morbidities, and a long length of stay. PMID:26688397

  6. National Hospital Input Price Index

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Anderson, Gerard; Schendler, Carol Ellen

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 percent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  7. Epidemiology of Orthopaedic Trauma Admissions Over One Year in a District General Hospital in England

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A; Young, A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Admission to district general hospitals in England has undergone change in recent years due to both an aging population and the reconfiguration of the major trauma network throughout the United Kingdom. Methods : We utilised a retrospective cohort study to analyse the epidemiology over a 12-month period at a district general hospital. Data was collected and divided into groups: upper limb, lower limb, vertebral disc disease, vertebral fracture, cellulitis without bone involvement and deep infection including metalwork. Results : 2817 patients were admitted over the 12-month period. There were 893 upper limb fractures, 1511 lower limb fractures, 126 vertebral disc disease, 55 vertebral fractures, 108 cellulitis without bone involvement and 124 deep infections with 19 admissions not specified due to coding. AN average of 242 patients were admitted each month with the majority admitted during the summer months. Conclusion : Although fractures make up the majority of the reason for which a person is admitted, there are also many other injuries/morbidities, which may necessitate admission. There is an increasing incidence of elderly osteoporotic fractures in females, which is balancing out the previously more common fractures seen in younger adults and adolescents. PMID:26069514

  8. Towards a National Pediatric Musculoskeletal Trauma Outcomes Registry: the Pediatric Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Research Group (POTORG) experience.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Michael G; Vitale, Mark A; Lehmann, Charles L; Hyman, Joshua E; Roye, David P; Skaggs, David L; Schmitz, Michael L; Sponseller, Paul D; Flynn, John M

    2006-01-01

    This study is a pilot effort towards the broader implementation of a national pediatric musculoskeletal trauma outcomes registry. The primary goal of this project is to explore the feasibility of a web-based data acquisition and management platform and to identify catalysts and obstacles to multi-center collaboration. A prospective cohort of children presenting to the Pediatric Emergency Departments with ankle, femur, supracondylar humerus, tibial spine, or open fractures at five clinical centers between October 2001 and March 2003 comprised the study population. Patients were enrolled via the treating orthopaedic resident, using a web-based data acquisition and management system. Orthopaedic attendees were sent an automated reminder to complete a follow-up form one week after treatment, and parents of enrolled children were sent child and parent health questionnaires by e-mail and mail in order to capture health-related quality of life and post-traumatic stress symptoms. A total of 299 patients were enrolled in the study with an average age of 7.3 years. Post-treatment follow-up questionnaires were completed by 39% of the attending orthopaedic surgeons, and by 43% of the enrolled patients or patient's parents. Children old enough to complete health questionnaires scored lower in 5 of 12 functional domains including Physical Function, Role/Social Emotional/Behavioral, Parental Impact-Emotional, Family Activities, and Family Cohesion. Within the subset of patients sustaining femur fractures whose parents completed health questionnaires, 9.5% reported significant post-traumatic stress symptoms. This study demonstrates the potential of a multi-center web-based registry to facilitate the collection of a rich array of pediatric trauma, treatment and patient-based outcomes data, although new regulatory issues regarding patient privacy pose challenges to such an approach. PMID:16557126

  9. Orthopaedic surgical treatment delays at a tertiary hospital in sub Saharan Africa: Communication gaps and implications for clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ifesanya, Adeleke O.; Ogundele, Olumuyiwa J.; Ifesanya, Joy U.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Delay in surgical treatment is a source of distress to patients and an important reason for poor outcome. We studied the delay before carrying out scheduled operative orthopaedic procedures and the factors responsible for it. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out between March 2011 and December 2012. Temporal details of the surgical procedures at our hospital were recorded in a proforma including the patients’ perception of the causes of the delay to surgery. Based on the urgency of the need for surgery, patients were classified into three groups using a modification of the method employed by Lankester et al. Data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 17.0. Predictors of surgical delay beyond 3 days were identified by logistic regression analysis. Results: Two hundred and forty-nine patients with a mean age 36.2 ± 19.2 years and M:F ratio 1.3 were recruited. 34.1% were modified Lankester group A, 45.4% group B and 20.5% group C. 47 patients (18.9%) had comorbidities, hypertension being the commonest (22 patients; 8.8%). Median delay to surgery was 4 days (mean = 17.6 days). Fifty percent of emergency room admissions were operated on within 3 days, the figure was 13% for other admissions. Lack of theatre slot was the commonest cause of delay. There was full concordance between doctors and patients in only 70.7% regarding the causes of the delay. In 15.7%, there was complete discordance. Logistic regression analysis confirmed modified Lankester groups B and C (P = 0.003) and weekend admission (P = 0.016) as significant predictors of delay to surgery of >3 days. Conclusion: Promptness to operative surgical care falls short of the ideal. Theatre inefficiency is a major cause of delay in treating surgical patients in our environment. Theatre facilities should be expanded and made more efficient. There is a need for better communication between surgeons and patients about delays in surgical

  10. Stereoscopy in orthopaedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S. L. E.

    2005-03-01

    Stereoscopy was used in medicine as long ago as 1898, but has not gained widespread acceptance except for a peak in the 1930's. It retains a use in orthopaedics in the form of Radiostereogrammetrical Analysis (RSA), though this is now done by computer software without using stereopsis. Combining computer assisted stereoscopic displays with both conventional plain films and reconstructed volumetric axial data, we are reassessing the use of stereoscopy in orthopaedics. Applications include use in developing nations or rural settings, erect patients where axial imaging cannot be used, and complex deformity and trauma reconstruction. Extension into orthopaedic endoscopic systems and teaching aids (e.g. operative videos) are further possibilities. The benefits of stereoscopic vision in increased perceived resolution and depth perception can help orthopaedic surgeons achieve more accurate diagnosis and better pre-operative planning. Limitations to currently available stereoscopic displays which need to be addressed prior to widespread acceptance are: availability of hardware and software, loss of resolution, use of glasses, and image "ghosting". Journal publication, the traditional mode of information dissemination in orthopaedics, is also viewed as a hindrance to the acceptance of stereoscopy - it does not deliver the full impact of stereoscopy and "hands-on" demonstrations are needed.

  11. Orthopaedic Footwear Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Although the need for orthopaedic shoes is increasing, the number of skilled shoemakers has declined. This has led to the development of a CAD/CAM system to design and fabricate, orthopaedic footwear. The NASA-developed RIM database management system is the central repository for CUSTOMLAST's information storage. Several other modules also comprise the system. The project was initiated by Langley Research Center and Research Triangle Institute in cooperation with the Veterans Administration and the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Later development was done by North Carolina State University and the University of Missouri-Columbia. The software is licensed by both universities.

  12. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim is to show radiology as a dynamic subject. Orthopaedic Radiology is divided into two sections with the first part focusing on the principles of diagnostic imaging and interpretation and the second applying this information to practical clinical problems.

  13. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  14. Auditing Orthopaedic Audit

    PubMed Central

    Guryel, E; Acton, K; Patel, S

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Clinical audit plays an important role in the drive to improve the quality of patient care and thus forms a cornerstone of clinical governance. Assurance that the quality of patient care has improved requires completion of the audit cycle. A considerable sum of money and time has been spent establishing audit activity in the UK. Failure to close the loop undermines the effectiveness of the audit process and wastes resources. PATIENTS AND METHODS We analysed the effectiveness of audit in trauma and orthopaedics at a local hospital by comparing audit projects completed over a 6-year period to criteria set out in the NHS National Audit and Governance report. RESULTS Of the 25 audits performed since 1999, half were presented to the relevant parties and only 20% completed the audit cycle. Only two of these were audits against national standards and 28% were not based on any standards at all. Only a third of the audits led by junior doctors resulted in implementation of their action plan compared to 75% implementation for consultant-led and 67% for nurse-led audits. CONCLUSIONS A remarkably large proportion of audits included in this analysis failed to meet accepted criteria for effective audit. Audits completed by junior doctors were found to be the least likely to complete the cycle. This may relate to the lack of continuity in modern medical training and little incentive to complete the cycle. Supervision by permanent medical staff, principally consultants, and involvement of the audit department may play the biggest role in improving implementation of change. PMID:18828963

  15. The American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association 2010 traveling fellowship.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpesh A; Cheng, Ivan; Yao, Jeffrey; Huffman, G Russell

    2011-12-21

    We started this journey excited by the prospects of visiting Japan, a country with a proud and historic past. We ended the fellowship accomplishing those goals, and we left with a great deal of admiration for our orthopaedic colleagues halfway around the world for their excellence in education, clinical care, and research. Their hospitality and attention to the details of our visit were exemplary and a lesson to us as we host visiting fellows in the future. Japan reflects its past, but it also offers a preview into our own nation's future: an aging population, a shrinking workforce, a stagnant economy, nationalized health care, and a mushrooming national debt. Of all of these factors, it is the aging population that we, as orthopaedic surgeons, will be most acutely aware of and involved with. The degenerative disorders that affect elderly patients dominate the landscape of surgical care in Japan. Osteoporosis and osteopenia permeate many aspects of care across orthopaedic subspecialties. The surgeons in Japan are developing innovative and cost-effective means of treating the large volume of older patients within the fiscal constraints of a nationalized health-care system. We learned, and will continue to learn more, from Japan about the management of this growing patient population with its unique pathologies and challenges. With the recent natural disaster and ongoing safety concerns in Japan, the character and will of the people of Japan have been on display. Their courage and resolve combined with order and compassion are a testament to the nation's cultural identity. The seeds of the Traveling Fellowship were planted shortly after Japan's last wide-scale reconstruction, and the ties that have bound the JOA and the AOA together are strengthened through this trying time. We strongly urge our colleagues in the U.S. to help support the people, the physicians, and the health-care system of Japan through its most recent tribulations and offer them the same care and

  16. The Malaysian Orthopaedic Association humanitarian mission to Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, I; Saw, A; Hyzan, Y; Sivananthan, K S

    2005-07-01

    The tsunami which occurred off the west coast of North Sumatra on December 26, 2004 devastated the coastal areas of North Sumatra, South-West Thailand, South-East India and Sri Lanka killing more than a quarter of a million people. The destruction was enormous with many coastal villages destroyed. The other countries affected were Malaysia, Myanmar, Maldives, Bangladesh, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania and the Seychelles. In January 2005, volunteers went in weekly rotation to Banda Aceh in collaboration with Global Peace Mission. These were Dr Hyzan Yusof, Dr Suryasmi Duski, Dr Sharaf Ibrahim, Dr Saw Aik, Dr Kamariah Nor and Dr Nor Azlin. In Banda Aceh, the surgical procedures that we could do were limited to external fixation of open fractures and debriding infected wounds at the Indonesian Red Crescent field hospital. In February, a team comprising Dato Dr K S Sivananthan, Dr T Kumar and Dr S Vasan spent a week in Sri Lanka. In Sri Lanka, Dato Sivananthan and his team were able to perform elective orthopaedic operations in Dr Poonambalam Memorial Hospital. We appealed for national and international aid and received support from local hospitals and the orthopaedic industry. International aid bound for Banda Aceh arrived in Kuala Lumpur from the Philippine Orthopaedic Association, the Chiba Children's Hospital in Japan and the Chinese Orthopaedic Association. The COA donated 1.5 tons of orthopaedic equipments. A special handing over ceremony from the COA to the Indonesian Orthopaedic Association was held in Putrajaya in March. Malaysia Airlines flew in the donated equipment to Kuala Lumpur while the onward flight to Aceh was provided by the Royal Malaysian Air Force. In April, Dr Saw Aik and Dr Yong Su Mei joined the Tsu-Chi International Medical Association for volunteer services on Batam Island, Indonesia. The MOA acknowledges the many individuals and organizations, both governmental and non-governmental, for their contributions in the humanitarian efforts. PMID

  17. Why veteran orthopaedic trauma surgeons are being fired and what we can do about it?

    PubMed

    Hill, Austin; Althausen, Peter L; O'Mara, Timothy J; Bray, Timothy J

    2013-06-01

    The financial realities of providing trauma care to injured patients can make it difficult to produce an accurate assessment of the cumulative value orthopaedic trauma surgeons provide to healthcare and university institutions. As with many political battles in the field of medicine, physicians who have been diligently focused on providing patient care were completely unaware of the impending upheaval around them. Whether orthopaedic trauma surgeons are employed or in some type of partnership with hospitals, too often surgeons find the relationship one-sided. In order to effectively negotiate with hospitals, surgeons must demonstrate the comprehensive value they provide to their respective healthcare institutions and universities. Orthopaedic trauma surgeons make direct and indirect financial contributions to the hospital in addition to educational and community services. The sum total of these valued contributions helps fund non-revenue generating programs, provides marketing opportunities, and improves the regional and national reputation of the healthcare institution. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the value contributed to healthcare institutions by orthopaedic trauma surgeons and will serve as a blueprint for all surgeons to accurately account for and demonstrate their value to hospitals while providing efficient and compassionate care to our patients. PMID:23571292

  18. Orthopaedic Surgeons as Clinical Leaders in the National Health Service, United Kingdom (NHS UK): Can the World Learn From Us?

    PubMed

    Javed, Mustafa; Moulder, Elizabeth; Mohsen, Amr

    2015-07-01

    This article outlines some of the key concepts in leadership (both styles and theories) to provide a platform for further learning and to help the modern day orthopaedic surgeons to apply these concepts to their current practice. It is focused on two major aspects: management of medical organizations and effective twenty-first century care by surgeons through proper leadership guide and aimed in improving patient care outcomes. Practicing proper leadership skills based on evidence resulted in effective management of organization. Thus achieving patient's satisfaction. PMID:26208560

  19. Paralytic ileus in the orthopaedic patient.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Ritterman, Scott A; Rubin, Lee E

    2015-06-01

    Paralytic ileus is marked by the cessation of bowel motility. This condition is a major clinical concern that may lead to severe patient morbidity in orthopaedic surgery and trauma patients. Ileus most commonly occurs following spinal surgery, traumatic injury, or lower extremity joint reconstruction, but it may also occur following minor orthopaedic procedures. Possible consequences of ileus include abdominal pain, malnutrition, prolonged hospital stay, hospital readmission, bowel perforation, and death. Therapies used in the treatment of ileus include minimization of opioids, early patient mobilization, pharmacologic intervention, and multidisciplinary care. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the clinical signs and symptoms of paralytic ileus and should understand treatment principles of this relatively common adverse event. PMID:25917235

  20. Developing Orthopaedic Trauma Capacity in Uganda: Considerations From the Uganda Sustainable Trauma Orthopaedic Program.

    PubMed

    OʼHara, Nathan N; OʼBrien, Peter J; Blachut, Piotr A

    2015-10-01

    Uganda, like many low-income countries, has a tremendous volume of orthopaedic trauma injuries. The Uganda Sustainable Trauma Orthopaedic Program (USTOP) is a partnership between the University of British Columbia and Makerere University that was initiated in 2007 to reduce the consequences of neglected orthopaedic trauma in Uganda. USTOP works with local collaborators to build orthopaedic trauma capacity through clinical training, skills workshops, system support, technology development, and research. USTOP has maintained a multidisciplinary approach to training, involving colleagues in anaesthesia, nursing, rehabilitation, and sterile reprocessing. Since the program's inception, the number of trained orthopaedic surgeons practicing in Uganda has more than doubled. Many of these newly trained surgeons provide clinical care in the previously underserved regional hospitals. The program has also worked with collaborators to develop several technologies aimed at reducing the cost of providing orthopaedic care without compromising quality. As orthopaedic trauma capacity in Uganda advances, USTOP strives to continually evolve and provide relevant support to colleagues in Uganda. PMID:26356209

  1. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    PubMed

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future. PMID:21838073

  2. One hundred years of orthopaedic education in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Lee, E H; Wong, H K

    2005-07-01

    The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Malaya (in Singapore) was established in 1952. Prior to this, the teaching of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University was undertaken by the Department of Surgery under the Professor of Surgery and Professor of Clinical Surgery. From a course consisting of 15 weekly classes on fractures for 18 undergraduates in the late 1930s, and the clinical postings in orthopaedic surgery for over 40 students in 1952, the programme now encompasses an exposure to musculoskeletal diseases and trauma in all 5 years of the undergraduate course. Over this time, the spectrum of clinical conditions has also changed, and with it the emphasis on the conditions to be taught; from that dealing primarily with tuberculosis of bones and joints, poliomyelitis, and childhood deformity, to those resulting from degenerative disorders, sports injuries, industrial and motor vehicle accidents, and cancer. The students are now taught orthopaedic surgery in all the major public hospitals. Local postgraduate training programmes for orthopaedic surgery started in the 1980s. From 1993, a more structured training and assessment programme was introduced for basic and advanced training in surgery and orthopaedics. Advanced trainees rotate through the various teaching hospitals to expose them to a wider range of orthopaedic problems as well as teachers. The postgraduate training programme is now well established, and Singapore is accredited by the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh as an orthopaedic training centre for higher surgical training. PMID:16010393

  3. Randomised Trial Support for Orthopaedic Surgical Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyeung C.; Adie, Sam; Naylor, Justine M.; Harris, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the proportion of orthopaedic procedures supported by evidence from randomised controlled trials comparing operative procedures to a non-operative alternative. Orthopaedic procedures conducted in 2009, 2010 and 2011 across three metropolitan teaching hospitals were identified, grouped and ranked according to frequency. Searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) were performed to identify RCTs evaluating the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Included studies were categorised as “supportive” or “not supportive” of operative treatment. A risk of bias analysis was conducted for included studies using the Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias tool. A total of 9,392 orthopaedic procedures were performed across the index period. 94.6% (8886 procedures) of the total volume, representing the 32 most common operative procedure categories, were used for this analysis. Of the 83 included RCTs, 22.9% (19/83) were classified as supportive of operative intervention. 36.9% (3279/8886) of the total volume of procedures performed were supported by at least one RCT showing surgery to be superior to a non-operative alternative. 19.6% (1743/8886) of the total volume of procedures performed were supported by at least one low risk of bias RCT showing surgery to be superior to a non-operative alternative. The level of RCT support for common orthopaedic procedures compares unfavourably with other fields of medicine. PMID:24927114

  4. The Orthopaedic Trauma Patient Experience: A Qualitative Case Study of Orthopaedic Trauma Patients in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Nathan N.; Mugarura, Rodney; Slobogean, Gerard P.; Bouchard, Maryse

    2014-01-01

    The disability adjusted life years (DALYs) associated with injuries have increased by 34% from 1990 to 2010, making it the 10th leading cause of disability worldwide, with most of the burden affecting low-income countries. Although disability from injuries is often preventable, limited access to essential surgical services contributes to these increasing DALY rates. Similar to many other low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), Uganda is plagued by a growing volume of traumatic injuries. The aim of this study is to explore the orthopaedic trauma patient's experience in accessing medical care in Uganda and what affects the injury might have on the socioeconomic status for the patient and their dependents. We also evaluate the factors that impact an individual's ability to access an appropriate treatment facility for their traumatic injury. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients 18 year of age or older admitted with a fractured tibia or femur at Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. As limited literature exists on the socioeconomic impacts of disability from trauma, we designed a descriptive qualitative case study, using thematic analysis, to extract unique information for which little has been previously been documented. This methodology is subject to less bias than other qualitative methods as it imposes fewer preconceptions. Data analysis of the patient interviews (n = 35) produced over one hundred codes, nine sub-themes and three overarching themes. The three overarching categories revealed by the data were: 1) the importance of social supports; 2) the impact of and on economic resources; and 3) navigating the healthcare system. Limited resources to fund the treatment of orthopaedic trauma patients in Uganda leads to reliance of patients on their friends, family, and hospital connections, and a tremendous economic burden that falls on the patient and their dependents. PMID:25360815

  5. Financial Analysis of National University Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Munjae

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper provides information for decision making of the managers and the staff of national university hospitals. Methods In order to conduct a financial analysis of national university hospitals, this study uses reports on the final accounts of 10 university hospitals from 2008 to 2011. Results The results of comparing 2008 and 2011 showed that there was a general decrease in total assets, an increase in liabilities, and a decrease in total medical revenues, with a continuous deficit in many hospitals. Moreover, as national university hospitals have low debt dependence, their management conditions generally seem satisfactory. However, some individual hospitals suffer severe financial difficulties and thus depend on short-term debts, which generally aggravate the profit and loss structure. Various indicators show that the financial state and business performance of national university hospitals have been deteriorating. Conclusion These research findings will be used as important basic data for managers who make direct decisions in this uncertain business environment or by researchers who analyze the medical industry to enable informed decision-making and optimized execution. Furthermore, this study is expected to contribute to raising government awareness of the need to foster and support the national university hospital industry. PMID:26730356

  6. The second national hospital costing study: background, results and implications.

    PubMed

    Oates, B; Murray, J; Hindle, D

    1998-01-01

    The costing of hospital outputs, and especially of acute admitted patients categorised by DRG, has been the focus of considerable attention in the last decade. Many individual hospitals now routinely estimate the costs of their main products, several State and Territory health authorities undertake periodic multi-site studies, and there have been a few one-off national studies. This paper summarises the methods and results of the most recent national study, which measured costs at a sample of public and private hospitals around Australia for the 1996-97 financial year. We briefly describe the main results and note some implications. PMID:10185689

  7. Retractions in orthopaedic research

    PubMed Central

    Yan, J.; MacDonald, A.; Baisi, L-P.; Evaniew, N.; Bhandari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite the fact that research fraud and misconduct are under scrutiny in the field of orthopaedic research, little systematic work has been done to uncover and characterise the underlying reasons for academic retractions in this field. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of retractions and identify the reasons for retracted publications in the orthopaedic literature. Methods Two reviewers independently searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (1995 to current) using MeSH keyword headings and the ‘retracted’ filter. We also searched an independent website that reports and archives retracted scientific publications (www.retractionwatch.com). Two reviewers independently extracted data including reason for retraction, study type, journal impact factor, and country of origin. Results One hundred and ten retracted studies were included for data extraction. The retracted studies were published in journals with impact factors ranging from 0.000 (discontinued journals) to 13.262. In the 20-year search window, only 25 papers were retracted in the first ten years, with the remaining 85 papers retracted in the most recent decade. The most common reasons for retraction were fraudulent data (29), plagiarism (25) and duplicate publication (20). Retracted articles have been cited up to 165 times (median 6; interquartile range 2 to 19). Conclusion The rate of retractions in the orthopaedic literature is increasing, with the majority of retractions attributed to academic misconduct and fraud. Orthopaedic retractions originate from numerous journals and countries, indicating that misconduct issues are widespread. The results of this study highlight the need to address academic integrity when training the next generation of orthopaedic investigators. Cite this article: J. Yan, A. MacDonald, L-P. Baisi, N. Evaniew, M. Bhandari, M. Ghert. Retractions in orthopaedic research: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:263–268. DOI: 10

  8. Health economics and orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Maniadakis, N; Gray, A

    2000-01-01

    It is becoming widely accepted that research which considers only the outcome and not the costs associated with new technologies in health care, is of limited value in making decisions about the use of scarce resources. Economic evaluation is becoming a standard feature of clinical research but many published economic evaluations fall short of best practice in their methodology. We have described the essential features of economic evaluation, using published studies in orthopaedics, in order to try to improve the ability of orthopaedic surgeons to read, understand and appraise such studies critically, and to encourage them to consider including economic evaluation in future investigations. PMID:10697306

  9. Database and Registry Research in Orthopaedic Surgery: Part I: Claims-Based Data.

    PubMed

    Pugely, Andrew J; Martin, Christopher T; Harwood, Jared; Ong, Kevin L; Bozic, Kevin J; Callaghan, John J

    2015-08-01

    The use of large-scale national databases for observational research in orthopaedic surgery has grown substantially in the last decade, and the data sets can be grossly categorized as either administrative claims or clinical registries. Administrative claims data comprise the billing records associated with the delivery of health-care services. Orthopaedic researchers have used both government and private claims to describe temporal trends, geographic variation, disparities, complications, outcomes, and resource utilization associated with both musculoskeletal disease and treatment. Medicare claims comprise one of the most robust data sets used to perform orthopaedic research, with >45 million beneficiaries. The U.S. government, through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, often uses these data to drive changes in health policy. Private claims data used in orthopaedic research often comprise more heterogeneous patient demographic samples, but allow longitudinal analysis similar to that offered by Medicare claims. Discharge databases, such as the U.S. National Inpatient Sample, provide a wide national sampling of inpatient hospital stays from all payers and allow analysis of associated adverse events and resource utilization. Administrative claims data benefit from the high patient numbers obtained through a majority of hospitals. Using claims, it is possible to follow patients longitudinally throughout encounters irrespective of the location of the institution delivering health care. Some disadvantages include lack of precision of ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) coding schemes. Much of these data are expensive to purchase, complicated to organize, and labor-intensive to manipulate--often requiring trained specialists for analysis. Given the changing health-care environment, it is likely that databases will provide valuable information that has the potential to influence clinical practice improvement and health policy for

  10. Support for hospital-based HIV testing and counseling: a national survey of hospital marketing executives.

    PubMed Central

    Boscarino, J A; Steiber, S R

    1995-01-01

    Today, hospitals are involved extensively in social marketing and promotional activities. Recently, investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that routine testing of hospital patients for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) could identify more than 100,000 patients with previously unrecognized HIV infections. Several issues are assessed in this paper. These include hospital support for voluntary HIV testing and AIDS education and the impact that treating AIDS patients has on the hospital's image. Also tested is the hypothesis that certain hospitals, such as for-profit institutions and those outside the AIDS epicenters, would be less supportive of hospital-based AIDS intervention strategies. To assess these issues, a national random sample of 193 executives in charge of hospital marketing and public relations were surveyed between December 1992 and January 1993. The survey was part of an ongoing annual survey of hospitals and included questions about AIDS, health education, marketing, patient satisfaction, and hospital planning. Altogether, 12.4 percent of executives indicated their hospital had a reputation for treating AIDS patients. Among hospitals without an AIDS reputation, 34.1 percent believed developing one would be harmful to the hospital's image, in contrast to none in hospitals that had such a reputation (chi 2 = 11.676, df = 1, P = .0006). Although 16.6 percent did not know if large-scale HIV testing should be implemented, a near majority (47.7 percent) expressed some support. In addition, 15 percent reported that HIV-positive physicians on the hospital's medical staff should not be allowed to practice medicine, but 32.1 percent indicated that they should.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7638335

  11. Seoul National University Bundang Hospital's Electronic System for Total Care

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee Hyuck; Lee, Hak Jong; Ha, Kyooseob; Lim, Cheong; Chin, Ho Jun; Yun, Jonghoar; Cho, Eun-Young; Chung, Eunja; Baek, Rong-Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Chul Hee; Lee, Hai-Seok; Byeon, Nam-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, which is the first Stage 7 hospital outside of North America, has adopted and utilized an innovative and emerging information technology system to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care. The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce the major components of the SNUBH information system and to describe our progress toward a next-generation hospital information system (HIS). Methods SNUBH opened in 2003 as a fully digital hospital by successfully launching a new HIS named BESTCare, "Bundang hospital Electronic System for Total Care". Subsequently, the system has been continuously improved with new applications, including close-loop medication administration (CLMA), clinical data warehouse (CDW), health information exchange (HIE), and disaster recovery (DR), which have resulted in the achievement of Stage 7 status. Results The BESTCare system is an integrated system for a university hospital setting. BESTCare is mainly composed of three application domains: the core applications, an information infrastructure, and channel domains. The most critical and unique applications of the system, such as the electronic medical record (EMR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support system (CDSS), CLMA, CDW, HIE, and DR applications, are described in detail. Conclusions Beyond our achievement of Stage 7 hospital status, we are currently developing a next-generation HIS with new goals of implementing infrastructure that is flexible and innovative, implementing a patient-centered system, and strengthening the IT capability to maximize the hospital value. PMID:22844650

  12. Neurology and orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Houlden, Henry; Charlton, Paul; Singh, Dishan

    2007-01-01

    Neurology encompasses all aspects of medicine and surgery, but is closer to orthopaedic surgery than many other specialities. Both neurological deficits and bone disorders lead to locomotor system abnormalities, joint complications and limb problems. The main neurological conditions that require the attention of an orthopaedic surgeon are disorders that affect the lower motor neurones. The most common disorders in this group include neuromuscular disorders and traumatic peripheral nerve lesions. Upper motor neurone disorders such as cerebral palsy and stroke are also frequently seen and discussed, as are chronic conditions such as poliomyelitis. The management of these neurological problems is often coordinated in the neurology clinic, and this group, probably more than any other, requires a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:17308288

  13. Successfully reforming orthopaedic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Peter A; Adair, Lisa

    2012-05-01

    Since 2005, Barwon Health has successfully reformed its orthopaedic outpatient service to address the following issues: increasing number of referrals, inefficient referral management and triage, long waiting times for non-urgent appointments, high 'Did Not Attend' (DNA) rates and poor utilisation of conservative therapies before referral to surgeon. Numerous strategies have been implemented including: waiting list audits, triage guidelines, physiotherapy-led clinics, a DNA policy, an orthopaedic lead nurse role and a patient-focussed booking system. There has been a 66% reduction in the number of patients waiting for their first appointment; an 87% reduction in the waiting time from referral to first appointment; a 10% reduction in new patient DNAs; and more efficient referral management and communication processes. Patients are now seen in clinically appropriate time frames and offered earlier access to a wider range of conservative treatments. PMID:22624648

  14. Footwear and orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Kurup, H V; Clark, C I M; Dega, R K

    2012-06-01

    Footwear is the oldest known fashion accessory in use. Footwear is often implicated in orthopaedic problems affecting lower limbs and back. Hence footwear modifications have a major role in management of these pathologies as well. This review explores footwear and its role in causation and management of orthopaedic problems. Based on our observations we recommend that children with flexible flatfeet should be encouraged to walk barefoot to help in developing their arches. Women with risk factors for secondary arthritis of knee or back pain may be advised to avoid heels. Commercial shoes which decrease hind foot loading may be used in symptomatic management of hindfoot and mid foot problems. Similarly shoes which decrease forefoot loading may be useful in managing forefoot pathology. Flip-flops should be avoided by diabetics as they do not protect from injuries. PMID:22443991

  15. Orthopaedic Management of Spasticity.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Tyler S; Ramirez, Jose M; Schiller, Jonathan R

    2015-12-01

    Spasticity is a common manifestation of many neurological conditions including multiple sclerosis, stroke, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injuries. Management of spasticity seeks to reduce its burden on patients and to limit secondary complications. Non-operative interventions including stretching/splinting, postural management, physical therapy/strengthening, anti-spasticity medications, and botulinum toxin injections may help patients with spasticity. Surgical management of these conditions, however, is often necessary to improve quality of life and prevent complications. Orthopaedic surgeons manage numerous sequelae of spasticity, including joint contractures, hip dislocations, scoliosis, and deformed extremities. When combined with the efforts of rehabilitation specialists, neurologists, and physical/occupational therapists, the orthopaedic management of spasticity can help patients maintain and regain function and independence as well as reduce the risk of long-tem complications. PMID:26623452

  16. Biomaterials in orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, M; Michiardi, A; Castaño, O; Planell, J.A

    2008-01-01

    At present, strong requirements in orthopaedics are still to be met, both in bone and joint substitution and in the repair and regeneration of bone defects. In this framework, tremendous advances in the biomaterials field have been made in the last 50 years where materials intended for biomedical purposes have evolved through three different generations, namely first generation (bioinert materials), second generation (bioactive and biodegradable materials) and third generation (materials designed to stimulate specific responses at the molecular level). In this review, the evolution of different metals, ceramics and polymers most commonly used in orthopaedic applications is discussed, as well as the different approaches used to fulfil the challenges faced by this medical field. PMID:18667387

  17. Registries in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C

    2015-02-01

    The first nationwide orthopaedic registry was created in Sweden in 1975 to collect data on total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since then, several countries have established registries, with varying degrees of success. Managing a registry requires time and money. Factors that contribute to successful registry management include the use of a single identifier for each patient to ensure full traceability of all procedures related to a given implant; a long-term funding source; a contemporary, rapid, Internet-based data collection method; and the collection of exhaustive data, at least for innovative implants. The effects of registries on practice patterns should be evaluated. The high cost of registries raises issues of independence and content ownership. Scandinavian countries have been maintaining orthopaedic registries for nearly four decades (since 1975). The first English-language orthopaedic registry was not created until 1998 (in New Zealand), and both the US and many European countries are still struggling to establish orthopaedic registries. To date, there are 11 registered nationwide registries on total knee and total hip replacement. The data they contain are often consistent, although contradictions occur in some cases due to major variations in cultural and market factors. The future of registries will depend on the willingness of health authorities and healthcare professionals to support the creation and maintenance of these tools. Surgeons feel that registries should serve merely to compare implants. Health authorities, in contrast, have a strong interest in practice patterns and healthcare institution performances. Striking a balance between these objectives should allow advances in registry development in the near future. PMID:25553603

  18. Long Sick Leave after Orthopaedic Inpatient Rehabilitation: Treatment Failure or Relapse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangels, Marija; Schwarz, Susanne; Worringen, Ulrike; Holme, Martin; Rief, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether short-term versus long-term sick leave after orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation can be predicted by initial assessment information, the clinical status at discharge, or whether the follow-up interval is crucial for later sick leave. We examined 214 patients from an orthopaedic rehabilitation hospital at admission,…

  19. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes among hospital workers at a public teaching and national referral hospital in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Makori, L.; Gikera, M.; Wafula, J.; Chakaya, J.; Edginton, M. E.; Kumar, A. M. V.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), Nairobi, Ken-ya, a large referral and teaching hospital. Objective: 1) To document tuberculosis (TB) case notification rates and trends; 2) to describe demographic, clinical and workplace characteristics and treatment outcomes; and 3) to examine associations between demographic and clinical characteristics, HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome) treatment and anti-tuberculosis treatment outcomes among hospital workers with TB at KNH during the period 2006–2011. Design: A retrospective cohort study involving a review of medical records. Results: The TB case notification rate among hospital staff ranged between 413 and 901 per 100 000 staff members per year; 51% of all cases were extra-pulmonary TB; 74% of all cases were among medical, paramedical and support staff. The TB-HIV coinfection rate was 60%. Only 75% had a successful treatment outcome. Patients in the retreatment category, those with unknown HIV status and those who were support staff had a higher risk of poor treatment outcomes. Conclusion: The TB case rate among hospital workers was unacceptably high compared to that of the general population, and treatment outcomes were poor. Infection control in the hospital and management of staff with TB requires urgent attention. PMID:26393055

  20. Two hundred years of orthopaedics in Wuerzburg-one hundred years of the Koenig-Ludwig-Haus.

    PubMed

    Jakuscheit, Axel; Rudert, Maximilian

    2016-08-01

    Wuerzburg in the centre of Germany claims to be a cradle of modern orthopaedics. Under the leadership of Johann Georg Heine (1771-1831) the first German orthopaedic hospital, the Carolinum, was established in 1816. Johann Georg Heine's legacy was continued by his son Joseph (1803-1877) and his nephew Bernhard Heine (1800-1846), before Albert Hoffa (1859-1907) put the clinical practice of orthopaedics on a strict scientific basis and further promoted a worldwide exchange of knowledge. In 1916, Albert Hoffa's successor Jakob Riedinger (1861-1917) founded the Koenig-Ludwig-Haus, which hosts the Orthopaedic Hospital and the Centre for Musculoskeletal Research of the University of Wuerzburg. On the occasion of the bicentenary and centenary anniversaries of the founding of the two orthopaedic hospitals, we provide a short view on the development of orthopaedics in Wuerzburg. PMID:27283104

  1. Advances in Regenerative Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic injuries are very common and a source of much misery and economic stress. Several relevant tissues, such as cartilage, meniscus and intra-articular ligaments, do not heal. And even bone, which normally regenerates spontaneously, can fail to mend. The regeneration of orthopaedic tissues requires four key components: cells, morphogenetic signals, scaffolds and an appropriate mechanical environment. Although differentiated cells from the tissue in question can be used, most cellular research focuses on the use mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These can be retrieved from many different tissues, and one unresolved question is the degree to which the origin of the cells matters. Embryonic and induced, pluripotential stem cells are also under investigation. Morphogenetic signals are most frequently supplied by individual, recombinant growth factors or native mixtures provided by, for instance, platelet-rich plasma; MSCs are also a rich source of trophic factors. Obstacles to the sustained delivery of individual growth factors can be addressed by gene transfer or smart scaffolds, but we still lack detailed, necessary information on which delivery profiles are needed. Scaffolds may be based upon natural products, synthetic materials, or devitalized extracellular matrix. Strategies to combine these components to regenerate tissue can follow traditional tissue engineering practices, but these are costly, cumbersome and not well suited to treating large numbers of individuals. More expeditious approaches make full use of intrinsic biological processes in vivo to avoid the need for ex vivo expansion of autologous cells and multiple procedures. Clinical translation remains a bottleneck. PMID:24182709

  2. Cost of Hospitalization and Length of Stay in People with Down Syndrome: Evidence from a National Hospital Discharge Claims Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Wen-Jiu; Lin, Lan-Ping; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims to describe the hospitalization profiles which include medical expenses and length of stays, and to determine their possible influencing factors of hospital admission on persons with Down syndrome in Taiwan. We employed a population-based, retrospective analyses used national health insurance hospital discharge data of the…

  3. The Affordable Care Act and orthopaedic trauma.

    PubMed

    Issar, Neil M; Jahangir, A Alex

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act has resulted in a dramatic governmental restructuring of the healthcare insurance market and delivery system. Orthopaedic traumatologists must be aware of the law's impact on their clinical practice, finances, and overall business model. This includes the effect of accountable care organizations, the Independent Payment Advisory Board, and the Physician Value-Based Payment Modifier program, as well as the impact of the Affordable Care Act's grace period provision, medical device excise tax, and cuts to funding for the Disproportionate Share Hospital program. PMID:25229683

  4. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. Methods A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants’ experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Results Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. Conclusions This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct, whistleblower protection, and higher

  5. Composites in orthopaedics

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, D.; Levine, D.

    1986-01-01

    With the increasing demand for superior performance placed on present day orthopaedic devices, there exists a constant demand to look for better materials for construction. Because of their good corrosion resistance, early devices were made from 304 or 316 stainless steels. However, the patient population has broadened to include younger individuals. These patients lead active lives and tend to stress the fracture fixation devices. Another requirement for younger patients is a longer implantable service: up to 20 years. With these requirements in mind, high-performance aerospace metal alloys based on cobalt chromium and titanium are used extensively. This paper discusses the requirements and the deficiencies of new materials; biocompatibility, biofunctionality, and manufacturing costs.

  6. Promoting safety of postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veney, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk for postoperative complications related to administration of pain medications, anxiolytics, and antiemetics. They are more likely to experience respiratory and cardiac complications, be transferred to an intensive care unit, or have an increased length of stay in the hospital. This informational article is for nurses who care for postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The focus is on promoting patient safety through communication, vigilant postoperative sedation assessment, and nursing interventions that include appropriate patient positioning, patient education, and involving patients and their families in care. PMID:24247310

  7. Reno Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship business curriculum.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Bray, Timothy J; Hill, Austin D

    2014-07-01

    The Reno Orthopaedic Center (ROC) Trauma Fellowship business curriculum is designed to provide the fellow with a graduate level business practicum and research experience. The time commitments in a typical 12-month trauma fellowship are significant, rendering a traditional didactic master's in business administration difficult to complete during this short time. An organized, structured, practical business education can provide the trauma leaders of tomorrow with the knowledge and experience required to effectively navigate the convoluted and constantly changing healthcare system. The underlying principle throughout the curriculum is to provide the fellow with the practical knowledge to participate in cost-efficient improvements in healthcare delivery. Through the ROC Trauma Fellowship business curriculum, the fellow will learn that delivering healthcare in a manner that provides better outcomes for equal or lower costs is not only possible but a professional and ethical responsibility. However, instilling these values without providing actionable knowledge and programs would be insufficient and ineffective. For this reason, the core of the curriculum is based on individual teaching sessions with a wide array of hospital and private practice administrators. In addition, each section is equipped with a suggested reading list to maximize the learning experience. Upon completion of the curriculum, the fellow should be able to: (1) Participate in strategic planning at both the hospital and practice level based on analysis of financial and clinical data, (2) Understand the function of healthcare systems at both a macro and micro level, (3) Possess the knowledge and skills to be strong leaders and effective communicators in the business lexicon of healthcare, (4) Be a partner and innovator in the improvement of the delivery of orthopaedic services, (5) Combine scientific and strategic viewpoints to provide an evidence-based strategy for improving quality of care in a

  8. Overcoming resistance to implementation of integrated care pathways in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Manning, Blaine T; Callahan, Charles D; Robinson, Brooke S; Adair, Daniel; Saleh, Khaled J

    2013-07-17

    The future of orthopaedic surgery will be shaped by unprecedented demographic and economic challenges, necessitating movement to so-called "second curve" innovations in the delivery of care. Implementation of integrated care pathways (ICPs) may be one solution to imminent cost and access pressures facing orthopaedic patients in this era of health-care accountability and reform. ICPs can lower costs and the duration of hospital stay while facilitating better outcomes through enhanced interspecialty communication. As with any innovation at the crossroads of paradigm change, implementation of integrated care pathways for orthopaedics may elicit surgeons' concern on a variety of grounds and on levels ranging from casual questioning to vehement opposition. No single method is always effective in promoting cooperation and adoption, so a combination of strategies offers the best chance of success. With a special focus on total joint replacement, we consider general patterns of resistance to change, styles of conflict, and specific issues that may underlie orthopaedic surgeon resistance to implementation of integrated care pathways. Methods to facilitate and sustain orthopaedic surgeon engagement in implementation of such pathways are discussed. PMID:23864183

  9. Few Hospital Palliative Care Programs Meet National Staffing Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Dudley, Nancy; Trupin, Laura; Rogers, Maggie; Meier, Diane E; Dumanovsky, Tamara

    2016-09-01

    The predominant model for palliative care delivery, outside of hospice care, is the hospital-based consultative team. Although a majority of US hospitals offer palliative care services, there has been little research on the staffing of their program teams and whether those teams meet national guidelines, such as the Joint Commission's standard of including at least one physician, an advanced practice or other registered nurse, a social worker, and a chaplain. Data from the 2012-13 annual surveys of the National Palliative Care Registry indicate that only 25 percent of participating programs met that standard based on funded positions, and even when unfunded positions were included, only 39 percent of programs met the standard. Larger palliative care programs were more likely than smaller ones to include a funded physician position, while smaller programs were more reliant upon advanced practice and registered nurses. To meet current and future palliative care needs, expanded and enhanced education, as well as supportive financing mechanisms for consultations, are needed. PMID:27605652

  10. Computer applications in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Pho, R W; Lim, S Y; Pereira, B P

    1990-09-01

    With the rapid developments in microprocessors, the widespread availability of computers has brought about broad applications in the field of orthopaedics. The present technology enables large quantities of data to be logically processed in a very short span of time. This has led to the development of information management database systems where relevant medical information may be retrieved very quickly and effectively. The analytical power of the computer has also been utilised in expert systems to assist in clinical-decision making process. Computer graphics have revolutionised the visualisation of physical features of internal and external body parts, providing new and improved modalities of diagnosis. In some centres, surgical planning and rehearsals are already being carried out at the computer terminal with the use of animation and computer graphics. Computer technology has also played an active role in the field of prosthetics and rehabilitation. Intelligent robotic systems and microprocessor with functional neuromuscular stimulation have been applied to benefit, and in some cases restore some motor functions to the physically disabled. With more collaboration between engineers, scientists and the medical community, several prototypes of computer-controlled prostheses and prosthesis designed and manufactured by Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology are available today to assist the amputees in their daily living and ambulatory activities. PMID:2260826

  11. Trends in Inpatient Hospital Deaths: National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2000-2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... Has the inpatient hospital death rate decreased for all patients and for those with selected first-listed ... 2010 differ from the length of stay for all hospitalizations? Inpatients who died in the hospital stayed ...

  12. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    MedlinePlus

    ... AOFAS / FootCareMD / Find a Surgeon Find an Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeon Page Content The Orthopaedic Distinction Who are Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeons? Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons are ...

  13. Sources of information influencing decision-making in orthopaedic surgery - an international online survey of 1147 orthopaedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    implants. Manufacturers of medical devices in orthopaedics employ a considerable workforce to inform or influence hospital managers and leading doctors with marketing activities. Our results indicate that it might be far more effective to channel at least some of these funds into peer-reviewed research projects, thereby assuring significantly higher acceptance of the related products. PMID:23496954

  14. Robotic systems in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lang, J E; Mannava, S; Floyd, A J; Goddard, M S; Smith, B P; Mofidi, A; Seyler, T M; Jinnah, R H

    2011-10-01

    Robots have been used in surgery since the late 1980s. Orthopaedic surgery began to incorporate robotic technology in 1992, with the introduction of ROBODOC, for the planning and performance of total hip replacement. The use of robotic systems has subsequently increased, with promising short-term radiological outcomes when compared with traditional orthopaedic procedures. Robotic systems can be classified into two categories: autonomous and haptic (or surgeon-guided). Passive surgery systems, which represent a third type of technology, have also been adopted recently by orthopaedic surgeons. While autonomous systems have fallen out of favour, tactile systems with technological improvements have become widely used. Specifically, the use of tactile and passive robotic systems in unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) has addressed some of the historical mechanisms of failure of non-robotic UKR. These systems assist with increasing the accuracy of the alignment of the components and produce more consistent ligament balance. Short-term improvements in clinical and radiological outcomes have increased the popularity of robot-assisted UKR. Robot-assisted orthopaedic surgery has the potential for improving surgical outcomes. We discuss the different types of robotic systems available for use in orthopaedics and consider the indication, contraindications and limitations of these technologies. PMID:21969424

  15. Energy healing: a complementary treatment for orthopaedic and other conditions.

    PubMed

    DiNucci, Ellen M

    2005-01-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies continue to grow in popularity among healthcare consumers. Among those modalities is energy healing (EH) (Eisenberg et al., 1998). EH is an adjunctive treatment that is noninvasive and poses little downside risk to patients. Well more than 50 major hospitals and clinics throughout the United States offer EH to patients (DiNucci, research table on healthcare facilities that offer Reiki, unpublished data, 2002). The National Institutes of Health is funding numerous EH studies that are examining its effects on a variety of conditions, including temporomandibular joint disorders, wrist fractures, cardiovascular health, cancer, wound healing, neonatal stress, pain, fibromyalgia, and AIDS (National Institutes of Health, 2004a). Several well-designed studies to date show significant outcomes for such conditions as wound healing (Grad, 1965) and advanced AIDS (Sicher, Targ, Moore, & Smith, 1998), and positive results for pain and anxiety (Aetna IntelliHealth, 2003a; Wardell, Weymouth, 2004), among others (Gallob, 2003). It is also suggested that EH may have positive effects on various orthopaedic conditions, including fracture healing, arthritis, and muscle and connective tissue (Prestwood, 2003). Because negative outcomes risk is at or near zero throughout the literature, EH is a candidate for use on many medical conditions. PMID:16056170

  16. Full PACS installation in Seoul National University Hospital, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, HyunWoo; Kim, DongOok; Ahn, JinYoung; Lee, DongHyuk; Lee, JinHyung; Park, HeeJung; Kim, JongHyo; Han, Jungu

    2002-05-01

    Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH) is composed of two buildings and has more than 1500 beds for patients needing hospitalization. Marotech has provided full PACS to SNUH with total HIS Integration in this year. In this paper, the installation process and management experience for seven months will be presented. At SNUH, 1643.8 exams were held per day during seven month after PACS installation. It is about 40 Gigabytes per day. Two acquisition servers (ACQ 1, 2), two database servers (DB 1, 2), two storage servers (LTA, network attached storage-NAS), one backup server (DLT) totally 8 servers were installed. SNUH has 11 CRs, 4 CTs, 3 MRIs, 9 NMs, 4 RFs, 20 USs, 7 ESs, 4 SCs, 5 XAs, and 5 Film Ditigers. All these modalities were integrated with PACS. DICOM 3.0 standard was conformed for images. DICOM Gateways were installed for modalities that do not support DICOM. The doctor can query and view Endoscopes, pathologic and anatomic data as well as radiological data. All the past five years exams is accessed less than 10 Seconds via on-line. Through the cooperation with SNUH and Marotech, HIS and PACS work together in stable state. These systems were integrated with HL7 standards and IHE.

  17. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  18. About the beginnings of orthopaedics in Timisoara.

    PubMed

    Poenaru, Dan V

    2015-12-01

    The historical and geographical territory of Banat is part of present-day Romania. Timisoara's history, the capital city of Banat region, dates back to the second century B.C. Medical life in Banat was re-organised after the promulgation of the Aulic Laws in the eighteenth century. Thorough research was undertaken through historic manuscripts, old newspapers, biographies and other papers about the history of Romanian medicine. The eighteenth century witnessed the building of three hospitals in Timisoara. In that period, Banat region benefited from the expertise and professionalism of doctors who graduated and were trained mainly in Central and Western European universities. By the beginning of the twentieth century, many medical clinics or sanatoriums specialising in orthopaedics and traumatology were offering their services to the population. Banat region had many good orthopaedists, and one of them was Prof. Dr. Doc. Berceanu, who graduated from the University of Medicine Bucharest and further specialised in Paris, France. He is the founder of the Orthopaedics and Traumatology Clinic in Timisoara. PMID:26227921

  19. Gas Gangrene in Orthopaedic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhimin; Zhang, Min; Yan, Shigui; Zhu, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Clostridial myonecrosis is most often seen in settings of trauma, surgery, malignancy, and other underlying immunocompromised conditions. Since 1953 cases of gas gangrene have been reported in orthopaedic patients including open fractures, closed fractures, and orthopaedic surgeries. We present a case of 55-year-old obese woman who developed rapidly progressive gas gangrene in her right leg accompanied by tibial plateau fracture without skin lacerations. She was diagnosed with clostridial myonecrosis and above-the-knee amputation was carried out. This patient made full recovery within three weeks of the initial episode. We identified a total of 50 cases of gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients. Several factors, if available, were analyzed for each case: age, cause of injury, fracture location, pathogen, and outcome. Based on our case report and the literature review, emergency clinicians should be aware of this severe and potentially fatal infectious disease and should not delay treatment or prompt orthopedic surgery consultation. PMID:24288638

  20. Orthopaedic Injuries in Equestrian Sports

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jason David; Gelbs, Jared Craig; Zhu, David Shiyu; Gallacher, Stacey Elisa; Sutton, Karen Michelle; Blaine, Theodore Alton

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the common nature of orthopaedic injuries in equestrian sports, there is no published review to specifically characterize orthopaedic injuries in equestrian athletes. Purpose: To characterize orthopaedic injury patterns in equine sports–related injuries and their treatment. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This review was performed through a PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus query (from 1978 to June 2014) in the English literature using search terms “(equine-related OR equestrian-related OR horse-related OR equestrian OR equestrians) AND (injury OR injuries).” Only full-text studies reporting on orthopaedic injury patterns pertinent to equestrian sports in the United States (US) and the United Kingdom (UK) were included. Orthopaedic injuries were defined as those resulting in a fracture or dislocation. In all, 182 studies were excluded, leaving a total of 27 studies for evaluation. The studies included were analyzed for demographic and epidemiological data for orthopaedic injuries, including fractures and dislocations. Cranial and facial injuries were excluded from analysis. Results: The majority of those injured in the US were female (64.5%). The leading cause of injury in the US was falling from a horse. The use of protective equipment seemed to vary widely, with helmet use ranging from less than 6% up to 66.7%. In the UK, fractures were found to account for 17.4% of reported injures, compared with 33.6% of injuries in the US. The majority of fractures in US riders occurred in the upper extremities (50.7%). Conclusion: This review helps characterize the epidemiology of equestrian injuries based on currently available data. PMID:26535400

  1. Radiation Safety in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Caird, Michelle S

    2015-01-01

    Patients, surgeons, and staff are exposed to ionizing radiation in pediatric orthopaedic surgery from diagnostic studies and imaging associated with procedures. Estimating radiation dose to pediatric patients is based on complex algorithms and dose to surgeons and staff is based on dosimeter monitoring. Surgeons can decrease radiation exposure to patients with careful and thoughtful ordering of diagnostic studies and by minimizing exposure intraoperatively. Surgeon and staff radiation exposure can be minimized with educational programs, proper shielding and positioning intraoperatively, and prudent use of intraoperative imaging. Overall, better awareness among pediatric orthopaedic surgeons of our role in radiation exposure can lead to improvements in radiation safety. PMID:26049299

  2. Improving patient flow: role of the orthopaedic discharge sister.

    PubMed

    Tytler, Beverley

    2016-03-01

    Timely and well-planned discharge improves the patient's experience, contributes to patient safety and reduces the length of hospital stays. The role of orthopaedic discharge sister was developed at James Cook University Hospital in 2007 to provide safe, timely and efficient discharge for patients from the trauma and theatre centre, and to improve patient experience and flow. This article gives an overview of the role and describes how the sister works with colleagues to plan patient discharges from pre-assessment and emergency department admission through their hospital stay until their departure. PMID:26948225

  3. Perioperative blood transfusions in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Karthikeyan E; Kim, Thomas J; Khanuja, Harpal S

    2014-11-01

    Blood transfusion after orthopaedic surgery accounts for 10% of all packed red blood-cell transfusions, but use varies substantially across hospitals and surgeons. Transfusions can cause systemic complications, including allergic reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, graft-versus-host disease, and infections. Tranexamic acid is a new cost-effective blood management tool to reduce blood loss and decrease the risk of transfusion after total joint arthroplasty. Current clinical evidence does not justify transfusions for a hemoglobin level of >8 g/dL in the absence of symptoms. Studies have also supported the use of this trigger in patients with a history or risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25378512

  4. Step up in orthopaedic care for Stockport Trust.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2009-04-01

    Specialist in the design and construction of modular healthcare buildings MTX Contracts has recently completed, on time and on budget, Stockport NHS Foundation Trust's impressive new four-storey orthopaedic and surgical facility at Stepping Hill Hospital. The company claims the new facility offers a quality of build and finish "as close to that of traditional build as is possible using modular construction techniques". Jonathan Baillie reports. PMID:19452799

  5. Applications of nanotechnology in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Tasker, L H; Sparey-Taylor, G J; Nokes, L D M

    2007-03-01

    Nanotechnology is the application of science and engineering at the nanoscale. A diverse range of applications are beginning to emerge in all areas of medicine. We performed a survey from November 2005 to March 2006 using the Internet search engines PubMed, ScienceDirect, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar. We report on the role of nanotechnology in orthopaedics, exploring current and potential applications. Nanostructured materials have been proposed as the next generation of orthopaedic implant properties by creating a surface environment more conducive for osteoblast function. Bone substitute materials, whose nanoscale composition emulates the hierarchic organization of natural bone, shows initiation of the desirable formation of an apatite layer. Nanotechnology also has been harnessed to improve the cutting performance and quality of surgical blades. Postoperative infection rates may be reduced by using nanofibrous membrane wound dressings containing antibacterial properties. The most notable application of nanotechnology in orthopaedics may be drug delivery, including nanotherapeutics for treating bone cancer and arthritis. Nanotechnology is being used in orthopaedics, and likely will play a valuable role in future developments. PMID:17224843

  6. Fundamentals of orthopaedics. Fourth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Gartland, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses topics on orthopaedic medicine. Treatments, radiographic findings, and potential complications are provided for the complete scope of musculoskeletal problems. It reviews the latest diagnostic techniques, including arthroscopy and CT scanning and also gives updates on the newest approaches to the management of skeletal infections, the latest on joint replacements, and offers a review of arthroscopic surgery.

  7. Institutional barriers to the orthopaedic clinician-scientist.

    PubMed

    Rosier, Randy N

    2006-08-01

    The clinician-scientist faces many career barriers that changes in medicine over the past two decades have accentuated. Political, socioeconomic, and cultural changes in medicine have increased financial pressures on physicians and hospitals, negatively impacting the ability of clinicians to pursue research activities. Examples of institutional barriers include pressure on physicians to increase clinical productivity to help offset rising costs and declining reimbursements, inadequate resources and structures to protect research time, a lack of consideration of the importance of spatial colocalization of interacting researchers and clinicians, insufficient focus on integrating clinician-scientists into research teams, and inadequate accessibility of administrative research infrastructure. Lack of mentorship and role models in orthopaedics also contributes to the barriers confronting the clinician-scientist. A number of steps could be taken by institutions to positively influence orthopaedic clinician-scientist career development. Creation of research teams in which orthopaedic clinician-scientists can collaborate effectively with other researchers is a critical step, as is providing protected time free of clinical responsibilities to be devoted to research. Increased attention to physical co-localization of the research activities of clinicians and scientists, and provision of research infrastructure at the department level are additional approaches that can be taken to ameliorate the institutional barriers to the orthopaedic clinician-scientist. PMID:16888531

  8. Performance Analysis of Hospital Information System of the National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jung Mi; Boo, Eun Hee; Kim, Jung A; Yoon, Soo Jin; Kim, Seong Woo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the qualitative and quantitative performances of the newly developed information system which was implemented on November 4, 2011 at the National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital. Methods Registration waiting time and changes in the satisfaction scores for the key performance indicators (KPI) before and after the introduction of the system were compared; and the economic effects of the system were analyzed by using the information economics approach. Results After the introduction of the system, the waiting time for registration was reduced by 20%, and the waiting time at the internal medicine department was reduced by 15%. The benefit-to-cost ratio was increased to 1.34 when all intangible benefits were included in the economic analysis. Conclusions The economic impact and target satisfaction rates increased due to the introduction of the new system. The results were proven by the quantitative and qualitative analyses carried out in this study. This study was conducted only seven months after the introduction of the system. As such, a follow-up study should be carried out in the future when the system stabilizes. PMID:23115744

  9. [Issues related to national university medical schools: focusing on the low wages of university hospital physicians].

    PubMed

    Takamuku, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    University hospitals, bringing together the three divisions of education, research, and clinical medicine, could be said to represent the pinnacle of medicine. However, when compared with physicians working at public and private hospitals, physicians working at university hospitals and medical schools face extremely poor conditions. This is because physicians at national university hospitals are considered to be "educators." Meanwhile, even after the privatization of national hospitals, physicians working for these institutions continue to be perceived as "medical practitioners." A situation may arise in which physicians working at university hospitals-performing top-level medical work while also being involved with university and postgraduate education, as well as research-might leave their posts because they are unable to live on their current salaries, especially in comparison with physicians working at national hospitals, who focus solely on medical care. This situation would be a great loss for Japan. This potential loss can be prevented by amending the classification of physicians at national university hospitals from "educators" to "medical practitioners." In order to accomplish this, the Japan Medical Association, upon increasing its membership and achieving growth, should act as a mediator in negotiations between national university hospitals, medical schools, and the government. PMID:25842820

  10. Planning for life after orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Barr, Joseph S; McCaslin, Michael J; Hinds, Cynthia K

    2014-01-01

    The word retirement is going out of fashion. Many orthopaedic surgeons want to work in some capacity when they stop performing surgery. Making a smooth transition from a busy orthopaedic practice to alternative work demands advanced planning. The surgeon must consider personal issues that involve how to use human capital (his or her accumulated knowledge and experience). New ventures, hobbies, travel, and spending time with family and friends are some possibilities. Plans for slowing down or leaving the practice should be discussed and agreed on well ahead of time. Agreements for buyouts may be difficult to work out and will require creative thinking. The solo practitioner can close the practice or hire a successor. Financial planning is perhaps the most important consideration and should be started by approximately age 40. It is recommended that the surgeon develop a portfolio of secure investments and annuities to provide adequate income for as long as is needed and then to turn the residual income to one's family, favorite charities, or other desired cause. A team of competent advisors is needed to help develop and achieve one's goals, create financial security, and provide the discipline to carry out the needed planning for life after orthopaedics. PMID:24720335

  11. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons/Orthopaedic Trauma Associations/Pediatric Orthopaedic Association Disaster Response and Preparedness Course.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anthony E; Gerlinger, Tad L; Born, Christopher T

    2015-10-01

    A disaster is a catastrophic event that disrupts normal infrastructure to such a degree that normal response mechanisms and capabilities cannot manage what is required to respond appropriately to the event. Launched after the largest urban disaster in modern history--the 2010 Haiti Earthquake--the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons/Orthopaedic Trauma Association/Pediatric Orthopaedic Association of North America (AAOS/SOMOS/OTA/POSNA) Disaster Response Course (DRC) is designed to prepare orthopaedic surgeons for service in disaster response and humanitarian assistance efforts in both the acute phases as well as in the recovery and reconstructions phases. To date, 395 orthopaedic surgeons have completed the DRC and 286 (72.4%) have opted to become registered disaster responders. PMID:26356210

  12. Is anybody managing the store? National trends in hospital performance.

    PubMed

    Griffith, John R; Pattullo, Andrew; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Jelinek, Richard C; Foster, David A

    2006-01-01

    Nine standardized measures compiled from Medicare data show trends in the safety, quality, financial management, and efficiency for more than 2,500 community hospitals over five years ending in 2003. Although much public attention has been given to hospital performance, along with exhortations to improve, few measures show substantial positive trends, either in variance reduction or overall improvement. The authors conclude that environmental forces are not stimulating improvement and that the overall picture is one of randomness rather than management. PMID:17184003

  13. Abortion a business hurdle for nation's Catholic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Burda, D

    1989-08-25

    Abortion is the foremost moral issue for 626 Catholic hospitals nationwide since church teachings prohibit the performance of elective abortions. This and the fact that Catholic hospitals can not do voluntary sterilizations can hinder their ability to get managed care contracts. In some cases a hospital will not join a network because abortions and sterilizations are done in other hospitals in the network. In other cases they have been in plans where abortions are performed in other contract facilities; this does not violate the Catholic church policy since the abortions are not performed in their facility. When a Catholic and secular hospital plan a merger, Catholic ideals seem to take precedence. A Catholic hospital that went bankrupt in Philadelphia, was turned over to investors, and was under no obligation to follow the Catholic church's directives, but did not perform abortions anyway. In Washington state there are merger talks going on between a secular facility and the Franciscan Health System. The cessation of abortion and sterilization services appear to be outweighed by the financial benefits. Besides, these procedures can be performed through other providers in the area. In Michigan similar merger talks may fail because of the abortion issue. The government justice system is investigating and is likely to challenge any merger there. PMID:10294510

  14. American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support AOSSM Research Publications Toggle American Journal of Sports Medicine Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine Journal Apps Sports Medicine Update Other Professional Resources ...

  15. Maternal Clinical Diagnoses and Hospital Variation in the Risk of Cesarean Delivery: Analyses of a National US Hospital Discharge Database

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Arcaya, Mariana C.; Subramanian, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cesarean delivery is the most common inpatient surgery in the United States, where 1.3 million cesarean sections occur annually, and rates vary widely by hospital. Identifying sources of variation in cesarean use is crucial to improving the consistency and quality of obstetric care. We used hospital discharge records to examine the extent to which variability in the likelihood of cesarean section across US hospitals was attributable to individual women's clinical diagnoses. Methods and Findings Using data from the 2009 and 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project—a 20% sample of US hospitals—we analyzed data for 1,475,457 births in 1,373 hospitals. We fitted multilevel logistic regression models (patients nested in hospitals). The outcome was cesarean (versus vaginal) delivery. Covariates included diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy, hypertension in pregnancy, hemorrhage during pregnancy or placental complications, fetal distress, and fetal disproportion or obstructed labor; maternal age, race/ethnicity, and insurance status; and hospital size and location/teaching status. The cesarean section prevalence was 22.0% (95% confidence interval 22.0% to 22.1%) among women with no prior cesareans. In unadjusted models, the between-hospital variation in the individual risk of primary cesarean section was 0.14 (95% credible interval 0.12 to 0.15). The difference in the probability of having a cesarean delivery between hospitals was 25 percentage points. Hospital variability did not decrease after adjusting for patient diagnoses, socio-demographics, and hospital characteristics (0.16 [95% credible interval 0.14 to 0.18]). A limitation is that these data, while nationally representative, did not contain information on parity or gestational age. Conclusions Variability across hospitals in the individual risk of cesarean section is not decreased by accounting for differences in maternal diagnoses. These findings highlight

  16. Lessons Learned from Unfavorable Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction: Japan National Cancer Center Hospital and Okayama University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Narusi; Onoda, Satoshi; Sakuraba, Minoru

    2016-10-01

    The risk of surgical site infection (SSI) remains high after major reconstructive surgery of the head and neck. Clinical data regarding SSI in microsurgical tongue reconstruction are described at National Cancer Hospital in Japan, including discussions of unfavorable representative cases, the relationship between SSI and preoperative irradiation at Okayama University Hospital in Japan, and strategies for SSI control in head and neck reconstruction. Local complications are inevitable in patients undergoing reconstruction in the head and neck areas. The frequency of major complications can be decreased, and late postoperative complications can be prevented with the help of appropriate methods. PMID:27601396

  17. Fathers of orthopaedics in Germany (eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries): Lorenz Heister in Helmsted; Johann Friedrich Dieffenbach in Berlin; Heine and family in Würzburg.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    In orthopaedic medicine in Germany, Lorenz Heister, practicing in the eighteenth century, is considered one of the fathers of German surgery and is renowned for his books on management of hemorrhage, wounds, fractures, bandaging, instrumentation and surgery. After Heister, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, orthopaedic medicine in Germany developed uniformly. In a period when few doctors were interested in a separate discipline of orthopaedics, Germany led in this field. Heine devoted himself to the development of the new profession of orthopaedics, and in 1816, he opened the first orthopaedic institute on German soil in the former monastery of St. Stephen, which later became known as the Karolinen-Institut. Along with Heine and his family, the special development of orthopaedics in Berlin may be attributed to the work of Dieffenbach who, in 1832, became professor at the University of Berlin and in 1840 director of the Clinical Institute for Surgery at Charité Hospital. PMID:26294002

  18. Followership characteristics among infection preventionists in U.S. hospitals: Results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Greene, M Todd; Saint, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Infection prevention practices vary across U.S. hospitals. Although the importance of leadership in infection prevention has been described, little is known about how followership influences such efforts. Our national survey found that hospitals with truly exemplary followers in infection control roles may be more likely to use recommended prevention practices. PMID:26698669

  19. Essentials of disaster management: the role of the orthopaedic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Born, Christopher T; Monchik, Keith O; Hayda, Roman A; Bosse, Michael J; Pollak, Andrew N

    2011-01-01

    Disaster preparedness and management education is essential for allowing orthopaedic surgeons to play a valuable, constructive role in responding to disasters. The National Incident Management System, as part of the National Response Framework, provides coordination between all levels of government and uses the Incident Command System as its unified command structure. An "all-hazards" approach to disasters, whether natural, man-made, intentional, or unintentional, is fundamental to disaster planning. To respond to any disaster, command and control must be established, and emergency management must be integrated with public health and medical care. In the face of increasing acts of terrorism, an understanding of blast injury pathophysiology allows for improved diagnostic and treatment strategies. A practical understanding of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear agents and their attendant clinical symptoms is also prerequisite. Credentialing and coordination between designated organizations and the federal government are essential to allow civilian orthopaedic surgeons to access systems capable of disaster response. PMID:21553757

  20. The case for orthopaedic medicine in Israel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal complaints are probably the most frequent reasons for visiting a doctor. They comprise more than a quarter of the complaints to primary practitioners and are also the most common reason for referral to secondary or tertiary medicine. The clinicians most frequently consulted on musculoskeletal problems, and probably perceived to know most on the topic are orthopaedic surgeons. But in Israel, there is significant ambivalence with various aspects of the consultations provided by orthopaedic surgeons, both among the public and among various groups of clinicians, particularly family practitioners and physiotherapists. Methods In order to understand this problem we integrate new data we have collected with previously published data. New data include the rates of visits to orthopaedic surgeons per annum in one of Israel’s large non-profit HMO’s, and the domains of the visits to an orthopaedic surgeon. Results Orthopaedic surgeons are the third most frequently contracted secondary specialists in one of the Israeli HMO’s. Between 2009 and 2012 there was a 1.7% increase in visits to orthopaedists per annum (P < 0.0001, after correction for population growth). Almost 80% of the domains of the problems presented to an orthopaedic surgeon were in fields orthopaedic surgeons have limited formal training. Discussion While orthopaedic surgeons are clearly the authority on surgical problems of the musculoskeletal system, most musculoskeletal problems are not surgical, and the orthopaedic surgeon often lacks training in these areas which might be termed orthopaedic medicine. Furthermore, in Israel and in many other developed countries there is no accessible medical specialty that studies these problems, trains medical students in the subject and focuses on treating these problems. The neglect of this area which can be called the “Orthopaedic Medicine Lacuna” is responsible for inadequate treatment of non-surgical problems of the

  1. Heterotopic Ossification in Orthopaedic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nauth, Aaron; Giles, Erica; Potter, Benjamin K.; Nesti, Leon J.; O’Brien, Frederick P.; Bosse, Michael J.; Anglen, Jeffrey O.; Mehta, Samir; Ahn, Jaimo; Miclau, Theodore; Schemitsch, Emil H.

    2012-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) can be defined as the pathological formation of bone in extra-skeletal tissues. There has been a substantial amount of recent research on the pathophysiology, prophylaxis and treatment of HO and traumatic conditions associated with the development of HO. This research has advanced our understanding of this disease and helped to clarify evidence-based approaches to both the prophylaxis and treatment of HO. This article reviews the literature on these topics with a focus on their application in orthopaedic trauma. PMID:23010648

  2. Orthopaedic research and education foundation and industry.

    PubMed

    Wurth, Gene R; Sherr, Judy H; Coffman, Thomas M

    2003-07-01

    Members of orthopaedic industry commit a significant amount of funds each year to support research and education programs that are directly related to their product(s). In addition, industry supports organizations such as the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation. The relationship between the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation and industry began in the early 1980s. The support to the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation from industry primarily has come in the form of unrestricted grants. These grants best can be looked at as an investment rather than a contribution. This form of giving, once called corporate philanthropy is more accurately referred to as strategic philanthropy. Members of industry make these investments to enhance their reputations, build brand awareness, market their products and services, improve employee morale, increase customer loyalty, and establish strategic alliances. The specialty of orthopaedics is among the leaders in medicine in the amount of funding raised within the specialty for research and education programs. This is because of the amount of support from members of industry and the surgeons. During the past 15 years, 40% of the annual support to the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation has come from industry and the balance has come from surgeons and members of lay public. Future industry support of the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation and other organizations within the specialty of orthopaedics will be dependent on the continued demonstration of tangible returns in areas described. PMID:12838052

  3. Predictors of patient satisfaction with inpatient hospital pain management across the United States: A national study.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Daniel C; Shen, Megan Johnson; Holcombe, Randall F

    2016-07-01

    Satisfactory pain management of hospitalized patients remains a national unmet need for the United States. Although prior research indicates that inpatient pain management may be improving nationally, not all populations of patients rate pain management as equally satisfactory. County-level predictors, such as demographics and population density, and hospital-level predictors (eg, hospital-bed number), are understudied determinants of pain management patient satisfaction. We created a multivariate regression model of pain management patient satisfaction scores as indicated by Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey results based on county and hospital level predictors. Number of hospital beds (β = -0.16), percent foreign-born (β = -0.16), and population density (β = -0.08) most strongly predicted unfavorable ratings, whereas African American (β = 0.23), white (β= 0.23), and younger population (β = 0.08) most strongly predicted favorable ratings. Greater attention should be placed on pain management in larger hospitals that serve foreign-born patients in population-dense areas. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:498-501. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26970075

  4. Organizational and market factors associated with leadership development programs in hospitals: a national study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Thompson, Jon M

    2012-01-01

    Effective leadership in hospitals is widely recognized as the key to organizational performance. Clinical, financial, and operational performance is increasingly being linked to the leadership practices of hospital managers. Moreover, effective leadership has been described as a means to achieve competitive advantage. Recent environmental forces, including reimbursement changes and increased competition, have prompted many hospitals to focus on building leadership competencies to successfully address these challenges. Using the resource dependence theory as our conceptual framework, we present results from a national study of hospitals examining the association of organizational and market factors with the provision of leadership development program activities, including the presence of a leadership development program, a diversity plan, a program for succession planning, and career development resources. The data are taken from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) 2008 Survey of Hospitals, the Area Resource File, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The results of multilevel logistic regressions of each leadership development program activity on organizational and market factors indicate that hospital size, system and network affiliation, and accreditation are significantly and positively associated with all leadership development program activities. The market factors significantly associated with all leadership development activities include a positive odds ratio for metropolitan statistical area location and a negative odds ratio for the percentage of the hospital's service area population that is female and minority. For-profit hospitals are less likely to provide leadership development program activities. Additional findings are presented, and the implications for hospital management are discussed. PMID:22530292

  5. Quality measurement in orthopaedics: the purchasers' view.

    PubMed

    Lansky, David; Milstein, Arnold

    2009-10-01

    While all of medicine is under pressure to increase transparency and accountability, joint replacement subspecialists will face special scrutiny. Disclosures of questionable consulting fees, a demographic shift to younger patients, and uncertainty about the marginal benefits of product innovation in a time of great cost pressure invite a serious and progressive response from the profession. Current efforts to standardize measures by the National Quality Forum and PQRI will not address the concerns of purchasers, payors, or policy makers. Instead, they will ask the profession to document its commitment to appropriateness, stewardship of resources, coordination of care, and patient-centeredness. One mechanism for addressing these expectations is voluntary development of a uniform national registry for joint replacements that includes capture of preoperative appropriateness indicators, device monitoring information, revision rates, and structured postoperative patient followup. A national registry should support performance feedback and quality improvement activity, but it must also be designed to satisfy payor, purchaser, policymaker, and patient needs for information. Professional societies in orthopaedics should lead a collaborative process to develop metrics, infrastructure, and reporting formats that support continuous improvement and public accountability. PMID:19641973

  6. A NASA discovery has current applications in orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been actively used for nearly 40 yr, during which time it has been known to reduce pain, inflammation, and edema. It also has the ability to promote healing of wounds, including deep tissues and nerves, and prevent tissue damage through cell death. Much of the landmark research was done by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and these studies provided a springboard for many additional basic science studies. Few current clinical studies in orthopaedics have been performed, yet only in the past few years have basic science studies outlined the mechanisms of the effect of LLLT on the cell and subsequently the organism. This article reviews the basic science of LLLT, gives a historical perspective, and explains how it works, exposes the controversies and complications, and shows the new immediately applicable information in orthopaedics. PMID:25541589

  7. The Nanaimo and Charles Camsell Indian Hospitals: First Nations' narratives of health care, 1945 to 1965.

    PubMed

    Drees, Laurie Meijer

    2010-01-01

    First Nations' perspectives on health and health care as delivered by doctors, nurses, and Canada's former Indian hospital system form a significant part of Canada's medical history, as well as a part of First Nations people's personal histories. Oral histories collected in Alberta and British Columbia suggest that First Nations people who experienced the Nanaimo and Charles Camsell Indian hospitals between 1945 and 1965 perceive the value of their experiences to be reflected in their survivance, a concept recalled through narratives emphasizing both humour and pain, as well as past and present personal resilience. PMID:21114087

  8. The Vienna Heritage of Iowa Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2003-01-01

    Strong traditions of basic research, clinical innovation, teaching and integrating science and evaluation of outcomes into clinical practice have characterized University of Iowa orthopaedics for ninety years. These traditions were brought to Iowa City from Vienna when Iowa City was a town of fewer than 10,000 people in a sparsely populated rural state. In the last third of the 19th century, surgeons at the University of Vienna, led by Theodore Billroth (1829-1894), helped transform the practice of surgery. They developed new more effective procedures, analyzed the results of their operations, promoted the emergence and growth of surgical specialties and sought understanding of tissue structure, physiology and pathophysiology. Their efforts made Vienna one of the world's most respected centers for operative treatment, basic and clinical research and surgical education. Two individuals who followed Billroth, Eduard Albert (1841-1900) and Adolf Lorenz (1854-1946) focused their research and clinical practice on orthopaedics. Their successes in the study and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders led one of their students, Arthur Steindler (1878-1959), a 1902 graduate of the Vienna Medical School, to pursue a career in orthopaedics. Following medical school, he worked in Lorenz's orthopaedic clinic until 1907 when he joined John Ridlon (1852-1936) at the Chicago Home for Crippled Children. In 1910, Steindler became Professor of Orthopaedics at the Drake Medical School in Des Moines, Iowa, and, in 1913, John G. Bowman, the President of the University of Iowa, recruited him to establish an orthopaedic clinical and academic program in Iowa City. For the next third of a century he guided the development of the University of Iowa Orthopaedics Department, helped establish the fields of orthopaedic biomechanics and kinesiology and tirelessly stressed the importance of physiology, pathology and assessment of the outcomes of operations. From the legacy of Billroth, Albert and

  9. Algodystrophy in major orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Umberto; Buharaja, Rodrigo; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Riccardi, Mariastella; Gasbarra, Elena; Feola, Maurizio; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Summary Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) describes a diversity of painful conditions following trauma, associated with abnormal regulation of blood flow and sweating, trophic changes, and edema of skin. Epidemiology of this disease is not convincing because of the difficulties and inaccuracies in the diagnosis. Several mechanisms are involved in the genesis of CRPS. The higher incidence of CRPS in women over 65 suggests that some changes involving natural and pathologic processes of aging predispose to onset a CRPS. Many features of the orthopaedic management (surgical time, immobilization, surgical incision, fracture osteosynthesis or prosthetic implants) might influence inflammation status in different way. It is mandatory to improve the understanding of both the pathogenesis of CRPS and the conditions that play a decisive role in its genesis. Furthermore it is important to find some biomarkers that allow early diagnosis before the onset of typical clinical signs. PMID:27134627

  10. National Lupus Hospitalization Trends Reveal Rising Rates of Herpes Zoster and Declines in Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sara G.; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Trupin, Laura; Gensler, Lianne; Katz, Patricia P.; Yelin, Edward H.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Yazdany, Jinoos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therapeutic practices have evolved over the past 15 years, but effects on infectious complications of SLE are unknown. We evaluated trends in hospitalizations for severe and opportunistic infections in a population-based SLE study. Methods Data derive from the 2000 to 2011 United States National Inpatient Sample, including individuals who met a validated administrative definition of SLE. Primary outcomes were diagnoses of bacteremia, pneumonia, opportunistic fungal infection, herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus, or pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). We used Poisson regression to determine whether infection rates were changing in SLE hospitalizations and used predictive marginals to generate annual adjusted rates of specific infections. Results We identified 361,337 SLE hospitalizations from 2000 to 2011 meeting study inclusion criteria. Compared to non-SLE hospitalizations, SLE patients were younger (51 vs. 62 years), predominantly female (89% vs. 54%), and more likely to be racial/ethnic minorities. SLE diagnosis was significantly associated with all measured severe and opportunistic infections. From 2000 to 2011, adjusted SLE hospitalization rates for herpes zoster increased more than non-SLE rates: 54 to 79 per 10,000 SLE hospitalizations compared with 24 to 29 per 10,000 non-SLE hospitalizations. Conversely, SLE hospitalizations for PCP disproportionately decreased: 5.1 to 2.5 per 10,000 SLE hospitalizations compared with 0.9 to 1.3 per 10,000 non-SLE hospitalizations. Conclusions Among patients with SLE, herpes zoster hospitalizations are rising while PCP hospitalizations are declining. These trends likely reflect evolving SLE treatment strategies. Further research is needed to identify patients at greatest risk for infectious complications. PMID:26731012

  11. Older Patients' Unexpressed Concerns About Orthopaedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hudak, Pamela L.; Armstrong, Kristy; Braddock, Clarence; Frankel, Richard M.; Levinson, Wendy

    2008-01-01

    Background: As the U.S. population ages, orthopaedic surgeons will increasingly be required to counsel older patients about major surgical procedures. Understanding patient concerns or worries about surgery could help orthopaedic surgeons to assist their patients in making these decisions. The objectives of this study were to explore the nature of patient concerns regarding orthopaedic surgery and to describe how patients raise concerns during visits with orthopaedic surgeons and how orthopaedic surgeons respond. Methods: As part of a study involving audiotaping of 886 visits between patients and orthopaedic surgeons, fifty-nine patients sixty years of age or older who were considering surgery were recruited to participate in semistructured telephone interviews at five to seven days and one month after the visit. Patients were asked about their perceptions of the visit and how they made their decision about surgery. These interviews were analyzed to identify patients' concerns with the use of qualitative content analysis and then compared with the audiotaped visits to determine whether these concerns were actually raised during the visit and, if so, how well the orthopaedic surgeons responded. Analyses based on patient race (black or white) were also performed. Results: One hundred and sixty-four concerns pertaining to (1) the surgery (anticipated quality of life after the surgery, the care facility, the timing of the operation, and the patient's capacity to meet the demands of the surgery) and (2) the surgeons (their competency, communication, and professional practices) were identified. Patients raised only 53% of their concerns with the orthopaedic surgeons and were selective in what they disclosed; concerns about the timing of the operation and about the care facility were frequently raised, but concerns about their capacity to meet the demands of the surgery and about the orthopaedic surgeons were not. Orthopaedic surgeons responded positively to 66% of the

  12. Access to primary care and the route of emergency admission to hospital: retrospective analysis of national hospital administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Thomas E; Harris, Matthew; Watt, Hilary; Soljak, Michael; Richards, Emma; Gunning, Elinor; Bottle, Alex; Macinko, James; Majeed, Azeem

    2016-01-01

    Background The UK government is pursuing policies to improve primary care access, as many patients visit accident and emergency (A and E) departments after being unable to get suitable general practice appointments. Direct admission to hospital via a general practitioner (GP) averts A and E use, and may reduce total hospital costs. It could also enhance the continuity of information between GPs and hospital doctors, possibly improving healthcare outcomes. Objective To determine whether primary care access is associated with the route of emergency admission—via a GP versus via an A and E department. Methods Retrospective analysis of national administrative data from English hospitals for 2011–2012. Adults admitted in an emergency (unscheduled) for ≥1 night via a GP or an A and E department formed the study population. The measure of primary care access—the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt—was derived from a large, nationally representative patient survey. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate associations, adjusting for patient and admission characteristics. Results The analysis included 2 322 112 emergency admissions (81.9% via an A and E department). With a 5 unit increase in the percentage of patients able to get a general practice appointment on their last attempt, the adjusted odds of GP admission (vs A and E admission) was estimated to increase by 15% (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.17). The probability of GP admission if ≥95% of appointment attempts were successful in each general practice was estimated to be 19.6%. This probability reduced to 13.6% when <80% of appointment attempts were successful. This equates to 139 673 fewer GP admissions (456 232 vs 316 559) assuming no change in the total number of admissions. Associations were consistent in direction across geographical regions of England. Conclusions Among hospital inpatients admitted as an emergency, patients

  13. Development of hospital-integrated large-scale PACS in Seoul National University Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, JongHyo; Yeon, Kyoung M.; Han, Man Chung; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Cho, Han I.

    1997-05-01

    The SNUH has started a PACS project with three main goals: to develop a fully hospital-integrated PACS, to develop a cost effective PACS using open systems architecture, and to extend PACS' role to the advanced application such as image guided surgery, multi-media assisted education and research. In order to achieve these goals, we have designed a PACS architecture which takes advantage of client-server computing, high speed communication network, computing power of up-to-date high-end PC, and advanced image compression method. We have installed ATM based communication network in radiology department and in-patient wards, and implemented DICOM compliant acquisition modules, image storage and management servers, and high resolution display workstations based on high-end PC and Microsoft Windows 95 and Windows NT operating systems. The SNUH PACS is in partial scale operation now, and will be expanded to full scale by the end of 1998.

  14. A national system for monitoring the performance of hospitals in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    McNatt, Zahirah; Linnander, Erika; Endeshaw, Abraham; Tatek, Dawit; Conteh, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many countries struggle to develop and implement strategies to monitor hospitals nationally. The challenge is particularly acute in low-income countries where resources for measurement and reporting are scarce. We examined the experience of developing and implementing a national system for monitoring the performance of 130 government hospitals in Ethiopia. Using participatory observation, we found that the monitoring system resulted in more consistent hospital reporting of performance data to regional health bureaus and the federal government, increased transparency about hospital performance and the development of multiple quality-improvement projects. The development and implementation of the system, which required technical and political investment and support, would not have been possible without strong hospital-level management capacity. Thorough assessment of the health sector’s readiness to change and desire to prioritize hospital quality can be helpful in the early stages of design and implementation. This assessment may include interviews with key informants, collection of data about health facilities and human resources and discussion with academic partners. Aligning partners and donors with the government’s vision for quality improvement can enhance acceptability and political support. Such alignment can enable resources to be focused strategically towards one national effort – rather than be diluted across dozens of potentially competing projects. Initial stages benefit from having modest goals and the flexibility for continuous modification and improvement, through active engagement with all stakeholders. PMID:26600614

  15. The Impact of National Cultural Differences on Nurses' Acceptance of Hospital Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to explore the influence of national cultural differences on nurses' perceptions of their acceptance of hospital information systems. This study uses the perspective of Technology Acceptance Model; national cultural differences in terms of masculinity/femininity, individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance are incorporated into the Technology Acceptance Model as moderators, whereas time orientation is a control variable on hospital information system acceptance. A quantitative research design was used in this study; 261 participants, US and Taiwan RNs, all had hospital information system experience. Data were collected from November 2013 to February 2014 and analyzed using a t test to compare the coefficients for each moderator. The results show that individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance all exhibit significant difference on hospital information system acceptance; however, both masculinity/femininity and time orientation factors did not show significance. This study verifies that national cultural differences have significant influence on nurses' behavioral intention to use hospital information systems. Therefore, hospital information system providers should emphasize the way in which to integrate different technological functions to meet the needs of nurses from various cultural backgrounds. PMID:25899441

  16. Orthopaedic Surgeon Burnout: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; DePasse, J Mason; Kamal, Robin N

    2016-04-01

    Burnout is a syndrome marked by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low job satisfaction. Rates of burnout in orthopaedic surgeons are higher than those in the general population and many other medical subspecialties. Half of all orthopaedic surgeons show symptoms of burnout, with the highest rates reported in residents and orthopaedic department chairpersons. This syndrome is associated with poor outcomes for surgeons, institutions, and patients. Validated instruments exist to objectively diagnose burnout, although family members and colleagues should be aware of early warning signs and risk factors, such as irritability, withdrawal, and failing relationships at work and home. Emerging evidence indicates that mindfulness-based interventions or educational programs combined with meditation may be effective treatment options. Orthopaedic residency programs, departments, and practices should focus on identifying the signs of burnout and implementing prevention and treatment programs that have been shown to mitigate symptoms. PMID:26885712

  17. American Academy of Neurological and Orthopaedic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Orthopaedic Surgeons Navigation Menu Home Who We Are Board of Directors Executive Committee Standing Committees Contact Us Membership Our ... gratitude, as well as congratulations from the entire Board of Directors, is extended to Dr. Zamorano for her invaluable ...

  18. A survey of orthopaedic journal editors determining the criteria of manuscript selection for publication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate the characteristics of editors and criteria used by orthopaedic journal editors in assessing submitted manuscripts. Methods Between 2008 to 2009 all 70 editors of Medline listed orthopaedic journals were approached prospectively with a questionnaire to determine the criteria used in assessing manuscripts for publication. Results There was a 42% response rate. There was 1 female editor and the rest were male with 57% greater than 60 years of age. 67% of the editors worked in university teaching hospitals and 90% of publications were in English. The review process differed between journals with 59% using a review proforma, 52% reviewing an anonymised manuscript, 76% using a routine statistical review and 59% of journals used 2 reviewers routinely. In 89% of the editors surveyed, the editor was able to overrule the final decision of the reviewers. Important design factors considered for manuscript acceptance were that the study conclusions were justified (80%), that the statistical analysis was appropriate (76%), that the findings could change practice (72%). The level of evidence (70%) and type of study (62%) were deemed less important. When asked what factors were important in the manuscript influencing acceptance, 73% cited an understandable manuscript, 53% cited a well written manuscript and 50% a thorough literature review as very important factors. Conclusions The editorial and review process in orthopaedic journals uses different approaches. There may be a risk of language bias among editors of orthopaedic journals with under-representation of non-English publications in the orthopaedic literature. PMID:21527007

  19. Justifications and needs for diversity in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    White, A A

    1999-05-01

    America is founded on high humanitarian, democratic ideals. The historic facts of slavery, discrimination, and segregation challenge and taint these democratic principles. Although progress has been made, serious racial problems remain. In 1997, the United States had 474 active hate groups, up 20% from 1996. African American males who have the same education as white males doing the same work earn approximately 75% of what their white counterparts earn. America, as predicted by the Kerner Commission Report, is two societies: black and white, separate, and unequal. Some astonishing disparities in healthcare exist. Peer reviewed medical literature documents that African Americans have higher infant mortality rates, shorter life expectancies, fewer joint replacements, and more amputations than whites. Communications within a diverse group of students and teachers enriches the educational experience. The late Supreme Court Justice Lewis Powell, LLD, asserted that a medical student from a particular background may enrich classmates' understanding of people whose cultures are different from their own, and improve their ability to serve a heterogeneous patient population. Diversity on clinical teams can enhance rapport between patient and physician, and can diminish unthinking insults to patients, born of physician ethnic insensitivity. Healthcare facilities with diverse staffs are more likely than homogeneous facilities to attract and successfully serve the nation's diverse population. A University of California at Davis School of Medicine study showed that diversity can be achieved without compromising quality of patient care. Clinically and ideologically, diversity in orthopaedics is good for patients and for the country. PMID:10335274

  20. Improving Service Quality in Long-term Care Hospitals: National Evaluation on Long-term Care Hospitals and Employees Perception of Quality Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkyung; Han, Woosok

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate predictors for specific dimensions of service quality perceived by hospital employees in long-term care hospitals. Methods Data collected from a survey of 298 hospital employees in 18 long-term care hospitals were analysed. Multivariate ordinary least squares regression analysis with hospital fixed effects was used to determine the predictors of service quality using respondents’ and organizational characteristics. Results The most significant predictors of employee-perceived service quality were job satisfaction and degree of consent on national evaluation criteria. National evaluation results on long-term care hospitals and work environment also had positive effects on service quality. Conclusion The findings of the study show that organizational characteristics are significant determinants of service quality in long-term care hospitals. Assessment of the extent to which hospitals address factors related to employeeperceived quality of services could be the first step in quality improvement activities. Results have implications for efforts to improve service quality in longterm care hospitals and designing more comprehensive national evaluation criteria. PMID:24159497

  1. Tuberculosis Hospitalization Fees and Bed Utilization in China from 1999 to 2009: The Results of a National Survey of Tuberculosis Specialized Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Mi, Fengling; Liu, Yuhong; Li, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background China is transitioning towards concentrating tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic and treatment services in hospitals, while the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) system will retain important public health functions. Patient expenditure incurred through hospitalization may lead to barriers to TB care or interruption of treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a national survey of TB specialized hospitals to determine hospitalization fees and hospital bed utilization in 1999, 2004, and 2009. Hospitalization of TB patients increased 185.3% from 1999 to 2009. While the average hospitalization fees also increased, the proportion of those fees in relation to GDP per capita decreased. Hospitalization fees differed across the three regions (eastern, central, and western). Using a least standard difference (LSD) paired analysis, in 2004, the difference in hospitalization fees was significant when comparing eastern and central provinces (p<0.001) as well as to western provinces (p<0.001). In 2009, the difference remained statistically significant when comparing eastern province hospitalization fees with central provinces (p<0.001) and western provinces (p = 0.008). In 2004 and 2009, the cost associated with hospitalization as a proportion of GDP per capita was highest in the western region. The average in-patient stay decreased from 33 days in 1999 to 26 and 27 days in 2004 and 2009 respectively. Finally, hospital bed utilization in all three regions increased over this period. Conclusions/Significance Our findings show that both the total number of in-patients and hospitalization fees increased from 1999 to 2009, though the proportion of hospitalization fees to GDP per capita decreased. As diagnostic services move to hospitals, regulatory and monitoring mechanisms should be established, and hospitals should make use of the experience garnered by the CDC system through continued strong collaborations. Infrastructure and social protection

  2. Use of a national collaborative to improve hospital quality in a low-income setting

    PubMed Central

    Linnander, Erika; McNatt, Zahirah; Sipsma, Heather; Tatek, Dawit; Abebe, Yigeremu; Endeshaw, Abraham; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality improvement collaboratives are a widely used mechanism to improve hospital performance in high-income settings, but we lack evidence about their effectiveness in low-income settings. Methods We conducted cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of data from the Ethiopian Hospital Alliance for Quality, a national collaborative sponsored by Ethiopia's Federal Ministry of Health. We identified hospital strategies associated with more positive patient satisfaction using linear regression and assessed changes in patient experience over a 3-year period (2012–2014) using matched t-tests. Results A total of 68 hospitals (response rate 68/120, 56.7%) were included in cross-sectional analysis. Four practices were significantly associated with more positive patient satisfaction (p<0.05): posting a record of cleaning activity in toilets and in patient wards, distributing leaflets in the local language with each prescription, and sharing ideas about patient experience across the hospital. Among hospitals that had complete data for longitudinal analysis (44/68, 65%), we found a 10% improvement in a 10-point measure of patient satisfaction (7.7 vs 8.4, p<0.01) from the start to the end of the study period. Conclusions Quality improvement collaboratives can be useful at scale in low-income settings in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly for hospitals that adopt strategies associated with patient satisfaction. PMID:26796023

  3. Bioceramic Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2003-11-02

    During the past century, man-made materials and devices have been developed to the point at which they have been used successfully to replace and/or restore function to diseased or damaged tissues. In the field of orthopaedics, the use of metal implants has significantly improved the quality of life for countless individuals. Critical factors for implant success include proper design, material selection, and biocompatibility. While early research focused on the understanding biomechanical properties of the metal device, recent work has turned toward improving the biological properties of these devices. This has lead to the introduction of calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics as a bioactive interface between the bulk metal impart and the surrounding tissue. The first calcium phosphate coatings where produced via vapor phase routes but more recently, there has been the emergence of solution based and biomimetic methods. While each approach has its own intrinsic materials and biological properties, in general CaP coatings have the promise to improve implant biocompatibility and ultimately implant longevity.

  4. Digital photography in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Elbeshbeshy, B; Trepman, E

    2001-01-01

    Digital photography has become a practical alternative to film photography for documentation, communication, and education about orthopaedic problems and treatment. Digital cameras may be used to document preoperative and postoperative condition, intraoperative findings, and imaging studies. Digital photographs are captured on the charged coupler device (CCD) of the camera, and processed as digital data. Images may be immediately viewed on the liquid crystal display (LCD) screen of the camera and reshot if necessary. Photographic image files may be stored in the camera in a floppy diskette, CompactFlash card, or SmartMedia card, and transferred to a computer. The images may be manipulated using photo-editing software programs, stored on media such as Zip disks or CD-R discs, printed, and incorporated into digital presentations. The digital photographs may be transmitted to others using electronic mail (e-mail) and Internet web sites. Transparency film slides may be converted to digital format and used in digital presentations. Despite the initial expense to obtain the required hardware, major cost savings in film and processing charges may be realized over time compared with film photography. PMID:11206828

  5. Administrative Databases in Orthopaedic Research: Pearls and Pitfalls of Big Data.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpesh A; Singh, Kern; Nunley, Ryan M; Minhas, Shobhit V

    2016-03-01

    The drive for evidence-based decision-making has highlighted the shortcomings of traditional orthopaedic literature. Although high-quality, prospective, randomized studies in surgery are the benchmark in orthopaedic literature, they are often limited by size, scope, cost, time, and ethical concerns and may not be generalizable to larger populations. Given these restrictions, there is a growing trend toward the use of large administrative databases to investigate orthopaedic outcomes. These datasets afford the opportunity to identify a large numbers of patients across a broad spectrum of comorbidities, providing information regarding disparities in care and outcomes, preoperative risk stratification parameters for perioperative morbidity and mortality, and national epidemiologic rates and trends. Although there is power in these databases in terms of their impact, potential problems include administrative data that are at risk of clerical inaccuracies, recording bias secondary to financial incentives, temporal changes in billing codes, a lack of numerous clinically relevant variables and orthopaedic-specific outcomes, and the absolute requirement of an experienced epidemiologist and/or statistician when evaluating results and controlling for confounders. Despite these drawbacks, administrative database studies are fundamental and powerful tools in assessing outcomes on a national scale and will likely be of substantial assistance in the future of orthopaedic research. PMID:26836377

  6. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers. 488.6 Section 488.6 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES...

  7. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers. 488.6 Section 488.6 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES...

  8. Boston's contributions to the development of orthopaedics in the United States. A brief history.

    PubMed

    Mankin, H J

    2000-05-01

    Since the early part of the nineteenth century, physicians from Boston have had a major impact on orthopaedics in America. Initially, the general surgeons such as John Ball Brown and his son, Buckminster had an impact on orthopaedics, but contributors such as Henry Bigelow and Charles Scudder added greatly to the knowledge and capacity for care. The first orthopaedic ward, Ward I, was located at the Massachusetts General Hospital and began the new era. Surgical treatment by orthopaedists began in the twentieth century with such contributors as Philip Wilson, EA Codman, Robert B. Osgood, Joel Goldthwait, Elliot Brackett, Robert Lovett, and Edward Bradford. These physicians not only treated patients at the Children's, Tufts University, Boston City, the Beth Israel, and the Massachusetts General Hospitals, but assumed the academic responsibilities of a major educational center. More recently the contributors to orthopaedics have included Marius Smith-Petersen, Otto Aufranc, Henry Banks, Edward Cave, Carter Rowe, Joseph Barr, and others who have created a spectacular program for education, research, and clinical care. PMID:10818968

  9. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID

  10. An international survey of physicians regarding clinical trials: a comparison between Kyoto University Hospital and Seoul National University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background International clinical trials are now rapidly expanding into Asia. However, the proportion of global trials is higher in South Korea compared to Japan despite implementation of similar governmental support in both countries. The difference in clinical trial environment might influence the respective physicians’ attitudes and experience towards clinical trials. Therefore, we designed a questionnaire to explore how physicians conceive the issues surrounding clinical trials in both countries. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted at Kyoto University Hospital (KUHP) and Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH) in 2008. The questionnaire consisted of 15 questions and 2 open-ended questions on broad key issues relating to clinical trials. Results The number of responders was 301 at KUHP and 398 at SNUH. Doctors with trial experience were 196 at KUHP and 150 at SNUH. Among them, 12% (24/196) at KUHP and 41% (61/150) at SUNH had global trial experience. Most respondents at both institutions viewed clinical trials favorably and thought that conducting clinical trials contributed to medical advances, which would ultimately lead to new and better treatments. The main reason raised as a hindrance to conducting clinical trials was the lack of personnel support and time. Doctors at both university hospitals thought that more clinical research coordinators were required to conduct clinical trials more efficiently. KUHP doctors were driven mainly by pure academic interest or for their desire to find new treatments, while obtaining credits for board certification and co-authorship on manuscripts also served as motivation factors for doctors at SNUH. Conclusions Our results revealed that there might be two different approaches to increase clinical trial activity. One is a social level approach to establish clinical trial infrastructure providing sufficient clinical research professionals. The other is an individual level approach that would provide incentives to

  11. [Problems in career planning for novice medical technologists in Japanese national hospitals].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Shu; Tsutaya, Shoji; Akimoto, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Keiya; Yabaka, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Skills and knowledge regarding many different types of test are required for medical technologists (MTs) to provide accurate information to help doctors and other medical specialists. In order to become an efficient MT, specialized training programs are required. Certification in specialized areas of clinical laboratory sciences or a doctoral degree in medical sciences may help MTs to realize career advancement, a higher earning potential, and expand the options in their career. However, most young MTs in national university hospitals are employed as part-time workers on a three-year contract, which is too short to obtain certifications or a doctoral degree. We have to leave the hospital without expanding our future. We need to take control of our own development in order to enhance our employability within the period. As teaching and training hospitals, national university hospitals in Japan are facing a difficult dilemma in nurturing MTs. I hope, as a novice medical technologist, that at least university hospitals in Japan create an appropriate workplace environment for novice MTs. PMID:23427696

  12. National Hospital Management Portal (NHMP): a framework for e-health implementation.

    PubMed

    Adetiba, E; Eleanya, M; Fatumo, S A; Matthews, V O

    2009-01-01

    Health information represents the main basis for health decision-making process and there have been some efforts to increase access to health information in developing countries. However, most of these efforts are based on the internet which has minimal penetration especially in the rural and sub-urban part of developing countries. In this work, a platform for medical record acquisition via the ubiquitous 2.5G/3G wireless communications technologies is presented. The National Hospital Management Portal (NHMP) platform has a central database at each specific country's national hospital which could be updated/accessed from hosts at health centres, clinics, medical laboratories, teaching hospitals, private hospitals and specialist hospitals across the country. With this, doctors can have access to patients' medical records more easily, get immediate access to test results from laboratories, deliver prescription directly to pharmacists. If a particular treatment can be provided to a patient more effectively in another country, NHMP makes it simpler to organise and carry out such treatment abroad. PMID:20643641

  13. A comparison of hospital administrative costs in eight nations: US costs exceed all others by far.

    PubMed

    Himmelstein, David U; Jun, Miraya; Busse, Reinhard; Chevreul, Karine; Geissler, Alexander; Jeurissen, Patrick; Thomson, Sarah; Vinet, Marie-Amelie; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2014-09-01

    A few studies have noted the outsize administrative costs of US hospitals, but no research has compared these costs across multiple nations with various types of health care systems. We assembled a team of international health policy experts to conduct just such a challenging analysis of hospital administrative costs across eight nations: Canada, England, Scotland, Wales, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United States. We found that administrative costs accounted for 25.3 percent of total US hospital expenditures--a percentage that is increasing. Next highest were the Netherlands (19.8 percent) and England (15.5 percent), both of which are transitioning to market-oriented payment systems. Scotland and Canada, whose single-payer systems pay hospitals global operating budgets, with separate grants for capital, had the lowest administrative costs. Costs were intermediate in France and Germany (which bill per patient but pay separately for capital projects) and in Wales. Reducing US per capita spending for hospital administration to Scottish or Canadian levels would have saved more than $150 billion in 2011. This study suggests that the reduction of US administrative costs would best be accomplished through the use of a simpler and less market-oriented payment scheme. PMID:25201663

  14. The Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled Eugene H. Pool, Fourth Surgeon-in-Chief 1933–1935 Followed by Philip D. Wilson, Fifth Surgeon-in-Chief 1935

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In 1933, for the second time in the history of the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (R & C), a general surgeon, Eugene Hillhouse Pool, MD, was appointed Surgeon-in-Chief by the Board of Managers of the New York Society for the Relief of the Ruptured and Crippled. R & C (whose name was changed to the Hospital for Special Surgery in 1940), then the oldest orthopaedic hospital in the country, was losing ground as the leading orthopaedic center in the nation. The R & C Board charged Dr. Pool with the task of recruiting the nation’s best orthopaedic surgeon to become the next Surgeon-in-Chief. Phillip D. Wilson, MD, from the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and the Harvard Medical School was selected and agreed to accept this challenge. He joined the staff of the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled in the spring of 1934 as Director of Surgery and replaced Dr. Pool as Surgeon-in-Chief the next year. It was the time of the Great Depression, which added a heavy financial toll to the daily operations of the hospital. With a clear and courageous vision, Dr. Wilson reorganized the hospital, its staff responsibilities, professional education and care of patients. He established orthopaedic fellowships to support young orthopaedic surgeons interested in conducting research and assisted them with the initiation of their new practices. Recognizing that the treatment of crippling conditions and hernia were becoming separate specialties, one of his first decisions was to restructure the Hernia Department to become the General Surgery Department. His World War I experiences in Europe helped develop his expertise in the fields of fractures, war trauma and amputations, providing a broad foundation in musculoskeletal diseases that was to be beneficial to him in his future role as the leader of R & C. PMID:18815851

  15. The impact of ongoing national terror on the community of hospital nurses in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ron, Pnina; Shamai, Michal

    2014-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore the connections between the exposure of nurses in Israel to national terror and the levels of distress experienced due to ongoing terror attacks. The data were collected from 214 nurses from various parts of Israel who work in three types of heath services (mainly hospital departments) and provide help to victims of terror. The nurses reported very high levels of burnout, high levels of stress and medium-to high levels of intrusive memories. Levels of exposure were associated with burnout, intrusive memories and level of stress. More professional attention should be given to hospital nurses who provide care for trauma patients. PMID:23982180

  16. Does Illicit Drug Use Influence Inpatient Adverse Events, Death, Length of Stay, and Discharge After Orthopaedic Trauma?

    PubMed

    Babatunde, Victor D; Menendez, Mariano E; Ring, David

    2016-01-01

    Illicit drug use among adults is increasing, but its associated risk following orthopaedic trauma remains largely unexplored. This study assessed the relationship of illicit drug use with inpatient adverse events, in-hospital mortality, prolonged length of stay, and nonroutine discharge. With the use of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, 7,118,720 orthopaedic trauma inpatients from 2002 to 2011 were identified and separated into illicit drug users (1.5%) and non-illicit drug users (98.5%). Multivariable regression modeling was used to determine the association between illicit drug use and each outcome variable. Illicit drug use was associated with higher odds of inpatient adverse events, but not greater likelihood of inpatient death. Illicit drug users were also more likely to experience prolonged hospital stay and nonroutine discharge. Prompt recognition and effective treatment interventions for orthopaedic trauma patients with a history of illicit drug use may improve inpatient outcomes. PMID:27082887

  17. Orthopaedic trauma from road crashes: is enough being done?

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Lachlan H; Brooke, Kathryn; Faux, Steven G

    2009-02-01

    A file review of patients presenting to the Emergency Department of St Vincent's Hospital with fractures sustained in a road crash was completed to describe patterns of orthopaedic injury, acute intervention and separation as well as the cost of care for adult road crash victims. One-hundred and eighty-seven patients were included. 65.8% were male; 48.1% were pedestrians. Differing patterns of injury corresponded to the role of the patient in the road crash (eg, pedestrian, driver of vehicle, etc). The mean length of stay was 8.8 days. 35.2% of patients were prescribed a different analgesic at discharge to that which they had received in the previous 24 hours. 35.8% had a documented discussion regarding insurance matters, usually with a social worker. 11.9% were discharged to inpatient rehabilitation. 56.2% had orthopaedic follow-up arranged at discharge, while 4.8% were discharged to an outpatient rehabilitation clinic. The mean overall cost was $13 336, with patients aged over 65 costing the most. The quality of acute care for fractures sustained in road crashes could be improved with evidence-based analgesia management, increased screening for psychiatric sequelae, enhanced assistance with insurance matters and vocational issues, and closer follow-up. Further research into the impact of these factors on long-term recovery is warranted. PMID:19203336

  18. Building the Capacity to Manage Orthopaedic Trauma After a Catastrophe in a Low-Income Country.

    PubMed

    Furey, Andrew; Rourke, James; Larsen, Hans

    2015-10-01

    Providing trauma care in an austere environment is very challenging, especially when the country is faced with a natural disaster. Unfortunately the combination of these elements highlights the deficiencies in managing orthopaedic trauma both in a developing country and in the face of a natural disaster, exponentially amplifying the effects of each. When considering the implementation and practice of orthopaedic trauma care in such an environment, one must consider the initial phase of program development and look further to the future in the development of a resilient program, which is sustainable. Through the use of the example of Haiti and a specific Non-Governmental Organization, we discuss the evidence for and thoughts behind developing orthopaedic trauma care program immediately after a natural disaster. This program aims to build capacity and empower a developing nation's health professionals to advance the care of orthopaedic trauma patients. We describe a model of capacity building that serves as a framework to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of low-to middle-income countries in providing orthopaedic trauma care when faced with such a challenge. PMID:26356206

  19. Silver nanoparticles and their orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Brennan, S A; Ní Fhoghlú, C; Devitt, B M; O'Mahony, F J; Brabazon, D; Walsh, A

    2015-05-01

    Implant-associated infection is a major source of morbidity in orthopaedic surgery. There has been extensive research into the development of materials that prevent biofilm formation, and hence, reduce the risk of infection. Silver nanoparticle technology is receiving much interest in the field of orthopaedics for its antimicrobial properties, and the results of studies to date are encouraging. Antimicrobial effects have been seen when silver nanoparticles are used in trauma implants, tumour prostheses, bone cement, and also when combined with hydroxyapatite coatings. Although there are promising results with in vitro and in vivo studies, the number of clinical studies remains small. Future studies will be required to explore further the possible side effects associated with silver nanoparticles, to ensure their use in an effective and biocompatible manner. Here we present a review of the current literature relating to the production of nanosilver for medical use, and its orthopaedic applications. PMID:25922449

  20. Ionising radiation: are orthopaedic surgeons at risk?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G. L.; Briggs, T. W.; Lavy, C. B.; Nordeen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Modern orthopaedic trauma practice involves increased exposure of the surgeon to ionising radiation. However, there have been no studies to investigate whether the doses received are within limits for non-classified workers. In this study, whole body, eye and extremity, namely hand, doses were measured in six orthopaedic surgeons during trauma cases requiring the use of X-rays in theatre. None of the subjects approached the recommended maximum dose levels for either the whole body, eyes or hands. This finding is reassuring. In orthopaedics, the limiting dose is that to the hands. This differs from previously studied groups, such as radiologists and cardiologists, in whom the limiting factor is the dose to the lens of the eye. Although current precautions appear to be adequate, safe practice in the future will depend on continuing vigilance and repetition of studies similar to this one as techniques and workloads change. PMID:1416705

  1. Three Dimensional Printing in Orthopaedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mulford, Jonathan; MacKay, N; Babazadeh, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Three dimensional (3D) printing technology has many current and future applications in orthopaedics. The objectives of this article are to review published literature regarding applications of 3D technology in orthopaedic surgery with a focus on knee surgery. Methods: A narrative review of the applications of 3D printing technology in orthopaedic practice was achieved by a search of computerised databases, internet and reviewing references of identified publications. Results: There is current widespread use of 3D printing technology in orthopaedics. 3D technology can be used in education, preoperative planning and custom manufacturing. Custom manufacturing applications include surgical guides, prosthetics and implants. Many future applications exist including biological applications. 3D printed models of anatomy have assisted in the education of patients, students, trainees and surgeons. 3D printed models also assist with surgical planning of complex injuries or unusual anatomy. 3D printed surgical guides may simplify surgery, make surgery precise and reduce operative time. Computer models based on MRI or CT scans are utilised to plan surgery and placement of implants. Complex osteotomies can be performed using 3D printed surgical guides. This can be particularly useful around the knee. A 3D printed guide allows pre osteotomy drill holes for the plate fixation and provides an osteotomy guide to allow precise osteotomy. 3D printed surgical guides for knee replacement are widely available. 3D printing has allowed the emergence of custom implants. Custom implants that are patient specific have been particularly used for complex revision arthroplasty or for very difficult cases with altered anatomy. Future applications are likely to include biological 3D printing of cartilage and bone scaffolds. Conclusion: 3D printing in orthopaedic surgery has and will continue to change orthopaedic practice. Its role is to provide safe, reproducible, reliable models with

  2. An audit of university education in trauma and orthopaedic surgery in Great Britain.

    PubMed Central

    O'Dowd, J K; Spencer, J D

    1992-01-01

    An audit of undergraduate trauma and orthopaedic surgery teaching was carried out in 24 of the 27 medical schools in Great Britain and major differences were found between the medical schools. The range of time spent in teaching trauma and orthopaedic surgery for undergraduates varied from 3 weeks to 12 weeks and in five out of 27 medical schools trauma and orthopaedic surgery tuition was split between various years of the clinical curriculum. In some schools there were 30 students on a firm and in others only one. The opportunity for undergraduates to give feedback to their teachers, the use of objective assessment at the end of such an appointment by the teachers, varied between medical schools. To avoid some of these very basic differences between our medical schools, the teaching of clinical subjects to undergraduates in medicine should be reviewed nationally and minimum standards set. PMID:1433062

  3. Antimicrobial biocompatible bioscaffolds for orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Ammar T; Terrell, Lekeith; Monroe, W Todd; Dasa, Vinod; Janes, Marlene E; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Hayes, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    Nationally, nearly 1.5 million patients in the USA suffer from ailments requiring bone grafts and hip and other joint replacements. Infections following internal fixation in orthopaedic trauma can cause osteomyelitis in 22-66% of cases and, if uncontrolled, the mortality rate can be as high as 2%. We characterize a procedure for the synthesis of antimicrobial and biocompatible poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) and poly-ethyleneglycol (PEG) bioscaffolds designed to degrade and absorb at a controlled rate. The bioscaffold architecture aims to provide a suitable substrate for the controlled release of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) to reduce bacterial growth and to aid the proliferation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) for tissue-engineering applications. The fabricated bioscaffolds were characterized by scanning transmission microscope (SEM) and it showed that the addition of tncreasing concentrations of SNPs results in the formation of dendritic porous channels perpendicular to the axis of precipitation. The antimicrobial properties of these porous bioscaffolds were tested according to a modified ISO 22196 standard across varying concentrations of biomass-mediated SNPs to determine an efficacious antimicrobial concentration. The bioscaffolds reduced the Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli viable colony-forming units by 98.85% and 99.9%, respectively, at an antimicrobial SNPs concentration of 2000 ppm. Human ASCs were seeded on bioscaffolds and cultured in vitro for 20 days to study the effect of SNPs concentration on the viability of cells. SEM analysis and the metabolic activity-based fluorescent dye, AlamarBlue®, demonstrated the growth of cells on the efficacious antimicrobial bioscaffolds. The biocompatibility of in vitro leached silver, quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), proved non-cytotoxic when tested against hASCs, as evaluated by MTT assay. PMID:22700366

  4. The Orthopaedically Handicapped and Computer Usage: The Case of TRNC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dincyurek, Sibel; Arsan, Nihan; Caglar, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Although various studies have been conducted in the field of orthopaedic impairment, research regarding computer education for orthopaedically impaired individuals remains insufficient. This study aimed to evaluate the use of computers by orthopaedically impaired individuals from a wider perspective. The findings of the study emphasise the…

  5. Great hospitals of Asia: the Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Gyu; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Chi Heon; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Established in 1957, the Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University College of Medicine is the one of the oldest neurosurgical departments in Korea. The seven past Chairmen (Bo Sung Sim, Kil Soo Choi, Dae Hee Han, Byung-Kyu Cho, Hyun Jib Kim, Hee-Won Jung, and Dong Gyu Kim) have devoted themselves to the development of the department. The current chair, Chun Kee Chung, assumed the position in July 2010. The current department comprises several clinical programs that encompass the entire spectrum of neurosurgical disorders, with 29 specialized faculty members and care teams in three hospitals: Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH), Boramae Medical Center (BMC), and Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH). The remarkable growth of the department during the last half century made it possible to perform 5,666 operations (3,299 at SNUH, 411 at BMC and 1,860 at SNUBH) during 2009. A total of 1,201 articles authored by faculty members were published in scientific journals between 1958 and 2009, approximately 32% of which were published in international journals. The department is regarded as the "Mecca" of neurosurgery in Korea because of its outstanding achievement and the many distinguished alumni with leadership roles in the academic field. This article traces the clinical, academic, and scientific development of the department, its present activities, and its future direction. PMID:21600472

  6. [Management of war orthopaedic injuries in recent armed conflicts].

    PubMed

    Frank, M; Mathieu, L

    2013-01-01

    The extremities continue to be the most frequent sites of wounding during armed conflicts despite the change of combat tactics, soldier armour and battlefield medical support. Due to the advances in prehospital care and timely transport to the hospital, orthopaedic surgeons deal with severe and challenging injuries of the limbs. In contrast to civilian extremity trauma, the most combat-related injuries are open wounds that often have infection-related complications. Data from two recent large armed conflicts (Iraq, Afghanistan) show that extremity injuries are associated with a high complication rate, morbidity and healthcare utilization. A systematic approach that consists of sequential surgical care and good transport capabilities can reduce the complication rate of these injuries. New medical technologies have been implemented in the treatment strategy during the last decade. This article reviews the published scientific data and current opinions on combat-related extremity injuries. Key words: extremity, combat, trauma, medical support system. PMID:23777944

  7. A Psychomotor Skills Course for Orthopaedic Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, Frederick G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The course described and evaluated here was developed at the University of Washington School of Medicine to teach 20 orthopaedic residents operative techniques, instrument usage, and safety precautions outside of the operating room without hazard to the patient or regard to time constraints. (JT)

  8. The Orthopaedic Training Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, George E.; And Others

    A four year study was initiated to systematically improve the certification procedures of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. Consequently, the immediate research aim was the development of more valid and reliable techniques in assessing professional competence in orthopedics. A definition of professional competence was reached through…

  9. Recognizing and Preventing Burnout among Orthopaedic Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Quick, James Campbell; Sime, Wesley E.; Novicoff, Wendy M.; Einhorn, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Stress, emotional exhaustion, and burnout are widespread in the medical profession in general and in orthopaedic surgery in particular. We attempted to identify variables associated with burnout as assessed by validated instruments. Surveys were sent to 282 leaders from orthopaedic surgery academic departments in the United States by e-mail and mail. Responses were received from 195 leaders for a response rate of 69%. The average surgeon worked 68.3 hours per week and more than ½ of this time was allocated to patient care. Highest stressors included excessive workload, increasing overhead, departmental budget deficits, tenure and promotion, disputes with the dean, and loss of key faculty. Personal-professional life imbalance was identified as an important risk factor for emotional exhaustion. Withdrawal, irritability, and family disagreements are early warning indicators of burnout and emotional exhaustion. Orthopaedic leaders can learn, and potentially model, ways to mitigate stress from other high-stress professions. Building on the strength of marital and family bonds, improving stress management skills and self-regulation, and improving efficiency and productivity can combine to assist the orthopaedic surgery leader in preventing burnout and emotional exhaustion. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0622-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19030943

  10. A national, cross-sectional survey of children's hospital-based safety resource centres

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, Sadiqa; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Seaver Hill, Karen; Arbogast, Kristy B; Gittelman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the location, staffing, clientele, safety product disbursement patterns, education provided and sustainability of safety resource centres (SRCs) in US children's hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was distributed to children's hospital-based SRC directors. Survey categories included: funding sources, customer base, items sold, items given free of charge, education provided and directors’ needs. Results 32/38 (84.2%) SRC sites (affiliated with 30 hospitals) completed the survey. SRCs were in many hospital locations including lobby (28.1%), family resource centres (12.5%), gift shop/retail space (18.8%), mobile units (18.8%) and patient clinics (12.5%). 19% of respondents reported that their SRC was financially self-sustainable. Sales to patients predominated (mean of 44%); however, hospital employees made up a mean of 20% (range 0–60%) of sales. 78.1% of SRCs had products for children with special healthcare needs. Documentation kept at SRC sites included items purchased (96.9%), items given free of charge (65.6%) and customer demographics (50%). 56.3% of SRCs provided formal injury prevention education classes. The SRCs’ directors’ most important needs were finances (46.9%), staffing (50%) and space (46.9%). All of the directors were ‘somewhat interested’ or ‘very interested’ in each of the following: creation of a common SRC listserv, national SRC data bank and multisite SRC research platform. Conclusions SRCs are located in many US children's hospitals, and can be characterised as heterogeneous in location, products sold, data kept and ability to be financially sustained. Further research is needed to determine best practices for SRCs to maximise their impact on injury prevention. PMID:24667383

  11. Longitudinal Association of Registered Nurse National Nursing Specialty Certification and Patient Falls in Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Diane K.; Cramer, Emily; Potter, Catima; Staggs, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Researchers have studied inpatient falls in relation to aspects of nurse staffing, focusing primarily on staffing levels and proportion of nursing care hours provided by registered nurses (RNs). Less attention has been paid to other nursing characteristics, such as RN national nursing specialty certification. Objective The aim of the study was to examine the relationship over time between changes in RN national nursing specialty certification rates and changes in total patient fall rates at the patient care unit level. Methods We used longitudinal data with standardized variable definitions across sites from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. The sample consisted of 7,583 units in 903 hospitals. Relationships over time were examined using multilevel (units nested in hospitals) latent growth curve modeling. Results The model indices indicated a good fit of the data to the model. At the unit level, there was a small statistically significant inverse relationship (r = −.08, p = .04) between RN national nursing specialty certification rates and total fall rates; increases in specialty certification rates over time tended to be associated with improvements in total fall rates over time. Discussion Our findings may be supportive of promoting national nursing specialty certification as a means of improving patient safety. Future study recommendations are (a) modeling organizational leadership, culture, and climate as mediating variables between national specialty certification rates and patient outcomes and (b) investigating the association of patient safety and specific national nursing specialty certifications which test plans include patient safety, quality improvement, and diffusion of innovation methods in their certifying examinations. PMID:26049719

  12. Facial Bone Fracture Patients Visiting Pusan National University Hospital in Busan and Yangsan: Trends and Risks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Geon; Son, Yong-Hyun; Chung, In-Kyo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined patients with facial bone fracture visiting Pusan National University Dental Hospital to understand the trends, and to enhance appropriate care and treatment for patients with facial bone fracture. Methods: We investigated 531 patients presenting with facial bone fracture in Yangsan and 802 patients in Busan from January 2010 to December 2013. We divided the patients by year, month, gender, age, site, and cause to compare with historic data and other studies. Results: The gender ratio was 3.58:1 in Yangsan and 4.31:1 in Busan. Patients aged in their 20s had the highest number of facial bone fractures in both Yangsan and Busan. The most frequent fracture site was the mandible, and the most frequent cause was slip down in both Yangsan and Busan. Conclusion: The investigation and comparison of patients with facial bone fracture who visited Pusan National University Hospital located at Yangsan and Busan from 2010 to 2013 found a difference in the total number of patients at each hospital, but the trends were not significantly different. PMID:27489825

  13. From Cape Town to Cambridge: Orthopaedic trauma in contrasting environments

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, John E; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the trauma experience gained by a trainee at a United Kingdom major trauma centre and a secondary level hospital in South Africa. METHODS: A profile of inpatient trauma cases during a five-week period in Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge and Somerset Hospital, Cape Town was created. This was achieved by recording various parameters for each patient admitted including age, gender, injury, mechanism of injury and postal/area code. This, together with details of the departments themselves, allows a comparison of the amount and variety of orthopaedic trauma cases experienced by an individual trainee in each setting. RESULTS: The trauma profiles differed significantly. Patients in Cape Town were younger and more likely to be male. In the young, injury in Cape Town was more likely to occur due to assault or being struck by a vehicle, whilst patients in Cambridge were more likely to be injured whilst in a vehicle or in high energy falls. In older patients, trauma at both centres was almost exclusively due to mechanical falls. In a given age group, injuries at the two centres were similar, however the majority of patients admitted to Addenbrooke’s were elderly, resulting in less variation in the overall injury profile. CONCLUSION: The trauma profile of a major trauma centre in the United Kingdom is less varied than that of a South African secondary centre, with significantly fewer cases per surgeon. This suggests a more varied training experience in the developing world with a greater caseload. PMID:27190759

  14. Predictive Factors of Hospital Mortality Due to Myocardial Infarction: A Multilevel Analysis of Iran's National Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh; Sajjadi, Homeira; Sadeghi, Mehraban

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding failure to establish the statistical presuppositions for analysis of the data by conventional approaches, hierarchical structure of the data as well as the effect of higher-level variables, this study was conducted to determine the factors independently associated with hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in Iran using a multilevel analysis. Methods: This study was a national, hospital-based, and cross-sectional study. In this study, the data of 20750 new MI patients between April, 2012 and March, 2013 in Iran were used. The hospital mortality due to MI was considered as the dependent variable. The demographic data, clinical and behavioral risk factors at the individual level and environmental data were gathered. Multilevel logistic regression models with Stata software were used to analyze the data. Results: Within 1-year of study, the frequency (%) of hospital mortality within 30 days of admission was derived 2511 (12.1%) patients. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of mortality with (95% confidence interval [CI]) was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5–2.8) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3–1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.4) for female gender, and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1–1.3) for humidity, all of which were considered as risk factors of mortality. But, OR of mortality was 0.7 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.7–0.8) and 0.5 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4–0.6) were considered as protective factors of mortality. Conclusions: Individual risk factors had independent effects on the hospital mortality due to MI. Variables in the province level had no significant effect on the outcome of MI. Increasing access and quality to treatment could reduce the mortality due to MI. PMID:26730342

  15. Orthopaedic complications of lumboperitoneal shunts.

    PubMed

    McIvor, J; Krajbich, J I; Hoffman, H

    1988-01-01

    Lumboperitoneal (LP) shunts performed for communicating hydrocephalus have been reported to lead to neurologic deficits in the lower limbs and spinal deformities as a result of arachnoiditis. A chart review of 375 children who underwent LP shunts between 1960 and 1981 at The Hospital For Sick Children in Toronto was undertaken. Of the 375 charts reviewed, evidence of shunt-induced neurologic deficits was seen in 63 patients. Thirty-four patients had back pain with or without sciatica, 45 patients had hamstring tightness, and 40 patients had foot deformities. Forty-nine patients had lumbar hyperlordosis, lordoscoliosis, and scoliosis. These deformities are postulated to be the result of arachnoiditis involving the conus medullaris and lower lumbar roots. PMID:3192696

  16. Hospital costs of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated in intensive care; a single centre evaluation using the national tariff-based system

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, J; Easton, S; Naik, V; Lockie, C; Brett, S J; Stümpfle, R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is a scarcity of literature reporting hospital costs for treating out of hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) survivors, especially within the UK. This is essential for assessment of cost-effectiveness of interventions necessary to allow just allocation of resources within the National Health Service. We set out primarily to calculate costs stratified against hospital survival and neurological outcomes. Secondarily, we estimated cost effectiveness based on estimates of survival and utility from previous studies to calculate costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Setting We performed a single centre (London) retrospective review of in-hospital costs of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after OOHCA over 18 months from January 2011 (following widespread introduction of targeted temperature management and primary percutaneous intervention). Participants Of 69 successive patients admitted over an 18-month period, survival and cerebral performance category (CPC) outcomes were obtained from review of databases and clinical notes. The Trust finance department supplied ICU and hospital costs using the Payment by Results UK system. Results Of those patients with ROSC admitted to ICU, survival to hospital discharge (any CPC) was 33/69 (48%) with 26/33 survivors in CPC 1–2 at hospital discharge. Cost per survivor to hospital discharge (including total cost of survivors and non-survivors) was £50 000, cost per CPC 1–2 survivor was £65 000. Cost and length of stay of CPC 1–2 patients was considerably lower than CPC 3–4 patients. The majority of the costs (69%) related to intensive care. Estimated cost per CPC 1–2 survivor per QALY was £16 000. Conclusions The costs of in-hospital patient care for ICU admissions following ROSC after OOHCA are considerable but within a reasonable threshold when assessed from a QALY perspective. PMID:25838503

  17. Southern Orthopaedic Association Abstract Publication Rate.

    PubMed

    Tait, Mark Adam; Petrus, Cara; Barnes, C Lowry

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the publication rate of manuscripts presented at the Southern Orthopaedic Association's (SOA) annual meetings. An extensive literature search was performed using Google Scholar and PubMed search engines and all accepted abstracts (posters or podium presentations) presented at an SOA annual meeting from 2005 to 2011 were evaluated. A total of 568 abstracts were presented at SOA meetings between 2005 and 2011. Of these, 234 (41%) were published in the peer-reviewed literature. The publication rate was 66% in 2005 and 28% in 2010. The average time from presentation to peer-reviewed publication was 1.6 ± 0.24 years (range, 2 years in 2006 to 1 year in 2011). The SOA publication rate was comparable with other major orthopaedic conference publication rates, yet more than half of all abstracts remain unpublished. SOA attendees should be aware that approximately 40% of all accepted presentations will go unpublished. PMID:27518291

  18. Role of decision aids in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    ten Have, Isha A; van den Bekerom, Michel PJ; van Deurzen, Derek FP; Hageman, Michel GJS

    2015-01-01

    Medical treatment of patients inherently entails the risk of undesired complication or side effects. It is essential to inform the patient about the expected outcomes, but also the possible undesired outcomes. The patients preference and values regarding the potential outcomes should be involved in the decision making process. Even though many orthopaedic surgeons are positive towards shared decision-making, it is minimally introduced in the orthopaedic daily practice and decision-making is still mostly physician based. Decision aids are designed to support the physician and patient in the shared- decision-making process. By using decision aids, patients can learn more about their condition and treatment options in advance to the decision-making. This will reduce decisional conflict and improve participation and satisfaction. PMID:26716082

  19. Setting standards for medical writing in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Mauffrey, Cyril; Scarlat, Marius M; Pećina, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Once the privilege of few clinical scholars in the field of orthopaedics, medical writing has become a must for career advancement. The number of papers submitted and published yearly has increased steadily, and with the development of the Internet, manuscript and journals have become easily accessible. Medical writing has risen to become a discipline in itself, with rules and standards. However, heterogeneity in the quality of papers submitted still prevails, with large variations in both form and content. With countries such as China and India submitting an exponential number of manuscripts, it is important and helpful that standards of medical writing be emphasised to help writers who do not always have the required support to produce an outstanding manuscript. In this paper, we summarise what may become standards for medical writing in the field of orthopaedics. PMID:24297610

  20. Use of supplemental steroids in patients having orthopaedic operations.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R J; Schiff, C F; Bromberg, J S

    1995-12-01

    It is commonly thought that patients receiving exogenous glucocorticoids have suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and need high supplemental doses of exogenous glucocorticoids (so-called stress steroids) to meet the demands of operative stress. Several reports have suggested that clinically important suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is extremely uncommon and that the levels of glucocorticoids required for stress are much lower than previously believed. A prospective study of twenty-eight patients who had thirty-five major orthopaedic operations was conducted. No patient received stress steroids; they were given only the baseline immunosuppressive doses of glucocorticoids (mean dose, ten milligrams of prednisone). Clinical information (based on regular physical examinations for signs and symptoms of hypotension, myalgia, arthralgia, ileus, and fever) and laboratory data (serum sodium levels, eosinophil count, and twenty-four-hour urinary free-cortisol levels, determined at perioperative and non-stress postoperative time-periods) were obtained to document any evidence of adrenocortical insufficiency. There was no such evidence in any of the patients, who were monitored during their entire hospitalization. The levels of twenty-four-hour urinary free cortisol showed that all patients had endogenous adrenocortical function and, when this information was considered together with the clinical outcome, it was concluded that this level of function was sufficient to meet the demands of operative stress. Adrenocortical insufficiency in patients who have orthopaedic operations without receiving supplemental stress steroids appears to be much less common than previously thought. While biochemical testing of the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis may sometimes reveal evidence of adrenal insufficiency, these tests do not predict the clinical outcome and may be too sensitive to guide decisions regarding treatment

  1. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “systems” approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. Setting A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. Participants All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. Interventions A one-day “lean” training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. Outcome Measures We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, “glitch count” and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. Results We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. Conclusions This version of “lean” system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in “lean” projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success. PMID:27124012

  2. ORTHOPAEDIC GENE THERAPY – LOST IN TRANSLATION?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C.H.; Ghivizzani, S.C.; Robbins, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Orthopaedic gene therapy has been the topic of considerable research for two decades. The preclinical data are impressive and many orthopaedic conditions are well suited to genetic therapies. But there have been few clinical trials and no FDA-approved product exists. This paper examines why this is so. The reasons are multifactorial. Clinical translation is expensive and difficult to fund by traditional academic routes. Because gene therapy is viewed as unsafe and risky, it does not attract major funding from the pharmaceutical industry. Start-up companies are burdened by the complex intellectual property environment and difficulties in dealing with the technology transfer offices of major universities. Successful translation requires close interactions between scientists, clinicians and experts in regulatory and compliance issues. It is difficult to create such a favourable translational environment. Other promising fields of biological therapy have contemplated similar frustrations approximately 20 years after their founding, so there seem to be more general constraints on translation that are difficult to define. Gene therapy has noted some major clinical successes in recent years, and a sense of optimism is returning to the field. We hope that orthopaedic applications will benefit collaterally from this upswing and move expeditiously into advanced clinical trials. PMID:21948071

  3. The impact of disruptive innovations in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Erik; Bozic, Kevin J

    2009-10-01

    The US healthcare system is currently facing daunting demographic and economic challenges. Because musculoskeletal disorders and disease represent a substantial and growing portion of this healthcare burden, novel approaches will be needed to continue to provide high-quality, affordable, and accessible orthopaedic care to our population. The concept of "disruptive innovations," which has been studied and popularized by Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen, may offer a potential framework for developing strategies to improve quality and control costs associated with musculoskeletal care. The introduction of mobile fluoroscopic imaging systems, the development of the Surgical Implant Generation Network intramedullary nail for treatment of long bone fractures in the developing world, the expanding role and contributions of physician assistants and nurse practitioners to the orthopaedic team, and the rise of ambulatory surgery centers are all examples of disruptive innovations in the field of orthopaedics. Although numerous cultural and regulatory barriers have limited the widespread adoption of these "disruptive innovations," we believe they represent an opportunity for clinicians to regain leadership in health care while at the same time improving quality and access to care for patients with musculoskeletal disease. PMID:19415405

  4. Implementation of computerized physician order entry in National Guard hospitals: Assessment of critical success factors

    PubMed Central

    Altuwaijri, Majid M.; Bahanshal, Abdullah; Almehaid, Mona

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the needs, process and experience of implementing a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system in a leading healthcare organization in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: The National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA) deployed the CPOE in a pilot department, which was the intensive care unit (ICU) in order to assess its benefits and risks and to test the system. After the CPOE was implemented in the ICU area, a survey was sent to the ICU clinicians to assess their perception on the importance of 32 critical success factors (CSFs) that was acquired from the literature. The project team also had several meetings to gather lessons learned from the pilot project in order to utilize them for the expansion of the project to other NGHA clinics and hospitals. Results: The results of the survey indicated that the selected CSFs, even though they were developed with regard to international settings, are very much applicable for the pilot area. The top three CSFs rated by the survey respondents were: The “before go-live training”, the adequate clinical resources during implementation, and the ordering time. After the assessment of the survey and the lessons learned from the pilot project, NGHA decided that the potential benefits of the CPOE are expected to be greater the risks expected. The project was then expanded to cover all NGHA clinics and hospitals in a phased approach. Currently, the project is in its final stages and expected to be completed by the end of 2011. Conclusion: The role of CPOE systems is very important in hospitals in order to reduce medication errors and to improve the quality of care. In spite of their great benefits, many studies suggest that a high percentage of these projects fail. In order to increase the chances of success and due to the fact that CPOE is a clinical system, NGHA implemented the system first in a pilot area in order to test the system without putting patients at risk and to

  5. The Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled Renamed The Hospital for Special Surgery 1940; The War Years 1941–1945

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In 1939, the 75th anniversary program marking the founding of the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (R & C), the oldest orthopaedic hospital in the nation, was held at the hospital site in New York City. Dr. Philip D. Wilson, Surgeon-in-Chief since 1935, used this event to mark the return of the hospital to its leadership role in the country. When the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled first opened its doors on May 1, 1863, the name of the hospital was not unusual; it described the type of patients treated. In 1940, the Board of Managers with guidance from Dr. Wilson changed the name to the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). In 1941, with Britain engaged in a European war, Dr. Wilson felt there was a need for the Americans to support the British. He personally organized the American Hospital in Britain, a privately funded voluntary unit, to help care for the wounded. After the United States actually entered World War II in December 1941, HSS quickly organized support at all levels with a significant number of professional and auxiliary staff, eventually enlisting in the military. Even with such staff turnover, the hospital continued to function under Dr. Wilson’s leadership. After the war ended in 1945, Wilson forged ahead to further restore HSS as a leader in musculoskeletal medicine and surgery. PMID:19048348

  6. Mortality and Treatment Patterns Among Patients Hospitalized With Acute Cardiovascular Conditions During Dates of National Cardiology Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Anupam B.; Prasad, Vinay; Goldman, Dana P.; Romley, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Thousands of physicians attend scientific meetings annually. Although hospital physician staffing and composition may be affected by meetings, patient outcomes and treatment patterns during meeting dates are unknown. OBJECTIVE To analyze mortality and treatment differences among patients admitted with acute cardiovascular conditions during dates of national cardiology meetings compared with nonmeeting dates. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective analysis of 30-day mortality among Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or cardiac arrest from 2002 through 2011 during dates of 2 national cardiology meetings compared with identical nonmeeting days in the 3 weeks before and after conferences (AMI, 8570 hospitalizations during 82 meeting days and 57 471 during 492 nonmeeting days; heart failure, 19 282 during meeting days and 11 4591 during nonmeeting days; cardiac arrest, 1564 during meeting days and 9580 during nonmeeting days). Multivariable analyses were conducted separately for major teaching hospitals and nonteaching hospitals and for low-and high-risk patients. Differences in treatment utilization were assessed. EXPOSURES Hospitalization during cardiology meeting dates. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Thirty-day mortality, procedure rates, charges, length of stay. RESULTS Patient characteristics were similar between meeting and nonmeeting dates. In teaching hospitals, adjusted 30-day mortality was lower among high-risk patients with heart failure or cardiac arrest admitted during meeting vs nonmeeting dates (heart failure, 17.5% [95% CI, 13.7%–21.2%] vs 24.8% [95% CI, 22.9%–26.6%]; P < .001; cardiac arrest, 59.1% [95% CI, 51.4%–66.8%] vs 69.4% [95% CI, 66.2%–72.6%]; P = .01). Adjusted mortality for high-risk AMI in teaching hospitals was similar between meeting and nonmeeting dates (39.2% [95% CI, 31.8%–46.6%] vs 38.5% [95% CI, 35.0%–42.0%]; P = .86), although adjusted percutaneous

  7. Breath tests sustainability in hospital settings: cost analysis and reimbursement in the Italian National Health System.

    PubMed

    Volpe, M; Scaldaferri, F; Ojetti, V; Poscia, A

    2013-01-01

    The high demand of Breath Tests (BT) in many gastroenterological conditions in time of limited resources for health care systems, generates increased interest in cost analysis from the point of view of the delivery of services to better understand how use the money to generate value. This study aims to measure the cost of C13 Urea and other most utilized breath tests in order to describe key aspects of costs and reimbursements looking at the economic sustainability for the hospital. A hospital based cost-analysis of the main breath tests commonly delivery in an ambulatory setting is performed. Mean salary for professional nurses and gastroenterologists, drugs/preparation used and disposable materials, purchase and depreciation of the instrument and the testing time was used to estimate the cost, while reimbursements are based on the 2013 Italian National Health System ambulatory pricelist. Variables that could influence the model are considered in the sensitivity analyses. The mean cost for C13--Urea, Lactulose and Lactose BT are, respectively, Euros 30,59; 45,20 and 30,29. National reimbursement often doesn't cover the cost of the analysis, especially considering the scenario with lower number of exam. On the contrary, in high performance scenario all the reimbursement could cover the cost, except for the C13 Urea BT that is high influenced by the drugs cost. However, consideration about the difference between Italian Regional Health System ambulatory pricelist are done. Our analysis shows that while national reimbursement rates cover the costs of H2 breath testing, they do not cover sufficiently C13 BT, particularly urea breath test. The real economic strength of these non invasive tests should be considered in the overall organization of inpatient and outpatient clinic, accounting for complete diagnostic pathway for each gastrointestinal disease. PMID:24443075

  8. Are primary care factors associated with hospital episodes for adverse drug reactions? A national observational study

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Ailsa J; Newson, Roger B; Soljak, Michael; Riboli, Elio; Car, Josip

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identification of primary care factors associated with hospital admissions for adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Design and setting Cross-sectional analysis of 2010–2012 data from all National Health Service hospitals and 7664 of 8358 general practices in England. Method We identified all hospital episodes with an International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 code indicative of an ADR, in the 2010–2012 English Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) admissions database. These episodes were linked to contemporary data describing the associated general practice, including general practitioner (GP) and patient demographics, an estimate of overall patient population morbidity, measures of primary care supply, and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) quality scores. Poisson regression models were used to examine associations between primary care factors and ADR-related episode rates. Results 212 813 ADR-related HES episodes were identified. Rates of episodes were relatively high among the very young, older and female subgroups. In fully adjusted models, the following primary care factors were associated with increased likelihood of episode: higher deprivation scores (population attributable fraction (PAF)=0.084, 95% CI 0.067 to 0.100) and relatively poor glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) control among patients with diabetes (PAF=0.372; 0.218 to 0.496). The following were associated with reduced episode likelihood: lower GP supply (PAF=−0.016; −0.026 to −0.005), a lower proportion of GPs with UK qualifications (PAF=−0.035; −0.058 to −0.012), lower total QOF achievement rates (PAF=−0.021; −0.042 to 0.000) and relatively poor blood pressure control among patients with diabetes (PAF=−0.144; −0.280 to −0.022). Conclusions Various aspects of primary care are associated with ADR-related hospital episodes, including achievement of particular QOF indicators. Further investigation with individual level data would help develop understanding of the

  9. Demonstrating the value of orthopaedic surgery through multicenter trials: AOA critical issues.

    PubMed

    Hilibrand, Alan S; Spindler, Kurt; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2015-04-01

    Orthopaedic surgery is expensive and will be carefully scrutinized in the U.S. under health-care reform. Unfortunately, although the orthopaedic literature is replete with clinical outcomes studies, there is still a paucity of meaningful clinical outcomes data that are free from bias. It is possible that orthopaedic procedures may be among the most cost-effective medical treatments for the aging population. However, it is only through the collection of patient-generated outcomes data in prospective randomized and observational studies that orthopaedic surgery can be shown to provide high value (defined as high-quality outcomes at a relatively low cost) to society.The burden of musculoskeletal disease in the U.S. is high; nearly half of all adults describe themselves as having a chronic musculoskeletal condition, and approximately one-quarter of all health-care dollars are spent treating musculoskeletal disease. For this reason, treatment for osteoarthritis, the costliest condition in the elderly population, has drawn great scrutiny from insurers and the government. In the absence of clinical outcomes data that prove the value of orthopaedic interventions, there will be pressure to reduce payments or even deny treatments for these conditions if they are perceived to be too expensive or lack outcomes data supporting their use.Multicenter trials are expensive; this paper analyzes challenges to, and opportunities for, funding. Although National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding has dropped nearly 20% over the past ten years in inflation-adjusted dollars, it has begun a gradual reorientation toward clinical research, which comprised almost 50% of its budget in 2013. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act focused more attention on clinical outcomes research, with the establishment of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), which will ultimately fund $750 million of comparative effectiveness research annually. Another new funding source within

  10. Public hospital quality report awareness: evidence from National and Californian Internet searches and social media mentions, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Huesch, Marco D; Currid-Halkett, Elizabeth; Doctor, Jason N

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Publicly available hospital quality reports seek to inform consumers of important healthcare quality and affordability attributes, and may inform consumer decision-making. To understand how much consumers search for such information online on one Internet search engine, whether they mention such information in social media and how positively they view this information. Setting and design A leading Internet search engine (Google) was the main focus of the study. Google Trends and Google Adwords keyword analyses were performed for national and Californian searches between 1 August 2012 and 31 July 2013 for keywords related to ‘top hospital’, best hospital’, and ‘hospital quality’, as well as for six specific hospital quality reports. Separately, a proprietary social media monitoring tool was used to investigate blog, forum, social media and traditional media mentions of, and sentiment towards, major public reports of hospital quality in California in 2012. Primary outcome measures (1) Counts of searches for keywords performed on Google; (2) counts of and (3) sentiment of mentions of public reports on social media. Results National Google search volume for 75 hospital quality-related terms averaged 610 700 searches per month with strong variation by keyword and by state. A commercial report (Healthgrades) was more commonly searched for nationally on Google than the federal government's Hospital Compare, which otherwise dominated quality-related search terms. Social media references in California to quality reports were generally few, and commercially produced hospital quality reports were more widely mentioned than state (Office of Statewide Healthcare Planning and Development (OSHPD)), or non-profit (CalHospitalCompare) reports. Conclusions Consumers are somewhat aware of hospital quality based on Internet search activity and social media disclosures. Public stakeholders may be able to broaden their quality dissemination initiatives by

  11. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention. Materials and Methods A national retrospective cohort of 1,620,898 patient hospitalizations from 116 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record (EHR) data collected from 2003 to 2012. HA-AKI was defined at stage 1+, stage 2+, and dialysis. EHR-based predictors were identified through logistic regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) regression, and random forests, and pair-wise comparisons between each were made. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 50 bootstrap iterations. In the final models, we report odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and importance rankings for predictor variables to evaluate their significance. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different model outcomes ranged from 0.746 to 0.758 in stage 1+, 0.714 to 0.720 in stage 2+, and 0.823 to 0.825 in dialysis. Logistic regression had the best AUC in stage 1+ and dialysis. Random forests had the best AUC in stage 2+ but the least favorable calibration plots. Multiple risk factors were significant in our models, including some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, antibiotics, and intravenous fluids given during the first 48 h of admission. Conclusions This study demonstrated that, although all the models tested had good discrimination, performance characteristics varied between methods, and the random forests models did not calibrate as well as the lasso or logistic regression models. In addition, novel modifiable risk factors were explored and found to be significant. PMID:26104740

  12. Strategies used by hospital nurses to cope with a national crisis: a manager's perspective.

    PubMed

    Hendel, T; Fish, M; Aboudi, S

    2000-12-01

    This article explores the anxiety level of, and coping strategies used by, hospital nurses, during a national state of emergency. The study was guided by a stress and coping framework, developed by Lazarus & Folkman, and was conducted at a large teaching hospital, located in the centre of Israel, during the Iraqi crisis in January and February, 1998. Data were collected from a sample of 100 female nurses, and a descriptive correlational design was used. The findings indicated that approximately 33% of the nurses expressed feelings of stress, tension and a sense of discomfort. The dominant coping strategy used by the nurses was direct-active, which was found to be the most effective strategy. As they were unable to remove or control the stressor, stress management intervention by nursing managers focused mainly on communicating with staff and providing social support - informational and emotional--to buffer the stressful experience. Providing support and help in finding practical solutions is important for maintaining emotional stability of staff, thereby helping them to improve their nursing interventions in assisting people to cope with stressful situations. PMID:11153519

  13. [From the medieval hospitals hospices to modern National public Health Institutes].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Since the most ancient times, hospital constructions and progresses in the clinical practice advanced pari passu. We can find exampless of this statement in Greek regions as well as in Greek citie overseas. Thus, during the renaissance, great figures ot that time converged in Italy: The genius Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and Leon Battista Alberti (1404-1472), a humanist and innovator of architecture. Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) and his contemporany artists performed anatomical dissection to perfect their art by studying the human body. Anatomical studies flourished at the University of Padua, driven by the Flemish Master. Based on the rigorous study of the anatomical substrate, the studies on the function of the already known organic structures excelled in the xvii century. That century started with the revelation of the major blood circulation by the British physician William Harvey, alumni of the University of Padua, and continued with the description of the minior or pulmonary circulation by ancient or contemporany authors and of the peripheral connections between the arterial and the venous system (Marcelo Malpighi, 1661). All these researchers, and others, were membres of the University of Padua, were the beneficial influence of the teachings of Galileo persisted. In the following centuries, together with the embryological and normal anatomy, the pathological anatomy, systematized by G.B. Morgani, became the cornerstone of the clinical practice. The model of the ancient hospitals evolved to ward the National Institutes of Health in Mexico fostered by Dr. Ignacio Chávez. PMID:25862293

  14. The New Zealand national junior doctors' strike: implications for the provision of acute hospital medical services.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Geoffrey; McCann, Kieran; Freeman, Peter; Beasley, Richard

    2008-06-01

    The New Zealand junior doctors' strike provided an opportunity to consider strategies that might be employed to overcome the international shortage of junior doctors. This article reports the experience of the emergency department (ED) and internal medicine (IM) services at Wellington Hospital during the national strike, in which medical services were primarily provided by specialist consultants in addition to, or as part of, their routine work. During the strike, elective admissions and outpatient clinics were mostly cancelled. In the ED, the waiting times and length of stay were markedly reduced. In IM, the proportion of patients admitted to the short stay unit rather than the general medical wards increased. Notwithstanding the different work circumstances, in both services one senior doctor carried the workload of at least two junior doctors. The deployment of additional senior medical staff to acute hospital services could greatly reduce the total number of doctors required. This strategy would have implications in terms of supporting acute medicine specialty initiatives, training, quality of care and funding. PMID:18624033

  15. Surgeons' knowledge about the costs of orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Rohman, Lebur; Hadi, Saifullah; Whitwell, George

    2014-08-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate consultant surgeons' knowledge about the costs of implants for various joint surgeries. METHODS. Questionnaires were distributed to consultant orthopaedic surgeons at 2 hospitals. Respondents were asked to estimate the implant costs of any brand for low-demand and high-demand total hip replacement (THR), total knee replacement (TKR), uni-compartmental knee replacement, arthroscopy shaver blade, total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) fixation, and meniscal repair. The actual cost of each implant was obtained from the manufacturer. RESULTS. 16 consultant surgeons completed the questionnaires. The respective mean estimated and actual costs for a low-demand THR implant were £1714 (range, £600-3000) and £1448 (range, £985- 2335), with an overestimation of 18.4%. The respective costs for a high-demand THR implant were £2172 (range, £600-6000) and £1737 (range, £1192-2335), with an overestimation of 25%. The respective costs for a TKR implant were £1550 (range, £600-6000) and £1316 (range, £995-1535), with an overestimation of 17.8%. The respective costs for a uni-compartmental knee replacement implant were £1040 (range, £600-2000) and £1296 (range, £698-1470), with an underestimation of 19.7%. The respective costs for an arthroscopy shaver blade were £110 (range, £75-150) and £94 (range, £80-100), with an overestimation of 16.6%. The respective costs for a total ACL fixation implant were £246 (range, £80-500) and £306 (range, £272-335), with an underestimation of 19.4%. The respective costs for a meniscal repair implant were £153 (range, £50-250) and £242 (range, £170-260), with an underestimation of 37%. CONCLUSION. The knowledge among consultant orthopaedic surgeons about implant costs was poor. To reduce implant costs, cooperation between surgeons and hospital managers and measures to increase surgeons' awareness about cost-reduction programmes are needed. PMID:25163960

  16. Dying in two acute hospitals: would usual care meet Australian national clinical standards?

    PubMed

    Clark, Katherine; Byfieldt, Naomi; Green, Malcolm; Saul, Peter; Lack, Jill; Philips, Jane L

    2014-05-01

    The Australian Commission for Quality and Safety in Health Care (ACQSHC) has articulated 10 clinical standards with the aim of improving the consistency of quality healthcare delivery. Currently, the majority of Australians die in acute hospitals. But despite this, no agreed standard of care exists to define the minimum standard of care that people should accept in the final hours to days of life. As a result, there is limited capacity to conduct audits that focus on the gap between current care and recommended care. There is, however, accumulating evidence in the end of life literature to define which aspects of care are likely to be considered most important to those people facing imminent death. These themes offer standards against which to conduct audits. This is very apt given the national recommendation that healthcare should be delivered in the context of considering people's wishes while always treating people with dignity and respect. PMID:24589365

  17. Nanostructured diamond coatings for orthopaedic applications

    PubMed Central

    CATLEDGE, S.A.; THOMAS, V.; VOHRA, Y.K.

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of orthopaedic devices being implanted, greater emphasis is being placed on ceramic coating technology to reduce friction and wear in mating total joint replacement components, in order to improve implant function and increase device lifespan. In this chapter, we consider ultra-hard carbon coatings, with emphasis on nanostructured diamond, as alternative bearing surfaces for metallic components. Such coatings have great potential for use in biomedical implants as a result of their extreme hardness, wear resistance, low friction and biocompatibility. These ultra-hard carbon coatings can be deposited by several techniques resulting in a wide variety of structures and properties. PMID:25285213

  18. The reconstructive microsurgery ladder in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Tintle, Scott M; Levin, L Scott

    2013-03-01

    Since the advent of the operating microscope by Julius Jacobson in 1960, reconstructive microsurgery has become an integral part of extremity reconstruction and orthopaedics. During World War I, with the influx of severe extremity trauma Harold Gillies introduced the concept of the reconstructive ladder for wound closure. The concept of the reconstructive ladder goes from simple to complex means of attaining wound closure. Over the last half century microsurgery has continued to evolve and progress. We now have a microsurgical reconstructive ladder. The microsurgical reconstruction ladder is based upon the early work on revascularization and replantation extending through the procedures that are described in this article. PMID:23352571

  19. Complications of orthopaedic surgery in horses.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Dean W

    2008-12-01

    Complications are a price all surgeons eventually pay. Experience and increasing skill will decrease many of them but certainly not all. The most important thing is for the surgeon to react correctly to a complication. Acknowledge the mistake (or bad luck) quickly and take whatever steps you can to correct the problem. Because so many equine orthopaedic cases have the potential for complications, recognizing and responding properly to these complications are imperative for successful outcomes. Discussion of the most common complications, their prevention and corrections, is presented. PMID:19203703

  20. Release of Chromium from Orthopaedic Arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Afolaranmi, G.A.; Tettey, J; Meek, R.M.D; Grant, M.H

    2008-01-01

    Many orthopaedic implants are composed of alloys containing chromium. Of particular relevance is the increasing number of Cobalt Chromium bearing arthroplasies being inserted into young patients with osteoarthritis. Such implants will release chromium ions. These patients will be exposed to the released chromium for over 50 years in some cases. The subsequent chromium ion metabolism and redistribution in fluid and tissue compartments is complex. In addition, the potential biological effects of chromium are also controversial, including DNA and chromosomal damage, reduction in CD8 lymphocyte levels and possible hypersensitivity reactions (ALVAL). The establishment of these issues and the measurement of chromium in biological fluids is the subject of this review. PMID:19461924

  1. Social Competence and Temperament in Children with Chronic Orthopaedic Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagmurlu, Bilge; Yavuz, H. Melis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate social competence in children with orthopaedic disability and its concurrent relations to child's temperament, health condition, and maternal warmth. Participants were 68 Turkish children (mean = 5.94 years) with chronic orthopaedic disability and their mothers coming from disadvantaged backgrounds.…

  2. Defining reference levels for intra-operative radiation exposure in orthopaedic trauma: A retrospective multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Hardman, J; Elvey, M; Shah, N; Simson, N; Patel, S; Anakwe, R

    2015-12-01

    There is currently limited data to define reference levels for the use of ionising radiation in orthopaedic trauma surgery. In this multicentre study, we utilise methodology employed by the Health Protection Agency in establishing reference levels for diagnostic investigations in order to define analogous levels for common and reproducible orthopaedic trauma procedures. Four hundred ninety-five procedures were identified across four Greater London hospitals over a 1-year period. Exposure was defined in terms of both time and dose area product (DAP). Third quartile mean values for either parameter were used to define reference levels. Variations both between centres and grades of lead surgeon were analysed as secondary outcomes. Reference levels; dynamic hip screw (DHS) 1.9225000 Gycm(2)/70.50 s, intramedullary (IM) femoral nail 1.5837500 Gycm(2)/126.00 s, open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) clavicle 0.2042500 Gycm(2)/21.50 s, ORIF lateral malleolus 0.32250500 Gycm(2)/35.00 s, ORIF distal radius 0.1300000 Gycm(2)/56.00 s. Grade of surgeon did not influence exposure in dynamic hip screw, and was inversely related to exposure in intramedullary femoral nails. Less variation was observed with exposure time than with DAP. This study provides the most comprehensive reference to guide fluoroscopy use in orthopaedic trauma to date, and is of value both at the point of delivery and for audit of local practice. PMID:26604035

  3. Validity of NBME Parts I and II for the Selection of Residents: The Case of Orthopaedic Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Susan M.

    The predictive validity of scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Part I and Part II examinations for the selection of residents in orthopaedic surgery was investigated. Use of NBME scores has been criticized because of the time lag between taking Part I and entering residency and because Part I content is not directly linked to…

  4. The management of pain in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Fetrow, K O

    1989-01-01

    The three general methods of treating pain are pharmacologic, physical and psychological. The goal of medical management of the patient with pain and inflammation is to relieve these symptoms with minimal side effects and inconvenience. Pain associated with inflammation may be relieved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including aspirin. All NSAIDs relieve pain and stiffness in a similar manner; their primary action appears to be the inhibition of the cyclo-oxygenase system in the arachidonic acid cascade. When prescribing NSAIDs for orthopaedic pain and inflammation, it seems sensible to start with aspirin because of its low cost and safety at analgesic doses. However, if safety and low incidence of side effects are the most important factors in determining appropriate therapy, newer NSAIDs such as ketoprofen will be preferred. The relief of pain is an important aspect of postoperative care. Parenteral and oral opiates serve as the standard against which other therapies for severe pain are compared. When pain cannot be adequately controlled with intramuscular or subcutaneous opiates, intravenous opiates controlled by the patient (patient-controlled analgesia) are often useful. Relatively small doses of epidural or intrathecal opiates can also be used to achieve postoperative pain relief. Thus, treatment for orthopaedic pain begins with NSAIDs, followed by an oral opiate combined with acetaminophen, aspirin, or another NSAID. If these regimens are ineffective, oral opiates followed by parenteral opiates may be tried. PMID:2520438

  5. Immobilized antibiotics to prevent orthopaedic implant infections.

    PubMed

    Hickok, Noreen J; Shapiro, Irving M

    2012-09-01

    Many surgical procedures require the placement of an inert or tissue-derived implant deep within the body cavity. While the majority of these implants do not become colonized by bacteria, a small percentage develops a biofilm layer that harbors invasive microorganisms. In orthopaedic surgery, unresolved periprosthetic infections can lead to implant loosening, arthrodeses, amputations and sometimes death. The focus of this review is to describe development of an implant in which an antibiotic tethered to the metal surface is used to prevent bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Building on well-established chemical syntheses, studies show that antibiotics can be linked to titanium through a self-assembled monolayer of siloxy amines. The stable metal-antibiotic construct resists bacterial colonization and biofilm formation while remaining amenable to osteoblastic cell adhesion and maturation. In an animal model, the antibiotic modified implant resists challenges by bacteria that are commonly present in periprosthetic infections. While the long-term efficacy and stability is still to be established, ongoing studies support the view that this novel type of bioactive surface has a real potential to mitigate or prevent the devastating consequences of orthopaedic infection. PMID:22512927

  6. Risk factors for school absence after acute orthopaedic injury in new york city.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Joshua E; Jewetz, Shari T; Matsumoto, Hiroko; Choe, Julie C; Vitale, Michael G

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of our study is to identify specific factors that affect a child's ability to attend school after an acute orthopaedic injury. One hundred and sixty-four school-aged patients receiving treatment for an acute orthopaedic injury at the Division of Pediatric Orthopaedics were interviewed along with their parents. Most participants were Hispanic, which reflects the population of the Washington Heights section of Manhattan served by our hospital. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with those parents whose children were unable to return to school. The parents were asked of both the total number of school absences and whether the child received home instruction. A survey regarding official school attendance policy was mailed to the principals of all the schools attended by the children in our study. Forty-seven percent of the children were unable to return to school immediately after their injuries. Nearly 70% (n = 51) of the children who did not immediately return to school attributed their nonattendance to their school's attendance policy. Only half of the absentees received home instruction. A multivariate analysis showed that both the type of school (public vs private) and the use of crutches were statistically significant risk factors for school absence. The median household income also trended toward significance in predicting school attendance. The responses to our survey regarding official school attendance policy demonstrated considerable variability among the schools. This study indicates that pediatric orthopaedic injuries and their treatment impact the ability of school-aged patients to attend school. Our study shows that children's socioeconomic background influences their ability to attend school while injured. PMID:17513963

  7. Hospital work and pregnancy outcomes: a study in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Varela, María M Morales; Kaerlev, Linda; Zhu, Jin Liang; Bonde, Jens Peter; Nøhr, Ellen-Aagaard; Llopis-González, Agustín; Olsen, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    In hospitals, women of reproductive age do a range of work tasks, some of which are known to carry potential risks. Tasks such as working with radiation, chemicals, and infectious agents, as well as performing heavy lifting or tasks requiring erratic sleep patterns have been reported to increase the risk of reproductive failures. Our aim was to study pregnancy outcomes in female hospital workers in Denmark. We performed a cohort study of 5976 female hospital workers and used as a reference group 60,890 women employed outside of hospitals. The reproductive health of hospital workers working during pregnancy is comparable to those of non-hospital workers for the majority of reproductive failures studied. However, an increased prevalence of congenital abnormalities was noted in some subgroups of hospital workers, which may indicate that some hospital work still entails fetotoxic hazards. PMID:19886351

  8. Approach to pain management in chronic opioid users undergoing orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Devin, Clinton J; Lee, Dennis S; Armaghani, Sheyan J; Bible, Jesse; Shau, David N; Martin, Peter R; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2014-10-01

    Opioids are commonly used for the management of pain in patients with musculoskeletal disorders; however, national attention has highlighted the potential adverse effects of the use of opioid analgesia in this and other nonmalignant pain settings. Chronic opioid users undergoing orthopaedic surgery represent a particularly challenging patient population in regard to their perioperative pain control and outcomes. Preoperative evaluation provides an opportunity to estimate a patient's preoperative opioid intake, discuss pain-related fears, and identify potential psychiatric comorbidities. Patients using high levels of opioids may also require referral to an addiction specialist. Various regional blockade and pharmaceutical options are available to help control perioperative pain, and a multimodal pain management approach may be of particular benefit in chronic opioid users undergoing orthopaedic surgery. PMID:25281256

  9. Holmium Laser Enucleation of Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Seoul National University Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jungbum; Choo, Minsoo; Park, Ji Hyun; Oh, Jin Kyu; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to report the experience acquired at the Seoul National University Hospital with Holmium Laser Enucleation of Prostate (HoLEP), combined with mechanical morcellation for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods A retrospective review was performed on the clinical data of 309 consecutive patients who underwent HoLEP at our institution between July 2008 and June 2010. All patients were evaluated preoperatively for prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound, maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) and quality of life (QoL) score. Peri- and postoperative parameters were evaluated and patients were followed-up at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12- months with the aforementioned investigations. Results The patients' mean age was 68.3 (±6.5) years and mean prostate volume was 55.6 (±23.6) mL. Mean enucleation time was 56.2 (±25.1) minutes, mean morcellation time was 11.3 (±9.5) minutes, and the mean resected weight of the prostate was 20.8 (±16.9) g. The mean catheter indwelling period was 1.9 (±1.7) days and mean hospital stay was 2.9 (±1.5) days. Significant improvement was noted in Qmax, IPSS, and QoL at the 1-year follow-up compared with baseline (P<0.01). At 1 month 17.2% of patients complained of irritative urinary symptoms, which were typically self-limiting within 3 months. Transient stress incontinence was reported in 15.2% of patients. No patient experienced persistent obstructive symptoms that required reoperation. Conclusions Our study showed that HoLEP is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for BPH. PMID:21468284

  10. Associations Between Vitamin D Level and Hospitalizations With and Without an Infection in a National Cohort of Medicare Beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Kempker, Jordan A; Magee, Matthew J; Cegielski, J Peter; Martin, Greg S

    2016-05-15

    Research has implicated low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level as a risk factor for infection; however, results have not been consistent. To further determine the nature of this relationship, we conducted a cohort study using Medicare beneficiaries participating in the 2001-2002 and 2003-2004 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with data individually linked to hospital records from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The primary exposure was a 25(OH)D level of <15 ng/mL versus ≥15 ng/mL. The outcomes were a hospitalization with or without an infection within 1 year of participation in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, as determined from the final hospital discharge codes (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification). Of 1,713 individuals, 348 had a baseline serum 25(OH)D level of <15 ng/mL, 77 experienced a hospitalization with an infection, and 287 experienced a hospitalization without an infection. In multivariable analyses, a serum 25(OH)D level of <15 ng/mL was associated with a higher risk of hospitalization with an infection (risk ratio = 2.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.3, 5.9, P < 0.01) but not of hospitalization without an infection (risk ratio = 1.4, 95% confidence interval: 0.9, 2.1, P = 0.1). In this study, we found an association between a serum 25(OH)D concentration of <15 ng/mL and a higher subsequent risk for hospitalization with an infection among Medicare beneficiaries. PMID:27189328

  11. The Implications of the National Minimum Wage for Training Practices and Skill Utilisation in the United Kingdom Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Gill; Williams, Steve; Adam-Smith, Derek

    2003-01-01

    Two key issues thrown up by the 1999 introduction of the National Minimum Wage (NMW) in the United Kingdom are its likely impact on employers' training practices in low paying sectors of the economy and the implications for skills. Based on a study of the hospitality industry, this article assesses the limited significance of the differential,…

  12. Disability and Hospital Care Expenses among National Health Insurance Beneficiaries: Analyses of Population-Based Data in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Fu-Gong; Lin, Pei-Ying; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    Nationwide data were collected concerning inpatient care use and medical expenditure of people with disabilities (N = 937,944) among national health insurance beneficiaries in Taiwan. Data included gender, age, hospitalization frequency and expenditure, healthcare setting and service department, discharge diagnose disease according to the ICD-9-CM…

  13. Implementation Issues of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure and Its Case Study for a Physician's Round at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Kim, Taegi; Kim, Jon Soo; Baek, Rong-Min; Suh, Chang Suk; Chung, Chin Youb

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The cloud computing-based virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) allows access to computing environments with no limitations in terms of time or place such that it can permit the rapid establishment of a mobile hospital environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the empirical issues to be considered when establishing a virtual mobile environment using VDI technology in a hospital setting and to examine the utility of the technology with an Apple iPad during a physician's rounds as a case study. Methods Empirical implementation issues were derived from a 910-bed tertiary national university hospital that recently launched a VDI system. During the physicians' rounds, we surveyed patient satisfaction levels with the VDI-based mobile consultation service with the iPad and the relationship between these levels of satisfaction and hospital revisits, hospital recommendations, and the hospital brand image. Thirty-five inpatients (including their next-of-kin) and seven physicians participated in the survey. Results Implementation issues pertaining to the VDI system arose with regard to the highly availability system architecture, wireless network infrastructure, and screen resolution of the system. Other issues were related to privacy and security, mobile device management, and user education. When the system was used in rounds, patients and their next-of-kin expressed high satisfaction levels, and a positive relationship was noted as regards patients' decisions to revisit the hospital and whether the use of the VDI system improved the brand image of the hospital. Conclusions Mobile hospital environments have the potential to benefit both physicians and patients. The issues related to the implementation of VDI system discussed here should be examined in advance for its successful adoption and implementation. PMID:23346476

  14. A national study of the efficiency of hospitals in urban markets.

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Y A; Luke, R D

    1993-01-01

    Using a sample of 3,000 urban hospitals, this article examines the contributions of selected hospital characteristics to variations in hospital technical efficiencies, while it accounts for multiple products and inputs, and controls for local environmental variations. Four hospital characteristics are examined: hospital size, membership in a multihospital system, ownership, and payer mix (managed care contracts, percent Medicare, and percent Medicaid). Ownership and percent Medicare are consistently found to be related significantly to hospital efficiency. Within the ownership variable, government hospitals tend to be more efficient and for-profit hospitals less efficient than other hospitals. Higher percentages of Medicare payment are negatively related to efficiency. While not consistently significant across all five of the MSA size categories in which the analyses are conducted, possession of managed care contracts, membership in a multihospital system, and size all are consistently related positively to hospital technical efficiency. These variables are also all significant when the hospitals are examined in a combined analysis. Percent Medicaid was not significant in any of the analyses. Implications for policy and the need for methodological work are discussed. PMID:8428810

  15. Radiation exposure to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures.

    PubMed

    Romanova, K; Vassileva, J; Alyakov, M

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the radiation dose to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures and to make efforts to ensure that radiation protection is optimised. The study was performed for Fractura femoris and Fractura cruris procedures performed in orthopaedic operating theatres, as well as for fractures of wrist, ankle and hand/shoulder performed in the emergency trauma room. The highest mean value of the eye lens dose of 47.2 μSv and higher mean fluoroscopy time of 3 min, as well as the corresponding highest maximum values of 77.1 μSv and 5.0 min were observed for the Fractura femoris procedure performed with the Biplanar 500e fluoroscopy systems. At a normal workload, the estimated mean annual dose values do not exceed the annual occupational dose limit for the lens of eye, but at a heavy workload in the department, this dose limit could be achieved or exceeded. The use of protective lead glasses is recommended as they could reduce the radiation exposure of the lens of the eye. The phantom measurements demonstrated that the use of half-dose mode could additionally reduce dose to the operator's eye lens. PMID:25944961

  16. Variation in use of non-surgical treatments among osteoarthritis patients in orthopaedic practice in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2015-01-01

    Objectives National and international evidence-based guidelines for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with non-surgical treatments, followed by surgical intervention if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatments, but there are indications that these are not optimally used. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which all recommended non-surgical treatments were used by patients with hip or knee OA who receive(d) a total hip or knee replacement, as reported by patients and orthopaedic surgeons. Setting We performed two cross-sectional internet-based surveys among patients and orthopaedic surgeons throughout the Netherlands. Participants 195 OA patients either have undergone total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty no longer than 12 months ago or being on the waiting list for surgery with a confirmed date within 3 months and 482 orthopaedic surgeons were invited to participate. Primary and secondary outcome measures The use of recommended non-surgical treatments including education about OA/treatment options, lifestyle advice, dietary therapy, physical therapy, acetaminophen, NSAIDs and glucocorticoid injections. Results 174 OA patients (93%) and 172 orthopaedic surgeons (36%) completed the surveys. Most recommended non-surgical treatments were given to the majority of patients (eg, 80% education about OA, 73% physical therapy, 72% acetaminophen, 80% NSAIDs). However, only 6% of patients and 10% of orthopaedic surgeons reported using a combination of all recommended treatments. Dietary therapy was used least frequently. Only 11% of overweight and 30% of obese participants reported having received dietary therapy and 28% of orthopaedic surgeons reported to prescribe dietary therapy to overweight patients. Conclusions While most recommended non-surgical treatments were used frequently as single therapy, the combination is used in only a small percentage of OA patients. Especially, use of dietary therapy

  17. Evidence-based orthopaedics or 'superstition in the pigeon'.

    PubMed

    Evans, R

    2009-01-01

    Pigeon behavioural conditioning methods are similar to the processes that orthopaedic surgeons use to evaluate new surgical procedures. Alternatively, evidence-based orthopaedics is a tool for surgeons to evaluate procedures in a systematic, patient-centred way that is less instinctive than pigeon behaviour. The objective of this article is to describe evidence-based orthopaedics, and then propose changes to surgical culture with the aim of refining the interpretation of the current literature and improving the quality of future research. The proposals are 'institutional' changes rather than calls for increased funding and more randomised controlled trials. PMID:19750292

  18. Patient Internet Use in a Community Outpatient Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Beall, McPherson S; Beall, M Scott; Greenfield, Mary Lou VH; Biermann, J Sybil

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated Internet use among orthopaedic patients in a private practice general orthopaedic setting. Of 154 respondents, twenty percent had used the Internet to research their orthopaedic diagnosis. Search rates were lowest for patients with arthritis and highest for patients with disorders of the spine or back. Seventy percent of these patients who had searched had found their searches helpful, and over 50% of patients who had searched had questions raised that they planned to address with their physicians. Of those patients who did search the Internet, none reported concern regarding the credibility of Internet retrieved material. PMID:12180601

  19. [Functional and orthopaedic aspects of dystrophinopathies].

    PubMed

    Boulay, C; Finidori, G

    2015-12-01

    Although the clinical picture and the natural progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) differ, borderline forms exist. Classical orthopaedic treatment is based on self-rehabilitation (by the parents and the patient), physical therapy, posture alignment with orthotics, ergotherapy to set up technical aides, notably positioning in an electric wheelchair to provide more satisfactory autonomy. The functional aspect predominates over pure orthopaedics. Although surgical indications have evolved for the lower limbs, pelvic-spinal arthrodesis for treatment of scoliosis remains the reference treatment, but the methods have evolved since the advent of corticotherapy for DMD. Corticotherapy slows the progression of motor deficits, the age at which walking ability is lost is delayed (shifting from 10 years to 13-14 years depending on the studies), scoliosis progresses later, respiratory insufficiency is better controlled, and therefore survival is prolonged (between 20 and 40 years). However, although this functional aspect seems to respond better to the progress in overall treatment, it also results from a multidisciplinary approach to the disease. Nevertheless, assessment is required, not at a time t as reflected by the scales currently in use, but during daily activities as proposed by qualitative and quantitative monitoring seeking to model nyctohemeral functional motor skills. The principle is to characterize the type of activity (sitting, standing, lying down, walking), its duration, its intensity (walking speed), its frequency (number of activity changes, number of walking episodes), and their sequence (temporal sequence, organization of activity variation). The goal is to identify the variety of functional motor skills and their occurrence over time to determine whether treatment contributes a functional benefit and whether this benefit is put into practice daily. PMID:26773586

  20. Fabricating specialised orthopaedic implants using additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    It has been hypothesised that AM is ideal for patient specific orthopaedic implants such as those used in bone cancer treatment, that can rapidly build structures such as lattices for bone and tissues to in-grow, that would be impossible using current conventional subtractive manufacturing techniques. The aim of this study was to describe the adoption of AM (direct metal laser sintering and electron beam melting) into the design manufacturing and post-manufacturing processes and the early clinical use. Prior to the clinical use of AM implants, extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of both laser and electron beam fabrications were undertaken. Concurrently, post-manufacturing processes evaluated included hipping, cleaning and coating treatments. The first clinical application of a titanium alloy mega-implant was undertaken in November 2010. A 3D model of the pelvic wing implant was designed from CT scans. Novel key features included extensive lattice structures at the bone interfaces and integral flanges to fix the implant to the bone. The pelvic device was implanted with the aid of navigation and to date the patient remains active. A further 18 patient specific mega-implants have now been implanted. The early use of this advanced manufacturing route for patient specific implants has been very encouraging enabling the engineer to produce more advanced and anatomical conforming implants. However, there are a new set of design, manufacturing and regulatory challenges that require addressing to permit this technique to be used more widely. This technology is changing the design and manufacturing paradigm for the fabrication of specialised orthopaedic implants.

  1. National Trends in Foot and Ankle Arthrodesis: 17-Year Analysis of the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery and National Hospital Discharge Survey.

    PubMed

    Best, Matthew J; Buller, Leonard T; Miranda, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Foot and ankle arthrodesis reliably reduces pain and functional disability among patients with arthritis and deformity. Since its introduction in 1953, improvements in surgical technique have enhanced the outcomes and reduced complications. However, little is known regarding US national trends of foot and ankle arthrodesis. The present study sought to use the most recently available Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data to investigate changes in the usage of inpatient and ambulatory foot and ankle arthrodesis. Cases of foot and ankle arthrodesis were identified using the National Hospital Discharge Survey and National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery, and the data were analyzed for trends in demographics, treatment, and usage. From 1994 to 2006, the population-adjusted rates of foot and ankle arthrodeses increased by 146% (8.2/100,000 capita to 20.2/100,000 capita). The number of outpatient arthrodeses performed with arthroscopic assistance increased by 858%. The population-adjusted rate of outpatient and inpatient procedures increased by 415% and 17%, respectively. The gender-adjusted rates increased by 59% for males and 209% for females. The age-adjusted rates increased among patients >35 years old in both settings. The use of peripheral nerve blocks during ambulatory procedures increased from 3.3% to 10.1%. Private insurance was the largest compensator. In conclusion, the rate of foot and ankle arthrodesis increased dramatically from 1990 to 2007 using the most up-to-date publicly available data. Knowledge of these national practice patterns could aid policy-makers and surgeons in appropriately allocating healthcare resources to ensure quality patient care. PMID:26213159

  2. Posttransfusion Haematocrit Equilibration: Timing Posttransfusion Haematocrit Check in Neonates at the National Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Audu, L. I.; Otuneye, A. T.; Mairami, A. B.; Mshelia, L. J.; Nwatah, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaemia is a common morbidity in the NICU and often requires transfusion of packed red blood cells. Haematocrit equilibration following red cell transfusion occurs over time ultimately resulting in a stable packed cell volume (PCV). Knowledge of this equilibration process is pertinent in the accurate timing of posttransfusion (PT) PCV. We conducted a prospective study to determine an appropriate timing for PT PCV estimation on 47 stable anaemic babies at the Neonatal Unit of National Hospital, Abuja. Values of PCV were determined before transfusion and at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours posttransfusion. Forty of the recruited neonates and young infants were analyzed. Their gestational age range was 26 to 40 weeks. 1-hour PT PCV (48.5% ± 5.5%) was similar to the 6-hour PT PCV (47.8% ± 5.6%) P = 0.516, but both were significantly different from the 12-hour (46.8% ± 5.9%), 24-hour (45.9 ± 5.8%), and 48-hour (45.4% ± 6.2%) PT PCVs. The 12-hour PT PCV was similar to the 24-hour and 48-hour PT PCVs (P = 0.237 and 0.063, resp.). We concluded that, in stable nonhaemorrhaging and nonhaemolysing young infants, the estimated timing of haematocrit equilibration and, consequently, posttransfusion PCV is 12 hours after red blood cell transfusion. PMID:25861284

  3. Associations of mental, and medical illnesses with against medical advice discharges: the National Hospital Discharge Survey, 1988-2006.

    PubMed

    Tawk, Rima; Freels, Sally; Mullner, Ross

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the association of mental and medical illnesses with the odds for leaving against medical advice (AMA) in a national sample of adult patients who left general hospitals between 1988 and 2006. Leaving AMA was first examined as a function of year and mental illness. Multiple logistic regression analysis was then used to adjust for patient and hospital characteristics when associating mental and major medical diagnoses with AMA discharges. The results indicated that leaving AMA was most strongly associated with mental health problems. However, the impact of mental illness was attenuated after adjusting for medical illnesses, patient and hospital characteristics. The strongest predictors of AMA discharge included being self-pay, having Medicaid insurance, being young and male, and the regional location of the hospital (Northeast). When substance abuse conditions were excluded from the mental illness discharge diagnoses, mental illness had lower odds for leaving AMA. The results may be of value to clinicians, and hospital administrators in helping to profile and target patients at risk for treatment-compliance problems. Prospective primary data collection that would include patient, physician, and hospital variables is recommended. PMID:22057857

  4. Clinical and conventional pharmacy services in Polish hospitals: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Pawłowska, Iga; Pawłowski, Leszek; Kocić, Ivan; Krzyżaniak, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    Background Pharmacist-led care services within the hospital pharmacy setting have a significant impact on efficient drug management processes. The work of pharmacists is directly associated with the provision of drugs and medical supplies along with additional clinical, administrative, organizational and educational duties. Depending on the country, these practice roles may differ to a significant extent. Objective The aim of this research was to explore the role of the hospital pharmacist and the provision of both clinical and traditional pharmaceutical services for patients and medical staff in Polish general hospitals. Setting Hospital pharmacies from all general hospitals in Poland. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted, utilizing an anonymous questionnaire as the research instrument. Heads of hospital pharmacies were requested to participate in this study and complete the questionnaire. The survey was initially piloted to improve the research method. Main outcome measure The types of pharmaceutical services performed in Polish general hospitals. Results 166 hospital pharmacies took part in this survey. The overall response rate was 60.8 %. The total number of full-time equivalent (FTE) professionals employed within the surveyed hospital pharmacies was approximately 833. The procurement and distribution of drugs were identified as pharmaceutical services performed by most of the participants. The significant majority of pharmacists were also involved in compounding, adverse drug reaction monitoring and rational drug management services. Eleven (7 %) of the responding pharmacists had direct contact with patients and 7 (4 %) pharmacists took part in ward rounds. More precise legal regulations regarding hospital pharmacy practice were measures indicated by most pharmacists as necessary changes required in the hospital pharmacy system. Conclusion Polish hospital pharmacists provide various pharmaceutical services. Their work is closely related with direct

  5. Robotic and Navigation Systems in Orthopaedic Surgery: How Much Do Our Patients Understand?

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin-Laing, Harry; Douglas, Stephen L; Haddad, Fares S

    2014-01-01

    Background Technology in orthopaedic surgery has become more widespread in the past 20 years, with emerging evidence of its benefits in arthroplasty. Although patients are aware of benefits of conventional joint replacement, little is known on patients' knowledge of the prevalence, benefits or drawbacks of surgery involving navigation or robotic systems. Methods In an outpatient arthroplasty clinic, 100 consecutive patients were approached and given questionnaires to assess their knowledge of navigation and robotics in orthopaedic surgery. Participation in the survey was voluntary. Results Ninety-eight patients volunteered to participate in the survey, mean age 56.2 years (range, 19 to 88 years; 52 female, 46 male). Forty percent of patients thought more than 30% of National Health Service (NHS) orthopaedic operations involved navigation or robotics; 80% believed this was the same level or less than the private sector. One-third believed most of an operation could be performed independently by a robotic/navigation system. Amongst perceived benefits of navigation/robotic surgery was more accurate surgery (47%), quicker surgery (50%), and making the surgeon's job easier (52%). Sixty-nine percent believed navigation/robotics was more expensive and 20% believed it held no benefit against conventional surgery, with only 9% believing it led to longer surgery. Almost 50% would not mind at least some of their operation being performed with use of robotics/navigation. Conclusions Although few patients were familiar with this new technology, there appeared to be a strong consensus it was quicker and more accurate than conventional surgery. Many patients appear to believe navigation and robotics in orthopaedic surgery is largely the preserve of the private sector. This study demonstrates public knowledge of such new technologies is limited and a need to inform patients of the relative merits and drawbacks of such surgery prior to their more widespread implementation. PMID

  6. Competencies for a Canadian orthopaedic surgery core curriculum.

    PubMed

    Wadey, V M R; Dev, P; Buckley, R; Walker, D; Hedden, D

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a list of 281 competencies deemed to be of importance in the training of orthopaedic surgeons. A stratified, randomised selection of non-university orthopaedic surgeons rated each individual item on a scale 1 to 4 of increasing importance. Summary statistics across all respondents were given. The mean scores and sds were computed. Secondary analyses were computed in general orthopaedics, paediatrics, trauma and adult reconstruction. Of the 156 orthopaedic surgeons approached 131 (84%) responded to the questionnaire. They rated 240 of the 281 items greater than 3.0 suggesting that competence in these was necessary by completion of training. Complex procedures were rated to be less important. The structure, delivery and implementation of the curriculum needs further study. Learning activities are 'driven' by the evaluation of competencies and thus competency-based learning may soon be in the forefront of training programmes. PMID:19949127

  7. The Future of Biologic Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Stuart B.; Yao, Zhenyu; Keeney, Michael; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Implants are widely used for othopaedic applications such as fixing fractures, repairing nonunions, obtaining a joint arthrodesis, total joint arthroplasty, spinal reconstruction, and soft tissue anchorage. Previously, orthopaedic implants were designed simply as mechanical devices; the biological aspects of the implant were a byproduct of stable internal/external fixation of the device to the surrounding bone or soft tissue. More recently, biologic coatings have been incorporated into orthopaedic implants in order to modulate the surrounding biological environment. This opinion article reviews current and potential future use of biologic coatings for orthopaedic implants to facilitate osseointegration and mitigate possible adverse tissue responses including the foreign body reaction and implant infection. While many of these coatings are still in the preclinical testing stage, bioengineers, material scientists and surgeons continue to explore surface coatings as a means of improving clinical outcome of patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery. PMID:23391496

  8. Venturing into the overlap between pediatric orthopaedics and hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A; Ratner, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    There is an overlap between pediatric orthopaedic surgery and hand surgery. A pediatric orthopaedic surgeon is accustomed to the intricacies of the immature skeleton, whereas a hand surgeon is more familiar with the regional anatomy and finer surgical techniques. Many hand diagnoses and surgical techniques are appropriate for the pediatric orthopaedic surgeon, including straightforward duplicated thumb reconstruction of a trigger thumb. Many pediatric diagnoses are more suitable for treatment by a hand surgeon, including simple syndactyly release and complex duplicated thumb reconstruction. Other procedures, such as pollicization, cleft hand reconstruction, synpolydactyly release, and macrodactyly management, require more advanced expertise for successful treatment. It is helpful for pediatric orthopaedic surgeons and hand surgeons to be familiar with the indications, surgical techniques, outcomes, and complications of pediatric hand surgery. PMID:24720302

  9. A Qualitative Exploration of Workarounds Related to the Implementation of National Electronic Health Records in Early Adopter Mental Health Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ser, Gloria; Robertson, Ann; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate the perceptions and reported practices of mental health hospital staff using national hospital electronic health records (EHRs) in order to inform future implementations, particularly in acute mental health settings. Methods Thematic analysis of interviews with a wide range of clinical, information technology (IT), managerial and other staff at two early adopter mental health National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in London, UK, implementing national EHRs. Results We analysed 33 interviews. We first sought out examples of workarounds, such as delayed data entry, entering data in wrong places and individuals using the EHR while logged in as a colleague, then identified possible reasons for the reported workarounds. Our analysis identified four main categories of factors contributing to workarounds (i.e., operational, cultural, organisational and technical). Operational factors included poor system integration with existing workflows and the system not meeting users' perceived needs. Cultural factors involved users' competence with IT and resistance to change. Organisational factors referred to insufficient organisational resources and training, while technical factors included inadequate local technical infrastructure. Many of these factors, such as integrating the EHR system with day-to-day operational processes, staff training and adequate local IT infrastructure, were likely to apply to system implementations in various settings, but we also identified factors that related particularly to implementing EHRs in mental health hospitals, for example: EHR system incompatibility with IT systems used by mental health–related sectors, notably social services; the EHR system lacking specific, mental health functionalities and options; and clinicians feeling unable to use computers while attending to distressed psychiatric patients. Conclusions A better conceptual model of reasons for workarounds should help with designing, and supporting the

  10. Use of osteoporosis medications after hospitalization for hip fracture: a cross-national study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seoyoung C.; Kim, Mi-Sook; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Song, Hong Ji; Liu, Jun; Hurtado, Isabel; Peiró, Salvador; Lee, Joongyub; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Park, Byung-Joo; Avorn, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While current osteoporosis management guidelines recommend use of pharmacologic treatment following hip fracture, the care of such patients has been suboptimal. The objective of this cross-national study is to quantify the use of and adherence to osteoporosis medication following hip fracture in three countries with different health care systems- the United States, Korea and Spain. Methods In three cohorts of patients aged ≥65 years hospitalized for hip fracture, we calculated the proportion receiving ≥1 osteoporosis drug after discharge. Adherence to osteoporosis treatment was measured as the proportion of days covered (PDC) during the first year following the hip fracture. Results We identified 86,202 patients with a hip fracture - 4,704 (U.S. Medicare), 6,700 (U.S. commercial), 57,631(Korea), and 17,167 (Spain). The mean age was 77–83 years and 74–78% were women. In the year prior to the index hip fracture, 16–18% were taking an osteoporosis medication. Within 3 months following the index hip fracture, 11% (U.S. Medicare), 13% (U.S. commercial), 39% (Korea), and 25% (Spain) of patients filled ≥1 prescription for osteoporosis medication. For those who filled one or more prescriptions for an osteoporosis medication, the mean PDC in the year following the fracture was 0.70 (U.S. Medicare), 0.67 (U.S. commercial), 0.43 (Korea) and 0.66 (Spain). Conclusions Regardless of differences in health care delivery systems and medication reimbursement plans, the use of osteoporosis medications for the secondary prevention of osteoporotic fracture was low. Adherence to osteoporosis treatment was also suboptimal with the PDC<0.70 in all three countries. PMID:25660252

  11. Prevalence and Characterization of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Mulago National Referral Hospital, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Okoche, Deogratius; Asiimwe, Benon B.; Katabazi, Fred Ashaba; Kato, Laban; Najjuka, Christine F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Carbapenemases have increasingly been reported in enterobacteriaceae worldwide. Most carbapenemases are plasmid encoded hence resistance can easily spread. Carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae are reported to cause mortality in up to 50% of patients who acquire bloodstream infections. We set out to determine the burden of carbapenem resistance as well as establish genes encoding for carbapenemases in enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates obtained from Mulago National Referral Hospital, Uganda. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a total of 196 clinical isolates previously collected from pus swabs, urine, blood, sputum, tracheal aspirates, cervical swabs, endomentrial aspirates, rectal swabs, Vaginal swabs, ear swabs, products of conception, wound biopsy and amniotic fluid. All isolates were subjected to phenotypic carbapenemase screening using Boronic acid-based inhibition, Modified Hodge and EDTA double combined disk test. In addition, all the isolates were subjected to PCR assay to confirm presence of carbapenemase encoding genes. Results The study found carbapenemase prevalence of 22.4% (44/196) in the isolates using phenotypic tests, with the genotypic prevalence slightly higher at 28.6% (56/196). Over all, the most prevalent gene was blaVIM (21,10.7%), followed by blaOXA-48 (19, 9.7%), blaIMP (12, 6.1%), blaKPC (10, 5.1%) and blaNDM-1 (5, 2.6%). Among 56 isolates positive for 67 carbapenemase encoding genes, Klebsiella pneumonia was the species with the highest number (52.2%). Most 32/67(47.7%) of these resistance genes were in bacteria isolated from pus swabs. Conclusion There is a high prevalence of carbapenemases and carbapenem-resistance encoding genes among third generation cephalosporins resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Uganda, indicating a danger of limited treatment options in this setting in the near future. PMID:26284519

  12. Authorities and foundation of the orthopaedic school in Germany in the 19th century: part II: Richard von Volkmann, Julius Wolff, Albert Hoffa, Friedrich Trendelenburg and other German authors.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The national achievements of the orthopaedic school of Germany became international in the second part of the 19th century, and from 1860 through 1914 its educational system attracted many physicians and surgeons from all over the world. During this period of 50 years, German surgeons asserted their dominance in orthopaedic surgery, particularly with four famous surgeons: Richard von Volkmann, Julius Wolff, Albert Hoffa, and Friedrich Trendelenburg. They held annual meetings, during which papers were read and discussed. We also present contributions to orthopaedic sciences of the other German authors during 19th century according to different cities. PMID:26585866

  13. [Nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in the intensive care units of a national hospital of Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Chincha, Omayra; Cornelio, Elia; Valverde, Violeta; Acevedo, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In order to describe the incidence of nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in intensive care units (UCI) of the National Hospital Cayetano Heredia, a retrospective observational study was conducted using the data from the Office of Epidemiology and Environmental Health from 2010 to 2012. A total number of 222 nosocomial infections were reported; the general medicine UCI reported the highest incidence of pneumonia cases associated to a mechanical ventilator in 1000 days of use of the device (28.6); infection of the blood stream associated to central venous catheter (11.9), and infection of the urinary tract associated to a catheter (8,1). The main infectious agents isolated were Pseudomona sp. (32.3%) in the emergency UCI, negative Staphylococcus coagulasa (36%) in the general medicine UCI and Candida sp (69.2%) in the Surgery UCI. The rates of infections associated to invasive devices were high as in other national hospitals with limited resources and infrastructure. PMID:24448938

  14. Radial forearm flaps as durable soft tissue coverage for local nationals being treated in the field hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Kh; Jeffery, Sla

    2013-03-01

    The current conflict in Afghanistan has seen the increasing use of Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) in insurgency attacks. In addition to the coalition forces killed and injured from these devices, local national civilians are also injured. Injuries often include amputations, open fractures and large areas of skin affected by fragmentation. Local national access to long-term care after an IED injury is limited, and often when the patient leaves a coalition hospital this concludes the care the patient will receive. Definitive, durable treatment options are needed for these patients. In the IED-injured patient with open extremity wounds and open metacarpal fractures, pedicled radial forearm flaps offer a suitable soft tissue coverage option. Four cases are reported on IED- injured Afghan patients treated at a Role 3 hospital facility. PMID:23720555

  15. Best practices of hospital security planning for patient surge--a comparative analysis of three national systems.

    PubMed

    Downey, Erin; Hebert, Anjanette

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines three international healthcare security systems as they relate to patient surge in Canada, Israel, and the United States. Its purpose is to compare the systems, to highlight unique characteristics that define those systems, and to initiate the development of best practices that transcend national boundaries. Several significant national characteristics of demographics, healthcare systems, and political climate, among others, present challenges to translating best practices among these three countries. However, we have found that best practice strategies exist in areas of communications, coordination, building design, space adaptability, and patient routing (both from the community to the hospital, as well as within the hospital) that can be shared and incorporated into the healthcare preparedness efforts in all three countries. PMID:20873500

  16. Changes in the monitoring and oversight practices of not-for-profit hospital governing boards 1989-2005: evidence from three national surveys.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Lee, Shoou-Yih D; Wang, Virginia; Margolin, Frances S

    2009-04-01

    Despite the legal and practical importance of monitoring and oversight of management by hospital governing boards, there is little empirical evidence of how hospital boards fulfill these roles and the extent to which these practices have changed over time. We utilize data from three national surveys of hospital governance to examine how oversight and monitoring practices in public and private not-for-profit (NFP) hospital boards have changed over time. Findings suggest that board relations with CEOs in NFP hospitals display important but potentially contradictory patterns. On the one hand, NFP hospital boards appear to be exercising more stringent oversight of management and hospital performance. On the other hand, management is more actively involved with governance matters with less separation of board and management. This general pattern varies by the dimension of oversight and monitoring practice and by specific characteristics of NFP hospitals. PMID:19052168

  17. HIV and Orthopaedics: Musculoskeletal Manifestations and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pretell-Mazzini, Juan; Subhawong, Ty; Hernandez, Victor H; Campo, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    ➤Advances in combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in recent years have transformed HIV infection into a chronic disease when treatment is available, increasing a patient's life expectancy and the chances that orthopaedic surgeons will encounter such patients in their clinical practice.➤Musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with HIV infection are common and sometimes are the initial presentation of the disease. Knowledge about neoplasms and associated conditions affecting muscle, bones, and joints is essential for successful management.➤Since the advent of cART, total joint arthroplasty has been shown to be a safe procedure; however, perioperative infection is still a small risk in patients with uncontrolled viral loads or CD4 counts of <400 cells/mm(3).➤With regard to trauma surgery, the rates of early and late infection around implants, as well as union rates, are comparable with those in the HIV-negative population; however, there is an increased risk of pulmonary, renal, and infectious or septic complications in the polytrauma setting.➤Factors such as CD4 count, nutritional status, cART therapy, viral load count, and other comorbidities (hemophilia, infection among intravenous drug users, etc.) should be considered when treating these patients in order to optimize their clinical outcomes. PMID:27147691

  18. A metrology solution for the orthopaedic industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, P.; Brown, L.; Jiang, X.; Blunt, L.

    2005-01-01

    Total joint replacement is one of the most common elective surgical procedures performed worldwide, with an estimate of 1.5 million operations performed annually. Currently joint replacements are expected to function for 10-15 years, however, with an increase in life expectancy, and a greater call for knee replacement due to increased activity levels, there is a requirement to improve their function to offer longer term improved quality of life for patients. The amount of wear that a joint incurs is seen as a good indicator of performance, with higher wear rates typically leading to reduced function and premature failure. New technologies and materials are pushing traditional wear assessment methods to their limits, and novel metrology solutions are required to assess wear of joints following in vivo and in vitro use. This paper presents one such measurement technique; a scanning co-ordinate metrology machine for geometrical assessment. A case study is presented to show the application of this technology to a real orthopaedic measurement problem: the wear of components in total knee replacement. This technique shows good results and provides a basis for further developing techniques for geometrical wear assessment of total joint replacements.

  19. Plaster of Paris: the orthopaedic surgeon heritage.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Plastering is one of the most ancient of the building handicrafts. Plaster is the common name for calcium sulphate hemi hydrate made by heating the mineral gypsum, the common name for sulphate of lime. In the tenth century the Arabs used liquid plaster in orthopaedic treatment. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, patients with fractures of the lower extremities-and often of the upper extremities as well-were treated in bed with restriction of all activity for many weeks until the fractures united. It was the practice of surgeons to dress wounds and fractures at frequent intervals. The bandages, pads, and splints were removed, the fractures manipulated, and the dressings reapplied. The search for simpler, less cumbersome methods of treatment led to the development of occlusive dressings, stiffened at first with starch and later with plaster of Paris. The ambulatory treatment of fractures was the direct result of these innovations. Two military surgeons, Antonius Mathijsen of the Netherlands, and Nikolai Ivanovitch Pirogov of Russia, were responsible for the introduction of the new plaster bandage technique. At the beginning of the twentieth century the technique was improved by Jean-François Calot, a French surgeon, who invented the hand manufacture of plaster bandage as a roll. During the twentieth century, walking cast and ambulation for fresh fractures were developed with plaster and pin incorporated in plaster; the open fracture care concept was introduced with plaster of Paris by Trueta before the external fixation. PMID:27055448

  20. Tissue engineering skeletal muscle for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payumo, Francis C.; Kim, Hyun D.; Sherling, Michael A.; Smith, Lee P.; Powell, Courtney; Wang, Xiao; Keeping, Hugh S.; Valentini, Robert F.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    With current technology, tissue-engineered skeletal muscle analogues (bioartificial muscles) generate too little active force to be clinically useful in orthopaedic applications. They have been engineered genetically with numerous transgenes (growth hormone, insulinlike growth factor-1, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor), and have been shown to deliver these therapeutic proteins either locally or systemically for months in vivo. Bone morphogenetic proteins belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily are osteoinductive molecules that drive the differentiation pathway of mesenchymal cells toward the chondroblastic or osteoblastic lineage, and stimulate bone formation in vivo. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells endogenously expressing bone morphogenetic proteins might serve as a vehicle for systemic bone morphogenetic protein delivery in vivo, proliferating skeletal myoblasts (C2C12) were transduced with a replication defective retrovirus containing the gene for recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (C2BMP-6). The C2BMP-6 cells constitutively expressed recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 and synthesized bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, based on increased alkaline phosphatase activity in coincubated mesenchymal cells. C2BMP-6 cells did not secrete soluble, bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, but retained the bioactivity in the cell layer. Therefore, genetically-engineered skeletal muscle cells might serve as a platform for long-term delivery of osteoinductive bone morphogenetic proteins locally.

  1. Work Hours and Self rated Health of Hospital Doctors in Norway and Germany. A comparative study on national samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between extended work hours and health is well documented among hospital doctors, but the effect of national differences in work hours on health is unexplored. The study examines the relationship between work hours and self rated health in two national samples of hospital doctors. Methods The study population consisted of representative samples of 1,260 German and 562 Norwegian hospital doctors aged 25-65 years (N = 1,822) who received postal questionnaires in 2006 (Germany) and 2008 (Norway). The questionnaires contained items on demography, work hours (number of hours per workday and on-call per month) and self rated subjective health on a five point scale - dichotomized into "good" (above average) and "average or below". Results Compared to Norway, a significantly higher proportion of German doctors exceeded a 9 hour work day (58.8% vs. 26.7%) and 60 hours on-call per month (63.4% vs. 18.3%). Every third (32.2%) hospital doctor in Germany worked more than this, while this pattern was rare in Norway (2.9%). In a logistic regression model, working in Norway (OR 4.17; 95% CI 3.02-5.73), age 25-44 years (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.29-2.14) and not exceeding 9 hour work day and 60 hours on-call per month (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.03-1.77) were all independent significant predictors of good self reported health. Conclusion A lower percentage of German hospital doctors reported self rated health as "good", which is partly explained by the differences in work time pattern. Initiatives to increase doctors' control over their work time are recommended. PMID:21338494

  2. Interprofessional Relationships between Orthopaedic and Podiatric Surgeons in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, A; Gwilym, SE; Reilly, IN; Kilmartin, TE; Ribbans, WJ

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The first comprehensive report on the interprofessional relationships between foot and ankle surgeons in the UK is presented. MATERIALS AND METHODS A questionnaire was sent to orthopaedic surgeons with membership of the British Foot and Ankle Surgery Society (BOFAS), orthopaedic surgeons not affiliated to the specialist BOFAS and podiatrists specialising in foot surgery. The questionnaire was returned by 77 (49%) of the BOFAS orthopaedic consultant surgeons, 66 (26%) of non-foot and ankle orthopaedic consultant surgeons and 99 (73%) of the podiatric surgeons. RESULTS While most respondents have experience of surgeons working in the other specialty in close geographical proximity, the majority do not believe that this has adversely affected their referral base. The experience of podiatrists of the outcomes of orthopaedic surgery has been more positive than orthopaedic surgeons of podiatric interventions. Podiatrists are more welcoming of future orthopaedic involvement in future foot and ankle services than in reverse. However, there are a sizeable number of surgeons in both professions who would like to see closer professional liaisons. The study has identified clear divisions between the professions but has highlighted areas where there is a desire from many clinicians to work more harmoniously together, such as in education, training and research. CONCLUSIONS While major concerns exist over issues such as surgery by non-registered medical practitioners and the suitable spectrum of surgery for each profession, many surgeons, in both professions, are willing to provide training for juniors in both specialties and there is a wish to have closer working relationships and common educational and research opportunities than exists at present. PMID:18796189

  3. The NAPPH (National Association of Private Psychiatric Hospitals) today--under new management. Interview by John Herrmann.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, R L

    1992-01-01

    When Robert L. Trachtenberg took over the executive directorship of the National Association of Private Psychiatric Hospitals some five months ago, he walked into a situation wherein several psychiatric specialty hospitals in Texas were under fire. "There were a lot of questions," Trachtenberg says, "and challenges to the credibility of psychiatric hospitals." He was referring to the Texas state investigation into abuses by personnel within psychiatric hospitals. Last year, the Texas Senate Interim Committee on Health and Human Services conducted an eight-month investigation into the conduct of the state's psychiatric hospitals after a newspaper article recounted the unconventional way in which a 14-year old boy was picked up and admitted to a psychiatric facility. After a number of public hearings, three private agencies overseeing Texas psychiatric hospitals adopted rules to prevent further problems in the areas of patient rights, fraudulent billing, patient recruitment and the admission and discharge process. The Senate Interim Committee, however, felt these rules needed to be codified into law and has drafted over 30 bills to be presented to the Texas legislature as omnibus legislation next January. Trachtenberg went to work to iron out methods to encourage better overseeing and state governance, as well as tackling the related issues of standards of care and managed care/utilization review. His background as Deputy Administrator of the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration within HHS provided him with a broad spectrum of knowledge about the field of psychiatry and its problems, and his vast experience in federal government--over 32 years of running domestic programs--enable him to have a keen sense of what can get done, and how. Health Systems REVIEW recently discussed the role of the NAPPH under its new leader, Bob Trachtenberg. What follows is an edited version of that conversation. PMID:10122848

  4. Patient satisfaction and non-UK educated nurses: a cross-sectional observational study of English National Health Service Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Peter; Sloane, Douglas M; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Ball, Jane E; Aiken, Linda H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether patient satisfaction with nursing care in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England is associated with the proportion of non-UK educated nurses providing care. Design Cross-sectional analysis using data from the 2010 NHS Adult Inpatient Survey merged with data from nurse and hospital administrator surveys. Logistic regression models with corrections for clustering were used to determine whether the proportions of non-UK educated nurses were significantly related to patient satisfaction before and after taking account of other hospital, nursing and patient characteristics. Setting 31 English NHS trusts. Participants 12 506 patients 16 years of age and older with at least one overnight stay that completed a satisfaction survey; 2962 bedside care nurses who completed a nurse survey; and 31 NHS trusts. Main outcome measure Patient satisfaction. Results The percentage of non-UK educated nurses providing bedside hospital care, which ranged from 1% to 52% of nurses, was significantly associated with patient satisfaction. After controlling for potential confounding factors, each 10-point increase in the percentage of non-UK educated nurses diminished the odds of patients reporting good or excellent care by 12% (OR=0.88), and decreased the odds of patients agreeing that they always had confidence and trust in nurses by 13% (OR=0.87). Other indicators of patient satisfaction also revealed lower satisfaction in hospitals with higher percentages of non-UK educated nurses. Conclusions Use of non-UK educated nurses in English NHS hospitals is associated with lower patient satisfaction. Importing nurses from abroad to substitute for domestically educated nurses may negatively impact quality of care. PMID:26634400

  5. Improving the outcome of paediatric orthopaedic trauma: an audit of inpatient management in Southampton.

    PubMed

    Cox, P J; Clarke, N M

    1997-11-01

    The patterns, management and outcome of non-fatal orthopaedic injury in childhood was audited over a 1 year period in Southampton. A computer-based audit (1 September 1993 to 31 August 1994) was conducted of all children aged under 15 years who were admitted to the orthopaedic unit after accidental injury. Management was audited by studying the primary conservative and operative treatment methods employed. Treatment outcome was evaluated in terms of need for secondary operative treatment, salvage internal fixation, length of hospital stay and unplanned readmission. In all, 398 children, representing 50/10,000 of the local paediatric population, were admitted with a traumatic injury. There was a significant (P < 0.001, Kolmogorov-Smirnov) seasonal variation in admission rate. There were 87.3% admissions required for fractures, 8.5% after soft tissue injury and 2.2% after joint injury. The following areas were identified where management and outcome could be improved: 1 A 12.1% readmission rate (47/346) in children with fractures owing to a 16% incidence of loss of position after closed reduction of distal radial, forearm shaft and distal humeral fractures. 2 In all, 24% of internal fixation procedures were performed as 'salvage' after failure of conservative treatment, entailing either reoperation during the initial admission or a further unplanned readmission. 3 A prolonged inpatient stay for patients with femoral fractures owing to a wide variation in treatment method. The outcome of non-fatal orthopaedic injury can be improved through the selective use of primary internal fixation of distal radial and humeral fractures and the close adherence to a management algorithm in femoral fractures. There may be a role for more specialised supervision of primary treatment of these particular fractures. PMID:9422873

  6. Does a referral from home to hospital affect satisfaction with childbirth? A cross-national comparison

    PubMed Central

    Christiaens, Wendy; Gouwy, Anneleen; Bracke, Piet

    2007-01-01

    Background The Belgian and Dutch societies present many similarities but differ with regard to the organisation of maternity care. The Dutch way of giving birth is well known for its high percentage of home births and its low medical intervention rate. In contrast, home births in Belgium are uncommon and the medical model is taken for granted. Dutch and Belgian maternity care systems are compared with regard to the influence of being referred to specialist care during pregnancy or intrapartum while planning for a home birth. We expect that a referral will result in lower satisfaction with childbirth, especially in Belgium. Methods Two questionnaires were filled out by 605 women, one at 30 weeks of pregnancy and one within the first two weeks after childbirth, either at home or in a hospital. Of these, 563 questionnaires were usable for analysis. Women were invited to participate in the study by independent midwives and obstetricians during antenatal visits in 2004–2005. Satisfaction with childbirth was measured by the Mackey Satisfaction with Childbirth Rating Scale, which takes into account the multidimensional nature of the concept. Results Belgian women are more satisfied than Dutch women and home births are more satisfying than hospital births. Women who are referred to the hospital while planning for a home birth are less satisfied than women who planned to give birth in hospital and did. A referral has a greater negative impact on satisfaction for Dutch women. Conclusion There is no reason to believe Dutch women receive hospital care of lesser quality than Belgian women in case of a referral. Belgian and Dutch attach different meaning to being referred, resulting in a different evaluation of childbirth. In the Dutch maternity care system home births lead to higher satisfaction, but once a referral to the hospital is necessary satisfaction drops and ends up lower than satisfaction with hospital births that were planned in advance. We need to understand more

  7. Epidemiology of Endometriosis in France: A Large, Nation-Wide Study Based on Hospital Discharge Data

    PubMed Central

    von Theobald, Peter; Cottenet, Jonathan; Iacobelli, Silvia; Quantin, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess the prevalence of hospitalization for endometriosis in the general population in France and in each French region and to describe temporal trends, rehospitalization rates, and prevalence of the different types of endometriosis. The analyses were carried out on French hospital discharge data and covered the period 2008–2012 and a population of 14,239,197 women of childbearing age. In this population, the prevalence of hospitalization for endometriosis was 0.9%, ranging from 0.4% to 1.6% between regions. Endometriosis affected 1.5% of hospitalized women of childbearing age, ranging from 1.0% to 2.4% between regions. The number of patients hospitalized for endometriosis significantly increased over the study period (p < 0.01). Of these, 4.2% were rehospitalized at least once at one year: ranging from 2.7% to 6.3% between regions. The cumulative rehospitalization rate at 3 years was 6.9%. The types of endometriosis according to the procedures performed were as follows: ovarian (40–50%), peritoneal (20–30%), intestinal (10–20%), and ureteral or bladder (<10%), with significant differences between regions. This is the first detailed epidemiological study of endometriosis in France. Further studies are needed to assess the reasons for the increasing prevalence of endometriosis and for the significant differences in regional prevalence of this disease. PMID:27148550

  8. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants. PMID:25988694

  9. Graduated introduction of orthopaedic implants: encouraging innovation and minimizing harm.

    PubMed

    Zywiel, Michael G; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2012-11-01

    There is continued pressure for the development of innovative orthopaedic surgical devices and techniques to meet the demands of increasingly younger and more active patients. However, as demonstrated by several recent orthopaedic implant withdrawals and recalls, clinically important unknown modes of failure for newly introduced devices may not become apparent for several years after widespread adoption, affecting a large number of patients. Different reasons have been implicated for this problem, including weaknesses in the United States medical device approval process, as well as deficiencies in mechanisms for post approval implant performance monitoring. Several remedies have been proposed over the past decades. We aim to stimulate discussion concerning the adoption of orthopaedic technology by describing the concept of a graduated implant approval process for orthopaedic devices that builds on recommendations previously made by other authors; by explaining how this will benefit patients, surgeons, and device manufacturers; and by clarifying why the time has come for the orthopaedic community to reconsider the adoption of such a process. PMID:23138245

  10. Diabetes and its negative impact on outcomes in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wukich, Dane K

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 285 million adults (aged 20-79 years) worldwide were diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus (DM) in 2010, and this number is projected to grow to 439 million adults by the year 2030. Orthopaedic surgeons, regardless of their subspecialty interest, will encounter patients with DM during their career since this epidemic involves both developed and emerging countries. Diabetes results in complications affecting multiple organ systems, potentially resulting in adverse outcomes after orthopaedic surgery. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of DM and its potential for impacting orthopaedic surgery patients. Diabetes adversely affects the outcome of all orthopaedic surgery subspecialties including foot and ankle, upper extremity, adult reconstructive, pediatrics, spine surgery and sports medicine. Poorly controlled diabetes negatively impacts bone, soft tissue, ligament and tendon healing. It is the complications of diabetes such as neuropathy, peripheral artery disease, and end stage renal disease which contributes to adverse outcomes. Well controlled diabetic patients without comorbidities have similar outcomes to patients without diabetes. Orthopaedic surgeons should utilize consultants who will assist in inpatient glycemic management as well as optimizing long term glycemic control. PMID:25893176

  11. Development of a method to analyze orthopaedic practice expenses.

    PubMed

    Brinker, M R; Pierce, P; Siegel, G

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to present a standard method by which an orthopaedic practice can analyze its practice expenses. To accomplish this, a five-step process was developed to analyze practice expenses using a modified version of activity-based costing. In this method, general ledger expenses were assigned to 17 activities that encompass all the tasks and processes typically performed in an orthopaedic practice. These 17 activities were identified in a practice expense study conducted for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. To calculate the cost of each activity, financial data were used from a group of 19 orthopaedic surgeons in Houston, Texas. The activities that consumed the largest portion of the employee work force (person hours) were service patients in office (25.0% of all person hours), maintain medical records (13.6% of all person hours), and resolve collection disputes and rebill charges (12.3% of all person hours). The activities that comprised the largest portion of the total expenses were maintain facility (21.4%), service patients in office (16.0%), and sustain business by managing and coordinating practice (13.8%). The five-step process of analyzing practice expenses was relatively easy to perform and it may be used reliably by most orthopaedic practices. PMID:10738440

  12. The National Accreditation Board for Hospital and Health Care Providers accreditation programme in India.

    PubMed

    Gyani, Girdhar J; Krishnamurthy, B

    2014-01-01

    Quality in health care is important as it is directly linked with patient safety. Quality as we know is driven either by regulation or by market demand. Regulation in most developing countries has not been effective, as there is shortage of health care providers and governments have to be flexible. In such circumstances, quality has taken a back seat. Accreditation symbolizes the framework for quality governance of a hospital and is based on optimum standards. Not only is India establishing numerous state of the art hospitals, but they are also experiencing an increase in demand for quality as well as medical tourism. India launched its own accreditation system in 2006, conforming to standards accredited by ISQua. This article shows the journey to accreditation in India and describes the problems encountered by hospitals as well as the benefits it has generated for the industry and patients. PMID:24938026

  13. Final report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission: will we get the health care governance reform we need?

    PubMed

    Stoelwinder, Johannes U

    2009-10-01

    The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission (NHHRC) has recommended that Australia develop a "single health system", governed by the federal government. Steps to achieving this include: a "Healthy Australia Accord" to agree on the reform framework; the progressive takeover of funding of public hospitals by the federal government; and the possible implementation of a consumer-choice health funding model, called "Medicare Select". These proposals face significant implementation issues, and the final solution needs to deal with both financial and political sustainability. If the federal and state governments cannot agree on a reform plan, the Prime Minister may need to go to the electorate for a mandate, which may be shaped by other economic issues such as tax reform and intergenerational challenges. PMID:19807630

  14. 77 FR 19293 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... the Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. Submit... INFORMATION: Name of Committee: Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... with or considering hip replacement (...

  15. Capturing orthopaedic surgical site infection data and assessing dental recommendations with respect to total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Florschutz, Anthony V; Parsley, Brian S; Shapiro, Irving M

    2015-04-01

    Greater documentation of patient history and clinical course is crucial for identifying factors that can influence surgical outcomes. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have already begun public reporting of hospital data on readmission, complication, and infection rates and will soon launch a website to make physician-specific outcomes data public. The orthopaedic community has the opportunity to lead the way in ensuring that adequate and accurate data is collected to facilitate appropriate comparisons that are based on patients' true risk of complications and the complexity of treatment. Several studies have reported a link between oral pathogens and periprosthetic infection, although it remains unclear whether organisms unique to dental tissues are also present in osteoarthritic joints and tissues affected by periprosthetic joint infection. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Dental Association are aware of these concerns and have created guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis in patients who have undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty and require high-risk dental procedures. Because these guidelines have received considerable criticism, recommendations that are based on scientific and case-controlled clinical studies and provide effective guidance on this important subject are needed. PMID:25808970

  16. Quality and Safety in Orthopaedics: Learning and Teaching at the Same Time: AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin P; Armstrong, April D; Hutzler, Lorraine; Egol, Kenneth A

    2015-11-01

    Increasing attention has been placed on providing higher quality and safer patient care. This requires the development of a new set of competencies to better understand and navigate the system and lead the orthopaedic team. While still trying to learn and develop these competencies, the academic orthopaedist is also expected to model and teach them.The orthopaedic surgeon must understand what is being measured and why, both for purposes of providing better care and to eliminate unnecessary expense in the system. Metrics currently include hospital-acquired conditions, "never events," and thirty-day readmission rates. More will undoubtedly follow.Although commitment and excellence at the individual level are essential, the orthopaedist must think at the systems level to provide the highest value of care. A work culture characterized by respect and trust is essential to improved communication, teamwork, and confidential peer review. An increasing number of resources, both in print and electronic format, are available for us to understand what we can do now to improve quality and safety.Resident education in quality and safety is a fundamental component of the systems-based practice competency, the Next Accreditation System, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review. This needs to be longitudinally integrated into the curriculum and applied parallel to the development of resident knowledge and skill, and will be best learned if resident learning is experiential and taught within a genuine culture of quality and safety. PMID:26537169

  17. The effects of blood transfusion on renal functions in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Satoglu, Ismail Safa; Akcay, Serkan; Horoz, Levent; Kaya, Erol; Karakasli, Ahmet; Skiak, Eyad; Basci, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The effects of perioperative blood transfusion on renal functions have been studied in various studies. In this study, we investigated the effects of blood transfusion on postoperative kidney functions in patients who underwent orthopaedic surgeries. Method: Total 136 patients who were operated for several orthopedic pathologies between June 2013 and December 2014 were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups according to the amounts of blood transfusion. Ninety five patients (69.8%) who were transfused less than 3 units were included in Group 1 and 41 patients (30.2%) who received 3 and more units of blood were included in Group 2. Results: There were no statistical difference between the two groups in terms of preoperative gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronical renal failure and smoking habbits (P > 0.05). No statistical differences between the groups were seen in terms of postoperative hospital stay, pulmonary and other complications as well as mortality (P > 0.05). When the two groups were compared for blood parameters showing postoperative renal and other system functions, no statistical differences were detected (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Blood transfusion does not have negative effects on postoperative BUN and creatinine levels in patients operated for orthopaedic pathologies. PMID:26430403

  18. Hospital Contacts With Infection and Risk of Schizophrenia: A Population-Based Cohort Study With Linkage of Danish National Registers

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Philip R.; Benros, Michael. E.; Mortensen, Preben B.

    2014-01-01

    Infections and immune responses have been suggested to play an important role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Several studies have reported associations between maternal infections during pregnancy and the child’s risk of schizophrenia; however, infection during childhood and adolescence unrelated to maternal infection during pregnancy has not been studied to nearly the same extent and the results are far from conclusive. Data were drawn from 2 population-based registers, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and the Danish National Hospital Register. We used a historical population-based cohort design and selected all individuals born in Denmark between 1981 and 1996 (n = 843 390). We identified all individuals with a first-time hospital contact with schizophrenia from 1991 through 2010. Out of the 3409 individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, a total of 1549 individuals had had a hospital contact with infection before their schizophrenia diagnosis (45%). Our results indicate that individuals who have had a hospital contact with infection are more likely to develop schizophrenia (relative risk [RR] = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.32–1.51) than individuals who had not had such a hospital contact. Bacterial infection was the type of infection that was associated with the highest risk of schizophrenia (RR = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.47–1.82). Our study does not exclude that a certain type of infection may have a specific effect; yet, it does suggest that schizophrenia is associated with a wide range of infections. This association may be due to inflammatory responses affecting the brain or genetic and environmental risk factors aggregating in families. PMID:24379444

  19. Understanding Orthopaedic Registry Studies: A Comparison with Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Inacio, Maria C S; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Dillon, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Orthopaedic registries are valuable for monitoring patient outcomes in real-world settings. Registries are useful for identifying procedure incidence and device utilization, evaluating outcomes, determining patients at risk for complications and reoperations, identifying devices in recall situations, assessing comparative effectiveness of procedures and devices, and providing data for research studies. In the present report, we describe how orthopaedic registries can be used to conduct research and how they compare with randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in regard to methodology. Using an example, a comparison of the performance of mobile and fixed bearings in total knee arthroplasty, we evaluate the differences between, and the similarities of, RCTs and registry cohort studies with regard to how they are conducted and how their findings are reported. Orthopaedic registry studies differ from RCTs in many ways and offer certain advantages. The strengths and limitations of registry cohort studies and RCTs must be understood to properly evaluate the literature. PMID:26738910

  20. Providing Orthopaedic Care for the Incarcerated: Obstacles and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Sraj, Shafic A

    2016-09-01

    Scant information on healthcare delivery to inmates is available in the medical literature. Healthcare provision to inmates has different rules than that for the general population and presents particular challenges for orthopaedic surgeons because of the nature of this population and restrictions imposed by their confinement. This population is typically of a lower socioeconomic status and is less well educated, has accumulated injuries over a lifetime, and has a considerable prevalence of communicable and blood-borne diseases, along with a high prevalence of smoking and high-risk behavior, such as drug-seeking, abuse, and self-inflicted injury. These variables add levels of complexity of care, including the determination of medical necessity for orthopaedic referral, the logistics of transportation and follow-up, access to durable medical equipment and ancillary services, and the choices the orthopaedic provider must make to optimize care within these limitations. PMID:27479830

  1. Melanoma in the Italian Population and Regional Environmental Influences: A National Retrospective Survey on 2001–2008 Hospitalization Records

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, Prisco; Neglia, Cosimo; Falco, Andrea; Rivezzi, Matteo; Agnello, Nadia; Argentiero, Alberto; Chitano, Giovanna; Distante, Chiara; Della Rosa, Giulia; Vinci, Giorgia; De Donno, Antonella; Distante, Alessandro; Romanini, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the burden of regional environmental factors influencing the incidence of Melanoma in the Italian population and overcome the problem of partial population coverage by local cancer registries and thematic archives. Methods: We analyzed the Italian national hospitalization records from 2001 to 2008 provided by the Ministry of Health, excluding hospital re-admissions of the same patients, in order to assess the occurrence of Melanoma over a 8-year period. Data were presented by age groups (absolute number of cases from 20 to ≥80 years old) and per Region (rates per 100,000 inhabitants) for each year. Results: The overall number of new hospitalizations due to malignant Melanoma increased by 16.8% from 2001 (n = 4846) to 2008 (n = 5823), with the rate per 100,000 inhabitants passing from 10.5 to almost 12.0 at a national level. The majority of new diagnoses of malignant Melanoma was observed in two age groups: 61–70 years old (from 979 in 2001 up to 1209 in 2008, corresponding to 15.1 and 18.1 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively) and 71–80 years old (from 954 in 2001 up to 1141 in 2008, corresponding to 19.5 and 21.8 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively). The number of hospitalizations due to Melanoma increased in all age groups with the only exception of the youngest patients aged 20–30 years old. The highest increases over the 8-year period were observed in people aged ≥81 years old (+34%), 61–70 years old (+20%) and surprisingly in the age group 31–40 years old (+17%). Southern Regions showed lower hospitalization rates compared to Northern Italy and Region Lazio. The highest increases between 2001 and 2008 were observed in Trentino/Alto Adige, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Valla d’Aosta and Veneto Region. Conclusions: Hospitalizations due to malignant Melanoma in Italy seem to be influenced by environmental or population-related factors showing a decreasing incidence rate from the Northern to Southern Regions

  2. Language, Literacy and Numeracy in National Training Packages: Case Studies in Aged Care and Hospitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Christine; Brand, Jennie Bickmore

    The implementation and effectiveness of the inclusion of literacy and numeracy in industry training packages was examined in case studies of three programs in Western Australia. Two were certificate programs in cooking and food and beverage as specified in the hospitality training package, and the third was an aged care program based on the…

  3. Risk Factors for Violent Offending in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A National Study of Hospitalized Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langstrom, Niklas; Grann, Martin; Ruchkin, Vladislav; Sjostedt, Gabrielle; Fazel, Seena

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about risk factors for violence among individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study uses data from Swedish longitudinal registers for all 422 individuals hospitalized with autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome during 1988-2000 and compares those committing violent or sexual offenses with those who did not. Thirty-one…

  4. Orthopaedic surgery in patients with von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Siboni, S M; Biguzzi, E; Solimeno, L P; Pasta, G; Mistretta, C; Mannucci, P M; Peyvandi, F

    2014-01-01

    Patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD) may need orthopaedic surgery because of disabling chronic arthropathy due to recurrent joint bleeding. They may also require this surgery independently of their haemostasis disorder. Knowledge regarding the management of orthopaedic surgery in VWD is limited. Description of management of orthopaedic surgery in patients with VWD, based upon retrospective data collection and analysis of 32 orthopaedic procedures carried out over a period of 33 years in 23 patients was the aim of this study. Of 32 procedures, six were minor (three hand surgery, one foot surgery, two others) and 26 were major (seven joint replacements, nine arthroscopic procedures, two foot surgery, eight others). Twenty-two procedures were performed using replacement therapy with plasma-derived concentrates containing both factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand factor (VWF). Two procedures in patients with acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AWVS) were performed using FVIII-VWF concentrates associated with intravenous immunoglobulins, or desmopressin plus tranexamic acid. Seven procedures were performed using desmopressin alone and one using intravenous immunoglobulins in AVWS. Bleeding complications occurred in seven procedures (22%). In one patient, an anti-VWF antibody was diagnosed after surgery. Anticoagulant prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism was implemented in four cases only and in two instances there was excessive bleeding. In conclusion, control of surgical haemostasis was achieved in most patients with VWD undergoing orthopaedic surgery. The control of haemostasis combined with an adequate surgical technique and early post-operative rehabilitation are warranted for the successful performance of orthopaedic surgery in VWD, which requires the involvement of specialized haemophilia centres. PMID:23992395

  5. Variations in Implementation of Acute Care Surgery: Results from a national survey of university-affiliated hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Santry, Heena P.; Madore, John C.; Collins, Courtney E.; Ayturk, M. Didem; Velmahos, George C.; Britt, LD; Kiefe, Catarina I.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To date, no studies have reported nationwide adoption of Acute Care Surgery (ACS) or identified structural and/or process variations for the care of emergency general surgery (EGS) patients within such models. METHODS We surveyed surgeons responsible for EGS coverage at University HealthSystems Consortium hospitals using an 8-page postal/email questionnaire querying respondents on hospital and EGS structure/process measures. Survey responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, univariate comparisons, and multivariable regression models. RESULTS 258 of 319 (81%) potential respondents completed surveys. 81 hospitals (31%) had implemented ACS while 134 (52%) had a traditional general surgeon on-call model (GSOC). 38 (15%) hospitals had another model (HYBRID). Larger bed, university-based, teaching hospitals with Level 1 trauma center verification status located in urban areas were more likely to have adopted ACS. In multivariable modeling, hospital type, setting, and trauma center verification predicted ACS implementation. EGS processes of care varied with 28% GSOC having block time vs 67% ACS (p<0.0001); 45% GSOC providing ICU care to EGS patients in a surgical/trauma ICU vs 93% ACS (p<0.0001); GSOC sharing call among 5.7 (+/− 3.2) surgeons vs 7.9 (+/−2.3) ACS surgeons (p<0.0001); and 13% GSOC taking in-house EGS call vs 75% ACS (p<0.0001). Among ACS hospitals there were variations in patient cohorting (25% EGS patients alone; 21% EGS+trauma; 17% EGS+elective; 30% EGS+trauma+elective), data collection (26% had prospective EGS registries), and patient handoffs (56% had attending surgeon presence), call responsibilities (averaging 4.8 (+/− 1.3) calls per month with 60% providing extra call stipend and 40% with no post-call clinical duties). CONCLUSION The potential of the ACS on the national crisis in access to EGS care is not fully met. Variations in EGS processes of care among adopters of ACS suggest that standardized criteria for ACS

  6. Audit of clinical-laboratory practices in haematology and blood transfusion at Muhimbili National Hospital in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Makubi, Abel N; Meda, Collins; Magesa, Alex; Minja, Peter; Mlalasi, Juliana; Salum, Zubeda; Kweka, Rumisha E; Rwehabura, James; Quaresh, Amrana; Magesa, Pius M; Robert, David; Makani, Julie; Kaaya, Ephata

    2012-10-01

    In Tanzania, there is paucity of data for monitoring laboratory medicine including haematology. This therefore calls for audits of practices in haematology and blood transfusion in order to provide appraise practice and devise strategies that would result in improved quality of health care services. This descriptive cross-sectional study which audited laboratory practice in haematology and blood transfusion at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) aimed at assessing the pre-analytical stage of laboratory investigations including laboratory request forms and handling specimen processing in the haematology laboratory and assessing the chain from donor selection, blood component processing to administration of blood during transfusion. A national standard checklist was used to audit the laboratory request forms (LRF), phlebotomists' practices on handling and assessing the from donor selection to administration 6f blood during transfusion. Both interview and observations were used. A total of 195 LRF were audited and 100% of had incomplete information such as patients' identification numbers, time sample ordered, reason for request, summary of clinical assessment and differential diagnoses. The labelling of specimens was poorly done by phlebotomists/clinicians in 82% of the specimens. Also 65% (132/202) of the blood samples delivered in the haematology laboratory did not contain the recommended volume of blood. There was no laboratory request form specific for ordering blood and there were no guidelines for indication of blood transfusion in the wards/ clinics. The blood transfusion laboratory section was not participating in external quality assessment and the hospital transfusion committee was not in operation. It is recommended that a referral hospital like MNH should have a transfusion committee to provide an active forum to facilitate communication between those involved with transfusion, monitor, coordinate and audit blood transfusion practices as per national

  7. Imaging in scoliosis from the orthopaedic surgeon's point of view.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Marc; Abel, Rainer

    2006-04-01

    For treating patients with scoliosis orthopaedic surgeons need diagnostic imaging procedures in order to provide answers about a possible underlying disease, choice of treatment, and prognosis. Once treatment is instituted, imaging is also critical for monitoring changes of the deformity so as to optimize therapy. The combined effort of orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists helps detect treatable causes of scoliosis at an early stage, define the need and timing for surgery, and ensure that every precaution is taken to minimize the risks of surgery. Neurosurgical causes, with particular reference to spinal cord tumours and syringomyelia, need to be addressed before scoliosis surgery can be contemplated. PMID:16439089

  8. National Estimates of Noncanine Bite and Sting Injuries Treated in US Hospital Emergency Departments, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ricky; Mack, Karin; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Proescholdbell, Scott; Annest, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Injuries resulting from contact with animals and insects are a significant public health concern. This study quantifies nonfatal bite and sting injuries by noncanine sources using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System–All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP). Methods The NEISS-AIP is an ongoing nationally representative surveillance system used to monitor all types and causes of injuries treated in US hospital emergency departments (EDs). Cases were coded by trained hospital coders using information from medical records on animal and insect sources of bite and sting injuries being treated. Data were weighted to produce national annualized estimates, percentages, and rates based on the US population. Results From 2001 to 2010 an estimated 10.1 million people visited EDs for noncanine bite and sting injuries, based on an unweighted case count of 169,010. This translates to a rate of 340.1 per 100,000 people (95% CI, 232.9–447.3). Insects accounted for 67.5% (95% CI, 45.8–89.2) of bite and sting injuries, followed by arachnids 20.8% (95% CI, 13.8–27.9). The estimated number of ED visits for bedbug bite injuries increased more than 7-fold—from 2156 visits in 2007 to 15,945 visits in 2010. Conclusions This study provides an update of national estimates of noncanine bite and sting injuries and describes the diversity of animal exposures based on a national sample of EDs. Treatment of nonfatal bite and sting injuries are costly to society. Direct medical and work time lost translates to an estimated $7.5 billion annually. PMID:24433776

  9. A Regional Assessment of Medicaid Access to Outpatient Orthopaedic Care: The Influence of Population Density and Proximity to Academic Medical Centers on Patient Access

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Brendan M.; Draeger, Reid W.; Olsson, Erik C.; Spang, Jeffrey T.; Lin, Feng-Chang; Kamath, Ganesh V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Access to care is limited for patients with Medicaid with many conditions, but data investigating this relationship in the orthopaedic literature are limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between health insurance status and access to care for a diverse group of adult orthopaedic patients, specifically if access to orthopaedic care is influenced by population density or distance from academic teaching hospitals. Methods: Two hundred and three orthopaedic practices within the state of North Carolina were randomly selected and were contacted on two different occasions separated by three weeks. An appointment was requested for a fictitious adult orthopaedic patient with a potential surgical problem. Injury scenarios included patients with acute rotator cuff tears, zone-II flexor tendon lacerations, and acute lumbar disc herniations. Insurance status was reported as Medicaid at the time of the first request and private insurance at the time of the second request. County population density and the distance from each practice to the nearest academic hospital were recorded. Results: Of the 203 practices, 119 (59%) offered the patient with Medicaid an appointment within two weeks, and 160 (79%) offered the patient with private insurance an appointment within this time period (p < 0.001). Practices in rural counties were more likely to offer patients with Medicaid an appointment as compared with practices in urban counties (odds ratio, 2.25 [95% confidence interval, 1.16 to 4.34]; p = 0.016). Practices more than sixty miles from academic hospitals were more likely to accept patients with Medicaid than practices closer to academic hospitals (odds ratio, 3.35 [95% confidence interval, 1.44 to 7.83]; p = 0.005). Conclusions: Access to orthopaedic care was significantly decreased for patients with Medicaid. Practices in less populous areas were more likely to offer an appointment to patients with Medicaid than practices in more

  10. 2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building (Building 90), administration and clinical hospital building (Building 88), and hospital building (Building 91) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, 4101 South Fourth Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  11. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES General Provisions § 488.6 Other national accreditation programs for... health agency providers of outpatient physical therapy, occupational therapy or speech pathology...

  12. Nurses' perceptions of and attitudes toward an electronic medical record system at Seoul National University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Sa; Park, Ihn Sook; You, Ock-Su; Shin, Hyeon-Ju; Woo, Kyung-Shun; Jo, Eun-Mee

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to investigate nurses' perceptions of and attitudes toward the use of electronic medical record (EMR) systems, 904 nurses in a university hospital were surveyed for demographic data and their perceptions of and attitudes toward an EMR system 6 months after its implementation. The questionnaire consisted of demographic information, perception statements relating to the effect of an EMR system, and attitude statements toward an EMR system (assessed on 4-point Likert scales, Cronbach's alpha = 0.979). Nurses' perceptions and attitudes were generally positive and correlated with the type of nursing unit, and their age, years of nursing experience, and job title. This result reinforces that nurses are generally accepting of the implementation of a new EMR system. However, strategies are needed for improving the satisfaction of nurses who have a negative perception of and attitude toward EMR systems. It is recommended that the findings of our study be implemented in other hospitals with ongoing EMR projects. PMID:17102423

  13. National Trends in Hospitalizations for Patients With Single-Ventricle Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Tabtabai, Sara; DeFaria Yeh, Doreen; Stefanescu, Ada; Kennedy, Kevin; Yeh, Robert W; Bhatt, Ami B

    2015-09-01

    Patients with single-ventricle (SV) anatomy now live to adulthood. Little is known about the cost of care and outcomes for patients with SV anatomy, especially those who develop heart failure (HF) cared for in adult hospitals in the United States. We analyzed the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2000 to 2011 for patients >14 years admitted to adult hospitals with the International Classifications of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes for SV anatomy. Demographics, outcomes, co-morbidities, and cost were assessed. From 2000 to 2011, the number of SV admissions was stable with a trend toward increased cost per admission over time. Coexistent hypertension, obesity, and liver, pulmonary, and renal diseases significantly increased over time. The most common reason for admission was atrial arrhythmia followed by HF. Patients with SV with HF had significantly higher inhospital mortality, length of stay, and more medical co-morbidities than those with SV and without HF. In conclusion, the cohort of patients with SV admitted to adult hospitals has changed in the modern era. Patients with SV have medical co-morbidities including renal and liver diseases, hypertension, and obesity at a surprisingly young age. Aggressive and proactive management of HF and arrhythmia may reduce cost of care for this challenging population. Patients with SV with HF have particularly high mortality, more medical co-morbidities, and increased cost of care and deserve more focused attention to improve outcomes. PMID:26100589

  14. [The Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified National Health System: a performance evaluation for auditing maternal near miss].

    PubMed

    Nakamura-Pereira, Marcos; Mendes-Silva, Wallace; Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos; Reichenheim, Michael E; Lobato, Gustavo

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the performance of the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SIH-SUS) in identifying cases of maternal near miss in a hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2008. Cases were identified by reviewing medical records of pregnant and postpartum women admitted to the hospital. The search for potential near miss events in the SIH-SUS database relied on a list of procedures and codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) that were consistent with this diagnosis. The patient chart review identified 27 cases, while 70 potential occurrences of near miss were detected in the SIH-SUS database. However, only 5 of 70 were "true cases" of near miss according to the chart review, which corresponds to a sensitivity of 18.5% (95%CI: 6.3-38.1), specificity of 94.3% (95%CI: 92.8-95.6), area under the ROC of 0.56 (95%CI: 0.48-0.63), and positive predictive value of 10.1% (IC95%: 4.7-20.3). These findings suggest that SIH-SUS does not appear appropriate for monitoring maternal near miss. PMID:23843001

  15. Proactive patient rounding to increase customer service and satisfaction on an orthopaedic unit.

    PubMed

    Tea, Christine; Ellison, Michael; Feghali, Fadia

    2008-01-01

    Customer service and patient satisfaction have become increasingly important in the healthcare industry. Given limited resources and a myriad of choices, on which facets of patient satisfaction should healthcare providers focus? An analysis of 40,000 observations across 4 hospitals found 1 important intervention: timely staff responsiveness. Using the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) quality methodology, the goal was set to improve staff responsiveness to orthopaedic patient needs and requests, thus improving patient satisfaction. A model to improve staff responsiveness was systematically developed and implemented. The I Care Rounding model places the emphasis on proactively meeting patient needs through hourly rounding, rather than caregivers providing care in a reactionary mode. After full implementation, positive improvement was demonstrated. PMID:18677250

  16. ‘Shell shock’ Revisited: An Examination of the Case Records of the National Hospital in London

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Stefanie Caroline; Jones, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    During the First World War the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic, in Queen Square, London, then Britain’s leading centre for neurology, took a key role in the treatment and understanding of shell shock. This paper explores the case notes of all 462 servicemen who were admitted with functional neurological disorders between 1914 and 1919. Many of these were severe or chronic cases referred to the National Hospital because of its acknowledged expertise and the resources it could call upon. Biographical data was collected together with accounts of the patient’s military experience, his symptoms, diagnostic interpretations and treatment outcomes. Analysis of the notes showed that motor syndromes (loss of function or hyperkinesias), often combined with somato-sensory loss, were common presentations. Anxiety and depression as well as vegetative symptoms such as sweating, dizziness and palpitations were also prevalent among this patient population. Conversely, psychogenic seizures were reported much less frequently than in comparable accounts from German tertiary referral centres. As the war unfolded the number of physicians who believed that shell shock was primarily an organic disorder fell as research failed to find a pathological basis for its symptoms. However, little agreement existed among the Queen Square doctors about the fundamental nature of the disorder and it was increasingly categorised as functional disorder or hysteria. PMID:25284893

  17. A Retrospective Case Series of Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) Placement at the Afghan National Police Hospital, Kabul, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Christian W; Royal, David; Arzoiey, Humayoon Abdul; Shefa, Azizullah; Sultani, Salim; Mosafa, Mohammed Omar; Sadat, Safiullah; Zirkle, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    In Afghanistan, adequate and cost-effective medical care for even routine conditions is lacking; especially for complex injuries like long-bone fractures. The Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) intramedullary nail is used for treatment of long-bone fractures from blunt injuries and does not require imaging. We are reporting for the first time results of the SIGN intramedullary nail at the Afghan National Police Hospital, a tertiary care facility in Kabul. 71 records from the SIGN Online Surgical Database were reviewed for gender, age, date of injury, implant date, patient's home of record, and type/ mechanism of injury. Mean age was 26.7 years, all but one being male; time from injury to implant ranged 1 to 401 days, with mean of 40.6 days. Long-bone fractures from motor vehicle accidents remained constant, and war injuries peaked in summer. Follow-up is limited because of security and financial burdens of travel. However, personal communication with Afghan National Police Hospital surgeons suggests that patients included in the current study have not experienced any adverse outcomes. While it remains to be seen if the SIGN Online Surgical Database will facilitate more comprehensive outcome studies, our results provide support for the efficacy of SIGN nails in treating long-bone fractures from war injuries. PMID:26741473

  18. A healthier future for all Australians: an overview of the final report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Christine C

    2009-10-01

    After extensive community and health industry consultation, the final report of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission, A healthier future for all Australians, was presented to the Australian Government on 30 June 2009. The reform agenda aims to tackle major access and equity issues that affect health outcomes for people now; redesign our health system so that it is better positioned to respond to emerging challenges; and create an agile, responsive and self-improving health system for long-term sustainability. The 123 recommendations are grouped in four themes: Taking responsibility: supporting greater individual and collective action to build good health and wellbeing. Connecting care: delivering comprehensive care for people over their lifetime, by strengthening primary health care, reshaping hospitals, improving subacute care, and opening up greater consumer choice and competition in aged care services. Facing inequities: taking action to tackle the causes and impact of health inequities, focusing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people in rural and remote areas, and access to mental health and dental services. Driving quality performance: having leadership and systems to achieve the best use of people, resources and knowledge, including "one health system" with national leadership and local delivery, revised funding arrangements, and changes to health workforce education, training and practice. PMID:19807629

  19. Improving translation success of cell-based therapies in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Bara, Jennifer J; Herrmann, Marietta; Evans, Christopher H; Miclau, Theodore; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Richards, R Geoff

    2016-01-01

    There is a clear discrepancy between the growth of cell therapy and tissue engineering research in orthopaedics over the last two decades and the number of approved clinical therapies and products available to patients. At the 2015 annual meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society, a workshop was held to highlight important considerations from the perspectives of an academic scientist, clinical researcher, and industry representative with the aim of helping researchers to successfully translate their ideas into clinical and commercial reality. Survey data acquired from workshop participants indicated an overall positive opinion on the future potential of cell-based therapies to make a significant contribution to orthopaedic medicine. The survey also indicated an agreement on areas requiring improvement in the development of new therapies, specifically; increased support for fundamental research and education and improved transparency of regulatory processes. This perspectives article summarises the content and conclusions of the workshop and puts forward suggestions on how translational success of cell-based therapies in orthopaedics may be achieved. PMID:26403666

  20. Moire Topography For The Detection Of Orthopaedic Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Syed A.; Lindseth, Richard E.

    1981-02-01

    Moire topography is applied for the follow-up of scoliosis patients. The results are then compared with the X-rays. A special lamp and scale arrangement is utilized for patient alignment. It is suggested that this technique will be used for the detection of all orthopaedic defects.

  1. Clubfoot: An Orthopaedic Surgeon Describes Clubfoot and Current Treatment Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitale, Michael

    2007-01-01

    As an orthopaedic surgeon who has treated numerous cases of clubfoot in his career, the author knows that it takes exceptional parents to deal with the challenges of having a child born with a clubfoot. However, it should be noted that a clubfoot diagnosis does not mean a life of pain, deformity, and disability for a child. Today's treatment…

  2. Computer Aided Orthopaedic Surgery: Incremental shift or paradigm change?

    PubMed

    Joskowicz, Leo; Hazan, Eric J

    2016-10-01

    Computer Aided Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS) is now about 25 years old. Unlike Neurosurgery, Computer Aided Surgery has not become the standard of care in Orthopaedic Surgery. In this paper, we provide the technical and clinical context raised by this observation in an attempt to elucidate the reasons for this state of affairs. We start with a brief outline of the history of CAOS, review the main CAOS technologies, and describe how they are evaluated. We then identify some of the current publications in the field and present the opposing views on their clinical impact and their acceptance by the orthopaedic community worldwide. We focus on total knee replacement surgery as a case study and present current clinical results and contrasting opinions on CAOS technologies. We then discuss the challenges and opportunities for research in medical image analysis in CAOS and in musculoskeletal radiology. We conclude with a suggestion that while CAOS acceptance may be more moderate than that of other fields in surgery, it still has a place in the arsenal of useful tools available to orthopaedic surgeons. PMID:27407004

  3. Reading the Small Print – Labelling Recommendations for Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Haene, Roger A; Sandhu, Ranbir S; Baxandall, Richard

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There exist, currently, no clear guidelines regarding standards for surgical implant labelling. Dimensions of the laminar flow canopies in orthopaedic use fixes the distance at which implant labels can be read. Mistakes when reading the label on an implant box can pose health risks for patients, and financial consequences for medical institutions. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Using scientifically validated tools such as the Snellen Chart Formula, a theoretical minimum standard for text on implant labels was reached. This theoretical standard was then tested under real operating conditions. After discovering a minimum practical standard for implant labels, the authors then audited current labels in use on a wide range of orthopaedic implant packages. Furthermore, other non-text-related labelling problems were also noted. RESULTS There is a definite minimum standard which should be observed when implant labels are manufactured. Implants in current use bear labels on the packaging that are of an insufficient standard to ensure patient safety in theatre. CONCLUSIONS The authors have established text parameters that will increase the legibility of implant labels. In the interests of improving risk management in theatre, therefore, the authors propose a standard for orthopaedic implant labelling, and believe this will provide a useful foundation for further discussion between the orthopaedic community and implant manufacturers. PMID:19686615

  4. Your first job in orthopaedic trauma: strategies for your career.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Craig S; Cannada, Lisa K

    2014-09-01

    Your first job in orthopaedic surgery is the culmination of years of training and hard work. This article will cover strategies for your first job search and your future career. We discuss job searching strategies prioritizing what is important. And once you start your first job, we discuss tips for how to make a good first impression and begin a successful career. PMID:25147996

  5. Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry: Quality Data Now Available.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jessica C; Greer, Renee M; Wenke, Joseph C; Ficke, James R; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry (MOTR) orginally began as part of the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DoDTR) and became a live registry in 2013. As a quality improvement process, this study examined MOTR data for 20 female amputees compared with DoDTR data. The DoDTR provided diagnosis and procedure codes as a list but no details. The MOTR provided additional data, including specific limb, fracture classifications, and associated injuries per limb. The MOTR allowed for construction of a treatment time line for each limb, including number and timing of debridements, antibiotics, and implant types. Orthopaedic-specific complications were also coded more frequently in the MOTR and clearly identified with a specific injury and treatment. During initial quality control checks, the MOTR provides a greater volume and granularity of detail for orthopaedic-specific injury and treatment information, indicating that the MOTR is on track to provide a valuable repository for data-driven orthopaedic management of combat injury. PMID:27518292

  6. Current management of intracerebral haemorrhage in China: a national, multi-centre, hospital register study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We aimed to examine current practice of the management and secondary prevention of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) in China where the disease is more common than in Western populations. Methods Data on baseline characteristics, management in-hospital and post-stroke, and outcome of ICH patients are from the ChinaQUEST (QUality Evaluation of Stroke Care and Treatment) study, a multi-centre, prospective, 62 hospital registry in China during 2006-07. Results Nearly all ICH patients (n = 1572) received an intravenous haemodiluting agent such as mannitol (96%) or a neuroprotectant (72%), and there was high use of intravenous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) (42%). Neurosurgery was undertaken in 137 (9%) patients; being overweight, having a low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on admission, and Total Anterior Circulation Syndrome (TACS) clinical pattern on admission, were the only baseline factors associated with this intervention in multivariate analyses. Neurosurgery was associated with nearly three times higher risk of death/disability at 3 months post-stroke (odd ratio [OR] 2.60, p < 0.001). Continuation of antihypertensives in-hospital and at 3 and 12 months post-stroke was reported in 732/935 (78%), 775/935 (83%), and 752/935 (80%) living patients with hypertension, respectively. Conclusions The management of ICH in China is characterised by high rates of use of intravenous haemodiluting agents, neuroprotectants, and TCM, and of antihypertensives for secondary prevention. The controversial efficacy of these therapies, coupled with the current lack of treatments of proven benefit, is a call for action for more outcomes based research in ICH. PMID:21276264

  7. Haunted by Enron's ghost. National Century Financial Enterprises files for Chapter 11, leaving a string of broken healthcare chains and hospitals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark

    2002-11-25

    Some are calling it the Enron of the healthcare industry. Ryder trucks hauled possible evidence from embattled financier National Century Financial Enterprises during an FBI raid. NCFE filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection last week, sending ripples through the industry and contributing to the bankruptcies of a string of national healthcare chains and at least six hospitals. PMID:12510558

  8. Social inequalities and women's satisfaction with childbirth care in Brazil: a national hospital-based survey.

    PubMed

    d'Orsi, Eleonora; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Diniz, Carmen Simone Grilo; Aguiar, Janaina Marques de; Gusman, Christine Ranier; Torres, Jacqueline Alves; Angulo-Tuesta, Antonia; Rattner, Daphne; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira

    2014-08-01

    The objective is to identify factors associated with women's satisfaction towards the care provided by the health professionals during hospital assisted delivery and identify how those factors influence their general levels of satisfaction. The cohort hospital based study was carried out in connection with the Birth in Brazil research. 15,688 women were included, interviewed at home, through the phone, from March 2011 to February 2012. All the variables that compose the professional/pregnant woman relationship (waiting time, respect, privacy, clarity of explanations, possibility of asking questions and participating in the decisions) and schooling remained independently associated with general satisfaction towards delivery care, in the adjusted model. The white women assisted in the southeastern and southern regions of the country, by the private sector and with a companion present gave a better evaluation of the care provided. Women value the way in which they are assisted by the health professionals, and there are inequalities in the way they are treated based on skin color, geographic region and financial situation. PMID:25167175

  9. Intertwined Epidemics: National Demographic Trends in Hospitalizations for Heroin- and Opioid-Related Overdoses, 1993–2009

    PubMed Central

    Unick, George Jay; Rosenblum, Daniel; Mars, Sarah; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The historical patterns of opiate use show that sources and methods of access greatly influence who is at risk. Today, there is evidence that an enormous increase in the availability of prescription opiates is fuelling a rise in addiction nationally, drawing in new initiates to these drugs and changing the geography of opiate overdoses. Recent efforts at supply-based reductions in prescription opiates may reduce harm, but addicted individuals may switch to other opiates such as heroin. In this analysis, we test the hypothesis that changes in the rates of Prescription Opiate Overdoses (POD) are correlated with changes in the rate of heroin overdoses (HOD). ICD9 codes from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and population data from the Census were used to estimate overall and demographic specific rates of POD and HOD hospital admissions between 1993 and 2009. Regression models were used to test for linear trends and lagged negative binomial regression models were used to model the interrelationship between POD and HOD hospital admissions. Findings show that whites, women, and middle-aged individuals had the largest increase in POD and HOD rates over the study period and that HOD rates have increased in since 2007. The lagged models show that increases in a hospitals POD predict an increase in the subsequent years HOD admissions by a factor of 1.26 (p<0.001) and that each increase in HOD admissions increase the subsequent years POD by a factor of 1.57 (p<0.001). Our hypothesis of fungibility between prescription opiates and heroin was supported by these analyses. These findings suggest that focusing on supply-based interventions may simply lead to a shift in use to heroin rather minimizing the reduction in harm. The alternative approach of using drug abuse prevention resources on treatment and demand-side reduction is likely to be more productive at reducing opiate abuse related harm. PMID:23405084

  10. Peer mentors, mobile phone and pills: collective monitoring and adherence in Kenyatta National Hospital's HIV treatment programme

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Kenyan state joined the international commitment to make antiretroviral treatment free in public health institutions to people infected with HIV. Less than a decade later, treatment has reached over 60% of those who need it in Kenya. This paper, which is based on an in-depth ethnographic case study of the HIV treatment programme at Kenyatta National Hospital, conducted intermittently between 2008 and 2014, examines how HIV-positive peer mentors encourage and track adherence to treatment regimens within and beyond the clinic walls using mobile phones and computer technology. This research into the everyday practices of patient monitoring demonstrates that both surveillance and adherence are collective activities. Peer mentors provide counselling services, follow up people who stray from treatment regimens, and perform a range of other tasks related to patient management and treatment adherence. Despite peer mentors’ involvement in many tasks key to encouraging optimal adherence, their role is rarely acknowledged by co-workers, hospital administrators, or public health officials. Following a biomedical paradigm, adherence at Kenyatta and in Kenya is framed by programme administrators as something individual clients must do and for which they must be held accountable. This framing simultaneously conceals the sociality of adherence and undervalues the work of peer mentors in treatment programmes. PMID:25175291