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Sample records for natriuretic peptide binding

  1. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Douglas G. . E-mail: Douglas.G.Johns@gsk.com; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-06-22

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K {sub i} values. DNP displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K {sub i} > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure.

  2. Natriuretic peptides in fish physiology.

    PubMed

    Loretz, C A; Pollina, C

    2000-02-01

    Natriuretic peptides exist in the fishes as a family of structurally-related isohormones including atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and ventricular natriuretic peptide (VNP); to date, brain natriuretic peptide (or B-type natriuretic peptide, BNP) has not been definitively identified in the fishes. Based on nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarity, the natriuretic peptide family of isohormones may have evolved from a neuromodulatory, CNP-like brain peptide. The primary sites of synthesis for the circulating hormones are the heart and brain; additional extracardiac and extracranial sites, including the intestine, synthesize and release natriuretic peptides locally for paracrine regulation of various physiological functions. Membrane-bound, guanylyl cyclase-coupled natriuretic peptide receptors (A- and B-types) are generally implicated in mediating natriuretic peptide effects via the production of cyclic GMP as the intracellular messenger. C- and D-type natriuretic peptide receptors lacking the guanylyl cyclase domain may influence target cell function through G(i) protein-coupled inhibition of membrane adenylyl cyclase activity, and they likely also act as clearance receptors for circulating hormone. In the few systems examined using homologous or piscine reagents, differential receptor binding and tissue responsiveness to specific natriuretic peptide isohormones is demonstrated. Similar to their acute physiological effects in mammals, natriuretic peptides are vasorelaxant in all fishes examined. In contrast to mammals, where natriuretic peptides act through natriuresis and diuresis to bring about long-term reductions in blood volume and blood pressure, in fishes the primary action appears to be the extrusion of excess salt at the gills and rectal gland, and the limiting of drinking-coupled salt uptake by the alimentary system. In teleosts, both hypernatremia and hypervolemia are effective stimuli for cardiac secretion of

  3. Binding sites of atrial natriuretic peptide in tree shrew adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, E.; Shigematsu, K.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Adrenal gland binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126) (ANP) were quantitated in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) by incubation of adrenal sections with (3-(/sup 125/I)-iodotyrosyl28) atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126), followed by autoradiography with computerized microdensitometry. In the adrenal glands, there are three types of ANP binding sites. One is located in the zona glomerulosa (BMax 84 +/- 6 fmol/mg protein; Kd 122 +/- 9 pM); the second in the zona fasciculata and reticularis (BMax 29 +/- 2 fmol/mg protein; Kd 153 +/- 6 pM) and the third in the adrenal medulla (BMax 179 +/- 1 fmol/mg protein; Kd 70 +/- 2 pM). Besides the influence of ANP on the regulation of adrenocortical mineralcorticoid and glucocorticoid secretion our findings raise the possibility for a local site of action of atrial natriuretic peptide in the regulation of adrenomedullary catecholamines in the tree shrew, primates and man.

  4. Brain natriuretic peptide binding sites in rats: In vitro autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, E.M.; Thibault, G.; Pelletier, S.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M. )

    1990-08-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a recently discovered family of natriuretic peptides highly homologous to atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Quantitative in vitro autoradiography with a computerized microdensitometer demonstrated that the distribution of BNP binding sites is similar to the known distribution pattern of ANF binding sites in rat tissues. Analysis of saturation and competition curves disclosed that the maximal binding capacity for BNP-(Asp-81--Tyr-106) and ANF-(Ser-99--Tyr-126) is similar within the plexiform layer of the olfactory bulb, the choroid plexus, and the adrenal zona glomerulosa. Examination of the competition curves of BNP-(Asp-81--Tyr-106), ANF-(Ser-99--Tyr-126), and des-(Gln-116--Gly-120)ANF-(Asp-102--Cys-121)NH2 (C-ANF, a ligand highly specific for ANF-R2 receptors) for {sup 125}I-labeled BNP-(Asp-81--Tyr-106) and {sup 125}I-labeled ANF-(Ser-99--Tyr-126) binding revealed that ANF fully displaced {sup 125}I-BNP binding and, conversely, BNP completely displaced {sup 125}I-ANF binding in these tissues, whereas C-ANF partially displaced 125-BNP and 125-ANF binding. Angiotensin II, insulin, glucagon, and substance P had no influence on {sup 125}I-BNP binding in the above tissues. These results support the view that BNP and ANF share the same binding sites in rats.

  5. Natriuretic peptides and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y; Somer, B G; Amatya, A

    1999-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides are a group of naturally occurring substances that act in the body to oppose the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. There are three major natriuretic peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), which is synthesized in the atria; brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), which is synthesized in the ventricles; and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), which is synthesized in the brain. Both ANP and BNP are released in response to atrial and ventricular stretch, respectively, and will cause vasorelaxation, inhibition of aldosterone secretion in the adrenal cortex, and inhibition of renin secretion in the kidney. Both ANP and BNP will cause natriuresis and a reduction in intravascular volume, effects amplified by antagonism of antidiuretic hormone (ADH). The physiologic effects of CNP are different from those of ANP and BNP. CNP has a hypotensive effect, but no significant diuretic or natriuretic actions. Three natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) have been described that have different binding capacities for ANP, BNP, and CNP. Removal of the natriuretic peptides from the circulation is affected mainly by binding to clearance receptors and enzymatic degradation in the circulation. Increased blood levels of natriuretic peptides have been found in certain disease states, suggesting a role in the pathophysiology of those diseases, including congestive heart failure (CHF), systemic hypertension, and acute myocardial infarction. The natriuretic peptides also serve as disease markers and indicators of prognosis in various cardiovascular conditions. The natriuretic peptides have been used in the treatment of disease, with the most experience with intravenous BNP in the treatment of CHF. Another pharmacologic approach being used is the inhibition of natriuretic peptide metabolism by neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor drugs. The NEP inhibitors are currently being investigated as treatments for CHF and systemic hypertension. PMID:11720638

  6. Cross-linking of atrial natriuretic peptide to binding sites in rat olfactory bulb membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wildey, G.M.; Glembotski, C.C.

    1986-12-01

    Binding sites for /sup 125/I-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)2 in rat olfactory bulb membranes have been studied using pharmacological and biochemical methods. Various unlabeled ANP-related peptides were tested for the ability to inhibit the binding of the radioligand in membrane binding assays. ANP(92-126) and ANP(99-126) were the most potent inhibitors tested, both exhibiting an IC50 value of 0.40 nM. ANP(103-126) and ANP(103-123) were 3 and 70 times less potent, respectively. ANP(111-126) was unable to inhibit the binding of the radioligand at a concentration of 1 microM. Several peptides unrelated to ANP were unable to inhibit the binding of the radioligand to rat olfactory bulb membranes. Membranes labeled with /sup 125/I-ANP were incubated with cross-linking agents and subjected to SDS-PAGE followed by autoradiography. A band possessing an apparent molecular mass of 116 kDa was identified. The labeling of this band was progressively decreased by increasing concentrations of unlabeled ANP(99-126) (IC50 = 0.6 nM) and by several other ANP-related peptides at nanomolar concentrations. For comparison purposes, ANP binding sites in rat aorta membranes were labeled with /sup 125/I-ANP and cross-linked using identical techniques. Three bands possessing molecular masses of 120, 72, and 62 kDa were identified. These results indicate that the ANP binding site in rat olfactory bulb membranes displays pharmacological and biochemical properties similar to peripheral ANP receptors.

  7. Evidence for a novel natriuretic peptide receptor that prefers brain natriuretic peptide over atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Goy, M F; Oliver, P M; Purdy, K E; Knowles, J W; Fox, J E; Mohler, P J; Qian, X; Smithies, O; Maeda, N

    2001-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exert their physiological actions by binding to natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), a receptor guanylate cyclase (rGC) that synthesizes cGMP in response to both ligands. The family of rGCs is rapidly expanding, and it is plausible that there might be additional, as yet undiscovered, rGCs whose function is to provide alternative signalling pathways for one or both of these peptides, particularly given the low affinity of NPRA for BNP. We have investigated this hypothesis, using a genetically modified (knockout) mouse in which the gene encoding NPRA has been disrupted. Enzyme assays and NPRA-specific Western blots performed on tissues from wild-type mice demonstrate that ANP-activated cGMP synthesis provides a good index of NPRA protein expression, which ranges from maximal in adrenal gland, lung, kidney, and testis to minimal in heart and colon. In contrast, immunoreactive NPRA is not detectable in tissues isolated from NPRA knockout animals and ANP- and BNP-stimulatable GC activities are markedly reduced in all mutant tissues. However, testis and adrenal gland retain statistically significant, high-affinity responses to BNP. This residual response to BNP cannot be accounted for by natriuretic peptide receptor B, or any other known mammalian rGC, suggesting the presence of a novel receptor in these tissues that prefers BNP over ANP. PMID:11513736

  8. Differential changes in atrial natriuretic peptide and vasopressin receptor bindings in kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, T.; Mitsui, T.; Yamamoto, I.; Katayama, E.; Ota, Z.; Ogawa, N.

    1987-01-19

    To elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and vasopressin (VP) in a hypertensive state, ANP and VP receptor bindings in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) kidney were analyzed using the radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) technique. Systolic blood pressure of SHR aged 12 weeks was statistically higher than that of age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of (/sup 125/I)-ANP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically lower than that of WKY rats, but dissociation constant (Kd) was not significantly different. On the other hand, Bmax of (/sup 3/H)-VP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically higher than that of WKY rats, but Kd were similar. Since the physiological action of ANP is natriuresis and VP is the most important antidiuretic hormone in mammalia, these opposite changes of ANP and VP receptor bindings in SHR kidney suggested that these peptides may play an important role in the pathophysiology of the hypertensive state, although it has not been confirmed as yet.

  9. [Brain natriuretic peptide].

    PubMed

    La Villa, G; Lazzeri, C; Fronzaroli, C; Franchi, F; Gentilini, P

    1995-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone with a spectrum of activities quite similar to those of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), including diuretic, natriuretic, hypotensive and smooth muscle relaxant activities. These effects are due to the stimulation of guanylate cyclase-linked natriuretic peptide receptors, leading to an increase in cyclic GMP concentration in target cells. BNP has a lower affinity than ANP for C (clearance) receptors, and is less susceptible to degradation by neutral endopeptidase-24.11, resulting in a longer half-life. In the kidney, BNP increases the glomerular filtration rate and inhibits sodium reabsorption in the distal tubule. It also inhibits the release of renin and aldosterone. Unlike ANP, produced by the atria, BNP is mainly synthesized and released into circulation by the left ventricle and is therefore influenced by stimuli involving this cardiac chamber, such as an increase in arterial pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. Plasma BNP levels are very low in healthy subjects, and respond modestly, although significantly to physiological stimuli such as changes in posture or sodium intake. In contrast, plasma BNP concentrations increase in disease states such as cirrhosis with ascites, hypertension, chronic renal failure, acute myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. In the latter condition, plasma BNP concentration is a reliable prognostic index. Evidence obtained by administering BNP to healthy subjects and hypertensive patients suggests that BNP, at physiological and pathophysiological plasma concentrations, markedly influences cardiovascular homeostasis, mainly due to its effects on sodium excretion and the renin-aldosterone axis. PMID:8718658

  10. Arg13 of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Reciprocally Modulates Binding to Guanylyl Cyclase but Not Clearance Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Deborah M.; Barbieri, Kathryn A.; McGuirk, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) decreases cardiac preload and hypertrophy. As such, synthetic BNP, nesiritide, was approved for the treatment of acutely decompensated heart failure. However, two problems limit its therapeutic potential. First, ensuing hypertension decreases urine output, and second, guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A), the primary signaling receptor for BNP, is down-regulated in heart failure. Thus, alternative or chimeric natriuretic peptides maintaining the renal but lacking the vasorelaxation properties of BNP provide an alternative approach. Here, we examined the ability of single amino acid substitutions in the conserved 17-amino acid disulfide ring structure of human BNP to activate GC-A and guanylyl cyclase-B (GC-B), which is not reduced in heart failure. We hypothesized that substitution of highly conserved residues in BNP with highly conserved residues from a GC-B-specific peptide would yield BNP variants with increased and decreased potency for human GC-B and GC-A, respectively. Substitution of Leu for Arg13 (l-bnp) yielded a 5-fold more potent activator of GC-B and 7-fold less potent activator of GC-A compared with wild type. l-bnp also bound GC-A 4.5-fold less tightly than wild type. In contrast, substitution of Met for Ser21 (M-BNP) had no effect. A peptide containing both the Leu and Met substitutions behaved similarly to l-bnp. Meanwhile, wild-type and l-bnp bound the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor with similar affinities. These data indicate that Arg13 of BNP is a critical discriminator of binding to guanylyl cyclase-linked but not clearance natriuretic peptide receptors, supporting designer natriuretic peptides as an alternative to wild-type BNP for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:20530652

  11. Natriuretic Peptides and Cardiometabolic Health.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak K; Wang, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides are cardiac-derived hormones with a range of protective functions, including natriuresis, diuresis, vasodilation, lusitropy, lipolysis, weight loss, and improved insulin sensitivity. Their actions are mediated through membrane-bound guanylyl cyclases that lead to production of the intracellular second-messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that genetic and acquired deficiencies of the natriuretic peptide system can promote hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, obesity, diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, and heart failure. Clinically, natriuretic peptides are robust diagnostic and prognostic markers, and augmenting natriuretic peptides is a target for therapeutic strategies in cardiometabolic disease. This review will summarize current understanding and highlight novel aspects of natriuretic peptide biology. PMID:26103984

  12. Novel bifunctional natriuretic peptides as potential therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Deborah M; Burnett, John C; Potter, Lincoln R

    2008-12-12

    Synthetic atrial natriuretic peptide (carperitide) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; nesiritide) are used to treat congestive heart failure. However, despite beneficial cardiac unloading properties, reductions in renal perfusion pressures limit their clinical effectiveness. Recently, CD-NP, a chimeric peptide composed of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) fused to the C-terminal tail of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), was shown to be more glomerular filtration rate-enhancing than BNP in dogs. However, the molecular basis for the increased responsiveness was not determined. Here, we show that the DNP tail has a striking effect on CNP, converting it from a non-agonist to a partial agonist of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A while maintaining the ability to activate NPR-B. This effect is specific for human receptors because CD-NP was only a slightly better activator of rat NPR-A due to the promiscuous nature of CNP in this species. Interesting, the DNP tail alone had no effect on any NPR even though it is effective in vivo. To further increase the potency of CD-NP for NPR-A, we converted two different triplet sequences within the CNP ring to their corresponding residues in BNP. Both variants demonstrated increased affinity and full agonist activity for NPR-A, whereas one was as potent as any NPR-A activator known. In contrast to a previous report, we found that DNP binds the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C). However, none of the chimeric peptides bound NPR-C with significantly higher affinity than endogenous ligands. We suggest that bifunctional chimeric peptides represent a new generation of natriuretic peptide therapeutics. PMID:18940797

  13. Novel Bifunctional Natriuretic Peptides as Potential Therapeutics*

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Deborah M.; Burnett, John C.; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic atrial natriuretic peptide (carperitide) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; nesiritide) are used to treat congestive heart failure. However, despite beneficial cardiac unloading properties, reductions in renal perfusion pressures limit their clinical effectiveness. Recently, CD-NP, a chimeric peptide composed of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) fused to the C-terminal tail of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), was shown to be more glomerular filtration rate-enhancing than BNP in dogs. However, the molecular basis for the increased responsiveness was not determined. Here, we show that the DNP tail has a striking effect on CNP, converting it from a non-agonist to a partial agonist of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A while maintaining the ability to activate NPR-B. This effect is specific for human receptors because CD-NP was only a slightly better activator of rat NPR-A due to the promiscuous nature of CNP in this species. Interesting, the DNP tail alone had no effect on any NPR even though it is effective in vivo. To further increase the potency of CD-NP for NPR-A, we converted two different triplet sequences within the CNP ring to their corresponding residues in BNP. Both variants demonstrated increased affinity and full agonist activity for NPR-A, whereas one was as potent as any NPR-A activator known. In contrast to a previous report, we found that DNP binds the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C). However, none of the chimeric peptides bound NPR-C with significantly higher affinity than endogenous ligands. We suggest that bifunctional chimeric peptides represent a new generation of natriuretic peptide therapeutics. PMID:18940797

  14. Autoradiographic localization and characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide binding sites in the rat central nervous system and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, T.R.; Wildey, G.M.; Manaker, S.; Glembotski, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) have recently been identified in both heart and CNS. These peptides possess potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasorelaxant activities, and are all apparently derived from a single prohormone. Specific ANP binding sites have been characterized in the adrenal zona glomerulosa and kidney cortex, and one study reported ANP binding sites in the CNS. However, a detailed examination of the localization of ANP binding sites throughout the brain has not been reported. In this study, quantitative autoradiography was employed to examine the distribution of ANP receptors in the rat CNS. The binding of (3-/sup 125/I-iodotyrosyl28) rat ANP-28 to binding sites in the rat CNS was saturable, specific for ANP-related peptides, and displayed high affinity (Kd = 600 pM). When the relative concentrations of ANP binding sites were determined throughout the rat brain, the highest levels of ANP binding were localized to the circumventricular organs, including the area postrema and subfornical organ, and the olfactory apparatus. Moderate levels of ANP binding sites were present throughout the midbrain and brain stem, while low levels were found in the forebrain, diencephalon, basal ganglia, cortex, and cerebellum. The presence of ANP binding sites in the subfornical organ and the area postrema, regions considered to be outside the blood-brain barrier, suggests that peripheral ANP levels may regulate some aspects of CNS control of salt and water balance. The possible functions of ANP binding sites in other regions of the rat brain are not known, but, like many other peptides, ANP may act as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator at these loci.

  15. Natriuretic peptide receptors in the fetal rat.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Zuo, Z

    1995-08-01

    In vitro autoradiography of rat fetuses from embryonic days 12-19 (E12-E19) showed widespread high-affinity specific binding sites for natriuretic peptides. The sites on E16 somites avidly bound C-type natriuretic peptide [CNP-(1-22)] as well as C-ANP, a synthetic ligand that selects the C-type natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR-C). Most somitic binding sites had high affinity for atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP-(1-28)], confirming their resemblance to NPR-C. A few had a lower apparent affinity for ANP-(1-28), suggesting that they might be NPR-B. CNP-(1-22) was more powerful than ANP-(1-28) as an agonist of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production in somites, and ATP augmented the action of CNP-(1-22). These observations further suggest the presence of NPR-B. However, with cross-linking of 3-[125I]iodo-0-tyrosyl rat CNP-(1-22) to somitic membranes followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, only a single 64-kDa binding protein was detected under reducing conditions. This is not consistent with intact approximately 120-kDa NPR-B. In vitro autoradiography of the binding of natriuretic peptides to E16 liver implied the presence of NPR-A and NPR-C-like receptors. Hepatic guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production was most powerfully stimulated by ANP-(1-28), as expected for NPR-A. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also identified NPR-A and NPR-C-like proteins in E16 hepatic membranes. Thus different NPRs are expressed by specific fetal tissues. This may be developmentally significant. PMID:7653543

  16. Effects of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides upon cyclic GMP levels, potassium transport, and receptor binding in rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, K.; Tan, P.K. )

    1990-02-01

    The ability of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) to alter cyclic GMP levels and NaKCl cotransport in rat neocortical astrocytes was determined. At concentrations of 10(-9)-10(-6) M, rat ANP99-126 (rANF), rat ANP102-126 (auriculin B), and rat ANP103-126 (atriopeptin III) stimulated 6- to 100-fold increases in cyclic GMP levels. Porcine BNP (pBNP) and rat BNP (rBNP) were 20%-90% as effective as rANF over most of this concentration range, although 10(-6) M pBNP produced a greater effect than rANF. NaKCl cotransport as measured by bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb+ influx was not altered by exposure of astrocytes to 10(-6)M rANF, pBNP, or rBNP. Both pBNP and rBNP, as well as rat ANP103-123 (atriopeptin I) and des(gl18, ser19, gly20, leu21, gly22) ANF4-23-NH2 (C-ANF4-23) strongly competed for specific 125I-rANF binding sites in astrocyte membranes with affinities ranging from 0.03 to 0.4 nM, suggesting that virtually all binding sites measured at subnanomolar concentrations of 125I-rANF were of the ANP-C (ANF-R2) receptor subtype. These receptors are thought to serve a clearance function and may be linked to a guanylate cyclase activity that is chemically and pharmacologically distinct from that coupled to ANP-A (ANF-R1) receptors. ANP receptors on astrocytes may function in limiting the access of ANP and BNP to neurons involved in body fluid and cardiovascular regulation.

  17. The natriuretic peptides and cardiometabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides are cardiac-derived hormones with a range of protective functions, including natriuresis, diuresis, vasodilation, lusitropy, lipolysis, weight loss, and improved insulin sensitivity. The actions are mediated through membrane bound guanylyl cyclases that lead to production of the intracellular second-messenger cGMP. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that genetic and acquired deficiencies of the natriuretic peptide system can promote hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, obesity, diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, and heart failure. Clinically, natriuretic peptides are robust diagnostic and prognostic markers and augmenting natriuretic peptides is a target for therapeutic strategies in cardio-metabolic disease. This review will summarize current understanding and highlight novel aspects of natriuretic peptide biology. PMID:26103984

  18. Reversibly bound chloride in the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor hormone-binding domain: Possible allosteric regulation and a conserved structural motif for the chloride-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Haruo; Qiu, Yue; Philo, John S; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Ogata, Craig M; Misono, Kunio S

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(−)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(−) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(−) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis. PMID:20066666

  19. Reversibly Bound Chloride in the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Hormone Binding Domain: Possible Allosteric Regulation and a Conserved Structural Motif for the Chloride-binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.; Qiu, Y; Philo, J; Arakawa, T; Ogata, C; Misono, K

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(-)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(-) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(-) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis.

  20. Natriuretic peptides in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Rucinski, Marcin; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; De Caro, Raffaele

    2010-01-01

    Atrial (ANP), brain (BNP), and C-type (CNP) natriuretic peptides act by binding to three main subtypes of receptors, named NPR-A, -B, and -C. NPR-A and NPR-B are coupled with guanylate cyclase. Not only NPR-C is involved in removing natriuretic peptides from the circulation but it also acts through inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. NPR-A binds ANP and BNP; NPR-B preferentially binds CNP; and NPR-C binds all natriuretic peptides with similar affinities. All natriuretic peptides and their receptors are widely present in the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal cortex, and medulla. In the hypothalamus, they reduce norepinephrine release, inhibit oxytocin, vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing factor, and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone release. In the hypophysis, natriuretic peptides inhibit basal and induced ACTH release. Conversely, the effects of natriuretic peptides on secretion of growth, luteinizing, and follicle-stimulating hormones are not clear. Natriuretic peptides are known to inhibit basal and stimulated aldosterone secretion, through an increase of intracellular cGMP, and to inhibit the growth of zona glomerulosa. Inhibition or stimulation of glucocorticoid secretion by adrenocortical cells has been reported on the basis of the species involved, and an indirect effect mediated by adrenalmedullary cells has been hypothesized. In the adrenal medulla, natriuretic peptides inhibit catecholamine release and increase catecholamine uptake. It appears that natriuretic peptides may play a role in the pathophysiology of adrenocortical neoplasias and pheochromocytomas. PMID:20797680

  1. Increased atrial natriuretic peptide (6-33) binding sites in the subfornical organ of water deprived and Brattleboro rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.; Israel, A.; Correa, F.M.A.; Kurihara, M.

    1986-09-01

    Binding sites for rat atrial natriuretic eptide (6-33) (ANP) were quantitated in the subfornical organ of chronically dehydrated homozygous Brattleboro rats unable to synthesize vasopressin; heterozygous Brattleboro rats, their controls, Long Evans rats and Long Evans rats after 4 days of water deprivation. Brain sections were incubated in the presence of /sup 125/I-ANP and the results analyzed by autoradiography coupled to computerized microdensitometry and comparison to /sup 125/I-standards. Brattleboro rats and water deprived Long Evans rats presented a higher number of ANP binding sites than their normally hydrated controls. The results suggest a role of ANP binding sites in the subfornical organ in the central regulation of fluid balance and vasopressin secretion.

  2. Urodilatin, a natriuretic peptide with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Richter, R; Forssmann, W G

    1998-02-21

    Natriuretic peptides (NP) constitute hormonal systems of great clinical impact. This report deals with Urodilatin (URO), a renal natriuretic peptide type A. From the gene of NP type A, a message for the preprohormone is transcribed in heart and kidney. The cardiac prohormone CDD/ANP-1-126 is synthesized in the heart atrium and processed during exocytosis forming the circulating hormone CDD/ANP-99-126. URO (CDD/ANP 95-126) is a product from the same gene, but differentially processed in the kidney and detected only in urine. Physiologically, URO acts in a paracrine fashion. After release from distal tubular kidney cells into the tubular lumen, URO binds to luminal receptors (NPR-A) in the collecting duct resulting in a cGMP-dependent signal transduction. cGMP generation is followed by an interaction with the amiloriode-sensitive sodium channel which induces diuresis and natriuresis. In this way, URO physiologically regulates fluid balance and sodium homeostasis. Moreover, URO excretion and natriuresis are in turn dependent on several physiological states, such as directly by sodium homeostasis. Pharmacologically, URO at low dose administered intravenously shows a strong diuretic and natriuretic effect and a low hypotensive effect. Renal, pulmonary, and cardiovascular effects evoked by pharmacological doses indicate that URO is a putative drug for several related diseases. Clinical trials show promising results for various clinical indications. However, the reduction in hemodialysis/hemofiltration in patients suffering from ARF following heart and liver transplantation, derived from preliminary trials recruiting a small number of patients, was not confirmed by a multicenter phase II study. In contrast, data for the prophylactic use of URO in this clinical setting suggest a better outcome for the patients. Furthermore, treatment of asthmatic patients showed a convincingly beneficial effect of URO on pulmonary function. Patients with congestive heart failure may also

  3. Natriuretic peptide-guided management in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chioncel, Ovidiu; Collins, Sean P; Greene, Stephen J; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Macarie, Cezar; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that manifests from various cardiac and noncardiac abnormalities. Accordingly, rapid and readily accessible methods for diagnosis and risk stratification are invaluable for providing clinical care, deciding allocation of scare resources, and designing selection criteria for clinical trials. Natriuretic peptides represent one of the most important diagnostic and prognostic tools available for the care of heart failure patients. Natriuretic peptide testing has the distinct advantage of objectivity, reproducibility, and widespread availability.The concept of tailoring heart failure management to achieve a target value of natriuretic peptides has been tested in various clinical trials and may be considered as an effective method for longitudinal biomonitoring and guiding escalation of heart failure therapies with overall favorable results.Although heart failure trials support efficacy and safety of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy as compared with usual care, the relationship between natriuretic peptide trajectory and clinical benefit has not been uniform across the trials, and certain subgroups have not shown robust benefit. Furthermore, the precise natriuretic peptide value ranges and time intervals of testing are still under investigation. If natriuretic peptides fail to decrease following intensification of therapy, further work is needed to clarify the optimal pharmacologic approach. Despite decreasing natriuretic peptide levels, some patients may present with other high-risk features (e.g. elevated troponin). A multimarker panel investigating multiple pathological processes will likely be an optimal alternative, but this will require prospective validation.Future research will be needed to clarify the type and magnitude of the target natriuretic peptide therapeutic response, as well as the duration of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy in heart failure patients. PMID:27110656

  4. Porcine brain natriuretic peptide receptor in bovine adrenal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, K.; Hashiguchi, T.; Ohashi, M.; Takayanagi, R.; Haji, M.; Matsuo, H.; Nawata, H.

    1989-01-01

    The action of porcine brain natriuretic peptide (pBNP) on the steroidogenesis was investigated in cultured bovine adrenocortical cells. Porcine BNP induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of both ACTH- and A II-stimulated aldosterone secretion. 10/sup /minus/8/M and 10/sup /minus/7/M pBNP also significantly inhibited ACTH-stimulated cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretions. Binding studies of (/sup 125/I)-pBNP to bovine adrenocortical membrane fractions showed that adrenal cortex had high-affinity and low-capacity pBNP binding sites, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.70 x 10/sup /minus/10/M and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 19.9 fmol/mg protein. Finally, the 135 Kd radioactive band was specially visualized in the affinity labeling of bovine adrenal cortex with disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS). These results suggest that pBNP may have receptor-mediated suppressive actions on bovine adrenal steroidogenesis, similar to that in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP).

  5. Allotopic antagonism of the non-peptide atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antagonist HS-142-1 on natriuretic peptide receptor NPR-A.

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Hugo; Labrecque, Jean; Deschênes, Julie; DeLéan, André

    2002-01-01

    The microbial polysaccharide HS-142-1 has been documented as an antagonist of natriuretic peptides. It inhibits activation and peptide binding to both guanylate receptors natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A and NPR-B, but has no effect on the non-cyclase receptor NPR-C. At first sight the effect of HS-142-1 on peptide binding appears to be surmountable, suggesting that it might be competitive despite its chemically divergent nature. We explored its mode of action on wild-type NPR-A (WT), on a disulphide-bridged constitutively active mutant (C423S) and on truncated mutants lacking either their cytoplasmic domain (DeltaKC) or both the cytoplasmic and the transmembrane domains (ECD). On the WT, HS-142-1 inhibited atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding with a pK value of 6.51 +/- 0.07 (K(d)=0.31 microM). It displayed a similar effect on the C423S mutant (pK=6.31 +/- 0.11), indicating that its action might not be due to interference with receptor dimerization. HS-142-1 also inhibited ANP binding to DeltaKC with a pK of 7.05 +/- 0.05 (K(d)=0.089 microM), but it was inactive on ANP binding to ECD at a concentration of 10(-4) M, suggesting that the antagonism was not competitive at the peptide-binding site located on the ECD and that the transmembrane domain might be required. HS-142-1 also enhanced dissociation of NPR-A-bound (125)I-ANP in the presence of excess unlabelled ANP, implying an allotopic (allosteric) mode of action for the antagonist. PMID:11829760

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide frameshift mutation in familial atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M; Karst, Margaret L; Zingman, Leonid V; Heublein, Denise M; Darbar, Dawood; Herron, Kathleen J; Ballew, Jeffrey D; de Andrade, Mariza; Burnett, John C; Olson, Timothy M

    2008-07-10

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia that is hereditary in a small subgroup of patients. In a family with 11 clinically affected members, we mapped an atrial fibrillation locus to chromosome 1p36-p35 and identified a heterozygous frameshift mutation in the gene encoding atrial natriuretic peptide. Circulating chimeric atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was detected in high concentration in subjects with the mutation, and shortened atrial action potentials were seen in an isolated heart model, creating a possible substrate for atrial fibrillation. This report implicates perturbation of the atrial natriuretic peptide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in cardiac electrical instability. PMID:18614783

  7. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Inhibits Spontaneous Contractile Activity of Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Lobov, G I; Pan'kova, M N

    2016-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous phase and tonic activity of smooth muscle strips from the capsule of isolated bovine mesenteric lymph nodes. Pretreatment with L-NAME, diclofenac, and methylene blue had practically no effect on the peptide-induced relaxation responses. In contrast, glibenclamide significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide. We suppose that the NO-dependent and cyclooxygenase signaling pathways are not involved in implementation of the inhibitory effects of atrial natriuretic peptide. ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of the smooth muscle cell membrane are the last component in the signaling pathway leading to relaxation of smooth muscles of the lymph node capsule caused by atrial natriuretic peptide; activation of these channels leads to membrane hyperpolarization and smooth muscle relaxation. PMID:27383173

  8. Natriuretic peptide receptor-B (guanylyl cyclase-B) mediates C-type natriuretic peptide relaxation of precontracted rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Drewett, J G; Fendly, B M; Garbers, D L; Lowe, D G

    1995-03-01

    The most potent known agonist for the natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B)/guanylyl cyclase-B is C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). A homologous ligand-receptor system consists of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and NPR-A/guanylyl cyclase-A. A third member of this family is NPR-C, a non-guanylyl cyclase receptor. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against NPR-B by immunizing mice with a purified receptor-IgG fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of NPR-B and the Fc portion of human IgG-gamma 1. One monoclonal antibody, 3G12, did not recognize NPR-A or NPR-C and bound to human and rat NPR-B. CNP binding to NPR-B and stimulation of cGMP synthesis were inhibited by 3G12. With cells isolated from either the media or adventitia layers of rat thoracic aorta, 3G12 did not interfere with ANP-stimulated cGMP synthesis, but it inhibited CNP-stimulated cGMP levels in cells from both layers. CNP (IC50 = 10 nM) and ANP (IC50 = 1 nM) caused relaxation of phenylephrine-contracted rat aortic rings. 3G12 caused a marked increase in the IC50 for CNP, from 10 nM to 140 nM, but failed to affect ANP-mediated relaxation. Therefore, our results for the first time demonstrate that CNP relaxes vascular smooth muscle by virtue of its binding to NPR-B. PMID:7876238

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide, and serum collagen markers after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Magga, Jarkko; Puhakka, Mikko; Hietakorpi, Seppo; Punnonen, Kari; Uusimaa, Paavo; Risteli, Juha; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Peuhkurinen, Keijo

    2004-04-01

    Experimental data suggest that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) act locally as antifibrotic factors in heart. We investigated the interrelationships of natriuretic peptides and collagen markers in 93 patients receiving thrombolytic treatment for their first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Collagen formation following AMI, evaluated as serum levels of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen, correlated with NH(2)-terminal proANP (r = 0.45, P < 0.001), BNP (r = 0.55, P < 0.001) and NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.50, P < 0.01) on day 4 after thrombolysis. Levels of intact amino terminal propeptide of type I procollagen decreased by 34% (P < 0.001), and levels of carboxy terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) increased by 65% (P < 0.001). ICTP levels correlated with NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.25, P < 0.05) and BNP (r = 0.28, P < 0.05) on day 4. Our results suggest that ANP and BNP may act as regulators of collagen scar formation and left ventricular remodeling after AMI in humans. Furthermore, degradation of type I collagen is increased after AMI and may be regulated by BNP. PMID:14607848

  10. Clinical utility of natriuretic peptides and troponins in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Devin W; Buttan, Anshu; Siegel, Robert J; Rader, Florian

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is based on clinical, echocardiographic and in some cases genetic findings. However, prognostication remains limited except in the subset of patients with high-risk indicators for sudden cardiac death. Additional methods are needed for risk stratification and to guide clinical management in HCM. We reviewed the available data regarding natriuretic peptides and troponins in HCM. Plasma levels of natriuretic peptides, and to a lesser extent serum levels of troponins, correlate with established disease markers, including left ventricular thickness, symptom status, and left ventricular hemodynamics by Doppler measurements. As a reflection of left ventricular filling pressure, natriuretic peptides may provide an objective measure of the efficacy of a specific therapy. Both natriuretic peptides and troponins predict clinical risk in HCM independently of established risk factors, and their prognostic power is additive. Routine measurement of biomarker levels therefore may be useful in the clinical evaluation and management of patients with HCM. PMID:27236124

  11. CD-NP, a chimeric natriuretic peptide for the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rose, Robert A

    2010-03-01

    In development by Nile Therapeutics Inc, under license from the Mayo Foundation, CD-NP is a chimeric natriuretic peptide in which the 15-amino acid C-terminal tail of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide is fused to the 22-amino acid human C-type natriuretic peptide. The rationale for its design was to create a peptide with the beneficial cardiovascular and renal effects of native natriuretic peptides, but without a clinically significant hypotensive response. CD-NP is able to bind to all three natriuretic peptide receptors (NPR-A, NPR-B and NPR-C) and, therefore, is unique in being able to increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate production downstream of both NPR-A and NPR-B. Animal studies and human trials demonstrated that CD-NP is safe and improves cardiovascular and renal function without inducing significant levels of hypotension. Preliminary data also suggest improved renal function in human heart failure patients. Ongoing clinical trials are needed to further validate CD-NP as an effective treatment option for heart failure. PMID:20178049

  12. Down-regulation does not mediate natriuretic peptide-dependent desensitization of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A or NPR-B: guanylyl cyclase-linked natriuretic peptide receptors do not internalize.

    PubMed

    Fan, Danhua; Bryan, Paula M; Antos, Laura K; Potthast, Regine J; Potter, Lincoln R

    2005-01-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A/GC-A) and B (NPR-B/GC-B) are members of the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase family that mediate the effects of natriuretic peptides via the second messenger, cGMP. Despite numerous reports of these receptors being down-regulated in response to various pathological conditions, no studies have actually measured desensitization and receptor internalization in the same cell line. Furthermore, the ligand-dependent trafficking properties of NPR-A remain controversial, whereas nothing is known about the trafficking of NPR-B. In this report, we tested whether down-regulation explains the ligand-dependent desensitization of NPR-A and NPR-B and characterized their trafficking properties using a combination of hormone-binding and antibody-based assays. Quantitative partition analysis indicated that (125)I-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was rapidly released into the medium after 293T cells stably expressing NPR-A were warmed from 4 degrees to 37 degrees C. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of medium supplemented with the protease inhibitor phosphoramidon indicated that the (125)I-ANP was mostly intact. In contrast, (125)I-ANP purified from medium bathing cells expressing NPR-C, a receptor known to internalize natriuretic peptides, was degraded. Cleavable biotinylation and noncleavable biotinylation assays indicated that neither NPR-A nor NPR-B was internalized or degraded in response to natriuretic peptide binding. In contrast, agonist-dependent internalization of a G protein-coupled receptor was clearly apparent in the same cell line. Finally, we show that NPR-A and NPR-B are desensitized in cells in which they are not internalized. We suggest that mechanisms other than receptor down-regulation account for the desensitization of NPR-A and NPR-B that occurs in response to various physiological and pathological stimuli. PMID:15459247

  13. Natriuretic peptide C receptor signalling in the heart and vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Robert A; Giles, Wayne R

    2008-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs), including atrial, brain and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), bind two classes of cell surface receptors: the guanylyl cyclase-linked A and B receptors (NPR-A and NPR-B) and the C receptor (NPR-C). The biological effects of NPs have been mainly attributed to changes in intracellular cGMP following their binding to NPR-A and NPR-B. NPR-C does not include a guanylyl cyclase domain. It has been denoted as a clearance receptor and is thought to bind and internalize NPs for ultimate degradation. However, a substantial body of biochemical work has demonstrated the ability of NPR-C to couple to inhibitory G proteins (Gi) and cause inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and activation of phospholipase-C. Recently, novel physiological effects of NPs, mediated specifically by NPR-C, have been discovered in the heart and vasculature. We have described the ability of CNP, acting via NPR-C, to selectively inhibit L-type calcium currents in atrial and ventricular myocytes, as well as in pacemaker cells (sinoatrial node myocytes). In contrast, our studies of the electrophysiological effects of CNP on cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated an NPR-C–Gi–phospholipase-C-dependent activation of a non-selective cation current mediated by transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. It is also known that CNP and BNP have important anti-proliferative effects in cardiac fibroblasts that appear to involve NPR-C. In the mammalian resistance vessels, including mesenteric and coronary arteries, CNP has been found to function as an NPR-C-dependent endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor that regulates local blood flow and systemic blood pressure by hyperpolarizing smooth muscle cells. In this review we highlight the role of NPR-C in mediating these NP effects in myocytes and fibroblasts from the heart as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:18006579

  14. Natriuretic peptides modify Pseudomonas fluorescens cytotoxicity by regulating cyclic nucleotides and modifying LPS structure

    PubMed Central

    Veron, Wilfried; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc GJ; Lesouhaitier, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Background Nervous tissues express various communication molecules including natriuretic peptides, i.e. Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) and C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP). These molecules share structural similarities with cyclic antibacterial peptides. CNP and to a lesser extent BNP can modify the cytotoxicity of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The psychrotrophic environmental species Pseudomonas fluorescens also binds to and kills neurons and glial cells, cell types that both produce natriuretic peptides. In the present study, we investigated the sensitivity of Pseudomonas fluorescens to natriuretic peptides and evaluated the distribution and variability of putative natriuretic peptide-dependent sensor systems in the Pseudomonas genus. Results Neither BNP nor CNP modified P. fluorescens MF37 growth or cultivability. However, pre-treatment of P. fluorescens MF37 with BNP or CNP provoked a decrease of the apoptotic effect of the bacterium on glial cells and an increase of its necrotic activity. By homology with eukaryotes, where natriuretic peptides act through receptors coupled to cyclases, we observed that cell-permeable stable analogues of cyclic AMP (dbcAMP) and cyclic GMP (8BcGMP) mimicked the effect of BNP and CNP on bacteria. Intra-bacterial concentrations of cAMP and cGMP were measured to study the involvement of bacterial cyclases in the regulation of P. fluorescens cytotoxicity by BNP or CNP. BNP provoked an increase (+49%) of the cAMP concentration in P. fluorescens, and CNP increased the intra-bacterial concentrations of cGMP (+136%). The effect of BNP and CNP on the virulence of P. fluorescens was independent of the potential of the bacteria to bind to glial cells. Conversely, LPS extracted from MF37 pre-treated with dbcAMP showed a higher necrotic activity than the LPS from untreated or 8BcGMP-pre-treated bacteria. Capillary electrophoresis analysis suggests that these different effects of the LPS may be due, at least in part, to

  15. Physiology of natriuretic peptides: The volume overload hypothesis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Arjamaa, Olli

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the natriuretic peptide system in the early 1980s aroused great interest among clinical cardiologists. The heart was not a mechanical pump alone, but also an endocrine organ that had powerful effects on blood circulation. Natriuretic peptides caused both natriuresis and diuresis, and they responded to a volume overload which caused either stretch or pressure on the heart. As a result, the findings led to the conclusion that the human body had a hormone with effects similar to those of a drug which treats high blood pressure. Later, it became evident that the volume contraction was fortified by extrarenal plasma shift. Here, a hypothesis is presented in which the role of natriuretic peptides is to regulate oxygen transport as the volume contraction leads to hemoconcentration with an increased oxygen-carrying capacity. Wall stress, either chemical or mechanical, changes the oxygen gradient of the myocardium and affects the diffusion of oxygen within a myocyte. In support of this hypothesis, hypoxia-response elements have been found in both the atrial natriuretic peptide and the brain natriuretic peptide genes. PMID:24527182

  16. Design, Synthesis, and Actions of a Novel Chimeric Natriuretic Peptide: CD-NP

    PubMed Central

    Lisy, Ondrej; Huntley, Brenda K.; McCormick, Daniel J.; Kurlansky, Paul A.; Burnett, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to design, synthesize and test in vivo and in vitro a new chimeric peptide that would combine the beneficial properties of 2 distinct natriuretic peptides with a biological profile that goes beyond native peptides. Background Studies have established the beneficial vascular and antiproliferative properties of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). While lacking renal actions, CNP is less hypotensive than the cardiac peptides atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide but unloads the heart due to venodilation. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide is a potent natriuretic and diuretic peptide that is markedly hypotensive and functions via a separate guanylyl cyclase receptor compared with CNP. Methods Here we engineered a novel chimeric peptide CD-NP that represents the fusion of the 22-amino acid peptide CNP together with the 15-amino acid linear C-terminus of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide. We also determined in vitro in cardiac fibroblasts cyclic guanosine monophosphate-activating and antiproliferative properties of CD-NP. Results Our studies demonstrate in vivo that CD-NP is natriuretic and diuretic, glomerular filtration rate enhancing, cardiac unloading, and renin inhibiting. CD-NP also demonstrates less hypotensive properties when compared with B-type natriuretic peptide. In addition, CD-NP in vitro activates cyclic guanosine monophosphate and inhibits cardiac fibroblast proliferation. Conclusions The current findings advance an innovative design strategy in natriuretic peptide drug discovery and development to create therapeutic peptides with favorable properties that may be preferable to those associated with native natriuretic peptides. PMID:18582636

  17. Downregulation of natriuretic peptide system and increased steroidogenesis in rat polycystic ovary.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Virginia M; Honorato-Sampaio, Kinulpe; Martins, Almir S; Reis, Fernando M; Reis, Adelina M

    2014-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is known to regulate ovarian functions, such as follicular growth and steroid hormone production. The aim of the present study was to investigate the natriuretic peptide system in a rat model of chronic anovulation, the rat polycystic ovary. Adult female Wistar rats received a single subcutaneous injection of 2mg estradiol valerate to induce polycystic ovaries, while the control group received vehicle injection. Two months later, their ovaries were quickly removed and analyzed. Polycystic ovaries exhibited marked elevation of testosterone and estradiol levels compared to control ovaries. The levels of ANP and the expression of ANP mRNA were highly reduced in the polycystic ovaries compared to controls. By immunohistochemistry, polycystic ovaries showed weaker ANP staining in stroma, theca cells and oocytes compared to controls. Polycystic ovaries also had increased activity of neutral endopeptidase, the main proteolytic enzyme that degrades natriuretic peptides. ANP receptor C mRNA was reduced and ANP binding to this receptor was absent in polycystic ovaries. Collectively, these results indicate a downregulation of the natriuretic peptide system in rat polycystic ovary, an established experimental model of anovulation with high ovarian testosterone and estradiol levels. Together with previous evidence demonstrating that ANP inhibits ovarian steroidogenesis, these findings suggest that low ovarian ANP levels may contribute to the abnormal steroid hormone balance in polycystic ovaries. PMID:25111374

  18. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using /sup 125/I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function.

  19. Specific Binding of Atrial Natriuretic Factor in Brain Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Pierre E.; Roubert, Pierre; Braquet, Pierre

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood--brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. We examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using 125I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity (dissociation constant, ≈ 10-10 M) and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of 125I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood--brain barrier function.

  20. Role of extracellular domain dimerization in agonist-induced activation of natriuretic peptide receptor A.

    PubMed

    Parat, Marie; McNicoll, Normand; Wilkes, Brian; Fournier, Alain; De Léan, André

    2008-02-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR) A is composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) with a ligand binding site, a single transmembrane region, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. The natural agonists atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP) bind and activate NPRA, leading to cyclic GMP production, which is responsible for their role in cardiovascular homeostasis. Previous studies suggested that stabilization of a dimeric form of NPRA by agonist is essential for receptor activation. However, ligand specificity and sequential steps of this dimerization process have not been investigated. We used radioligand binding, fluorescence resonance energy transfer homoquenching, and molecular modeling to characterize the interaction of human NPRA-ECD with ANP, BNP, the superagonist (Arg(10),Leu(12),Ser(17),Leu(18))-rANP-(1-28), the minimized analog mini-ANP and the antagonist (Arg(6),beta-cyclohexyl-Ala(8),d-Tic(16),Arg(17),Cys(18))-rANP-(6-18)-amide (A71915). ANP binds to preformed ECD dimers and spontaneous dimerization is the rate-limiting step of the ligand binding process. All the studied peptides, including A71915 antagonist, induce a dose-dependent fluorescence homoquenching, specific to dimerization, with potencies highly correlated with their binding affinities. A71915 induced more quenching than other peptides, suggesting stabilization by the antagonist of ECD dimer in a distinct inactive conformation. In summary, these results indicate that the ligand-induced dimerization process of NPRA is different from that for cytokine receptor model. Agonists or antagonists bind to preformed dimeric ECD, leading to dimer stabilization in an active or inactive conformation, respectively. Furthermore, the highly sensitive fluorescence assay designed to assess dimerization could serve as a powerful tool for further detailing the kinetic steps involved in natriuretic peptide receptor binding and activation. PMID:17965196

  1. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  2. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A–nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells. PMID:25775533

  3. Reduced ability of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) to activate natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPR-B) causes dwarfism in lbab -/- mice.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Andrea R; Kruse, Andrew C; Earhart, Cathleen A; Ohlendorf, Douglas H; Potter, Lincoln R

    2008-09-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) stimulates endochondrial ossification by activating the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase, natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B). Recently, a spontaneous autosomal recessive mutation that causes severe dwarfism in mice was identified. The mutant, called long bone abnormality (lbab), contains a single point mutation that converts an arginine to a glycine in a conserved coding region of the CNP gene, but how this mutation affects CNP activity has not been reported. Here, we determined that 30-fold to greater than 100-fold more CNP(lbab) was required to activate NPR-B as compared to wild-type CNP in whole cell cGMP elevation and membrane guanylyl cyclase assays. The reduced ability of CNP(lbab) to activate NPR-B was explained, at least in part, by decreased binding since 10-fold more CNP(lbab) than wild-type CNP was required to compete with [125I][Tyr0]CNP for receptor binding. Molecular modeling suggested that the conserved arginine is critical for binding to an equally conserved acidic pocket in NPR-B. These results indicate that reduced binding to and activation of NPR-B causes dwarfism in lbab(-/-) mice. PMID:18554750

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Expresses a Functional Human Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Ortholog: Involvement in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Rosay, Thibaut; Bazire, Alexis; Diaz, Suraya; Clamens, Thomas; Blier, Anne-Sophie; Mijouin, Lily; Hoffmann, Brice; Sergent, Jacques-Aurélien; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Boireau, Wilfrid; Vieillard, Julien; Hulen, Christian; Dufour, Alain; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Considerable evidence exists that bacteria detect eukaryotic communication molecules and modify their virulence accordingly. In previous studies, it has been demonstrated that the increasingly antibiotic-resistant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can detect the human hormones brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) at micromolar concentrations. In response, the bacterium modifies its behavior to adapt to the host physiology, increasing its overall virulence. The possibility of identifying the bacterial sensor for these hormones and interfering with this sensing mechanism offers an exciting opportunity to directly affect the infection process. Here, we show that BNP and CNP strongly decrease P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Isatin, an antagonist of human natriuretic peptide receptors (NPR), prevents this effect. Furthermore, the human NPR-C receptor agonist cANF4-23 mimics the effects of natriuretic peptides on P. aeruginosa, while sANP, the NPR-A receptor agonist, appears to be weakly active. We show in silico that NPR-C, a preferential CNP receptor, and the P. aeruginosa protein AmiC have similar three-dimensional (3D) structures and that both CNP and isatin bind to AmiC. We demonstrate that CNP acts as an AmiC agonist, enhancing the expression of the ami operon in P. aeruginosa. Binding of CNP and NPR-C agonists to AmiC was confirmed by microscale thermophoresis. Finally, using an amiC mutant strain, we demonstrated that AmiC is essential for CNP effects on biofilm formation. In conclusion, the AmiC bacterial sensor possesses structural and pharmacological profiles similar to those of the human NPR-C receptor and appears to be a bacterial receptor for human hormones that enables P. aeruginosa to modulate biofilm expression. PMID:26307165

  5. Natriuretic peptides in cardiovascular diseases: current use and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Massimo; Rubattu, Speranza; Burnett, John

    2014-01-01

    The natriuretic peptides (NPs) family, including atrial, B-type, and C-type NPs, is a group of hormones possessing relevant haemodynamic and anti-remodelling actions in the cardiovascular (CV) system. Due to their diuretic, natriuretic, vasorelaxant, anti-proliferative, and anti-hypertrophic effects, they are involved in the pathogenic mechanisms leading to major CV diseases, such as heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy, and cerebrovascular accidents. Blood levels of NPs have established predictive value in the diagnosis of HF, as well as for its prognostic stratification. In addition, they provide useful clinical information in hypertension and in both stable and unstable coronary artery disease. Structural abnormalities of atrial natriuretic peptide gene (NPPA), as well as genetically induced changes in circulating levels of NPs, have a pathogenic causal link with CV diseases and represent emerging markers of CV risk. Novel NP-based therapeutic strategies are currently under advanced clinical development, as they are expected to contribute to the future management of hypertension and HF. The present review provides a current appraisal of NPs’ clinical implications and a critical perspective of the potential therapeutic impact of pharmacological manipulation of this class of CV hormones. PMID:24227810

  6. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S.

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  7. A Test in Context Critical Evaluation of Natriuretic Peptide Testing in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Gary S.; Felker, G. Michael; Tang, W.H. Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Circulating natriuretic peptide measurements have been used extensively over the past 15 years to diagnose and monitor patients with heart failure. We are still learning how complex the dynamics of natriuretic peptides can be in the interpretation of test results in individual patients. Although natriuretic peptide measurements are widely used in practice, there are questions regarding why these peptides may not necessarily track with blood volume or invasive hemodynamic measurements in individual patients. Interpretation of natriuretic peptide measurements will depend on many factors, including special patient populations, obesity, renal function, the state of congestion or decongestion, and whether patients are receiving specific therapies. Natriuretic peptide measurements have clearly revolutionized clinical care for patients with heart failure, but further research should provide insights to help use these measurements to individualize patient care beyond the current guidelines. PMID:26796399

  8. A Test in Context: Critical Evaluation of Natriuretic Peptide Testing in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Francis, Gary S; Felker, G Michael; Tang, W H Wilson

    2016-01-26

    Circulating natriuretic peptide measurements have been used extensively over the past 15 years to diagnose and monitor patients with heart failure. We are still learning how complex the dynamics of natriuretic peptides can be in the interpretation of test results in individual patients. Although natriuretic peptide measurements are widely used in practice, there are questions regarding why these peptides may not necessarily track with blood volume or invasive hemodynamic measurements in individual patients. Interpretation of natriuretic peptide measurements will depend on many factors, including special patient populations, obesity, renal function, the state of congestion or decongestion, and whether patients are receiving specific therapies. Natriuretic peptide measurements have clearly revolutionized clinical care for patients with heart failure, but further research should provide insights to help use these measurements to individualize patient care beyond the current guidelines. PMID:26796399

  9. Associations of plasma natriuretic peptide, adrenomedullin, and homocysteine levels with alterations in arterial stiffness: The Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental studies suggest that the natriuretic peptides influence lipid and fatty acid metabolism. Although it has been shown that obese individuals have reduced natriuretic peptide levels, conflicting data exist on the relation of natriuretic peptide levels to other metabolic risk factors. We ex...

  10. Chamber-dependent circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-02-25

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) have important local functions within the myocardium, where they protect against accelerated fibrosis. As circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides could be of importance in local cardiac protection against disease, we examined the diurnal changes of the mRNAs encoding ANP, BNP, and their common receptor NPR-A in atrial and ventricular myocardium. Forty eight mice were killed at the following ZT times: 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24, where ZT designates Zeitgeber; ZT 0 corresponds to lights ON and ZT 12 corresponds to lights OFF. Eight animals (4 males and 4 females) were included at each time point. Another 48 animals were killed during the second cycle of dark/dark (designated Circadian Time or CT: CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, and CT 24). The cellular contents of the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 as well as ANP, BNP, and their common receptor (NPR-A) were determined using RT-PCR. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents oscillated in antiphase in both atrial and ventricular regions, where Bmal1 mRNA peaked 12h out of phase relative to Per1 mRNA. ANP and NPR-A atrial mRNA contents revealed borderline significant diurnal changes, whereas ventricular BNP mRNA contents exhibited pronounced oscillation during constant darkness with nadir at CT 12 (P<0.0001). In conclusion, we report a chamber-dependent circadian profile of cardiac BNP mRNA contents, which is not paralleled by the related ANP gene. Our findings suggest that the BNP mRNA pattern could be associated with increased cardiac susceptibility and response to disease. PMID:20035806

  11. [Measurement of natriuretic peptides in heart failure: the good laboratory and clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Kovács, L Gábor; Nyolczas, Noémi; Habon, Tamás; Sepp, Róbert; Piroth, Zsolt; Hajas, Ágota; Boncz, Imre; Tomcsányi, János; Kappelmayer, János; Merkely, Béla

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (BNP, NT-proBNP) play a pivotal role in cardiovascular homeostasis, mainly due to their roles in vasodilatation, natriuresis, diuresis and due to their antiproliferative properties. Proper measurement of the natriuretic peptide levels may help differentiate between respiratory and cardiac forms of dyspnea, diagnose early forms of heart failure, evaluate severity of heart failure (prognosis) and monitor the efficacy of therapy. In many countries natriuretic peptide levels are being used as one of the earliest diagnostics tools to evaluate the involvement of the heart. Current theoretical and clinical data confirm the importance of natriuretic peptides in routine healthcare. These roles are clearly described in international recommendations and guidelines. In the current review the authors discuss the problems of the measurement of natriuretic peptides in Hungary, including several aspects related to laboratory medicine, cardiology and health economy. PMID:26211747

  12. C-TYPE NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE (CNP): CARDIOVASCULAR ROLES AND POTENTIAL AS A THERAPEUTIC TARGET

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, Natalie G.; Khambata, Rayomand S.; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides play a fundamental role in cardiovascular homeostasis by modulation of fluid and electrolyte balance and vascular tone. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) represents the paracrine element of the natriuretic peptide axis which complements the endocrine actions of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). CNP is produced by the endothelium and the heart and appears to play a prominent role in vascular and cardiac function, both physiologically and pathologically. This provides a rationale for the therapeutic potential of pharmacological interventions targeted to CNP signalling. This article provides an overview of the biology and pharmacology of CNP, with emphasis on the cardiovascular system, and discusses pathologies in which drugs designed to manipulate CNP signalling maybe of clinical benefit. PMID:21247399

  13. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the suggestions by Chabrier et al. (1987) and Steardo and Nathanson (1987) that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain, the ANP receptors in primary cultures of bovine brain microvessel endothelian cells were quantitated and characterized. Results of partition binding studies and the effect of cGMP additions indicated the presence of at least two types of ANP receptors, with the majority of the receptors being the nonguanylate cyclase coupled receptors. The presence of at least two ANP receptor types suggests an active role for ANP in regulating brain endothelial cell function.

  14. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, Amie J.; Khambata, Rayomand S.; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J.; Baliga, Reshma S.; Lumsden, Natalie G.; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J.; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J.; Simone, Michela I.; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F.; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J.; MacAllister, Raymond J.; Selwood, David L.; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor–C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25105365

  15. Endocytosis and Trafficking of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Potential Role of Short Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    The targeted endocytosis and redistribution of transmembrane receptors among membrane-bound subcellular organelles are vital for their correct signaling and physiological functions. Membrane receptors committed for internalization and trafficking pathways are sorted into coated vesicles. Cardiac hormones, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) bind to guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and elicit the generation of intracellular second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which lowers blood pressure and incidence of heart failure. After ligand binding, the receptor is rapidly internalized, sequestrated, and redistributed into intracellular locations. Thus, NPRA is considered a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular locations through its lifetime. The utilization of pharmacologic and molecular perturbants has helped in delineating the pathways of endocytosis, trafficking, down-regulation, and degradation of membrane receptors in intact cells. This review describes the investigation of the mechanisms of internalization, trafficking, and redistribution of NPRA compared with other cell surface receptors from the plasma membrane into the cell interior. The roles of different short-signal peptide sequence motifs in the internalization and trafficking of other membrane receptors have been briefly reviewed and their potential significance in the internalization and trafficking of NPRA is discussed. PMID:26151885

  16. Natriuretic peptides: diagnostic tools and predictors of heart failure outcome.

    PubMed

    Isakson, Susan R; Gardetto, Nancy J; Maisel, Alan S

    2006-11-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a progressive disease whose outcome largely depends on early, accurate and prompt diagnosis, accompanied by evidence-based treatment. The explosion of uptake of natriuretic peptides (NPs) in clinical practice belies an understanding of how peptides are used. The signal for NP release is the same signal that causes symptoms of CHF, such as increased wall stress. Thus, NPs can reliably add to the information a physician brings to the table as they attempt to diagnose the acutely dyspneic patient with CHF. Additionally, NPs have strong prognostic utility in the emergency room and the hospital. Monitoring of NPs during treatment for acute CHF may help manage the patient. In the future, it is possible that NPs will play a more prominent role in early detection of left ventricular dysfunction as well as guiding chronic CHF treatment. PMID:19804259

  17. Neprilysin and Natriuretic Peptide Regulation in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Morant-Talamante, Nuria; Lupón, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Neprilysin is acknowledged as a key player in neurohormonal regulation, a cornerstone of modern drug therapy in chronic heart failure. In the cardiovascular system, neprilysin cleaves numerous vasoactive peptides, some with mainly vasodilating effects (natriuretic peptides, adrenomedullin, bradykinin) and other with mainly vasoconstrictor effects (angiotensin I and II, endothelin-1). For decades, neprilysin has been an important biotarget. Academia and industry have combined active efforts to search for neprilysin inhibitors (NEPIs) that might be useful in clinical practice. NEPI monotherapy was initially tested with little success due to efficacy issues. Next, combination of NEPI and ACE-inhibiting activity agents were abandoned due to safety concerns. Recently, the combination of NEPI and ARB, also known as ARNI, has shown better than expected results in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, and multitude of ongoing studies are set to prove its value across the heart failure spectrum. PMID:27260315

  18. Atrial natriuretic peptide in cardiovascular biology and disease (NPPA).

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Wang, Hao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-09-10

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a cardiac hormone that regulates salt-water balance and blood pressure by promoting renal sodium and water excretion and stimulating vasodilation. ANP also has an anti-hypertrophic function in the heart, which is independent of its systemic blood pressure-lowering effect. In mice, ANP deficiency causes salt-sensitive hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Recent studies have shown that ANP plays an important role in regulating vascular remodeling and energy metabolism. Variants in the human NPPA gene, encoding the ANP precursor, are associated with hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF) and obesity. ANP and related peptides are used as biomarkers for heart disease. Recombinant proteins and small molecules that enhance the ANP pathway have been developed to treat patients with HF. In this review, we discuss the role of ANP in cardiovascular biology and disease. PMID:26074089

  19. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Renal Dopaminergic System: A Positive Friendly Relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Marcelo Roberto; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia Lucía; Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás Martín; Kravetz, María Cecilia; Fernández, Belisario Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Sodium metabolism by the kidney is accomplished by an intricate interaction between signals from extrarenal and intrarenal sources and between antinatriuretic and natriuretic factors. Renal dopamine plays a central role in this interactive network. The natriuretic hormones, such as the atrial natriuretic peptide, mediate some of their effects by affecting the renal dopaminergic system. Renal dopaminergic tonus can be modulated at different steps of dopamine metabolism (synthesis, uptake, release, catabolism, and receptor sensitization) which can be regulated by the atrial natriuretic peptide. At tubular level, dopamine and atrial natriuretic peptide act together in a concerted manner to promote sodium excretion, especially through the overinhibition of Na+, K+-ATPase activity. In this way, different pathological scenarios where renal sodium excretion is dysregulated, as in nephrotic syndrome or hypertension, are associated with impaired action of renal dopamine and/or atrial natriuretic peptide, or as a result of impaired interaction between these two natriuretic systems. The aim of this review is to update and comment on the most recent evidences demonstrating how the renal dopaminergic system interacts with atrial natriuretic peptide to control renal physiology and blood pressure through different regulatory pathways. PMID:25013796

  20. Contribution of Kv7 channels to natriuretic peptide mediated vasodilation in normal and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Stott, Jennifer B; Barrese, Vincenzo; Jepps, Thomas A; Leighton, Emma V; Greenwood, Iain A

    2015-03-01

    The Kv7 family of voltage-gated potassium channels are expressed within the vasculature where they are key regulators of vascular tone and mediate cAMP-linked endogenous vasodilator responses, a pathway that is compromised in hypertension. However, the role of Kv7 channels in non-cAMP-linked vasodilator pathways has not been investigated. Natriuretic peptides are potent vasodilators, which operate primarily through the activation of a cGMP-dependent signaling pathway. This study investigated the putative role of Kv7 channels in natriuretic peptide-dependent relaxations in the vasculature of normal and hypertensive animals. Relaxant responses of rat aorta to both atrial and C-type natriuretic peptides and the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside were impaired by the Kv7 blocker linopirdine (10 μmol/L) but not by the Kv7.1-specific blocker HMR1556 (10 μmol/L) and other K(+) channel blockers. In contrast, only the atrial natriuretic peptide response was sensitive to linopirdine in the renal artery. These Kv7-mediated responses were attenuated in arteries from hypertensive rats. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that A- and B-type natriuretic peptide receptors were expressed at high levels in the aorta and renal artery from normal and spontaneously hypertensive rats. This study provides the first evidence that natriuretic peptide responses are impaired in hypertension and that recruitment of Kv7 channels is a key component of natriuretic peptide-dependent vasodilations. PMID:25547342

  1. Effect of natriuretic peptides on cerebral artery blood flow in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song; Goetze, Jens P; Jeppesen, Jørgen L; Burnett, John C; Olesen, Jes; Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Ashina, Messoud

    2015-12-01

    The natriuretic peptides (NPs), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), have vasoactive functions that concern humans and most animals, but their specific effects on cerebral circulation are poorly understood. We therefore examined the responsiveness of cerebral arteries to different doses of the natriuretic peptides in animals and humans. We conducted a dose-response experiment in guinea pigs (in vitro) and a double-blind, three-way cross-over study in healthy volunteers (in vivo). In the animal experiment, we administered cumulative doses of NPs to pre-contracted segments of cerebral arteries. In the main study, six healthy volunteers were randomly allocated to receive two intravenous doses of ANP, BNP or CNP, respectively, over 20 min on three separate study days. We recorded blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) by transcranial Doppler. In addition, we measured temporal and radial artery diameters, headache response and plasma concentrations of the NPs. In guinea pigs, ANP and BNP but not CNP showed significant dose-dependent relaxation of cerebral arteries. In healthy humans, NP infusion had no effect on mean VMCA, and we found no difference in hemodynamic responses between the NPs. Furthermore, natriuretic peptides did not affect temporal and radial artery diameters or induce headache. In conclusion, natriuretic peptides in physiological and pharmacological doses do not affect blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery or dilate extracerebral arteries in healthy volunteers. PMID:26417835

  2. Relationship in humans between atrial natriuretic peptide and arginine vasopressin during dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, J.C. Jr.; Wilson, D.M.; Kao, P.C.; Schwab, T.R.; Heublein, D.M.; Heser, D.W.

    1986-03-01

    The present study was designed to define in normal humans (n=6) the relationship between atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) during thirty-six hours of dehydration. Atrial natriuretic peptide was measured from extracted plasma by radioimmunoassay to alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide; arginine vasopressin was measured from platelet free plasma by specific radioimmunoassay to AVP. Determinations were obtained of ANP, AVP and plasma osmolality (Posm) prior to and following fluid deprivation for thirty-six hours. The present study demonstrates that dehydration in humans increases plasma osmolality and arginine vasopressin but does not increase atrial natriuretic peptide. These investigations importantly dissociate these two peptide hormonal systems during the physiologic adaptation to fluid deprivation.

  3. Correlation between B type natriuretic peptide and metabolic risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wen-Hua; Chen, Li-Ying; Dai, Hong-Lei; Chen, Jian-Hua; Chen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It has been shown that B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level can indicate cardiovascular disease. However, the association between BNP and metabolic risk factors is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and metabolic risk factors. Material and methods A total of 11,508 subjects were selected from those who underwent health examinations in our hospital. NT-proBNP, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose and lipid profile were measured. The level of NT-proBNP was measured and classified into four stratifications (BNP ≥ 20 pg/ml, ≥ 40 pg/ml, ≥ 60 pg/ml, and ≥ 80 pg/ml) to analyze the relationship between BNP and metabolic risk factors. Results B type natriuretic peptide increased gradually with increasing age (p < 0.001). The BNP levels were significantly higher in women than in men (p < 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis showed a positive association between NT-proBNP levels and systolic blood pressure (p < 0.001), fasting plasma glucose (p < 0.05), and total cholesterol (p < 0.001 in women). The NT-proBNP levels were inversely associated with diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein, and LDL cholesterol. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a close relationship between NT-proBNP and systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and total cholesterol. In the BNP ≥ 60 pg/ml group, odds ratio (OR) values were 1.80, 1.56 and 1.54 (female) and 3.74, 1.59 and 1.51 (male), respectively. In the BNP ≥ 80 pg/ml group, OR values were 2.45, 1.65 and 1.84 (female) and 4.61, 1.66 and 1.75 (male), respectively. Conclusions NT-proBNP was independently associated with the main metabolic risk factors (systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and total cholesterol). These findings suggest that the combined determination of NT-proBNP and the main metabolic risk factors could be

  4. Natriuretic peptide control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Coué, Marine; Moro, Cedric

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NP) have recently emerged as metabolic hormones. Physiological stimulation of cardiac NP release as during exercise may contribute to increase fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissue and their oxidation by skeletal muscles. Clinical studies have shown that although very high plasma NP level characterizes cardiac dysfunction and heart failure, a consistently reduced plasma NP level is observed in metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. A low circulating NP level also predicts the risk of new onset type 2 diabetes. It is unclear at this stage if the "natriuretic handicap" observed in obesity is causally associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Recent work indicates that NP can activate a thermogenic program in brown and white fat, increase energy expenditure and inhibit food intake. Mouse studies also argue for a key role of NP in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. This review will focus on recent human and mouse studies to highlight the metabolic roles of NP and their potential relevance in the context of obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26037452

  5. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of natriuretic peptide receptor-guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Misono, Kunio S.; Philo, John S.; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Ogata, Craig M.; Qiu, Yue; Ogawa, Haruo; Young, Howard S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and homologous B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and BNP counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by the A-type natriuretic peptide receptor (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylate cyclase (GC) linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation, and signaling mechanism of the NPRA and other receptor-GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacter GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylate cyclase catalytic domain consisting of C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. AC is activated by binding of Gsα to C2 and ensuing 7° rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer into a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in the NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity. PMID:21375693

  6. Are endogenous cardenolides controlled by atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Brar, Kanwarjeet S; Gao, Yonglin; El-Mallakh, Rif S

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous cardenolides are digoxin-like substances and ouabain-like substances that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and mood disorders in clinical and pre-clinical studies. Regulatory signals for endogenous cardenolides are still unknown. These endogenous compounds are believed to be produced by the adrenal gland in the periphery and the hypothalamus in the central nervous system, and constitute part of an hormonal axis that may regulate the catalytic activity of the α subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. A review of literature suggests that there is great overlap in physiological environments that are associated with either elevations or reductions in the levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and endogenous cardenolides. This suggests that these two factors may share a common regulatory signal or perhaps that ANP may be involved in the regulation of endogenous cardenolides. PMID:27241248

  7. Molecular evolution of shark C-type natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Takano, M; Sasayama, Y; Takei, Y

    1994-06-01

    C-type natriuretic peptides (CNP) of varying length were isolated from the atrium or ventricle of a shark, Lamna ditropis and their amino acid sequences were determined. Although the sequence of Lamna CNP was highly homologous to those of other CNPs sequenced to date, the Lamna CNP-41, the longest CNP identified in this study, has one amino acid replacement from those of Triakis scyllia and Scyliorhinus canicula, and three amino acid replacements from that of Squalus acanthias. The degree of similarity of CNP molecules coincides well with their systematic positions in the cladogram of elasmobranchs; Lamna, Triakis and Scyliorhinus belong to the same order, but Lamna and Squalus belong to different orders. The facts that Lamna and Triakis are in different suborders but Triakis and Scyliorhinus are in the same suborder and have identical CNP-41, also support this evolutionary implication. PMID:7765421

  8. Clinical implications of defective B-type natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Menon, Santosh G; Mills, Roger M; Schellenberger, Ute; Saqhir, Syed; Protter, Andrew A

    2009-12-01

    Our understanding of the natriuretic peptide system continues to evolve rapidly. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), originally thought to be a simple volume-regulating hormone that is produced in response to cardiac stretch, has been shown to also play important roles in modulating bronchodilation, endothelial function, and cardiac remodeling. Recent data demonstrate that elevated levels of BNP in patients with heart failure do not represent a simple ratcheting up of normal production in response to increased stimulus. Instead, we now know that chronic stimulation of BNP synthesis induces a reversion to fetal gene expression, resulting in production of high molecular weight forms of BNP that are functionally deficient. Standard point-of-care BNP assays are immunoassays that will detect any molecule containing the target epitopes. Consequently, these assays cannot distinguish between defective, high molecular weight forms of BNP and normal, physiologically active BNP. In 2 separate evaluations, mass spectroscopy detected little, if any, normal BNP in patients with heart failure, despite the appearance of high circulating levels of immunoreactive BNP (iBNP) using commercial assays. Therefore, these commercial assays should be considered to be only an indication of myocardial stress. They do not measure physiologic BNP activity. This accounts for the "BNP paradox," namely, that administration of exogenous recombinant human BNP (rhBNP, nesiritide) has substantial clinical and hemodynamic impact in the presence of high levels of circulating iBNP using commercial assays. In addition to its short-term hemodynamic impact, rhBNP may have other important effects in this setting, and further investigation is warranted. PMID:20014209

  9. Clinical value of natriuretic peptides in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Santos-Araújo, Carla; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Pestana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    According to several lines of evidence, natriuretic peptides (NP) are the main components of a cardiac-renal axis that operate in clinical conditions of decreased cardiac hemodynamic tolerance to regulate sodium homeostasis, blood pressure and vascular function. Even though it is reasonable to assume that NP may exert a relevant role in the adaptive response to renal mass ablation, evidence gathered so far suggest that this contribution is probably complex and dependent on the type and degree of the functional mass loss. In the last years NP have been increasingly used to diagnose, monitor treatment and define the prognosis of several cardiovascular (CV) diseases. However, in many clinical settings, like chronic kidney disease (CKD), the predictive value of these biomarkers has been questioned. In fact, it is now well established that renal function significantly affects the plasmatic levels of NP and that renal failure is the clinical condition associated with the highest plasmatic levels of these peptides. The complexity of the relation between NP plasmatic levels and CV and renal functions has obvious consequences, as it may limit the predictive value of NP in CV assessment of CKD patients and be a demanding exercise for clinicians involved in the daily management of these patients. This review describes the role of NP in the regulatory response to renal function loss and addresses the main factors involved in the clinical valorization of the peptides in the context of significant renal failure. PMID:26299165

  10. Atrial natriuretic factor mRNA and binding sites in the adrenal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, D J; Davenport, A P; Brown, M J

    1990-01-01

    The factor inhibiting aldosterone secretion produced by the adrenal medulla may be atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), since the latter abolishes aldosterone release in response to a number of secretagogues, including angiotensin II and K+. In this study we have shown that cells in the adrenal medulla contain ANF mRNA and therefore have the potential to synthesize this peptide. The presence of binding sites for ANF predominantly in the adrenal zona glomerulosa suggests that, if ANF is synthesized in the medulla and transferred to the cortex, it may affect mineralocorticoid status. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2146954

  11. Increased plasma levels and blunted effects of brain natriuretic peptide in rats with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, A; Grossman, E; Keiser, H R

    1991-07-01

    The hemodynamic and renal effects of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were studied in conscious rats with experimental congestive heart failure (CHF) produced by an aortocaval fistula. The peptide had potent hypotensive, diuretic, and natriuretic effects in control rats, all of which were abolished in CHF. Plasma levels of BNP increased time-dependently during the development of CHF, and were more than four-fold higher in sodium retaining rats than in control rats. The data suggest that BNP secretion from the atria is increased in CHF, and that resistance to BNP, in addition to the relative resistance to atrial natriuretic factor, may contribute to sodium retention in CHF. PMID:1831369

  12. Changes in Serum Natriuretic Peptide Levels after Percutaneous Closure of Small to Moderate Ventricular Septal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Yuksel; Akdemir, Ramazan; Gunduz, Huseyin; Murat, Sani; Bulut, Orhan; Kocayigit, İbrahim; Vatan, M. Bulent; Cakar, M. Akif; Yeter, Ekrem; Kilic, Harun; Agac, Mustafa Tarik; Acar, Zeydin

    2012-01-01

    Background. B-type natriuretic peptide has been shown to be a very sensitive and specific marker of heart failure. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of percutaneous closure of ventricular septal defects with Amplatzer septal occluders on brain natriuretic peptide levels. Methods. Between 2008 and 2011, 23 patients underwent successfully percutaneous ventricular septal defect closure in 4 cardiology centers. Brain natriuretic peptide levels were measured in nine patients (4 male, mean ages were 25.3 ± 14.3) who underwent percutaneous closure with Amplatzer occluders for membranous or muscular ventricular septal defects were enrolled in the study. Brain natriuretic peptide levels were measured one day before and one month after the closure. Patients were evaluated clinically and by echocardiography one month after the procedure. Results. Percutaneous closures of ventricular septal defects were successfully performed in all patients. There was not any significant adverse event in patients group during followup. Decrease in brain natriuretic peptide levels after closure were statistically significant (97.3 ± 78.6 versus 26.8 ± 15.6, P = 0.013). Conclusion. Brain Natriuretic Peptide levels are elevated in patients with ventricular septal defects as compared to controls. Percutaneous closure of Ventricular Septal Defect with Amplatzer occluders decreases the BNP levels. PMID:22629130

  13. Glucagon-like peptide-1: effect on pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Skov, Jeppe; Holst, Jens Juul; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2014-01-01

    The antihypertensive actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) receptor agonists have been linked to the release of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in mice. Whether a GLP1-ANP axis exists in humans is unknown. In this study, we examined 12 healthy young males in a randomized, controlled, double-blinded, single-day, cross-over study to evaluate the effects of a 2-h native GLP1 infusion. Plasma proANP concentrations were measured by an automated mid-region-directed proANP immunoassay and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) on Roche Modular E170. Urine was collected for measurements of sodium excretion. Although GLP1 infusion increased the urinary sodium excretion markedly, there were no significant changes in either proANP or proBNP concentrations. When GLP1 infusion was stopped, sodium excretion declined rapidly. As proANP concentration reflects ANP secretion, our data could not confirm the existence of a GLP1-ANP axis in humans. Especially, the natriuretic effects of GLP1 seem unlikely to be mediated exclusively via ANP. PMID:24327600

  14. Plasma cardiac natriuretic peptide determination as a screening test for the detection of patients with mild left ventricular impairment.

    PubMed Central

    Omland, T.; Aakvaag, A.; Vik-Mo, H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of measuring the cardiac natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and brain natriuretic peptide, as screening tests for identifying patients with mild left ventricular impairment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the cardiac natriuretic peptides. SETTING: Cardiac catheterisation unit, Norwegian central hospital. PATIENTS: A consecutive series of 254 patients undergoing diagnostic left-sided cardiac catheterisation. One hundred and twenty eight of these patients had a history of previous myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of normal and impaired left ventricular function, as evaluated by logistic regression analysis and estimation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (an index of overall diagnostic accuracy). Ventricular function was assessed by the measurement of left ventricular end diastolic pressure and angiographically determined left ventricular ejection fraction. RESULTS: Logistic regression analysis showed that plasma brain natriuretic peptide was the best predictor of increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure (> or = 15 mm Hg) (P < 0.001), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (< or = 45%) (P < 0.001), and the combination of left ventricular ejection fraction < or = 45% and left ventricular end diastolic pressure > or = 15 mm Hg (P < 0.001). The areas under the ROC function for the detection of left ventricular dysfunction were 0.789 for brain natriuretic peptide, 0.665 for atrial natriuretic factor, and 0.610 for N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma brain natriuretic peptide seemed to be a better indicator of left ventricular function than plasma atrial natriuretic factor or N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of circulating atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and

  15. Human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 contains a natriuretic peptide receptor system that responds preferentially to ANP among various natriuretic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Katafuchi, T.; Hagiwara, H.; Ito, T.; Kangawa, K.; Matsuo, H.; Hirose, S. )

    1990-12-31

    A new type of ANP receptor system which clearly distinguishes natriuretic peptides A and B (ANP and BNP) has been identified in the human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 and characterized. SW-13 cells responded to nanomolar concentrations of ANP with large increases in cGMP levels but in the case of BNP, much higher concentrations were required to produce the same extent of response. This property is unique since the 140-kDa ANP receptors so far characterized do not discriminate between ANP and BNP. For comparison, various natriuretic peptide receptors were also re-characterized using the recently identified CNP.

  16. Circulatory fate of the atrial natriuretic peptide precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J.; Hilliker, S.; Borden, L.; Hancock, N.; Scarborough, R.; Vlasuk, G.

    1986-03-05

    The atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) are stored in atria principally as a 126 amino acid precursor form (proANP). Although a predominant circulating form of the ANP's is apparently 28 amino acids in length (ANP(1-28)), smaller quantities of proANP can be detected in plasma by radioimmunoassay. This raises the possibility that ANP(1-28) may be derived from proANP within the circulation. To test this possibility, HPLC was used to assess the conversion of recombinant /sup 35/S-cysteine-labelled proANP (/sup 35/S-proANP) to /sup 35/S-ANP(1-28) following incubation with biological fluids. It was determined that incubation with rat or human serum readily converts /sup 35/S-proANP to /sup 35/S-ANP(1-28), however, this conversion did not occur upon incubation with plasma. Furthermore, /sup 35/S-proANP infused into the circulation of the rat was quite stable metabolically. No /sup 35/S-ANP(1-28) or related low molecular weight ANP's could be detected in the circulation for up to two hours following /sup 35/S-proANP administration. These data imply that proANP is not converted significantly to ANP(1-28) in the circulation of the rat. Thus, processing of proANP to ANP(1-28) probably occurs within the atrium or during release of the peptides from atrium.

  17. The plant natriuretic peptide receptor is a guanylyl cyclase and enables cGMP-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Gehring, Chris

    2016-06-01

    The functional homologues of vertebrate natriuretic peptides (NPs), the plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs), are a novel class of peptidic hormones that signal via guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and systemically affect plant salt and water balance and responses to biotrophic plant pathogens. Although there is increasing understanding of the complex roles of PNPs in plant responses at the systems level, little is known about the underlying signaling mechanisms. Here we report isolation and identification of a novel Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein that directly interacts with A. thaliana PNP, AtPNP-A. In vitro binding studies revealed that the Arabidopsis AtPNP-A binds specifically to the LRR protein, termed AtPNP-R1, and the active region of AtPNP-A is sufficient for the interaction to occur. Importantly, the cytosolic part of the AtPNP-R1, much like in some vertebrate NP receptors, harbors a catalytic center diagnostic for guanylyl cyclases and the recombinant AtPNP-R1 is capable of catalyzing the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP. In addition, we show that AtPNP-A causes rapid increases of cGMP levels in wild type (WT) leaf tissue while this response is significantly reduced in the atpnp-r1 mutants. AtPNP-A also causes cGMP-dependent net water uptake into WT protoplasts, and hence volume increases, whereas responses of the protoplasts from the receptor mutant are impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that the identified LRR protein is an AtPNP-A receptor essential for the PNP-dependent regulation of ion and water homeostasis in plants and that PNP- and vertebrate NP-receptors and their signaling mechanisms share surprising similarities. PMID:26945740

  18. Endothelin-stimulated secretion of natriuretic peptides by rat atrial myocytes is mediated by endothelin A receptors.

    PubMed

    Thibault, G; Doubell, A F; Garcia, R; Larivière, R; Schiffrin, E L

    1994-03-01

    Endothelin (ET), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, is known to enhance the secretion of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) by the heart. In the present study, we investigated the potency of ET isopeptides to stimulate ANF and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) secretion in primary cultures of neonatal atrial myocytes, and we characterized the receptor mediating these effects. All ET isopeptides caused a twofold increase of ANF and BNP secretion with the following order of potency: ET-1 approximately ET-2 > sarafotoxin 6b > ET-3. Secretion of the natriuretic peptides was blocked by BQ-123, an ETA-receptor antagonist, but was not affected by either IRL-1620 or [Ala1,3,11,15]ET-1, two ETB-receptor agonists. ET receptors were localized by autoradiography on the surface of atrial myocytes, indicating that contaminating cells were not responsible for 125I-ET-1 binding. Competition binding analyses were then used to assess the ET-receptor subtype on atrial myocyte membrane preparations. A high-affinity (100 pmol/L) binding site with high density (approximately 1500 fmol/mg) was found to preferentially bind the ET isopeptides in the following order: ET-1 > or = ET-2 > or = sarafotoxin 6b > ET-3. Binding was totally displaced by BQ-123 but not by IRL-1620. The ET binding site therefore had the characteristics of an ETA-like receptor. Analysis by cross-linking and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that it possessed a molecular mass of approximately 50 kD. Northern blot analysis of both ETA- and ETB-receptor mRNAs allowed only the detection of the former, indicating that the ETB receptor may be expressed in very small amounts. These results demonstrate that ANF and BNP secretion by atrial myocytes is enhanced by ET via binding to an ETA-like receptor. PMID:8118954

  19. Guanylyl Cyclase/Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Role in the Pathophysiology of Cardiovascular Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2012-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), also known as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), is an endogenous and potent hypotensive hormone that elicits natriuretic, diuretic, vasorelaxant, and anti-proliferative effects, which are important in the control of blood pressure and cardiovascular events. One principal locus involved in the regulatory action of ANP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA). Studies on ANP, BNP, and their receptor, GC-A/NPRA, have greatly increased our knowledge of the control of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders. Cellular, biochemical, and molecular studies have helped to delineate the receptor function and signaling mechanisms of NPRA. Gene-targeted and transgenic mouse models have advanced our understanding of the importance of ANP, BNP, and GC-A/NPRA in disease states at the molecular level. Importantly, ANP and BNP are used as critical markers of cardiac events; however, their therapeutic potentials for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, heart failure, and stroke have just begun to be realized. We are now just at the initial stage of molecular therapeutics and pharmacogenomic advancement of the natriuretic peptides. More investigations should be undertaken and ongoing ones be extended in this important field. PMID:21815745

  20. Guanylyl cyclase / atrial natriuretic peptide receptor-A: role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Kailash N

    2011-08-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), also known as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), is an endogenous and potent hypotensive hormone that elicits natriuretic, diuretic, vasorelaxant, and anti-proliferative effects, which are important in the control of blood pressure and cardiovascular events. One principal locus involved in the regulatory action of ANP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is guanylyl cyclase / natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA). Studies on ANP, BNP, and their receptor, GC-A/NPRA, have greatly increased our knowledge of the control of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders. Cellular, biochemical, and molecular studies have helped to delineate the receptor function and signaling mechanisms of NPRA. Gene-targeted and transgenic mouse models have advanced our understanding of the importance of ANP, BNP, and GC-A/NPRA in disease states at the molecular level. Importantly, ANP and BNP are used as critical markers of cardiac events; however, their therapeutic potentials for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, heart failure, and stroke have just begun to be realized. We are now just at the initial stage of molecular therapeutics and pharmacogenomic advancement of the natriuretic peptides. More investigations should be undertaken and ongoing ones be extended in this important field. PMID:21815745

  1. Natriuretic peptides in relation to the cardiac innervation and conduction system.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Magnus

    2002-09-01

    During the past two decades, the heart has been known to undergo endocrine action, harbouring peptides with hormonal activities. These, termed "atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)," "brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)," and "C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)," are polypeptides mainly produced in the cardiac myocardium, where they are released into the circulation, producing profound hypotensive effects due to their diuretic, natriuretic, and vascular dilatory properties. It is, furthermore, well established that cardiac disorders such as congestive heart failure and different forms of cardiomyopathy are combined with increased expression of ANP and BNP, leading to elevated levels of these peptides in the plasma. Besides the occurrence of natriuretic peptides (NPs) in the ordinary myocardium, the presence of ANP in the cardiac conduction system has been described. There is also evidence of ANP gene expression in nervous tissue such as the nodose ganglion and the superior cervical ganglion of the rat, ganglia known to be involved in the neuronal regulation of the heart. Furthermore, in the mammalian heart, ANP appears to affect the cardiac autonomic nervous system by sympathoinhibitory and vagoexcitatory actions. This article provides an overview of the relationship between the cardiac conduction system, the cardiac innervation and NPs in the mammalian heart and provides data for the concept that ANP is also involved in neuronal cardiac regulation. PMID:12226807

  2. C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Analog as Therapy for Achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is an important regulator of bone formation. Gain-of-function mutations in the FGFR3 gene result in chondrodysplasias which include achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of dwarfism, in which skull, appendicular and axial skeletons are affected. The skeletal phenotype of patients with ACH showed defective proliferation and differentiation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate cartilage. Both endochondral and membranous ossification processes are disrupted during development. At cellular level, Fgfr3 mutations induce increased phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor FGFR3, which correlate with an enhanced activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Potential therapeutic strategies have emerged for ACH. Several preclinical studies have been conducted such as the C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) analog (BMN111), intermittent parathyroid hormone injections, soluble FGFR3 therapy, and meclozine and statin treatments. Among the putative targets to antagonize FGFR3 signaling, CNP (or BMN111) is one of the most promising strategies. BMN111 acts as a key regulator of longitudinal bone growth by downregulating the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, which is activated as a result of a FGFR3 gain-of-function mutation. Preclinical studies showed that BMN111 treatment led to a large improvement in skeletal parameters in Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice mimicking ACH. In 2014, a clinical trial (phase 2) of BMN111 in pediatric patients with ACH has started. This first clinical trial marks the first big step towards real treatment for these patients. PMID:26684019

  3. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases resistance to venous return in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.W.; Frohlich, E.D.; Trippodo, N.C.

    1987-05-01

    To examine mechanisms by which administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) decreases venous return, the authors compared the hemodynamic effects of ANP furosemide (FU), and hexamethonium (HEX) with those of vehicle (VE) in anesthetized rats. Compared with VE, ANP reduced mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and cardiac index and increased calculated resistance to venous return. /sup 141/Ce-labeled microspheres were used to determine cardiac output. Mean circulatory filling pressure, distribution of blood flow between splanchnic organs and skeletal muscles, and total peripheral resistance remained unchanged. FU increased urine output similar to that of ANP, yet produced no hemodynamic changes, dissociating diuresis, and decreased cardiac output. HEX lowered arterial pressure through a reduction in total peripheral resistance without altering cardiac output or resistance to venous return. The results confirm previous findings that ANP decreases cardiac output through a reduction in venous return and suggest that this results partly from increased resistance to venous return and not from venodilation or distribution of blood flow.

  4. Sibjotang Increases Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Secretion in Beating Rabbit Atria

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Jeong; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Lee, Yun Jung; Kim, Hye Yoom; Tan, Rui; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2015-01-01

    Sibjotang (Shizaotang), traditional herbal medicine formula, which was first documented in the Shanghanlun, has long been prescribed for the treatment of impairment of the body fluid homeostasis. The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of Sibjotang on the secretion of a cardiac hormone, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), one of the main hormones involved in the regulation of the body fluid and blood pressure homeostasis. Water extract of Sibjotang increased ANP secretion concomitantly with an increase in atrial dynamics in a concentration-dependent manner. Sibjotang-induced increase in ANP secretion and positive inotropic effect were attenuated by GO6976 and LY333531, selective inhibitors of conventional protein kinase C, but not Rottlerin, an inhibitor of novel PKCδ. Similarly to the effect of Sibjotang, extracts of components of Sibjotang, Euphorbia kansui, and Daphne genkwa, but not Euphorbia pekinensis and Ziziphus jujuba, increased ANP secretion and atrial dynamics. Ingredients of Sibjotang, apigenin, rosmarinic acid, and salvianolic acid B decreased ANP secretion and atrial dynamics. These findings suggest that Sibjotang increases ANP secretion and atrial dynamics via activation of conventional protein kinase C signaling. This finding provides experimental evidence for the rationale in the use of Sibjotang in the treatment of impairment of the regulation of body fluid and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:26495007

  5. Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethys-mography of supine health male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n equals 6) and during placebo infusion (n equals 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 plus or minus 4 to 2,568 plus or minus 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion; mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3 percent respectively, relative to pre-infusion baseline values (p is less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20 percent with ANP infusion, wheras blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, phamacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

  6. Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethysmography of supine healthy male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n = 6) and during placebo infusion (n = 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 +/- 4 to 2,568 +/- 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion: mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3%, respectively, relative to preinfusion baseline values (p less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however, was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20% with ANP infusion, whereas blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/ arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, pharmacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchnic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

  7. Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

  8. ENaC is regulated by natriuretic peptide receptor-dependent cGMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lai-Jing; Alli, Abdel A.; Eaton, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) located at the apical membrane of polarized epithelial cells are regulated by the second messenger guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). The mechanism for this regulation has not been completely characterized. Guanylyl cyclases synthesize cGMP in response to various intracellular and extracellular signals. We investigated the regulation of ENaC activity by natriuretic peptide-dependent activation of guanylyl cyclases in Xenopus 2F3 cells. Confocal microscopy studies show natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs), including those coupled to guanylyl cyclases, are expressed at the apical membrane of 2F3 cells. Single-channel patch-clamp studies using 2F3 cells revealed that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) or 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cGMP, but not C-type natriuretic peptide or cANP, decreased the open probability of ENaC. This suggests that NPR-A, but not NPR-B or NPR-C, is involved in the natriuretic peptide-mediated regulation of ENaC activity. Also, it is likely that a signaling pathway involving cGMP and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in this mechanism, since inhibitors of soluble guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G, inducible NO synthase, or an NO scavenger blocked or reduced the effect of ANP on ENaC activity. PMID:23324181

  9. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Mashael F.; Smith, Craig M.; Weiss, Scott L.; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004–0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002–0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003–0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187–1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4–1.2, 29) (p< 0.05) controls. A-FaBP and mrProANP (Median, IQR ng/mL, n) were elevated in septic patients compared to control groups on first 2 days after admission to the PICU (p <0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, mrProANP, and A-FaBP to distinguish septic patients from healthy controls were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.76, respectively. MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was inversely and mrProANP was directly related to PIM-2, PELOD, and ICU and hospital LOS (p<0.05). A-FaBP level was associated with PELOD, hospital and ICU length of stay (p<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio associated with poor Glasgow Outcome Score (p<0.05). A-FaBP levels in septic patients with neurological dysfunction (29.3, 17.2–54.6, 7) were significantly increased compared to septic patients without neurological dysfunction (14.6, 13.3–20.6, 11). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios

  10. Atrial natriuretic peptide receptor heterogeneity and effects on cyclic GMP accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Leitman, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on guanylate cyclase activity and cyclic GMP accumulation were examined, since these hormones appear to be intimately associated with blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. ANP was found to increase cyclic GMP accumulation in ten cell culture systems, which were derived from blood vessels, adrenal cortex, kidney, lung, testes and mammary gland. ANP receptors were characterized in intact cultured cells using {sup 125}I-ANP{sub 8-33}. Specific {sup 125}I-ANP binding was saturable and of high affinity. Scratchard analysis of the binding data for all cell types exhibited a straight line, indicating that these cells possessed a single class of binding sites. Despite the presence of linear Scatchard plots, these studies demonstrated that cultured cells possess two functionally and physically distinct ANP-binding sites. Most of the ANP-binding sites in cultured cells have a molecular size of 66,000 daltons under reducing conditions. The identification of cultured cell types in which hormones (ANP and oxytocin) regulate guanylate cyclase activity and increase cyclic GMP synthesis will provide valuable systems to determine the mechanisms of hormone-receptor coupling to guanylate cyclase and the cellular processes regulated by cyclic GMP.

  11. [Clinical significance of natriuretic peptides in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea].

    PubMed

    Špác, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Acute dyspnea is one of the most common emergency department symptoms. But early diagnosis and treatment could be e challenging because of multiple potential causes. The gold standard biomarkers in cardiac dyspnea are B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-B-type (natriuretic peptide NT-pro BNP), which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. The purpose of this review is to analyze diagnostic potential of BNP and NT-pro BNP biomarkers use in patients with acute dyspnea. BNP and NT-proBNP are markers of cardiac stress but are not cardiac-specific. They have comparable clinical utility, and both help in excluding acute cardiac dyspnea but they cannot reliably discriminate systolic from diastolic HF.Key word: acute dyspnea - natriuretic peptide - heart failure. PMID:27627091

  12. Atrial natriuretic peptide mediates oxytocin secretion induced by osmotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Chriguer, Rosengela S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Franci, Celso R

    2003-02-15

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), first discovered in the heart, has been also detected in various brain regions involved in the control of cardiovascular function and water and sodium balance. The anteroventral region of the third ventricle (AV3V) and the subfornical organ (SFO) have ANP-immunoreactive projections towards the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei of the hypothalamus. Extracellular fluid (ECF) hyperosmolality stimulates the secretion of oxytocin (OT) which induces ANP release by the atrium. On the other hand, passive immunoneutralization of ANP reduces OT secretion in response to ECF hypertonicity. Previous studies have shown the co-localization of ANP and OT in PVN and SON neurons and in the periventricular region, as well as the presence of ANPergic and oxytocinergic neurons in the median eminence. The aim of the present study was to investigate the OT and ANP content in the SON and PVN of the hypothalamus and in the posterior pituitary (PP) after an osmotic stimulus that induces OT secretion. The results showed that intracerebroventricular microinjection of normal rabbit serum (NRS) or of ANP antiserum followed or not by an intraperitoneal injection of isotonic saline did not alter OT secretion or OT content in the PVN, SON, and PP; passive ANP immunoneutralization reduced the basal content of ANP in the PVN, SON, and PP of animals in a situation of isotonicity; the ANP antiserum inhibited the increase of OT secretion and content of OT and ANP in the PVN, SON and PP induced by the osmotic stimulus. Thus, the increase in plasma OT and oxytocinergic neurons of the hypothalamus-posterior pituitary system in response to hypertonicity depends on the action of endogenous ANP, i.e., ECF hypertonicity must activate ANPergic neurons which directly or indirectly stimulate OT release. PMID:12576148

  13. The relationship among brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), cholesterol and lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hidekazu; Sata, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship among brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), cholesterol and lipoprotein. Design A retrospective, cross-sectional study. Setting Tokushima University Hospital area. Patients A retrospective study of 46 patients (nine inpatients and 37 outpatients) with angina pectoris or arrhythmias who were seen at Tokushima University Hospital Cardiovascular Division and had measurements of their BNP, fatty acid and lipid profile. The average age of patients was 57±17 years, and 39% were male subjects. Main outcome measures BNP, dihomo-γ-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), apolipoproteinA1, apolipoprotein A2 (ApoA2), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), apolipoprotein C2, apolipoprotein C3, apolipoprotein E, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Results The baseline characteristics of the patients were shown in table 1 and the data of lipoprotein were shown in table 2. Table 3 shows the relationship among BNP, cholesterol and lipoprotein. The authors found significant negative correlation between serum levels of BNP and ApoA2 (figure 1; r=−0.458, p=0.001), serum levels of BNP and ApoB (figure 2; r=−0.328, p=0.026) and serum levels of BNP and TC (figure 3; r=-0.383, p=0.010). There is a possibility that dietary EPA and DHA may modulate cardiac mitochondrial and autonomic nervous system dysfunction via fatty-acids-PPARs-PTEN-PI3K/Akt-SREBPs system and affect serum BNP levels indirectly. Conclusion BNP had significant negative correlation with ApoA2, ApoB and TC. The findings suggest that increasing serum levels of ApoA2, ApoB and TC may have an effect on improving heart function. But the mechanism is presently unclear. PMID:27326018

  14. Useulness of B Natriuretic Peptides and Procalcitonin in Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Delerme, S; Chenevier-Gobeaux, C; Doumenc, B; Ray, P

    2008-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is the main cause of acute dyspnea in patients presented to an emergency department (ED), and it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a polypeptide, released by ventricular myocytes directly proportional to wall tension, for lowering renin-angiotensin-aldosterone activation. For diagnosing CHF, both BNP and the biologically inactive NT-proBNP have similar accuracy. Threshold values are higher in elderly population, and in patients with renal dysfunction. They might have also a prognostic value. Studies demonstrated that the use of BNP or NT-proBNP in dyspneic patients early in the ED reduced the time to discharge, total treatment cost. BNP and NT-proBNP should be available in every ED 24 hours a day, because literature strongly suggests the beneficial impact of an early appropriate diagnosis and treatment in dyspneic patients.Etiologic diagnosis of febrile patients who present to an ED is complex and sometimes difficult. However, new evidence showed that there are interventions (including early appropriate antibiotics), which could reduce mortality rate in patients with sepsis. For diagnosing sepsis, procalcitonin (PCT) is more accurate than C-reactive protein. Thus, because of its excellent specificity and positive predictive value, an elevated PCT concentration (higher than 0.5 ng/mL) indicates ongoing and potentially severe systemic infection, which needs early antibiotics (e.g. meningitis). In lower respiratory tract infections, CAP or COPD exacerbation, PCT guidance reduced total antibiotic exposure and/or antibiotic treatment duration. PMID:19578505

  15. Radioimmunoassay and characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide in human plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yandle, T.G.; Espiner, E.A.; Nicholls, M.G.; Duff, H.

    1986-07-01

    A RIA for alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha hANP) in plasma was developed and used to study the immunoreactive components secreted by the heart and circulating in peripheral venous plasma. The assay used (125I)diiodotyrosyl-alpha hANP, purified by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and a C-terminal-specific antiserum purchased from Peninsula Laboratories. Serial dilution curves of coronary sinus plasma samples were parallel with the standard curve, but significant nonparallelism was found in peripheral plasma samples of low immunoreactivity. When plasma was extracted using C-18 Sep-Pak cartridges, serial dilution curves from both coronary sinus and peripheral plasma samples were parallel to the standard curve. Although values for plasma samples assayed before and after extraction agreed closely (r = 0.99; n = 76), immunoreactive ANP in unextracted plasma was consistently greater (70-79 pmol/liter) than in extracts of plasma, suggesting non-specific interference by a component in plasma when assayed without extraction. Mean plasma immunoreactive ANP in 19 normal subjects consuming a normal salt intake was 14 +/- 1 (+/- SE) pmol/liter. In 5 normal men, increasing dietary sodium intake from 10 to 200 mmol sodium/day was associated with a 2-fold increment in ANP levels, and similar changes accompanied acute sodium loading using iv saline. Elevated values were found in patients with congestive heart failure (mean, 58 pmol/liter; range, 0-200; n = 9), chronic renal failure (mean, 118 pmol/liter; range, 30-290; n = 8), and primary aldosteronism (range, 32-90 pmol/liter; n = 3). HPLC and gel chromatographic analysis of the immunoreactive material found in coronary sinus plasma extracts showed that a large amount of the material eluted in the position of alpha hANP.

  16. Relative antidipsogenic potencies of six homologous natriuretic peptides in eels.

    PubMed

    Miyanishi, Hiroshi; Nobata, Shigenori; Takei, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) exhibits a potent antidipsogenic effect in seawater (SW) eels to limit excess Na(+) uptake, thereby effectively promoting SW adaptation. Recently, cardiac ANP, BNP and VNP and brain CNP1, 3 and 4, have been identified in eels. We examined the antidipsogenic effect of all homologous NPs using conscious, cannulated eels in both FW and SW together with parameters that affect drinking. A dose-response study (0.01-1 nmol/kg) in SW eels showed the relative potency of the antidipsogenic effect was in the order ANP ≥ VNP > BNP = CNP3 > CNP1 ≥ CNP4, while the order was ANP = VNP = BNP > CNP3 = CNP1 = CNP4 for the vasodepressor effect. The minimum effective dose of ANP for the antidipsogenic effect is much lower than that in mammals. ANP, BNP and VNP at 0.3 nmol/kg decreased drinking, plasma Na(+) concentration and aortic pressure and increased hematocrit in SW eels. The cardiac NPs induced similar changes in drinking, aortic pressure and hematocrit in FW eels, but aside from BNP no change in plasma Na(+) concentration. CNPs had no effect on drinking, plasma Na(+) concentration and hematocrit but induced mild hypotension in both FW and SW eels, except for CNP3 that inhibited drinking in SW eels. These results show that ANP, BNP and VNP are potent antidipsogenic hormones in eels in spite of other regulatory factors working to induce drinking, and that CNPs are without effects on drinking except for the ancestor of the cardiac NPs, CNP3. PMID:21967218

  17. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Induces Postprandial Lipid Oxidation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Budziarek, Petra; Boschmann, Michael; Moro, Cedric; Adams, Frauke; Franke, Gabriele; Berlan, Michel; Marques, Marie A.; Sweep, Fred C.G.J.; Luft, Friedrich C.; Lafontan, Max; Jordan, Jens

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) regulates arterial blood pressure. In addition, ANP has recently been shown to promote human adipose tissue lipolysis through cGMP-mediated hormone-sensitive lipase activation. We hypothesized that ANP increases postprandial free fatty acid (FFA) availability and energy expenditure while decreasing arterial blood pressure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We infused human ANP (25 ng · kg−1 · min−1) in 12 men (age 32 ± 0.8 years, BMI 23.3 ± 0.4 kg/m2) before, during, and 2 h after ingestion of a standardized high-fat test meal in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over fashion. Cardiovascular changes were monitored by continuous electrocardiogram and beat-by-beat blood pressure recordings. Metabolism was monitored through venous blood sampling, intramuscular and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue microdialysis, and indirect calorimetry. RESULTS—ANP infusion decreased mean arterial blood pressure by 4 mmHg during the postprandial phase (P < 0.01 vs. placebo). At the same time, ANP induced lipolysis systemically (P < 0.05 vs. placebo) and locally in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (P < 0.0001 vs. placebo), leading to a 50% increase in venous glycerol (P < 0.01) and FFA (P < 0.05) concentrations compared with placebo. The increase in FFA availability with ANP was paralleled by a 15% increase in lipid oxidation rates (P < 0.05 vs. placebo), driving a substantial increase in postprandial energy expenditure (P < 0.05 vs. placebo). CONCLUSIONS—Our data identify the ANP system as a novel pathway regulating postprandial lipid oxidation, energy expenditure, and concomitantly arterial blood pressure. The findings could have therapeutic implications. PMID:18835931

  18. Receptor binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor are expressed by brown adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Bacay, A.C.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Mantyh, P.W. )

    1988-09-01

    To explore the possibility that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is involved in thermoregulation we used quantitative receptor autoradiography and homogenate receptor binding assays to identify ANF bindings sites in neonatal rat and sheep brown adipose tissue, respectively. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography were were able to localize high levels of specific binding sites for {sup 125}I-rat ANF in neonatal rat brown adipose tissue. Homogenate binding assays on sheep brown fat demonstrated that the radioligand was binding to the membrane fraction and that the specific binding was not due to a lipophilic interaction between {sup 125}I-rat ANF and brown fat. Specific binding of {sup 125}I-rat ANF to the membranes of brown fat cells was inhibited by unlabeled rat ANF with a Ki of 8.0 x 10(-9) M, but not by unrelated peptides. These studies demonstrate that brown fat cells express high levels of ANF receptor binding sites in neonatal rat and sheep and suggest that ANF may play a role in thermoregulation.

  19. [Do natriuretic peptides have a new chance in treatment of heart failure?].

    PubMed

    Špinarová, Lenka; Špinar, Jindřich; Vítovec, Jiří

    2014-12-01

    The effect of natriuretic peptides on cardiovascular and renal system offers a potential benefit in therapy of hypertension and heart failure; however the current results of clinical trials are not encouraging. Synthetic B natriuretic peptide has demonstrated short-term hemodynamic improvement in patients, but in terms of renal function and long-term prognosis the effect was questionable. Nevertheless, new hope is ularitid a dual inhibitor of neprilysin and ARB: LCZ 696, the ongoing clinical studies and previous data from pilot studies appear promising. PMID:25692836

  20. C-type natriuretic peptide activates a non-selective cation current in acutely isolated rat cardiac fibroblasts via natriuretic peptide C receptor-mediated signalling.

    PubMed

    Rose, R A; Hatano, N; Ohya, S; Imaizumi, Y; Giles, W R

    2007-04-01

    In the heart, fibroblasts play an essential role in the deposition of the extracellular matrix and they also secrete a number of hormonal factors. Although natriuretic peptides, including C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and brain natriuretic peptide, have antifibrotic effects on cardiac fibroblasts, the effects of CNP on fibroblast electrophysiology have not been examined. In this study, acutely isolated ventricular fibroblasts from the adult rat were used to measure the effects of CNP (2 x 10(-8) M) under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions. CNP, as well as the natriuretic peptide C receptor (NPR-C) agonist cANF (2 x 10(-8) M), significantly increased an outwardly rectifying non-selective cation current (NSCC). This current has a reversal potential near 0 mV. Activation of this NSCC by cANF was abolished by pre-treating fibroblasts with pertussis toxin, indicating the involvement of G(i) proteins. The cANF-activated NSCC was inhibited by the compounds Gd(3+), SKF 96365 and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of mRNA from rat ventricular fibroblasts revealed the expression of several transient receptor potential (TRP) channel transcripts. Additional electrophysiological analysis showed that U73122, a phospholipase C antagonist, inhibited the cANF-activated NSCC. Furthermore, the effects of CNP and cANF were mimicked by the diacylglycerol analogue 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), independently of protein kinase C activity. These are defining characteristics of specific TRPC channels. More detailed molecular analysis confirmed the expression of full-length TRPC2, TRPC3 and TRPC5 transcripts. These data indicate that CNP, acting via the NPR-C receptor, activates a NSCC that is at least partially carried by TRPC channels in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:17204501

  1. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding and ANP-induced increases in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels have been observed in brain microvessels (Chabrier et al., 1987; Steardo and Nathanson, 1987), suggesting that this fluid-regulating hormone may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain. This study was initiated to characterize the ANP receptors in primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs). The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, for ANP increased from 0.25 nM to 2.5 nM, and the number of ANP binding sites as determined by Scatchard analysis increased from 7,100 to 170,000 sites/cell between 2 and 10 days of culture following monolayer formation. Time- and concentration-dependent studies on the stimulation of cGMP levels by ANP indicated that guanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptors were present in BMECs. The relative abilities of ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and a truncated analog of ANP containing amino acids 5-27 (ANP 5-27) to modulate the accumulation of cGMP was found to be ANP greater than BNP much greater than ANP 5-27. Affinity cross-linking with disuccinimidyl suberate and radiolabeled ANP followed by gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions demonstrated a single band corresponding to the 60-70 kD receptor, indicating the presence of the nonguanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptor. Radiolabeled ANP binding was examined in the presence of various concentrations of either ANP, BNP, or ANP 5-27 and suggested that a large proportion of the ANP receptors present in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells bind all of these ligands similarly. These data indicate both guanylate cyclase linked and nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors are present on BMECs and that a higher proportion of the nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors is expressed. This in vitro culture system may provide a valuable tool for the examination of ANP receptor expression and function in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

  2. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  7. Agonist selectivity for three species of natriuretic peptide receptor-A.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, J R; Sehl, P; Quan, C; Burnier, J P; Lowe, D G

    1995-01-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequence of mouse natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) cDNA and compared the revised deduced amino acid sequence with those of rat and human NPR-A. The ligand selectivity of these three receptor/guanylyl cyclases was examined by whole-cell stimulation of cGMP production. The 28-amino acid atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has only one difference among these three species, i.e., human Met-12 versus rat and mouse Ile-12. However, despite the nearly invariant ANP sequence among these species, ANP analogs have marked differences in ED50 values and maximal cGMP responses among the three receptors. With the natriuretic peptide analogs we tested, human NPR-A is less sensitive than rat or mouse NPR-A to changes in the 17-amino acid, disulfide-bonded ring of ANP and to the species differences in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) but is more sensitive to deletions in the carboxyl tail of ANP. The ANP determinants of agonist potency have therefore changed for different species of NPR-A. This is reflected in the amino acid sequence divergence in the receptor extracellular domains and in the divergence and specificity of BNP among species. Our results suggest that the coevolution of NPR-A and BNP has thus been constrained within the context of the conserved ANP sequence. PMID:7838126

  8. Atrial natriuretic factor binding sites in experimental congestive heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, C.; Thibault, G.; Wrobel-Konrad, E.; De Lean, A.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M. )

    1989-10-01

    A quantitative in vitro autoradiographic study was performed on the aorta, renal glomeruli, and adrenal cortex of cardiomyopathic hamsters in various stages of heart failure and correlated, in some instances, with in vivo autoradiography. The results indicate virtually no correlation between the degree of congestive heart failure and the density of 125I-labeled atrial natriuretic factor ((Ser99, Tyr126)ANF) binding sites (Bmax) in the tissues examined. Whereas the Bmax was increased in the thoracic aorta in moderate and severe heart failure, there were no significant changes in the zona glomerulosa. The renal glomeruli Bmax was lower in mild and moderate heart failure compared with control and severe heart failure. The proportion of ANF B- and C-receptors was also evaluated in sections of the aorta, adrenal, and kidney of control and cardiomyopathic hamsters with severe heart failure. (Arg102, Cys121)ANF (des-(Gln113, Ser114, Gly115, Leu116, Gly117) NH2) (C-ANF) at 10(-6) M displaced approximately 505 of (Ser99, Tyr126)125I-ANF bound in the aorta and renal glomeruli and approximately 20% in the adrenal zona glomerulosa in both series of animals. These results suggest that ANF may exert a buffering effect on the vasoconstriction of heart failure and to a certain extent may inhibit aldosterone secretion. The impairment of renal sodium excretion does not appear to be related to glomerular ANF binding sites at any stage of the disease.

  9. Protective effect of atrial natriuretic peptide on electrical-field-stimulated rat ventricular strips during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ljusegren, M E; Andersson, R G

    1994-12-01

    We have previously shown that atrial natriuretic peptide reduces lactate accumulation in non-beating rat ventricular myocardium exposed to hypoxic conditions, and that hypoxia induces release of atrial natriuretic peptide from isolated rat atrial tissue. In these studies we suggested that atrial natriuretic peptide may be physiologically important for protection of the myocardium during periods of oxygen deficit. In the present study, we used isolated strips of rat right ventricle, contracted by electrical-field-stimulation, as a model of a beating myocardium. After contraction stabilization, hypoxic conditions were introduced through aeration with 20% O2, held for 20 or 30 min., and then interrupted by reoxygenation with 95% O2. The contractile force was recorded and the percentage regain of the contractions after reoxygenation was considered as an indication of the amount of cell damage induced during the period of hypoxia. The results show that after 30 min. of hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation, ventricular strips treated with atrial natriuretic peptide (0.1 microM) recovered 67.9 +/- 2.8% of the prehypoxic force of contraction; control strips from the same ventricle regained 44.9 +/- 4.4% (P = 0.015) of their initial contractile activity. After 20 min. of hypoxia followed by reoxygenation, a ventricular strip incubated together with an atrium regained 78.6 +/- 2.4% of the prehypoxic force of contraction as compared to a 60.2 +/- 2.7% regain (P = 0.002) for the control strip. We conclude that atrial natriuretic peptide protects the working ventricular myocardium during hypoxia, which further supports our previously reported suggestion that the effect on myocardial metabolism is physiologically relevant during situations of oxygen deficit in heart muscle. PMID:7899254

  10. Racial Differences in Circulating Natriuretic Peptide Levels: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepak K; Claggett, Brian; Wells, Quinn; Cheng, Susan; Li, Man; Maruthur, Nisa; Selvin, Elizabeth; Coresh, Josef; Konety, Suma; Butler, Kenneth R; Mosley, Thomas; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hoogeveen, Ron; Ballantyne, Christie M; Solomon, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Background Natriuretic peptides promote natriuresis, diuresis, and vasodilation. Experimental deficiency of natriuretic peptides leads to hypertension (HTN) and cardiac hypertrophy, conditions more common among African Americans. Hospital-based studies suggest that African Americans may have reduced circulating natriuretic peptides, as compared to Caucasians, but definitive data from community-based cohorts are lacking. Methods and Results We examined plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) levels according to race in 9137 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study participants (22% African American) without prevalent cardiovascular disease at visit 4 (1996–1998). Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses were performed adjusting for clinical covariates. Among African Americans, percent European ancestry was determined from genetic ancestry informative markers and then examined in relation to NTproBNP levels in multivariable linear regression analysis. NTproBNP levels were significantly lower in African Americans (median, 43 pg/mL; interquartile range [IQR], 18, 88) than Caucasians (median, 68 pg/mL; IQR, 36, 124; P<0.0001). In multivariable models, adjusted log NTproBNP levels were 40% lower (95% confidence interval [CI], −43, −36) in African Americans, compared to Caucasians, which was consistent across subgroups of age, gender, HTN, diabetes, insulin resistance, and obesity. African-American race was also significantly associated with having nondetectable NTproBNP (adjusted OR, 5.74; 95% CI, 4.22, 7.80). In multivariable analyses in African Americans, a 10% increase in genetic European ancestry was associated with a 7% (95% CI, 1, 13) increase in adjusted log NTproBNP. Conclusions African Americans have lower levels of plasma NTproBNP than Caucasians, which may be partially owing to genetic variation. Low natriuretic peptide levels in African Americans may contribute to the greater risk for HTN and its sequalae in

  11. [Human atrial natriuretic peptide: a secretory product of the heart and its significance for physiology and clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Vierhapper, H; Waldhäusl, W

    1987-03-01

    This review deals with the physiological and clinical importance of human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP). This peptide, which is produced by the myocardial cells of the right atrium, induces a diuretic and natriuretic response and has an inhibitory effect on aldosterone secretion. Recent elucidation of the peptide's structure represents the latest achievement in the search for an endogenous, natriuretic and hypotensive substance and has resulted in the publication of much, partly only preliminary data of its role within the homeostatic control of body sodium and water, as well as in various pathological disorders. The extensive literature is reviewed. PMID:2953110

  12. Functional receptors in the avian kidney for C-type natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Brenner, D; Gerstberger, R

    1999-04-01

    Renal actions of avian-specific C-type natriuretic peptide (chCNP) were investigated in the conscious Pekin duck. Under conditions of steady-state renal water and salt elimination, systemic chCNP administration (6 and 30 pmol/min x kg BW for 20 min) dose dependently induced transient natriuresis and diuresis. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate remained constant throughout the experiment. Employing receptor autoradiography, binding sites specific for [125I]BH-chCNP could be localized at high density in glomeruli of both reptilian- and mammalian-type nephrons, and arterioles of the avian kidney. The distal tubular zone revealed [125I]BH-chCNP binding sites at medium, the medullary cone area at low density. Using an enriched kidney membrane fraction, competitive displacement studies with [125I]BH-chCNP as radioligand and various unlabeled peptide analogs (chANP, chCNP, rANP, rBNP, frANP, rANP(4-23)) allowed the discrimination of high-affinity (IC50 values 10(-10)-10(-9) M) and low-affinity (IC50 values 10(-8)-10(-7) M) binding sites different from typical mammalian receptor subtypes. Intracellular cyclic GMP formation could be demonstrated immunocytochemically for both types of glomeruli and cells of the distal tubular zone in fixed tissue sections after in vivo application of chCNP (0.8 nmol/min x kg BW; 5 min). The results obtained by combination of physiological in vivo studies and in vitro receptor analysis indicate an important role for chCNP in the modulation of avian kidney function. PMID:10098496

  13. Regulation of endothelial cell shape and monolayer permeability by atrial natriuretic peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Lofton-Day, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), considered to be an important regulator of intravascular fluid volume, binds specifically to receptors on endothelial cells. In this study, the role of ANP-specific binding was investigated by examining the effect of ANP on the morphology and macromolecular permeability of monolayer cultures of bovine aortic endothelial cells. ANP alone had no observable effect on the monolayers. However, incubation of monolayers with ANP antagonized thrombin- or glucose oxidase-induced cell shape changes and intercellular gap formation. ANP pretreatment also opposed the effect of thrombin and glucose oxidase on actin filament distribution as observed by rhodamine-phalloidin staining and digital image analysis of F0actin staining. In addition, ANP reversed cell shape changes and cytoskeletal alterations induced by thrombin treatment but did not reverse alternations induced by glucose oxidase treatment. ANP significantly reduced increases in monolayer permeability to albumin resulting from thrombin or glucose oxidases treatment. Thrombin caused a 2-fold increase in monolayer permeability to {sup 125}I-labeled albumin, which was abolished by 10{sup {minus}8}-10{sup {minus}6}M ANP pretreatment. Glucose oxidase caused similar increases in permeability and was inhibited by ANP at slightly shorter time periods.

  14. INTERACTING DISCIPLINES: Cardiac natriuretic peptides and obesity: perspectives from an endocrinologist and a cardiologist

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Hugo R; Birkenfeld, Andreas L; de Bold, Adolfo J

    2015-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1981, the cardiac natriuretic peptides (cNP) atrial natriuretic peptide (also referred to as atrial natriuretic factor) and brain natriuretic peptide have been well characterised in terms of their renal and cardiovascular actions. In addition, it has been shown that cNP plasma levels are strong predictors of cardiovascular events and mortality in populations with no apparent heart disease as well as in patients with established cardiac pathology. cNP secretion from the heart is increased by humoral and mechanical stimuli. The clinical significance of cNP plasma levels has been shown to differ in obese and non-obese subjects. Recent lines of evidence suggest important metabolic effects of the cNP system, which has been shown to activate lipolysis, enhance lipid oxidation and mitochondrial respiration. Clinically, these properties lead to browning of white adipose tissue and to increased muscular oxidative capacity. In human association studies in patients without heart disease higher cNP concentrations were observed in lean, insulin-sensitive subjects. Highly elevated cNP levels are generally observed in patients with systolic heart failure or high blood pressure, while obese and type-2 diabetics display reduced cNP levels. Together, these observations suggest that the cNP system plays a role in the pathophysiology of metabolic vascular disease. Understanding this role should help define novel principles in the treatment of cardiometabolic disease. PMID:26115665

  15. Molecular cloning of hamster brain and atrial natriuretic peptide cDNAs. Cardiomyopathic hamsters are useful models for brain and atrial natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, N; Ogawa, Y; Itoh, H; Arai, H; Suga, S; Nakagawa, O; Komatsu, Y; Kishimoto, I; Takaya, K; Yoshimasa, T

    1994-01-01

    Brain and atrial natriuretic peptides (BNP and ANP) are cardiac hormones with diuretic, natriuretic, and vasodilatory activities. Cardiomyopathic hamsters are widely used animal models of heart failure. Due to the structural divergence of BNP among species, examination on pathophysiological roles of BNP using cardiomyopathic hamsters is so far impossible. We therefore isolated hamster BNP and ANP cDNAs, and investigated synthesis and secretion of these peptides in normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters. The COOH-terminal 32-residue peptide of cloned hamster preproBNP with 122 amino acids, preceded by a single arginine residue, supposedly represents hamster BNP showing < 50% homology to rat BNP. Alpha-hamster ANP, 28-residue peptide, is identical to alpha-rat ANP. In hamsters, BNP and ANP occur mainly in the ventricle and the atrium, respectively. The 32-wk-old hypertrophic cardiomyopathic BIO14.6 strain exhibited ventricular hypertrophy. The 32-wk-old dilated cardiomyopathic BIO53.58 strain remained at the stage without apparent heart failure. In BIO14.6 and BIO53.58 strains at this age, ventricular BNP and ANP gene expressions are augmented, and the plasma BNP concentration is elevated to 136 and 108 fmol/ml, respectively, three times greater than the elevated plasma ANP concentration, which well mimics changes of the plasma BNP and ANP concentrations in human heart failure. Cardiomyopathic hamsters, therefore, are useful models to investigate the implication of BNP in human cardiovascular diseases. Images PMID:8083346

  16. Vascular effects and electrolyte homeostasis of the natriuretic peptide isolated from Crotalus oreganus abyssus (North American Grand Canyon rattlesnake) venom.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, S L; Dias-Junior, C A; Baldasso, P A; Damico, D C S; Carvalho, B M A; Garanto, A; Acosta, G; Oliveira, E; Albericio, F; Soares, A M; Marangoni, S; Resende, R R

    2012-08-01

    Crotalus oreganus abyssus is a rattlesnake that is usually found in the Grand Canyon, United States of America. Knowledge regarding the composition of C. o. abyssus venom is scarce. New natriuretic peptides (NPs) have been isolated and characterized from the venoms of members of the Crotalinae family. The NP family comprises three members, ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide), BNP (b-type natriuretic peptide) and CNP (c-type natriuretic peptide), and has an important role in blood pressure regulation and electrolyte homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to characterize a novel natriuretic-like peptide (Coa_NP2), isolated from C. o. abyssus venom. The Coa_NP2 presents an average molecular mass of 3419.88Da (theoretical average molecular mass 3418.94Da, monoisotopic molecular mass 3416.66Da and theoretical PI 7.78) and its amino acid sequence presents the loop region that is characteristic of natriuretic peptides. The peptide has 32 amino acids and its complete sequence is SYGISSGCFGLKLDRIGTMSGLGCWRLLQDSP. Coa_NP2 is a natriuretic peptide of the ANP/BNP-like family, since the carboxyterminal region of CNP has its own NP domain. We demonstrate, herein, that Coa_NP2 produces a dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial pressure in rats, followed by significant increases in concentrations of markers of nitric oxide formation measured in the plasma and vasorelaxation in a thoracic aortic ring bath. The structural and biological aspects confirm Coa_NP2 as a new natriuretic peptide, isolated from snake venom. PMID:22617223

  17. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A signaling antagonizes phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ release, and activation of protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2014-01-01

    Thus far, three related natriuretic peptides (NPs) and three distinct sub-types of cognate NP receptors have been identified and characterized based on the specific ligand binding affinities, guanylyl cyclase activity, and generation of intracellular cGMP. Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) specifically bind and activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) shows specificity to activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-B (GC-B/NPRB). All three NPs bind to natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPRC), which is also known as clearance or silent receptor. The NPRA is considered the principal biologically active receptor of NP family; however, the molecular signaling mechanisms of NP receptors are not well understood. The activation of NPRA and NPRB produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP, which serves as the major signaling molecule of all three NPs. The activation of NPRB in response to CNP also produces the intracellular cGMP; however, at lower magnitude than that of NPRA, which is activated by ANP and BNP. In addition to enhanced accumulation of intracellular cGMP in response to all three NPs, the levels of cAMP, Ca2+ and inositol triphosphate (IP3) have also been reported to be altered in different cells and tissue types. Interestingly, ANP has been found to lower the concentrations of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3; however, NPRC has been proposed to increase the levels of these metabolic signaling molecules. The mechanistic studies of decreased and/or increased levels of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in response to NPs and their receptors have not yet been clearly established. This review focuses on the signaling mechanisms of ANP/NPRA and their biological effects involving an increased level of intracellular accumulation of cGMP and a decreased level of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in different cells and tissue systems. PMID:25202235

  18. Insulin/glucose induces natriuretic peptide clearance receptor in human adipocytes: a metabolic link with the cardiac natriuretic pathway.

    PubMed

    Bordicchia, M; Ceresiani, M; Pavani, M; Minardi, D; Polito, M; Wabitsch, M; Cannone, V; Burnett, J C; Dessì-Fulgheri, P; Sarzani, R

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NP) are involved in cardiorenal regulation and in lipolysis. The NP activity is largely dependent on the ratio between the signaling receptor NPRA and the clearance receptor NPRC. Lipolysis increases when NPRC is reduced by starving or very-low-calorie diet. On the contrary, insulin is an antilipolytic hormone that increases sodium retention, suggesting a possible functional link with NP. We examined the insulin-mediated regulation of NP receptors in differentiated human adipocytes and tested the association of NP receptor expression in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) with metabolic profiles of patients undergoing renal surgery. Differentiated human adipocytes from VAT and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) adipocyte cell line were treated with insulin in the presence of high-glucose or low-glucose media to study NP receptors and insulin/glucose-regulated pathways. Fasting blood samples and VAT samples were taken from patients on the day of renal surgery. We observed a potent insulin-mediated and glucose-dependent upregulation of NPRC, through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, associated with lower lipolysis in differentiated adipocytes. No effect was observed on NPRA. Low-glucose medium, used to simulate in vivo starving conditions, hampered the insulin effect on NPRC through modulation of insulin/glucose-regulated pathways, allowing atrial natriuretic peptide to induce lipolysis and thermogenic genes. An expression ratio in favor of NPRC in adipose tissue was associated with higher fasting insulinemia, HOMA-IR, and atherogenic lipid levels. Insulin/glucose-dependent NPRC induction in adipocytes might be a key factor linking hyperinsulinemia, metabolic syndrome, and higher blood pressure by reducing NP effects on adipocytes. PMID:27101299

  19. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations in dogs with right-sided congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    KANNO, Nobuyuki; HORI, Yasutomo; HIDAKA, Yuichi; CHIKAZAWA, Seishiro; KANAI, Kazutaka; HOSHI, Fumio; ITOH, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The clinical utility of plasma natriuretic peptide concentrations in dogs with right-sided congestive heart failure (CHF) remains unclear. We investigated whether plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are useful for assessing the congestive signs of right-sided heart failure in dogs. This retrospective study enrolled 16 healthy dogs and 51 untreated dogs with presence (n=28) or absence (n=23) of right-sided CHF. Medical records of physical examinations, thoracic radiography and echocardiography were reviewed. The plasma concentration of canine ANP was measured with a chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were determined using an enzyme immunoassay. Plasma ANP and NT-proBNP concentrations in dogs with right-sided CHF were significantly higher than in healthy controls and those without right-sided CHF. The plasma NT-proBNP concentration >3,003 pmol/l used to identify right-sided CHF had a sensitivity of 88.5% and specificity of 90.3%. An area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.93. The AUC for NT-proBNP was significantly higher than the AUCs for the cardiothoracic ratio, vertebral heart score, ratio of right ventricular end-diastolic internal diameter to body surface area, tricuspid late diastolic flow and ratio of the velocities of tricuspid early to late diastolic flow. These results suggest that plasma ANP and NT-proBNP concentrations increase markedly in dogs with right-sided CHF. Particularly, NT-proBNP is simple and helpful biomarkers to assess the right-sided CHF. PMID:26607133

  20. Increase in plasma concentrations of cardiodilatin (amino terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide) in cardiac failure and during recumbency.

    PubMed Central

    Meleagros, L; Gibbs, J S; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R

    1988-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of cardiodilatin, the peptide sequence at the amino terminal of the pro-atrial natriuretic peptide, in 17 normal subjects ranged from 59 to 202 (mean 118 (SEM) (9] pmol/l. Recumbency increased the mean (SEM) concentration to 160 (13) pmol/l. The plasma concentration of cardiodilatin in 24 patients with congestive cardiac failure was much higher (964 (175) pmol/l) than in the normal subjects. It was highest in those with heart failure in New York Heart Association functional classes III and IV and the concentration correlated both with atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations and left ventricular ejection fraction. Concentrations rose during induced tachycardia in three patients tested. Chromatography showed a single clean peak of plasma cardiodilatin immunoreactivity. It seems that cardiodilatin is a second circulating cardiac peptide that is jointly released with atrial natriuretic peptide by common stimuli. Other workers have reported that, like atrial natriuretic peptide, three partial cardiodilatin sequences can stimulate renal particulate guanylate cyclase and increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The simultaneous release of cardiodilatin in higher circulating concentrations than atrial natriuretic peptide may be relevant to the finding that appropriate concentrations of exogenous atrial natiuretic peptide alone do not produce the full renal effects associated with endogenous peptide release. PMID:2970269

  1. Natriuretic peptides induce weak VASP phosphorylation at Serine 239 in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Borgognone, Alessandra; Lowe, Kate L; Watson, Stephen P; Madhani, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophoshate (cGMP) is the common second messenger for the cardiovascular effects of nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides (NP; for example, atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP]), which activate soluble and particulate guanylyl cyclases (sGC and pGC), respectively. The role of NO in regulating cGMP and platelet function is well documented, whereas there is little evidence supporting a role for NPs in regulating platelet reactivity. By studying platelet aggregation and secretion in response to a PAR-1 peptide, collagen and ADP, and phosphorylation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) substrate VASP at serine 239, we evaluated the effects of NPs in the absence or presence of the non-selective cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylanxthine (IBMX). Our results show that NPs, possibly through the clearance receptor (natriuretic peptide receptor-C, NPR-C) expressed on platelet membranes, increase VASP phosphorylation but only following PDE inhibition, indicating a small, localised cGMP synthesis. As platelet aggregation and secretion measured under the same conditions were not affected, we conclude that the magnitude of PKG activation achieved by NPs in platelets per se is not sufficient to exert functional inhibition of platelet involvement in haemostasis. PMID:23469931

  2. Subcellular trafficking of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A with concurrent generation of intracellular cGMP

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Indra; Garg, Renu; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) activates guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), which lowers blood pressure and blood volume. The objective of the present study was to visualize internalization and trafficking of enhanced GFP (eGFP)-tagged NPRA (eGFP–NPRA) in human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) cells, using immunofluorescence (IF) and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of eGFP–NPRA. Treatment of cells with ANP initiated rapid internalization and co-localization of the receptor with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1), which was highest at 5 min and gradually decreased within 30 min. Similarly, co-localization of the receptor was observed with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1); however, after treatment with lysosomotropic agents, intracellular accumulation of the receptor gradually increased within 30 min. Co-IP assays confirmed that the localization of internalized receptors occurred with subcellular organelles during the endocytosis of NPRA. Rab 11, which was used as a recycling endosome (Re) marker, indicated that ∼20% of receptors recycled back to the plasma membrane. ANP-treated cells showed a marked increase in the IF of cGMP, whereas receptor was still trafficking into the intracellular compartments. Thus, after ligand binding, NPRA is rapidly internalized and trafficked from the cell surface into endosomes, Res and lysosomes, with concurrent generation of intracellular cGMP. PMID:26374856

  3. Subcellular trafficking of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A with concurrent generation of intracellular cGMP.

    PubMed

    Mani, Indra; Garg, Renu; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2015-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) activates guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), which lowers blood pressure and blood volume. The objective of the present study was to visualize internalization and trafficking of enhanced GFP (eGFP)-tagged NPRA (eGFP-NPRA) in human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) cells, using immunofluorescence (IF) and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of eGFP-NPRA. Treatment of cells with ANP initiated rapid internalization and co-localization of the receptor with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1), which was highest at 5 min and gradually decreased within 30 min. Similarly, co-localization of the receptor was observed with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1); however, after treatment with lysosomotropic agents, intracellular accumulation of the receptor gradually increased within 30 min. Co-IP assays confirmed that the localization of internalized receptors occurred with subcellular organelles during the endocytosis of NPRA. Rab 11, which was used as a recycling endosome (Re) marker, indicated that ∼20% of receptors recycled back to the plasma membrane. ANP-treated cells showed a marked increase in the IF of cGMP, whereas receptor was still trafficking into the intracellular compartments. Thus, after ligand binding, NPRA is rapidly internalized and trafficked from the cell surface into endosomes, Res and lysosomes, with concurrent generation of intracellular cGMP. PMID:26374856

  4. B-type Natriuretic Peptide circulating forms: Analytical and bioactivity issues.

    PubMed

    Yandle, Tim G; Richards, A Mark

    2015-08-25

    B-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP), A-type and C-type Natriuretic Peptides (ANP and CNP) comprise a family of peptides that retain a common ring structure and conserved amino acid sequences. All are present in the heart, but only BNP and ANP are regarded as primarily cardiac secretory products. BNP and ANP, acting through a guanylyl cyclase receptor, increase sodium and water excretion by the kidney, induce vasodilation, reduce blood pressure, counteract the bioactivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems and possess anti-hypertrophic and anti-fibrotic properties. BNP is synthesised in cardiomyocytes first as the precursor peptide preproBNP. Removal of the signal peptide from preproBNP produces proBNP which is cleaved to produce the biologically active carboxy-terminal BNP peptide and the inactive N-terminal fragment, NT-proBNP. BNP, NT-proBNP, proBNP and the C-terminal portion of the BNP signal peptide have been detected in human plasma as well as multiple sub-forms including truncated forms of BNP and NT-proBNP, as well as variable glycosylation of NT-proBNP and proBNP. The origin of these circulating forms, their potential bioactivity and their detection by current analytical methods are presented in this review. PMID:26160054

  5. Synthesis, internalization, and localization of atrial natriuretic peptide in rat adrenal medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, G.; Chabot, J.G.; Garcia-Caballero, T.; Gossard, F.; Dihl, F.; Belles-Isles, M.; Heisler, S.

    1988-07-01

    Some, though not all studies, have indicated that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) can bind to adrenal medullary cells. ANP-like immunoreactivity (ANP-LI) has also been identified in catecholamine-secreting cells. Together, these findings suggest that ANP may be taken up and/or synthesized in the adrenal medulla. The present study was designed to ascertain, by in situ hybridization, whether adrenal chromaffin cells could synthesize ANP, to define by an in vivo ultrastructural autoradiographic approach, whether ANP could, in fact, bind to rat adrenal medulla cells, to determine whether there was a cellular (noradrenaline (NA) vs. adrenaline (A)) selectivity in the binding process, and to establish whether extracellular (125I)ANP could be internalized by these cells. The cellular and subcellular distribution of endogenous ANP-LI was also investigated in both cell types by cryoultramicrotomy and immunocytochemical approaches. The in situ hybridization studies indicate the presence of mRNA to ANP in about 15% of adrenal medullary cells. Intravenous injection of (125I)ANP resulted in a 3-fold, preferential and specific radiolabeling of A-as compared to NA-containing cells. In A-containing cells, plasma membranes were significantly labeled 2 and 5 min post injection; cytoplasmic matrix, mitochondria, and secretory granules throughout the time course studied (1-30 min post injection). Lysosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and nuclei were not labeled. ANP-LI was identified in both NA- and A-containing cells; in the former, it was almost exclusively localized in secretory vesicles, in the latter it was detected in plasma membranes, cytoplasmic matrix, nuclear euchromatin, some mitochondria and relatively fewer granules than in NA-containing cells.

  6. Thyrotropin modulates receptor-mediated processing of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in cultured thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Y.L.; Burman, K.D.; Lahiri, S.; Abdelrahim, M.M.; D'Avis, J.C.; Wartofsky, L. )

    1991-03-01

    In a prior study of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding to cultured thyroid cells, we reported that at 4 C, more than 95% of bound ANP is recovered on cell membranes, with negligible ANP internalization observed. Since ANP binding was inhibited by TSH, we have further studied TSH effects on postbinding ANP processing to determine whether this phenomenon reflects enhanced endocytosis of the ANP-receptor complex. An ANP chase study was initiated by binding (125I) ANP to thyroid cells at 4 C for 2 h, followed by incubation at 37 C. ANP processing was then traced by following 125I activity at various time intervals in three fractions: cell surface membranes, incubation medium, and inside the cells. Radioactivity released into medium represented processed ANP rather than ANP dissociated from surface membranes, since prebound (125I)ANP could not be competitively dissociated by a high concentration of ANP (1 mumol/L) at 37 C. Chase study results showed that prebound ANP quickly disappeared from cell membranes down to 34% by 30 min. Internalized ANP peaked at 10 min, with 21% of initial prebound ANP found inside the cells. At the same time, radioactivity recovered in incubation medium sharply increased between 10-30 min from 8% to 52%. Preincubation of cells with chloroquine (which blocks degradation of the ANP-receptor complex by inhibiting lysosomal hydrolase) caused a 146% increase in internalized (125I)ANP by 30 min (39% compared to 15% control), while medium radioactivity decreased from 52% to 16%, suggesting that processing of the receptor complex is mediated via lysosomal enzymes. In chase studies employing cells pretreated with chloroquine, TSH stimulated the internalization rate of ANP-receptor complex. By 30 min, TSH significantly reduced the membrane-bound ANP, and the decrease was inversely correlated to the increase in internalized radioactivity.

  7. Natriuretic peptide resistance of mesenteric arteries in spontaneous hypertensive rat is alleviated by exercise.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Zhang, B; Su, X-L; Tie, R; Chang, P; Zhang, X-C; Wang, J-B; Zhao, G; Zhu, M-Z; Zhang, H-F; Chen, B-Y

    2016-06-20

    Proximal resistance vessels, such as the mesenteric arteries, contribute substantially to the peripheral resistance. The reactivity of resistance vessels to vasoactive substance like natriuretic peptides plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. In current study, we investigated the reactivity of mesenteric arteries to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a well known vasodilating factor, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), as well as the effects of exercise training on it. As a result, ANP-induced vasorelaxation was attenuated in SHR with significantly increased phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), and decreased cGMP/ANP ratio, compared with WKY rats as control. Intriguingly, the decreased reactivity to ANP in SHR was markedly reversed by exercise training. In addition, ANP resistance of in vitro mesenteric arteries was diminished by sildenafil a potent selective inhibitor of PDE5. In conclusion, ANP resistance occurs in resistance vessels of SHR, suggesting predisposition to hypertension, which can be reversed by exercise. PMID:26447511

  8. Clinical Applications of Natriuretic Peptides in Assessment of Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Abhishek; Ahmed, Vaseem; Garg, Aakash; Aggarwal, Chirag

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers such as natriuretic peptides (NPs) have evolving clinical utility beyond the scope of heart failure. The role of NPs in the management of valvular heart disease is a growing area of investigation. NPs have much potential in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with hemodynamically significant valvular lesions who have traditionally been excluded from consideration of surgical intervention. NPs also have a role in the risk stratification of these patients as well as in routine surveillance and monitoring. Together with echocardiographic data and functional status, NPs are being incorporated into the management of valvular heart disease. In this review we examine the evidence for the role of natriuretic peptides in assessment of VHD. PMID:26265794

  9. Natriuretic peptide testing for heart failure therapy guidance in the inpatient and outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Green, Sandy M; Green, Jamie A; Januzzi, James L

    2009-01-01

    Acutely destabilized heart failure is one of the most common diagnoses in the modern health care system. It has high hospital readmission rates and significant short-, medium-, and long-term mortality, likely due to misdiagnosis or failure to assess adequate treatment before discharge. Cardiac biomarkers such as B-type natriuretic peptide and its amino terminal cleavage equivalent N-terminal fragment have rapidly become one of the key tools in the diagnosis and guidance of heart failure therapy. In this article, we shall review the data on the current use of the natriuretic peptides for the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of heart failure in both the outpatient and inpatient settings. PMID:19300043

  10. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Wheeler, Janet I; Gehring, Chris; Irving, Helen R; Marondedze, Claudius

    2015-09-01

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article "Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress" by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386. PMID:26217812

  11. Cardiac content of brain natriuretic peptide in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Naoto; Aburaya, Masahito; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Kato, Johji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kida, Osamu; Eto, Tanenao; Kangawa, Kenji; Tanaka, Kenjiro ); Minamino, Naoto; Matsuo, Hisayuki )

    1991-01-01

    The cardiac content of immunoreactive rat brain natriuretic peptide (ir-rBNP) in deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The atrial content of ir-rBNP was significantly lower in the DOCA-salt group than in the control group. However, the ventricular content of ir-rBNP was markedly increased in the DOCA-salt group as compared to the other groups. Ir-rBNP level in the atria was negatively correlated with blood pressure, while that in the ventricle was positively correlated with blood pressure. A significant correlation was observed between tissue levels of ir-rBNP and ir-rat atrial natriuretic peptide (rANP) both in atrium and ventricle. These results raise the possibility that rBNP as well as rANP functions as a cardiac hormone, the production of which probably changes in response to increased of body fluid and blood pressure.

  12. Cardiovascular biomarker midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide during and after preeclamptic pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Sugulle, Meryam; Herse, Florian; Hering, Lydia; Mockel, Martin; Dechend, Ralf; Staff, Anne Cathrine

    2012-02-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), a precursor of the atrial natriuretic peptide, is a biomarker for cardiovascular disease. We obtained plasma from 184 pregnant women in gestational weeks 24 to 42 (normotensive pregnancies: n=77, preeclampsia: n=107), from 25 of these women at 5 to 8 years after index pregnancy (normotensive pregnancies: n=11, preeclampsia: n=14), and from 49 normotensive, nonpregnant women and analyzed them by immunoassay for MR-proANP. To investigate potential sources, placental and decidual atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA expression levels were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR in 21 normotensive and 23 preeclamptic pregnancies, as well as in human heart and kidney samples. For further confirmation, we measured circulating MR-proANP and performed expression studies in a transgenic rat model for preeclampsia. MR-proANP was significantly elevated in maternal plasma in preeclampsia compared with normotensive pregnancies (135 versus 56 pmol/L; P<0.001). However, 5 to 8 years after pregnancy, there was no difference (formerly preeclamptic women versus formerly normotensive in pregnancy: 53 versus 49 pmol/L; P=0.5). Our preeclamptic rat model confirmed the acute MR-proANP differences between preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies (10.9±1.9 versus 4.3±0.3 pmol/L; P=0.05). Atrial natriuretic peptide expression was high in the heart but negligible in the uteroplacental unit in both normotensive humans and rats, whereas expression in maternal and fetal hearts in the preeclamptic rats was significantly increased, compared with controls. MR-proANP is a serviceable biomarker in preeclampsia, both in humans and a rat model, probably reflecting cardiovascular hemodynamic stress. PMID:22184318

  13. [Natriuretic peptides. History of discovery, chemical structure, mechanism of action and the removal routes. Basis of diagnostic and therapeutic use].

    PubMed

    Stryjewski, Piotr J; Nessler, Bohdan; Cubera, Katarzyna; Nessler, Jadwiga

    2013-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NP) are the group of proteins synthesized and secreted by the mammalian heart. All the NP are synthesized from prohormones and have 17-amino acid cyclic structures containing two cysteine residues linked by internal disulphide bond. They are characterized by a wide range of actions, mainly through their membrane receptors. The NP regulate the water and electrolyte balance, blood pressure through their diuretic, natriuretic, and relaxating the vascular smooth muscles effects. They also affect the endocrine system and the nervous system. The neurohormonal regulation of blood circulation results are mainly based on antagonism with renin--angiotensin--aldosterone system. The NP representatives are: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), urodilatine and (DNP) Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide, not found in the human body. According to the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology determination of NT-proBNP level have found a use in the diagnosis of acute and chronic heart failure, risk stratification in acute coronary syndromes and pulmonary embolism. There are reports found in the literature, that demonstrate the usefulness of NT-proBNP determination in valvular, atrial fibrillation, and syncopes. Recombinant human ANP--Carperitid and BNP--Nesiritid, have already found a use in the adjunctive therapy of dyspnea in acute heart failure. PMID:24167949

  14. Attenuated response to atrial natriuretic peptide in rats with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kohzuki, M; Hodsman, G P; Johnston, C I

    1989-02-01

    The natriuretic, diuretic, and hypotensive effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were examined in rats 4 wk after myocardial infarction induced by left coronary artery ligation. Synthetic rat ANP (fragment 1-28) was infused intravenously in doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 for 30 min. There was a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure in controls and rats with infarction, although only in control rats was there a significant decrease in diastolic blood pressure. Changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were attenuated in rats with infarction compared with controls (P less than 0.01). The diuretic and natriuretic effects of ANP were observed in both groups of rats, but the effects were significantly less in rats with infarction (P less than 0.01). The ANP infusion did not induce significant changes in heart rate or hematocrit in controls or rats with infarction. The results indicate that rats with chronic left heart failure are less sensitive to the natriuretic, diuretic, and hypotensive effects of ANP when compared with controls. The attenuated renal response to ANP may contribute to the impaired sodium and water excretion in chronic heart failure, although other mechanisms are involved. PMID:2521777

  15. Receptors for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and regulation of thyroglobulin secretion by ANP in human thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sellitti, D.F.; Tseng, Y.C.L.; Wartofsky, L. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC )

    1989-01-01

    Specific binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were identified and characterized in primary cultures of human thyroid cells. Saturation analysis using ({sup 125}I) {alpha} rat (1-28) ANP as the ligand showed a single class of high affinity binding which was inhibited by atriopeptin I and the {alpha} -human form of ANP, but not by a C-terminal fragment (13-28) of the peptide. The number of ANP binding sites in these cultures was not altered by the thyroid hormone concentration of the medium. In a dose-response experiment, thyroglobulin secretion was significantly reduced in the presence of 0.01 nM ANP and was maximally reduced with 10 nM ANP. Cyclic GMP production was increased threefold in the presence of 100 nM ANP, but was unchanged with lower doses of the peptides. The finding of receptors in thyroid follicular cells suggests a hitherto unrecognized role of ANP in the thyroid gland.

  16. DEFINITIVE ROLE FOR NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE RECEPTOR-C IN MEDIATING THE VASORELAXANT ACTIVITY OF C-TYPE NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE AND ENDOTHELIUM-DERIVED HYPERPOLARISING FACTOR

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Inmaculada C.; Panayiotou, Catherine M.; Sheraz, Adil; Madhani, Melanie; Scotland, Ramona S.; Nobles, Muriel; Kemp-Harper, Barbara; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) has recently been suggested to represent an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in the mammalian resistance vasculature, important in the regulation of local blood flow and systemic blood pressure. Additionally, this peptide has been shown to protect against ischaemia-reperfusion injury and inhibits leukocyte and platelet activation. Herein, we use a novel, selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) antagonist (M372049) to highlight the pivotal contribution of CNP/NPR-C signalling in the EDHF-dependent regulation of vascular tone and investigate the mechanism(s) underlying the release and biological activity of CNP and EDHF. Methods In vitro pharmacological investigation was conducted in rat (Sprague-Dawley) aorta and mesenteric resistance arteries. Relaxant responses to CNP, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), the nitric oxide donor spermine-NONOate (SPER-NO) and the endothelium-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine (ACh) were examined in the absence and presence of M372049 or inhibitor cocktails shown previously to block endothelium-dependent dilatation in the resistance vasculature. RT-PCR was employed to characterize the expression of NPR subtypes in the vessels studied. Results M372049 produced concentration-dependent inhibition of the vasorelaxant activity of CNP in rat isolated mesenteric resistance arteries but not aorta; in contrast, M372049 did not affect relaxations to ANP or SPER-NO in either vessel. M372049 or ouabain alone produced small, significant inhibition of EDHF-dependent relaxations in mesenteric arteries and in combination acted synergistically to abolish such responses. A combination of M372049 with established inhibitors of EDHF-dependent relaxation revealed that multiple, distinct pathways coordinate the bioactivity of EDHF in the resistance vasculature, and that CNP/NPR-C signalling represents a major component. Conclusions These data substantiate CNP/NPR-C signalling as a

  17. Inhibition of atrial natriuretic peptide-induced natriuresis by plasma hydrolysates containing pepsanurin.

    PubMed

    Borić, M P; Croxatto, H R; Albertini, R; Roblero, J S

    1992-02-01

    The specificity of antidiuretic actions of pepsanurin, a peptidic fraction obtained by pepsin hydrolysis of plasma, was studied in anesthetized rats and in isolated perfused rat kidneys. Pepsanurin was obtained from fresh dialyzed human plasma digested with pepsin (2,400 units/ml, 18 hours at 37 degrees C, pH 2.5), deproteinized (10 minutes at 80 degrees C), and centrifuged. In the rat, intraperitoneal injections of pepsanurin (0.5 ml/100 g body wt) significantly inhibited the effects of an intravenous bolus of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) (0.5 micrograms) on water, sodium, and potassium excretion without altering systemic blood pressure. In addition, pepsanurin abolished the peak in glomerular filtration rate and reduced the ANP-induced rise in fractional sodium excretion. Pepsanurin also inhibited the natriuretic effects of amiloride (10 micrograms/100 g body wt i.v.) without changing glomerular filtration rate, but it did not inhibit the potassium-retaining effect of amiloride. In contrast, pepsanurin had no effect on basal urinary excretion, and it did not affect the diuretic response induced by furosemide (doses of 25, 50, or 100 micrograms i.v.). Control peptidic hydrolysates prepared from human plasma preincubated 48 hours at 37 degrees C (PIPH), bovine albumin (BSAH), or human albumin did not inhibit ANP, amiloride, or furosemide. In perfused kidneys, pepsanurin significantly and reversibly reduced sodium and water excretion. Furthermore, pepsanurin, but not PIPH or BSAH, blocked the natriuretic and diuretic effects of ANP. These results support the existence of a specific plasma substrate able to release a peptide or peptides that counteract distal tubule diuresis and natriuresis by an intrarenal mechanism. PMID:1531208

  18. A Familial Mutation Renders Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Resistant to Proteolytic Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Deborah M.; Yoder, Andrea R.; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2009-01-01

    A heterozygous frameshift mutation causing a 12-amino acid extension to the C terminus of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was recently genetically linked to patients with familial atrial fibrillation (Hodgson-Zingman, D. M., Karst, M. L., Zingman, L. V., Heublein, D. M., Darbar, D., Herron, K. J., Ballew, J. D., de Andrade, M., Burnett, J. C., Jr., and Olson, T. M. (2008) N. Engl. J. Med. 359, 158–165). The frameshift product (fsANP), but not wild-type ANP (wtANP), was elevated in the serum of affected patients, but the molecular basis for the elevated peptide concentrations was not determined. Here, we measured the ability of fsANP to interact with natriuretic peptide receptors and to be proteolytically degraded. fsANP and wtANP bound and activated human NPR-A and NPR-C similarly, whereas fsANP had a slightly increased efficacy for human NPR-B. Proteolytic susceptibility was addressed with novel bioassays that measure the time required for kidney membranes or purified neutral endopeptidase to abolish ANP-dependent activation of NPR-A. The half-life of fsANP was markedly greater than that of wtANP in both assays. Additional membrane proteolysis studies indicated that wtANP and fsANP are preferentially degraded by neutral endopeptidase and serine peptidases, respectively. These data indicate that the familial ANP mutation associated with atrial fibrillation has only minor effects on natriuretic peptide receptor interactions but markedly modifies peptide proteolysis. PMID:19458086

  19. Localization of corin and atrial natriuretic peptide expression in human renal segments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Wang, Hao; Dong, Ningzheng; Zhang, Ce; Xue, Boxin; Wu, Qingyu

    2016-09-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-mediated natriuretic response is a well-established cardiac endocrine function. Corin is a transmembrane protease that activates ANP in the heart. Corin expression has been detected in non-cardiac tissues including the kidney. Here we examined corin, pro-ANP/ANP and natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) expression in human renal segments. By immunostaining and in situ hybridization, we found similar corin, pro-ANP/ANP and NPR-A protein and mRNA expression in human renal segments. The expression was most abundant in the proximal convoluted tubules and the medullary connecting ducts. In the proximal tubules, corin protein was present in the apical membrane region underneath the brush border where the ANP-degrading protease neprilysin was abundant. These results suggest that corin-mediated pro-ANP activation may occur in renal segments and that locally produced ANP may act in an autocrine manner to regulate sodium and water reabsorption in situ Our results also point to the proximal convoluted tubules as a major site for local ANP action. Such a renal corin/ANP autocrine mechanism may differ from the cardiac corin/ANP endocrine mechanism in regulating sodium homoeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27343265

  20. Multiple biomarker strategy based on parathyroid hormone and natriuretic peptides testing for improved prognosis of chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gruson, Damien; Ahn, Sylvie A; Rousseau, Michel F

    2015-02-01

    Biomarkers offer new perspectives for a more personalized management of patients with heart failure (HF). Hyperparathyroidism is common in HF patients and parathyroid hormone (PTH) testing might provide added value for the prognostication of HF patients. Our objectives were therefore to determine the efficiency of multiple biomarker strategy based on PTH and natriuretic peptides measurement for the risk stratification of patients with HF. Circulating concentrations of bioactive PTH 1-84 and natriuretic peptides, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP), were measured with automated immunoassays in 45 healthy individuals and 137 HF patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Circulating levels of PTH 1-84 and natriuretic peptides were significantly increased in HF patients in comparison to HF patients. Over a long-term follow-up, baseline PTH 1-84 levels were related to the risk of cardiovascular death. Furthermore, in multiple biomarker approach, PTH measurement was additive to BNP and NT-proBNP testing for the cardiovascular risk assessment of HF patients. In conclusion, the combination of PTH 1-84 and natriuretic peptides testing improves the prognostication of HF patients and might allowed more personalized approach for risk stratification and treatment selection in HF patients. PMID:25572303

  1. Ligand-Mediated Endocytosis and Intracellular Sequestration of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptors: Role of GDAY Motif

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    The guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), also referred to as GC-A, is a single polypeptide molecule having a critical function in blood pressure regulation and cardiovascular homeostasis. GC-A/NPRA, which resides in the plasma membrane, consists of an extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single transmembrane domain, and an intracellular cytoplasmic region containing a protein kinase-like homology domain (KHD) and a guanylyl cyclase (GC) catalytic domain. After binding with atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP), GC-A/NPRA is internalized and sequestered into intracellular compartments. Therefore, GC-A/NPRA is a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular compartments through its lifetime. This review describes the roles of short-signal sequences in the internalization, trafficking, and intracellular redistribution of GC-A/NPRA from cell surface to cell interior. Evidence indicates that, after internalization, the ligand-receptor complexes dissociate inside the cell and a population of GC-A/NPRA recycles back to the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the disassociated ligands are degraded in the lysosomes. However a small percentage of the ligand escapes the lysosomal degradative pathway and is released intact into culture medium. By using pharmacologic and molecular perturbants, emphasis has been placed on the cellular regulation and processing of ligand-bound GC-A/NPRA in terms of receptor trafficking and down-regulation in intact cells. The discussion is concluded by examining the functions of short-signal sequence motifs in the cellular life-cycle of GC-A/NPRA, including endocytosis, trafficking, metabolic processing, inactivation, and/or down-regulation in model cell systems. PMID:19941037

  2. The role of the renin-angiotensin and natriuretic peptide systems in the pulmonary vasculature.

    PubMed Central

    Cargill, R I; Lipworth, B J

    1995-01-01

    1. The role of vasoactive peptide systems in the pulmonary vasculature has been studied much less extensively than systemic vascular and endocrine effects. The current understanding of the role of the renin-angiotensin (RAS) and natriuretic peptide systems (NPS) in the pulmonary circulation is therefore reviewed. 2. Plasma concentrations of angiotensin II, the main vasoactive component of the RAS, are elevated in pulmonary hypertension and may interact with hypoxaemia to cause further pulmonary vasoconstriction. Pharmacological manipulation of angiotensin II can attenuate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction but larger studies are needed to establish the efficacy of this therapeutic strategy in established pulmonary hypertension. 3. Although all the known natriuretic peptides, ANP, BNP and CNP are elevated in cor pulmonale, only ANP and BNP appear to have pulmonary vasorelaxant activity in humans. ANP and BNP can also attenuate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, suggesting a possible counter-regulatory role for these peptides. Inhibition of ANP/BNP metabolism by neutral endopeptidase has been shown to attenuate development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension but this property has not been tested in humans. 4. It is also well established that there are potentially important endocrine and systemic circulatory interactions between the RAS and NPS. This also occurs in the pulmonary circulation and in humans, where at least BNP acts to attenuate angiotensin II induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. This interaction may be particularly relevant as a mechanism to counter-regulate overactivity of the RAS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8527262

  3. Clinical implications of B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro--B-type natriuretic peptide in the care of the vascular surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Wayne Causey, Marlin; Singh, Niten

    2014-12-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (also known as brain natriuretic peptide or BNP) is a physiologic marker that is often used to assess a patient's global cardiovascular health. BNP is secreted from the ventricular cardiac myocytes in response to stretch that occurs due to increased intravascular volume. PreproBNP is cleaved into BNP and N-terminal proBNP (NT proBNP) to cause diuresis, natriuresis, and vasodilation, and can be measured with a blood laboratory assay test or point-of-care testing. BNP/NT proBNP has been most extensively studied in the diagnosis and management of heart failure, but within the past 5 years, interest has carried over to vascular surgery patients. Studies have demonstrated that elevated levels of BNP/NT-proBNP (typically >100 pg/mL/>300 pg/mL) are associated with major adverse cardiac events at 30 and 180 days. Additional analysis of BNP/NT-proBNP has demonstrated that patients can be classified as very low risk (<19 pg/mL), low risk (<100 pg/mL), intermediate risk (100 to 400 pg/mL), or high risk (>400 pg/mL). BNP/NT-proBNP in the low- and very-low-risk groups suggests patients are unlikely to have a major adverse cardiac event. An elevated BNP/NT-proBNP, excluding those with reasons for abnormal values, suggests the need for additional risk stratification and medical risk factor optimization. A preoperative measure of BNP or NT-proBNP affords an easy and rapid opportunity to individually and objectively quantify perioperative cardiovascular risk. Recent studies have also identified other biomarkers, none superior to BNP or NT-proBNP, but that, when used concomitantly, aid in further stratifying perioperative risk and will likely be the focus of future investigations. PMID:26073822

  4. Brain Natriuretic Peptide: It's Not About the Brain or Just Another Smart Polypeptide--It's About the Heart.

    PubMed

    Carella, Dominick M

    2015-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone with diuretic, natriuretic, and vasodilator properties. Measurement of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations is increasingly used to aid diagnosis, assess prognosis, and tailor treatment in adults with congestive heart failure. Recent studies suggest that the peptide is also useful in pediatric patients. The diagnostic role of plasma BNP in neonates admitted to the NICU has shown promise as an aid in diagnosis in neonates with signs of congenital heart disease; as a biomarker of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, patent ductus arteriosus, and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn; a predictive biomarker of the response to indomethacin in preterm infants; and, more significantly, in acute heart failure. PMID:26803017

  5. Effects of angiotensin, vasopressin and atrial natriuretic peptide on intraocular pressure in anesthetized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, D. E.; Shue, S. G.; Keil, L. C.; Balaban, C. D.; Severs, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), vasopressin (AVP) and angiotensin (ANG) on blood and intraocular pressures of pentobarbital anesthetized rats were evaluated following intravenous, intracerebroventricular or anterior chamber routes of administration. Central injections did not affect intraocular pressure. Equipressor intravenous infusions of ANG raised, whereas AVP decreased, intraocular pressure. Direct infusions of a balanced salt solution (0.175 microliter/min) raised intraocular pressure between 30 and 60 min. Adding ANG or ANP slightly reduced this solvent effect but AVP was markedly inhibitory. An AVP-V1 receptor antagonist reversed the blunting of the solvent-induced rise by the peptide, indicating receptor specificity. Acetazolamide pretreatment lowered intraocular pressure, but the solvent-induced rise in intraocular pressure and inhibition by AVP still occurred without altering the temporal pattern. Thus, these effects appear unrelated to aqueous humor synthesis rate. The data support the possibility of intraocular pressure regulation by peptides acting from the blood and aqueous humor.

  6. Effect of exercise training on cardiac oxytocin and natriuretic peptide systems in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Gutkowska, Jolanta; Paquette, Amélie; Wang, Donghao; Lavoie, Jean-Marc; Jankowski, Marek

    2007-07-01

    Exercise training results in cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations that may be beneficial in menopausal women by reducing blood pressure, insulin resistance, and cholesterol level. The adaptation of the cardiac hormonal systems oxytocin (OT), natriuretic peptides (NPs), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in response to exercise training was investigated in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Ovariectomy significantly augmented body weight (BW), left ventricle (LV) mass, and intra-abdominal fat pad weight and decreased the expression of oxytocin receptor (OTR), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A), in the right atrium (RA) and LV, indicating estrogenic control of these genes. These effects of ovariectomy were counteracted by 8-wk-long exercise training which decreased fat pad weight (33.4 +/- 2.3 to 23.4 +/- 3.1 g, n = 8, P < 0.05), plasma free fatty acids (0.124 +/- 0.033 to 0.057 +/- 0.010 mM, n = 8, P < 0.01), and plasma triacylglycerol (0.978 +/- 0.174 to 0.588 +/- 0.115 mM, n = 8, P < 0.05). Chronic exercise tended to decrease BW and stimulated ANP (4- to 5-fold) and OTR gene expression in the LV and RA and BNP and inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA in the LV. In sham-operated rats, exercise augmented ANP expression in the RA, downregulated GC-A mRNA in the LV and RA, but increased its expression threefold in the RA of OVX animals. Endothelial NOS and iNOS expression was enhanced in the left atrium of sham-operated rats. Altogether, these data indicate that in OVX animals, chronic exercise significantly enhances cardiac OT, NPs, and NOS, thus implicating all three hormonal systems in the beneficial effects of exercise training. PMID:17475680

  7. Biological actions of brain natriuretic peptide in thoracic inferior vena caval constriction.

    PubMed

    Clavell, A L; Stingo, A J; Aarhus, L L; Burnett, J C

    1993-12-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) shares structural and functional similarities to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Although BNP and ANP interact with the same biologically active guanylate cyclase-coupled receptor, recent reports conflict with regard to the biological actions of exogenous BNP in sodium-retaining and edematous states. We studied the biological actions of BNP in normal dogs (n = 5) and sodium-avid dogs with chronic thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC) (n = 6). In normal dogs BNP increased glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, and urinary sodium excretion and decreased proximal and distal fractional reabsorption of sodium with activation of urinary guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). These renal actions occurred in association with marked hypotensive actions and activation of systemic cGMP. In TIVCC, a state characterized by chronic reductions of cardiac output, avid sodium retention, edema, and activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), the renal actions of BNP were absent in association with marked attenuation of the urinary cGMP response. In contrast, an enhanced hypotensive response with preserved activation of systemic cGMP was observed. In neither normal dogs nor TIVCC dogs did BNP inhibit the RAAS. These studies report that BNP is a potent vasoactive and natriuretic peptide with potent proximal and distal tubular actions in normal dogs. These studies also demonstrate that in TIVCC, a model of low cardiac output and congestive failure that results in marked sodium retention with edema in which there is activation of the RAAS, the renal actions of BNP are attenuated while the vasoactive actions are enhanced. PMID:8285286

  8. Endothelial NO/cGMP system contributes to natriuretic peptide-mediated coronary and peripheral vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Brunner, F; Wölkart, G

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the endothelial nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylyl cyclase system is involved in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) mediated regulation of coronary and peripheral vascular resistance. Rat hearts were perfused via the aorta at constant flow and the effect of ANP and CNP on coronary perfusion pressure and release of cGMP was determined in the absence and presence of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA; 0.2 mmol/L) and the specific inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase ODQ (20 micromol/L), respectively (n = 6). ANP (10-300 nmol/L) reduced perfusion pressure from 133 +/- 2 to 53 +/- 2 mm Hg (-60%; control) in the presence of L-NNA from 132 +/- 1 to 71 +/- 1 mm Hg (-46%) and in the presence of ODQ from 133 +/- 1 to 85 +/- 2 (-36%) (n = 6; P < 0.05). Disruption of the coronary endothelium by perfusion of hearts with collagenase reduced the relaxant effect of ANP to a similar extent as L-NNA. Basal release of cGMP was increased up to sixfold by ANP and this increase was reduced by L-NNA and ODQ (n = 6; P < 0.05). The coronary relaxant effect of CNP (0.1-3 micromol/L) was similarly attenuated by L-NNA and ODQ (n = 6). In conscious mice, a low dose of L-NNA (30 nmol) consistently reduced the blood pressure lowering effect of ANP (30 nmol) by approximately 40% (n = 7), whereas the hypotensive effect of nitroprusside (0.15 micromol) was not affected (n = 5). We conclude that the coronary dilatory and hypotensive action of natriuretic peptides involves the endothelium and is partly mediated by soluble guanylyl cyclase. The data may explain previous observations in humans with congestive heart failure showing impaired vascular ANP responses. PMID:11162200

  9. B and C types natriuretic peptides modulate norepinephrine uptake and release in the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Vatta, M S; Presas, M; Bianciotti, L G; Zarrabeitia, V; Fernández, B E

    1996-09-16

    We previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) regulates catecholamine metabolism in the central nervous system. ANF, B and C types natriuretic peptides (BNP and CNP) also play a regulatory role in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular activity and hormonal and neuro-hormonal secretions. The aim of the present work was to investigate BNP and CNP effects on the uptake and release of norepinephrine (NE) in rat hypothalamic slices incubated in vitro. Results showed that BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 nM) enhanced total and neuronal [3H]NE uptake but did not modify non-neuronal uptake. BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1 nM) caused a rapid increase in NE uptake (1 min), which was sustained for 60 min. BNP (100 nM) did not modify the intracellular distribution of NE; however, 1 nM CNP increased the granular store and decreased the cytosolic pool of NE. BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 nM), diminished spontaneous NE release. In addition, BNP (1, 10, 100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 pM, as well as 1, 10 and 100 nM) reduced NE output induced by 25 mM KCl. These results suggest that BNP and CNP may be involved in the regulation of several central as well as peripheral physiological functions through the modulation of noradrenergic neurotransmission at the presynaptic neuronal level. Present results provide evidence to consider CNP as the brain natriuretic peptide since physiological concentrations of this peptide (pM) diminished NE evoked release. PMID:8897640

  10. [ATRIAL AND BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES OF CARDIAC MUSCLE CELLS IN POSTREPERFUSION PERIOD IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Bugrova, M L

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation and release of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in right atrial cardiac muscle cells has been investigated in rats after 60 minutes and 60 days after the reperfusion start. The total ischemia was simulated by the method of V. G. Korpachev. Immunocytochemical localization of peptides in cardiomyocytes was performed in ultrathin sections using polyclonal antibodies. The intensity of accumulation/excretion of ANP and BNP were analyzed by the method of counting the number of granules (A- and B-types) with immunoreactive labels in 38 x 38 mkm2 visual fields in transmission electron microscope Morgagni 268D (FEI). The results were assessed using Mann-Whitney U-test (p < 0.05). After 60 minutes and 60 days post-reperfusion period, we detected an increase in the synthesis and release of ANP and BNP. The reaction of BNP was more pronounced than ANP. This is due to the fact that ANP is the main hormone of the natriuretic peptide system involved in the regulation of blood pressure in normal conditions, while BNP is the principal regulator of pressure in cardiovascular pathology. PMID:27228659

  11. The precursor to B-type natriuretic peptide is an O-linked glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Ute; O'Rear, Jessica; Guzzetta, Andrew; Jue, Rodney A; Protter, Andrew A; Pollitt, N Stephen

    2006-07-15

    Human pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP), the precursor for B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) and compared by Western blot analysis to BNP cross-reacting material immunoprecipitated from the plasma of heart failure patients. Both recombinant and native forms co-migrated as a diffuse band centered around 25 kDa and were reduced to a 12 kDa species by treatment with a mixture of O-link deglycosylation enzymes. The 108-amino acid CHO-expressed protein was examined by tryptic mapping and LC-MS and found to be an O-linked glycoprotein. Determination of the sites of O-glycosyl addition by blank cycle sequencing of tryptic and Glu-C (Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease) peptides showed that there are seven sites of glycosylation confined to a 36-amino acid residue stretch within the center of the propeptide region. This data is consistent with previous observations of higher molecular weight isoforms of BNP. PMID:16750161

  12. C-type natriuretic peptide modulates quorum sensing molecule and toxin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Blier, Anne-Sophie; Veron, Wilfried; Bazire, Alexis; Gerault, Eloïse; Taupin, Laure; Vieillard, Julien; Rehel, Karine; Dufour, Alain; Le Derf, Franck; Orange, Nicole; Hulen, Christian; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Lesouhaitier, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinates its virulence expression and establishment in the host in response to modification of its environment. During the infectious process, bacteria are exposed to and can detect eukaryotic products including hormones. It has been shown that P. aeruginosa is sensitive to natriuretic peptides, a family of eukaryotic hormones, through a cyclic nucleotide-dependent sensor system that modulates its cytotoxicity. We observed that pre-treatment of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) increases the capacity of the bacteria to kill Caenorhabditis elegans through diffusive toxin production. In contrast, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) did not affect the capacity of the bacteria to kill C. elegans. The bacterial production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was enhanced by both BNP and CNP whereas the production of phenazine pyocyanin was strongly inhibited by CNP. The amount of 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ), a precursor to 2-heptyl-3-hydroxyl-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas quinolone signal; PQS), decreased after CNP treatment. The quantity of 2-nonyl-4-quinolone (HNQ), another quinolone which is synthesized from HHQ, was also reduced after CNP treatment. Conversely, both BNP and CNP significantly enhanced bacterial production of acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) [e.g. 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) and butanoylhomoserine lactone (C4-HSL)]. These results correlate with an induction of lasI transcription 1 h after bacterial exposure to BNP or CNP. Concurrently, pre-treatment of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with either BNP or CNP enhanced PAO1 exotoxin A production, via a higher toxA mRNA level. At the same time, CNP led to elevated amounts of algC mRNA, indicating that algC is involved in C. elegans killing. Finally, we observed that in PAO1, Vfr protein is essential to the pro-virulent effect of CNP whereas the regulator PtxR supports only a part of the CNP pro-virulent activity. Taken together, these data reinforce the hypothesis that during

  13. C-type natriuretic peptide modulates quorum sensing molecule and toxin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Blier, Anne-Sophie; Veron, Wilfried; Bazire, Alexis; Gerault, Eloïse; Taupin, Laure; Vieillard, Julien; Rehel, Karine; Dufour, Alain; Le Derf, Franck; Orange, Nicole; Hulen, Christian; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinates its virulence expression and establishment in the host in response to modification of its environment. During the infectious process, bacteria are exposed to and can detect eukaryotic products including hormones. It has been shown that P. aeruginosa is sensitive to natriuretic peptides, a family of eukaryotic hormones, through a cyclic nucleotide-dependent sensor system that modulates its cytotoxicity. We observed that pre-treatment of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) increases the capacity of the bacteria to kill Caenorhabditis elegans through diffusive toxin production. In contrast, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) did not affect the capacity of the bacteria to kill C. elegans. The bacterial production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was enhanced by both BNP and CNP whereas the production of phenazine pyocyanin was strongly inhibited by CNP. The amount of 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ), a precursor to 2-heptyl-3-hydroxyl-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas quinolone signal; PQS), decreased after CNP treatment. The quantity of 2-nonyl-4-quinolone (HNQ), another quinolone which is synthesized from HHQ, was also reduced after CNP treatment. Conversely, both BNP and CNP significantly enhanced bacterial production of acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) [e.g. 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) and butanoylhomoserine lactone (C4-HSL)]. These results correlate with an induction of lasI transcription 1 h after bacterial exposure to BNP or CNP. Concurrently, pre-treatment of P. aeruginosa PAO1 with either BNP or CNP enhanced PAO1 exotoxin A production, via a higher toxA mRNA level. At the same time, CNP led to elevated amounts of algC mRNA, indicating that algC is involved in C. elegans killing. Finally, we observed that in PAO1, Vfr protein is essential to the pro-virulent effect of CNP whereas the regulator PtxR supports only a part of the CNP pro-virulent activity. Taken together, these data reinforce the hypothesis that during

  14. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  15. A Constitutively “Phosphorylated” Guanylyl Cyclase-linked Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Mutant Is Resistant to Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Lincoln R.; Hunter, Tony

    1999-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of the natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is hypothesized to mediate its desensitization in response to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding. Recently, we identified six phosphorylation sites within the kinase homology domain of NPR-A and determined that the conversion of these residues to alanine abolished the ability of the receptor to be phosphorylated or to be activated by ANP and ATP. In an attempt to generate a form of NPR-A that mimics a fully phosphorylated receptor but that is resistant to dephosphorylation, we engineered a receptor variant (NPR-A-6E) containing glutamate substitutions at all six phosphorylation sites. Consistent with the known ability of negatively charged glutamate residues to substitute functionally, in some cases, for phosphorylated residues, we found that NPR-A-6E was activated 10-fold by ANP and ATP. As determined by guanylyl cyclase assays, the hormone-stimulated activity of the wild-type receptor declined over time in membrane preparations in vitro, and this loss was blocked by the serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor microcystin. In contrast, the activity of NPR-A-6E was more linear with time and was unaffected by microcystin. The nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue adenosine 5′-(β,γ-imino)-triphosphate was half as effective as ATP in stimulating the wild-type receptor but was equally as potent in stimulating NPR-A-6E, suggesting that ATP is required to keep the wild-type but not 6E variant phosphorylated. Finally, the desensitization of NPR-A-6E in whole cells was markedly blunted compared with that of the wild-type receptor, consistent with its inability to shed the negative charge from its kinase homology domain via dephosphorylation. These data provide the first direct test of the requirement for dephosphorylation in guanylyl cyclase desensitization and they indicate that it is an essential component of this process. PMID:10359598

  16. Plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides in patients with adrenal pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    HU, WEI; SHI, LEI; ZHOU, PANG-HU; ZHANG, XIAO-BIN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate any changes in the plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin (ADM), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with adrenal pheochromocytoma (PC). The plasma concentrations of the three peptides were measured in 45 healthy control individuals and 90 untreated patients with PC, who consisted of 20 normotensive patients, 30 borderline hypertensive patients and 40 hypertensive patients. After 4 weeks of effective antihypertensive therapy for hypertensive PC patients, the concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP were measured again, and laparoscopic adrenalectomy was then performed for all PC patients with values that were measured 2 weeks later. The plasma concentrations of the three peptides were significantly increased in the borderline hypertensive and hypertensive patients compared with the concentrations in control individuals and normotensive patients. In addition, there were significant differences between the levels of ADM, ANP and BNP in the borderline and hypertensive groups. The plasma ADM concentration was not associated with the blood urea nitrogen levels, serum creatinine levels or glomerular filtration rate, but was correlated with the serum epinephrine, serum norepinephrine and urine vanillylmandelic acid levels. In addition, the ADM concentration was associated with the systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular mass index and plasma concentrations of ANP and BNP in the hypertensive patients with PC. After 4 weeks of antihypertensive treatment, the values of the three peptides in the hypertensive patients with PC were not significantly changed. As expected, the values in borderline and hypertensive groups were significantly decreased 2 weeks subsequent to surgery, whereas there were no significant changes in the normotensive group. ADM may participate, along with ANP and BNP, in the mechanisms that counteract further elevation

  17. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates agonist-induced pulmonary edema in mice with targeted disruption of the gene for natriuretic peptide receptor-A

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Whei; Green, Sabrina; Grinnell, Katie L.; Machan, Jason T.; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits agonist-induced pulmonary edema formation, but the signaling pathway responsible is not well defined. To investigate the role of the particulate guanylate cyclase-linked receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), we measured acute lung injury responses in intact mice and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) with normal and disrupted expression of NPR-A. NPR-A wild-type (NPR-A+/+), heterozygous (NPR-A+/−), and knockout (NPR-A−/−) mice were anesthetized and treated with thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lung injury was assessed by lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight and by protein and cell concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. No difference in pulmonary edema formation was seen between NPR-A genotypes under baseline conditions. TRAP and LPS increased lung W/D weight and BAL fluid cell counts more in NPR-A−/− mice than in NPR-A+/− or NPR-A+/+ mice, but no genotype-related differences were seen in TRAP-induced increases in bloodless lung W/D weight or LPS-induced increases in BAL protein concentration. Pretreatment with ANP infusion completely blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and blunted LPS-induced increases in BAL cell counts and protein concentration in both NPR-A−/− and NPR-A+/+ mice. Thrombin decreased transmembrane electrical resistance in monolayers of PMVECs in vitro, and this effect was attenuated by ANP in PMVECs isolated from both genotypes. Administration of the NPR-C-specific ligand, cANF, also blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and LPS-induced increases in BAL cell count and protein concentration in NPR-A+/+ and NPR-A−/− mice. We conclude that ANP is capable of attenuating agonist-induced lung edema in the absence of NPR-A. The protective effect of ANP on agonist-induced lung injury and pulmonary barrier function may be mediated by NPR-C. PMID:23195629

  18. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates agonist-induced pulmonary edema in mice with targeted disruption of the gene for natriuretic peptide receptor-A.

    PubMed

    Klinger, James R; Tsai, Shu-Whei; Green, Sabrina; Grinnell, Katie L; Machan, Jason T; Harrington, Elizabeth O

    2013-02-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits agonist-induced pulmonary edema formation, but the signaling pathway responsible is not well defined. To investigate the role of the particulate guanylate cyclase-linked receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), we measured acute lung injury responses in intact mice and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) with normal and disrupted expression of NPR-A. NPR-A wild-type (NPR-A+/+), heterozygous (NPR-A+/-), and knockout (NPR-A-/-) mice were anesthetized and treated with thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lung injury was assessed by lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight and by protein and cell concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. No difference in pulmonary edema formation was seen between NPR-A genotypes under baseline conditions. TRAP and LPS increased lung W/D weight and BAL fluid cell counts more in NPR-A-/- mice than in NPR-A+/- or NPR-A+/+ mice, but no genotype-related differences were seen in TRAP-induced increases in bloodless lung W/D weight or LPS-induced increases in BAL protein concentration. Pretreatment with ANP infusion completely blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and blunted LPS-induced increases in BAL cell counts and protein concentration in both NPR-A-/- and NPR-A+/+ mice. Thrombin decreased transmembrane electrical resistance in monolayers of PMVECs in vitro, and this effect was attenuated by ANP in PMVECs isolated from both genotypes. Administration of the NPR-C-specific ligand, cANF, also blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and LPS-induced increases in BAL cell count and protein concentration in NPR-A+/+ and NPR-A-/- mice. We conclude that ANP is capable of attenuating agonist-induced lung edema in the absence of NPR-A. The protective effect of ANP on agonist-induced lung injury and pulmonary barrier function may be mediated by NPR-C. PMID:23195629

  19. Differential response of C-type natriuretic peptide to estrogen and dexamethasone in adult bone.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Timothy C R; Wellby, Martin; Barrell, Graham K; Richards, A Mark; Espiner, Eric A

    2014-09-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is crucial in promoting endochondral bone growth in mammals including humans but whether this paracrine hormone participates in maintaining bone integrity in the mature skeleton is unknown. Accordingly we studied changes in plasma and bone tissue CNP in anoestrus adult ewes receiving short term anabolic (estrogen) or catabolic (dexamethasone) treatment for 7days. CNP and the aminoterminal fragment of the CNP prohormone (NTproCNP) were measured in plasma and extracts of cancellous bone excised from vertebral, iliac, tibial and marrow tissues. Concentrations of CNP peptides were much higher in vertebral and iliac extracts than those of tibial or marrow. Both plasma CNP and NTproCNP increased rapidly after estrogen followed by a later rise in bone alkaline phosphatase. Vertebral and iliac (but not tibial or marrow) CNP peptide content were significantly increased by estrogen. Consistent with a skeletal source, plasma NTproCNP was significantly associated with vertebral tissue CNP. In contrast, bone tissue CNP peptide content was unaffected by dexamethasone despite suppression of plasma CNP peptides and bone alkaline phosphatase. We postulate that increases in trabecular bone CNP reflect new endosteal bone formation in these estrogen responsive tissues whereas reduced plasma CNP peptides after dexamethasone, without change in cancellous bone content, reflects reductions in cortical bone turnover. PMID:24880122

  20. The Functional Genomics of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Perspectives and Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac hormones atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) activate guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produce the second messenger cGMP. The GC-A/NPRA is a member of the growing family of GC receptors. The recent biochemical, molecular, and genomic studies of GC-A/NPRA have provided important insights into the regulation and functional activity of this receptor protein with a particular emphasis on cardiac and renal protective roles in hypertension and cardiovascular disease states. The progress in this field of research has significantly strengthened and advanced our knowledge about the critical roles of Npr1 gene (coding for GC-A/NPRA) in control of fluid volume, blood pressure, cardiac remodeling, and other physiological functions and pathological states. Overall, this review attempts to provide insight and to delineate the current concepts in the field of functional genomics and signaling of GC-A/NPRA in hypertension and cardiovascular disease states at the molecular level. PMID:21375691

  1. Emerging Roles of Natriuretic Peptides and their Receptors in Pathophysiology of Hypertension and Cardiovascular Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2009-01-01

    Thus far, three related natriuretic peptides (NPs) and three distinct receptors have been identified, which have advanced our knowledge towards understanding the control of high blood pressure, hypertension, and cardiovascular disorders to a great extent. Biochemical and molecular studies have been advanced to examine receptor function and signaling mechanisms and the role of second messenger cGMP in pathophysiology of hypertension, renal hemodynamics, and cardiovascular functions. The development of gene-knockout and gene-duplication mouse models along with transgenic mice have provided a framework for understanding the importance of the antagonistic actions of natriuretic peptides receptor in cardiovascular events at the molecular level. Now, NPs are considered as circulating markers of congestive heart failure, however, their therapeutic potential for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, renal insufficiency, cardiac hypertrophy, congestive heart failure, and stroke has just begun to unfold. Indeed, the alternative avenues of investigations in this important are need to be undertaken, as we are at the initial stage of the molecular therapeutic and pharmacogenomic implications. PMID:19746200

  2. Neutral endopeptidase inhibition and the natriuretic peptide system: an evolving strategy in cardiovascular therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mangiafico, Sarah; Costello-Boerrigter, Lisa C.; Andersen, Ingrid A.; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Burnett, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension and heart failure (HF) are common diseases that, despite advances in medical therapy, continue to be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, innovative therapeutic strategies are needed. Inhibition of the neutral endopeptidase (NEPinh) had been investigated as a potential novel therapeutic approach because of its ability to increase the plasma concentrations of the natriuretic peptides (NPs). Indeed, the NPs have potent natriuretic and vasodilator properties, inhibit the activity of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, lower sympathetic drive, and have antiproliferative and antihypertrophic effects. Such potentially beneficial effects can be theoretically achieved by the use of NEPinh. However, studies have shown that NEPinh alone does not result in clinically meaningful blood pressure-lowering actions. More recently, NEPinh has been used in combination with other cardiovascular agents, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and antagonists of the angiotensin receptor. Another future possible combination would be the use of NEPinh with NPs or their newly developed chimeric peptides. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the use and effects of NEPinh alone or in combination with other therapeutic agents for the treatment of human cardiovascular disease such as HF and hypertension. PMID:22942338

  3. B and C types natriuretic peptides modify norepinephrine uptake and release in the rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Vatta, M S; Presas, M F; Bianciotti, L G; Rodriguez-Fermepin, M; Ambros, R; Fernandez, B E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) modulates adrenomedullar norepinephrine (NE) metabolism. On this basis, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of B and C types natriuretic peptides (BNP and CNP) on the uptake, intracellular distribution and release of 3H-NE. Experiments were carried out in rat adrenal medulla slices incubated "in vitro." Results showed that 100 nM of both, CNP and BNP, enhanced total and neuronal NE uptake. Both peptides (100 nM) caused a rapid increase in NE uptake during the first minute, which was sustained for 60 min. NE intracellular distribution was only modified by CNP (100 nM), which increased the granular fraction and decreased the cytosolic pool. On the other hand, spontaneous as well as evoked (KCl) NE release, was decreased by BNP and CNP (50 and 100 nM for spontaneous release and 1, 10, 50 and 100 nM for evoked output). The present results suggest that BNP and CNP may regulate catecholamine secretion and modulate adrenomedullary biological actions mediated by catecholamines, such as blood arterial pressure, smooth muscle tone, and metabolic activities. PMID:9437706

  4. Effect of dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) on L-type calcium channel current and its pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Ying; Cai, Zheng-Xu; Li, Ping; Cai, Chun-Yu; Qu, Cheng-Long; Guo, Hui-Shu

    2010-09-24

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), a newly-described natriuretic peptide, relaxes gastrointestinal smooth muscle. L-type calcium channel currents play an important role in regulating smooth muscle contraction. The effect of DNP on L-type calcium channel currents in gastrointestinal tract is still unclear. This study was designed to investigate the effect of DNP on barium current (I(Ba)) through the L-type calcium channel in gastric antral myocytes of guinea pigs and cGMP-pathway mechanism. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record L-type calcium channel currents. The content of cGMP in guinea pig gastric antral smooth muscle and perfusion solution was measured using radioimmunoassay. DNP markedly enhanced cGMP levels in gastric antral smooth muscle tissue and in perfusion medium. DNP concentration-dependently inhibited I(Ba) in freshly isolated guinea pig gastric antral circular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of guinea pigs. DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba) was partially blocked by LY83583, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase. KT5823, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor, almost completely blocked DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba). However, DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba) was potentiated by zaprinast, an inhibitor of cGMP-sensitive phosphodiesterase. Taken together, DNP inhibits L-type calcium channel currents via pGC-cGMP-PKG-dependent signal pathway in gastric antral myocytes of guinea pigs. PMID:20594955

  5. A perspective on the role of natriuretic peptides in amphibian osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Donald, John A; Trajanovska, Sofie

    2006-05-15

    The natriuretic peptide (NP) system is a complex family of peptides and receptors that is primarily linked to the maintenance of osmotic and cardiovascular homeostasis. In amphibians, the potential role(s) of NPs is complicated by the range of osmoregulatory strategies found in amphibians, and the different tissues that participate in osmoregulation. Atrial NP, brain NP, and C-type NP have been isolated or cloned from a number of species, which has enabled physiological studies to be performed with homologous peptides. In addition, three types of NP receptors have been cloned and partially characterised. Natriuretic peptides are always potent vasodilators in amphibian blood vessels, and ANP has been shown to increase the permeability of the microcirculation. In the perfused kidney, ANP causes vasodilation, diuresis and natriuresis that are caused by an increased GFR rather than effects in the renal tubules. These data are supported by the presence of ANP receptors only on the glomeruli and renal blood vessels. In the bladder and skin, the function of NPs is enigmatic because physiological analysis of the effects of ANP on bladder and skin function has yielded conflicting data with no clear role for NPs being revealed. Overall, NPs often have no direct effect, but in some studies they have been shown to inhibit the function of AVT. In addition, there is evidence that ANP can inhibit salt retention in amphibians since it can inhibit the ability of adrenocorticotrophic hormone or angiotensin II to stimulate corticosteroid secretion. It is proposed that an important role for cardiac NPs could be in the control of hypervolaemia during periods of rapid rehydration, which occurs in terrestrial amphibians. PMID:16343494

  6. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  7. Monitoring B-type natriuretic peptide in patients undergoing therapy with neprilysin inhibitors. An emerging challenge?

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian

    2016-09-15

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is primarily synthesized by the ventricles of the heart as a 108-amino acid polypeptide precursor (i.e., proBNP), which is then cleaved into a 76-amino acid biologically inert N-terminal fragment (NT-proBNP) and a biologically active 32-amino acid peptide (BNP). The generation of BNP is considerably enhanced in response to high ventricular filling pressures, so that the measurement of either the active hormone or NT-proBNP has become a mainstay in patients with congestive heart failure. Recent evidence was brought that the enzyme neprilysin efficiently degrades circulating BNP in vivo, whereas proBNP and NT-proBNP are virtually resistant to enzymatic cleavage. Increasing emphasis is currently placed on the fact that that measuring BNP in patients taking the novel and promising neprilysin inhibitors such as LCZ696 may not reliably reflect cardiac dysfunction. Since laboratory monitoring in patients with heart failure should be aimed to define the role of BNP in modulating fluid hemostasis and cardiac remodeling, but natriuretic peptides should also serve as reliable biomarkers of cardiac function and treatment response in these patients, the assessment of neither BNP nor NT-proBNP alone provides a comprehensive biological and clinical picture. Therefore, it seems reasonable to suggest both BNP and the neprilysin-resistant peptide NT-proBNP should be concomitantly assessed in patients with heart failure who take neprilysin inhibitors, so allowing to concomitantly monitor the progression of heart failure and to assess the actual cardiorenal potency of circulating BNP. PMID:27317994

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide stimulates salt secretion by shark rectal gland by releasing VIP

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, P.; Stoff, J.S.; Solomon, R.J.; Lear, S.; Kniaz, D.; Greger, R.; Epstein, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Salt secretion by the isolated perfused rectal gland of the spiny dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, is stimulated by synthetic rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP II) as well as extracts of shark heart, but not by 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. Cardiac peptides have no effect on isolated rectal gland cells or perfused tubules, suggesting that stimulation requires an intact gland. The stimulation of secretion by ANP II is eliminated by maneuvers that block neurotransmitter release. Cardiac peptides stimulate the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), known to be present in rectal glands nerves, into the venous effluent of perfused glands in parallel with their stimulation of salt secretion, but the release of VIP induced by ANP II is prevented by perfusion with procaine. VIP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cardiac peptides thus appear to regulate rectal gland secretion by releasing VIP from neural stores within the gland. It is possible that other physiological effects of these hormones might be explained by an action to enhanced local release of neurotransmitters.

  9. Impact of Modifiable Risk Factors on B-type Natriuretic Peptide and Cardiac Troponin T Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pratyaksh K; Pradhan, Aruna D; Cook, Nancy R; Ridker, Paul M; Everett, Brendan M

    2016-02-01

    Alcohol use, physical activity, diet, and cigarette smoking are modifiable cardiovascular risk factors that have a substantial impact on the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death. We hypothesized that these behaviors may alter concentrations of cardiac troponin, a marker of myocyte injury, and B-type natriuretic peptide, a marker of myocyte stress. Both markers have shown strong association with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In 519 women with no evidence of cardiovascular disease, we measured circulating concentrations of cardiac troponin T, using a high-sensitivity assay (hsTnT), and the N-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). We used logistic regression to determine if these behaviors were associated with hsTnT ≥ 3 ng/l or with NT-proBNP in the highest quartile (≥ 127.3 ng/l). The median (Q1 to Q3) NT-proBNP of the cohort was 68.8 ng/l (40.3 to 127.3 ng/l), and 30.8% (160 of 519) of the cohort had circulating hsTnT ≥ 3 ng/l. In adjusted models, women who drank 1 to 6 drinks/week had lower odds of having a hsTnT ≥ 3 ng/l (odds ratio 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.34 to 0.96) and lower odds of having an elevated NT-proBNP (odds ratio 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 0.96). We were subsequently able to validate the results for B-type natriuretic peptide in a large independent cohort. In conclusion, our results suggest that regular alcohol consumption is associated with lower concentrations of hsTnT and NT-proBNP, 2 cardiovascular biomarkers associated with cardiovascular risk, and raise the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of alcohol consumption may be mediated by direct effects on the myocardium. PMID:26739393

  10. The potential value of integrated natriuretic peptide and echo-guided heart failure management.

    PubMed

    Scali, Maria Chiara; Simioniuc, Anca; Dini, Frank Lloyd; Marzilli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in guiding Heart Failure (HF) therapy with Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) or N-terminal prohormone of Brain Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP), with the goal of lowering concentrations of these markers (and maintaining their suppression) as part of the therapeutic approach in HF. However, recent European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and American Heart Association/ American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) guidelines did not recommend biomarker-guided therapy in the management of HF patients. This has likely to do with the conceptual, methodological, and practical limitations of the Natriuretic Peptides (NP)-based approach, including biological variability, slow time-course, poor specificity, cost and venipuncture, as well as to the lack of conclusive scientific evidence after 15 years of intensive scientific work and industry investment in the field. An increase in NP can be associated with accumulation of extra-vascular lung water, which is a sign of impending acute heart failure. If this is the case, an higher dose of loop diuretics will improve symptoms. However, if no lung congestion is present, diuretics will show no benefit and even harm. It is only a combined clinical, bio-humoral (for instance with evaluation of renal function) and echocardiographic assessment which may unmask the pathophysiological (and possibly therapeutic) heterogeneity underlying the same clinical and NP picture. Increase in B-lines will trigger increase of loop diuretics (or dialysis); the marked increase in mitral insufficiency (at baseline or during exercise) will lead to increase in vasodilators and to consider mitral valve repair; the presence of substantial inotropic reserve during stress will give a substantially higher chance of benefit to beta-blocker or Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT). To each patient its own therapy, not with a "blind date" with symptoms and NP and carpet bombing with drugs, but with an open-eye targeted approach on the

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide infusion in chronic heart failure in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kohzuki, M; Hodsman, G P; Harrison, R W; Western, P S; Johnston, C I

    1989-01-01

    The natriuretic, diuretic, and hypotensive responses to infused atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were measured in rats 4 weeks after myocardial infarction induced by coronary artery ligation. Rat [1-28]-ANP was infused intravenously in doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 microgram/kg/min for 30 min each under pentobarbital anesthesia. There was a marked natriuresis, diuresis, and fall in blood pressure in rats with infarction but each response was significantly attenuated when compared with sham-operated controls (ANOVA: p less than 0.01, p less than 0.05, and p less than 0.01, respectively). Urinary cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) excretion in rats with infarction was higher than that of controls but rose to the same absolute level in both groups in response to ANP infusion (0.3 microgram/kg/min). Reduced ANP responsiveness may result from impaired postreceptor mechanisms or from physiological antagonism by angiotensin II. Reduced ANP responsiveness may partly explain impaired salt handling in heart failure. PMID:2473348

  12. Characterization of solubilized atrial natriuretic peptide receptors from rat olfactory bulb and A10 cultured smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, T.R.; Zyskind, A.D.; Glembotski, C.C.

    1988-08-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors from A10 cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and rat olfactory bulbs have been solubilized and then pharmacologically and biochemically compared. The dissociation constant for 125I-ANP(99-126) was 12.7 pM for the VSMC-derived receptor and 164 pM for the olfactory receptor. Competition binding between 125I-ANP(99-126) and several unlabeled ANP analogs with the soluble olfactory receptor, demonstrated a rank order potency of ANP(99-126) = ANP(103-126) much greater than ANP(103-123). However, the rank order potency of the soluble VSMC ANP receptor was ANP(99-126) = ANP(103-126) = ANP(103-123). Therefore, the olfactory ANP receptor appears to require the complete COOH-terminal sequence of ANP as compared with the VSMC ANP receptor. When the 2 soluble receptor preparations were applied to a GTP-agarose column, a portion of the olfactory ANP receptor was retained on the column and could be eluted with 5 mM GTP, while the VSMC ANP receptor did not adsorb to the column. Since the olfactory bulb ANP receptor has been shown to contain a binding component of 116 kDa, while the VSMC ANP receptor binding component is 66 kDa, these receptors appear to be similar to the 2 receptor classes described recently in which the 120 kDa receptor that binds GTP is postulated to be coupled to guanylate cyclase, while the 60 kDa receptor does not bind GTP, is not coupled to guanylate cyclase, and may possess a hormone clearance function. Taken together, these data indicate that cyclic GMP appears to be a second messenger for ANP in the brain.

  13. Ammonia inhibits the C-type natriuretic peptide-dependent cyclic GMP synthesis and calcium accumulation in a rat brain endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Konopacka, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena; Albrecht, Jan

    2008-05-01

    Recently we reported a decrease of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-dependent, natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP (cGMP) synthesis in a non-neuronal compartment of cerebral cortical slices of hyperammonemic rats [Zielińska, M., Fresko, I., Konopacka, A., Felipo, V., Albrecht, J., 2007. Hyperammonemia inhibits the natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP synthesis in the astrocytic compartment of rat cerebral cortex slices. Neurotoxicology 28, 1260-1263]. Here we accounted for the possible involvement of cerebral capillary endothelial cells in this response by measuring the effect of ammonia on the CNP-mediated cGMP formation and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) accumulation in a rat cerebral endothelial cell line (RBE-4). We first established that stimulation of cGMP synthesis in RBE-4 cells was coupled to protein kinase G (PKG)-mediated Ca2+ influx from the medium which was inhibited by an L-type channel blocker nimodipine. Ammonia treatment (1h, 5mM NH4Cl) evoked a substantial decrease of CNP-stimulated cGMP synthesis which was related to a decreased binding of CNP to NPR2 receptors, and depressed the CNP-dependent [Ca2+]i accumulation in these cells. Ammonia also abolished the CNP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation in the absence of Na+. In cells incubated with ammonia in the absence of Ca2+ a slight CNP-dependent increase of [Ca2+]i was observed, most likely representing Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Depression of CNP-dependent cGMP-mediated [Ca2+]i accumulation may contribute to cerebral vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with hyperammonemia or hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:18222015

  14. A review on B-type natriuretic peptide monitoring: assays and biosensors.

    PubMed

    Maalouf, Rita; Bailey, Steven

    2016-09-01

    Since its discovery in 1988, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has been recognized as a powerful cardiovascular biomarker for a number of disease states, specifically heart failure. Concurrent with such a discovery, much effort has been allocated to the precise monitoring of physiological BNP levels. Thus, it can be used to guide the therapy of heart failure and determine the patient's stage of disease. Thus, we discuss in this article BNP as a potent biomarker. Subsequently, we will review the progress of biosensing devices as they could be applied to monitor BNP levels as assays, benchtop biosensors and implantable biosensors. The analytical characteristics of commercially available BNP assays are presented. Still emerging as a field, we define four obstacles that present opportunity for the future development of implantable biosensor: foreign body response, sensor renewability, sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:26979601

  15. C-type natriuretic peptide signalling drives homeostatic effects in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Peake, N J; Bader, D L; Vessillier, S; Ramachandran, M; Salter, D M; Hobbs, A J; Chowdhury, T T

    2015-10-01

    Signals induced by mechanical loading and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) represent chondroprotective routes that may potentially prevent osteoarthritis (OA). We examined whether CNP will reduce hyaluronan production and export via members of the multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and diminish pro-inflammatory effects in human chondrocytes. The presence of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) increased HA production and export via MRP5 that was reduced with CNP and/or loading. Treatment with IL-1β conditioned medium increased production of catabolic mediators and the response was reduced with the hyaluronan inhibitor, Pep-1. The induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines by the conditioned medium was reduced by CNP and/or Pep-1, αCD44 or αTLR4 in a cytokine-dependent manner, suggesting that the CNP pathway is protective and should be exploited further. PMID:26307537

  16. Gene expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in rat papillary muscle. Rapid induction by mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Jarygin, C; Hänze, J; Lang, R E

    1994-06-13

    The effect of mechanical stretch on protein synthesis and the expression of the gene for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was examined in electrically paced, isolated papillary muscles from rat heart. Incorporation of [3H]phenylalanine into protein increased only in stretched but not in unloaded muscles. Five hours of stretching increased ANP mRNA levels more than threefold as compared to freshly excised papillary muscles. A drastic fall in ANP mRNA levels was observed in unloaded muscles over this time. These data indicate that papillary muscles similar to other ventricular tissue are capable of activating ANP gene expression in response to increased load. The effect occurs in vitro and does not depend on circulating or nervous factors. The unexpected rapid induction of ANP gene expression in such a particular structure of the heart raises the possibility of local actions of ventricular ANP. PMID:8013631

  17. C-type natriuretic peptide improved vitrified-warmed mouse cumulus oocyte complexes developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Wei, Qiang; Li, Wei; Ge, Junbang; Zhao, Xiaoe; Ma, Baohua

    2016-04-01

    Cryopreservation of cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) is important for reproductive medicine. However, the vitrified-warmed COCs have lower maturation rate and subsequent developmental competence compared with fresh COCs. The present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of supplementation of the maturation medium with C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) on the developmental competence of vitrified-warmed mouse COCs. Addition of CNP to the maturation medium improved the maturation rate and enhanced the developmental competence of vitrified-warmed mouse COCs. The reason may be that vitrified COCs led to a decline in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels. Furthermore, addition of CNP to the maturation medium elevated cGMP levels of the vitrified-warmed COCs. In conclusion, cryopreservation-associated lower maturation rate and developmental competence of COCs may be ameliorated by CNP during maturation culture after warming. PMID:26921772

  18. Genetic Decreases in Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Simon W. M.; Krege, John H.; Oliver, Paula M.; Hagaman, John R.; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Pang, Stephen C.; Flynn, T. Geoffrey; Smithies, Oliver

    1995-02-01

    To determine if defects in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system can cause hypertension, mice were generated with a disruption of the proANP gene. Homozygous mutants had no circulating or atrial ANP, and their blood pressures were elevated by 8 to 23 millimeters of mercury when they were fed standard (0.5 percent sodium chloride) and intermediate (2 percent sodium chloride) salt diets. On standard salt diets, heterozygotes had normal amounts of circulating ANP and normal blood pressures. However, on high (8 percent sodium chloride) salt diets they were hypertensive, with blood pressures elevated by 27 millimeters of mercury. These results demonstrate that genetically reduced production of ANP can lead to salt-sensitive hypertension.

  19. Low plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide in severe acute heart failure: merely a case?

    PubMed

    Brentana, Loretta; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Corrà, Ugo; Gattone, Marinella; Pistono, Massimo; Imparato, Alessandro; Gnemmi, Marco; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo

    2007-11-30

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is commonly used for diagnosis and prognosis of patients with congestive heart failure (HF). High levels of BNP are associated with high probability of cardiogenic dyspnea and higher risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. We describe a case of acute HF (worsening chronic HF) in a 74-year-old male with low plasma BNP levels on admission, in whom a rapid and consistent increase in the marker's concentration occurred after administration of diuretics and vasodilators, despite a prompt clinical and hemodynamic improvement. Reports of cardiogenic dyspnea with moderate increase or normal plasma levels of BNP have been recently published: does this signify a pitfall for BNP as a useful diagnostic and prognostic tool? Clinical implications of our observation are discussed, and we conclude that neurohumoral biomarkers do not obviate the need for a careful physical and instrumental examination of patient. PMID:17382416

  20. Involvement of the atrial natriuretic peptide in cardiovascular pathophysiology and its relationship with exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this minireview we describe the involvement of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in cardiovascular pathophysiology and exercise. The ANP has a broad homeostatic role and exerts complex effects on the cardio-circulatory hemodynamics, it is produced by the left atrium and has a key role in regulating sodium and water balance in mammals and humans. The dominant stimulus for its release is atrial wall tension, commonly caused by exercise. The ANP is involved in the process of lipolysis through a cGMP signaling pathway and, as a consequence, reducing blood pressure by decreasing the sensitivity of vascular smooth muscle to the action of vasoconstrictors and regulate fluid balance. The increase of this hormone is associated with better survival in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). This minireview provides new evidence based on recent studies related to the beneficial effects of exercise in patients with cardiovascular disease, focusing on the ANP. PMID:22313592

  1. Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Julie; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Christoffersen, Christina; Goetze, Jens P

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart, but the temporal expression profile of their cognate receptors has not been examined in white adipose tissue. We therefore collected peri-renal white adipose tissue and serum from WT mice. Tissue mRNA contents of NPRs – NPR-A and NPR-C, the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1, and transcripts involved in lipid metabolism were quantified at 4-h intervals: in the diurnal study, mice were exposed to a period of 12 h light followed by 12 h darkness (n=52). In the circadian study, mice were kept in darkness for 24 h (n=47). Concomitant serum concentrations of free fatty acids, glycerol, triglycerides (TGs), and insulin were measured. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents showed reciprocal circadian profiles (P<0.0001). NPR-A mRNA contents followed a temporal pattern (P=0.01), peaking in the dark (active) period. In contrast, NPR-C mRNA was expressed in an antiphase manner with nadir in the active period (P=0.007). TG concentrations in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003). In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue. The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner. PMID:26286623

  2. Natriuretic peptides stimulate the cardiac sodium pump via NPR-C-coupled NOS activation.

    PubMed

    William, M; Hamilton, E J; Garcia, A; Bundgaard, H; Chia, K K M; Figtree, G A; Rasmussen, H H

    2008-04-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) and their receptors (NPRs) are expressed in the heart, but their effects on myocyte function are poorly understood. Because NPRs are coupled to synthesis of cGMP, an activator of the sarcolemmal Na(+)-K(+) pump, we examined whether atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) regulates the pump. We voltage clamped rabbit ventricular myocytes and identified electrogenic Na(+)-K(+) pump current (arising from the 3:2 Na(+):K(+) exchange and normalized for membrane capacitance) as the shift in membrane current induced by 100 micromol/l ouabain. Ten nanomoles per liter ANP stimulated the Na(+)-K(+) pump when the intracellular compartment was perfused with pipette solutions containing 10 mmol/l Na(+) but had no effect when the pump was at near maximal activation with 80 mmol/l Na(+) in the pipette solution. Stimulation was abolished by inhibition of cGMP-activated protein kinase with KT-5823, nitric oxide (NO)-activated guanylyl cyclase with 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), or NO synthase with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Since synthesis of cGMP by NPR-A and NPR-B is not NO dependent or ODQ sensitive, we exposed myocytes to AP-811, a highly selective ligand for the NPR-C "clearance" receptor. It abolished ANP-induced pump stimulation. Conversely, the selective NPR-C agonist ANP(4-23) reproduced stimulation. The stimulation was blocked by l-NAME. To examine NO production in response to ANP(4-23), we loaded myocytes with the NO-sensitive fluorescent dye diacetylated diaminofluorescein-2 and examined them by confocal microscopy. ANP(4-23) induced a significant increase in fluorescence, which was abolished by L-NAME. We conclude that NPs stimulate the Na(+)-K(+) pump via an NPR-C and NO-dependent pathway. PMID:18272821

  3. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is not related to cardiac natriuretic peptide in nulliparous and lactating women

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Hussein F; Nicholls, M Gary; Frampton, Christopher M; Benedict, Sheela; Yasin, Javed

    2009-01-01

    Background Vitamin D deficiency is associated with heightened risk of cardiovascular disease. Potential mechanisms include involvement of vitamin D in regulation of renin-angiotensin system and manufacture and secretion of cardiac natriuretic peptides. Our aim was to document relationships between 25 hydroxyvitamin [25(OH)D] and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and plasma renin activity (PRA) levels and to document the effect of vitamin D administration on NT-proBNP and PRA levels in vitamin D deficient subjects. Methods Serum 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), plasma or serum NT-proBNP and PRA levels were measured at baseline in nulliparous and lactating women and after 2 months of oral vitamin D2 (2,000 IU/day or 60,000 IU/month) supplementation to lactating women. Results Baseline levels of 25(OH)D were low (<50 nmol/L) in most women whereas PRA and NT-proBNP levels were within the normal range. There were no significant correlations between baseline 25(OH)D or PTH with NT-proBNP and PRA. Vitamin D administration over a 2-month period in lactating women was associated with a decline in NT-proBNP (by 9.1 ± 2.0 pmol/L; p < 0.001) and PRA (by 0.32 ± 0.17 nmol/L/hr; p = 0.064). However, there were no significant correlations between the changes from baseline in 25(OH)D and either NT-proBNP (r = -0.04, p = 0.8) or PRA (r = -0.04, p = 0.8). Conclusion We found no significant correlations between 25(OH)D or PTH with NT-proBNP and PRA in vitamin D deficient women. Further information is required to clarify the effects of vitamin D administration on cardiac structure and function. PMID:19178708

  4. Natriuretic peptide receptor 3 (NPR3) is regulated by microRNA-100.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lee Lee; Wee, Abby S Y; Lim, Jia Yuen; Ng, Jessica Y X; Chong, Jenny P C; Liew, Oi Wah; Lilyanna, Shera; Martinez, Eliana C; Ackers-Johnson, Matthew Andrew; Vardy, Leah A; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah; Ng, Tze P; Lam, Carolyn S P; Foo, Roger S Y; Richards, Arthur Mark; Chen, Yei-Tsung

    2015-05-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor 3 (NPR3) is the clearance receptor for the cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs). By modulating the level of NPs, NPR3 plays an important role in cardiovascular homeostasis. Although the physiological functions of NPR3 have been explored, little is known about its regulation in health or disease. MicroRNAs play an essential role in the post-transcriptional expression of many genes. Our aim was to investigate potential microRNA-based regulation of NPR3 in multiple models. Hypoxic challenge elevated levels of NPPB and ADM mRNA, as well as NT-proBNP and MR-proADM in human left ventricle derived cardiac cells (HCMa), and in the corresponding conditioned medium, as revealed by qRT-PCR and ELISA. NPR3 was decreased while NPR1 was increased by hypoxia at mRNA and protein levels in HCMa. Down-regulation of NPR3 mRNA was also observed in infarct and peri-infarct cardiac tissue from rats undergoing myocardial infarction. From microRNA microarray analyses and microRNA target predictive databases, miR-100 was selected as a candidate regulator of NPR3 expression. Further analyses confirmed up-regulation of miR-100 in hypoxic cells and associated conditioned media. Antagomir-based silencing of miR-100 enhanced NPR3 expression in HCMa. Furthermore, miR-100 levels were markedly up-regulated in rat hearts and in peripheral blood after myocardial infarction and in the blood from heart failure patients. Results from this study point to a role for miR-100 in the regulation of NPR3 expression, and suggest a possible therapeutic target for modulation of NP bioactivity in heart disease. PMID:25736855

  5. Epithelium integrity is crucial for the relaxant activity of brain natriuretic peptide in human isolated bronchi

    PubMed Central

    Matera, Maria G; Calzetta, Luigino; Passeri, Daniela; Facciolo, Francesco; Rendina, Erino A; Page, Clive; Cazzola, Mario; Orlandi, Augusto

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) plays an important role in several biological functions, including bronchial relaxation. Here, we have investigated the role of BNP and its cognate receptors in human bronchial tone. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Effects of BNP on responses to carbachol and histamine were evaluated in non-sensitized, passively sensitized, epithelium-intact or denuded isolated bronchi and in the presence of methoctramine, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and aminoguanidine. Natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) were investigated by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and real-time PCR. Release of NO and acetylcholine from bronchial tissues and cultured BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells was also investigated. KEY RESULTS BNP reduced contractions mediated by carbachol and histamine, with decreased Emax (carbachol: 22.7 ± 4.7%; histamine: 59.3 ± 1.8%) and increased EC50 (carbachol: control 3.33 ± 0.88 µM, BNP 100 ± 52.9 µM; histamine: control 16.7 ± 1.7 µM, BNP 90 ± 30.6 µM); BNP was ineffective in epithelium-denuded bronchi. Among NPRs, only atrial NPR (NPR1) transcripts were detected in bronchial tissue. Bronchial NPR1 immunoreactivity was detected in epithelium and inflammatory cells but faint or absent in airway smooth muscle cells. NPR1 transcripts in bronchi increased after incubation with BNP, but not after sensitization. Methoctramine and quinine abolished BNP-induced relaxant activity. The latter was associated with increased bronchial mRNA for NO synthase and NO release, inhibited by L-NAME and aminoguanidine. In vitro, BNP increased acetylcholine release from bronchial epithelial cells, whereas NO release was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Epithelial cells mediate the BNP-induced relaxant activity in human isolated bronchi. PMID:21410689

  6. Binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in brain: alterations in Brattleboro rats

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R.; Plunkett, L.M.

    1986-12-01

    Binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF-28) were analyzed in discrete brain areas of Brattleboro rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus and Long-Evans (LE) controls by quantitative autoradiography. The maximum binding capacity (Bmax) and affinity constant (Ka) for /sup 125/I-ANF-28 were elevated significantly in the subfornical organ of Brattleboro rats compared to matched LE controls. In contrast, values for Bmax and Ka for /sup 125/I-ANF-28 binding in choroid plexus and area postrema were similar for rats of the two strains. These findings are consistent with a selective upregulation of ANF-28 binding sites in the subfornical organ of Brattleboro rats which exhibit a profound disturbance in body fluid homeostasis. These alterations in ANF-28 binding sites in the subfornical organ may represent a compensatory response to the absence of vasopressin in the Brattleboro rat.

  7. A disulfide-bridged mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A displays constitutive activity. Role of receptor dimerization in signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Mc Nicoll, N; Marquis, M; De Léan, A

    1999-04-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), a particulate guanylyl cyclase receptor, is composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane spanning, a kinase homology domain (KHD), and a guanylyl cyclase domain. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), the natural agonists, bind and activate the receptor leading to cyclic GMP production. This receptor has been reported to be spontaneously dimeric or oligomeric. In response to agonists, the KHD-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, and it is assumed that ATP binds to the KHD. Since NPR-A displays a pair of juxtamembrane cysteines separated by 8 residues, we hypothesized that the removal of one of those cysteines would leave the other unpaired and reactive, thus susceptible to form an interchain disulfide bridge and to favor the dimeric interactions. Here we show that NPR-AC423S mutant, expressed mainly as a covalent dimer, increases the affinity of pBNP for this receptor by enhancing a high affinity binding component. Dimerization primarily depends on ECD since a secreted NPR-A C423S soluble ectodomain (ECDC423S) also documents a covalent dimer. ANP binding to the unmutated ECD yields up to 80-fold affinity loss as compared with the membrane receptor. However, the ECD C423S mutation restores a high binding affinity. Furthermore, C423S mutation leads to cellular constitutive activation (20-40-fold) of basal catalytic production of cyclic GMP by the full-length mutant. In vitro particulate guanylyl cyclase assays demonstrate that NPR-AC423S displays an increased sensitivity to ATP treatment alone and that the effect of ANP + ATP joint treatment is cumulative instead of synergistic. Finally, the cellular and particulate guanylyl cyclase assays indicate that the receptor is desensitized to agonist stimulation. We conclude the following: 1) dimers are functional units of NPR-A guanylyl cyclase activation; and 2) agonists are inducing dimeric contact

  8. Prognostic Value of Adrenomedullin and Natriuretic Peptides in Uroseptic Patients Induced by Ureteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zhou, Pang-Hu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Xiao-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate whether urosepsis is related to irrigation pressure of ureteroscopy (URS) and evaluate the prognostic value of adrenomedullin (ADM) and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in URS-induced uroseptic patients. From July 2008 to October 2013, we enrolled 332 patients with untreated unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). The UUO group included three subgroups of, respectively, 118, 132, and 82 patients who underwent URS under intermittent stable irrigation pressure of, respectively, 80, 120, and 160 mmHg. The plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP, and BNP were measured in all subjects. URS was performed for all UUO patients; the values of the three peptides were measured again after URS. Irrigation pressure and stone size were independent risk factors of urosepsis. After URS, the plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP, and BNP were significantly higher in uroseptic patients. Moreover, the concentrations were significantly higher depending on the disease severity. Plasma concentrations of the three peptides were correlated with plasma ET concentration in the uroseptic patients. The areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of ADM, ANP, and BNP for predicting urosepsis were 0.811, 0.728, and 0.764, respectively. In conclusion, ADM, along with ANP and BNP, is valuable for prognosis in urosepsis secondary to URS which is associated with irrigation pressure. PMID:26880865

  9. Prognostic Value of Adrenomedullin and Natriuretic Peptides in Uroseptic Patients Induced by Ureteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Zhou, Pang-hu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Xiao-bin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate whether urosepsis is related to irrigation pressure of ureteroscopy (URS) and evaluate the prognostic value of adrenomedullin (ADM) and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in URS-induced uroseptic patients. From July 2008 to October 2013, we enrolled 332 patients with untreated unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). The UUO group included three subgroups of, respectively, 118, 132, and 82 patients who underwent URS under intermittent stable irrigation pressure of, respectively, 80, 120, and 160 mmHg. The plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP, and BNP were measured in all subjects. URS was performed for all UUO patients; the values of the three peptides were measured again after URS. Irrigation pressure and stone size were independent risk factors of urosepsis. After URS, the plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP, and BNP were significantly higher in uroseptic patients. Moreover, the concentrations were significantly higher depending on the disease severity. Plasma concentrations of the three peptides were correlated with plasma ET concentration in the uroseptic patients. The areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of ADM, ANP, and BNP for predicting urosepsis were 0.811, 0.728, and 0.764, respectively. In conclusion, ADM, along with ANP and BNP, is valuable for prognosis in urosepsis secondary to URS which is associated with irrigation pressure. PMID:26880865

  10. Interactive Roles of Ets-1, Sp1, and Acetylated Histones in the Retinoic Acid-dependent Activation of Guanylyl Cyclase/Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Gene Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prerna; Garg, Renu; Bolden, Gevoni; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac hormones atrial and brain natriuretic peptides activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), which plays a critical role in reduction of blood pressure and blood volume. Currently, the mechanisms responsible for regulating the Npr1 gene (coding for GC-A/NPRA) transcription are not well understood. The present study was conducted to examine the interactive roles of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), Ets-1, Sp1, and histone acetylation on the transcriptional regulation and function of the Npr1 gene. Deletion analysis of the Npr1 promoter and luciferase assays showed that ATRA enhanced a 16-fold Npr1 promoter activity and greatly stimulated guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity of the receptor protein in both atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-dependent and -independent manner. As confirmed by gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, ATRA enhanced the binding of both Ets-1 and Sp1 to the Npr1 promoter. The retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) was recruited by Ets-1 and Sp1 to form a transcriptional activator complex with their binding sites in the Npr1 promoter. Interestingly, ATRA also increased the acetylation of histones H3 and H4 and enhanced their recruitment to Ets-1 and Sp1 binding sites within the Npr1 promoter. Collectively, the present results demonstrate that ATRA regulates Npr1 gene transcription and GC activity of the receptor by involving the interactive actions of Ets-1, Sp1, and histone acetylation. PMID:20864529

  11. C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Induces Anti-contractile Effect Dependent on Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress, and NPR-B Activation in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Pernomian, Laena; Prado, Alejandro F.; Silva, Bruno R.; Azevedo, Aline; Pinheiro, Lucas C.; Tanus-Santos, José E.; Bendhack, Lusiane M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the role of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation in C-type natriuretic peptide-anti-contractile effect on Phenylephrine-induced contraction in aorta isolated from septic rats. Methods and Results: Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery was used to induce sepsis in male rats. Vascular reactivity was conducted in rat aorta and resistance mesenteric artery (RMA). Measurement of survival rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma nitric oxide, specific protein expression, and localization were evaluated. Septic rats had a survival rate about 37% at 4 h after the surgery, and these rats presented hypotension compared to control-operated (Sham) rats. Phenylephrine-induced contraction was decreased in sepsis. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) induced anti-contractile effect in aortas. Plasma nitric oxide was increased in sepsis. Nitric oxide-synthase but not natriuretic peptide receptor-B expression was increased in septic rat aortas. C-type natriuretic peptide-anti-contractile effect was dependent on nitric oxide-synthase, ROS, and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation. Natriuretic peptide receptor-C, protein kinase-Cα mRNA, and basal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent ROS production were lower in septic rats. Phenylephrine and CNP enhanced ROS production. However, stimulated ROS production was low in sepsis. Conclusion: CNP induced anti-contractile effect on Phenylephrine contraction in aortas from Sham and septic rats that was dependent on nitric oxide-synthase, ROS, and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation. PMID:27445832

  12. Influence of storage conditions on in vitro stability of atrial natriuretic peptide and of anesthesia on plasma atrial natriuretic peptide concentration in cats.

    PubMed

    Heishima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Yasutomo; Chikazawa, Seishiro; Kanai, Kazutaka; Hoshi, Fumio; Itoh, Naoyuki

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the in vitro stability of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in plasma samples under various storage conditions and the influence of anesthesia on plasma ANP concentration in cats. ANIMALS 1 cat with congestive heart failure and 5 healthy adult mixed-breed cats. PROCEDURES A plasma sample from the cat with heart failure was serially diluted, and dilutional parallelism of ANP concentration was evaluated. Plasma samples containing aprotinin or serum samples from the 5 healthy cats were kept at room temperature (27°C) for ≤ 12 hours. Plasma samples from the same healthy cats were stored at -70°, -20°, or 4°C for ≤ 14 days. Plasma samples were obtained from the healthy cats before and during isoflurane anesthesia. Plasma ANP concentrations were measured at a commercial laboratory by use of a human ANP chemiluminescence assay. RESULTS Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 1.5% and 2.5%, respectively, and dilutional parallelism was established. Although ANP concentration decreased by 82.4 ± 13.6% (mean ± SD) after sample storage for 12 hours at room temperature, this decrease was prevented by aprotinin. Plasma ANP concentrations were stable for 7 days at -20°C and for 14 days at -70°C. However, concentrations decreased markedly to 57.6 ± 6.9% at -20°C and to 18.0 ± 3.0% at 4°C after 14 days. Plasma ANP concentration decreased significantly in cats during anesthesia and was correlated with blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that aprotinin should be added routinely in preparation of plasma samples from cats for measurement of ANP concentration, and those samples, if stored, should be frozen immediately at ≤ -20°C. General anesthesia or systemic blood pressure may affect plasma ANP concentration in cats. PMID:27463548

  13. Effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on type II alveolar epithelial cells of the rat lung. Autoradiographic and morphometric studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Y; Watanabe, T; Watanabe, M; Hasegawa, S; Uchiyama, Y

    1989-01-01

    Effects of atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) on Type II cells of the rat lung were examined, using autoradiographic and morphometric techniques. The injection of an excess of ANP, together with [125I]ANP, significantly inhibited the uptake of radioactive ANP in the lung tissue. Following autoradiography, silver grains of [125I]ANP labelled Type II cells, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of vessels, bronchi and bronchioles. As for morphometric changes in subcellular structures of Type II cells after the injection of ANP, the volume and surface densities of the rough endoplasmic reticulum increased at 15 minutes, while those of the Golgi complex increased from 5 minutes, peaking at 30 minutes. At 15 minutes the volume and surface densities of mitochondria significantly increased. The volume and surface densities of multivesicular bodies with an electron-dense matrix also increased from 15 minutes after the injection. Lamellar bodies showed decreased volume and surface densities at 15 minutes whereas the densities showed an increase at 30 minutes and were higher at 60 minutes than those in the control. These results suggest that Type II cells provide a binding site for ANP which facilitates the production of lamellar bodies in addition to their secretion. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:2533592

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptide and oxytocin induce natriuresis by release of cGMP

    PubMed Central

    Soares, T. J.; Coimbra, T. M.; Martins, A. R.; Pereira, A. G. F.; Carnio, E. C.; Branco, L. G. S.; Albuquerque-Araujo, W. I. C.; de Nucci, G.; Favaretto, A. L. V.; Gutkowska, J.; McCann, S. M.; Antunes-Rodrigues, J.

    1999-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that oxytocin (OT) causes natriuresis by activation of renal NO synthase that releases NO followed by cGMP that mediates the natriuresis. To test this hypothesis, an inhibitor of NO synthase, l-nitroarginine methyl ester (NAME), was injected into male rats. Blockade of NO release by NAME had no effect on natriuresis induced by atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). This natriuresis presumably is caused by cGMP because ANP also activates guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cGMP from GTP. The 18-fold increase in sodium (Na+) excretion induced by OT (1 μg) was accompanied by an increase in urinary cGMP and preceded by 20 min a 20-fold increase in NO3− excretion. NAME almost completely inhibited OT-induced natriuresis and increased NO3− excretion; however, when the dose of OT was increased 10-fold, a dose that markedly increases plasma ANP concentrations, NAME only partly inhibited the natriuresis. We conclude that the natriuretic action of OT is caused by a dual action: generation of NO leading to increased cGMP and at higher doses release of ANP that also releases cGMP. OT-induced natriuresis is caused mainly by decreased tubular Na+ reabsorption mediated by cGMP. In contrast to ANP that releases cGMP in the renal vessels and the tubules, OT acts on its receptors on NOergic cells demonstrated in the macula densa and proximal tubules to release cGMP that closes Na+ channels. Both ANP- and OT-induced kaliuresis also appear to be mediated by cGMP. We conclude that cGMP mediates natriuresis and kaliuresis induced by both ANP and OT. PMID:9874809

  15. Prognostic role of troponin and natriuretic peptides as biomarkers for deterioration of left ventricular ejection fraction after chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kornacewicz-Jach, Zdzisława; Safranow, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity due to anthracyclines, trastuzumab and other potential cardiotoxic drugs is still a problem of modern chemotherapy. For years researchers have tried to find biological markers that can predict changes in the heart. The most thoroughly tested markers are troponin and natriuretic peptides. Some studies have proven that these markers can indeed be useful. In studies which have shown the predictive role of troponin I the assessment of this marker was performed very frequently. It is not possible to carry out such serial measurements in many centers because of typical 1-day hospital stay times. The predictive role of natriuretic peptides still needs further investigation. This review considers the newest research from recent years. PMID:25395954

  16. Hemodynamic, renal, and hormonal responses to alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Ogihara, T; Nakamaru, M; Hara, H; Higaki, J; Rakugi, H; Tateyama, H; Minamino, T; Iinuma, K; Kumahara, Y

    1987-08-01

    Hemodynamic, renal, and hormonal effects of intravenous bolus injection of 50 micrograms synthetic alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha-hANP) were studied in eight patients with congestive heart failure. alpha-hANP caused significant reductions in mean blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance. These responses were sustained up to 90 minutes and not accompanied by reflex tachycardia. Cardiac index and stroke volume index increased significantly at 90 minutes and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and mean right atrial pressure remained unchanged. Urine volume, urinary sodium excretion, creatinine clearance, and fractional excretion of sodium increased significantly, but fractional excretion of potassium and phosphate did not change. Elevated plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone, and norepinephrine were suppressed after the injection of alpha-hANP. The bolus injection of this peptide has moderately hypotensive, vasorelaxant, and natriuretic effects in patients with congestive heart failure. PMID:2955995

  17. Cocaine-associated increase of atrial natriuretic peptides: an early predictor of cardiac complications in cocaine users?

    PubMed Central

    Casartelli, Alessandro; Dacome, Lisa; Tessari, Michela; Pascali, Jennifer; Bortolotti, Federica; Trevisan, Maria Teresa; Bosco, Oliviero; Cristofori, Patrizia; Tagliaro, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cocaine is known to produce life-threatening cardiovascular complications, and the investigation of the causes of death may be challenging in forensic medicine. The increasing knowledge of the cardiac function biomarkers and the increasing sensitivity of assays provide new tools in monitoring the cardiac life-threatening pathological conditions and in the sudden death investigation in chronic abusers. In this work, cardiac dysfunction was assessed in an animal model by measuring troponin I and natriuretic peptides as biomarkers, and considering other standard endpoints used in preclinical toxicology studies. Methods Lister Hooded rats were treated with cocaine in chronic self-administration studies. Troponin I (cTnI) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were evaluated at different time points and heart weight and histopathology were assessed at the end of the treatment period. Furthermore, cocaine and its main metabolites were measured in the rat fur to assess rats’ cocaine exposure. All the procedures and endpoints considered were designed to allow an easy and complete translation from the laboratory animals to human beings, and the same approach was also adopted with a group of 10 healthy cocaine abuse volunteers with no cardiac pathologies. Results Cardiac troponin I values were unaffected, and ANP showed an increasing trend with time in all cocaine-treated animals considered. Similarly, in the healthy volunteers, no changes were observed in troponin serum levels, whereas the N-terminal brain natriuretic pro-peptide (NT proBNP) showed variations comparable with the changes observed in rats. Conclusions In conclusion, natriuretic peptides could represent an early indicator of heart dysfunction liability in chronic cocaine abusers. PMID:27326180

  18. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Lipid Metabolism through Its Receptor NPR1 and the Glycerolipid Metabolism Pathway in Chicken Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Zhao, G P; Liu, R R; Li, Q H; Zheng, M Q; Li, S F; Liang, Z; Zhao, Z H; Wen, J

    2015-11-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to lipid metabolism in mammals, but its effect and the molecular mechanisms underlying it in chickens are incompletely understood. We found that the level of natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB, which encodes BNP) mRNA expression in high-abdominal-fat chicken groups was significantly higher than that of low-abdominal-fat groups. Partial correlations indicated that changes in the weight of abdominal fat were positively correlated with NPPB mRNA expression level. In vitro, compared with the control group, preadipocytes with NPPB interference showed reduced levels of proliferation, differentiation, and glycerin in media. Treatments of cells with BNP led to enhanced proliferation and differentiation of cells and glycerin concentration, and mRNA expression of its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) was upregulated significantly. In cells exposed to BNP, 482 differentially expressed genes were identified compared with controls without BNP. Four genes known to be related to lipid metabolism (diacylglycerol kinase; lipase, endothelial; 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1; and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 2) were enriched in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway and expressed differentially. In conclusion, BNP stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and lipolysis of preadipocytes through upregulation of the levels of expression of its receptor NPR1 and key genes enriched in the glycerolipid metabolic pathway. PMID:26463554

  19. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), not ANP, is the principal cardiac natriuretic peptide in vertebrates as revealed by comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Takei, Yoshio; Inoue, Koji; Trajanovska, Sofie; Donald, John A

    2011-05-01

    The natriuretic peptide (NP) family consists of at least seven members; cardiac ANP, BNP and VNP and brain CNPs (CNP1-4). Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses showed that CNP4 is the ancestral molecule of the family, from which CNP3 and CNP1/2 were duplicated in this order, and that the three cardiac NPs were generated from CNP3 by tandem duplication. Seven members existed at the divergence of ray-finned fishes and lobe-finned fishes (tetrapods), but some of the NP genes have disappeared during the course of evolution. In ray-finned fishes, all three cardiac NPs exist in chondrostei and some migratory teleost species, but VNP is generally absent and ANP is absent in a group of teleosts (Beloniformes). In tetrapods, ANP and BNP are present in mammals and amphibians, but ANP is usually absent in reptiles and birds. Thus, BNP is a ubiquitous cardiac NP in bony fishes and tetrapods though elasmobranchs and cyclostomes have only CNP3/4 as a cardiac NP. Functional studies indicate that cardiac NPs are essential Na(+)-extruding hormones throughout vertebrates; they play critical roles in seawater (SW) adaptation in teleosts, while they are important volume-depleting hormones in mammals as water and Na(+) are regulated in parallel in terrestrial animals. In mammals, cardiac NPs become prominent in pathological conditions such as heart failure where they are used in diagnosis and treatment. Although the functional role of BNP has not yet been fully elucidated compared with ANP in non-mammalian vertebrates, it appears that BNP plays pivotal roles in the cardiovascular and body fluid regulation as shown in mammals. ANP has previously been recognized as the principal cardiac NP in mammals and teleosts, but comparative studies have revealed that BNP is the only cardiac NP that exists in all tetrapods and teleosts. This is an excellent example showing that comparative studies have created new insights into the molecular and functional evolution of a hormone family. PMID

  20. B-type natriuretic peptide and amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in pediatric patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuki, Shinichi; Wagner, Brandie D; Ivy, David Dunbar

    2011-01-01

    Objectives B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the amino-terminal fragment (NTproBNP) correlate with clinical variables, but have not been simultaneously studied in a large number of pediatric patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The purpose of our investigation was to compare BNP and NTproBNP with clinical indicators of disease in a pediatric PAH population for which biomarkers are much needed. Design We retrospectively compared BNP and NTproBNP levels with exercise capacity, echocardiographic data, and hemodynamics in PAH patients under 21 years-old. Two hundred sixty three blood samples from 88 pediatric PAH patients were obtained, with BNP and NTproBNP drawn at the same time. Results There was a correlation between BNP and NTproBNP with mean pulmonary arterial pressure/mean arterial pressure (mPAP/mSAP) ratio (r=0.40 p<0.01, r=0.45 p<0.01, respectively), mean right atrial pressure (mRAP) (r=0.48 p<0.01, r=0.48 p<0.01), and tricuspid regurgitant (TR) velocity (r=0.36 p<0.01, r=0.41 p<0.01). BNP and NTproBNP are associated with 6 minute walking distance, mPAP, mPAP/mSAP ratio, mRAP, pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), and TR velocity when investigated longitudinally. On the average, a 1 unit increase in log BNP or NTproBNP was associated with 4.5 unitsxm2 or 3.4 unitsxm2 increase in PVRI, respectively. There was a strong correlation between log BNP and log NTproBNP measurements (r= 0.87, p<0.01). Conclusion In pediatric PAH, BNP and NTProBNP are strongly correlated and predict changes in clinical variables and hemodynamics. In a cross-sectional analysis, NTproBNP correlated with echocardiographic and exercise data better than BNP; NTproBNP showed less within patient variability over time, therefore NTproBNP can add additional information towards predicting these clinical measurements. PMID:22325151

  1. Atrial natriuretic peptide and circadian blood pressure regulation: clues from a chronobiological approach.

    PubMed

    Portaluppi, F; Vergnani, L; degli Uberti, E C

    1993-06-01

    A critical review of the data available in the literature today permits a better understanding of the multiple actions of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the cardiovascular system. Moreover, the results of chronobiological studies suggest a role for this peptide in the determination of the circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP). ANP can affect BP by several mechanisms, including modification of renal function and vascular tone, counteraction of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and action on brain regulatory sites. A series of interrelated events may follow from very small changes in the plasma levels of ANP. The endpoints are blood volume and BP reduction, but they are rapidly offset (mainly by reactive sympathetic activation) as soon as blood volume or pressure is threatened. The circadian rhythms of BP and ANP are antiphasic under normal conditions and in essential hypertension. The loss in the nocturnal decrease of BP is accompanied by a comparable loss in the nocturnal surge of ANP in hypertensive renal failure and hypotensive heart failure. In the latter condition, BP and ANP variabilities correlate significantly both before and after therapy-induced functional recovery, independently of the mean BP levels. Autonomic function modulates the secretion of ANP, which seems more apt to determine only transient changes in BP levels, as suggested by the short half-life of the peptide and the buffering role of its clearance receptors. There is now sufficient evidence that ANP contributes to short-term control over BP and electrolyte balance, in contrast and in opposition to the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is involved primarily in long-term BP control. By interfering with other well-established neurohormonal factors, ANP appears to be an additional modulator of the circadian rhythm of BP. PMID:8391398

  2. C-type natriuretic peptide in Parkinson's disease: reduced secretion and response to deprenyl.

    PubMed

    Espiner, E A; Dalrymple-Alford, J C; Prickett, T C R; Alamri, Y; Anderson, T J

    2014-04-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a neurotrophic factor widely expressed in the central nervous system including the basal ganglia, limbic system and hypothalamus. Nothing is known of CNP's role in the human brain but in rodents CNP promotes axon growth and branching, and interacts with dopaminergic function in models of addiction. Because preliminary evidence showed reduced levels in Parkinson's disease (PD), we examined concentrations of CNP peptides in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 146 PD patients from the DATATOP study to determine changes over time in relation to medication status and cognitive function. CNP and an aminoterminal product of proCNP (NTproCNP) were measured in extracts from stored CSF by radioimmunoassay. CSF samples were obtained twice-at enrolment and at the study's endpoint (requirement for levodopa treatment) after treatment with placebo or deprenyl. At enrolment, median baseline concentration of CSF NTproCNP (776 pmol/L, n = 146) was significantly lower than that in a reference group without neurological disorder (1,010 pmol/L, p < 0.001). Concentrations declined significantly during placebo (p = 0.02) and lower values at enrolment were associated with more rapid functional decline (p < 0.01). In contrast, deprenyl-a treatment which delayed the need for levodopa-nullified the time-dependent decline in CSF NTproCNP. In conclusion subnormal CSF NTproCNP which declines with time and associates with increasing functional disability implicates CNP in PD. Concordant clinical and peptide responses to deprenyl suggest that some of the benefits of monoamine oxidase inhibitors in PD are mediated by preserving tissue CNP activity. PMID:24306276

  3. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  4. The diagnostic accuracy of the natriuretic peptides in heart failure: systematic review and diagnostic meta-analysis in the acute care setting

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Emmert; Dworzynski, Katharina; Al-Mohammad, Abdallah; Cowie, Martin R; McMurray, John J V; Mant, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine and compare the diagnostic accuracy of serum natriuretic peptide levels (B type natriuretic peptide, N terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP), and mid-regional proatrial natriuretic peptide (MRproANP)) in people presenting with acute heart failure to acute care settings using thresholds recommended in the 2012 European Society of Cardiology guidelines for heart failure. Design Systematic review and diagnostic meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, Cochrane central register of controlled trials, Cochrane database of systematic reviews, database of abstracts of reviews of effects, NHS economic evaluation database, and Health Technology Assessment up to 28 January 2014, using combinations of subject headings and terms relating to heart failure and natriuretic peptides. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Eligible studies evaluated one or more natriuretic peptides (B type natriuretic peptide, NTproBNP, or MRproANP) in the diagnosis of acute heart failure against an acceptable reference standard in consecutive or randomly selected adults in an acute care setting. Studies were excluded if they did not present sufficient data to extract or calculate true positives, false positives, false negatives, and true negatives, or report age independent natriuretic peptide thresholds. Studies not available in English were also excluded. Results 37 unique study cohorts described in 42 study reports were included, with a total of 48 test evaluations reporting 15 263 test results. At the lower recommended thresholds of 100 ng/L for B type natriuretic peptide and 300 ng/L for NTproBNP, the natriuretic peptides have sensitivities of 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.93 to 0.96) and 0.99 (0.97 to 1.00) and negative predictive values of 0.94 (0.90 to 0.96) and 0.98 (0.89 to 1.0), respectively, for a diagnosis of acute heart failure. At the lower recommended threshold of 120 pmol/L, MRproANP has a sensitivity ranging from 0.95 (range 0

  5. A cardiac pathway of cyclic GMP-independent signaling of guanylyl cyclase A, the receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Klaiber, Michael; Dankworth, Beatrice; Kruse, Martin; Hartmann, Michael; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Völker, Katharina; Gaßner, Birgit; Oberwinkler, Heike; Feil, Robert; Freichel, Marc; Groschner, Klaus; Skryabin, Boris V.; Frantz, Stefan; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Pongs, Olaf; Kuhn, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) regulates arterial blood pressure, moderates cardiomyocyte growth, and stimulates angiogenesis and metabolism. ANP binds to the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase (GC) receptor, GC-A, to exert its diverse functions. This process involves a cGMP-dependent signaling pathway preventing pathological [Ca2+]i increases in myocytes. In chronic cardiac hypertrophy, however, ANP levels are markedly increased and GC-A/cGMP responses to ANP are blunted due to receptor desensitization. Here we show that, in this situation, ANP binding to GC-A stimulates a unique cGMP-independent signaling pathway in cardiac myocytes, resulting in pathologically elevated intracellular Ca2+ levels. This pathway involves the activation of Ca2+‐permeable transient receptor potential canonical 3/6 (TRPC3/C6) cation channels by GC-A, which forms a stable complex with TRPC3/C6 channels. Our results indicate that the resulting cation influx activates voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels and ultimately increases myocyte Ca2+i levels. These observations reveal a dual role of the ANP/GC-A–signaling pathway in the regulation of cardiac myocyte Ca2+i homeostasis. Under physiological conditions, activation of a cGMP-dependent pathway moderates the Ca2+i-enhancing action of hypertrophic factors such as angiotensin II. By contrast, a cGMP-independent pathway predominates under pathophysiological conditions when GC-A is desensitized by high ANP levels. The concomitant rise in [Ca2+]i might increase the propensity to cardiac hypertrophy and arrhythmias. PMID:22027011

  6. Dual role for adenine nucleotides in the regulation of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor, guanylyl cyclase-A.

    PubMed

    Foster, D C; Garbers, D L

    1998-06-26

    The ability to both sensitize and desensitize a guanylyl cyclase receptor has not been previously accomplished in a broken cell or membrane preparation. The guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor is known to require both atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and an adenine nucleotide for maximal cyclase activation. When membranes from NIH 3T3 cells stably overexpressing GC-A were incubated with ATP, AMPPNP, or ATPgammaS, only ATPgammaS dramatically potentiated ANP-dependent cyclase activity. When the membranes were incubated with ATPgammaS and then washed, GC-A now became sensitive to ANP/AMPPNP stimulation, suggestive that thiophosphorylation had sensitized GC-A to ligand and adenine nucleotide binding. Consistent with this hypo- thesis, the ATPgammaS effects were both time- and concentration-dependent. Protein phosphatase stability of thiophosphorylation (ATPgammaS) relative to phosphorylation (ATP) appeared to explain the differential effects of the two nucleotides since microcystin, beta-glycerol phosphate, or okadaic acid coincident with ATP or ATPgammaS effectively sensitized GC-A to ligand stimulation over prolonged periods of time in either case. GC-A was phosphorylated in the presence of [gamma32P]ATP, and the magnitude of the phosphorylation was increased by the addition of microcystin. Thus, the phosphorylation of GC-A correlates with the acquisition of ligand sensitivity. The establishment of an in vitro system to sensitize GC-A demonstrates that adenine nucleotides have a daul function in the regulation of GC-A through both phosphorylation of and binding to regulatory sites. PMID:9632692

  7. Role of cyclic GMP and calcineurin in homologous and heterologous desensitization of natriuretic peptide receptor-A.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Yann; De Léan, André

    2006-05-01

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) mediates natriuretic, hypotensive, and antihypertrophic effects of natriuretic peptides through the production of cGMP. In pathological conditions such as heart failure, these effects are attenuated by homologous and heterologous desensitization mechanisms resulting in the dephosphorylation of the cytosolic portion of the receptor. In contrast with natriuretic peptide-induced desensitization, pressor hormone-induced desensitization is dependent on protein kinase C (PKC) stimulation and (or) cytosolic calcium elevation. Mechanisms by which PKC and Ca(2+) promote NPR-A desensitization are not known. The role of cGMP and of the cytosolic Ca(2+) pathways in NPR-A desensitization were therefore studied. In contrast with the activation of NPR-A by its agonist, activation of soluble guanylyl cyclases of LLC-PK1 cells by sodium nitroprusside also leads to a production of cGMP but without altering NPR-A activation. Consequently, cGMP elevation per se does not appear to mediate homologous desensitization of NPR-A. In addition, cytosolic calcium increase is required only for the heterologous desensitization pathway since the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM blocks only PMA or ionomycin-induced desensitization. Calcineurin inhibitors block the NPR-A guanylyl cyclase heterologous desensitization induced by ionomycin, suggesting an essential role for this Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphatase in NPR-A desensitization. In summary, the present report demonstrates that neither cGMP nor Ca(2+) cytosolic elevation cause NPR-A homologous desensitization. Our results also indicate for the first time a role for calcineurin in NPR-A heterologous desensitization. PMID:16902599

  8. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in cold-induced diuresis (CID)

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, J.W.; Freund, B.J.; DuBose, D.A.; McKay, J.M.; Hashiro, G.M. Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI )

    1991-03-11

    The hormonal control of cold-induced diuresis (CID) remains unresolved. This study investigated the role of ANP, plasma vasopressin (AVP), and aldosterone (ALDO) on CID. Four semi-nude men participated in a 210 min exposure to 15C and 29C air, on separate days. These subjects drank 300 mL of water and had an intravenous saline drip throughout both exposures to replace blood and insensible fluid losses. CID was observed in 15C but not in the 29C experiment, as indicated by a greater urine output. In 15C, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased after 90 min by 41% and remained elevated for 2 h relative to 29C. No differences were observed in AVP between 15C and 29C. In the 15C versus the 29C experiment, ALDO was approximately 37% lower at the pre, 15 and 90 min time periods. Mean arterial blood pressure was generally greater but only significant at 60 min during the 15C versus the 29C experiment. Urinary NA{sup +} excretion was elevated in 15C relative to 29C while no difference in K{sup +} excretion was observed. Although pressure effects may contribute, the observed natriuresis in the absence of a kaliuresis in the cold suggests a physiological role of ANP in CID.

  9. Urinary C-Type Natriuretic Peptide: An Emerging Biomarker for Heart Failure and Renal Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Rosita; Burnett, John C.; Sangaralingham, S. Jeson

    2015-01-01

    The public health and economic burden of heart failure (HF) is staggering and the need for relevant pathophysiologic and clinical biomarkers to advance the field and improve HF therapy remains high. Renal dysfunction is common among HF patients and is associated with increased HF hospitalization and mortality. It is widely recognized that mechanisms contributing to HF pathogenesis include a complex bidirectional interaction between the kidney and heart, encompassed by the term cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Among a new wave of urinary biomarkers germane to CRS, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) has emerged as an innovative biomarker of renal structural and functional impairment in HF and chronic renal disease states. CNP is a hormone, synthesized in the kidney, and is an important regulator of cell proliferation and organ fibrosis. Hypoxia, cytokines and fibrotic growth factors, which are inherent to both cardiac and renal remodeling processes, are among the recognized stimuli for CNP production and release. In this review we aim to highlight current knowledge regarding the biology and pathophysiologic correlates of urinary CNP, and its potential clinical utility as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in HF and renal disease states. PMID:25512164

  10. NT pro B type natriuretic peptide levels in constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Parakh, Neeraj; Mehrotra, Sameer; Seth, Sandeep; Ramakrishnan, S.; Kothari, Shyam S.; Bhargava, Balram; Bahl, V.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The differentiation of constrictive pericarditis (CP) from restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) may be clinically difficult and may require multiple investigations. Even though brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is shown to be higher in patients with RCM as compared to CP, the clinical utility is not fully established especially in Indian patients known to have advanced CP and myocardial involvement. Methods and results We measured NT-pro-BNP levels in 49 patients suspected of having either CP or RCM, diagnosed on the basis of echocardiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, endomyocardial biopsy and cardiac catheterization data as needed. Twenty nine patients (Mean age – 26 yrs, 24 males) had CP and 20 patients (Mean age – 39 yrs, 14 males) had RCM. The median plasma NT-pro-BNP levels were significantly higher in RCM as compared to CP [1775 (208–7500) pg/ml vs 124 (68–718) pg/ml, respectively; p = 0.001]. A cut off value of 459 pg/ml had sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of 90%, 86% and 88% respectively, for differentiating CP from RCM. Conclusions The NT-pro-BNP levels are significantly elevated in RCM as compared to CP. PMID:25820049

  11. Reduced immunoreactivities of B-type natriuretic peptide in pulmonary arterial hypertension rats after ranolazine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Kwan Chang

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe pulmonary vascular disease characterized by sustained increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure and excessive thickening and remodeling of the distal small pulmonary arteries. During disease progression, structural remodeling of the right ventricular (RV) impairs pump function, creates pro-arrhythmic substrates and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an anti-anginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects of heart dysfunction. RAN also has anti-arrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAN could reduce the mal-adaptive structural remodeling of the RV, and prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline-induced rat model of PAH. RAN reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrosis. In addition, RAN prevented cardiovascular death in rat model of PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the functional properties of the RV, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of heart impairment. PMID:27051563

  12. Culture on electrospun polyurethane scaffolds decreases atrial natriuretic peptide expression by cardiomyocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Danielle N; Akins, Robert E; Parrag, Ian C; Woodhouse, Kimberly A; Rabolt, John F

    2008-12-01

    The function of the mammalian heart depends on the functional alignment of cardiomyocytes, and controlling cell alignment is an important consideration in biomaterial design for cardiac tissue engineering and research. The physical cues that guide functional cell alignment in vitro and the impact of substrate-imposed alignment on cell phenotype, however, are only partially understood. In this report, primary cardiac ventricular cells were grown on electrospun, biodegradable polyurethane (ES-PU) with either aligned or unaligned microfibers. ES-PU scaffolds supported high-density cultures and cell subpopulations remained intact over two weeks in culture. ES-PU cultures contained electrically-coupled cardiomyocytes with connexin-43 localized to points of cell:cell contact. Multi-cellular organization correlated with microfiber orientation and aligned materials yielded highly oriented cardiomyocyte groupings. Atrial natriuretic peptide, a molecular marker that shows decreasing expression during ventricular cell maturation, was significantly lower in cultures grown on ES-PU scaffolds than in those grown on tissue culture polystyrene. Cells grown on aligned ES-PU had significantly lower steady state levels of ANP and constitutively released less ANP over time indicating that scaffold-imposed cell organization resulted in a shift in cell phenotype to a more mature state. We conclude that the physical organization of microfibers in ES-PU scaffolds impacts both multi-cellular architecture and cardiac cell phenotype in vitro. PMID:18823659

  13. Reduced immunoreactivities of B-type natriuretic peptide in pulmonary arterial hypertension rats after ranolazine treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Kwan Chang; Choe, Soo Young; Hong, Young Mi

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe pulmonary vascular disease characterized by sustained increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure and excessive thickening and remodeling of the distal small pulmonary arteries. During disease progression, structural remodeling of the right ventricular (RV) impairs pump function, creates pro-arrhythmic substrates and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an anti-anginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects of heart dysfunction. RAN also has anti-arrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAN could reduce the mal-adaptive structural remodeling of the RV, and prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline-induced rat model of PAH. RAN reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrosis. In addition, RAN prevented cardiovascular death in rat model of PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the functional properties of the RV, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of heart impairment. PMID:27051563

  14. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels Predict Ventricular Arrhythmia Post Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Yaron; Malik, Adnan S; Lin, Hongbo; Shen, Changyu; Wang, I-Wen; Wozniak, Thomas C; Hashmi, Zubair A; Pickrell, Jeanette; Jani, Milena; Caccamo, Marco A; Gradus-Pizlo, Irmina; Hadi, Azam

    2015-12-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels have been shown to predict ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and sudden death in patients with heart failure. We sought to determine whether BNP levels before left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation can predict VA post LVAD implantation in advanced heart failure patients. We conducted a retrospective study consisting of patients who underwent LVAD implantation in our institution during the period of May 2009-March 2013. The study was limited to patients receiving a HeartMate II or HeartWare LVAD. Acute myocardial infarction patients were excluded. We compared between the patients who developed VA within 15 days post LVAD implantation to the patients without VA. A total of 85 patients underwent LVAD implantation during the study period. Eleven patients were excluded (five acute MI, four without BNP measurements, and two discharged earlier than 13 days post LVAD implantation). The incidence of VA was 31%, with 91% ventricular tachycardia (VT) and 9% ventricular fibrillation. BNP remained the single most powerful predictor of VA even after adjustment for other borderline significant factors in a multivariate logistic regression model (P < 0.05). BNP levels are a strong predictor of VA post LVAD implantation, surpassing previously described risk factors such as age and VT in the past. PMID:25864448

  15. Role of atrial natriuretic peptide in systemic responses to acute isotonic volume expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Yancy, Clyde W.; Buckey, Jay C.; Lane, Lynda D.; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    A hypothesis is proposed that a temporal relationship exists between increases in cardiac filling pressure and plasma artrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentration and also between ANP elevation and vasodilation, fluid movement from plasma to interstitium, and increased urine volume (UV). To test the hypothesis, 30 ml/kg isotonic saline were infused in supine male subjects over 24 min and responses were monitored for 3 h postinfusion. Results show that at end infusion, mean arterial pressure (RAP), heart rate and plasma volume exhibited peak increases of 146, 23, and 27 percent, respectively. Mean plasma ANP and UV peaked (45 and 390 percent, respectively) at 30 min postinfusion. Most cardiovascular variables had returned toward control levels by 1 h postinfusion, and net reabsorption of extravascular fluid ensued. It is concluded that since ANP was not significantly increased until 30 min postinfusion, factors other than ANP initiate responses to intravascular fluid loading. These factors include increased vascular pressures, baroreceptor-mediated vasolidation, and hemodilution of plasma proteins. ANP is suggested to mediate, in part, the renal response to saline infusion.

  16. Angiotensin II-stimulated secretion of arginine vasopressin is inhibited by atrial natriuretic peptide in humans.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Toshiyoshi; Miyamoto, Takenori

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the effect of the intravenous infusion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the response of plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels to intravenous infusion of angiotensin II (ANG II) in healthy individuals. Intravenous infusion of ANP (10 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) slightly but significantly decreased plasma AVP levels, while intravenous infusion of ANG II (10 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) resulted in slightly increased plasma AVP levels. ANG II infused significant elevations in arterial blood pressure and central venous pressure (CVP). Because the elevation in blood pressure could have potentially inhibited AVP secretion via baroreceptor reflexes, the effect of ANG II on blood pressure was attenuated by the simultaneous infusion of nitroprusside. ANG II alone produced a remarkable increase in plasma AVP levels when infused with nitroprusside, whereas the simultaneous ANP intravenous infusion (10 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) abolished the increase in plasma AVP levels induced by ANG II when blood pressure elevation was attenuated by nitroprusside. Thus, ANG II increased AVP secretion and ANP inhibited not only basal AVP secretion but also ANG II-stimulated AVP secretion in humans. These findings support the hypothesis that circulating ANP modulates AVP secretion, in part, by antagonizing the action of circulating ANG II. PMID:21123762

  17. Genetic Analysis of the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Gene Polymorphisms among Essential Hypertensive Patients in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsian, Nooshin; Ismail, Patimah; Ahmadloo, Salma; Eskandarian, Narges; Etemad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) considerably influences blood pressure regulation through water and sodium homoeostasis. Several of the studies have utilized anonymous genetic polymorphic markers and made inconsequent claims about the ANP relevant disorders. Thus, we screened Insertion/Deletion (ID) and G191A polymorphisms of ANP to discover sequence variations with potential functional significance and to specify the linkage disequilibrium pattern between polymorphisms. The relationships of detected polymorphisms with EH with or without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) status were tested subsequently. Method. ANP gene polymorphisms (I/D and A191G) were specified utilizing mutagenically separated Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 320 subjects including 163 EH case subjects and 157 controls. Result. This case-control study discovered a significant association between I/D polymorphisms of ANP gene in EH patient without T2DM. However, the study determined no association between G191A polymorphisms of ANP in EH with or without T2DM. In addition, sociodemographic factors in the case and healthy subjects exhibited strong differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. As a risk factor, ANP gene polymorphisms may affect hypertension. Despite the small sample size in this study, it is the first research assessing the ANP gene polymorphisms in both EH and T2DM patients among Malaysian population. PMID:27413750

  18. Plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin and natriuretic peptides in patients with essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    HU, WEI; ZHOU, PANG-HU; ZHANG, XIAO-BIN; XU, CHANG-GENG; WANG, WEI

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess any changes in the plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin (ADM) and atrial and brain natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP, respectively), and to investigate their pathophysiological roles in patients with essential hypertension (EH). The plasma ADM, ANP and BNP concentrations were measured in 64 patients with untreated EH and 35 normotensive control subjects. After 4 weeks of effective antihypertensive therapy with oral drugs for the hypertensive patients, the plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP in the hypertensive patients were measured again. The plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP were significantly higher in the hypertensive patients than those in the control subjects, and the concentrations increased with the clinical stage. Furthermore, the hypertensive patients exhibited increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr) and decreased glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) compared with the control subjects. The plasma ADM concentration was not only correlated with BUN, Scr and the GFR, but was also associated with the MAP and the plasma levels of ANP and BNP. Following effective antihypertensive therapy with oral medication for 4 weeks, the plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP were significantly, but not sharply, decreased. In conclusion, ADM, along with ANP and BNP, may be involved in the mechanisms acting against a further increase in blood pressure and may be useful biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertensive patients. PMID:26136912

  19. Constitutively active form of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 ameliorates experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nawa, Nobutoshi; Ishida, Hidekazu; Katsuragi, Shinichi; Baden, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Higeno, Ryota; Torigoe, Fumiko; Mihara, Seiko; Narita, Jun; Miura, Kohji; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    We recently found a constitutively active mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (caNPR2; V883M), which synthesizes larger amounts of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) intracellularly without any ligand stimulation than existing drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of gene transduction using caNPR2 for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In vitro gene transduction into human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells using Sendai virus (SeV) vectors carrying caNPR2 induced 10,000-fold increases in the synthesis of cGMP without ligand stimulation, and the proliferation of caNPR2-expressing cells was significantly attenuated. The PAH model rats generated by hypoxia and the administration of SU5416 were then treated with SeV vectors through a direct injection into the left pulmonary artery. Right ventricular systolic pressure was significantly decreased 2 weeks after the treatment, while systemic blood pressure remained unchanged. Histological analyses revealed that the medial wall thickness and occlusion rate of pulmonary arterioles were significantly improved in caNPR2-treated lungs. Neither the systemic integration of virus vectors nor side effects were observed. The massive stimulation of cGMP synthesis by gene therapy with caNPR2 was safe and effective in a PAH rat model and, thus, has potential as a novel therapy for patients with severe progressive PAH. PMID:27419193

  20. Glipizide suppresses embryonic vasculogenesis and angiogenesis through targeting natriuretic peptide receptor A.

    PubMed

    Gu, Quliang; Wang, Chaojie; Wang, Guang; Han, Zhe; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Li, Jiangchao; Qi, Cuiling; Xu, Tao; Yang, Xuesong; Wang, Lijing

    2015-05-01

    Glipizide, a second-generation sulfonylurea, has been widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, it is controversial whether or not glipizide would affect angiogenesis or vasculogenesis. In the present study, we used early chick embryo model to investigate the effect of glipizide on angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, which are the two major processes for embryonic vasculature formation as well as tumor neovascularization. We found that Glipizide suppressed both angiogenesis in yolk-sac membrane (YSM) and blood island formation during developmental vasculogenesis. Glipizide did not affect either the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) or mesoderm cell migration. In addition, it did not interfere with separation of smooth muscle cell progenitors from hemangioblasts. Moreover, natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA) has been identified as the putative target for glipizide׳s inhibitory effect on vasculogenesis. When NPRA was overexpressed or activated, blood island formation was reduced. NPRA signaling may play a crucial role in the effect of glipizide on vasculogenesis during early embryonic development. PMID:25823921

  1. Defective Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Signaling in Skeletal Muscle Links Obesity to Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Coué, Marine; Badin, Pierre-Marie; Vila, Isabelle K; Laurens, Claire; Louche, Katie; Marquès, Marie-Adeline; Bourlier, Virginie; Mouisel, Etienne; Tavernier, Geneviève; Rustan, Arild C; Galgani, Jose E; Joanisse, Denis R; Smith, Steven R; Langin, Dominique; Moro, Cedric

    2015-12-01

    Circulating natriuretic peptide (NP) levels are reduced in obesity and predict the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Since skeletal muscle was recently shown as a key target tissue of NP, we aimed to investigate muscle NP receptor (NPR) expression in the context of obesity and T2D. Muscle NPRA correlated positively with whole-body insulin sensitivity in humans and was strikingly downregulated in obese subjects and recovered in response to diet-induced weight loss. In addition, muscle NP clearance receptor (NPRC) increased in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and T2D. Similar results were found in obese diabetic mice. Although no acute effect of brain NP (BNP) on insulin sensitivity was observed in lean mice, chronic BNP infusion improved blood glucose control and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle of obese and diabetic mice. This occurred in parallel with a reduced lipotoxic pressure in skeletal muscle due to an upregulation of lipid oxidative capacity. In addition, chronic NP treatment in human primary myotubes increased lipid oxidation in a PGC1α-dependent manner and reduced palmitate-induced lipotoxicity. Collectively, our data show that activation of NPRA signaling in skeletal muscle is important for the maintenance of long-term insulin sensitivity and has the potential to treat obesity-related metabolic disorders. PMID:26253614

  2. Role of calcium in effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on aldosterone production in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, L.; Schiffrin, E.L.

    1987-04-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits the stimulation of aldosterone secretion by isolated adrenal glomerulosa cells produced by angiotensin II (ANG II), ACTH, and potassium. The effect of ANP on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium on isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. In the presence of ANP the maximal response of aldosterone output stimulated by ANG II or potassium decreased and the half-maximum (EC/sub 50/) of the response to ACTH was displaced to the right. Because these effects resemble those of calcium-channel blockers, the authors investigated the effect of different concentrations of nifedipine, a dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker, on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium. Nifedipine produced effects similar to ANP. The maximal response of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II and potassium was decreased and the dose-response curve to ACTH was displaced to the right. ANP decreased the maximal response of aldosterone to the dihydropyridine derivative BAY K8644, a calcium-channel activator, without change in its EC/sub 50/. In contrast, nifedipine displaced the dose-response curve to BAY K8644 to the right as expected of a competitive inhibitor. The effect of ANP and nifedipine on basal and stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx into isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. ANP may act on the rat adrenal glomerulosa cells at least in part by interference with calcium entry.

  3. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females.

    PubMed

    Holditch, Sara J; Schreiber, Claire A; Burnett, John C; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb-/-) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb-/- females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb-/- female. This study highlights BNP's vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  4. The natriuretic peptides system in the pathophysiology of heart failure: from molecular basis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Massimo; Carnovali, Marino; Mastromarino, Vittoria

    2016-01-01

    After its discovery in the early 1980s, the natriuretic peptide (NP) system has been extensively characterized and its potential influence in the development and progression of heart failure (HF) has been investigated. HF is a syndrome characterized by the activation of different neurohormonal systems, predominantly the renin-angiotensin (Ang)-aldosterone system (RAAS) and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), but also the NP system. Pharmacological interventions have been developed to counteract the neuroendocrine dysregulation, through the down modulation of RAAS with ACE (Ang-converting enzyme) inhibitors, ARBs (Ang receptor blockers) and mineralcorticoid antagonists and of SNS with β-blockers. In the last years, growing attention has been paid to the NP system. In the present review, we have summarized the current knowledge on the NP system, focusing on its role in HF and we provide an overview of the pharmacological attempts to modulate NP in HF: from the negative results of the study with neprilysin (NEP) inhibitors, alone or associated with an ACE inhibitor and vasopeptidase inhibitors, to the most recently and extremely encouraging results obtained with the new pharmacological class of Ang receptor and NEP inhibitor, currently defined ARNI (Ang receptor NEP inhibitor). Indeed, this new class of drugs to manage HF, supported by the recent results and a vast clinical development programme, may prompt a conceptual shift in the treatment of HF, moving from the inhibition of RAAS and SNS to a more integrated target to rebalance neurohormonal dysregulation in HF. PMID:26637405

  5. Anhedonia and altered cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide following chronic stressor and endotoxin treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Wann, Boubacar Pasto; Audet, Marie-Claude; Gibb, Julie; Anisman, Hymie

    2010-02-01

    Chronic stressors and inflammatory immune activation may contribute to pathophysiological alterations associated with both major depression and cardiovascular disease. The present study, conducted in mice, assessed whether a chronic stressor of moderate severity that induced an anhedonic effect, when coupled with a bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), additively or interactively provoked circulating and heart atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a potentially useful diagnostic and prognostic tool in cardiac diseases. As well, given the potential role of inflammatory processes in both depression and cardiovascular disease, we assessed pro-inflammatory mRNA expression in heart in response to the stressor and the LPS treatments. Male CD-1 mice that had been exposed to a chronic, variable stressor over 4 weeks displayed reduced sucrose consumption, possibly reflecting the anhedonic effects of the stressor. Treatment with LPS (10mug) provoked increased circulating corticosterone levels in both chronically stressed and non-stressed mice. Moreover, ANP concentrations in plasma and in the left ventricle were increased by both the stressor and the LPS treatments, as were left atrial and ventricular cytokine (interleukin-1beta; tumor necrosis factor-alpha) mRNA expression. Further, these treatments synergistically influenced the rise of plasma ANP. A link may exist between stressor-provoked depressive features (anhedonia) and immune activation, with elevated levels of ANP, a potential marker of cardiovascular disturbance. These findings are consistent with the view that chronic stressors and inflammatory immune activation may represent a common denominator subserving the frequent comorbidity between these illnesses. PMID:19604644

  6. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females

    PubMed Central

    Holditch, Sara J.; Schreiber, Claire A.; Burnett, John C.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb−/−) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb−/− females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb−/− female. This study highlights BNP’s vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  7. In vivo natriuretic peptide reporter assay identifies chemical modifiers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy signalling

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jason R.; Robinson, Tamara Y.; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Kelly, Amy E.; Coy, Shannon; Peterson, Randall T.; MacRae, Calum A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Despite increased understanding of the fundamental biology regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and heart failure, it has been challenging to find novel chemical or genetic modifiers of these pathways. Traditional cell-based methods do not model the complexity of an intact cardiovascular system and mammalian models are not readily adaptable to chemical or genetic screens. Our objective was to create an in vivo model suitable for chemical and genetic screens for hypertrophy and heart failure modifiers Methods and results Using the developing zebrafish, we established that the cardiac natriuretic peptide genes (nppa and nppb), known markers of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and heart failure, were induced in the embryonic heart by pathological cardiac stimuli. This pathological induction was distinct from the developmental regulation of these genes. We created a luciferase-based transgenic reporter line that accurately modelled the pathological induction patterns of the zebrafish nppb gene. Utilizing this reporter line, we were able to show remarkable conservation of pharmacological responses between the larval zebrafish heart and adult mammalian models. Conclusion By performing a focused screen of chemical agents, we were able to show a distinct response of a genetic model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to the histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostatin A, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor, U0126. We believe this in vivo reporter line will offer a unique approach to the identification of novel chemical or genetic regulators of myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure. PMID:22198505

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases microvascular blood flow and macromolecular escape during renin infusion in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Boric, M.P.; Albertini, R. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) on microvascular hemodynamics and macromolecular permselectivity were studied in the hamster cheek pouch under resting conditions and during intravenous renin infusion. Fluorescent intravital microscopy was used to observe arteriolar diameters and to detect escape of fluorescent dextran of 150 K-Daltons (FITC-Dx-150). Microvascular plasma flow was estimated by clearance of 51Cr-EDTA and net macromolecular transport by clearance of FITC-Dx-150. At rest, topical ANP (2-250 ng/ml) had no effect on arteriolar diameter, 51Cr-EDTA clearance, relative vascular conductance (RVC) or FITC-Dx-150 clearance. Infusion of renin (10 mU/Kg/Hr, iv) elevated systemic arterial pressure by 30% and reduced cheek pouch RVC by 26%. During renin infusion, topical ANP (50 ng/ml) produced transient arteriolar vasodilation, and increased 51Cr-EDTA clearance (+35%), RVC (+58%) and FITC-Dx-150 clearance (+54%), without affecting systemic pressure. ANP did not induce venular leakage sites under any condition, but changes in FITC-Dx-150 clearance were highly correlated with changes in 51Cr-EDTA clearance, suggesting that the larger macromolecular escape was due to increases in microvascular blood flow and capillary/post-capillary hydrostatic pressure.

  9. Serum B-type natriuretic peptide levels as a marker for anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YA-DI; CHEN, SU-XIAN; REN, LI-QUN

    2016-01-01

    Observational and experimental studies have produced inconsistent evidence about the association of serum levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) with anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (AIC). Therefore, the current meta-analysis examined the association between serum BNP levels and AIC by using data from high quality studies published in peer-reviewed journals. Relevant studies were identified through literature searches of China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Web of Science, PubMed, Google Scolar and China BioMedicine (CBM). STATA software was used in this meta-analysis for statistical analysis. In addition, the crude standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for the highest vs. the lowest category of serum BNP levels was calculated. A total of 8 independent case-control studies, containing 126 AIC patients and 569 healthy controls, were included for the current meta-analysis. The results indicated a significant difference in serum BNP levels between the cardiotoxic group and normal group, with respect to post-treatment and pretreatment with anthracyclines. Specifically, the serum levels of BNP increased remarkably after treatment with anthracyclines in the cardiotoxic group, compared with the normal group. No publication bias was detected in this meta-analysis. The findings of the present study provide strong evidence that serum BNP levels may be associated with AIC. PMID:27123140

  10. Constitutively active form of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 ameliorates experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nawa, Nobutoshi; Ishida, Hidekazu; Katsuragi, Shinichi; Baden, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Higeno, Ryota; Torigoe, Fumiko; Mihara, Seiko; Narita, Jun; Miura, Kohji; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    We recently found a constitutively active mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (caNPR2; V883M), which synthesizes larger amounts of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) intracellularly without any ligand stimulation than existing drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of gene transduction using caNPR2 for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In vitro gene transduction into human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells using Sendai virus (SeV) vectors carrying caNPR2 induced 10,000-fold increases in the synthesis of cGMP without ligand stimulation, and the proliferation of caNPR2-expressing cells was significantly attenuated. The PAH model rats generated by hypoxia and the administration of SU5416 were then treated with SeV vectors through a direct injection into the left pulmonary artery. Right ventricular systolic pressure was significantly decreased 2 weeks after the treatment, while systemic blood pressure remained unchanged. Histological analyses revealed that the medial wall thickness and occlusion rate of pulmonary arterioles were significantly improved in caNPR2-treated lungs. Neither the systemic integration of virus vectors nor side effects were observed. The massive stimulation of cGMP synthesis by gene therapy with caNPR2 was safe and effective in a PAH rat model and, thus, has potential as a novel therapy for patients with severe progressive PAH. PMID:27419193

  11. Role of a molecular variant of rat atrial natriuretic Peptide gene in vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    De Paolis, Paola; Nobili, Valerio; Lombardi, Alessia; Tarasi, David; Barbato, Daniela; Marchitti, Simona; Ganten, Ursula; Brunetti, Ercole; Volpe, Massimo; Rubattu, Speranza

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies in a hypertensive animal model of stroke and in humans showed that mutations of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene are associated with increased risk of stroke. To elucidate the vascular disease mechanisms that result from structural modifications of the ANP gene, we investigated a coding mutation of the ANP gene in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRsp). This mutation leads to a Gly/Ser transposition in the prosegment of ANP. We found that presence of this mutation is associated with increased immunostaining of ANP in the wall of SHRsp cerebral vessels. The mutation causes a major inhibitory effect on endothelial cell proliferation, as assessed by thymidine incorporation, and on angiogenesis, as determined by an endothelial cell tube formation assay, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to ANP/SHRsp. These in vitro findings show that the SHRsp-derived form of ANP has an inhibitory effect on vascular remodeling and they provide further support for a role of the ANP gene in the pathogenesis of cerebrovascular disease in the animal model. PMID:17522368

  12. Agonistic induction of a covalent dimer in a mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A documents a juxtamembrane interaction that accompanies receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Deschênes, J; McNicoll, N; De Léan, A

    2001-03-16

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is composed of an extracellular domain with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane-spanning domain, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. In response to agonists (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide), the kinase homology domain-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, which allows the production of cyclic GMP. Previous work from our laboratory strongly indicated that agonists are exerting their effects through the induction of a juxtamembrane dimeric contact. However, a direct demonstration of this mechanism remains to be provided. As a tool, we are now using the properties of a new mutation, D435C. It introduces a cysteine at a position in NPR-A corresponding to a supplementary cysteine found in NPR-C6, another receptor of this family (a disulfide-linked dimer). Although this D435C mutation only leads to trace levels of NPR-A disulfide-linked dimer at basal state, covalent dimerization can be induced by a treatment with rat ANP or with other agonists. The NPR-A(D435C) mutant has not been subjected to significant structural alterations, since it shares with the wild type receptor a similar dose-response pattern of cellular guanylyl cyclase activation. However, a persistent activation accompanies NPR-A(D435C) dimer formation after the removal of the inducer agonist. On the other hand, a construction where the intracellular domain of NPR-A(D435C) has been truncated (DeltaKC(D435C)) displays a spontaneous and complete covalent dimerization. In addition, the elimination of the intracellular domain in wild type DeltaKC and DeltaKC(D435C) is associated with an increase of agonist binding affinity, this effect being more pronounced with the weak agonist pBNP. Also, a D435C secreted extracellular domain remains unlinked even after incubation with rat ANP. In summary, these results demonstrate, in a dynamic fashion, the agonistic induction of a dimeric contact in the

  13. Permeability and contractile responses of collecting lymphatic vessels elicited by atrial and brain natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Davis, Michael J; Huxley, Virginia H

    2013-10-15

    Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP, respectively) are cardiac hormones released into the bloodstream in response to hypervolaemia or fluid shifts to the central circulation. The actions of both peptides include natriuresis and diuresis, a decrease in systemic blood pressure, and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Further, ANP and BNP elicit increases in blood microvessel permeability sufficient to cause protein and fluid extravasation into the interstitium to reduce the vascular volume. Given the importance of the lymphatic vasculature in maintaining fluid balance, we tested the hypothesis that ANP or BNP (100 nM) would likewise elevate lymphatic permeability (Ps) to serum albumin. Using a microfluorometric technique adapted to in vivo lymphatic vessels, we determined that rat mesenteric collecting lymphatic Ps to rat serum albumin increased by 2.0 ± 0.4-fold (P = 0.01, n = 7) and 2.7 ± 0.8-fold (P = 0.07, n = 7) with ANP and BNP, respectively. In addition to measuring Ps responses, we observed changes in spontaneous contraction amplitude and frequency from the albumin flux tracings in vivo. Notably, ANP abolished spontaneous contraction amplitude (P = 0.005) and frequency (P = 0.006), while BNP augmented both parameters by ∼2-fold (P < 0.01 each). These effects of ANP and BNP on contractile function were examined further by using an in vitro assay. In aggregate, these data support the theory that an increase in collecting lymphatic permeability opposes the absorptive function of the lymphatic capillaries, and aids in the retention of protein and fluid in the interstitial space to counteract volume expansion. PMID:23897233

  14. C-type natriuretic peptide in combination with sildenafil attenuates proliferation of rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zenitani, Masahiro; Nojiri, Takashi; Uehara, Shuichiro; Miura, Koichi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kimura, Toru; Nakahata, Kengo; Miyazato, Mikiya; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Kangawa, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a malignant mesenchymal tumor and the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children. Because of several complications associated with intensive multimodal therapies, including growth disturbance and secondary cancer, novel therapies with less toxicity are urgently needed. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), an endogenous peptide secreted by endothelial cells, exerts antiproliferative effects in multiple types of mesenchymal cells. Therefore, we investigated whether CNP attenuates proliferation of RMS cells. We examined RMS patient samples and RMS cell lines. All RMS clinical samples expressed higher levels of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), the specific receptor for CNP, than RMS cell lines. GC-B expression in RMS cells decreased with the number of passages in vitro. Therefore, GC-B stable expression lines were established to mimic clinical samples. CNP increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in RMS cells in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating the biological activity of CNP. However, because cGMP is quickly degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs), the selective PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil was added to inhibit its degradation. In vitro, CNP, and sildenafil synergistically inhibited proliferation of RMS cells stably expressing GC-B and decreased Raf-1, Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. These results suggested that CNP in combination with sildenafil exerts antiproliferative effects on RMS cells by inhibiting the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. This regimen exerted synergistic effects on tumor growth inhibition without severe adverse effects in vivo such as body weight loss. Thus, CNP in combination with sildenafil represents a promising new therapeutic approach against RMS. PMID:26816265

  15. Regulation of B-type natriuretic peptide synthesis by insulin in obesity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Thoonen, Robrecht; Yao, Vincent; Buys, Emmanuel S; Popovich, John; Su, Yan Ru; Wang, Thomas J; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Human studies suggest that insulin resistance and obesity are associated with a decrease in B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) plasma concentrations. The objective of the study was to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in the association between insulin resistance and decreased BNP plasma concentrations. Mice fed a high-fat, high-fructose (HFHF) diet for 4 weeks developed mild obesity and systemic insulin resistance. Elevated plasma concentrations of insulin, glucose and triglycerides were noted. The HFHF diet was also associated with myocardial insulin resistance, characterized by an impaired response of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-AKT (PI3K-AKT) pathway to insulin in the left ventricle. Myocardial BNP expression and protein were decreased in HFHF-fed mice compared with control animals. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to 100 nm insulin activated PI3K-AKT signalling (15 min) and induced a 1.9 ± 0.3-fold increase in BNP gene expression (6 h). Prolonged exposure of cardiomyocytes to a high insulin concentration (100 nm) for 48 h induced insulin resistance, characterized by an impaired response of the PI3K-AKT signalling pathway and a decreased response of the BNP gene expression to insulin. The decreased response in BNP gene expression was reproduced by treating cardiomyocytes for 7 h with a PI3-kinase inhibitor (wortmannin). In conclusion, HFHF diet in vivo, prolonged exposure to an elevated concentration of insulin or inhibition of the PI3K-AKT pathway in vitro all decrease BNP mRNA levels; this decrease may in turn contribute to the decreased BNP peptide concentrations in plasma observed in insulin-resistant individuals. PMID:26446173

  16. Plant natriuretic peptides induce proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to stress

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Ilona; Marondedze, Claudius; Wheeler, Janet I.; Gehring, Chris; Irving, Helen R.

    2014-01-01

    In plants, structural and physiological evidence has suggested the presence of biologically active natriuretic peptides (PNPs). PNPs are secreted into the apoplast, are systemically mobile and elicit a range of responses signaling via cGMP. The PNP-dependent responses include tissue specific modifications of cation transport and changes in stomatal conductance and the photosynthetic rate. PNP also has a critical role in host defense responses. Surprisingly, PNP-homologs are produced by several plant pathogens during host colonization suppressing host defense responses. Here we show that a synthetic peptide representing the biologically active fragment of the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) induces the production of reactive oxygen species in suspension-cultured A. thaliana (Col-0) cells. To identify proteins whose expression changes in an AtPNP-A dependent manner, we undertook a quantitative proteomic approach, employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, to reveal temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM PNP at two different time-points post-treatment. Both concentrations yield a distinct differential proteome signature. Since only the higher (1 nM) concentration induces a ROS response, we conclude that the proteome response at the lower concentration reflects a ROS independent response. Furthermore, treatment with 1 nM PNP results in an over-representation of the gene ontology (GO) terms “oxidation-reduction process,” “translation” and “response to salt stress” and this is consistent with a role of AtPNP-A in the adaptation to environmental stress conditions. PMID:25505478

  17. Age-adjusted plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level in Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Heul; Ko, Kyung Ok; Lim, Jae Woo; Yoon, Jung Min; Lee, Gyung Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent reports showed that plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) could be a useful biomarker of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) unresponsiveness and coronary artery lesion (CAL) development in Kawasaki disease (KD). The levels of these peptides are critically influenced by age; hence, the normal range and upper limits for infants and children are different. We performed an age-adjusted analysis of plasma NT-proBNP level to validate its clinical use in the diagnosis of KD. Methods The data of 131 patients with KD were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into 2 groups—group I (high NT-proBNP group) and group II (normal NT-proBNP group)—comprising patients with NT-proBNP concentrations higher and lower than the 95th percentile of the reference value, respectively. We compared the laboratory data, responsiveness to IVIG, and the risk of CAL in both groups. Results Group I showed significantly higher white blood cell count, absolute neutrophil count, C-reactive protein level, aspartate aminotransferase level, and troponin-I level than group II (P<0.05). The risk of CAL was also significantly higher in group I (odds ratio, 5.78; P=0.012). IVIG unresponsiveness in group I was three times that in group II (odds ratio, 3.35; P= 0.005). Conclusion Age-adjusted analysis of plasma NT-proBNP level could be helpful in predicting IVIG unresponsiveness and risk of CAL development in patients with KD. PMID:27588030

  18. Role of FQQI motif in the internalization, trafficking, and signaling of guanylyl-cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A in cultured murine mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Mani, Indra; Garg, Renu; Pandey, Kailash N

    2016-01-01

    Binding of the cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to transmembrane guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP in target cells. To delineate the critical role of an endocytic signal in intracellular sorting of the receptor, we have identified a FQQI (Phe(790), Gln(791), Gln(792), and Ile(793)) motif in the carboxyl-terminal region of NPRA. Mouse mesangial cells (MMCs) were transiently transfected with the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-tagged wild-type (WT) and mutant constructs of eGFP-NPRA. The mutation FQQI/AAAA, in the eGFP-NPRA cDNA sequence, markedly attenuated the internalization of mutant receptors by almost 49% compared with the WT receptor. Interestingly, we show that the μ1B subunit of adaptor protein-1 binds directly to a phenylalanine-based FQQI motif in the cytoplasmic tail of the receptor. However, subcellular trafficking indicated that immunofluorescence colocalization of the mutated receptor with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1), lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and Rab 11 marker was decreased by 57% in early endosomes, 48% in lysosomes, and 42% in recycling endosomes, respectively, compared with the WT receptor in MMCs. The receptor containing the mutated motif (FQQI/AAAA) also produced a significantly decreased level of intracellular cGMP during subcellular trafficking than the WT receptor. The coimmunoprecipitation assay confirmed a decreased level of colocalization of the mutant receptor with subcellular compartments during endocytic processes. The results suggest that the FQQI motif is essential for the internalization and subcellular trafficking of NPRA during the hormone signaling process in intact MMCs. PMID:26377794

  19. Cloning and sequence analysis of an Ophiophagus hannah cDNA encoding a precursor of two natriuretic peptide domains.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Guoyu; Jiang, Ping; He, Yingying; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2011-04-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake. Despite the components are mainly neurotoxins, the venom contains several proteins affecting blood system. Natriuretic peptide (NP), one of the important components of snake venoms, could cause local vasodilatation and a promoted capillary permeability facilitating a rapid diffusion of other toxins into the prey tissues. Due to the low abundance, it is hard to purify the snake venom NPs. The cDNA cloning of the NPs become a useful approach. In this study, a 957 bp natriuretic peptide-encoding cDNA clone was isolated from an O. hannah venom gland cDNA library. The open-reading frame of the cDNA encodes a 210-amino acid residues precursor protein named Oh-NP. Oh-NP has a typical signal peptide sequence of 26 amino acid residues. Surprisingly, Oh-NP has two typical NP domains which consist of the typical sequence of 17-residue loop of CFGXXDRIGC, so it is an unusual NP precursor. These two NP domains share high amino acid sequence identity. In addition, there are two homologous peptides of unknown function within the Oh-NP precursor. To our knowledge, Oh-NP is the first protein precursor containing two NP domains. It might belong to another subclass of snake venom NPs. PMID:21334357

  20. The natriuretic peptide/guanylyl cyclase--a system functions as a stress-responsive regulator of angiogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela; Völker, Katharina; Schwarz, Kristine; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Flögel, Ulrich; Jacoby, Christoph; Stypmann, Jörg; van Eickels, Martin; Gambaryan, Stepan; Hartmann, Michael; Werner, Matthias; Wieland, Thomas; Schrader, Jürgen; Baba, Hideo A

    2009-07-01

    Cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) modulate blood pressure and volume by activation of the receptor guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) and subsequent intracellular cGMP formation. Here we report what we believe to be a novel function of these peptides as paracrine regulators of vascular regeneration. In mice with systemic deletion of the GC-A gene, vascular regeneration in response to critical hind limb ischemia was severely impaired. Similar attenuation of ischemic angiogenesis was observed in mice with conditional, endothelial cell-restricted GC-A deletion (here termed EC GC-A KO mice). In contrast, smooth muscle cell-restricted GC-A ablation did not affect ischemic neovascularization. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR revealed BNP expression in activated satellite cells within the ischemic muscle, suggesting that local BNP elicits protective endothelial effects. Since within the heart, BNP is mainly induced in cardiomyocytes by mechanical load, we investigated whether the natriuretic peptide/GC-A system also regulates angiogenesis accompanying load-induced cardiac hypertrophy. EC GC-A KO hearts showed diminished angiogenesis, mild fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction. In vitro BNP/GC-A stimulated proliferation and migration of cultured microvascular endothelia by activating cGMP-dependent protein kinase I and phosphorylating vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and p38 MAPK. We therefore conclude that BNP, produced by activated satellite cells within ischemic skeletal muscle or by cardiomyocytes in response to pressure load, regulates the regeneration of neighboring endothelia via GC-A. This paracrine communication might be critically involved in coordinating muscle regeneration/hypertrophy and angiogenesis. PMID:19487812

  1. Area postrema, a brain circumventricular organ, is the site of antidipsogenic action of circulating atrial natriuretic peptide in eels.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Takehiro; Nobata, Shigenori; Hyodo, Susumu; Takei, Yoshio

    2007-11-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) potently reduces excess drinking to ameliorate hypernatremia in seawater (SW) eels. However, the cerebral mechanism underlying the antidipsogenic effect is largely unknown. To localize the ANP target site in the brain, we examined the distribution of ANP receptors (NPR-A) in eel brain immunohistochemically using an antiserum specific for eel NPR-A. The immunoreactive NPR-A was localized in the capillaries of various brain regions. In addition, immunoreactive neurons were observed mostly in the medulla oblongata, including the reticular formation, glossopharyngeal-vagal motor complex, commissural nucleus of Cajal, and area postrema (AP). Trypan Blue, which binds serum albumin and does not cross the blood-brain barrier, was injected peripherally and stained the neurons in the AP but not other NPR-A immunopositive neurons. These histological data indicate that circulating ANP acts on the AP, which was further confirmed by physiological experiments. To this end, the AP in SW eels was topically destroyed by electric cauterization or were by chemical lesion of its neurons by kainic acid, and ANP (100 pmol kg(-1)) was then injected into the circulation. Both heat-coagulative and chemical lesions to the AP greatly reduced an antidipsogenic effect of ANP, but the ANP effect was retained in sham-operated eels and in those with lesions outside the AP. These results strongly suggest that the AP, a circumventricular organ without a blood-brain barrier, serves as a functional window of access for the circulating ANP to inhibit drinking in eels. PMID:17981865

  2. Enhanced Hypertrophy In ob/ob Mice Due To An Impairment in Expression Of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Mascareno, Eduardo; Beckles, Daniel; Dhar-Mascareno, Manya; Siddiqui, M.A.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale We investigated the molecular mechanism(s) that play a role in leptin signaling during the development of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) due to pressure overload. To this end, ob/ob leptin deficient and C57BL/6J control mice were subjected transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Methods Control sham C57BL/6J and ob/ob mice, along with C57BL/6J and ob/ob leptin deficient mice were subjected transverse aortic constriction (TAC) for 15 days and then evaluated for morphological, physiological, and molecular changes associated with pressure overload hypertrophy. Results Evaluation by echocardiography revealed a significant increase in left ventricular mass (LVmass) and wall thickness in ob/ob mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) as compared to C57BL/6J. Analysis of the expression of molecular markers of LVH, such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), revealed a blunted increase in the level of ANP in ob/ob mice as compared to C57BL/6J mice. We observed that leptin plays a role in modulating the transcriptional activity of the promoter of the ANP gene. Leptin acts by regulating NFATc4, a member of the nuclear factor activated T cell (NFAT) family of transcription factors in cardiomyocytes. Our in vivo studies revealed that ob/ob mice subjected to TAC failed to activate the NFATc4 in the heart, however, intraperitoneal injection of leptin in ob/ob mice restored the NFATc4 DNA-binding activity and induced expression of the ANP gene. Conclusion This study establishes the role of leptin as an anti-hypertrophic agent during pressure overload hypertrophy, and suggests that a key molecular event is the leptin mediated activation of NFATc4 that regulates the transcriptional activation of the ANP gene promoter. PMID:19560554

  3. Atrial natriuretic peptide suppresses endothelin gene expression and proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts through a GATA4-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Denis J.; Rahmutula, Dolkun; Nishimoto, Minobu; Liang, Faquan; Gardner, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a hormone that has both antihypertrophic and antifibrotic properties in the heart. We hypothesized that myocyte-derived ANP inhibits endothelin (ET) gene expression in fibroblasts. Methods and results We have investigated the mechanism(s) involved in the antiproliferative effect of ANP on cardiac fibroblasts in a cell culture model. We found that cardiac myocytes inhibited DNA synthesis in co-cultured cardiac fibroblasts as did treatment with the ET-1 antagonist BQ610. The effect of co-culture was reversed by antibody directed against ANP or the ANP receptor antagonist HS-142-1. ANP inhibited the expression of the ET-1 gene and ET-1 gene promoter activity in cultured fibroblasts. The site of the inhibition was localized to a GATA-binding site positioned between −132 and −135 upstream from the transcription start site. GATA4 expression was demonstrated in cardiac fibroblasts, GATA4 bound the ET-1 promoter both in vitro and in vivo, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of GATA4 inhibited ET-1 expression. ET-1 treatment resulted in increased levels of phospho-serine105 GATA4 in cardiac fibroblasts and this induction was partially suppressed by co-treatment with ANP. Conclusion Collectively, these findings suggest that locally produced ET-1 serves as an autocrine stimulator of fibroblast proliferation, that ANP produced in neighbouring myocytes serves as a paracrine inhibitor of this proliferation, and that the latter effect operates through a reduction in GATA4 phosphorylation and coincident reduction in GATA4-dependent transcriptional activity. PMID:19546173

  4. Isolation, homology modeling and renal effects of a C-type natriuretic peptide from the venom of the Brazilian yellow scorpion (Tityus serrulatus).

    PubMed

    Alves, Renata S; Ximenes, Rafael M; Jorge, Antonio R C; Nascimento, Nilberto R F; Martins, René D; Rabello, Marcelo M; Hernandes, Marcelo Z; Toyama, Daniela O; Toyama, Marcos H; Martins, Alice M C; Havt, Alexandre; Monteiro, Helena S A

    2013-11-01

    Mammalian natriuretic peptides (NPs) have been extensively investigated for use as therapeutic agents in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we describe the isolation, sequencing and tridimensional homology modeling of the first C-type natriuretic peptide isolated from scorpion venom. In addition, its effects on the renal function of rats and on the mRNA expression of natriuretic peptide receptors in the kidneys are delineated. Fractionation of Tityus serrulatus venom using chromatographic techniques yielded a peptide with a molecular mass of 2190.64 Da, which exhibited the pattern of disulfide bridges that is characteristic of a C-type NP (TsNP, T. serrulatus Natriuretic Peptide). In the isolated perfused rat kidney assay, treatment with two concentrations of TsNP (0.03 and 0.1 μg/mL) increased the perfusion pressure, glomerular filtration rate and urinary flow. After 60 min of treatment at both concentrations, the percentages of sodium, potassium and chloride transport were decreased, and the urinary cGMP concentration was elevated. Natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) mRNA expression was down regulated in the kidneys treated with both concentrations of TsNP, whereas NPR-B, NPR-C and CG-C mRNAs were up regulated at the 0.1 μg/mL concentration. In conclusion, this work describes the isolation and modeling of the first natriuretic peptide isolated from scorpion venom. In addition, examinations of the renal actions of TsNP indicate that its effects may be related to the activation of NPR-B, NPR-C and GC-C. PMID:23911732

  5. Mechanical stretch increases brain natriuretic peptide production and secretion in the human fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Jorge A; Delpiano, Ana M; Cuello, Mauricio A; Poblete, José A

    2013-05-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is synthesized by human fetal membranes, both the amnion and chorion. This locally produced BNP inhibits the contraction of the human myometrium, contributing to the maintenance of myometrial quiescence during pregnancy. We tested the hypothesis that BNP production is increased by fetal membrane stretching, which is predicted to occur in the expanding uterus, and inhibited by epidermal growth factor (EGF), whose production in the fetal membranes increases in late pregnancy. Term fetal membranes were obtained during elective cesarean delivery before labor. Sections of membranes were placed in an isolated chamber containing DMEM: F12 medium (37°C) and stretched with a 35 g weight. Medium and tissue samples were collected at 0, 3, 6, 18, and 24 hours for measurement of messenger RNA (mRNA) and BNP levels in the presence/absence of EGF (2 × 10(-9 )mol/L). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and β-actin were also evaluated to discard a nonspecific effect of mechanical stretch on protein expression. We found that amnion and chorion stretching increased the BNP mRNA (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) and protein (radioimmunosorbent assay [RIA]) levels from 18 hours onward. The effect of stretching was inhibited by EGF (2 × 10(-9) mol/L). Stretch did not increase iNOS or β-actin protein levels. We concluded that chorion and amnion stretching may increase BNP expression in the fetal membranes during pregnancy, while increasing biological activity of EGF may decrease BNP production in the chorion and amnion late in pregnancy. We postulate BNP is an important regulator of myometrial contractility during pregnancy, and its production is modulated by both stretch and progressive increase in EGF levels during pregnancy. PMID:23012317

  6. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Regulates Ca2+ Channel in Early Developmental Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lin; Wang, Min; Yin, Wen-Xuan; Yuan, Qi; Chen, Ying-Xiao; Fleischmann, Bernd; Hescheler, Jürgen; Ji, Guangju

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiomyocytes derived from murine embryonic stem (ES) cells possess various membrane currents and signaling cascades link to that of embryonic hearts. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in regulation of membrane potentials and Ca2+ currents has not been investigated in developmental cardiomyocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the role of ANP in regulating L-type Ca2+ channel current (ICaL) in different developmental stages of cardiomyocytes derived from ES cells. ANP decreased the frequency of action potentials (APs) in early developmental stage (EDS) cardiomyocytes, embryonic bodies (EB) as well as whole embryo hearts. ANP exerted an inhibitory effect on basal ICaL in about 70% EDS cardiomyocytes tested but only in about 30% late developmental stage (LDS) cells. However, after stimulation of ICaL by isoproterenol (ISO) in LDS cells, ANP inhibited the response in about 70% cells. The depression of ICaL induced by ANP was not affected by either Nω, Nitro-L-Arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthetase (NOS) inhibitor, or KT5823, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) selective inhibitor, in either EDS and LDS cells; whereas depression of ICaL by ANP was entirely abolished by erythro-9-(2-Hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA), a selective inhibitor of type 2 phosphodiesterase(PDE2) in most cells tested. Conclusion/Significances Taken together, these results indicate that ANP induced depression of action potentials and ICaL is due to activation of particulate guanylyl cyclase (GC), cGMP production and cGMP-activation of PDE2 mediated depression of adenosine 3′, 5′–cyclic monophophate (cAMP)–cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in early cardiomyogenesis. PMID:20107504

  7. The association between brain natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler parameters in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oner, Taliha; Ozdemir, Rahmi; Hazan, Filiz; Karadeniz, Cem; Doksoz, Onder; Yilmazer, Murat Muhtar; Mese, Timur; Tavli, Vedide

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the association between brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and tissue Doppler imaging measurements and also screening for deadly mutations in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We enrolled 20 patients diagnosed with HCM (age:10.7±5 years (1-17), 85% male, weight:42.25±23.10 kg, height:141.80±32.45 cm) and 20 age, gender and body weight-matched control subjects. We performed electrocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography, and tissue Doppler echocardiography in each group, as well as genetic tests (for Arg403Gln, Arg453Cys, Arg719Trp and Arg719Gln mutations in MYH7 Exons 13, 14, 19) and BNP in the patients. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence (Group 1) or absence (Group 2) of left ventricular (LV) outflow tract obstruction. QTc dispersion and the LV ejection fraction and left atrial (LA) volume index were increased in Group 1. The LA volume index and the mitral and septal E/Ea ratio and septum Z-score were increased while the mitral lateral annulus and septal annulus Ea wave velocities and the mitral and tricuspid E/A ratio were decreased in patients with high levels of BNP compared to those with normal BNP levels. There were no mutations that are associated with increased risk of sudden death found in patients included in this study. In the light of our data, we conclude that such parameters BNP levels above the 98 pg/mL, septal thickness Z-score >6, and higher mitral and septal E/Ea ratios can be used for management of patients with HCM according to life-threatening conditions. PMID:26773184

  8. Role of supraspinal vasopressin neurones in the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Yusof, A P M; Yusoff, N H M; Suhaimi, F W; Coote, J H

    2009-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine if paraventricular-spinal vasopressin neurones participate in the sympatho-inhibitory effects of systemically administered atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats anesthetized with 1.3 g/kg urethane. Changes in mean arterial pressure (mm Hg), heart rate (beats per minute) and RSNA (%) were measured following intravenous bolus administration of ANP (250 ng, 500 ng and 5 microg). Intrathecal application of selective V 1a receptor antagonist was performed to test for the involvement of supraspinal vasopressin pathways in mediating the effect on sympathetic outflow evoked by intravenous ANP administration. The results obtained demonstrated that both low and high doses of ANP caused renal sympathoinhibition (250 ng; - 7.5 +/- 1%, 500 ng; - 14.2 +/- 1%, 5 microg; - 16.4 +/- 2%), concomitant with vasodilation and bradycardia. After spinal vasopressin receptor blockade, the inhibitory effects of ANP were prevented and there was a small renal sympatho-excitation (250 ng; + 1.7 +/- 0.2%, 500 ng; + 6.1 +/- 0.03%, 5 microg; + 8.0 +/- 0.03%, P < 0.05). Therefore, the renal sympathetic nerve inhibition elicited by circulating ANP is dependent on the efficacy of a well established supraspinal vasopressin pathway. Since supraspinal vasopressin neurones without exception excite renal sympathetic neurones, it is suggested that ANP elicits this effect by activating cardiac vagal afferents that inhibit the spinally projecting vasopressin neurones at their origin in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. PMID:19349212

  9. [Pathophysiological significance of the natriuretic peptide system: receptor subtype as another key factor].

    PubMed

    Naruse, M; Yoshimoto, T; Tanabe, A; Naruse, K

    1998-09-01

    The natriuretic peptide (NP) system is one of the most important systems regulating blood pressure and body-fluid homeostasis. The biological activities of the system are determined by the NPs and the receptors, which are comprised of three subtypes: NP-AR and NP-BR related to biological activities and NP-CR related to the clearance of NP. We focused our studies on the receptor subtypes. In hypertensive rats (SHR-SP/Izm, DOCA/salt), NP-AR was upregulated and NP-CR was downregulated. The ACE inhibitor derapril, but not the Ca2+ blocker manidipine, normalized the upregulated NP-AR, but the effect was completely abolished by the bradykinin beta 2-receptor antagonist, suggesting that bradykinin regulates the vascular NP-AR. The AT1 antagonist TCV-116, but not manidipine, reversed the downregulated NP-CR. Ang II decreased NP-CR in cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. These results suggest that upregulation of NP-AR and downregulation of NP-CR with the increased plasma NPs counteract hypertension by enhancing the action of NP. A beta-blocker (carvedilol) potentiated the hypotensive action of NPs by increasing plasma NPs and enhancing the vascular response to NPs via downregulation of the vascular and lung NP-CR. The newly found mode of actions could be related to its anti-heart failure effect. In genetically hyperglycemic Wistar fatty rats, vascular NP-BR and NP-AR were upregulated. Since plasma ANP and vascular CNP were significantly increased, the local CNP/NP-BR system as well as the systemic ANP/NP-AR system may play an important role in counteracting vascular remodeling in diabetes mellitus. All these observations provide in vivo evidence for the pathophysiological significance of the receptor subtype of the NPs. PMID:9793068

  10. Chronic Treatment with Atrial Natriuretic Peptide in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Beneficial Renal Effects and Sex Differences

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Mariana; Caniffi, Carolina; Bouchet, Gonzalo; Costa, María A.; Elesgaray, Rosana; Arranz, Cristina; Tomat, Analía L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic treatment with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on renal function, nitric oxide (NO) system, oxidative stress, collagen content and apoptosis in kidneys of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), as well as sex-related differences in the response to the treatment. Methods 10 week-old male and female SHR were infused with ANP (100 ng/h/rat) or saline (NaCl 0.9%) for 14 days (subcutaneous osmotic pumps). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was recorded and diuresis and natriuresis were determined. After treatment, renal NO synthase (NOS) activity and eNOS expression were evaluated. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione concentration and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in the kidney. Collagen was identified in renal slices by Sirius red staining and apoptosis by Tunel assay. Results Female SHR showed lower SBP, oxidative stress, collagen content and apoptosis in kidney, and higher renal NOS activity and eNOS protein content, than males. ANP lowered SBP, increased diuresis, natriuresis, renal NOS activity and eNOS expression in both sexes. Renal response to ANP was more marked in females than in males. In kidney, ANP reduced TBARS, renal collagen content and apoptosis, and increased glutathione concentration and activity of GPx and SOD enzymes in both sexes. Conclusions Female SHR exhibited less organ damage than males. Chronic ANP treatment would ameliorate hypertension and end-organ damage in the kidney by reducing oxidative stress, increasing NO-system activity, and diminishing collagen content and apoptosis, in both sexes. PMID:25774801