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Sample records for natural beryl crystals

  1. Optical Properties of Natural and Synthetic Beryl Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsova, V.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Trinkler, L.; Merkulov, V.

    2015-03-01

    The results of investigation of photoluminescence and UV-Visible absorption spectra of natural beryl crystals from Ural Mountains before and after fast neutron irradiation and synthetic crystal grown in Belarus and Russia are presented. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of synthetic beryl crystals contain a broad band with maxima 740 nm excited both by UV light (λex = 260 nm, 271 nm) and laser excitation (λex =263 nm). This band is connected with Fe2+ ions. The temperature lowering down to 8 K leads to appearance of narrow lines in the 680 - 720 nm regions. Emission lines observed in the luminescence spectra are connected with electron transition 2Eg→4A2g of the Cr3+ ions: R-lines (682.5 nm) arise from isolated Cr3+ ions occupying Al3+ sites; N-lines (691, 698, 703, 706 and 711 nm) arise from several types of exchange-coupled pairs of Cr3+ ions occupying first, second and third nearest and related neighbour Al3+ sites. It is shown that the absorption bands in the 690-580 nm region of natural pale blue beryl crystals caused by neutron irradiation belong to a complex center, which consists of Cr3+ ions and radiation defect - F or F+- center. Presence of Fe2+ ions contributes to the persistence of the complex defect.

  2. Properties of beryl single crystals grown by a high pressure hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Furusaki, T.; Bando, Y.; Kodaira, K. ); Matsushita, T. )

    1989-08-01

    The authors discuss beryl crystals grown under high pressure hydrothermal condition of 1 GPa. The optimum crystal growth was observed at 600{sup 0}C and from 0.1N NaOH solution. The beryl crystals from 0.1 - 0.3N NaOH solutions incorporated water molecules and alkali cations in the channels of the beryl structure. The crystals showed same refractive indices and density as those of natural emerald crystals. These physical properties were very similar to natural emeralds.

  3. Dipole defects in beryl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, B. A.; Cordeiro, R. C.; Blak, A. R.

    2010-11-01

    Dipole defects in gamma irradiated and thermally treated beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18) samples have been studied using the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) technique. TSDC experiments were performed in pink (morganite), green (emerald), blue (aquamarine) and colourless (goshenite) natural beryl. TSDC spectra present dipole peaks at 190K, 220K, 280K and 310K that change after gamma irradiation and thermal treatments. In morganite samples, for thermal treatments between 700K and 1100K, the 280K peak increase in intensity and the band at 220K disappears. An increase of the 280K peak and a decrease of the 190K peak were observed in the TSDC spectra of morganite after a gamma irradiation of 25kGy performed after the thermal treatments. In the case of emerald samples, thermal treatments enhanced the 280K peak and gamma irradiation partially destroyed this band. The goshenite TSDC spectra present only one band at 280K that is not affected either by thermal treatments or by gamma irradiation. All the observed peaks are of dipolar origin because the intensity of the bands is linearly dependent on the polarization field, behaviour of dipole defects. The systematic study, by means of TSDC measurements, of ionizing irradiation effects and thermal treatments in these crystals makes possible a better understanding of the role played by the impurities in beryl crystals.

  4. Optical and crystal-chemical changes in aquamarines and yellow beryls from Thanh Hoa province, Vietnam induced by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridrichová, Jana; Bačík, Peter; Rusinová, Petra; Antal, Peter; Škoda, Radek; Bizovská, Valéria; Miglierini, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    Optical and crystal-chemical changes in two beryl varieties after the heat treatment were determined using a wide spectrum of analytical methods. Studied aquamarines are generally more enriched in Fe (up to 0.25 apfu) and alkali (up to 0.08 apfu) than yellow beryls (up to 0.07 apfu Fe, up to 0.04 apfu alkali). The determined c/ a ratio of 0.997-0.998 classified all our studied beryls as "normal" beryls. While no crystal structure changes were observed in samples heated to 700 °C, those heated to 900 and 1,100 °C exhibited cracks and fissures. Reduced Fe occurred in samples heated between 300 and 700 °C, and subsequent oxidation from 900 to 1,100 °C induced changes in their colour and clarity. The Fe-bearing beryl colour is controlled by the position of the absorption edge and the presence of a broad band attributed to Fe2+ in the NIR region. Blue colour results from the absorption edge located deeper in the UV region and the presence of broad band in the NIR region. Shift of absorption edge to the visible region at the presence of the broad band gives a yellow colour. Although our studied beryls are enriched in H2O I molecule due to their low alkali content, the H2O II molecule is also present. The following two dehydration processes were observed: (1) release of one double-coordinating H2O II molecule at 300-500 °C and (2) total dehydration at 900-1,100 °C. The observed cracks and fissures likely resulted from channel water release in large beryl crystals.

  5. Vibrational states of a water molecule in a nano-cavity of beryl crystal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukova, Elena S.; Torgashev, Victor I.; Gorshunov, Boris P.; Lebedev, Vladimir V.; Shakurov, Gil'man S.; Kremer, Reinhard K.; Pestrjakov, Efim V.; Thomas, Victor G.; Fursenko, Dimitry A.; Prokhorov, Anatoly S.; Dressel, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Low-energy excitations of a single water molecule are studied when confined within a nano-size cavity formed by the ionic crystal lattice. Optical spectra are measured of manganese doped beryl single crystal Mn:Be3Al2Si6O18, that contains water molecules individually isolated in 0.51 nm diameter voids within the crystal lattice. Two types of orientation are distinguished: water-I molecules have their dipole moments aligned perpendicular to the c axis and dipole moments of water-II molecules are parallel to the c-axis. The optical conductivity σ(ν) and permittivity ɛ'(ν) spectra are recorded in terahertz and infrared ranges, at frequencies from several wavenumbers up to ν = 7000 cm-1, at temperatures 5-300 K and for two polarizations, when the electric vector E of the radiation is parallel and perpendicular to the c-axis. Comparative experiments on as-grown and on dehydrated samples allow to identify the spectra of σ(ν) and ɛ'(ν) caused exclusively by water molecules. In the infrared range, well-known internal modes ν1, ν2, and ν3 of the H2O molecule are observed for both polarizations, indicating the presence of water-I and water-II molecules in the crystal. Spectra recorded below 1000 cm-1 reveal a rich set of highly anisotropic features in the low-energy response of H2O molecule in a crystalline nano-cavity. While for E∥c only two absorption peaks are detected, at ˜90 cm-1 and ˜160 cm-1, several absorption bands are discovered for E⊥c, each consisting of narrower resonances. The bands are assigned to librational (400-500 cm-1) and translational (150-200 cm-1) vibrations of water-I molecule that is weakly coupled to the nano-cavity "walls." A model is presented that explains the "fine structure" of the bands by a splitting of the energy levels due to quantum tunneling between the minima in a six-well potential relief felt by a molecule within the cavity.

  6. Infrared spectroscopy of OD vibrators in minerals at natural dilution: hydroxyl groups in talc and kaolinite, and structural water in beryl and emerald.

    PubMed

    de Donato, Philippe; Cheilletz, Alain; Barres, Odile; Yvon, Jacques

    2004-05-01

    An infrared (IR) study of natural deuteration is conducted on minerals containing hydroxyl groups (talc and kaolinite) and channel-water-bearing minerals (beryl and emerald). In talc, the OD valence vibration is located at 2710 cm(-1), corresponding to OD groups surrounded by 3 Mg atoms. In kaolinite, the OD valence vibrations are located at 2671 cm(-1) (inner OD group), 2712, 2706, and 2700 cm(-1) (three inner-surface OD groups). In beryl and emerald, natural deuteration of channel water is observed for the first time by infrared microspectroscopy. In beryl from Minas Gerais (Brazil), the OD profiles are characterized by four bands at 2735, 2686, 2672, and 2641 cm(-1). In emeralds from Colombia and Brazil, the OD profiles are characterized by five or four bands, respectively, at 2816, 2737, 2685, 2673, and 2641 cm(-1) (Colombia) and 2730, 2684, 2672, and 2640 cm(-1) (Brazil). The band at 2816 cm(-1) can be assigned to -OD or OD(-), and bands at 2686-2684, 2673-2672, and 2641-2640 cm(-1) can be assigned to type-I and type-II HOD molecules. The band at 2737-2730 cm(-1) is partially disturbed by combination bands of the mineral. Such OD profiles are different from those obtained by artificial deuteration at higher OD dilution. PMID:15165327

  7. Anisotropic dynamics of water ultra-confined in macroscopically oriented channels of single-crystal beryl: A multi-frequency analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Mamontov, Eugene; Ishai, Paul ben; Kolesnikov, Alexander I

    2013-01-01

    The properties of fluids can be significantly altered by the geometry of their confining environments. While there has been significant work on the properties of such confined fluids, the properties of fluids under ultraconfinement, environments where, at least in one plane, the dimensions of the confining environment are similar to that of the confined molecule, have not been investigated. This paper investigates the dynamic properties of water in beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18), the structure of which contains approximately 5-A-diam channels parallel to the c axis. Three techniques, inelastic neutron scattering, quasielastic neutron scattering, and dielectric spectroscopy, have been used to quantify these properties over a dynamic range covering approximately 16 orders of magnitude. Because beryl can be obtained in large single crystals we were able to quantify directional variations, perpendicular and parallel to the channel directions, in the dynamics of the confined fluid. These are significantly anisotropic and, somewhat counterintuitively, show that vibrations parallel to the c-axis channels are significantly more hindered than those perpendicular to the channels. The effective potential for vibrations in the c direction is harder than the potential in directions perpendicular to it. There is evidence of single-file diffusion of water molecules along the channels at higher temperatures, but below 150 K this diffusion is strongly suppressed. No such suppression, however, has been observed in the channel-perpendicular direction. Inelastic neutron scattering spectra include an intramolecular stretching O-H peak at 465 meV. As this is nearly coincident with that known for free water molecules and approximately 30 meV higher than that in liquid water or ice, this suggests that there is no hydrogen bonding constraining vibrations between the channel water and the beryl structure. However, dielectric spectroscopic measurements at higher temperatures and lower frequencies

  8. Natural photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  9. Single Crystals Grown Under Unconstrained Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunagawa, Ichiro

    Based on detailed investigations on morphology (evolution and variation in external forms), surface microtopography of crystal faces (spirals and etch figures), internal morphology (growth sectors, growth banding and associated impurity partitioning) and perfection (dislocations and other lattice defects) in single crystals, we can deduce how and by what mechanism the crystal grew and experienced fluctuation in growth parameters through its growth and post-growth history under unconstrained condition. The information is useful not only in finding appropriate way to growing highly perfect and homogeneous single crystals, but also in deciphering letters sent from the depth of the Earth and the Space. It is also useful in discriminating synthetic from natural gemstones. In this chapter, available methods to obtain molecular information are briefly summarized, and actual examples to demonstrate the importance of this type of investigations are selected from both natural minerals (diamond, quartz, hematite, corundum, beryl, phlogopite) and synthetic crystals (SiC, diamond, corundum, beryl).

  10. Blue, complexly zoned, (Na,Mg,Fe,Li)-rich beryl from quartz-calcite veins in low-grade metamorphosed Fe-deposit Skály near Rýmařov, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Milan; Gadas, Petr; Filip, Jan; Vaculovič, Tomáš; Přikryl, Jan; Fojt, Bohuslav

    2011-10-01

    Syn-tectonic quartz-calcite veins containing blue beryl are enclosed in hematite > magnetite-rich portions of the low-grade metamorphosed Fe-deposit Skály near Rýmařov, Czech Republic. Aggregates of pale to deep blue beryl, up to 2 cm in diameter, are associated with euclase, clinochlore, hematite, albite and dravite. Complexly zoned beryl crystals consist of skeletal aggregates of beryl I randomly distributed within volumetrically dominant beryl II with narrow rims of beryl III. All types of beryl have similar contents of Na (0.32-0.49 apfu) and Mg (0.31-0.41 apfu) but variable contents of Fetot (0.05-0.34 apfu) and Al (1.20-1.62 apfu). The LA-ICP-MS study yielded elevated contents of Li, up 1,314 ppm (0.28 wt.% Li2O) in beryl I. The quartz-calcite veins represent an unusual type of low-T metamorphic-hydrothermal vein related to Fe-ore deposit characterized by single-stage fracturing and mobilization in a closed system at T~200-300°C and CO{3/2-} as a major complexing agent for the mobility of Be.

  11. Speciation and diffusion profiles of H2O in water-poor beryl: comparison with cordierite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Ventura, G.; Radica, F.; Bellatreccia, F.; Freda, C.; Cestelli Guidi, M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports on water speciation and diffusion in synthetic beryl samples treated in CO2-rich atmosphere, at 700 MPa and 700 and 800 °C, respectively. The study has been conducted by means of polarized FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) integrated with FPA (focal plane array) imaging. As expected, the infrared spectra show the presence of CO2 but also of minor H2O interpreted as resulting from moisture present in the starting materials used for the experiments. FPA-FTIR images show that H2O diffuses into the beryl matrix along the structural channels oriented parallel to [001]. Spectra collected along profiles parallel to the c-axis show subtle changes as a function of the distance from the crystal edge; these changes can be correlated to a progressive change in the H2O coordination environment in the channel, as a response to the varying H2O/alkali ratio. In particular, the data show that when 2H2O > Na+ apfu (atoms per formula unit), H2O can assume both type I and type II orientation; in the latter case, each Na cation coordinates two H2O[II] molecules (doubly coordinated H2O). If 2H2O < Na+ apfu, then H2O[II] molecules are singly coordinated to each Na cation. The same type of feature is observed and commented for the structurally related cordierite. Diffusion coefficients and activation energies have been also determined for both types of water molecules.

  12. Use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in the determination of gem provenance: beryls

    SciTech Connect

    McManus, Catherine E.; McMillan, Nancy J.; Harmon, Russell S.; Whitmore, Robert C.; De Lucia, Frank C. Jr.; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2008-11-01

    The provenance of gem stones has been of interest to geologists, gemologists, archeologists, and historians for centuries. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides a minimally destructive tool for recording the rich chemical signatures of gem beryls (aquamarine, goshenite, heliodor, and morganite). Broadband LIBS spectra of 39 beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18) specimens from 11 pegmatite mines in New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Maine (USA) are used to assess the potential of using principal component analysis of LIBS spectra to determine specimen provenance. Using this technique, beryls from the three beryl-bearing zones in the Palermo no. 1 pegmatite (New Hampshire) can be recognized. However, the compositional variation within this single mine is comparable to that in beryls from all three states. Thus, a very large database with detailed location metadata will be required to routinely determine gem beryl provenance.

  13. Use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in the determination of gem provenance: beryls.

    PubMed

    McManus, Catherine E; McMillan, Nancy J; Harmon, Russell S; Whitmore, Robert C; De Lucia, Frank C; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2008-11-01

    The provenance of gem stones has been of interest to geologists, gemologists, archeologists, and historians for centuries. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides a minimally destructive tool for recording the rich chemical signatures of gem beryls (aquamarine, goshenite, heliodor, and morganite). Broadband LIBS spectra of 39 beryl (Be(3)Al(2)Si(6)O(18)) specimens from 11 pegmatite mines in New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Maine (USA) are used to assess the potential of using principal component analysis of LIBS spectra to determine specimen provenance. Using this technique, beryls from the three beryl-bearing zones in the Palermo #1 pegmatite (New Hampshire) can be recognized. However, the compositional variation within this single mine is comparable to that in beryls from all three states. Thus, a very large database with detailed location metadata will be required to routinely determine gem beryl provenance. PMID:19122706

  14. Hydrogen bonding nature during ADP crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Congting; Xue, Dongfeng

    2014-02-01

    The hydrogen bonding nature during ADP crystallization is studied on the basis of anisotropic chemical bonding conditions in ADP crystal combined with in situ IR observation. The variations of hydrogen bonding nature of NH4+ and HPO4- groups dominate the transformation from the free hydrated ionic state to crystalline state during ADP crystallization. Anisotropic ADP crystal morphology depends on the anisotropic chemical bonding conditions along [1 0 0] and [1 0 1] directions. ADP crystal morphologies with different HPO4-n (n = 1-8) clusters can be calculated on the basis of hydrogen bonding conditions and HPO4-n cluster structures at the growth interface. Experimentally, in situ IR spectrum can record the breaking of P-O⋯H-O-H and H-N⋯H-O-H, and the formation of P-O⋯H-O-P and H-N⋯H-O-P hydrogen bonding during ADP crystallization. The present work provides a promising strategy to identify the chemical bonding nature during crystallization processes of molecular crystals from aqueous solution.

  15. Sliding Wear Response of Beryl Reinforced Aluminum Composite - A Factorial Design Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharat, V.; Durga Prasad, B.; Prabhakar, M. Bhovi; Venkateswarlu, K.

    2016-02-01

    Al-Beryl MMCs were successfully fabricated using powder metallurgy route. Processing conditions such as beryl content and particle size were varied and its influence on dry sliding wear response was studied. Effect of test parameters like applied load and sliding distance on wear performance of Al-Beryl MMCs were discussed detail. Sliding wear tests were conducted using a pin on disc machine based on the 24 (4 factors at 2 levels) factorial design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to obtain the contribution of control parameters on wear rate. The present study shows that wear resistance of Al-beryl MMCs not only depends on the beryl content but also influenced by normal load, sliding distance and particle size. The results show that most significant variables affecting wear rate of Al - beryl MMCs are size of the beryl particles (22%), beryl content (19.60%), sliding distance (18.47%), and normal load (10.30%). The interaction effects of these parameters are less significant in influencing wear rate compared to the individual parameters. The correlation between sliding wear and its parameters was obtained by multiple regression analysis. Regression model developed in the present study can be successfully implemented to predict the wear response of Al-Beryl MMCs.

  16. Storage of Nitrogen in the Cyclosilicates Beryl and Cordierite: Nitrogen Cycling, Isotope Fractionation, and Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeri, K. E.; Bebout, G. E.; Idleman, B. D.; Geiger, C. A.; Li, L.

    2011-12-01

    The N isotope system shows potential for tracing the transfer of volatiles among Earth's major reservoirs, including the transfer of organic N into solid inorganic phases. This work explores the potential for the storage of N (i.e., N2 and possibly as ammonium) in various microporous minerals (pores or channels), specifically the cyclosilicates beryl and cordierite (see early work on beryl by Scalan, 1958, dissertation, Univ. Arkansas). Isotopic analyses of the N2 residing in these phases could help elucidate fluid-rock interactions, potentially contributing information regarding fluid-mineral fractionation, and provide records of past biological processes (see Palya et al., 2011, Chem. Geol.). We are investigating the N release from beryl crystals of different size separates by using various heating regimes. Samples are first examined petrographically to determine equilibrium mineral assemblages (based on textures of the coexisting phases) and to identify possible mica (or other mineral) inclusions that could contaminate the N analyses. Analyses of one beryl sample from New England, USA, yielded very similar N concentrations and δ15Nair (40 ppm N; +5%) when tested over a wide range of grain sizes (0.25 to 1.00 mm), extraction temperatures (1050-1100°C), and durations of heating (3-5 hours at maximum T), which is consistent with complete extraction of the N2 from the channels of beryl. Shift to higher N and δ15N concentrations, in some analyses, can be attributed to very small amounts of mica as inclusions (observed by SEM) not removed by sieving and hand-picking. Preliminary work on cordierite has concentrated on several samples of iolite (gemstone variety of cordierite)-bearing, chlorite-muscovite schist from Connecticut, USA. For these rock samples, mica-rich matrices contain up to 350 ppm N with δ15Nair near +3.5%, whereas the iolite grains contain little or no measurable N. This contrasts with the observation by Palya et al. (2011) that cordierites in

  17. Crystal chemistry of the natural vanadium bronzes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T., Jr.; Hughes, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The crystal chemistry of the natural vanadium bronze minerals is reviewed on the basis of published information and new studies (mainly by X-ray powder-diffraction methods) using type material wherever possible. The known V bronze minerals are divided into three categories: 1) the hewettite group, 2) the straczekite group, 3) other structure types including navajoite, schubnelite, fervanite, shcherbinaite, bannermanite, and melanovanadite. All known structures associated with the fibrous V bronzes (fiber spacing 3.6 A??) can be considered as various lateral linkages (into sheets or networks) of only two types of polyvanadate chains: 1) a divanadate chain (V2O6)n consisting of alternating square pyramids, and 2) a tetravanadate chain (V4O12)n consisting of four highly condensed single octahedral chains. -from Authors

  18. Spectroscopic and bond-topological investigation of interstitial volatiles in beryl from Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridrichová, Jana; Bačík, Peter; Bizovská, Valéria; Libowitzky, Eugen; Škoda, Radek; Uher, Pavel; Ozdín, Daniel; Števko, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Nine beryl samples from Western Carpathians, Slovakia, were investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis. Two types of water H2O I and H2O II were detected. Infrared spectroscopy proved the presence of water type I and II in the presence of alkali cations with several bands: (1) symmetric stretching vibration—ν1; (2) antisymmetric stretching mode—ν3; (3) bending vibration—ν2. The presence of singly and doubly coordinated type II water (IIs and IId) was confirmed by single-crystal IR spectroscopy. From Raman spectra a band at 3606 cm-1 was assigned to ν1 of water type I and the range of 3597-3600 cm-1 to water type II. The presence of doubly coordinating water indicates a relatively highly hydrated environment with the presence of alkali ions including Na as the dominant cation coordinated by H2O II. CO2 bands were detected only by single-crystal IR spectroscopy. Thermal analysis proved total water loss in the range of 1.4-2.0 wt% and three main dehydration events. Based on the study of bond-topological arrangements two molecules of H2O IId are each bound with two H···O1 bonds and one Na-OW bond with an angular distortion, and by releasing one H2O molecule more stable H2O IIs is produced. The H2O I molecule is bound only by two equivalent hydrogen bonds. The H2O IIs molecule with a Na-OW bond strength of 0.28 vu and two H···O1 bonds of 0.14 vu without any forced angular distortion is the most stable of all.

  19. Spectroscopic and bond-topological investigation of interstitial volatiles in beryl from Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridrichová, Jana; Bačík, Peter; Bizovská, Valéria; Libowitzky, Eugen; Škoda, Radek; Uher, Pavel; Ozdín, Daniel; Števko, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Nine beryl samples from Western Carpathians, Slovakia, were investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis. Two types of water H2O I and H2O II were detected. Infrared spectroscopy proved the presence of water type I and II in the presence of alkali cations with several bands: (1) symmetric stretching vibration—ν1; (2) antisymmetric stretching mode—ν3; (3) bending vibration—ν2. The presence of singly and doubly coordinated type II water (IIs and IId) was confirmed by single-crystal IR spectroscopy. From Raman spectra a band at 3606 cm-1 was assigned to ν1 of water type I and the range of 3597-3600 cm-1 to water type II. The presence of doubly coordinating water indicates a relatively highly hydrated environment with the presence of alkali ions including Na as the dominant cation coordinated by H2O II. CO2 bands were detected only by single-crystal IR spectroscopy. Thermal analysis proved total water loss in the range of 1.4-2.0 wt% and three main dehydration events. Based on the study of bond-topological arrangements two molecules of H2O IId are each bound with two H···O1 bonds and one Na-OW bond with an angular distortion, and by releasing one H2O molecule more stable H2O IIs is produced. The H2O I molecule is bound only by two equivalent hydrogen bonds. The H2O IIs molecule with a Na-OW bond strength of 0.28 vu and two H···O1 bonds of 0.14 vu without any forced angular distortion is the most stable of all.

  20. Protein crystallization on liquid surfaces: Forced versus natural crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsa, A.

    2005-11-01

    Two-dimensional crystallization of proteins has recently been reported where streptavidin protein dissolved in the bulk liquid anchors to binding sites on a biotinylated lipid monolayer initially spread on the liquid surface. Thermodynamic aspects investigated include the effects of subphase buffer and pH, dilution of bulk protein and monolayer. Here, we investigate three possible avenues where flow can influence protein crystallization: i) change the initial state of monolayer, ii) advect dissolved protein to the interface, iii) apply direct hydrodynamic force on the crystals at the interface. The flow system consists of a stationary open cylinder driven by constant rotation of the floor, in the axisymmetric flow regime with inertia. Direct imaging of the interface illuminated by forward scattering of a laser was utilized to avoid labeling proteins for conventional fluorescence microscopy. These images provide greater detail than Brewster angle microscopy. Scientific motivation is to use flow to probe protein structure, and the application is to make designer protein thin-films, e.g. for biosensors.

  1. Reservoir characterization of lacustrine sediments from the Late Triassic, Beryl Field, UK North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.; Welton, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Located on the western flank of the Viking Graben, the Beryl Field has been producing from the Late Triassic Lewis reservoir since first oil in 1976. The Beryl A Triassic contains an estimated STOIIP of 256 mmstb, with a cumulative production of 31 mmstb (8/95) (12% recovery). Low recovery to date, coupled with high remaining reserves potential, necessitated a new simulation model and optimized development program for the Lewis reservoir. This paper summarizes the revised reservoir description of the Beryl A Triassic, a complex lacustrine and fluvial system, and its integration with the reservoir simulation. The Triassic reservoir is subdivided into four zones: Lewis Units I, II, III and IV. Six lithofacies associations are identified in core: offshore lacustrine, lacustrine sandflat, marginal lacustrine, floodplain, sheetflood/overbank, and fluvial. Detailed petrological studies were conducted which confirmed that both depositional and diagenetic processes influenced reservoir properties and quality. Optimal reservoir quality is preserved in fluvial and lacustrine sandflat deposits. Argillaceous floodplain and lacustrine facies are non-reservoir and form barriers to vertical fluid migration. Calcrete lags (concentrated at the base of fluvial channels) and carbonate paleosols form baffles to flow. Fieldwide correlation of core and log facies resulted in the identification of 27 genetic flow-units. This geologically-based layering scheme was integrated with production data to generate the framework for vertical zonation for the new reservoir simulation. The simulation studies produced as accelerated development program for the Beryl A Triassic. Reserves have increased as result of optimizing secondary recovery.

  2. Reservoir characterization of lacustrine sediments from the Late Triassic, Beryl Field, UK North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J. ); Welton, J.E. )

    1996-01-01

    Located on the western flank of the Viking Graben, the Beryl Field has been producing from the Late Triassic Lewis reservoir since first oil in 1976. The Beryl A Triassic contains an estimated STOIIP of 256 mmstb, with a cumulative production of 31 mmstb (8/95) (12% recovery). Low recovery to date, coupled with high remaining reserves potential, necessitated a new simulation model and optimized development program for the Lewis reservoir. This paper summarizes the revised reservoir description of the Beryl A Triassic, a complex lacustrine and fluvial system, and its integration with the reservoir simulation. The Triassic reservoir is subdivided into four zones: Lewis Units I, II, III and IV. Six lithofacies associations are identified in core: offshore lacustrine, lacustrine sandflat, marginal lacustrine, floodplain, sheetflood/overbank, and fluvial. Detailed petrological studies were conducted which confirmed that both depositional and diagenetic processes influenced reservoir properties and quality. Optimal reservoir quality is preserved in fluvial and lacustrine sandflat deposits. Argillaceous floodplain and lacustrine facies are non-reservoir and form barriers to vertical fluid migration. Calcrete lags (concentrated at the base of fluvial channels) and carbonate paleosols form baffles to flow. Fieldwide correlation of core and log facies resulted in the identification of 27 genetic flow-units. This geologically-based layering scheme was integrated with production data to generate the framework for vertical zonation for the new reservoir simulation. The simulation studies produced as accelerated development program for the Beryl A Triassic. Reserves have increased as result of optimizing secondary recovery.

  3. Crystal structure of natural phaeosphaeride A.

    PubMed

    Abzianidze, Victoria V; Poluektova, Ekaterina V; Bolshakova, Ksenia P; Panikorovskii, Taras L; Bogachenkov, Alexander S; Berestetskiy, Alexander O

    2015-08-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H23NO5, contains two independent mol-ecules. Phaeosphaeride A contains two primary sections, an alkyl chain consisting of five C atoms and a cyclic system consisting of fused five- and six-membered rings with attached substituents. In the crystal, the mol-ecules form layered structures. Nearly planar sheets, parallel to the (001) plane, form bilayers of two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks with the hy-droxy groups located on the inter-ior of the bilayer sheets. The network is constructed primarily of four O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which form a zigzag pattern in the (001) plane. The butyl chains inter-digitate with the butyl chains on adjacent sheets. The crystal was twinned by a twofold rotation about the c axis, with refined major-minor occupancy fractions of 0.718 (6):0.282 (6). PMID:26396831

  4. Reconnaissance of beryl-bearing pegmatites in the Ruby Mountains, other areas in Nevada, and northwestern Mohave County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Jerry Chipman; Hinrichs, E. Neal

    1957-01-01

    The scheelite-beryl deposits at Oreana and in Humboldt Canyon, Pershing County., are rich in beryllium.  Twelve samples from the Humboldt Canyon (Lakeview) deposit range from 0.018 to 0.11 percent BeO, but underground crosscuts have failed to intersect similar rock at depth. Beryl locally constitutes as much as 10 percent of the pegmati tic ore at Oreana. &nbs

  5. Crystal structure of natural phaeosphaeride A

    PubMed Central

    Abzianidze, Victoria V.; Poluektova, Ekaterina V.; Bolshakova, Ksenia P.; Panikorovskii, Taras L.; Bogachenkov, Alexander S.; Berestetskiy, Alexander O.

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H23NO5, contains two independent mol­ecules. Phaeosphaeride A contains two primary sections, an alkyl chain consisting of five C atoms and a cyclic system consisting of fused five- and six-membered rings with attached substituents. In the crystal, the mol­ecules form layered structures. Nearly planar sheets, parallel to the (001) plane, form bilayers of two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks with the hy­droxy groups located on the inter­ior of the bilayer sheets. The network is constructed primarily of four O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which form a zigzag pattern in the (001) plane. The butyl chains inter­digitate with the butyl chains on adjacent sheets. The crystal was twinned by a twofold rotation about the c axis, with refined major–minor occupancy fractions of 0.718 (6):0.282 (6). PMID:26396831

  6. FTIR imaging in diffusion studies: CO2 and H2O in a synthetic sector-zoned beryl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Ventura, Giancarlo; Radica, Francesco; Bellatreccia, Fabio; Cavallo, Andrea; Cinque, Gianfelice; Behrens, Harald

    2015-06-01

    In this work we investigate the strongly inhomogeneous distribution of CO2 and H2O in a synthetic beryl having a peculiar hourglass zoning of Cr due to the crystal growth. The sample was treated at 800°C, 500 MPa, in a CO2-rich atmosphere. High-resolution FESEM images revealed that the hourglass boundary is not correlated to physical discontinuities, at least at the scale of tens of nanometers. Polarized FPA-FTIR imaging, on the other side, revealed that the chemical zoning acts as a fast pathway for carbon dioxide diffusion, a feature never observed so far in minerals. The hourglass zone boundary may be thus considered as a structural defect possibly due to the mismatch induced by the different growth rates of each sector. High-resolution synchrotron-light FTIR imaging, in addition, also allows enhancement of CO2 diffusion along the hourglass boundary to be distinguished from diffusion along fractures in the grain. Therefore, FTIR imaging provides evidence that different diffusion mechanisms may locally combine, suggesting that the distribution of the target molecules needs to be be carefully characterized in experimental studies. This piece of information is mandatory when the study is aimed at extracting diffusion coefficients from analytical profiles. Combination of TOF-SIMS and FPA data shows a significant depletion of type II H2O along the hourglass boundary, indicating that water diffusion could be controlled by the distribution of alkali cations within channels, coupled to a plug effect of CO2.

  7. Ground-water data for the Beryl-Enterprise area, Escalante Desert, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mower, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    This report contains a compilation of selected ground-water data for the Beryl-Enterprise area, Iron and Washington Counties, Utah. The records of the wells include such information as driller 's logs, yield, drawdown, use, and temperature of the well water. There are also records of water levels in selected wells for the period 1973-79, chemical analyses of ground water, records of selected springs, and a tabulation of ground-water withdrawals for 1937-78. (USGS)

  8. Quantum Tunneling of Water in Beryl: A New State of the Water Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Reiter, George F.; Choudhury, Narayani; Prisk, Timothy R.; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Ehlers, George; Seel, Andrew G.; Wesolowski, David J.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.

    2016-04-01

    Using neutron scattering and ab initio simulations, we document the discovery of a new "quantum tunneling state" of the water molecule confined in 5 Å channels in the mineral beryl, characterized by extended proton and electron delocalization. We observed a number of peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra that were uniquely assigned to water quantum tunneling. In addition, the water proton momentum distribution was measured with deep inelastic neutron scattering, which directly revealed coherent delocalization of the protons in the ground state.

  9. Minerals from Macedonia XXIII. Spectroscopic and structural characterization of schorl and beryl cyclosilicates.

    PubMed

    Makreski, Petre; Jovanovski, Gligor

    2009-08-01

    IR and Raman spectroscopy study on two collected cyclosilicate species: schorl (from tourmaline group), Na(Fe,Mg)(3)Al(6)(BO(3))(3)Si(6)O(18)(OH,F)(4) and beryl (Be,Mg,Fe)(3)Al(2)Si(6)O(18) were carried out. Although beryl is nominally anhydrous mineral, vibrational results strongly indicate that H(2)O molecules exist in the structural channels. The number of vibrational bands and their frequencies revealed the presence of H(2)O type II, in which C(2) symmetry axis of the water molecule is parallel to the structural channel (and to the c-axis of beryl). On the other hand, it was found that observed bands in the IR and Raman OH stretching region of the other tourmaline varieties appear as a result of the cation combinations involving dominant presence of Mg and Fe cations in the Y structural sites. The strong indication derived from the vibrational spectroscopic results that the studied mineral represents a schorl variety, coincide very well with the results obtained by powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray microprobe analysis. Both minerals show IR spectral similarities in the region below 1500 cm(-1), whereas the resemblance between the Raman spectra (1500-100 cm(-1)) is less expressed confirming that these spectra are more sensitive to compositional changes and to structural disorder. The identification of both minerals was additionally supported by studying the powder X-ray diffraction diagrams. PMID:18722809

  10. Quantum Tunneling of Water in Beryl. A New State of the Water Molecule

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Reiter, George F.; Choudhury, Narayani; Prisk, Timothy R.; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Ehlers, George; Seel, Andrew G.; Wesolowski, David J.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.

    2016-04-22

    When using neutron scattering and ab initio simulations, we document the discovery of a new “quantum tunneling state” of the water molecule confined in 5 Å channels in the mineral beryl, characterized by extended proton and electron delocalization. We observed a number of peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra that were uniquely assigned to water quantum tunneling. Additionally, the water proton momentum distribution was measured with deep inelastic neutron scattering, which directly revealed coherent delocalization of the protons in the ground state.

  11. Quantum Tunneling of Water in Beryl: A New State of the Water Molecule.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Reiter, George F; Choudhury, Narayani; Prisk, Timothy R; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Ehlers, George; Seel, Andrew G; Wesolowski, David J; Anovitz, Lawrence M

    2016-04-22

    Using neutron scattering and ab initio simulations, we document the discovery of a new "quantum tunneling state" of the water molecule confined in 5 Å channels in the mineral beryl, characterized by extended proton and electron delocalization. We observed a number of peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra that were uniquely assigned to water quantum tunneling. In addition, the water proton momentum distribution was measured with deep inelastic neutron scattering, which directly revealed coherent delocalization of the protons in the ground state. PMID:27152824

  12. Refurbishment of ballast water system of the gravity base structure - Beryl 'A'

    SciTech Connect

    Seume, K.; Gilchrist, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Beryl Alpha Gravity Base Platform has operated satisfactorily for the past 11 years and is expected to stay in operation until the year 2017. The Ballast Water System is a vital part of the platform's oil storage and export equipment. In 1986, during routine pipe inspections in the lower part of the utility shaft, significant defects were discovered which resulted in major refurbishment work. Innovative designs and working procedures were employed for replacement and reinforced grout encasement of line pipe sections. This paper details the important aspects of this refurbishment work.

  13. Dichroism and birefringence of natural violet diamond crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinova, A. F. Titkov, S. V.; Imangazieva, K. B.; Evdishchenko, E. A.; Sergeev, A. M.; Zudin, N. G.; Orekhova, V. P.

    2006-05-15

    Investigation of the optical properties of natural violet diamonds from the Yakutian kimberlites is performed. A red shift of the absorption edge is revealed in the absorption spectra of these crystals. This shift is indicative of the presence of a high concentration of nitrogen in the diamonds studied. Along with the strong band at 0.550 {mu}m, weaker bands at 0.390, 0.456 and 0.496 {mu}m are revealed. It is shown that violet diamond crystals have birefringence and dichroism of about 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -6}, respectively. When a light beam propagates perpendicularly to colored lamellas, the dichroism is much larger and the birefringence is smaller than in the case where the beam direction is parallel to lamellas.

  14. Differences in crystal habitus of natural and synthetic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Arkadiusz K.; Händel, Matthias; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-05-01

    The formation of colloids from natural aqueous solutions is influenced by a multitude of biogeochemical and physicochemical processes and the presence of a large diversity of geogen and biogen, inorganic and organic solution phase components. A thereby frequently neglected class of components is the dissolved and colloidal phase organic matter (DOM). As DOM will interact with other solution phase components, we hypothesize that nanosized and colloidal particles formed in DOM bearing solutions may differ from synthetic precipitates either by size, shape, crystal habitus, crystallinity, composition or combinations of that. To investigate this, we analyzed natural colloidal particles collected from a limestone aquifer of the Upper Muschelkalk formation at Hainich National Park, Thuringia, Germany. Major groundwater components are Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, SO42-, Cl-, HCO3- , and about 1 ppm of total organic carbon (TOC) in dissolved and colloidal form. Synthetic nanoparticles were precipitated from a series of oversaturated solutions containing single or mixtures of the following salts CaSO4, MgSO4, Ca(HCO3)2 NaCl typical for limestone environments. The solutions were produced with both natural groundwater and pure water (milli-Q). Droplets of such produced colloidal suspension were pipetted on silicon wafers and subject to air drying. The wafers were then analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We found that particles from oversaturated CaSO4 solution in pure water precipitate as large needle shaped crystals, whereas precipitates from CaSO4 solution in natural water were much smaller and showed a rosette like shape - similar in size and shape to gypsum crystals collected from the limestone formation water. Similar differences we found for other aqueous solution compositions. From this pilot study we presume that even minute amounts of dissolved and colloidal phase organic matter in

  15. The dynamic nature of crystal growth in pores.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Jose R A; Gerke, Kirill M; Stack, Andrew G; Lee, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of crystal growth in porous media controls a variety of natural processes such as ore genesis and crystallization induced fracturing that can trigger earthquakes and weathering, as well as, sequestration of CO2 and toxic metals into geological formations. Progress on understanding those processes has been limited by experimental difficulties of dynamically studying the reactive surface area and permeability during pore occlusion. Here, we show that these variables cause a time-dependency of barite growth rates in microporous silica. The rate is approximately constant and similar to that observed on free surfaces if fast flow velocities predominate and if the time-dependent reactive surface area is accounted for. As the narrower flow paths clog, local flow velocities decrease, which causes the progressive slowing of growth rates. We conclude that mineral growth in a microporous media can be estimated based on free surface studies when a) the growth rate is normalized to the time-dependent surface area of the growing crystals, and b) the local flow velocities are above the limit at which growth is transport-limited. Accounting for the dynamic relation between microstructure, flow velocity and growth rate is shown to be crucial towards understanding and predicting precipitation in porous rocks. PMID:27615371

  16. Discerning nature's mechanism for making complex biocomposite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bettye L.; Paloczi, George T.; Hansma, Paul K.; Paul Levine, R.

    2000-04-01

    Marine organisms have a unique ability to produce complex composite structures at ambient temperature and pressure using inorganic materials found in nature such as calcium carbonate and organic material (e.g. proteins and polysaccharides) produced at the cellular level. Examples of such organisms range from molluscs with complex mineral shells [J. Aizenberg, G. Lambert, L. Addadi, S. Weiner, Adv. Mater. 8 (1996) 222; S. Albeck, S. Weiner, L. Addadi, Chem. Euro. J. 2 (1996) 278] to single-celled algae with ornate mineral scales [R.N. Pienaar, in: A. Winter, W.G. Siesser (Eds.), Coccolithophores, Cambridge University Press, New York, 1994, p. 13]. Understanding the basic process of scale or shell formation is intrinsic to mimicking nature's biofabrication scheme. We isolated and fractionated the organic material from the scales of the coccolithophore algae, Pleurochrysis carterae. We analyzed by atomic force microscopy the effects that the extracted organic material has on a growing calcite crystal in situ.

  17. Imaging in natural light with nematic liquid crystals (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galstian, Tigran V.

    2015-10-01

    Nametic liquid crystals (NLC) are most commonly used liquid crystal (LC) materials in various light modulators [1], displays [2] and lenses [3]. However those materials have a fundamental limitation: they are polarization sensitive since the refractive index modulation here is achieved by the electric field induced reorientation of their local anisotropy axis. Thus, the standard imaging optical systems (used in consumer electronic products and dealing with natural light sources [4]) have to use double NLC structures in a cross oriented way and in rather requiring geometrical conditions. We describe a simple but very efficient optical device that allows the dynamic focusing of unpolarized light using a single NLC layer. The operation principle of the proposed device is based on the combination of an electrically variable "single layer lens" with two fixed optical elements for light reflection and 90° polarization flip. Such an approach is made possible thanks to the close integration of thin film wave plate and mirror. Preliminary experimental studies of the obtained electrically variable mirror show very promising results. Several standard camera geometries, using the double layer approach, and possible new geometries, using the reflective approach, will be described. References 1. Gordon D. Love, Wave-front correction and production of Zernike modes with a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator, Applied Optics, Vol. 36, Issue 7, pp. 1517-1524 (1997). 2. P. Yeh and C. Gu, Optics of Liquid Crystal Displays, Wiley, 1999. 3. T. Galstian, Smart Mini-Cameras, CRC Press, Taylor and Francis group, 2013. 4. www.lensvector.com

  18. Lung function, biological monitoring, and biological effect monitoring of gemstone cutters exposed to beryls

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, R.; Heinrich-Ramm, R.; Nowak, D.; Olma, K.; Poschadel, B.; Szadkowski, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Gemstone cutters are potentially exposed to various carcinogenic and fibrogenic metals such as chromium, nickel, aluminium, and beryllium, as well as to lead. Increased beryllium concentrations had been reported in the air of workplaces of beryl cutters in Idar-Oberstein, Germany. The aim of the survey was to study the excretion of beryllium in cutters and grinders with occupational exposure to beryls—for example, aquamarines and emeralds—to examine the prevalence of beryllium sensitisation with the beryllium lymphocyte transformation test (BeLT), to examine the prevalence of lung disease induced by beryllium, to describe the internal load of the respective metals relative to work process, and to screen for genotoxic effects in this particular profession.
METHODS—In a cross sectional investigation, 57 out of 100 gemstone cutters working in 12 factories in Idar-Oberstein with occupational exposure to beryls underwent medical examinations, a chest radiograph, lung function testing (spirometry, airway resistance with the interrupter technique), and biological monitoring, including measurements of aluminium, chromium, and nickel in urine as well as lead in blood. Beryllium in urine was measured with a newly developed direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy technique with a measurement limit of 0.06 µg/l. Also, cytogenetic tests (rates of micronuclei and sister chromatid exchange), and a BeLT were performed. Airborne concentrations of beryllium were measured in three factories. As no adequate local control group was available, the cutters were categorised into those with an exposure to beryls of >4 hours/week (group A) and ⩽4 hours/week (group B).
RESULTS—Clinical, radiological, or spirometric abnormalities indicating pneumoconiosis were detected in none of the gemstone cutters. Metal concentrations in biological material were far below the respective biological limit values, and beryllium in urine was only measurable in

  19. Crystal chemistry of natural and synthetic trioctahedral micas: Exploring the limits of geometric crystal chemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Patrick H. J.

    Seventy-five synthetic powder trioctahedral mica samples (between Mg, Co, Ni, and Fe end members, with different degrees of oxidation, vacancy and Al/Si contents, and including an OH/F substitution series) were studied by room-temperature powder X-ray diffraction. The iron-bearing samples were studied by 57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy. Subsets of the samples were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and gas chromatography. Lattice parameters (refined under the 1M stacking polytype, space group C2/m) were determined for all powder samples and iron site populations ([4]Fe 3+, [6]Fe2+, and [6]Fe 2+) were obtained from Mossbauer spectroscopy. The relation (c/a)cosbeta* = 113 was found to hold exactly (within experimental error) for all synthetic powders whereas it does not hold in general for synthetic and natural 1M single-crystals. The above relation is predicted to hold for geometric home-octahedral sheets (having equal M1 and M2 site bond lengths) and not to hold for geometric meso-octahedral sheets (having unequal M1 and M2 site bond lengths). The counter-rotation of the M2 site of 1M single-crystals exactly (within experimental error) follows the geometric meso-octahedral sheet model, which, assuming a uniform octahedral sheet height and site-specific M1 and M2 bond lengths, predicts site-specific flattening angles and a counter-rotation angle for the M2 site which is uniquely determined by the bond length difference between the M1 and M2 sites. A geometric meso-octahedral 2:1 layer silicate was shown to require corrugated tetrahedral sheets composed of bond-distorted tetrahedra. Key geometric meso-octahedral distortions in 1M single-crystals were identified and elucidated: (i) intra-layer top-bottom displacements within a TOT layer; and (ii) a tetrahedral bending angle between the apical bond and the pyramidal base formed by the three basal bonds. Plots

  20. Crystal structure of complex natural aluminum magnesium calcium iron oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Aksenov, S. M.; Verin, I. A.

    2010-07-15

    The structure of a new natural oxide found near the Tashelga River (Eastern Siberia) was studied by X-ray diffraction. The pseudo-orthorhombic unit cell parameters are a = 5.6973(1) A, b = 17.1823(4) A, c = 23.5718(5) A, {beta} = 90{sup o}, sp. gr. Pc. The structure was refined to R = 0.0516 based on 4773 reflections with vertical bar F vertical bar > 7{sigma}(F) taking into account the twin plane perpendicular to the z axis (the twin components are 0.47 and 0.53). The crystal-chemical formula (Z = 4) is Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}{sup IV}Fe{sub 2}{sup (2+)IV}[Al{sub 14}{sup VI}O{sub 31}(OH)][Al{sub 2}{sup IV}O][Al{sup IV}]AL{sup IV}(OH)], where the Roman numerals designate the coordination of the atoms. The structure of the mineral is based on wide ribbons of edge-sharing Al octahedra (an integral part of the spinel layer). The ribbons run along the shortest x axis and are inclined to the y and z axes. The adjacent ribbons are shifted with respect to each other along the y axis, resulting in the formation of step-like layers in which the two-ribbon thickness alternates with the three-ribbon thickness. Additional Al octahedra and Mg and Fe{sup 2+} tetrahedra are located between the ribbons. The layers are linked together to form a three-dimensional framework by Al tetrahedra, Ca polyhedra, and hydrogen bonds with the participation of OH groups.

  1. Heterogeneous nucleation as the predominant mode of crystallization in natural magmas: numerical model and implications for crystal-melt interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špillar, Václav; Dolejš, David

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization of natural magmas is inherently a disequilibrium process, which involves nucleation and growth kinetics, melt-crystal mechanical interactions and subsolidus modifications, which are all recorded in the resulting rock texture. We use a new high-resolution three-dimensional numerical model to address the significance and consequences of homogeneous versus heterogeneous crystal nucleation in silicate magmas. With increasing amount of heterogeneous nuclei during crystallization, initially equigranular textures evolve to porphyritic, bimodal and spherulitic types. The corresponding crystal size distributions (CSDs) become concave-up curved, the clustering index progressively decreases, and the grain contact relationships record increased clustering. Concave-up curved CSDs previously interpreted as resulting from multistage crystallization, mixing of crystal populations, grain agglomeration, or size-dependent growth are now predicted, consistently with other size, spatial and clustering parameters, to form by heterogeneous crystal nucleation. Correlation relationships between various textural parameters and the fraction of heterogeneous nuclei are calibrated and used on representative volcanic and plutonic rocks, including cumulate rocks, to deduce the fraction of heterogeneous nuclei. The results indicate that ~60 to ~99 % of all nuclei are heterogeneous. For plutonic and cumulate rocks, the estimate of the heterogeneous nuclei fraction based on the clustering index is significantly lower than other estimates. Such discrepancies, in general, point to the occurrence of other processes, and here, the results imply that crystal-mush compaction and interstitial melt extraction were involved during the magma solidification. Formation of crystals in clusters, implicit for heterogeneous nucleation, implies that greater efficiency of crystal-melt separation is expected in these situations.

  2. A naturally grown three-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianxiang; Lu, Dazhi; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear frequency conversion via three-dimensional (3D) quasi-phase matching (QPM) process is experimentally realized based on a Ba0.77Ca0.23TiO3 (BCT) crystal. The ferroelectric domains in BCT crystal are observed, and the results reveal that the antiparallel domains distribute in three dimensions and can provide 3D reciprocal lattice vectors for QPM processes. Broadband petal-like second-harmonic patterns are achieved, which are well consistent with the theoretical quasi-cubic model of 3D nonlinear photonic crystals. Our work not only promotes the development of QPM technique but also builds a platform for 3D nonlinear optics and quantum optics.

  3. Dimensions and aspect ratios of natural ice crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Um, J.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Hong, Y. P.; Lee, S. -S.; Jung, C. H.; Lawson, R. P.; Mo, Q.

    2014-12-10

    During the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the Tropics, the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in the Arctic, and the 2010 Small PARTicles In CirrUS (SPARTICUS) campaign in mid-latitudes, high-resolution images of ice crystals were recorded by a Cloud Particle Imager at temperatures (T) between -87 and 0 °C. The projected maximum dimension (D'), length (L'), and width (W') of pristine columns, plates, and component bullets of bullet rosettes were measured using newly developed software, the Ice Crystal Ruler. The number of bullets in each bullet rosette was also measured. Column crystals were furthermore » distinguished as either horizontally oriented columns or columns with other orientations to eliminate any orientation effect on the measured dimensions. Dimensions and aspect ratios (AR, dimension of major axis divided by dimension of minor axis) of crystals were determined as functions of temperature, geophysical location, and type of cirrus. Dimensions of crystals generally increased as temperature increased. Columns and bullets had larger dimensions (i.e., W') of the minor axis (i.e., a axis) for a given dimension (i.e., D' or L') of the major axis (i.e., c axis), and thus smaller AR, as T increased, whereas this trend did not occur for plate crystals. The average number of branches in bullet rosettes was 5.50±1.35 during three campaigns and 6.32±1.34 (5.46±1.34; 4.95±1.01) during TWP-ICE (SPARTICUS; ISDAC). The AR of bullets increased with the number of branches in bullet rosettes. Most dimensions of crystals and ARs of columnar crystals measured during SPARTICUS were larger than those measured during TWP-ICE and ISDAC at −67 < T < −35 °C and at −40 < T < −15 °C, respectively. The relative occurrence of varying pristine habits depended strongly on cirrus type (i.e., anvil or non-anvil clouds), with plates especially occurring more frequently in anvils. The L–W relationships of columns

  4. Dimensions and aspect ratios of natural ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, J.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Hong, Y. P.; Lee, S.-S.; Jung, C. H.; Lawson, R. P.; Mo, Q.

    2015-04-01

    During the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the tropics, the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in the Arctic, and the 2010 Small PARTicles In CirrUS (SPARTICUS) campaign at mid-latitudes, high-resolution images of ice crystals were recorded by a Cloud Particle Imager at temperatures (T) between -87 and 0 °C. The projected maximum dimension (D'), length (L'), and width (W') of pristine columns, plates, and component bullets of bullet rosettes were measured using newly developed software, the Ice Crystal Ruler. The number of bullets in each bullet rosette was also measured. Column crystals were further distinguished as either horizontally oriented columns or columns with other orientations to eliminate any orientation effect on the measured dimensions. The dimensions and aspect ratios (AR, the dimension of the major axis divided by the dimension of the minor axis) of crystals were determined as functions of temperature, geophysical location, and type of cirrus. Dimensions of crystals generally increased with temperature. Columns and bullets had larger dimensions (i.e., W') of the minor axis (i.e., a axis) for a given dimension (i.e., D' orL') of the major axis (i.e., c axis), and thus smaller AR, as T increased, whereas this trend did not occur for plate crystals. The average number of branches in bullet rosettes was 5.50 ± 1.35 during three campaigns and 6.32 ± 1.34 (5.46 ± 1.34; 4.95 ± 1.01) during TWP-ICE (SPARTICUS; ISDAC). The AR of bullets increased with the number of branches in bullet rosettes. Most dimensions of crystals and ARs of columnar crystals measured during SPARTICUS were larger than those measured during TWP-ICE and ISDAC at -67 < T < -35 °C and at -40 < T < -15 °C, respectively. The relative occurrence of varying pristine habits depended strongly on cirrus type (i.e., anvil or non-anvil clouds), with plates especially occurring more frequently in anvils. The L-W relationships of columns

  5. Dimensions and aspect ratios of natural ice crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Um, J.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Hong, Y. P.; Lee, S. -S.; Jung, C. H.; Lawson, R. P.; Mo, Q.

    2015-04-15

    During the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the tropics, the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in the Arctic, and the 2010 Small PARTicles In CirrUS (SPARTICUS) campaign at mid-latitudes, high-resolution images of ice crystals were recorded by a Cloud Particle Imager at temperatures (T) between -87 and 0 °C. The projected maximum dimension (D'), length (L'), and width (W') of pristine columns, plates, and component bullets of bullet rosettes were measured using newly developed software, the Ice Crystal Ruler. The number of bullets in each bullet rosette was also measured. Column crystals were furthermore » distinguished as either horizontally oriented columns or columns with other orientations to eliminate any orientation effect on the measured dimensions. The dimensions and aspect ratios (AR, the dimension of the major axis divided by the dimension of the minor axis) of crystals were determined as functions of temperature, geophysical location, and type of cirrus. Dimensions of crystals generally increased with temperature. Columns and bullets had larger dimensions (i.e., W') of the minor axis (i.e., a axis) for a given dimension (i.e., D' orL') of the major axis (i.e., c axis), and thus smaller AR, as T increased, whereas this trend did not occur for plate crystals. The average number of branches in bullet rosettes was 5.50 ± 1.35 during three campaigns and 6.32 ± 1.34 (5.46 ± 1.34; 4.95 ± 1.01) during TWP-ICE (SPARTICUS; ISDAC). The AR of bullets increased with the number of branches in bullet rosettes. Most dimensions of crystals and ARs of columnar crystals measured during SPARTICUS were larger than those measured during TWP-ICE and ISDAC at −67 < T < -35 °C and at −40 < T < −15 °C, respectively. The relative occurrence of varying pristine habits depended strongly on cirrus type (i.e., anvil or non-anvil clouds), with plates especially occurring more frequently in anvils. The L

  6. Dynamic crystallization of chondrule melts of porphyritic olivine composition - Textures experimental and natural

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, Gary

    1989-01-01

    A full range of textures characteristic for porphyritic olivine chondrules was reproduced in melts of the same composition, crystallized under dynamic crystallization conditions (under controlled cooling), as determined by electron microprobe analyses. The primary differences between the natural and experimentally produced porphyritic olivine textures were the nature and the extent of matrix crystallization, which reflected the subsolidus or low-temperature cooling history. The most confining limits on the chondrule-forming process were found to be the presence of crystalline precursors for the chondrule melts and the upper temperature limit of melting.

  7. Inducing uniform single-crystal like orientation in natural rubber with constrained uniaxial stretch.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiming; Meng, Lingpu; Lu, Jie; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Wenhua; Huang, Ningdong; Chen, Liang; Li, Liangbin

    2015-07-01

    The effect of flow on crystallization is commonly attributed to entropic reduction, which is caused by stretch and orientation of polymer chains but overlooks the role of flow on final-state free energy. With the aid of in situ synchrotron radiation wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and a homemade constrained uniaxial tensile testing machine, polycrystals possessing single-crystal-like orientation rather than uniaxial orientation are found during the constrained stretch of natural rubber, whereas the c-axis and a-axis align in the stretch direction (SD) and constrained direction (CD), respectively. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that aligning the a-axis of crystal nuclei in CD leads to the lowest free energy increase and favors crystal nucleation. This indicates that the nomenclature of strain-induced crystallization may not fully account for the nature of flow-induced crystallization (FIC) as strain mainly emphasizes the entropic reduction of initial melt, whereas stress rather than strain plays the dominant role in crystal deformation. The current work not only contributes to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of flow-induced crystallization but also demonstrates the potential application of constrained uniaxial tensile stretch for the creation of functional materials containing polycrystals that possess single-crystal-like orientation. PMID:26021287

  8. A Micro-Mechanically Based Continuum Model for Strain-Induced Crystallization in Natural Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Sunny Jigger

    Recent experimental results show that strain-induced crystallization can substantially improve the crack growth resistance of natural rubber. While this might suggest superior designs of tires or other industrial applications where elastomers are used, a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics of strain-induced crystallization in natural rubber has to be developed before any design process can be started. The objective of this work is to develop a computationally-accessible micro-mechanically based continuum model, which is able to predict the macroscopic behavior of strain crystallizing natural rubber. While several researchers have developed micro-mechanical models of partially crystallized polymer chains, their results mainly give qualitative agreement with experimental data due to a lack of good micro-macro transition theories or the lack of computational power. However, recent developments in multiscale modeling in polymers provide new tools to continue this early work. In this thesis, a new model is proposed to model strain-induced crystallization in natural rubber. To this end, a micro-mechanical model of a constrained partially crystallized polymer chain with an extended-chain crystal is derived and connected to the macroscopic level using the non-affine micro-sphere model. On the macroscopic level, a thermodynamically consistent framework for strain-crystallizing materials is developed, and a description of the crystallization kinetics is introduced. For that matter, an evolution law for crystallization based on the gradient of the macroscopic Helmholtz free energy function (chemical potential) in combination with a simple threshold function is used. A numerical implementation of the model is proposed and its predictive performance assessed using published data.

  9. Novel photonic crystals: incorporation of nano-CdS into the natural photonic crystals within peacock feathers.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Su, Huilan; Song, Fang; Gu, Jiajun; Di, Zhang; Jiang, Limin

    2009-03-01

    In this investigation, the natural 2D photonic crystals (PhCs) within peacock feathers are applied to incorporate CdS nanocrystallites. Peacock feathers are activated by ethylenediaminetetraacetic/dimethylformamide suspension to increase the reactive sites on the keratin component, on which CdS nanoparticles (nano-CdS) are in situ formed in succession and serve as the "seeds" to direct further incorporation during the following solvothermal procedure. Thus, homogeneous nano-CdS are loaded both on the feathers' surface layer and inside the 2D PhCs. The obtained nano-CdS/peacock feathers hybrids are novel photonic crystals whose photonic stop bands are markedly different from that of the natural PhCs within original peacock feathers, as observed by the reflection spectra. PMID:19437723

  10. Statistical Nature of Atomic Disorder in Irradiated Crystals.

    PubMed

    Boulle, A; Debelle, A

    2016-06-17

    Atomic disorder in irradiated materials is investigated by means of x-ray diffraction, using cubic SiC single crystals as a model material. It is shown that, besides the determination of depth-resolved strain and damage profiles, x-ray diffraction can be efficiently used to determine the probability density function (PDF) of the atomic displacements within the crystal. This task is achieved by analyzing the diffraction-order dependence of the damage profiles. We thereby demonstrate that atomic displacements undergo Lévy flights, with a displacement PDF exhibiting heavy tails [with a tail index in the γ=0.73-0.37 range, i.e., far from the commonly assumed Gaussian case (γ=2)]. It is further demonstrated that these heavy tails are crucial to account for the amorphization kinetics in SiC. From the retrieved displacement PDFs we introduce a dimensionless parameter f_{D}^{XRD} to quantify the disordering. f_{D}^{XRD} is found to be consistent with both independent measurements using ion channeling and with molecular dynamics calculations. PMID:27367393

  11. Statistical Nature of Atomic Disorder in Irradiated Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulle, A.; Debelle, A.

    2016-06-01

    Atomic disorder in irradiated materials is investigated by means of x-ray diffraction, using cubic SiC single crystals as a model material. It is shown that, besides the determination of depth-resolved strain and damage profiles, x-ray diffraction can be efficiently used to determine the probability density function (PDF) of the atomic displacements within the crystal. This task is achieved by analyzing the diffraction-order dependence of the damage profiles. We thereby demonstrate that atomic displacements undergo Lévy flights, with a displacement PDF exhibiting heavy tails [with a tail index in the γ =0.73 - 0.37 range, i.e., far from the commonly assumed Gaussian case (γ =2 )]. It is further demonstrated that these heavy tails are crucial to account for the amorphization kinetics in SiC. From the retrieved displacement PDFs we introduce a dimensionless parameter fDXRD to quantify the disordering. fDXRD is found to be consistent with both independent measurements using ion channeling and with molecular dynamics calculations.

  12. Impact of natural variation in bacterial F17G adhesins on crystallization behaviour.

    PubMed

    Buts, Lieven; Wellens, Adinda; Van Molle, Inge; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy; Lahmann, Martina; Oscarson, Stefan; De Greve, Henri; Bouckaert, Julie

    2005-08-01

    Since the introduction of structural genomics, the protein has been recognized as the most important variable in crystallization. Recent strategies to modify a protein to improve crystal quality have included rationally engineered point mutations, truncations, deletions and fusions. Five naturally occurring variants, differing in 1-18 amino acids, of the 177-residue lectin domain of the F17G fimbrial adhesin were expressed and purified in identical ways. For four out of the five variants crystals were obtained, mostly in non-isomorphous space groups, with diffraction limits ranging between 2.4 and 1.1 A resolution. A comparative analysis of the crystal-packing contacts revealed that the variable amino acids are often involved in lattice contacts and a single amino-acid substitution can suffice to radically change crystal packing. A statistical approach proved reliable to estimate the compatibilities of the variant sequences with the observed crystal forms. In conclusion, natural variation, universally present within prokaryotic species, is a valuable genetic resource that can be favourably employed to enhance the crystallization success rate with considerably less effort than other strategies. PMID:16041081

  13. Thermal diffusion boron doping of single-crystal natural diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung-Hun; Wu, Henry; Mikael, Solomon; Mi, Hongyi; Blanchard, James P.; Venkataramanan, Giri; Zhou, Weidong; Gong, Shaoqin; Morgan, Dane; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-05-01

    With the best overall electronic and thermal properties, single crystal diamond (SCD) is the extreme wide bandgap material that is expected to revolutionize power electronics and radio-frequency electronics in the future. However, turning SCD into useful semiconductors requires overcoming doping challenges, as conventional substitutional doping techniques, such as thermal diffusion and ion implantation, are not easily applicable to SCD. Here we report a simple and easily accessible doping strategy demonstrating that electrically activated, substitutional doping in SCD without inducing graphitization transition or lattice damage can be readily realized with thermal diffusion at relatively low temperatures by using heavily doped Si nanomembranes as a unique dopant carrying medium. Atomistic simulations elucidate a vacancy exchange boron doping mechanism that occurs at the bonded interface between Si and diamond. We further demonstrate selectively doped high voltage diodes and half-wave rectifier circuits using such doped SCD. Our new doping strategy has established a reachable path toward using SCDs for future high voltage power conversion systems and for other novel diamond based electronic devices. The novel doping mechanism may find its critical use in other wide bandgap semiconductors.

  14. Crystal structure and crystal chemistry of melanovanadite, a natural vanadium bronze.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konnert, J.A.; Evans, H.T., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The crystal structure of melanovanadite from Minas Ragra, Peru, has been determined in space group P1. The triclinic unit cell (non-standard) has a 6.360(2), b 18.090(9), c 6.276(2) A, alpha 110.18(4)o, beta 101.62(3)o, gamma 82.86(4)o. A subcell with b' = b/2 was found by crystal-structure analysis to contain CaV4O10.5H2O. The subcell has a layer structure in which the vanadate sheet consists of corner-shared tetrahedral VO4 and double square-pyramidal V2O8 groups, similar to that previously found in synthetic CsV2O5. Refinement of the full structure (R = 0.056) showed that the Ca atom, which half-occupies a general position in the subcell, is 90% ordered at one of these sites in the whole unit cell. Bond length-bond strength estimates indicate that the tetrahedra contain V5+, and the square pyramids, V4+.-J.A.Z.

  15. Strain-induced crystallization and mechanical properties of functionalized graphene sheet-filled natural rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbas, Bulent; Toki, Shigeyuki; Hsiao, Benjamin S.; Chu, Benjamin; Register, Richard A.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Prud'homme, Robert K.; Adamson, Douglas H.

    2012-03-11

    The effects of functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) on the mechanical properties and strain-induced crystallization of natural rubber (NR) are investigated. FGSs are predominantly single sheets of graphene with a lateral size of several hundreds of nanometers and a thickness of 1.5 nm. The effect of FGS and that of carbon black (CB) on the strain-induced crystallization of NR is compared by coupled tensile tests and X-ray diffraction experiments. Synchrotron X-ray scattering enables simultaneous measurements of stress and crystallization of NR in real time during sample stretching. The onset of crystallization occurs at significantly lower strains for FGS-filled NR samples compared with CB-filled NR, even at low loadings. Neat-NR exhibits strain-induced crystallization around a strain of 2.25, while incorporation of 1 and 4 wt % FGS shifts the crystallization to strains of 1.25 and 0.75, respectively. In contrast, loadings of 16 wt % CB do not significantly shift the critical strain for crystallization. Two-dimensional (2D) wide angle X-ray scattering patterns show minor polymer chain alignment during stretching, in accord with previous results for NR. Small angle X-ray scattering shows that FGS is aligned in the stretching direction, whereas CB does not show alignment or anisotropy. The mechanical properties of filled NR samples are investigated using cyclic tensile and dynamic mechanical measurements above and below the glass transition of NR.

  16. Crystal field effect on EPR and optical absorption properties of natural green zoisite.

    PubMed

    Javier-Ccallata, Henry; Watanabe, Shigueo

    2013-03-01

    In this study the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption (OA) of natural crystal of zoisite were investigated after γ ((60)Co) irradiation and high temperature annealing. EPR measurements show that the zoisite from Tefilo Otoni MG Brazil contain Cr(3+), Fe(3+) and Mn(2+) ions and occupy distorted Al(3+) octahedral and tetrahedral sites which are subjected to the action of a strong crystal field in axial direction. Absorption bands which in principle give rise to sets of EPR lines between 500 and 2500 G were found using the deconvolution method. The application of high doses of gamma ray and high temperature annealing has shown no significant effects on EPR and OA spectra. Spin-allowed, spin-forbidden and crystal field parameters were calculated for 3d(3) configuration and interpreted using the spin Hamiltonian formalism containing axial and rhombic terms in low symmetries. PMID:23291113

  17. Cooperative parametric (quasi-Cherenkov) radiation produced by electron bunches in natural or photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anishchenko, S. V.; Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2015-07-01

    We study the features of cooperative parametric (quasi-Cherenkov) radiation arising when initially unmodulated electron (positron) bunches pass through a crystal (natural or artificial) under the conditions of dynamical diffraction of electromagnetic waves in the presence of shot noise. A detailed numerical analysis is given for cooperative THz radiation in artificial crystals. The radiation intensity above 200 MW/cm2 is obtained in simulations. The peak intensity of cooperative radiation emitted at small and large angles to particle velocity is investigated as a function of the current density of an electron bunch. The peak radiation intensity appeared to increase monotonically until saturation is achieved. At saturation, the shot noise causes strong fluctuations in the intensity of cooperative parametric radiation. It is shown that the duration of radiation pulses can be much longer than the particle flight time through the crystal. This enables a thorough experimental investigation of the time structure of cooperative parametric radiation generated by electron bunches available with modern accelerators. The complicated time structure of cooperative parametric (quasi-Cherenkov) radiation can be observed in crystals (natural or artificial) in all spectral ranges (X-ray, optical, terahertz, and microwave).

  18. Characterization of single-crystal diamond grown from the vapor phase on substrates of natural diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Altukhov, A. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Dukhnovsky, M. P.; Zemlyakov, V. E.; Ziablyuk, K. N.; Mitenkin, A. V.; Muchnikov, A. B. Radishev, D. B.; Ratnikova, A. K.; Fedorov, Yu. Yu.

    2011-03-15

    The results of studies of single-crystal diamond layers with orientation (100) grown on substrates of IIa-type natural diamond by chemical-vapor deposition and of semiconductor diamond obtained subsequently by doping by implantation of boron ions are reported. Optimal conditions of postimplantation annealing of diamond that provide the hole mobility of 1150 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} (the highest mobility obtained so far for semiconductor diamond after ion implantation) are given.

  19. Exploring crystallization kinetics in natural rhyolitic melts using high resolution CT imagery of spherulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, T. W.; Befus, K. S.; Gardner, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Little of our understanding of crystallization kinetics has been directly derived from studies of natural samples. We examine crystallization of rhyolitic melts by quantifying spherulite sizes and number densities in obsidian collected from Yellowstone caldera using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (CT) imagery. Spherulites are spherical to ellipsoidal masses of intergrown alkali feldspar and quartz in a radiating, fibrous structure. They are thought to form in response to relatively rapid crystallization of melt in response to large amounts of undercooling. Recent research using compositional gradients that form outside of spherulites has suggested that they nucleate at 700 to 500 ˚C and their growth slows exponentially until it eventually ceases at ~400 ˚C. By quantifying spherulite textures, and using those temperature constraints, we derive new kinetic information regarding crystallization in natural rhyolitic systems. We find that spherulites range from 0.2 to 12.3 mm in diameter, and are 0.004 to 49.5 mm3 in volume. Such values generate number densities of 70 to 185 spherulites cm-3. Histograms of size display positively skewed distributions indicating small spherulites are far more abundant than larger ones. Those distributions imply nucleation rates change as a function of temperature. At higher temperatures where the melt is undercooled by 400-500 ˚C, nucleation is rare and growth is favored. With decreasing temperature, nucleation rates increase rapidly until cold enough temperatures are reached that diffusion limits crystallization and causes it to cease (undercoolings of ~650 ˚C). Assuming a cooling rate for the host obsidian of 10-5 ˚C s-1, then overall spherulite nucleation rates are 0.01 to 0.03 spherulites cm-3 hour-1.

  20. Crystallization of urine mineral components may depend on the chemical nature of Proteus endotoxin polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Torzewska, Agnieszka; Staczek, Paweł; Rózalski, Antoni

    2003-06-01

    Formation of infectious urinary calculi is the most common complication accompanying urinary tract infections by members of the genus Proteus. The major factor involved in stone formation is the urease produced by these bacteria, which causes local supersaturation and crystallization of magnesium and calcium phosphates as carbonate apatite [Ca(10)(PO(4))(6).CO(3)] and struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4).6H(2)O), respectively. This effect may also be enhanced by bacterial polysaccharides. Macromolecules of such kind contain negatively charged residues that are able to bind Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), leading to the accumulation of these ions around bacterial cells and acceleration of the crystallization process. The levels of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions bound by whole Proteus cells were measured, as well as the chemical nature of isolated LPS polysaccharides, and the intensity of the in vitro crystallization process was compared in a synthetic urine. The results suggest that the sugar composition of Proteus LPS may either enhance or inhibit the crystallization of struvite and apatite, depending on its chemical structure and ability to bind cations. This points to the increased importance of endotoxin in urinary tract infections. PMID:12748265

  1. Crystal Structures of Non-Natural Nucleobase Pairs in A- and B-DNA†

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Millie M.; Singh, Isha; Kellett, Whitney F.; Hoshika, Shuichi; Benner, Steven A.; Richards, Nigel G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which synthetic biology can be used to expand genetic information systems compatible with natural enzymes and cells will depend on the extent to which multiple and contiguous non-natural nucleobase pairs fit within the standard double helical conformations of DNA. Toward this goal, two non-standard nucleobases (Z, 6-amino-5-nitro-2(1H)-pyridone and P, 2-amino-imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)one) were designed to form a Z:P pair with a standard “edge on” Watson-Crick geometry, but with rearranged hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups. Here, we present the crystal structures of two self-complementary 16-mer oligonucleotides containing Z:P pairs. The first contained two consecutive Z:P nucleobase pairs and was found to crystallize within a host-guest complex in B-form. The second contained six consecutive Z:P pairs; it was found to crystallize as an A-form DNA duplex, although it can adopt B-form in solution as inferred from circular dichroism spectra. Although Z:P pairs have some structural properties that are similar to those of G:C pairs, unique features include stacking of the nitro group on Z with the adjacent heterocyclic nucleobase ring in A-DNA. In both B-and A-DNA, major groove widths associated with the Z:P pairs are approximately 1 Å wider than those of comparable G:C pairs potentially due to the presence of the nitro group in Z. Thus, our structural studies suggest that multiple and consecutive Z:P pairs are readily accommodated in DNA duplex structures recognized by natural polymerases, and therefore the GACTZP synthetic genetic system has the requisite properties to expand sequence space. PMID:25961938

  2. Numerical modeling of crystal growth on a centrifuge for unstable natural convection configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Downey, J. P.; Curreri, P. A.; Jones, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The fluid mechanics associated with crystal growth processes on centrifuges is modeled using 2D and 3D models. Two-dimensional calculations show that flow bifurcations exist in such crystal growth configurations where the ampoule is oriented in the same direction as the resultant gravity vector and a temperature gradient is imposed on the melt. A scaling analysis is formulated to predict the flow transition point from the natural convection dominated regime to the Coriolis force dominated regime. Results of 3D calculations are presented for two thermal configurations of the crystal growth cell: top heated and bottom heated with respect to the centrifugal acceleration. In the top heated configuration, a substantial reduction in the convection intensity within the melt can be attained by centrifuge operations, and close to steady diffusion-limited thermal conditions can be achieved over a narrow range of the imposed microgravity level. In the bottom heated configuration the Coriolis force has a stabilizing effect on fluid motion by delaying the onset of unsteady convection.

  3. Crystal structures of a natural and a Cs-exchanged clinoptilolite

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.R.; Spaid, A.T.; Bish, D.L.

    1990-05-01

    The crystal structures of natural and Cs-exchanged silica-rich clinoptilolite have been refined in space group C2/m using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (R = 0.062 and 0.083, respectively; all reflections). Chemical formulae of the two structures are Na{sub 1.3}K{sub 1.2}Ca{sub 1.55}Al{sub 6.2}Si{sub 29.8}O{sub 72}{center_dot}23H{sub 2}O and Cs{sub 3.8}Ca{sub 1.2}Al{sub 6.1}Si{sub 29.7}O{sub 72}{center_dot}19H{sub 2}O. Unit-cell dimensions of the two are virtually identical (a = 17.633 {angstrom}, b = 17.941 {angstrom}, c = 7.400 {angstrom}, and {beta} = 116.39{degree} for the natural sample, and a = 17.692 {angstrom}, b = 17.945 {angstrom}, c = 7.404 {angstrom}, and {beta} = 116.36{degree} for the Cs-exchanged sample). The positions of extra-framework cations in the natural sample are similar to those reported previously, except that there is no atom at the position ascribed to Mg, consistent with the low Mg content of the sample. Cs occupies split positions near high-symmetry special positions that are unrelated to the cation positions in the natural sample. All Cs positions have relatively long Cs-H{sub 2}O and Cs-O distances ranging from 3.0 to 3.5 {angstrom}. Clinoptilolite is a major component in tuffs at the Nevada Test Site, a large reservation in southern Nevada used for underground testing of nuclear weapons, and it may be used for future isolation of high-level radioactive wastes.

  4. Pegmatites of the Crystal Mountain district, Larimer County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurston, William R.

    1952-01-01

    The Front Range of Colorado is composed chiefly of schists of the pre-Cambrian Idaho Springs formation which have been intruded by a variety of granitic batholiths. In the Crystal Mountain district the Mount Olympus granite, a satellite of the Longs Peak batholith, forms sills and essentially concordant multiple intrusions in quartz-mica schist that dips southward at moderate to steep angles. A great number of pegmatites accompanied and followed the intrusion of the sills, and formed concordant and discordant bodies in schist and granite. Over 1,300 pegmatites in the Hyatt area north of the Big Thompson River are mapped and individually described. There are 27 pegmatites in the area that are made up of a wall zone and a core, and one, the pegmatite at the Hyatt mine, is composed of five zones. The largest pegmatites in the area are discordant in schist and occupy zones that are interpreted to be tear faults and tension fractures produced by the successive intrusions of granite that formed multiple sills. The majority of pegmatites in the large multiple sills were emplaced along the foliation and fractures. The composition of 96 percent of the pegmatites is granitic, 3.5 percent are quartz-rich pegmatites, and a few are tourmaline-rich. The pegmatites were intruded over a period of time and probably were derived from a granitic magma at different stages during differentiation. Solutions escaping from many of the pegmatites tournalinized and silicified the wall rocks for a few inches to two feet, but chemical and spectrographic analyses fail to show the transport of any other constituents. Perthite, plagioclase, and quartz are the essential minerals of the pegmatites, and muscovite is a minor but widespread constituent. Tourmaline, garnet, beryl, and apatite are common accessory minerals, and lithiophillitite-triphylite, bismuthinite, uraninite, columbite-tantalite, and chrysoberyl are rare constituents. Beryl is found in 250 or 27 percent of the pegmatites and makes

  5. Crystallization and sublimation of non-racemic mixtures of natural amino acids: a path towards homochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2012-07-01

    Homochirality of biologically important molecules such as amino acids and sugars is a prerequisite for the origin of life. There are different forces or mechanisms in the Universe to trigger off the primary imbalance in the enantiomeric ratio. Very likely the initial bias of one type of enantiomers over the other on Earth was arisen from the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (carbonaceous meteorites). The phase transitions (crystallization, sublimation) of non-racemic mixtures of enantiomers are ones of the most probable mechanisms for the homochirogenesis[1]. The sublimation, almost uninvestigated subject and forgotten for 30 years, revealed recently a pathway to the enantioenrichment of natural amino acids[2]. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure amino acid a partial sublimation gives a considerable enrichment. In our further experiments we combined two first-order phase transitions of amino acid(s) mixtures: crystallization and sublimation. The results show the possibility of the transfer of enantiopurity between different amino acids[3]. Subliming a crystallized mixture of racemic amino acids with an enantiopure one we found that the sublimate is a non-racemic mixture of the same handedness for all components. The significance of the studies can be realized taking into account that just 5 of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to homochiral self-organization. The relevance of these studies to the Prebiotic Earth and to the evolution of the single handedness of biological molecules will be discussed. [1] Blackmond, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 2011, 366, 2878. [2] Guillemin et al., Chem. Commun. 2010 , 46, 1482. [3] Tarasevych, Guillemin et al., submitted.

  6. Tear energy and strain-induced crystallization of natural rubber/styrene-butadiene rubber blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, F.; Akabori, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Kawazura, T.; Kawahara, S.

    2009-08-01

    Strain-induced crystallization of natural rubber (NR), dispersed in styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), was investigated in relation to dimensional feature of a dispersoid and crosslink density of NR by measuring tear energy (G) of crosslinked NR/SBR blends. The crosslinked NR/SBR blends in ratios of 1/9 and 3/7 by weight were prepared by mixing masticated NR and SBR with an internal mixer at a rotor speed of 30 rpm, followed by crosslinking with dicumyl peroxide on a hot press at 444 K for 60 min. The G, measured in wide-ranges of temperature and tear rate, was superposed into a master curve with a Williams-Landel-Ferry shift factor. The G of the NR/SBR(3/7) blend abruptly decreased to a level comparable to that of SBR at about melting temperature of NR crystals formed on straining. The temperature, at which the dramatic decrease in the G occurred, was associated with the dimensional feature of the NR dispersoid and the crosslink density.

  7. Nature of Defects Induced by Au Implantation in Hexagonal Silicon Carbide Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gentils, Aurelie; Barthe, Marie-France; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter

    2009-03-10

    Pulsed-slow-positron-beam-based positron lifetime spectroscopy was used to investigate the nature of vacancy defects induced by 20 MeV Au implantation in single crystals 6H-SiC. Preliminary analysis of the data shows that at lower fluence, below 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, a positron lifetime of 220 ps has been obtained: it could be associated with the divacancy V{sub Si}-V{sub C} in comparison with the literature. At higher fluence, above 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, a positron lifetime of 260-270 ps, increasing with the incident positron energy, has been observed after decomposition of the lifetime spectra. By comparison with lifetime calculations, open-volumes such as quadrivacancy (V{sub Si}-V{sub C}){sub 2} clusters could be associated with this value.

  8. Spiral and target patterns in bivalve nacre manifest a natural excitable medium from layer growth of a biological liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Julyan H E; Checa, Antonio G; Escribano, Bruno; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio

    2009-06-30

    Nacre is an exquisitely structured biocomposite of the calcium carbonate mineral aragonite with small amounts of proteins and the polysaccharide chitin. For many years, it has been the subject of research, not just because of its beauty, but also to discover how nature can produce such a superior product with excellent mechanical properties from such relatively weak raw materials. Four decades ago, Wada [Wada K (1966) Spiral growth of nacre. Nature 211:1427] proposed that the spiral patterns in nacre could be explained by using the theory Frank [Frank F (1949) The influence of dislocations on crystal growth. Discuss Faraday Soc 5:48-54] had put forward of the growth of crystals by means of screw dislocations. Frank's mechanism of crystal growth has been amply confirmed by experimental observations of screw dislocations in crystals, but it is a growth mechanism for a single crystal, with growth fronts of molecules. However, the growth fronts composed of many tablets of crystalline aragonite visible in micrographs of nacre are not a molecular-scale but a mesoscale phenomenon, so it has not been evident how the Frank mechanism might be of relevance. Here, we demonstrate that nacre growth is organized around a liquid-crystal core of chitin crystallites, a skeleton that the other components of nacre subsequently flesh out in a process of hierarchical self-assembly. We establish that spiral and target patterns can arise in a liquid crystal formed layer by layer through the Burton-Cabrera-Frank [Burton W, Cabrera N, Frank F (1951) The growth of crystals and the equilibrium structure of their surfaces. Philos Trans R Soc London Ser A 243:299-358] dynamics, and furthermore that this layer growth mechanism is an instance of an important class of physical systems termed excitable media. Artificial liquid crystals grown in this way may have many technological applications. PMID:19528636

  9. Spiral and target patterns in bivalve nacre manifest a natural excitable medium from layer growth of a biological liquid crystal

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Checa, Antonio G.; Escribano, Bruno; Sainz-Díaz, C. Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    Nacre is an exquisitely structured biocomposite of the calcium carbonate mineral aragonite with small amounts of proteins and the polysaccharide chitin. For many years, it has been the subject of research, not just because of its beauty, but also to discover how nature can produce such a superior product with excellent mechanical properties from such relatively weak raw materials. Four decades ago, Wada [Wada K (1966) Spiral growth of nacre. Nature 211:1427] proposed that the spiral patterns in nacre could be explained by using the theory Frank [Frank F (1949) The influence of dislocations on crystal growth. Discuss Faraday Soc 5:48–54] had put forward of the growth of crystals by means of screw dislocations. Frank's mechanism of crystal growth has been amply confirmed by experimental observations of screw dislocations in crystals, but it is a growth mechanism for a single crystal, with growth fronts of molecules. However, the growth fronts composed of many tablets of crystalline aragonite visible in micrographs of nacre are not a molecular-scale but a mesoscale phenomenon, so it has not been evident how the Frank mechanism might be of relevance. Here, we demonstrate that nacre growth is organized around a liquid-crystal core of chitin crystallites, a skeleton that the other components of nacre subsequently flesh out in a process of hierarchical self-assembly. We establish that spiral and target patterns can arise in a liquid crystal formed layer by layer through the Burton–Cabrera–Frank [Burton W, Cabrera N, Frank F (1951) The growth of crystals and the equilibrium structure of their surfaces. Philos Trans R Soc London Ser A 243:299–358] dynamics, and furthermore that this layer growth mechanism is an instance of an important class of physical systems termed excitable media. Artificial liquid crystals grown in this way may have many technological applications. PMID:19528636

  10. Microstructures and Crystallographic Misorientation in Experimentally Deformed Natural Quartz Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thust, Anja; Heilbronner, Renée.; Stünitz, Holger

    2010-05-01

    Samples of natural milky quartz were deformed in a Griggs deformation apparatus at different confining pressures (700 MPa, 1000 MPa, 1500 MPa), with constant displacement rates of 1 * 10-6s-1, axial strains of 3 - 19%, and at a temperature of 900° C. The single crystal starting material contains a large number of H2O-rich fluid inclusions. Directly adjacent to the fluid inclusions the crystal is essentially dry (50-150H/106Si, determined by FTIR). The samples were cored from a narrow zone of constant 'milkyness' (i.e. same density of fluid inclusions) in a large single crystal in two different orientations (1) normal to one of the prism planes (⊥{m} orientation) and (2) 45° to and to (O+ orientation).During attaining of the experimental P and T conditions, numerous fluid inclusions decrepitate by cracking. Rapid crack healing produces regions of very small fluid inclusions ('wet' quartz domains). Only these regions are subsequently deformed by dislocation glide, dry quartz domains without cracking and decrepitation of fluid inclusions remain undeformed. Sample strain is not sufficient to cause recrystallization, so that deformation is restricted to dislocation glide. In experiments at lower temperatures (800, 700° C) or at lower strain rate (10-5s-1) there is abundant cracking and semi-brittle deformation, indicating that 900° C, (10-6s-1) represents the lower temperature end of crystal plastic deformation in these single crystals. Peak strengths (at 900° C) range between 150 and 250 MPa for most samples of both orientations. There is a trend of decreasing strength with increasing confining pressure, as described by Kronenberg and Tullis (1984) for quartzites, but the large variation in strength due to inhomogeneous sample strain precludes a definite analysis of the strength/pressure dependence in our single crystals. In the deformed samples, we can distinguish a number of microstructures and inferred different slip systems. In both orientations, deformation

  11. Crystal structure of an RNA duplex containing phenyl-ribonucleotides, hydrophobic isosteres of the natural pyrimidines.

    PubMed Central

    Minasov, G; Matulic-Adamic, J; Wilds, C J; Haeberli, P; Usman, N; Beigelman, L; Egli, M

    2000-01-01

    Chemically modified nucleotide analogs have gained widespread popularity for probing structure-function relationships. Among the modifications that were incorporated into RNAs for assessing the role of individual functional groups, the phenyl nucleotide has displayed surprising effects both in the contexts of the hammerhead ribozyme and pre-mRNA splicing. To examine the conformational properties of this hydrophobic base analog, we determined the crystal structure of an RNA double helix with incorporated phenyl ribonucleotides at 1.97 A resolution. In the structure, phenyl residues are engaged in self-pairing and their arrangements suggest energetically favorable stacking interactions with 3'-adjacent guanines. The presence of the phenyl rings in the center of the duplex results in only moderate changes of the helical geometry. This finding is in line with those of earlier experiments that showed the phenyl analog to be a remarkably good mimetic of natural base function. Because the stacking interactions displayed by phenyl residues appear to be similar to those for natural bases, reduced conformational restriction due to the lack of hydrogen bonds with phenyl as well as alterations in its solvent structure may be the main causes of the activity changes with phenyl-modified RNAs. PMID:11105752

  12. Electron transfer kinetics on natural crystals of MoS2 and graphite.

    PubMed

    Velický, Matěj; Bissett, Mark A; Toth, Peter S; Patten, Hollie V; Worrall, Stephen D; Rodgers, Andrew N J; Hill, Ernie W; Kinloch, Ian A; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Georgiou, Thanasis; Britnell, Liam; Dryfe, Robert A W

    2015-07-21

    Here, we evaluate the electrochemical performance of sparsely studied natural crystals of molybdenite and graphite, which have increasingly been used for fabrication of next generation monolayer molybdenum disulphide and graphene energy storage devices. Heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics of several redox mediators, including Fe(CN)6(3-/4-), Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+) and IrCl6(2-/3-) are determined using voltammetry in a micro-droplet cell. The kinetics on both materials are studied as a function of surface defectiveness, surface ageing, applied potential and illumination. We find that the basal planes of both natural MoS2 and graphite show significant electroactivity, but a large decrease in electron transfer kinetics is observed on atmosphere-aged surfaces in comparison to in situ freshly cleaved surfaces of both materials. This is attributed to surface oxidation and adsorption of airborne contaminants at the surface exposed to an ambient environment. In contrast to semimetallic graphite, the electrode kinetics on semiconducting MoS2 are strongly dependent on the surface illumination and applied potential. Furthermore, while visibly present defects/cracks do not significantly affect the response of graphite, the kinetics on MoS2 systematically accelerate with small increase in disorder. These findings have direct implications for use of MoS2 and graphene/graphite as electrode materials in electrochemistry-related applications. PMID:26088339

  13. Vibrational spectra and natural bond orbital analysis of organic crystal L-prolinium picrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwin, Bismi; Amalanathan, M.; Hubert Joe, I.

    2012-10-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis and quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed on the organic crystal L-prolinium picrate (LPP). The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of LPP have been investigated using B3LYP method. The calculated molecular geometry has been compared with the experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA 4 program. The various intramolecular interactions confirming the biological activity of the compound have been exposed by natural bond orbital analysis. The distribution of Mulliken atomic charges and bending of natural hybrid orbitals associated with hydrogen bonding also reflects the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding thereby enhancing bioactivity. The analysis of the electron density of HOMO and LUMO gives an idea of the delocalization and low value of energy gap indicates electron transport in the molecule and thereby bioactivity. Vibrational analysis reveals the presence of strong O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O interaction between L-prolinium and picrate ions providing evidence for the charge transfer interaction between the donor and acceptor groups and is responsible for its bioactivity.

  14. Spectroscopic studies of excitons in cuprous oxide: Natural crystals and synthetic thick films on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi

    2001-10-01

    We observed exciton photoluminescence from Cu2O natural bulk crystals under two-photon excitation to the 1s, as well as to the 2s level, over a wide temperature range. The direct recombination emission, denoted as Xo, and a phonon- assisted, electric-dipole radiative transition involving G-12 longitudinal optical phonons, denoted as Xo- G-12 , were observed for 1s excitation. We have studied the angular (at 1.8K) and temperature (from 1.8K to 297K) dependence of the time integrated photoluminescence intensity of both emission features. For resonant pumping to the 1s level, the direct emission is strongly enhanced at low temperature. It is forward directed, however, with an angular width substantially larger than the divergence of the excitation beam; excitation to the 2s level (which subsequently decays into a 1s level) results in a more isotropic angular distribution of Xo emission. The lifetime of the Xo emission resulting from resonant excitation to the 1s level at 1.8K is ~2ns, shorter than the decay time of thermalized orthoexcitons. The results support the idea that resonant two-photon excitation to the 1s level results primarily in a quadrupole-orthoexciton-polariton formation. A theory involving the Green's function and coupled photon-exciton wave equations was developed to simulate the coherent polariton propagation. To study excitons in a spatially confined geometry, we developed an ex situ growth technique to obtain single-crystal like Cu2O thick films on MgO substrates. The optical absorption spectrum exhibits the exciton absorption series up to n = 5p at low temperature. 1s orthoexciton direct emission and phonon-assisted emission features were observed to split into three (on MgO (110)) and two (on MgO (111)) peaks. The distortion of film crystal structure and the effective Hamiltonian including a deformation potential were used to explain the energy level splitting and shift of the 1s orthoexcitons in Cu2O films. Cu2O dots and waveguides were also

  15. Crystal structure of obscurine: a natural product isolated from the stem bark of B. obscura.

    PubMed

    Lenta, Bruno N; Chouna, Rodolphe J; Neumann, Beate; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Sewald, Norbert

    2015-07-01

    The title compound, C24H31NO3 {systematic name: (E)-3-[(1R*,2S*,4aS*,8aR*)-2-(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)-1,2,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octa-hydro-naphthalen-1-yl]-N-iso-butyl-acryl-amide}, is a natural product isolated from the stem bark of B. obscura. It is composed of an octa-hydro-naphthalene ring system substituted with an essentially planar benzodioxole ring system [r.m.s. deviation = 0.012 Å] and an extended iso-butyl-acryl-amide group. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains propagating along [100]. The chains are linked by pairs of C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, involving inversion-related benzodioxole ring systems, forming ribbons lying parallel to (010). There are also C-H⋯π inter-actions present within the ribbons. PMID:26279906

  16. Playing with light in diatoms: small water organisms with a natural photonic crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stefano, Luca; De Stefano, Mario; Maddalena, Pasqualino; Moretti, Luigi; Rea, Ilaria; Mocella, Vito; Rendina, Ivo

    2007-05-01

    Complex micro- and nano-structured materials for photonic applications are designed and fabricated using top technologies. A completely different approach to engineering systems at the sub-micron-scale consists in recognizing the nanostructures and morphologies that nature has optimized during life's history on earth. In fact, biological organisms could exhibit ordered geometries and complex photonic structures which often overcome the products of the best available fabrication technologies. An example is given by diatoms. They are microalgae with a peculiar cell wall made of amorphous hydrated silica valves, reciprocally interconnected in a structure called the frustule. Valve surfaces exhibit specie-specific patterns of regular arrays of chambers, called areolae, developed into the frustule depth. Areolae range in diameter from few hundreds of nanometers up to few microns, and can be circular, polygonal or elongate. The formation of these patterns can be modeled by self-organised phase separation. Despite of the high level of knowledge on the genesis and morphology of diatom frustules, their functions are not completely understood. In this work, we show that the silica skeletons of marine diatoms, characterized by a photonic crystal-like structure, have surprising optical properties, being capable of filtering and focalizing light, as well as exhibiting optical sensing capabilities.

  17. Crystal structure of obscurine: a natural product isolated from the stem bark of B. obscura

    PubMed Central

    Lenta, Bruno N.; Chouna, Rodolphe J.; Neumann, Beate; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Sewald, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C24H31NO3 {systematic name: (E)-3-[(1R*,2S*,4aS*,8aR*)-2-(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)-1,2,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octa­hydro­naphthalen-1-yl]-N-iso­butyl­acryl­amide}, is a natural product isolated from the stem bark of B. obscura. It is composed of an octa­hydro­naphthalene ring system substituted with an essentially planar benzodioxole ring system [r.m.s. deviation = 0.012 Å] and an extended iso­butyl­acryl­amide group. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains propagating along [100]. The chains are linked by pairs of C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, involving inversion-related benzodioxole ring systems, forming ribbons lying parallel to (010). There are also C—H⋯π inter­actions present within the ribbons. PMID:26279906

  18. Natural olivine crystal-fabrics in the western Pacific convergent region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michibayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) within a natural peridotite commonly consist three pole figures for [100], [010] and [001] axes and are categorized into the well-known five olivine fabric types: A, B, C, D and E, which are easily connected with olivine slip systems: A as (010)[100], B as (010)[001], C as (001)[001], D as {0kl}[100] and E as (001)[100]. The five fabric types have been discussed on flow stress, water contents and pressure effect in mantle. In addition, AG type has also been proposed in recognition of its common occurrence in nature. The development of AG-type is not clear and could require some factors such as complex slip systems, non-coaxial strain types or the effect of melt during plastic flow. Here, we present our olivine fabric database mainly for the convergent margin in the western Pacific region. We introduce a new index named fabric-index angle (FIA) related to P-wave property of a single olivine crystal instead of a tentative classification of CPOs into the six fabric types, so that a set of CPOs can be expressed as a single angle in a range between -90° and 180°. The six olivine fabric types can have unique FIA: 63° for A type, -28° for B type, 158° for C type, 90° for D type, 106° for E type and 0° for AG type. We divided our olivine database into five tectonic groups: ophiolites, ridge peridotites, trench peridotites, peridotite xenoliths and peridotites enclosed in high-pressure metamorphic rocks. Our result shows that although our database is not yet large enough except the trench peridotites to define the characteristic of the five tectonic groups, the natural olivine fabrics vary in a range of the FIA: 0° to 150° for the ophiolites, 40° to 80° for the ridge peridotites, -40° to 100° for the trench peridotites, 0° to 100° for the peridotite xenoliths and -40° to 10° for the peridotites enclosed in high-pressure metamorphic rocks. The trench peridotites show statistically bimodal distribution of FIA

  19. Photoinduced chemical reactions on natural single crystals and synthesized crystallites of mercury(II) sulfide in aqueous solution containing naturally occurring amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pal, Bonamali; Ikeda, Shigeru; Ohtani, Bunsho

    2003-03-10

    Photoirradiation at >300 nm of aqueous suspensions of several natural crystal specimens and synthesized crystallites of mercury(II) sulfide (HgS) induced deaminocyclization of optically active or racemic lysine into pipecolinic acid (PCA) under deaerated conditions. This is the first example, to the best of our knowledge, of photoinduced chemical reactions of natural biological compounds over natural minerals. It was found that the natural HgS crystals had activity higher than those of synthesized ones but lower than those of other sulfides of transition metals, e.g., CdS and ZnS, belonging to the same II-IV chalcogenides. In almost all of the photoreactions, decompostion of HgS occurred to liberate hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and Hg(2+), and the latter seemed to have undergone in-situ reductive deposition on HgS as Hg(0) after a certain induction period (24-70 h) during the photoirradiation, as indicated by the darkened color of the suspensions. The formation of PCA, presumably through combination of oxidation of lysine and reduction of an intermediate, cyclic Schiff base, could also be seen after a certain induction time of the Hg(0) formation. This was supported by the fact that the addition of small amount of Hg(2+) (0.5 wt % of HgS) increased the PCA yield by almost 2-fold. We also tried to elucidate certain aspects of the plausible stereochemical reactions in relation to the chiral crystal structure of HgS. Although, in some experiments, slight enantiomeric excess of the product PCA was observed, the excess was below or equal to the experimental error and no other supporting analytical data could not be obtained; we cannot conclude the enantiomeric photoproduction of PCA by the natural chiral HgS specimen. PMID:12611518

  20. Syntheses, spectroscopic characterization, crystal structure and natural rubber vulcanization activity of new disulfides derived from sulfonyldithiocarbimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Leandro de Carvalho; Rubinger, Mayura Marques Magalhães; Tavares, Eder do Couto; Janczak, Jan; Pacheco, Elen Beatriz Acordi Vasques; Visconte, Leila Lea Yuan; Oliveira, Marcelo Ribeiro Leite

    2013-09-01

    The compounds (Bu4N)2[(4-RC6H4SO2NCS2)2] [Bu4N = tetrabutylammonium cation; R = H (1), F (2), Cl (3) and Br (4)] and (Ph4P)2[(4-RC6H4SO2NCS2)2]ṡH2O [Ph4P = tetraphenylphosphonium cation and R = I (5)] were synthesized by the reaction of the potassium dithiocarbimates (4-RC6H4SO2NCS2K2ṡ2H2O) with I2 and Bu4NBr or Ph4PCl. The IR data were consistent with the formation of the dithiocarbimatodisulfides anions. The NMR spectra showed the expected signals for the cations and anions in a 2:1 proportion. The structures of compounds 1-5 were determined by the single crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds 2, 3 and 4 are isostructural and crystallise in the centrosymmetric space group C2/c of the monoclinic system. Compound 1 crystallises in the monoclinic system in the space group of P21/n and the compound 5 crystallises in the centrosymmetric space group P-1 of the triclinic system. The complex anions of compounds 2, 3 and 4 exhibit similar conformations having twofold symmetry, while in 1 and 5 the anions exhibit C1 symmetry. The activity of the new compounds in the vulcanization of the natural rubber was evaluated and compared to the commercial accelerators ZDMC, TBBS and TMTD. These studies confirm that the sulfonyldithiocarbimato disulfides anions are new vulcanization accelerators, being slower than the commercial accelerators, but producing a greater degree of crosslinking, and scorch time values compatible with good processing safety for industrial applications. The mechanical properties, stress and tear resistances were determined and compared to those obtained with the commercial accelerators.

  1. Use of hydrogen peroxide treatment and crystal violet agar plates for selective recovery of bacteriophages from natural environments

    SciTech Connect

    Asghari, A.; Farrah, S.R.; Bitton, G. )

    1992-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide inactivated bacteriophages and bacteria at different rates. A concentration of 0.1% hydrogen peroxide reduced the numbers of several bacteria by an average of 94% but caused an average of 25% inactivation in the numbers of bacteriophages tested. Treating natural samples with hydrogen peroxide selectively reduced the indigenous bacterial flora and permitted better visualization of plaques of lawns of Escherichia coli C-3000. In some cases indigenous gram-positive bacteria were relatively resistant to hydrogen peroxide, but their growth could be limited by incorporation of crystal violet into the bottom agar used for plaque assays. The use of hydrogen peroxide treatment and crystal violet-containing plates permitted recovery of more phages from natural samples than did other procedures, such as chloroform pretreatment or the use of selective plating agar such as EC medium.

  2. Optical hyperpolarization and inductive readout of 31P donor nuclei in natural abundance single crystal 29Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Thomas; Haas, Holger; Deshpande, Rahul; Gumann, Patryk; Cory, David

    2016-05-01

    We optically polarize and inductively detect 31P donor nuclei in single crystal silicon at high magnetic fields (6 . 7T). Samples include both natural abundance 29Si and an isotopically purified 28Si sample. We observe dipolar order in the 29Si nuclear spins through a spin-locking measurement. This provides a means of characterizing spin transport in the vicinity of the 31P donors.

  3. Crystal Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomaker, Verner; Lingafelter, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of crystal systems, comparing (in table format) crystal systems with lattice types, number of restrictions, nature of the restrictions, and other lattices that can accidently show the same metrical symmetry. (JN)

  4. A comparative study on the crystal structure of bicycle analogues to the natural phytotoxin helminthosporins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Luiz Cláudio de Almeida; Teixeira, Robson Ricardo; Nogueira, Leonardo Brandão; Maltha, Celia Regina Alvares; Doriguetto, Antônio Carlos; Martins, Felipe Terra

    2016-02-01

    Herein we described structural insights of a series of analogues to helminthosporin phytotoxins. The key reaction used to prepare the compounds corresponded to the [3 + 4] cycloaddition between the oxyallyl cation generated from 2,4-dibromopentan-3-one and different furans. Their structures were confirmed upon IR, NMR and X-ray diffraction analyses. While bicycles 7, 8 and 9 crystallize in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group P21/c, compound 10 was solved in the noncentrosymmetric orthorhombic space group P212121. The solid materials obtained were shown to be racemic crystals (7, 8, 9) or racemic conglomerate (10). In all compounds, there is formation of a bicycle featured by fused tetrahydropyranone and 2,5-dihydrofuran rings. They adopt chair and envelope conformations, respectively. Crystal packing of all compounds is stabilized through C-H•••O contacts. Conformational aspects as well as similarities and differences among the crystal structures of the synthesized analogues are discussed.

  5. Nanorelief of the natural cleavage surface of triglycine sulphate crystals with substitutional and interstitial impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Belugina, N. V.; Gainutdinov, R. V.; Tolstikhina, A. L. Dolbinina, V. V.; Sorokina, N. I.; Alekseeva, O. A.

    2011-11-15

    Ferroelectric triglycine sulphate crystals (TGS) with substitutional (LADTGS+ADP, DTGS) and interstitial (Cr) impurities have been studied by atomic-force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray fluorescence. The nanorelief parameters of the mirror cleavage TGS(010) surface have been measured with a high accuracy. A correlation between the crystal defect density in the bulk and the cleavage surface nanorelief is revealed at the submicrometer level.

  6. High-pressure behavior of natural single-crystal epidote and clinozoisite up to 40 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Fei; Wu, Xiang; Wang, Ying; Fan, Dawei; Qin, Shan; Yang, Ke; Townsend, Joshua P.; Jacobsen, Steven D.

    2016-06-01

    The comparative compressibility and high-pressure stability of a natural epidote (0.79 Fe-total per formula unit, Fetot pfu) and clinozoisite (0.40 Fetot pfu) were investigated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The lattice parameters of both phases exhibit continuous compression behavior up to 30 GPa without evidence of phase transformation. Pressure-volume data for both phases were fitted to a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with V 0 = 461.1(1) Å3, K 0 = 115(2) GPa, and K0' = 3.7(2) for epidote and V 0 = 457.8(1) Å3, K 0 = 142(3) GPa, and K0' = 5.2(4) for clinozoisite. In both epidote and clinozoisite, the b-axis is the stiffest direction, and the ratios of axial compressibility are 1.19:1.00:1.15 for epidote and 1.82:1.00:1.19 for clinozoisite. Whereas the compressibility of the a-axis is nearly the same for both phases, the b- and c-axes of the epidote are about 1.5 times more compressible than in clinozoisite, consistent with epidote having a lower bulk modulus. Raman spectra collected up to 40.4 GPa also show no indication of phase transformation and were used to obtain mode Grüneisen parameters (γ i) for Si-O vibrations, which were found to be 0.5-0.8, typical for hydrous silicate minerals. The average pressure coefficient of Raman frequency shifts for M-O modes in epidote, 2.61(6) cm-1/GPa, is larger than found for clinozoisite, 2.40(6) cm-1/GPa, mainly due to the different compressibility of FeO6 and AlO6 octahedra in M3 sites. Epidote and clinozoisite contain about 2 wt% H2O are thus potentially important carriers of water in subducted slabs.

  7. Evidence For Weak Ferromagnetic Moment Within The Basal Plane Of Hematite Natural Crystals At Low-Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, F. M.; Hirt, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hematite is an iron oxide (α-Fe2O3) that represents the most oxidized state in the wüstite-magnetite-hematite system. Hematite is antiferromagnetic (AFM) at room temperature with a small canted moment lying within the crystal symmetry plane or basal plane (weak ferromagnetism, WFM). Al low temperatures hematite undergoes a magnetic phase transition from WFM to a pure antiferromagnetic configuration (AF), which is known as the Morin transition. Low-temperature magnetization of hematite within the basal has been studied in a collection of natural crystals by means of torque magnetometry. Comparison between the torque curves at room temperature and at 77 K allows identification of a weak ferromagnetic moment constrained within the basal plane at temperatures well below the Morin transition. Annealing the samples produces the expected reduction of the weak ferromagnetic moment, but there is also a relationship between the ferromagnetic moment before and after annealing. Low temperature measurements after the annealing experiment reveal the presence of a weak ferromagnetic moment that survives the annealing. This observation suggests the magnetic structure of natural hematite crystals below the Morin transition can still be a carrier of magnetization.

  8. Nature of multiplet structure of luminescence spectra of doped naphthalene and benzophenone crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curmei, N. D.; Klishevich, G. V.; Melnyk, V. I.; Tereshchenko, A. G.; Zloba, D. I.; Sherban, D.

    2013-09-01

    Luminescence spectra of naphthalene and benzophenone doped with their monosubstituted derivatives at 4.2 K were studied. The multiplet structure of these spectra was analyzed using the symmetry properties of the free molecules and crystal structures. It was shown that fl uorescence and phosphorescence spectra of the studied objects had a doublet character.

  9. Radiation dosimetry using decreasing TL intensity in a few variety of silicate crystals.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigueo; Cano, Nilo F; Gundu Rao, T K; Oliveira, Letícia M; Carmo, Lucas S; Chubaci, Jose F D

    2015-11-01

    This study shows that there are some ionic crystals which after irradiation with high gamma dose Dm and subsequent irradiation with low doses ranging up to 500Gy present a decreasing TL intensity as dose increases. This interesting feature can be used as a calibration curve in radiation dosimetry. Such behavior can be found in green quartz, three varieties of beryl and pink tourmaline. In all these silicate crystals it can be shown that irradiation with increasing γ-dose there is a dose Dm for which the TL intensity is maximum. Of course, Dm varies depending on the crystal and irradiated crystal with the dose Dm is stable. If one of these crystals is taken and irradiated with doses from low values up to 400-500Gy, a curve of decreasing TL intensity is obtained; such a curve can be used as a calibration curve. PMID:26277189

  10. Role of Stearic Acid in the Strain-Induced Crystallization of Crosslinked Natural Rubber and Synthetic Cis-1,4-Polyisoprene

    SciTech Connect

    Kohjiya,S.; Tosaka, M.; Furutani, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Toki, S.; Hsiao, B.

    2007-01-01

    Strain-induced crystallization of crosslinked natural rubber (NR) and its synthetic analogue, cis-1,4-polyisoprene (IR), both mixed with various amounts of stearic acid (SA), were investigated by time-resolved X-ray diffraction using a powerful synchrotron radiation source and simultaneous mechanical (tensile) measurement. No acceleration or retardation was observed on NR in spite of the increase of SA amount. Even the SA-free IR crystallized upon stretching, and the overall crystallization behavior of IR shifted to the larger strain ratio with increasing SA content. No difference due to the SA was detected in the deformation of crystal lattice by stress for both NR and IR. These results suggested that the extended network chains are effective for the initiation of crystallization upon stretching, while the role of SA is trivial. These behaviors are much different from their crystallization at low temperature by standing, where SA acts as a nucleating agent.

  11. Monomial Crystals and Partition Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingley, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Recently Fayers introduced a large family of combinatorial realizations of the fundamental crystal B(Λ0) for ^sln, where the vertices are indexed by certain partitions. He showed that special cases of this construction agree with the Misra-Miwa realization and with Berg's ladder crystal. Here we show that another special case is naturally isomorphic to a realization using Nakajima's monomial crystal.

  12. New Insights into the Relationship Between Network Structure and Strain Induced Crystallization in Unvolcanized Natural Rubber by Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, S.; Hsiao, B; Amnuaypornsri, S; Sakdapipanich, J

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between the network structure and strain-induced crystallization in un-vulcanized as well as vulcanized natural rubbers (NR) and synthetic poly-isoprene rubbers (IR) was investigated via synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) technique. It was found that the presence of a naturally occurring network structure formed by natural components in un-vulcanized NR significantly facilitates strain-induced crystallization and enhances modulus and tensile strength. The stress-strain relation in vulcanized NR is due to the combined effect of chemical and naturally occurring networks. The weakness of naturally occurring network against stress and temperature suggests that vulcanized NR has additional relaxation mechanism due to naturally occurring network. The superior mechanical properties in NR compared with IR are mainly due to the existence of naturally occurring network structure.

  13. Microscopic nature of crystal phase quantum dots in ultrathin GaAs nanowires by nanoscale luminescence characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loitsch, Bernhard; Müller, Marcus; Winnerl, Julia; Veit, Peter; Rudolph, Daniel; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J.; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Jürgen; Koblmüller, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    Crystal phase quantum dots (CPQD) embedded in a nanowire (NW) geometry have recently emerged as efficient single photon emitters. In typical III–V semiconductor NWs such CPQDs are linked to the well-known zincblende (ZB)/wurtzite (WZ) polytypism that occurs mostly randomly along the NW axis, making it difficult to assess the exact position and microscopic nature of a particular emitter. Here, we employ highly spatially-resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy directly in a scanning transmission electron microscope to unambiguously identify type, microscopic nature, position and luminescence characteristics of single polytype defects in ultrathin GaAs–AlGaAs core–shell NWs with nanometer-scale resolution. Importantly, we find that individual twin defects (1 ML-inclusion of WZ in a ZB crystal) are the predominant source for QD emission, where the spectral position depends sensitively on the strength of radial confinement by the ultrathin GaAs NW core. By analyzing the temperature-dependent luminescence properties of a ∼1 ML thick/7 nm wide twin-defect CPQD, we determine a thermal activation energy of ∼7.4 meV for the confined excitons, as well as an evolution in linewidth that reflects phonon-mediated broadening processes, corroborating the QD-like behavior. Our findings also reveal the presence of effective carrier diffusion in-between isolated CPQDs.

  14. Aqueous photofate of crystal violet under simulated and natural solar irradiation: Kinetics, products, and pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Yang, Shaogui; Sun, Cheng; Wang, Lianhong; Wang, Qingeng

    2016-01-01

    In this work photodegradation rates and pathways of an illegal veterinary drug, crystal violet, were studied under simulated and solar irradiation with the goal of assessing the potential of photolysis as a removal mechanism in the aquatic environment. Factors influencing the photodegradation process under simulated sunlight were investigated, including pH, humic acid, Fe(2+), Ca(2+), [Formula: see text] , and [Formula: see text] , of which favorable conditions were optimized by the orthogonal array design. The degradation processes of crystal violet conformed to pseudo first-order kinetics, with different rate constants under different conditions. Reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl radical, singlet oxygen, and superoxide anion participated in the indirect photolysis process, leading to much higher decolorization efficiencies than those of direct photolysis and hydrolysis. Contrasting to simulated irradiation, solar irradiation led to complete decolorization. Sixty-four products were identified by high resolution liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, elucidating relatively complete mineralization through photolysis. Based on the analyses of the degradation products and calculations of the frontier electron density, transformation pathways were proposed as singlet oxygen addition, N-demethylation, hydroxyl addition, decomposition of conjugated structure, the removal of benzene ring and the ring-opening reaction. As a result, small products generated as carboxylic acids, alcohols and amines, which were not likely to cause severe hazards to the environment. This study provided both a reference for photodegradation of crystal violet and future safety applications and predictions of decontamination of related triphenylmethane veterinary drug under environmental conditions. PMID:26497275

  15. Sites of the N1 nitrogen paramagnetic centers in natural diamond crystals: Dissymmetrization of the structure as a result of plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titkov, S. V.; Mineeva, R. M.; Ryabchikov, I. D.; Speransky, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Using the method of EPR spectroscopy, it is shown that the N1 nitrogen centers (N-C-N+) are unevenly distributed over possible sites in natural brown crystals of plastically deformed diamonds. The influence of deformational dissymmetrization of the structure on the anisotropy of some physical properties of natural diamonds is discussed.

  16. Insulating Nature of Strongly Correlated Massless Dirac Fermions in an Organic Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Ishikawa, Kyohei; Takehara, Ryosuke; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tamura, Masafumi; Kanoda, Kazushi

    2016-06-01

    Through resistivity measurements of an organic crystal hosting massless Dirac fermions with a charge-ordering instability, we reveal the effect of interactions among massless Dirac fermions on the charge transport. A low-temperature resistivity upturn appears robustly irrespective of the pressure and is enhanced while approaching the critical pressure of charge ordering, indicating that the insulating behavior originates from short-range Coulomb interactions. The observation of an apparently vanishing gap in the charge-ordered phase accords with the theoretical prediction of nontopological edge states.

  17. The nature of photoinduced changes in the magnetostriction of yttrium-iron garnet single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Vorob'eva, N. V.

    2011-05-15

    A model of the occurrence of photoinduced changes in linear magnetostriction is proposed based on a complex experimental study of magnetostrictive strains in yttrium-iron garnets Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} with low contents of different impurities. Analytical expressions for calculating the magnetostriction in yttrium-iron garnet single crystals with different types of doping are presented. The correlation of the photoinduced change in the magnetostriction with the crystallographic features of the samples is demonstrated. The changes in the magnetostriction constants are analyzed quantitatively for samples prepared in different ways.

  18. Impurities and Electronic Property Variations of Natural MoS2 Crystal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Addou, Rafik; McDonnell, Stephen; Barrera, Diego; Guo, Zaibing; Azcatl, Angelica; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Hui; Hinkle, Christopher L; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel; Alshareef, Husam N; Colombo, Luigi; Hsu, Julia W P; Wallace, Robert M

    2015-09-22

    Room temperature X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (HR-RBS), Kelvin probe method, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are employed to study the properties of a freshly exfoliated surface of geological MoS2 crystals. Our findings reveal that the semiconductor 2H-MoS2 exhibits both n- and p-type behavior, and the work function as measured by the Kelvin probe is found to vary from 4.4 to 5.3 eV. The presence of impurities in parts-per-million (ppm) and a surface defect density of up to 8% of the total area could explain the variation of the Fermi level position. High resolution RBS data also show a large variation in the MoSx composition (1.8 < x < 2.05) at the surface. Thus, the variation in the conductivity, the work function, and stoichiometry across small areas of MoS2 will have to be controlled during crystal growth in order to provide high quality uniform materials for future device fabrication. PMID:26301428

  19. High-temperature single-crystal neutron diffraction study of natural chondrodite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Martin; Lager, George A.; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Fernandez-Diaz, Maria Teresa

    2006-03-01

    The H-atom environment in a Tilly Foster chondrodite was analyzed using single-crystal neutron-diffraction data collected at 500, 700 and 900 K and previously published low temperature data collected at 10, 100 and 300 K on the same crystal (Mg4.64Fe0.28Mn0.014Ti0.023(Si1.01O4)2F1.16(OH)0.84; Friedrich et al. in Am Mineral 86:981-989, 2001). The full mean square displacement matrix Σ of the O-H pair was determined from the temperature dependence of the anisotropic displacement parameters, enabling a proper correction of the O-H bond for thermal vibration without assumptions about the correlation of O and H movements. The results show that the perpendicular O-H motions in chondrodite are intermediate between the riding and the independent motion models. The corrected O-H bond lengths do not change with temperature whereas the corrected H···F distances show an increase of ~0.02 Å with temperature, as do the Mg-O distances. This result shows that spectroscopic observations on the strength of the covalent O-H bond cannot be interpreted unambiguously in terms of a corresponding behaviour of the associated H···O/F hydrogen bond.

  20. Effects of Cr 3+ impurity concentration on the crystallography of synthetic emerald crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Huang, Eugene; Lee, Jan-Shing; Yu, Shu-Cheng

    2011-06-01

    Flux method has been adopted for the synthesis of emerald crystals using PbO-V 2O 5 as a flux in order to study the crystallography of the synthetic crystals. In general, the hue of green color of emerald deepens with the addition of Cr 3+. The molar volume of the synthesized crystals was found to increase with the incorporation of Cr 2O 3 dopant. The substitution of Cr 3+ for Al 3+ in the octahedral sites of beryl results in the expansion of a-axis, while c-axis remains nearly unchanged. The maximum Cr 2O 3-content allowed in the crystal lattice of emerald has been found to be about 3.5 wt%. When the doping Cr 2O 3-content exceeds 3.5 wt%, a significant anomaly in lattice parameters starts to take place, accompanying the precipitation of an unknown phase in the emerald matrix.

  1. Structure analysis on synthetic emerald crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Lee, Jiann-Shing; Huang, Eugene; Liao, Ju-Hsiou

    2013-05-01

    Single crystals of emerald synthesized by means of the flux method were adopted for crystallographic analyses. Emerald crystals with a wide range of Cr3+-doping content up to 3.16 wt% Cr2O3 were examined by X-ray single crystal diffraction refinement method. The crystal structures of the emerald crystals were refined to R 1 (all data) of 0.019-0.024 and w R 2 (all data) of 0.061-0.073. When Cr3+ substitutes for Al3+, the main adjustment takes place in the Al-octahedron and Be-tetrahedron. The effect of substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ in the beryl structure results in progressively lengthening of the Al-O distance, while the length of the other bonds remains nearly unchanged. The substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ may have caused the expansion of a axis, while keeping the c axis unchanged in the emerald lattice. As a consequence, the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Be bonding angles are found to decrease, while the angle of Si-O-Be increases as the Al-O distance increases during the Cr replacement.

  2. 3D Micro-topography of Transferred Laboratory and Natural Ice Crystal Surfaces Imaged by Cryo and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, N. B.; Boaggio, K.; Bancroft, L.; Bandamede, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted micro-scale roughness on the surfaces of ice crystals grown and imaged in-situ within the chambers of environmental scanning electron microscopes (ESEM). These observations appear to align with theoretical and satellite observations that suggest a prevalence of rough ice in cirrus clouds. However, the atmospheric application of the lab observations are indeterminate because the observations have been based only on crystals grown on substrates and in pure-water vapor environments. In this work, we present details and results from the development of a transfer technique which allows natural and lab-grown ice and snow crystals to be captured, preserved, and transferred into the ESEM for 3D imaging. Ice crystals were gathered from 1) natural snow, 2) a balloon-borne cirrus particle capture device, and 3) lab-grown ice crystals from a diffusion chamber. Ice crystals were captured in a pre-conditioned small-volume (~1 cm3) cryo-containment cell. The cell was then sealed closed and transferred to a specially-designed cryogenic dewer (filled with liquid nitrogen or crushed dry ice) for transport to a new Hitachi Field Emission, Variable Pressure SEM (SU-5000). The cryo-cell was then removed from the dewer and quickly placed onto the pre-conditioned cryo transfer stage attached to the ESEM (Quorum 3010T). Quantitative 3D topographical digital elevation models of ice surfaces are reported from SEM for the first time, including a variety of objective measures of statistical surface roughness. The surfaces of the transported crystals clearly exhibit signatures of mesoscopic roughening that are similar to examples of roughness seen in ESEM-grown crystals. For most transported crystals, the habits and crystal edges are more intricate that those observed for ice grown directly on substrates within the ESEM chamber. Portions of some crystals do appear smooth even at magnification greater than 1000x, a rare observation in our ESEM-grown crystals. The

  3. Crystal structure and theoretical calculations of Julocrotine, a natural product with antileishmanial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Rafael Y. O.; Brasil, Davi S. B.; Alves, Cláudio N.; Guilhon, Giselle M. S. P.; Santos, Lourivaldo S.; Arruda, Mara S. P.; Müller, Adolfo H.; Barbosa, Patrícia S.; Abreu, Alcicley S.; Silva, Edilene O.; Rumjanek, Victor M.; Souza, Jaime, Jr.; da Silva, Albérico B. F.; Santos, Regina H. De A.

    Julocrotine, N-(2,6-dioxo-1-phenethyl-piperidin-3-yl)-2-methyl-butyramide, is a potent antiproliferative agent against the promastigote and amastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis (L.). In this work, the crystal structure of Julocrotine was solved by X-ray diffraction, and its geometrical parameters were compared with theoretical calculations at the B3LYP and HF level of theory. IR and NMR spectra also have been obtained and compared with theoretical calculations. IR absorptions calculated with the B3LYP level of theory employed together with the 6-311G+(d,p) basis set, are close to those observed experimentally. Theoretical NMR calculations show little deviation from experimental results. The results show that the theory is in accordance with the experimental data.0

  4. Crystal-structure properties and the molecular nature of hydrostatically compressed realgar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejny, Clivia; Sagl, Raffaela; Többens, Daniel M.; Miletich, Ronald; Wildner, Manfred; Nasdala, Lutz; Ullrich, Angela; Balic-Zunic, Tonci

    2012-05-01

    The structure of realgar, As4S4, and its evolution with pressure have been investigated employing in situ X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and vibrational spectroscopy on single-crystal samples in diamond-anvil cells. Compression under true hydrostatic conditions up to 5.40 GPa reveals equation-of-state parameters of V 0 = 799.4(2.4) Å3 and K 0 = 10.5(0.4) GPa with K_0^' = 8.7. The remarkably high compressibility can be attributed to a denser packing of the As4S4 molecules with shortening of the intermolecular bonds of up to 12 %, while the As4S4 molecules remain intact showing rigid-unit behaviour. From ambient pressure to 4.5 GPa, Raman spectra exhibit a strong blue shift of the Raman bands of the lattice-phonon regime of 24 cm-1, whereas frequencies from intramolecular As-S stretching modes show negligible or no shifts at all. On pressurisation, realgar shows a continuous and reversible colour change from bright orange over deep red to black. Optical absorption spectroscopy shows a shift of the absorption edge from 2.30 to 1.81 eV up to 4.5 GPa, and DFT calculations show a corresponding reduction in the band gap. Synchrotron-based measurements on polycrystalline samples up to 45.5 GPa are indexed according to the monoclinic structure of realgar.

  5. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  6. Spontaneous and induced radiation by electrons/positrons in natural and photonic crystals. Volume free electron lasers (VFELs): From microwave and optical to X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous and induced radiation produced by relativistic particles passing through natural and photonic crystals has enhanced capabilities for achieving the radiation sources operating in different wavelength ranges. Use of a non-one-dimensional distributed feedback, arising through Bragg diffraction in spatially periodic systems (natural and artificial (electromagnetic, photonic) crystals), establishes the foundation for the development of volume free electron lasers/masers (VFELs/VFEMs) as well as high-energy charged particle accelerators. The analysis of basic principles of VFEL theory demonstrates the promising potential of VFELs as the basis for the development of high-power microwave and optical sources.

  7. How Does a Raindrop Grow?: Precipitation in natural clouds may develop from ice crystals or from large hygroscopic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Braham, R R

    1959-01-16

    On the basis of presently available data, combined with present-day knowledge of the physics and chemistry of cloud particle development, it is possible to make the following generalizations about the mode of precipitation in natural clouds. 1) The all-water mechanism begins to operate as soon as a parcel of cloud air is formed and continues to operate throughout the life of the cloud. The ice-crystal mechanism, on the other hand, can begin to operate only after the top of the cloud has reached levels where ice nuclei can be effective (about -15 degrees C). Some clouds never reach this height; any precipitation from them must be through the all-water mechanism. In cold climates and at high levels in the atmosphere, the cloud bases may be very close to this critical temperature. In the tropics, approximately 25,000 feet separate the bases of low clouds from the natural ice level. 2) The number of large hygroscopic nuclei in maritime air over tropical oceans is entirely adequate to rain-out any cloud with a base below about 10,000 feet, provided the cloud duration and cloud depth is sufficient for the precipitation process to operate. Extensive trajectories over land will decrease the number of sea-salt particles, both because of sedimentation and removal in rain. Measurements show an order-of-magnitude decrease in the number of large particles as maritime air moves from the Gulf of Mexico to the vicinity of St. Louis, during the summer months. Measurements in Arizona and New Mexico show even smaller chloride concentrations, presumably because of the long overland trajectories required in reaching these areas. The maritime particles lost in overland trajectories apparently are more than replaced by particles of land origin. The latter are usually of mixed composition and are less favorable for the formation of outsized solution droplets. 3) Ice nuclei, required for the formation of ice crystals and for droplet freezing, are rather rare at temperatures higher than

  8. Stress-induced melting of crystals in natural rubber: a new way to tailor the transition temperature of shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Heuwers, Benjamin; Quitmann, Dominik; Katzenberg, Frank; Tiller, Joerg C

    2012-09-26

    Lightly cross-linked natural rubber (NR, cis-1,4-polyisoprene) was found to be an exceptional cold programmable shape memory polymer (SMP) with strain storage of up to 1000%. These networks are stabilized by strain-induced crystals. Here, we explore the influence of mechanical stress applied perpendicular to the elongation direction of the network on the stability of these crystals. We found that the material recovers its original shape at a critical transverse stress. It could be shown that this is due to a disruption of the strain-stabilizing crystals, which represents a completely new trigger for SMPs. The variation of transverse stress allows tuning of the trigger temperature T(trig) (σ) in a range of 45 to 0 °C, which is the first example of manipulating the transition of a crystal-stabilized SMP after programming. PMID:22760997

  9. Tracking the nature and duration of magma transfer beneath Mauna Loa using a crystal population and kinetic modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, M.; Morgan, D. J.; Thornber, C. R.; Trusdell, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Deep long period (DPL) seismic swarms recently detected beneath Mauna Loa fuel speculation whether the volcano could enter a renewed phase of unrest. To mitigate threats from future eruptions, a better understanding of how and over which timescales magma moves within Mauna Loa is required. We present a novel approach linking the compositions preserved in the chemical stratigraphy of 158 olivine crystals with kinetic modelling to provide timescales and routes of magma migration beneath Mauna Loa prior to the voluminous (376 million m3, [1]) 1950 eruption of Mauna Loa. We have studied a total of 8 near-vent samples erupted from fissures that opened progressively at elevations from 12,000ft to 8,500ft within the first 24h of the eruption (June 1-23, 1950). The samples contain olivine crystals with different populations of core (Fo89, Fo87-88, Fo85-86, Fo82-84), and rim compositions (majority Fo78-81) and zoning patterns (normal, reverse and complex). The diverging compositional and zoning record can be best explained as the product of magma evolution in five distinct magmatic environments (MEs): M0 (=Fo89), M1 (=Fo87-88), M2 (=Fo85-86), M3 (=Fo82-84), M4 (=Fo78-81) with melt transfer and mixing among them. Modelling the diffusive relaxation of the compositional zoning profiles constrains the timescales and durations over which crystals (and melt) are transferred between the different MEs. Diffusion models were performed at temperatures of 1133-1168°C and fO2 at ∆NNO -0.55 [2]. The derived timescales range from ~20 days up to 11 months, with the majority of the timescales being shorter than 4 months. The nature and duration of magma transfer beneath Mauna Loa prior to the catastrophic 1950 eruption is interpreted as follows: (i) Three dominant magma migration pathways connecting the environments M1:M4, M3:M4 and M2:M4 can be identified; and (ii) transfer of magma along these routes occurs in multiples pulses commencing up to 8 months before, and becoming more

  10. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray single-crystal diffractometry, and electronic structure calculations on natural alexandrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Sven-Ulf; Grodzicki, Michael; Lottermoser, Werner; Redhammer, Günther J.; Tippelt, Gerold; Ponahlo, Johann; Amthauer, Georg

    2007-09-01

    Natural alexandrite Al2BeO4:Cr from Malyshevo near Terem Tschanka, Sverdlovsk, Ural, Russia, has been characterized by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray single-crystal diffractometry and by electronic structure calculations in order to determine oxidation state and location of iron. The sample contains 0.3 wt% of total iron oxide. The 57Fe Mössbauer spectrum can be resolved into three doublets. Two of them with hyperfine parameters typical for octahedrally coordinated high-spin Fe3+ and Fe2+, respectively, are assigned to iron substituting for Al in the octahedral M2-site. The third doublet is attributed to Fe3+ in hematite. Electronic structure calculations in the local spin density approximation are in reasonable agreement with experimental data provided that expansion and/or distortion of the coordination octahedra are presumed upon iron substitution. The calculated hyperfine parameters of Fe3+ are almost identical for the M1 and M2 positions, but the calculated ligand-field splitting is by far too large for high-spin Fe3+ on M1.

  11. Natural olivine crystal-fabrics in the western Pacific convergence region: A new method to identify fabric type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Mainprice, David; Fujii, Ayano; Uehara, Shigeki; Shinkai, Yuri; Kondo, Yusuke; Ohara, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Teruaki; Fryer, Patricia; Bloomer, Sherman H.; Ishiwatari, Akira; Hawkins, James W.; Ji, Shaocheng

    2016-06-01

    Crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) of olivine within natural peridotites are commonly depicted by pole figures for the [100], [010], and [001] axes, and they can be categorized into five well-known fabric types: A, B, C, D, and E. These fabric types can be related to olivine slip systems: A with (010)[100], B with (010)[001], C with (001)[001], D with {0kl}[100], and E with (001)[100]. In addition, an AG type is commonly found in nature, but its origin is controversial, and could involve several contributing factors such as complex slip systems, non-coaxial strain types, or the effects of melt during plastic flow. In this paper we present all of our olivine fabric database published previously as well as new data mostly from ocean floor, mainly for the convergent margin of the western Pacific region, and we introduce a new index named Fabric-Index Angle (FIA), which is related to the P-wave property of a single olivine crystal. The FIA can be used as an alternative to classifying the CPOs into the six fabric types, and it allows a set of CPOs to be expressed as a single angle in a range between -90° and 180°. The six olivine fabric types have unique values of FIA: 63° for A type, -28° for B type, 158° for C type, 90° for D type, 106° for E type, and 0° for AG type. We divided our olivine database into five tectonic groups: ophiolites, ridge peridotites, trench peridotites, peridotite xenoliths, and peridotites enclosed in high-pressure metamorphic rocks. Our results show that although our database is not yet large enough (except for trench peridotites) to define the characteristics of the five tectonic groups, the natural olivine fabrics vary in their range of FIA: 0° to 150° for the ophiolites, 40° to 80° for the ridge peridotites, -40° to 100° for the trench peridotites, 0° to 100° for the peridotite xenoliths, and -40° to 10° for the peridotites enclosed in high-pressure metamorphic rocks. The trench peridotites show a statistically

  12. A comparison of the abilities of natural rubber (NR) and synthetic polyisoprene cis-1,4 rubber (IR) to crystallize under strain at high strain rates.

    PubMed

    Candau, Nicolas; Chazeau, Laurent; Chenal, Jean-Marc; Gauthier, Catherine; Munch, Etienne

    2016-02-01

    Strain induced crystallization (SIC) of a natural rubber (NR) and a synthetic rubber (IR) with a high amount of cis-1,4 units (98.6%) is studied, thanks to in situ wide angle X-ray (WAXS) experiments at room temperature performed in a large range of strain rates. During stretching at a low strain rate (4.2 × 10(-3) s(-1)), SIC in IR occurs at a larger stretching ratio than in NR. As a result, the crystallinity index at a given stretching ratio is lower in IR than in NR, in spite of the similar crosslink densities of the chains involved in the crystallization in both materials. This lower ability for crystallization in IR is attributed to the presence of branching along its backbone and its lower stereoregularity. Conversely, dynamic experiments performed at high strain rates (10(1)/10(2) s(-1)) show for both materials a similar ability to crystallize. This unexpected result is confirmed by monotonic tensile tests performed in a large range of strain rates. The reason is thermodynamic: the chain extension plays a predominant role compared to the role of the microstructure defects when the strain rate is high, i.e. when the kinetics of the crystallite nucleation forces the crystallization to occur at a large stretching ratio. A thermodynamic model enables qualitative reproduction of the experimental results. PMID:26750589

  13. Radiation-induced defects in quartz. II. Single-crystal W-band EPR study of a natural citrine quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuanming; Nilges, Mark J.; Mashkovtsev, Rudolf I.

    2008-08-01

    Single-crystal electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of a natural citrine quartz without any artificial irradiation, measured at W-band frequencies (˜94 GHz) and temperatures of 77, 110 and 298 K, allow better characterization of three previously-reported Centers (#6, #7 and B) and discovery of three new defects (B', C' and G'). The W-band EPR spectra reveal that Centers #6 and #7 do not reside on twofold symmetry axes, contrary to results from a previous X-band EPR study. The W-band spectra also show that the previously reported Center B is a mixture of two defects (B and B') with similar g matrices but different-sized 27Al hyperfine structures. Center C' has similar principal g values to the previously reported Center C but is distinct from the latter by a larger 27Al hyperfine structure with splittings from 0.10 to 0.22 mT. Also, Center G' has a similar g matrix to the previously reported Center G but a different 27Al hyperfine structure with splittings from 0.41 to 0.53 mT. These spin-Hamiltonian parameters, together with observed thermal properties and microwave-power dependence, suggest that Centers #6 and #7 probably represent O{2/3-} type defects. Centers B and B' are probably superoxide radicals (O{2/-}) with the unpaired spin localized on the same pair of oxygen atoms around a missing Si atom but linked to a substitutional Al3+ ion each at different neighboring tetrahedral sites. Similarly, Centers G and G' are most likely superoxide radicals with the unpaired spin localized on another pair of oxygen atoms around a missing Si atom and linked to a substitutional Al3+ ion each at different neighboring tetrahedral sites. Center C' is probably an ozonide radical associated with a missing Si atom and linked to a substitutional Al3+ ion at the neighboring tetrahedral site. This study exemplifies the value of high-frequency EPR for discrimination of similar defect centers and determination of small local structural distortions that are often difficult

  14. High-frequency electromagnetic properties of soft magnetic Nd2Co17 micron flakes fractured along c crystal plane with natural resonance frequency exceeding 10 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbo; Wang, Peng; Ma, Tianyong; Wang, Ying; Qiao, Liang; Wang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Planar anisotropy Nd2Co17 flakes fractured along c crystal plane were fabricated by surfactant-assisted high-energy ball milling technique. The magnetic flakes have a diameter range of 5-20 μm and a typical thickness of approximately 120 nm. The frequency dependence of complex permeability of Nd2Co17 epoxy resin composite has been investigated in the frequency range of 0.1-18 GHz. The measurement results show that the natural resonance frequency reaches 12.5 GHz while the initial permeability survives up to 2.26. The superior high frequency properties come from the large out-of-plane anisotropy field and the flake structure fractured along the c crystal plane of Nd2Co17. The planar anisotropic Nd2Co17 flakes have significant potential applications in the high-frequency devices working in the frequency beyond 10 GHz.

  15. Preparation and crystallization kinetics of new structurally well-defined star-shaped biodegradable poly(L-lactide)s initiated with diverse natural sugar alcohols.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qinghui; Li, Faxue; Li, Qiaobo; Li, Yang; Jia, Lin; Yang, Jing; Fang, Qiang; Cao, Amin

    2005-01-01

    This study presents syntheses, structural characterization, and crystallization kinetic investigation of new structurally well-defined star-shaped poly(l-lactide)s (PLLAs). First, a series of new 3- to 6-arm star-shaped PLLAs were synthesized through SnOct(2) catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of (l)-lactide with natural sugar alcohols of glycerol, erythritol, xylitol, and sorbitol as the favorable initiators. Subsequently, their chemical structures were characterized by means of GPC, NMR, and viscometer with respect to the star-shaped structures, demonstrating the well-defined arm structures as evidenced on the g(1/2)/g' values, where g and g' denote the ratios of mean-square radius of gyration and intrinsic viscosity of a star-shaped polymer to those of a linear structural reference with similar absolute molecular weight. Furthermore, spherulite morphologies and growth rates were studied by a polarized microscopy (POM) for the synthesized star-shaped PLLAs with different molecular weights, and it was found that the more arms of a star-shaped PLLA finally resulted in a lower spherulite growth rate. With regard to the crystallization kinetics of these star-shaped PLLAs, isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization were examined by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). It was found that Avrami exponent n values of isothermal crystallization were almost independent of the isothermal crystallization temperature T(c) for different series of star-shaped PLLAs. In contrast, the values of Avrami exponent n were observed to strongly depend on the star-shaped structures with different arms, implying their distinct nucleation mechanisms, and the more arms of a star-shaped PLLA led to a slower isothermal crystallization rate. On the basis of a modified Avrami equation, new light was shed on the nonisothermal crystallization kinetics for the star-shaped PLLAs, and the activation energies were found to vary from 146.86 kJ/mol for the linear PLLA EG-3 to 221.23 kJ/mol of

  16. Micro-gravity: Superconducting coils for crystal growth. Influence of the levitation force on natural convection in the fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quettier, L.; Vincent-Viry, O.; Mailfert, A.; Juster, F. P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents a novel design of superconducting coils able to generate a micro-gravity environment for protein crystal growth in aqueous solution. The structures have been calculated thanks to a method for “inverse source synthesis problem" developed at the GREEN Choice of the angular offset between the directions of magnetic force field and magnetic field in the working area as well as convection phenomena are also studied.

  17. Crystal structure of extracellular domain of human lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1), the ligand for natural killer receptor-P1A.

    PubMed

    Kita, Shunsuke; Matsubara, Haruki; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Tamaoki, Takaharu; Okabe, Yuki; Fukuhara, Hideo; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Krayukhina, Elena; Uchiyama, Susumu; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kuroki, Kimiko; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence has revealed the pivotal roles of C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs) in the regulation of a wide range of immune responses. Human natural killer cell receptor-P1A (NKRP1A) is one of the CTLRs and recognizes another CTLR, lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1) on target cells to control NK, NKT and Th17 cells. The structural basis for the NKRP1A-LLT1 interaction was limitedly understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the ectodomain of LLT1. The plausible receptor-binding face of the C-type lectin-like domain is flat, and forms an extended β-sheet. The residues of this face are relatively conserved with another CTLR, keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin, which binds to the CTLR member, NKp65. A LLT1-NKRP1A complex model, prepared using the crystal structures of LLT1 and the keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin-NKp65 complex, reasonably satisfies the charge consistency and the conformational complementarity to explain a previous mutagenesis study. Furthermore, crystal packing and analytical ultracentrifugation revealed dimer formation, which supports a complex model. Our results provide structural insights for understanding the binding modes and signal transduction mechanisms, which are likely to be conserved in the CTLR family, and for further rational drug design towards regulating the LLT1 function. PMID:25826155

  18. Single crystals of Yb2 Ti2 O7 grown by the Optical Floating Zone technique: naturally ``stuffed'' pyrochlores?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Kate; Proffen, Thomas; Dabkowska, Hanna; Quilliam, Jeffery; Yaraskavitch, Luke; Kycia, Jan; Gaulin, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    In the ``quantum spin ice'' pyrochlore material Yb2Ti2O7, Yb3+ ions are coupled to each other via Ising-like ferromagnetic exchange, creating a situation similar to the highly frustrated classical spin ice compounds, but with significant quantum fluctuations. The ground state of the model resides near two exotic and disordered ``quantum spin liquid'' phases. The experimentally observed ground state of Yb2Ti2O7 is, however, controversial in the literature. Most samples, except one crystal which orders ferromagnetically, show disordered states with varying properties. The controversy is likely to be related to the presence of structural defects of an unspecified type that are known to cause sample-dependence of the low temperature specific heat, particularly in the single crystal samples. Using neutron powder diffraction, we investigated one pulverized single crystal of Yb2Ti2O7 grown by the standard Optical Floating Zone method, and found evidence that 2.3% excess Yb3+ ions reside on the non-magnetic Ti4+ sites, despite perfect stoichiometry of the starting material. This type of defect lattice is known as a ``stuffed'' pyrochlore structure. The effect of the stuffed spins is an open question which can now be investigated in detail. Support from NSERC of Canada

  19. Lithium peroxide crystal clusters as a natural growth feature of discharge products in Li-O2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zakharchenko, Tatiana K; Kozmenkova, Anna Ya; Itkis, Daniil M; Goodilin, Eugene A

    2013-01-01

    The often observed and still unexplained phenomenon of the growth of lithium peroxide crystal clusters during the discharge of Li-O2 cells is likely to happen because of self-assembling Li2O2 platelets that nucleate homogeneously right after the intermediate formation of superoxide ions by a single-electron oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This feature limits the rechargeability of Li-O2 cells, but at the same time it can be beneficial for both capacity improvement and gain in recharge rate if a proper liquid phase mediator can be found. PMID:24367744

  20. Synchrotron X-ray Scattering; Sensile Strength and Strain-Induced Crystallization in Carbon Black Filled Natural Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Toki,S.; Minouchi, N.; Sics, I.; Hsiao, B.; Kohjiya, S.

    2008-01-01

    The tensile strength of rubber depends on a combination of contributions, in particular on the finite extensibility of chain segments between network points and on strain-induced crystallization. In order to achieve high tensile strength at high strain at break, we optimized the composition and processing parameters to gain high molecular flexibility by the cure conditions, to acquire high flexibility of sulfur bridges by the accelerator, and to increase the modulus level without losing rubber molecule flexibility by carbon black. As a result, our formula performed a tensile strength of 42.5 MPa at 25 C under ISO-37, as officially measured by the Society of Rubber Industry, Japan, in 2004.

  1. Analysis of the nature of electrical conductivity in nominally undoped LiNbO{sub 3} crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pritulenko, A. S. Yatsenko, A. V.; Yevdokimov, S. V.

    2015-03-15

    The temperature dependence of electrical conductivity and admittance of two nominally undoped lithium niobate crystals of congruent composition has been investigated in the temperature range of 293–450 K and simulated in the range of 350–700 K. It is shown that the ion conductivity at T < 450 K is mainly determined by OH{sup −} groups; however, some other mechanisms may manifest themselves at higher temperatures; a likely one is diffusion of oxygen vacancies, which leads to an increase in the “averaged” conductivity activation energy.

  2. Nature of red luminescence band in research-grade ZnO single crystals: A "self-activated" configurational transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. N.; Xu, S. J.; Zheng, C. C.; Ning, J. Q.; Ling, F. C. C.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.; Skorupa, W.

    2014-07-01

    By implanting Zn+ ions into research-grade intentionally undoped ZnO single crystal for facilitating Zn interstitials (Zni) and O vacancies (VO) which is revealed by precise X-Ray diffraction rocking curves, we observe an apparent broad red luminescence band with a nearly perfect Gaussian lineshape. This red luminescence band has the zero phonon line at ˜2.4 eV and shows distinctive lattice temperature dependence which is well interpreted with the configurational coordinate model. It also shows a low "kick out" thermal energy and small thermal quenching energy. A "self-activated" optical transition between a shallow donor and the defect center of Zni-VO complex or VZnVO di-vacancies is proposed to be responsible for the red luminescence band. Accompanied with the optical transition, large lattice relaxation simultaneously occurs around the center, as indicated by the generation of multiphonons.

  3. Nature of the magnetic ground state in the mixed valence compound CeRuSn: a single-crystal study.

    PubMed

    Fikáček, J; Prokleška, J; Prchal, J; Custers, J; Sechovský, V

    2013-10-16

    We report on detailed low-temperature measurements of the magnetization, the specific heat and the electrical resistivity on high-quality CeRuSn single crystals. The compound orders antiferromagnetically at T(N) = 2.8 K with the Ce(3+) ions locked within the a-c plane of the monoclinic structure. Magnetization shows that below T(N) CeRuSn undergoes a metamagnetic transition when applying a magnetic field of 1.5 and 0.8 T along the a- and c-axis, respectively. This transition manifests in a tremendous negative jump of ~25% in the magnetoresistance. The value of the saturated magnetization along the easy magnetization direction (c-axis) and the magnetic entropy above T(N) derived from specific heat data correspond to the scenario of only one third of the Ce ions in the compound being trivalent and carrying a stable Ce(3+) magnetic moment, whereas the other two thirds of the Ce ions are in a nonmagnetic tetravalent and/or mixed valence state. This is consistent with the low-temperature CeRuSn crystal structure i.e., a superstructure consisting of three unit cells of the CeCoAl type piled up along the c-axis, and in which the Ce(3+) ions are characterized by large distances from the Ru ligands while the Ce-Ru distances of the other Ce ions are much shorter causing a strong 4f-ligand hybridization and hence leading to tetravalent and/or mixed valence Ce ions. PMID:24055927

  4. The Cloudy Crystal Ball: A Projection of the Nature of the University Counseling Center in the Year 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maes, John L.

    The nature of counseling in the year 2000 will be determined more by developing social needs than by existing programs. Since the direction of social development is toward increasingly dynamic, complex, and potentially stressful times, counseling services must be responsive to such conditions. The university counselor of the future will need to be…

  5. At last! The single-crystal X-ray structure of a naturally occurring sample of the ilmenite-type oxide FeCrO3.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cruz, María Ana; Elizalde-González, María de la Paz; Escudero, Roberto; Bernès, Sylvain; Silva-González, Rutilo; Reyes-Ortega, Yasmi

    2015-10-01

    A natural single crystal of the ferrimagnetic oxide FeCrO3, which was found in an opencast mine situated in the San Luis Potosí State in Mexico, has been characterized in order to elucidate some outstanding issues about the actual structure of this material. The single-crystal X-ray analysis unambiguously shows that transition metal cations are segregated in alternating layers normal to the threefold crystallographic axis, affording a structure isomorphous to that of ilmenite (FeTiO3), in the space group R3̅. The possible occurrence of cation antisite and vacancy defects is below the limit of detection available from X-ray data. Structural and magnetic results are in agreement with the coherent slow intergrowth of magnetic phases provided by the two antiferromagnetic corundum-type parent oxides Fe2O3 (hematite) and Cr2O3 (eskolaite). Our results are consistent with the most recent density functional theory (DFT) studies carried out on digital FeCrO3 [Sadat Nabi & Pentcheva (2011). Phys. Rev. B, 83, 214424], and suggest that synthetic samples of FeCrO3 might present a cation distribution different to that of the ilmenite structural type. PMID:26428405

  6. Influence of non steady gravity on natural convection during micro-gravity solidification of semiconductors. I - Time scale analysis. II - Implications for crystal growth experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, P. R.; Motakef, S.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the influence of temporal variations in the magnitude of gravity on natural convection during unidirectional solidification of semiconductors. It is shown that the response time to step changes in g at low Rayleigh numbers is controlled by the momentum diffusive time scale. At higher Rayleigh numbers, the response time to increases in g is reduced because of inertial effects. The degree of perturbation of flow fields by transients in the gravitational acceleration on the Space Shuttle and the Space Station is determined. The analysis is used to derive the requirements for crystal growth experiments conducted on low duration low-g vehicles. Also, the effectiveness of sounding rockets and KC-135 aircraft for microgravity experiments is examined.

  7. Ferroindialite (Fe2+,Mg)2Al4Si5O18, a new beryl-group mineral from the Eifel volcanic region, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukanov, N. V.; Aksenov, S. M.; Pekov, I. V.; Ternes, B.; Schüller, W.; Belakovskiy, D. I.; Van, K. V.; Blass, G.

    2014-12-01

    A new mineral, ferroindialite, a Fe2+-dominant analog of indialite, has been found in a pyrometamorphosed xenolith of pelitic rock hosted in alkaline basalts. Associated minerals are phlogopite, sanidine, sillimanite, pyroxenes of the enstatite-ferrosilite series, wagnerite, fluorapatite, tridymite, zircon and almandine. Ferroindialite forms brown-purple to gray with a violet-blue tint short prismatic or thick tabular hexagonal crystals up to 1.5 mm in size. The new mineral is brittle, with a Mohs' hardness of 7. Cleavage is not observed. D meas = 2.66(1), D calc = 2.667 g/cm3. IR spectrum shows neither H2O nor OH groups. Ferroindialite is anomalously biaxial (-), α = 1.539(2), β = 1.552(2), γ = 1.554(2), 2 V meas = 30(10)°. The mineral is weakly pleochroic, ranging from colorless on X to pale violet on Z. Dispersion is weak, r < v. The chemical composition (electron microprobe, mean of five point analyses, wt %) is as follows: 0.14 Na2O, 0.46 K2O, 4.95 MgO, 1.13 MnO, 12.66 FeO, 2.64 Fe2O3, 30.45 Al2O3, 47.22 SiO2, total is 99.65. The distribution of total iron content between Fe2+ and Fe3+ was carried out according to structural data. The empirical formula of ferroindialite is: (K0.06Na0.03)(Fe{1.12/2+}Mg0.78Mn0.10)Σ2.00(Al3.79Fe{0.21/3+})Σ4.00Si4.98O18. The simplified formula is: (Fe2+,Mg)2Al4Si5O18. The crystal structure has been refined on a single crystal, R = 0.049. Ferroindialite is hexagonal, space group P6/ mcc; a = 9.8759(3), c = 9.3102(3) Å, V = 786.40(3) Å3, Z = 2. The strongest lines in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern [ d, Å ( I, %) ( hkl)] are: 8.59 (100) (100), 4.094 (27) (102), 3.390 (35) (112), 3.147 (19) (202), 3.055 (31) (211), 2.657 (12) (212), 1.695 (9) (224). The type specimen of ferroindialite is deposited in the Fersman Mineralogical Museum, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, registration number 4400/1.

  8. Heat capacities and thermodynamic functions for beryl, Be3Al2Si6O18, phenakite, Be2SiO4, euclase, BeAlSiO4(OH), bertrandite, Be4Si2O7(OH)2, and chrysoberyl, BeAl2O4.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Barton, M.D.; Robie, R.A.; Haselton, H.T., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The heat capacities of beryl, phenakite, euclase and bertrandite have been measured between approx 5 and 800 K by combined quasi-adiabatic cryogenic calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. The heat capacities of chrysoberyl have been measured from 340 to 800 K. The resulting data have been combined with solution and phase-equilibrium experimental data and simultaneously adjusted using the programme PHAS20 to provide an internally consistent set of thermodynamic properties for several important beryllium phases. The experimental heat capacities and tables of derived thermodynamic properties are presented.-J.A.Z.

  9. The Growth of Naturally-Generated Small Fatigue Cracks in a Nickel-Base Single-Crystal Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yandt, Scott A.

    An experimental and analytical study on the formation and growth small fatigue cracks embedded in a notch in single-crystal superalloy has been investigated. The experimental program consisted of 12 constant amplitude fatigue tests performed on single-edge notch (SEN) fatigue specimens oriented with the loading axis along [010] and with a notch factor of 2.7. The fatigue tests concentrated on one temperature (650°C) and loading condition with the secondary crystallographic orientation---the notch orientation---being the primary variable. Two secondary crystallographic orientations were considered in the present study, [101] and [100]. In the analytical study, the distribution of stresses and strains in the notch region and the stress-intensity factors and the elastic-plastic J-integral for Mode-I semi-elliptical surface cracks embedded at the notch root were investigated using the finite element method (FEM). The anisotropic material properties were shown to have a significant effect on both the stress and strain distribution in the notch region and the crack-tip parameters. The results of the experimental study have shown that fatigue cracks formation occurs via expansion of elliptical subsurface interdendritic pores located at high stress regions in the notch. Once the subsurface crack intersected the notch surface, subsequent crack growth occurred as semi-elliptical surface cracks. The secondary crystallographic orientation had a marked effect on crack-initiation life (the number of cycles to form a crack with a surface length of 760 mum) but no effect on small crack propagation behaviour. Crack initiation life predictions were made using a holistic lifing approach that considers the size, distribution and local stresses acting at the subsurface pores and utilizes the small fatigue crack growth data obtained from the experimental study. The predictions were found to agree reasonably well with the experimental test results and to account for the crack initiation

  10. Natural age dispersion arising from the analysis of broken crystals. Part I: Theoretical basis and implications for the apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Roderick W.; Beucher, Romain; Roper, Steven; Persano, Cristina; Stuart, Fin; Fitzgerald, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade major progress has been made in developing both the theoretical and practical aspects of apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry and it is now standard practice, and generally seen as best practice, to analyse single grain aliquots. These individual prismatic crystals are often broken and are fragments of larger crystals that have broken during mineral separation along the weak basal cleavage in apatite. This is clearly indicated by the common occurrence of only 1 or no clear crystal terminations present on separated apatite grains, and evidence of freshly broken ends when grains are viewed using a scanning electron microscope. This matters because if the 4He distribution within the whole grain is not homogeneous, because of partial loss due to thermal diffusion for example, then the fragments will all yield ages different from each other and from the whole grain age. Here we use a numerical model with a finite cylinder geometry to approximate 4He ingrowth and thermal diffusion within hexagonal prismatic apatite crystals. This is used to quantify the amount and patterns of inherent, natural age dispersion that arises from analysing broken crystals. A series of systematic numerical experiments were conducted to explore and quantify the pattern and behaviour of this source of dispersion using a set of 5 simple thermal histories that represent a range of plausible geological scenarios. In addition some more complex numerical experiments were run to investigate the pattern and behaviour of grain dispersion seen in several real data sets. The results indicate that natural dispersion of a set of single fragment ages (defined as the range divided by the mean) arising from fragmentation alone varies from c. 7% even for rapid (c. 10 °C/Ma), monotonic cooling to over 50% for protracted, complex histories that cause significant diffusional loss of 4He. The magnitude of dispersion arising from fragmentation scales with the grain cylindrical radius, and is of

  11. Crystal structure of a mirror-image L-RNA aptamer (Spiegelmer) in complex with the natural L-protein target CCL2

    PubMed Central

    Oberthür, Dominik; Achenbach, John; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Buchner, Klaus; Maasch, Christian; Falke, Sven; Rehders, Dirk; Klussmann, Sven; Betzel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We report the crystal structure of a 40mer mirror-image RNA oligonucleotide completely built from nucleotides of the non-natural L-chirality in complex with the pro-inflammatory chemokine L-CLL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1), a natural protein composed of regular L-amino acids. The L-oligonucleotide is an L-aptamer (a Spiegelmer) identified to bind L-CCL2 with high affinity, thereby neutralizing the chemokine's activity. CCL2 plays a key role in attracting and positioning monocytes; its overexpression in several inflammatory diseases makes CCL2 an interesting pharmacological target. The PEGylated form of the L-aptamer, NOX-E36 (emapticap pegol), already showed promising efficacy in clinical Phase II studies conducted in diabetic nephropathy patients. The structure of the L-oligonucleotide·L-protein complex was solved and refined to 2.05 Å. It unveils the L-aptamer's intramolecular contacts and permits a detailed analysis of its structure–function relationship. Furthermore, the analysis of the intermolecular drug–target interactions reveals insight into the selectivity of the L-aptamer for certain related chemokines. PMID:25901662

  12. Crystal structure of a mirror-image L-RNA aptamer (Spiegelmer) in complex with the natural L-protein target CCL2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberthür, Dominik; Achenbach, John; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Buchner, Klaus; Maasch, Christian; Falke, Sven; Rehders, Dirk; Klussmann, Sven; Betzel, Christian

    2015-04-01

    We report the crystal structure of a 40mer mirror-image RNA oligonucleotide completely built from nucleotides of the non-natural L-chirality in complex with the pro-inflammatory chemokine L-CLL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1), a natural protein composed of regular L-amino acids. The L-oligonucleotide is an L-aptamer (a Spiegelmer) identified to bind L-CCL2 with high affinity, thereby neutralizing the chemokine's activity. CCL2 plays a key role in attracting and positioning monocytes; its overexpression in several inflammatory diseases makes CCL2 an interesting pharmacological target. The PEGylated form of the L-aptamer, NOX-E36 (emapticap pegol), already showed promising efficacy in clinical Phase II studies conducted in diabetic nephropathy patients. The structure of the L-oligonucleotide.L-protein complex was solved and refined to 2.05 Å. It unveils the L-aptamer's intramolecular contacts and permits a detailed analysis of its structure-function relationship. Furthermore, the analysis of the intermolecular drug-target interactions reveals insight into the selectivity of the L-aptamer for certain related chemokines.

  13. Effects of the amino acid sequence on thermal conduction through β-sheet crystals of natural silk protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Bai, Zhitong; Ban, Heng; Liu, Ling

    2015-11-21

    Recent experiments have discovered very different thermal conductivities between the spider silk and the silkworm silk. Decoding the molecular mechanisms underpinning the distinct thermal properties may guide the rational design of synthetic silk materials and other biomaterials for multifunctionality and tunable properties. However, such an understanding is lacking, mainly due to the complex structure and phonon physics associated with the silk materials. Here, using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics, we demonstrate that the amino acid sequence plays a key role in the thermal conduction process through β-sheets, essential building blocks of natural silks and a variety of other biomaterials. Three representative β-sheet types, i.e. poly-A, poly-(GA), and poly-G, are shown to have distinct structural features and phonon dynamics leading to different thermal conductivities. A fundamental understanding of the sequence effects may stimulate the design and engineering of polymers and biopolymers for desired thermal properties. PMID:26455593

  14. Characterisation of a natural quartz crystal as a reference material for microanalytical determination of Ti, Al, Li, Fe, Mn, Ga and Ge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Audetat, Andreas; Garbe-Schonberg, Dieter; Kronz, Andreas; Pettke, Thomas; Rusk, Brian G.; Donovan, John J.; Lowers, Heather

    2015-01-01

    A natural smoky quartz crystal from Shandong province, China, was characterised by laser ablation ICP-MS, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and solution ICP-MS to determine the concentration of twenty-four trace and ultra trace elements. Our main focus was on Ti quantification because of the increased use of this element for titanium-in-quartz (TitaniQ) thermobarometry. Pieces of a uniform growth zone of 9 mm thickness within the quartz crystal were analysed in four different LA-ICP-MS laboratories, three EPMA laboratories and one solution-ICP-MS laboratory. The results reveal reproducible concentrations of Ti (57 ± 4 μg g-1), Al (154 ± 15 μg g-1), Li (30 ± 2 μg g-1), Fe (2.2 ± 0.3 μg g-1), Mn (0.34 ± 0.04 μg g-1), Ge (1.7 ± 0.2 μg g-1) and Ga (0.020 ± 0.002 μg g-1) and detectable, but less reproducible, concentrations of Be, B, Na, Cu, Zr, Sn and Pb. Concentrations of K, Ca, Sr, Mo, Ag, Sb, Ba and Au were below the limits of detection of all three techniques. The uncertainties on the average concentration determinations by multiple techniques and laboratories for Ti, Al, Li, Fe, Mn, Ga and Ge are low; hence, this quartz can serve as a reference material or a secondary reference material for microanalytical applications involving the quantification of trace elements in quartz.

  15. Culturable halophilic archaea at the initial and crystallization stages of salt production in a natural solar saltern of Goa, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Goa is a coastal state in India and salt making is being practiced for many years. This investigation aimed in determining the culturable haloarchaeal diversity during two different phases of salt production in a natural solar saltern of Ribandar, Goa. Water and sediment samples were collected from the saltern during pre-salt harvesting phase and salt harvesting phase. Salinity and pH of the sampling site was determined. Isolates were obtained by plating of the samples on complex and synthetic haloarchaeal media. Morphology of the isolates was determined using Gram staining and electron microscopy. Response of cells to distilled water was studied spectrophotometrically at 600nm. Molecular identification of the isolates was performed by sequencing the 16S rRNA. Results Salinity of salt pans varied from 3-4% (non-salt production phase) to 30% (salt production phase) and pH varied from 7.0-8.0. Seven haloarchaeal strains were isolated from water and sediment samples during non-salt production phase and seventeen haloarchaeal strains were isolated during the salt production phase. All the strains stained uniformly Gram negative. The orange-red acetone extract of the pigments showed similar spectrophotometric profile with absorption maxima at 393, 474, 501 and 535 nm. All isolates obtained from the salt dilute phase were grouped within the genus Halococcus. This was validated using both total lipid profiling and 16S rRNA data sequencing. The isolates obtained from pre-salt harvesting phase were resistant to lysis. 16S rRNA data showed that organisms belonging to Halorubrum, Haloarcula, Haloferax and Halococcus genera were obtained during the salt concentrated phase. The isolates obtained from salt harvesting phase showed varied lysis on suspension in distilled water and /or 3.5% NaCl. Conclusion Salterns in Goa are transiently operated during post monsoon season from January to May. During the pre-salt harvesting phase, all the isolates obtained belonged to

  16. On the use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy to characterize the naturally existing crystal in Pakistan and its optical emission spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Javed; Mahmood, S.; Tufail, Iram; Asghar, H.; Ahmed, R.; Baig, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    We have used the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopic (LIBS) technique to qualitatively identify the naturally existing transparent crystal as a pure quartz (SiO2) by observing its optical emission spectra using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, fundamental wavelength at 1064 nm and second harmonic at 532 nm. The spectra were registered using a set of five miniature spectrometers covering the spectral range from 200 nm to 720 nm. The plasma temperature has been calculated in the range from 8500 K to 10,200 K and the electron densities determined from the Stark broadened spectral lines in the range of 1.0 × 1017 cm- 3 to 6.0 × 1017 cm- 3. We report here the full widths at maximum of the spectral lines associated with the 3p4s 3P0,1,2 → 3p23P0,1,2, 1S0, 1D2 transitions in Si and four multiplets of singly ionized silicon.

  17. Crystal structure and theoretical study of IR and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of cordatin, a natural product with antiulcerogenic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasil, Davi S. B.; Alves, Cláudio N.; Guilhon, Giselle M. S. P.; Muller, Adolfo H.; Secco, Ricardo De S.; Peris, Gabriel; Llusar, Rosa

    Cordatin is a furan diterpenoid with a clerodane skeleton isolated from Croton palanostigma Klotzsch (Euphorbiaceae). This natural product shows significant antiulcerogenic activity, similar to cimetidine (Tagamet®), a compound used for the treatment of peptic ulcers. The crystal structure of cordatin was obtained by X-ray diffraction and its geometrical parameters were compared with theoretical calculations at the B3LYP theory level. The IR and NMR (1H and 13C chemical shifts and coupling constants) spectra were obtained and compared with the theoretical calculations. The B3LYP theory level, with the 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis set, provided IR absorption values close to the experimental data. Moreover, theoretical NMR parameters obtained in both gas phase and chloroform solvent at the B3PW91/DGDZVP, B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p), and B3PW91/6-311+G(2d,p) levels showed good correlations with the experimental results.

  18. Unidirectional growth of L-asparagine monohydrate single crystal: First time observation of NLO nature and other studies of crystalline perfection, optical, mechanical and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Mohd.; Riscob, B.; Maurya, K. K.; Ganesh, V.; Wahab, M. A.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2010-10-01

    L-asparagine monohydrate (LAM), a new amino acid single crystal, was grown by slow evaporation solution technique (SEST) as well as by recently invented Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method in aqueous medium. Using SR method, LAM single crystal of diameter ˜18 mm and length ˜52 mm was grown for the first time. The growth conditions were optimized and the maximum growth rate of 1.0 mm per day was observed for the SR crystal. The crystal structure was confirmed by powder XRD. The crystalline perfection was assessed by high resolution XRD and etching studies and found that the quality of the SR crystal is better than the SEST crystal. The UV-vis-NIR spectroscopic study revealed that the SR crystal has good optical transparency than that of SEST crystal. The relative second harmonic generation efficiency was measured and found to be ˜0.35 times to that of KDP. The laser damage threshold (LDT) was measured and found that the SR crystal has higher LDT value (5.76 GW cm -2) than SEST crystal (4.75 GW cm -2). The Vickers's microhardness and dielectric studies were also carried out and discussed.

  19. Hemimorphite as a natural sink for arsenic in zinc deposits and related mine tailings: Evidence from single-crystal EPR spectroscopy and hydrothermal synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Mao; Lin, Jinru; Pan, Yuanming

    2010-05-01

    Hemimorphite is a refractory mineral in surface environments and occurs commonly in supergene non-sulfide Zn deposits and Zn mine tailings. Single-crystal electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of gamma-ray-irradiated hemimorphite from Mapimi (Durango, Mexico) reveal two arsenic-associated oxyradicals: [AsO 4] 4- and [AsO 4] 2-. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analyses confirm this sample to contain 270 ppm As and that hemimorphite from other Zn deposits has appreciable amounts of arsenic as well. Spin Hamiltonian parameters, including matrices g, A ( 75As) and P( 75As), show that the [AsO 4] 4- radical formed from electron trapping by a locally uncompensated [AsO 4] 3- ion substituting for [SiO 4] 4-. Matrices g, A( 75As) and P( 75As) of the [AsO 4] 2- radical show it to have the unpaired spin on the bridging oxygen of an [AsO 4] 3- ion at a Si site and linked to a monovalent impurity ion. This structural model for the [AsO 4] 2- radical is further supported by observed 29Si and 1H superhyperfine structures arising from interactions with a single Si atom (A/g eβe = ˜1 mT at B// c) and two equivalent H atoms (A/g eβe = ˜0.3 mT at B∧ b = 10°), respectively. Hydrothermal experiments at 200 °C and ˜9.5 MPa show that hemimorphite contains up to ˜2.5 wt% As 2O 5 and suggest that both the arsenate concentration and the pH value in the solution affect the As content in hemimorphite. These results demonstrate that hemimorphite is capable of sequestering arsenate in its crystal lattice, hence is a natural sink for attenuating As in supergene non-sulfide Zn deposits and Zn mine tailings. Moreover, results from hemimorphite potentially have more far-reaching implications for major silicates such as zeolites in the immobilization and removal of arsenic in surface environments.

  20. Crystal Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Nona; Whitmore, Sherry

    1989-01-01

    Presents a many-faceted learning approach to the study of crystals. Provides instructions for performing activities including crystal growth and patterns, creating miniature simulations of crystal-containing rock formations, charcoal and sponge gardens, and snowflakes. (RT)

  1. Hambergite-rich melt inclusions in morganite crystals from the Muiane pegmatite, Mozambique and some remarks on the paragenesis of hambergite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Rainer; Davidson, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Raman spectroscopic studies of daughter crystals of hambergite [Be2BO3(OH, F)] in primary melt and secondary fluid inclusions in morganite crystals from the Muiane pegmatite, Mozambique, show that the inclusions have extremely high beryllium concentrations, corresponding to as much as 10.6% (g/g) in melt inclusions and 1.25% (g/g) BeO in fluid inclusions. These melt and fluid inclusions were trapped at about 610°C and 277°C, respectively. We propose two possible mechanisms for the formation of the hambergite crystals: (i) direct crystallization from a boron- and beryllium-rich pegmatite-forming melt or (ii) these are daughter crystals produced by the retrograde reaction of the boron-rich inclusion fluid with the beryl host, after release of boric acid from the primary trapped metastable volatile-rich silicate melt during cooling and recrystallization. Although we favor the second option, either case demonstrate the extent to which Be maybe concentrated in a boron-rich fluid at relatively high temperatures, and in which species of Be maybe transported. One important constraint on the stability of the hambergite paragenesis is temperature; at temperatures of ≥650°C (at 2 kbar) hambergite is not stable and converts to bromellite [BeO].

  2. Comparison of the inhibitory capacity of two groups of pure natural extract on the crystallization of two types of material compound urinary stones in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghalia, Mohamed; Ghalem, Said; Allali, Hocine

    2015-10-01

    Urolithiasis is defined as the result of an abnormal precipitation within the urinary tract. This precipitation is most often from the normal constituents of the urine. This is a fairly common condition in the population. She is happy and recurrent etiology is often unknown if hypothetical. In Algeria, as in many countries, a large number of patients use herbal medicines in the treatment of their diseases including urolithiasis. Thus the aim of this study is the most widely used to evaluate the effectiveness of aqueous extracts of medicinal plants, in the treatment of calcium urolithiasis oxalo-and magnesium-amoniaco in vitro. The study also examines the effect of these extracts on the states of crystallization (nucleation, crystal growth, crystal aggregation), followed by photography on polarized light microscope.In this regard, we are devoted to studying the crystallization steps from oxalo-calcium and phospho-calcic prepared as artificial urine and supersaturated aqueous solutions, maintained at 37 °C to remain close to biological conditions. Extracts of the first group of herbs: Ammodaucus leucotrichus, Ajuga iva, Globularia alypum, Atriplex halimus are studied on the crystallization calcium oxalate, we cite the Ammodaucus leucotrichus which acts on the stages of nucleation, growth and the aggregation with a total inhibition. The second group of extracts plants tested on calcium phosphate crystallization : Acacia raddiana, Citrullus colocynthis, Rhus tripartita, Pistacia lentiscu, Warionia saharae, are able to significantly reduce phosphate crystallization in vitro. It is easily proved by FTIR and optical microscope. In conclusion the results of our work allows us to confirm the use of these plants as an aqueous decoction, in the field of urolithiasis. These activities may help to strengthen the body in depressed situations.

  3. On the nature of fracture of SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} and PbB{sub 4}O{sub 7} single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dolzhenkova, E. F. Baumer, V. N.; Tolmachev, A. V.; Oseledchik, Yu. S.

    2007-09-15

    The crack resistance and peculiarities of the internal structure of isostructural SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} and PbB{sub 4}O{sub 7} single crystals of the framework type have been studied. It is shown that the cleavage of these crystals, which is atypical of this type and inherent in strontium and lead tetraborates, is due to the presence of boron-oxygen layers (bound by a relatively small number of covalent bonds) in their 3D boron-oxygen frameworks; crystals are cleaved along these layers. It is established that cracks propagate in SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} and PbB{sub 4}O{sub 7} single crystals as a result of breakage of both the bonds between bridge atoms and the bonds in B{sub 3}O{sub 3} boron-oxygen cycles-the main elements of the boron-oxygen framework. The break of bonds in the boron-oxygen cycles is explained by the presence of an unusual oxygen position in these cycles, which is shared by three boron-oxygen tetrahedra and whose B-O bonds are much weaker in comparison with the bonds typical of BO{sub 4} groups.

  4. Determining Magma Mixing Duration Prior to the 1915 Eruption of Lassen Peak, California by Comparing Experimental Growth of Reaction Rims and Natural Olivine Crystals in Black Dacite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, N. A.; Schwab, B. E.; Castro, J. M.; Clynne, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Lassen Peak, located in northern California, last erupted in 1915 producing hybrid black dacite containing xenocrystic olivine grains with morphologically complex reaction rims of orthopyroxene. These rims are interpreted to have grown during magma mixing/mingling of admixed basaltic andesite and dacite reservoir magma prior to eruption. Reaction rim growth rates were determined from a series of hydrothermal experiments performed on starting materials consisting of powdered natural dacite pumice from the 1915 eruption and ~5 wt. % of Fo85 olivine separated from a spinel lherzolite xenolith (UM-5) from Kilbourne Hole, NM to constrain the length of time between magma recharge and eruption. Time series experiments were performed with run durations of 50, 100, 200, 400, and 600 hours at 50 and 100 MPa, 825oC and 875oC. The experiments produced a range in reaction rim growth rates where rim thickness generally increased with time. Average rim growth rate for each series is as follows: 0.031 μm²h-1 for 50 MPa at 825oC, 0.010 μm²h-1 for 50 MPa at 875oC, 0.158 μm²h-1 for 100 MPa at 825oC, and 0.088 μm²h-1 for 100 MPa at 875oC. Overall, the 100 MPa experiments resulted in faster growth rates and thicker reaction rims than the 50 MPa experiments. At a given pressure, the higher temperature (875 oC) experiments show slower average growth rates, but thicker reaction rims than the 825oC equivalents. This suggests that growth rate is not constant over time, but likely is more rapid at the early stages of the experiments/heating event, and then slows over time. Reaction rim widths on 100 olivine grains from samples of black dacite were determined by analysis of SEM BSE images and average 26.1 ± 21.7 μm. This average rim width corresponds to a range of mixing durations of 5.8 months (100 MPa, 825oC) to 93 months (50 MPa, 875oC). Average reaction duration of 10.6 months (at 100 MPa, 875oC) is most consistent with our previous experimental work on the 1915 dacite. Reaction

  5. Unifying the crystallization behavior of hexagonal and square crystals with the phase-field-crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Zheng, Chen; Jing, Zhang; Yongxin, Wang; Yanli, Lu

    2016-03-01

    By employing the phase-field-crystal models, the atomic crystallization process of hexagonal and square crystals is investigated with the emphasis on the growth mechanism and morphological change. A unified regime describing the crystallization behavior of both crystals is obtained with the thermodynamic driving force varying. By increasing the driving force, both crystals (in the steady-state) transform from a faceted polygon to an apex-bulged polygon, and then into a symmetric dendrite. For the faceted polygon, the interface advances by a layer-by-layer (LL) mode while for the apex-bulged polygonal and the dendritic crystals, it first adopts the LL mode and then transits into the multi-layer (ML) mode in the later stage. In particular, a shift of the nucleation sites from the face center to the area around the crystal tips is detected in the early growth stage of both crystals and is rationalized in terms of the relation between the crystal size and the driving force distribution. Finally, a parameter characterizing the complex shape change of square crystal is introduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 54175378, 51474176, and 51274167), the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM7261), and the Doctoral Foundation Program of Ministry of China (Grant No. 20136102120021).

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a natural complex of phospholipase A2 from Echis carinatus (saw-scaled viper).

    PubMed

    Nagpal, A; Chandra, V; Kaur, P; Singh, T P

    1999-06-01

    A novel complex of phospholipase A2 complexed with another venom protein has been isolated and purified from saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) venom. The molecular weights of the two components are 16 and 14 kDa, respectively. The complex was purified using an Affigel blue column and an anion-exchange (DEAE Sephacel) column. Long diamond-shaped crystals were obtained by hanging-drop vapour diffusion. The protein complex was dissolved at a concentration of 10 mg ml-1 in 20 mM sodium cacodylate, 1 mM CaCl2 and 2% dioxane at pH 6.0. The reservoir contained the same buffer with 7%(w/v) PEG 4000. Crystals appeared within 2-3 weeks. Native data to 2.9 A resolution have been obtained at 291 K. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P21 with unit-cell parameters a = 74.47, b = 47.87, c = 106.39 A, beta = 104.5 degrees and contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement is in progress. PMID:10329797

  7. Role of Solvents in Improvement of Dissolution Rate of Drugs: Crystal Habit and Crystal Agglomeration

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoodi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization is often used for manufacturing drug substances. Advances of crystallization have achieved control over drug identity and purity, but control over the physical form remains poor. This review discusses the influence of solvents used in crystallization process on crystal habit and agglomeration of crystals with potential implication for dissolution. According to literature it has been known that habit modification of crystals by use of proper solvents may enhance the dissolution properties by changing the size, number and the nature of crystal faces exposed to the dissolution medium. Also, the faster dissolution rate of drug from the agglomerates of crystals compared with the single crystals may be related to porous structure of the agglomerates and consequently their better wettability. It is concluded from this review that in-depth understanding of role of the solvents in crystallization process can be applied to engineering of crystal habit or crystal agglomeration, and predictably dissolution improvement in poorly soluble drugs. PMID:25789214

  8. Lysozyme Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    To the crystallographer, this may not be a diamond but it is just as priceless. A Lysozyme crystal grown in orbit looks great under a microscope, but the real test is X-ray crystallography. The colors are caused by polarizing filters. Proteins can form crystals generated by rows and columns of molecules that form up like soldiers on a parade ground. Shining X-rays through a crystal will produce a pattern of dots that can be decoded to reveal the arrangement of the atoms in the molecules making up the crystal. Like the troops in formation, uniformity and order are everything in X-ray crystallography. X-rays have much shorter wavelengths than visible light, so the best looking crystals under the microscope won't necessarily pass muster under the X-rays. In order to have crystals to use for X-ray diffraction studies, crystals need to be fairly large and well ordered. Scientists also need lots of crystals since exposure to air, the process of X-raying them, and other factors destroy them. Growing protein crystals in space has yielded striking results. Lysozyme's structure is well known and it has become a standard in many crystallization studies on Earth and in space.

  9. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  10. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  11. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  12. Computational crystallization.

    PubMed

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed. PMID:26792536

  13. Exploring the nature of low-lying excited-states in molecular crystals from many-body perturbation theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, Tonatiuh; Sharifzadeh, Sahar; Rinn, Andre; da Jornada, Felipe H.; Shao, Meiyue; Witte, Gregor; Yang, Chao; Louie, Steven G.; Chatterjee, Sangaam; Kronik, Leeor; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    Organic semiconductors have attracted attention due to their potential for optoelectronics and novel phenomena, such as singlet fission. Here, we use many-body perturbation theory to simulate neutral excitations in acene and perylene crystals. By diagonalizing the full Bethe-Salpether (BSE) Hamiltonian beyond the Tamm Dancoff approximation (TDA), we find that both low-lying excitation energies and oscillator strengths are in improved agreement with experiments relative to the TDA. We characterize the low-lying excitons, focusing in the degree of charge-transfer and spatial delocalization, connecting their relevance to singlet fission. For perylene, we find overall good agreement with absorption measurements, and we see evidence for the formation of an ``exciton-polariton'' band in β-perylene. This work is supported by the DOE.

  14. Crystal Data

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 3 NIST Crystal Data (PC database for purchase)   NIST Crystal Data contains chemical, physical, and crystallographic information useful to characterize more than 237,671 inorganic and organic crystalline materials. The data include the standard cell parameters, cell volume, space group number and symbol, calculated density, chemical formula, chemical name, and classification by chemical type.

  15. Titania single crystals with a curved surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Yang, Bing Xing; Wu, Long; Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Porun; Zhao, Huijun; Yu, Yan Yan; Gong, Xue Qing; Yang, Hua Gui

    2014-11-01

    Owing to its scientific and technological importance, crystallization as a ubiquitous phenomenon has been widely studied over centuries. Well-developed single crystals are generally enclosed by regular flat facets spontaneously to form polyhedral morphologies because of the well-known self-confinement principle for crystal growth. However, in nature, complex single crystalline calcitic skeleton of biological organisms generally has a curved external surface formed by specific interactions between organic moieties and biocompatible minerals. Here we show a new class of crystal surface of TiO2, which is enclosed by quasi continuous high-index microfacets and thus has a unique truncated biconic morphology. Such single crystals may open a new direction for crystal growth study since, in principle, crystal growth rates of all facets between two normal {101} and {011} crystal surfaces are almost identical. In other words, the facet with continuous Miller index can exist because of the continuous curvature on the crystal surface.

  16. Titania single crystals with a curved surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Yang, Bing Xing; Wu, Long; Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Porun; Zhao, Huijun; Yu, Yan Yan; Gong, Xue Qing; Yang, Hua Gui

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its scientific and technological importance, crystallization as a ubiquitous phenomenon has been widely studied over centuries. Well-developed single crystals are generally enclosed by regular flat facets spontaneously to form polyhedral morphologies because of the well-known self-confinement principle for crystal growth. However, in nature, complex single crystalline calcitic skeleton of biological organisms generally has a curved external surface formed by specific interactions between organic moieties and biocompatible minerals. Here we show a new class of crystal surface of TiO₂, which is enclosed by quasi continuous high-index microfacets and thus has a unique truncated biconic morphology. Such single crystals may open a new direction for crystal growth study since, in principle, crystal growth rates of all facets between two normal {101} and {011} crystal surfaces are almost identical. In other words, the facet with continuous Miller index can exist because of the continuous curvature on the crystal surface. PMID:25373513

  17. Crystal structure of a Schistosoma mansoni septin reveals the phenomenon of strand slippage in septins dependent on the nature of the bound nucleotide.

    PubMed

    Zeraik, Ana E; Pereira, Humberto M; Santos, Yuri V; Brandão-Neto, José; Spoerner, Michael; Santos, Maiara S; Colnago, Luiz A; Garratt, Richard C; Araújo, Ana P U; DeMarco, Ricardo

    2014-03-14

    Septins are filament-forming GTP-binding proteins involved in important cellular events, such as cytokinesis, barrier formation, and membrane remodeling. Here, we present two crystal structures of the GTPase domain of a Schistosoma mansoni septin (SmSEPT10), one bound to GDP and the other to GTP. The structures have been solved at an unprecedented resolution for septins (1.93 and 2.1 Å, respectively), which has allowed for unambiguous structural assignment of regions previously poorly defined. Consequently, we provide a reliable model for functional interpretation and a solid foundation for future structural studies. Upon comparing the two complexes, we observe for the first time the phenomenon of a strand slippage in septins. Such slippage generates a front-back communication mechanism between the G and NC interfaces. These data provide a novel mechanistic framework for the influence of nucleotide binding to the GTPase domain, opening new possibilities for the study of the dynamics of septin filaments. PMID:24464615

  18. Nature of the gap-like feature and subgap features in electronic Raman spectra of RNi_2B_2C (R = Y, Lu) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, In-Sang; Klein, M. V.; Fisher, I.; Canfield, P. C.

    2000-03-01

    We previously found superconductivity-induced changes in the electronic Raman spectra of RNi_2B_2C (R = Y, Lu) in different scattering geometries.(http://xxx.lanl.gov/format/cond-mat/9910087) Finite intensity was observed for the first time in a conventional superconductor below the gap, and its strength is linear in the Raman shift ω. This behavior of the subgap feature is confirmed using several excitation wavelengths. Electron irradiation of the single crystals increases the Raman scattering response only above the 2Δ feature, suggesting that the subgap feature is a robust, intrinsic property of these systems. Our measurements establish that finite Raman scattering does exist below the 2Δ gap for borocarbide superconductors, which are thought to be conventional BCS-type superconductors. The 2Δ-peak intensity as a function of the magnetic field shows the nonlinear behavior predicted for both conventional and cuprate superconductors.(Blumberg et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett 78, 2461 (1997) Strong anisotropy in the intensity of the 2Δ peak as well as the finite scattering below the gap may have its origin related to the strong anisotropy of the Fermi surfaces of the borocarbides.

  19. Nature of red luminescence band in research-grade ZnO single crystals: A “self-activated” configurational transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. N.; Xu, S. J. Zheng, C. C.; Ning, J. Q.; Ling, F. C. C.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.; Skorupa, W.

    2014-07-28

    By implanting Zn{sup +} ions into research-grade intentionally undoped ZnO single crystal for facilitating Zn interstitials (Zn{sub i}) and O vacancies (V{sub O}) which is revealed by precise X-Ray diffraction rocking curves, we observe an apparent broad red luminescence band with a nearly perfect Gaussian lineshape. This red luminescence band has the zero phonon line at ∼2.4 eV and shows distinctive lattice temperature dependence which is well interpreted with the configurational coordinate model. It also shows a low “kick out” thermal energy and small thermal quenching energy. A “self-activated” optical transition between a shallow donor and the defect center of Zn{sub i}-V{sub O} complex or V{sub Zn}V{sub O} di-vacancies is proposed to be responsible for the red luminescence band. Accompanied with the optical transition, large lattice relaxation simultaneously occurs around the center, as indicated by the generation of multiphonons.

  20. 1α,25(OH)2-3-Epi-Vitamin D3, a Natural Physiological Metabolite of Vitamin D3: Its Synthesis, Biological Activity and Crystal Structure with Its Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Ferdinand; Sigüeiro, Rita; Sato, Yoshiteru; Araujo, Clarisse; Schuster, Inge; Antony, Pierre; Peluso, Jean; Muller, Christian; Mouriño, Antonio; Moras, Dino; Rochel, Natacha

    2011-01-01

    Background The 1α,25-dihydroxy-3-epi-vitamin-D3 (1α,25(OH)2-3-epi-D3), a natural metabolite of the seco-steroid vitamin D3, exerts its biological activity through binding to its cognate vitamin D nuclear receptor (VDR), a ligand dependent transcription regulator. In vivo action of 1α,25(OH)2-3-epi-D3 is tissue-specific and exhibits lowest calcemic effect compared to that induced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. To further unveil the structural mechanism and structure-activity relationships of 1α,25(OH)2-3-epi-D3 and its receptor complex, we characterized some of its in vitro biological properties and solved its crystal structure complexed with human VDR ligand-binding domain (LBD). Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we report the more effective synthesis with fewer steps that provides higher yield of the 3-epimer of the 1α,25(OH)2D3. We solved the crystal structure of its complex with the human VDR-LBD and found that this natural metabolite displays specific adaptation of the ligand-binding pocket, as the 3-epimer maintains the number of hydrogen bonds by an alternative water-mediated interaction to compensate the abolished interaction with Ser278. In addition, the biological activity of the 1α,25(OH)2-3-epi-D3 in primary human keratinocytes and biochemical properties are comparable to 1α,25(OH)2D3. Conclusions/Significance The physiological role of this pathway as the specific biological action of the 3-epimer remains unclear. However, its high metabolic stability together with its significant biologic activity makes this natural metabolite an interesting ligand for clinical applications. Our new findings contribute to a better understanding at molecular level how natural metabolites of 1α,25(OH)2D3 lead to significant activity in biological systems and we conclude that the C3-epimerization pathway produces an active metabolite with similar biochemical and biological properties to those of the 1α,25(OH)2D3. PMID:21483824

  1. Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John D.

    1995-02-01

    This book describes the chemical and physical structure of molecular crystals, their optical and electronic properties, and the reactions between neighboring molecules in crystals. In the second edition, the author has taken into account research that has undergone extremely rapid development since the first edition was published in 1987. For instance, he gives extensive coverage to the applications of molecular materials in high-technology devices (e.g. optical communications, laser printers, photocopiers, liquid crystal displays, solar cells, and more). There is also an entirely new chapter on the recently discovered Buckminsterfullerene carbon molecule (C60) and organic non-linear optic materials.

  2. The discovery of X-rays diffraction: From crystals to DNA. A case study to promote understanding of the nature of science and of its interdisciplinary character

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Francesco; Leone, Matteo; Robotti, Nadia

    2016-05-01

    The advantages of introducing history of science topics into the teaching of science has been advocated by a large number of scholars within the science education community. One of the main reasons given for using history of science in teaching is its power to promote understanding of the nature of science (NOS). In this respect, the historical case of X-rays diffraction, from the discovery of Max von Laue (1912) to the first X-rays diffraction photographs of DNA (1953), is a case in point for showing that a correct experimental strategy and a favourable theoretical context are not enough to make a scientific discovery.

  3. Introduction to protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Alexander; Gavira, Jose A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystallization was discovered by chance about 150 years ago and was developed in the late 19th century as a powerful purification tool and as a demonstration of chemical purity. The crystallization of proteins, nucleic acids and large biological complexes, such as viruses, depends on the creation of a solution that is supersaturated in the macromolecule but exhibits conditions that do not significantly perturb its natural state. Supersaturation is produced through the addition of mild precipitating agents such as neutral salts or polymers, and by the manipulation of various parameters that include temperature, ionic strength and pH. Also important in the crystallization process are factors that can affect the structural state of the macromolecule, such as metal ions, inhibitors, cofactors or other conventional small molecules. A variety of approaches have been developed that combine the spectrum of factors that effect and promote crystallization, and among the most widely used are vapor diffusion, dialysis, batch and liquid–liquid diffusion. Successes in macromolecular crystallization have multiplied rapidly in recent years owing to the advent of practical, easy-to-use screening kits and the application of laboratory robotics. A brief review will be given here of the most popular methods, some guiding principles and an overview of current technologies. PMID:24419610

  4. Introduction to protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Alexander; Gavira, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystallization was discovered by chance about 150 years ago and was developed in the late 19th century as a powerful purification tool and as a demonstration of chemical purity. The crystallization of proteins, nucleic acids and large biological complexes, such as viruses, depends on the creation of a solution that is supersaturated in the macromolecule but exhibits conditions that do not significantly perturb its natural state. Supersaturation is produced through the addition of mild precipitating agents such as neutral salts or polymers, and by the manipulation of various parameters that include temperature, ionic strength and pH. Also important in the crystallization process are factors that can affect the structural state of the macromolecule, such as metal ions, inhibitors, cofactors or other conventional small molecules. A variety of approaches have been developed that combine the spectrum of factors that effect and promote crystallization, and among the most widely used are vapor diffusion, dialysis, batch and liquid-liquid diffusion. Successes in macromolecular crystallization have multiplied rapidly in recent years owing to the advent of practical, easy-to-use screening kits and the application of laboratory robotics. A brief review will be given here of the most popular methods, some guiding principles and an overview of current technologies. PMID:24419610

  5. Active and driven hydrodynamic crystals.

    PubMed

    Desreumaux, N; Florent, N; Lauga, E; Bartolo, D

    2012-08-01

    Motivated by the experimental ability to produce monodisperse particles in microfluidic devices, we study theoretically the hydrodynamic stability of driven and active crystals. We first recall the theoretical tools allowing to quantify the dynamics of elongated particles in a confined fluid. In this regime hydrodynamic interactions between particles arise from a superposition of potential dipolar singularities. We exploit this feature to derive the equations of motion for the particle positions and orientations. After showing that all five planar Bravais lattices are stationary solutions of the equations of motion, we consider separately the case where the particles are passively driven by an external force, and the situation where they are self-propelling. We first demonstrate that phonon modes propagate in driven crystals, which are always marginally stable. The spatial structures of the eigenmodes depend solely on the symmetries of the lattices, and on the orientation of the driving force. For active crystals, the stability of the particle positions and orientations depends not only on the symmetry of the crystals but also on the perturbation wavelengths and on the crystal density. Unlike unconfined fluids, the stability of active crystals is independent of the nature of the propulsion mechanism at the single-particle level. The square and rectangular lattices are found to be linearly unstable at short wavelengths provided the volume fraction of the crystals is high enough. Differently, hexagonal, oblique, and face-centered crystals are always unstable. Our work provides a theoretical basis for future experimental work on flowing microfluidic crystals. PMID:22864543

  6. Crystal Chemistry of Melanite Garnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Dawn Marie

    1999-01-01

    This original project resulted in a detailed crystal chemical data map of a titanium rich garnet (melanite) suite that originates from the Crowsnest Volcanics of Alberta Canada. Garnet is typically present during the partial melting of the earth's mantle to produce basalt. Prior studies conducted at Youngstown State University have yielded questions as to the crystal structure of the melanite. In the Studies conducted at Youngstown State University, through the use of single crystal x-ray diffraction, the c-axis appears to be distorted creating a tetragonal crystal instead of the typical cubic crystal of garnets. The micro probe was used on the same suite of titanium rich garnets as used in the single crystal x-ray diffraction. The combination of the single crystal x-ray research and the detailed microprobe research will allow us to determine the exact crystal chemical structure of the melanite garnet. The crystal chemical data was gathered through the utilization of the SX100 Electron Probe Micro Analyzer. Determination of the exact chemical nature may prove useful in modeling the ultramafic source rock responsible for the formation of the titanium rich lunar basalts.

  7. Chemical Analysis of Reaction Rims on Olivine Crystals in Natural Samples of Black Dacite Using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Lassen Peak, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Lassen Volcanic Center is the southernmost volcanic region in the Cascade volcanic arc formed by the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Lassen Peak last erupted in 1915 in an arc related event producing a black dacite material containing xenocrystic olivine grains with apparent orthopyroxene reaction rims. The reaction rims on these olivine grains are believed to have formed by reactions that ensued from a mixing/mingling event that occurred prior to eruption between the admixed mafic andesitic magma and a silicic dacite host material. Natural samples of the 1915 black dacite from Lassen Peak, CA were prepared into 15 polished thin sections and carbon coated for analysis using a FEI Quanta 250 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to identify and measure mineral textures and disequilibrium reaction rims. Observed mineralogical textures related to magma mixing include biotite and amphibole grains with apparent dehydration/breakdown rims, pyroxene-rimmed quartz grains, high concentration of microlites in glass matrix, and pyroxene/amphibole reaction rims on olivine grains. Olivine dissolution is evidenced as increased iron concentration toward convolute edges of olivine grains as observed by Backscatter Electron (BSE) imagery and elemental mapping using NSS spectral imaging software. In an attempt to quantify the area of reaction rim growth on olivine grains within these samples, high-resolution BSE images of 30 different olivine grains were collected along with Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) of different phases. Olivine cores and rims were extracted from BSE images using Photoshop and saved as separate image files. ImageJ software was used to calculate the area (μm2) of the core and rim of these grains. Average pyroxene reaction rim width for 30 grains was determined to be 11.68+/-1.65 μm. Rim widths of all 30 grains were averaged together to produce an overall average rim width for the Lassen Peak black dacite. By quantifying the reaction rims on olivine grains

  8. Crystal chemistry of a Ba-dominant analogue of hydrodelhayelite and natural ion-exchange transformations in double- and triple-layer phyllosilicates in post-volcanic systems of the Eifel region, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkova, N. V.; Chukanov, N. V.; Pekov, I. V.; Turchkova, A. G.; Lykova, I. S.; Schüller, W.; Ternes, B.; Pushcharovsky, D. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A Ba-dominant (Ba > K) analogue of hydrodelhayelite (BDAH) from Löhley (Eifel Mts., Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany) and Ba-enriched varieties of related double- and triple-layer phyllosilicates from Eifel are studied. The crystal structure of BDAH was solved by direct methods and refined to R = 0.0698 [1483 unique reflections with I > 2σ(I)]. It is orthorhombic, Pmmn, a = 23.9532(9), b = 7.0522(3), c = 6.6064(3) Å, V = 1115.97(8) Å3, Z = 2. The structure is based upon delhayelite-type double-layer tetrahedral blocks [(Al,Si)4Si12O34(OH,O)4] connected by chains of (Ca,Fe)-centered octahedra. Ba2+ and subordinate K+ occur at partially vacant sites in zeolitic channels within the tetrahedral blocks. The crystal-chemical formula of BDAH is: (Ba0.42K0.34□0.24)(Ca0.88Fe0.12)2(□0.90Mg0.10)2[Si6(Al0.5Si0.5)2O17(OH0.71O0.29)2]ṡ6H2O. The formation of BDAH and Ba-rich varieties of altered delhayelite/fivegite, günterblassite and hillesheimite is considered as a result of leaching of Na, Cl, F and, partially, K and Ca accompanied with hydration and the capture of Ba as a result of natural ion exchange. These minerals are structurally a "bridge" between single-layer phyllosilicates and zeolites having the open three-dimensional tetrahedral Al-Si-O frameworks.

  9. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  10. Effect of crystal habit on the dissolution behaviour of simvastatin crystals and its relationship to crystallization solvent properties.

    PubMed

    Bukovec, P; Benkic, P; Smrkolj, M; Vrecer, F

    2016-05-01

    Simvastatin crystals, having same crystal structure but different types of habits and hence different intrinsic dissolution rate, were prepared by recrystallization from solvents selected according to their polarity index. Scanning electron microscopy, laser diffraction, image analysis, X-ray powder diffractometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were used to investigate the physicochemical characteristics of the prepared crystals. The isolated crystals exhibited different crystal habits but possessed the same internal crystal structure. In this study the comparative intrinsic dissolution behaviour of the simvastatin crystals with different types of habits was studied and explained by surface energy and correlated to different solvent systems that were used for crystallization. In our work we diminished the influence of all other physical parameters that could influence the dissolution rate, e.g. particle size, specific surface area and polymorphism in order to focus the study onto the impact of crystal shape itself on the dissolution rate of simvastatin crystals. Rod shaped crystals isolated from more hydrophilic solvent mixture dissolved faster than plate-like crystals obtained from solvent mixture with lower polarity index. We correlated this fact to the different growth rate of the individual faces which resulted in different relative size of the individual crystal faces exposed to the dissolution medium as well as the chemical nature of those faces which in turn influenced the wettability and subsequent dissolution of the active pharmaceutical ingredient. PMID:27348970

  11. Comparing Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Janet; Hoiberg, Karen; Chumbley, Scott

    2003-01-01

    This standard lesson on identifying salt and sugar crystals expands into an opportunity for students to develop their observation, questioning, and modeling skills. Although sugar and salt may look similar, students discovered that they looked very different under a magnifying glass and behaved differently when dissolved in water. In addition,…

  12. Therapeutic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Some readers might not fully know what the difference is between crystallography, and the "new age" practice of dangling crystals around the body to capitalise on their healing energy. The latter is often considered to be superstition, while ironically, the former has actually resulted in real rationally-based healing of human diseases…

  13. Butterfly wing color: A photonic crystal demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically modeled the optical behavior of a natural occurring photonic crystal, as defined by the geometrical characteristics of the Teinopalpus Imperialis butterfly. In particular, following a genetic algorithm approach, we demonstrate how its wings follow a triclinic crystal geometry with a tetrahedron unit base. By performing both photonic band analysis and transmission/reflection simulations, we are able to explain the characteristic colors emerging by the butterfly wings, thus confirming their crystal form.

  14. Viewing Ice Crystals Using Polarized Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsman, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a method for identifying and examining single ice crystals by photographing a thin sheet of ice placed between two inexpensive polarizing filters. Suggests various natural and prepared sources for ice that promote students' insight into crystal structures, and yield colorful optical displays. Includes directions, precautions, and sample…

  15. Antiferromagnetic magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncoso, Roberto E.; Ulloa, Camilo; Pesce, Felipe; Nunez, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    We describe the features of magnonic crystals based upon antiferromagnetic elements. Our main results are that with a periodic modulation of either magnetic fields or system characteristics, such as the anisotropy, it is possible to tailor the spin-wave spectra of antiferromagnetic systems into a band-like organization that displays a segregation of allowed and forbidden bands. The main features of the band structure, such as bandwidths and band gaps, can be readily manipulated. Our results provide a natural link between two steadily growing fields of spintronics: antiferromagnetic spintronics and magnonics.

  16. Crystal structures of the apo form and a complex of human LMW-PTP with a phosphonic acid provide new evidence of a secondary site potentially related to the anchorage of natural substrates.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Emanuella M B; Trivella, Daniela B B; Scorsato, Valéria; Dias, Mariana P; Bazzo, Natália L; Mandapati, Kishore R; de Oliveira, Fábio L; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen V; Pilli, Ronaldo A; Miranda, Paulo C M L; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2015-08-01

    Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMW-PTP, EC 3.1.3.48) are a family of single-domain enzymes with molecular weight up to 18 kDa, expressed in different tissues and considered attractive pharmacological targets for cancer chemotherapy. Despite this, few LMW-PTP inhibitors have been described to date, and the structural information on LMW-PTP druggable binding sites is scarce. In this study, a small series of phosphonic acids were designed based on a new crystallographic structure of LMW-PTP complexed with benzylsulfonic acid, determined at 2.1Å. In silico docking was used as a tool to interpret the structural and enzyme kinetics data, as well as to design new analogs. From the synthesized series, two compounds were found to act as competitive inhibitors, with inhibition constants of 0.124 and 0.047 mM. We also report the 2.4Å structure of another complex in which LMW-PTP is bound to benzylphosphonic acid, and a structure of apo LMW-PTP determined at 2.3Å resolution. Although no appreciable conformation changes were observed, in the latter structures, amino acid residues from an expression tag were found bound to a hydrophobic region at the protein surface. This regions is neighbored by positively charged residues, adjacent to the active site pocket, suggesting that this region might be not a mere artefact of crystal contacts but an indication of a possible anchoring region for the natural substrate-which is a phosphorylated protein. PMID:26117648

  17. Partitioning behavior and stabilization of hydrophobically coated HfO2, ZrO2 and Hfx Zr 1-x O2 nanoparticles with natural organic matter reveal differences dependent on crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Divina A; Depner, Sean W; Watson, David F; Aga, Diana S; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2011-11-30

    The interactions of engineered nanomaterials with natural organic matter (NOM) exert a profound influence on the mobilities of the former in the environment. However, the influence of specific nanomaterial structural characteristics on the partitioning and colloidal stabilization of engineered nanomaterials in various ecological compartments remains underexplored. Herein, we present a systematic study of the interactions of humic acid (HA, as a model for NOM) with monodisperse, well-characterized, ligand-passivated HfO(2), ZrO(2), and solid-solution Hf(x)Zr(1-x)O(2) nanoparticles (NPs). We note that mixing with HA induces the almost complete phase transfer of hydrophobically coated monoclinic metal oxide (MO) NPs from hexane to water. Furthermore, HA is seen to impart appreciable colloidal stabilization to the NPs in the aqueous phase. In contrast, phase transfer and aqueous-phase colloidal stabilization has not been observed for tetragonal MO-NPs. A mechanistic model for the phase transfer and aqueous dispersal of MO-NPs is proposed on the basis of evidence from transmission electron microscopy, ζ-potential measurements, dynamic light scattering, Raman and infrared spectroscopies, elemental analysis, and systematic experiments on a closely related set of MO-NPs with varying composition and crystal structure. The data indicate the synergistic role of over-coating (micellar), ligand substitution (coordinative), and electrostatic processes wherein HA acts both as an amphiphilic molecule and a charged chelating ligand. The strong observed preference for the phase transfer of monoclinic instead of tetragonal NPs indicates the importance of the preferential binding of HA to specific crystallographic facets and suggests the possibility of being able to design NPs to minimize their mobilities in the aquatic environment. PMID:21963173

  18. Fluorite-related one-dimensional units in natural bismuth oxysulfates: the crystal structures of Bi14O16(SO4)5 and Bi30O33(SO4)9(AsO4)2.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Daniela; Garavelli, Anna; Bindi, Luca

    2015-10-01

    The crystal structures of two new natural Bi oxysulfates with the formula Bi14O16(SO4)5 [labelled new phase I; monoclinic, space group C2, a = 21.658 (4), b = 5.6648 (9), c = 15.092 (3) Å, β = 119.433 (11)° and Z = 2] and Bi30O33(SO4)9(AsO4)2 [labelled new phase II; triclinic, space group P1, a = 5.670 (3), b = 13.9408 (9), c = 22.7908 (18) Å, α = 80.903 (5), β = 82.854 (14), γ = 78.27 (2)° and Z = 1] from the high-temperature fumarole deposit of the La Fossa crater at Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) are reported. The structures are built up by a combination of fluorite-related Bi-O units and isolated (SO4)(2-) tetrahedra (new phase I) or both (SO4)(2-) and (AsO4)(3-) tetrahedra (new phase II). Owing to the effect of stereoactive lone pairs of Bi(3+), Bi-O units in both the structures can be suitably described in terms of oxo-centered OBi4 tetrahedra. The structure of Bi14O16(SO4)5 is based upon one-dimensional [O16Bi14](10+) ribbons formed by six chains of edge-sharing OBi4 tetrahedra extending along [010]. In the structure of Bi30O33(SO4)9(AsO4)2 the same ribbon type coexists with another one-dimensional ribbon formed by seven chains of edge-sharing OBi4 tetrahedra and with the composition [O17Bi16](14+). Ribbons of the same type are joined by (SO4)(2-) and (AsO4)(3-) tetrahedra along [010] – if a reduced triclinic unit-cell setting is considered – so forming two different (001) slabs which alternate to each other along [001] and are joined by additional (SO4)(2-) tetrahedra. New phase I represents the natural analogues of synthetic Bi14O16(SO4)5, but with an ordered structure model. PMID:26428401

  19. Living liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuang; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic particles, often termed “active fluid,” has attracted enormous attention in the broad scientific community because of its fundamentally nonequilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here, we introduce a class of active matter––living liquid crystals (LLCs)––that combines living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingredients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of intriguing dynamic phenomena, caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (i) nonlinear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by nonuniform director, (ii) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (iii) activity-triggered transition from a nonflowing uniform state into a flowing one-dimensional periodic pattern and its evolution into a turbulent array of topological defects, and (iv) birefringence-enabled visualization of microflow generated by the nanometers-thick bacterial flagella. Unlike their isotropic counterpart, the LLCs show collective dynamic effects at very low volume fraction of bacteria, on the order of 0.2%. Our work suggests an unorthodox design concept to control and manipulate the dynamic behavior of soft active matter and opens the door for potential biosensing and biomedical applications. PMID:24474746

  20. Living liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Aranson, Igor S

    2014-01-28

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic particles, often termed "active fluid," has attracted enormous attention in the broad scientific community because of its fundamentally nonequilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here, we introduce a class of active matter--living liquid crystals (LLCs)--that combines living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingredients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of intriguing dynamic phenomena, caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (i) nonlinear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by nonuniform director, (ii) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (iii) activity-triggered transition from a nonflowing uniform state into a flowing one-dimensional periodic pattern and its evolution into a turbulent array of topological defects, and (iv) birefringence-enabled visualization of microflow generated by the nanometers-thick bacterial flagella. Unlike their isotropic counterpart, the LLCs show collective dynamic effects at very low volume fraction of bacteria, on the order of 0.2%. Our work suggests an unorthodox design concept to control and manipulate the dynamic behavior of soft active matter and opens the door for potential biosensing and biomedical applications. PMID:24474746

  1. Bulk modulus for polar covalent crystals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bo; Wang, Qianqian; Tian, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    A microscopic empirical model of bulk modulus based on atomic-scale parameters is proposed. These parameters include the bond length, the effective bonded valence electron (EBVE) number, and the coordination number product of two bonded atoms, etc. The estimated bulk moduli from our model are in good agreement with experimental values for various polar covalent crystals including ionic crystals. Our current work sheds lights on the nature of bulk modulus, provides useful clues for design of crystals with low compressibility, and is applicable to complex crystals such as minerals of geophysical importance. PMID:24166098

  2. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  3. A crystal-orbital calculation on three-dimensional crystal of TTF-TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikov, E. B.

    1994-07-01

    A crystal-orbital calculation on the three-dimensional TTF-TCNQ crystal has been carried out in the Hartree-Fock all-valence electron approximation using the CRYSTAL92 routine package. The expected quasi-one-dimensional metal nature of the TTF-TCNQ band structure along the direction of TTF and TCNQ infinite stacks alignment has been reproduced. The charge transfer between TTF and TCNQ has been calculated to be of 0.57 e.

  4. Crystals and Crystals: On the Mythology of Magmatic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B.

    2008-12-01

    The intimate records of the deep functioning of magmatic systems reside in the temporal and spatial records of magma flux, composition and crystal load. The records for a single system are piecemeal: Plutons show good spatial records, but poor temporal records. Volcanoes give through lava sequences good temporal records, but no spatial context. Because of this dichotomy, two, almost mutually exclusive, branches of magmatology have developed, whereas in Nature there is only a single process. The processes envisioned in these schools necessary to deliver the end rock record are distinct. It is our tools and historic perspectives that have steered the science, not the subject itself. Due to this approach an almost mythical conception of how magmas function has become commonplace. The circumvention of this dilemma rests in carefully evaluating the records on hand in the light of a broad understanding of the fundamental mechanics of how magma lives and dies. It is these basic principles that promise to unify plutonic and volcanic evidence to reveal the full nature of magmatism on all scales. The two most basic features of all magmatic processes are the universal presence of solidification fronts and the presence or absence of a crystal cargo. Almost without exception (e.g., shallow pressure quenching) all first generation crystals grow in marginal solidification fronts (SFs) bordering all magmas. The package of isotherms bounded by the liquidus and solidus define SFs, which propagate in response to the rate of cooling. All physical and chemical processes occurring within SFs compete with the advancement or retreat of solidification. SFs are governed by crystallinity regimes: Suspension Zone (<25 % xtals), Capture Front (~25 %), Mush Zone (25-55%), Rigidity Front (~55%; Critical Crystallinity), and Rigid Crust Zone (>55% xtals). Magmas are laced with nuclei that multiply and grow when overtaken. Crystal growth rates are bounded; tiny crystals reside at the front of SFs

  5. Growth and surface topography of WSe2 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Vijay; Vyas, Chirag; Pataniya, Pratik; Jani, Mihir; Pathak, Vishal; Patel, Abhishek; Pathak, V. M.; Patel, K. D.; Solanki, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    Tungsten Di-Selenide belongs to the family of TMDCs showing their potential applications in the fields of Optoelectronics and PEC solar cells. Here in the present investigation single crystals of WSe2 were grown by Direct Vapour Transport Technique in a dual zone furnace having temperature difference of 50 K between the two zones. These single crystals were characterized by EDAX which confirms the stiochiometry of the grown crystals. Surface topography of the crystal was studied by optical micrograph showing the left handed spirals on the surface of WSe2 crystals. Single crystalline nature of the crystals was confirmed by SAED.

  6. Crystallization process

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Robert J.; Brown, William R.; Auyang, Lun; Liu, Yin-Chang; Cook, W. Jeffrey

    1986-01-01

    An improved crystallization process is disclosed for separating a crystallizable material and an excluded material which is at least partially excluded from the solid phase of the crystallizable material obtained upon freezing a liquid phase of the materials. The solid phase is more dense than the liquid phase, and it is separated therefrom by relative movement with the formation of a packed bed of solid phase. The packed bed is continuously formed adjacent its lower end and passed from the liquid phase into a countercurrent flow of backwash liquid. The packed bed extends through the level of the backwash liquid to provide a drained bed of solid phase adjacent its upper end which is melted by a condensing vapor.

  7. Ribbon Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Jakob; Markvorsen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    A repetitive crystal-like pattern is spontaneously formed upon the twisting of straight ribbons. The pattern is akin to a tessellation with isosceles triangles, and it can easily be demonstrated with ribbons cut from an overhead transparency. We give a general description of developable ribbons using a ruled procedure where ribbons are uniquely described by two generating functions. This construction defines a differentiable frame, the ribbon frame, which does not have singular points, whereby we avoid the shortcomings of the Frenet–Serret frame. The observed spontaneous pattern is modeled using planar triangles and cylindrical arcs, and the ribbon structure is shown to arise from a maximization of the end-to-end length of the ribbon, i.e. from an optimal use of ribbon length. The phenomenon is discussed in the perspectives of incompatible intrinsic geometries and of the emergence of long-range order. PMID:24098360

  8. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  9. X-ray Microscopic Characterization of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Holmes, A.; Thomas, B.R.; Chernov, a. A.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic mapping of the variation in degree of perfection and in type of defects in entire protein crystals by x-rays may well be a prerequisite for better understanding causes of lattice imperfections, the growth history, and properties of protein crystals. However, x-ray microscopic characterization of bulk protein crystals, in the as-grown state, is frequently more challenging than that of small molecular crystals due to the experimental difficulties arising largely from the unique features possessed by protein crystals. In this presentation, we will illustrate ssme recent activities in employing coherence-based phase contrast x-ray imaging and high-angular-resolution diffraction techniques for mapping microdefects and the degree of perfection of protein crystals, and demonstrate a correlation between crystal perfection, diffraction phenomena., and crystallization conditions. The observed features and phenomena will be discussed in context to gain insight into the nature of defects, nucleation and growth, and the properties of protein crystals.

  10. Using Inorganic Crystals To Grow Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Mcpherson, Alexander A.

    1989-01-01

    Solid materials serve as nucleating agents. Protein crystals induced by heterogeneous nucleation and in some cases by epitaxy to grow at lower supersaturations than needed for spontaneous nucleation. Heterogeneous nucleation makes possible to grow large, defect-free single crystals of protein more readily. Such protein crystals benefits research in biochemistry and pharmacology.

  11. Crystals of suspended marine barite in the eastern equatorial Pacific: processes of dissolution and effects on crystal morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoxia; Yang, Zuosheng; Fan, Dejiang; Li, Yunhai

    2015-01-01

    Suspended particulate substances were sampled in the eastern equatorial Pacific in water column from surface to near bottom in five stations in 2005, from which 868 barite crystals were recovered. The barite crystals were examined under scanning electron microscopy. About 61% of the total barites crystals contained detectable Sr by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Barite crystals could be classified into four groups based on their morphology: 1) bladed; 2) ovoid or rounded; 3) arrow-like; and 4) irregularly shaped. The arrow-like barite crystals in natural environment has never been reported before. In addition, about a half of the studied crystals showed features of dissolution as cavities or holes inside of the crystals or around their edges. We found that differential dissolution of barite crystals is consequence of heterogeneous Sr distribution in barite crystals. Our results would help in understanding the biogeochemical processes of marine barite formation and preservation in seawater and marine sediments.

  12. Crystals of suspended marine barite in the eastern equatorial Pacific: processes of dissolution and effects on crystal morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoxia; Yang, Zuosheng; Fan, Dejiang; Li, Yunhai

    2014-09-01

    Suspended particulate substances were sampled in the eastern equatorial Pacific in water column from surface to near bottom in five stations in 2005, from which 868 barite crystals were recovered. The barite crystals were examined under scanning electron microscopy. About 61% of the total barites crystals contained detectable Sr by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Barite crystals could be classified into four groups based on their morphology: 1) bladed; 2) ovoid or rounded; 3) arrow-like; and 4) irregularly shaped. The arrow-like barite crystals in natural environment has never been reported before. In addition, about a half of the studied crystals showed features of dissolution as cavities or holes inside of the crystals or around their edges. We found that differential dissolution of barite crystals is consequence of heterogeneous Sr distribution in barite crystals. Our results would help in understanding the biogeochemical processes of marine barite formation and preservation in seawater and marine sediments.

  13. Crystallization of lithium borate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goktas, A. A.; Neilson, G. F.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    The glass-forming ability and crystallization behavior of lithium borate compositions, in the diborate-to-metaborate-range, were studied. In particular, the nature and sequence of formation of crystalline phases and the tendency toward devitrification were investigated as functions of temperature, thermal history and batch composition. It was found that the sequence of crystalline phase formation was sensitive to all of the three latter factors, and it was observed that under certain conditions metastable defect structures of the metaborate can appear.

  14. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  15. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into an adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  16. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into and adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  17. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  18. Organic crystal growth experiment facility (13-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanbayashi, Akio

    1992-01-01

    The interesting nature of metal-like organic compounds composed of charge transfer complexes has been recently realized. Crystals of these complexes can usually be grown by the solution crystallization method. It is difficult to grow such organic crystals on Earth, especially from the chemical reactions through diffusion controlled process in the solutions, because of gravitational disturbances, or sedimentation. The International Microgravity Lab. (IML-1) Organic Crystal Growth with G-Gitter Preventive Measure (OCGP) experiment is expected to grow a single crystal large enough to allow its intrinsic physical properties to be measured and its detailed crystal structure to be determined. This experiment also attempts to assess the experimental conditions including the microgravity environment for further study of the fundamental process of solution crystallization, nucleation, and growth from supersaturated phases including chemical reactions. Microgravity disturbances, G-jitter, may be an important environmental factor in the experimental method to assess. The vibration damping effects on organic crystal growth can be carefully studied.

  19. Crystal growth and characterization of new semiorganic nonlinear optical single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulshrestha, Shobha; Shrivastava, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    An organic material of a L-histidine monohydrochloride single crystal was grown in a distilled water solution using the slow evaporation method at 40-45°C. The grown crystal was transparent and colourless, with a size of about 20 × 9 × 5 mm3, obtained within a period of 21 days. The solubility of grown crystals have found out at various temperatures. The UV-visible transmittance studies show that the grown crystals have wide optical transparency in the entire visible region It is observed that the crystal has transparency window from 255nm to 700nm and its energy gap (Eg) found to be is 3.1eV. The grown crystal was subjected to powder X-ray diffraction analysis, confirming that the orthorhombic crystalline nature of the crystal. To identify the surface morphology, the as grown crystal was subjected to FE-SEM technique. The chemical composition of the grown crystal was estimated by Energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The optical behaviour of the grown crystal was analyzed by PL study.

  20. Weak crystallization theory of metallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Ivar; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Demler, Eugene A.

    2016-06-01

    Crystallization is one of the most familiar, but hardest to analyze, phase transitions. The principal reason is that crystallization typically occurs via a strongly first-order phase transition, and thus rigorous treatment would require comparing energies of an infinite number of possible crystalline states with the energy of liquid. A great simplification occurs when crystallization transition happens to be weakly first order. In this case, weak crystallization theory, based on unbiased Ginzburg-Landau expansion, can be applied. Even beyond its strict range of validity, it has been a useful qualitative tool for understanding crystallization. In its standard form, however, weak crystallization theory cannot explain the existence of a majority of observed crystalline and quasicrystalline states. Here we extend the weak crystallization theory to the case of metallic alloys. We identify a singular effect of itinerant electrons on the form of weak crystallization free energy. It is geometric in nature, generating strong dependence of free energy on the angles between ordering wave vectors of ionic density. That leads to stabilization of fcc, rhombohedral, and icosahedral quasicrystalline (iQC) phases, which are absent in the generic theory with only local interactions. As an application, we find the condition for stability of iQC that is consistent with the Hume-Rothery rules known empirically for the majority of stable iQC; namely, the length of the primary Bragg-peak wave vector is approximately equal to the diameter of the Fermi sphere.

  1. CRYSTAL COLLIMATION AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FLILLER,III, R.P.; DREES,A.; GASSNER,D.; HAMMONS,L.; MCINTYRE,G.; PEGGS,S.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; BIRYUKOV,V.; CHESNKOV,Y.; TEREKHOV,V.

    2002-06-02

    For the year 2001 run, a bent crystal was installed in the yellow ring of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The crystal forms the first stage of a two stage collimation system. By aligning the crystal to the beam, halo particles are channeled through the crystal and deflected into a copper scraper. The purpose is to reduce beam halo with greater efficiency than with a scraper alone. In this paper we present the first results from the use of the crystal collimator. We compare the crystal performance under various conditions, such as different particle species, and beta functions.

  2. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  3. Optical properties of natural topaz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsova, V.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Trinkler, L.; Chikvaidze, G.

    2013-12-01

    The results of investigation of infrared, Raman and UV-Visible absorption spectra of natural topaz crystals from Ukraine before and after fast neutron irradiation are presented. We assume that the ~ 620 nm band in topaz crystals is associated with the presence of Cr3+, Fe2+ and Mn2+ impurities. The broad band with maxima at 650 cm-1 observed in Raman spectra for topaz irradiated by fast neutrons may be connected with lattice disorder. Exchange interaction between radiation defect and impurity ions during neutron irradiation leads to appearance of additional absorption band in UV-VIS spectra and bands broadening in infrared and Raman spectra of investigated crystals.

  4. Convection patterns and temperature fields of ammonothermal GaN bulk crystal growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Yoshio; Sato, Osamu; Tomida, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Chiaki

    2016-05-01

    The natural convection heat transfer in an ammonothermal process for growing GaN bulk single crystals has been examined numerically. We consider only one crystal to simplify the calculation and discuss the relationship between convection patterns and temperature fields. Two types of convection patterns are observed owing to the difference in the crystal radius. When the convection pattern is transformed, the crystal surface temperature decreases as the crystal radius increases.

  5. Controlling spontaneous emission in bioreplica photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Matthew R.; Butler, Elizabeth S.; Bartl, Michael H.

    2012-04-01

    Sophisticated methods have been created by nature to produce structure-based colors as a way to address the need of a wide variety of organisms. This pallet of available structures presents a unique opportunity for the investigation of new photonic crystal designs. Low-temperature sol-gel biotemplating methods were used to transform a single biotemplate into a variety of inorganic oxide structures. The density of optical states was calculated for a diamond-based natural photonic crystal, as well as several structures templated from it. Calculations were experimentally probed by spontaneous emission studies using time correlated single photon counting measurements.

  6. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  7. Apparatus for growing crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J. (Inventor); Witt, August F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for growing crystals from a melt employing a heat pipe, consisting of one or more sections, each section serving to control temperature and thermal gradients in the crystal as it forms inside the pipe.

  8. Crystallization from Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone

  9. Apparatus for mounting crystal

    DOEpatents

    Longeway, Paul A.

    1985-01-01

    A thickness monitor useful in deposition or etching reactor systems comprising a crystal-controlled oscillator in which the crystal is deposited or etched to change the frequency of the oscillator. The crystal rests within a thermally conductive metallic housing and arranged to be temperature controlled. Electrode contacts are made to the surface primarily by gravity force such that the crystal is substantially free of stress otherwise induced by high temperature.

  10. Lunar Magma Ocean Crystallization: Constraints from Fractional Crystallization Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    The currently accepted paradigm of lunar formation is that of accretion from the ejecta of a giant impact, followed by crystallization of a global scale magma ocean. This model accounts for the formation of the anorthosite highlands crust, which is globally distributed and old, and the formation of the younger mare basalts which are derived from a source region that has experienced plagioclase extraction. Several attempts at modelling the crystallization of such a lunar magma ocean (LMO) have been made, but our ever-increasing knowledge of the lunar samples and surface have raised as many questions as these models have answered. Geodynamic models of lunar accretion suggest that shortly following accretion the bulk of the lunar mass was hot, likely at least above the solidus]. Models of LMO crystallization that assume a deep magma ocean are therefore geodynamically favorable, but they have been difficult to reconcile with a thick plagioclase-rich crust. A refractory element enriched bulk composition, a shallow magma ocean, or a combination of the two have been suggested as a way to produce enough plagioclase to account for the assumed thickness of the crust. Recently however, geophysical data from the GRAIL mission have indicated that the lunar anorthositic crust is not as thick as was initially estimated, which allows for both a deeper magma ocean and a bulk composition more similar to the terrestrial upper mantle. We report on experimental simulations of the fractional crystallization of a deep (approximately 100km) LMO with a terrestrial upper mantle-like (LPUM) bulk composition. Our experimental results will help to define the composition of the lunar crust and mantle cumulates, and allow us to consider important questions such as source regions of the mare basalts and Mg-suite, the role of mantle overturn after magma ocean crystallization and the nature of KREEP

  11. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  12. Artistic Crystal Creations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    In this inquiry-based, integrative art and science activity, Grade 5-8 students use multicolored Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) crystallizing solutions to reveal beautiful, cylindrical, 3-dimensional, needle-shaped structures. Through observations of the crystal art, students analyze factors that contribute to crystal size and formation, compare…

  13. Total immersion crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Crystals of wide band gap materials are produced by positioning a holder receiving a seed crystal at the interface between a body of molten wide band gap material and an overlying layer of temperature-controlled, encapsulating liquid. The temperature of the layer decreases from the crystallization temperature of the crystal at the interface with the melt to a substantially lower temperature at which formation of crystal defects does not occur, suitably a temperature of 200 to 600 C. After initiation of crystal growth, the leading edge of the crystal is pulled through the layer until the leading edge of the crystal enters the ambient gas headspace which may also be temperature controlled. The length of the column of liquid encapsulant may exceed the length of the crystal such that the leading edge and trailing edge of the crystal are both simultaneously with the column of the crystal. The crystal can be pulled vertically by means of a pulling-rotation assembly or horizontally by means of a low-angle withdrawal mechanism.

  14. Food Crystalization and Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food Crystalization and Eggs Deana R. Jones, Ph.D. USDA Agricultural Research Service Egg Safety and Quality Research Unit Athens, Georgia, USA Deana.Jones@ars.usda.gov Sugar, salt, lactose, tartaric acid and ice are examples of constituents than can crystallize in foods. Crystallization in a foo...

  15. Crystal chemistry of meteoritic hibonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, R. G.; Burns, V. M.

    1984-11-01

    The characteristics of cation vacancies and site occupancies of natural hibonites in meteors are discussed. Note is taken of the effect of the specific locations of the hibonites in the matrices on the crystal chemistry, electronic stabilities, and spectral features of the metal ions which replace the Al(3+). Hibonites form beta-alumina hexagonal cells with 26 cation sites. Fe cations are found in octahedral, tetrahedral, and five-fold coordinations. Fe(2+) is found in face-shared Al(3) octahedra, a siting explained in terms of ionic radius and crystal field stabilization energy criteria. Spectral colors are attributed to V(3+) and Ti(3+) field transitions at 400 and 700 nm, respectively, although the 700 nm line may arise from transitions of Ti(3+) to Ti(4+) or Fe(2+) to Fe(3+) during heating. Excesses of Mg-26 can be traced to decay of nebular Al-26.

  16. Crystal Chemistry of Meteoritic Hibonites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.; Burns, V. M.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of cation vacancies and site occupancies of natural hibonites in meteors are discussed. Note is taken of the effect of the specific locations of the hibonites in the matrices on the crystal chemistry, electronic stabilities, and spectral features of the metal ions which replace the Al(3+). Hibonites form beta-alumina hexagonal cells with 26 cation sites. Fe cations are found in octahedral, tetrahedral, and five-fold coordinates. Fe(2+) is found in face-shared Al(3) octahedra, a siting explained in terms of ionic radius and crystal field stabilization energy criteria. Spectral colors are attributed to V(3+) and Ti(3+) field transitions at 400 and 700 nm, respectively, although the 700 nm line may arise from transitions of Ti(3+) to Ti(4+) or Fe(2+) to Fe(3+) during heating. Excesses of Mg-26 can be traced to decay of nebular Al-26.

  17. Crystal chemistry of meteoritic hibonites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.; Burns, V. M.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of cation vacancies and site occupancies of natural hibonites in meteors are discussed. Note is taken of the effect of the specific locations of the hibonites in the matrices on the crystal chemistry, electronic stabilities, and spectral features of the metal ions which replace the Al(3+). Hibonites form beta-alumina hexagonal cells with 26 cation sites. Fe cations are found in octahedral, tetrahedral, and five-fold coordinations. Fe(2+) is found in face-shared Al(3) octahedra, a siting explained in terms of ionic radius and crystal field stabilization energy criteria. Spectral colors are attributed to V(3+) and Ti(3+) field transitions at 400 and 700 nm, respectively, although the 700 nm line may arise from transitions of Ti(3+) to Ti(4+) or Fe(2+) to Fe(3+) during heating. Excesses of Mg-26 can be traced to decay of nebular Al-26.

  18. Fast Crystals and Strong Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Weitz, David

    2009-11-04

    This talk describes new results on model colloid systems that provide insight into the behavior of fundamental problems in colloid physics, and more generally, for other materials as well. By visualizing the nucleation and growth of colloid crystals, we find that the incipient crystallites are much more disordered than expected, leading to a larger diversity of crystal morphologies. When the entropic contribution of these diverse morphologies is included in the free energy, we are able to describe the behavior very well, and can predict the nucleation rate surprisingly accurately. The talk also describes the glass transition in deformable colloidal particles, and will show that when the internal elasticity of the particles is included, the colloidal glass transition mimics that of molecular glass formers much more completely. These results also suggest that the elasticity at the scale of the fundamental unit, either colloid particle or molecule, determines the nature of the glass transition, as described by the "fragility."

  19. In vivo protein crystallization opens new routes in structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, Rudolf; Cupelli, Karolina; Redecke, Lars; Nass, Karol; DePonte, Daniel P; White, Thomas A; Stellato, Francesco; Rehders, Dirk; Liang, Mengning; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J; Bostedt, Christoph; Boutet, Sébastien; Bozek, John D; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; Davidsson, Jan; Doak, R Bruce; Ekeberg, Tomas; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Hunter, Mark S; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A; Lomb, Lukas; Maia, Filipe R N C; Kimmel, Nils; Martin, Andrew V; Messerschmidt, Marc; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond G; Soltau, Heike; Stern, Stephan; Strüder, Lothar; Timneanu, Nicusor; Ullrich, Joachim; Wang, Xiaoyu; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; Williams, Garth J; Wunderer, Cornelia B; Fromme, Petra; Spence, John C H; Stehle, Thilo; Chapman, Henry N; Betzel, Christian; Duszenko, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Protein crystallization in cells has been observed several times in nature. However, owing to their small size these crystals have not yet been used for X-ray crystallographic analysis. We prepared nano-sized in vivo–grown crystals of Trypanosoma brucei enzymes and applied the emerging method of free-electron laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography to record interpretable diffraction data. This combined approach will open new opportunities in structural systems biology. PMID:22286384

  20. Maximizing Macromolecule Crystal Size for Neutron Diffraction Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, R. A.; Kephart, R.; Leardi, R.; Myles, D. A.; Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A challenge in neutron diffraction experiments is growing large (greater than 1 cu mm) macromolecule crystals. In taking up this challenge we have used statistical experiment design techniques to quickly identify crystallization conditions under which the largest crystals grow. These techniques provide the maximum information for minimal experimental effort, allowing optimal screening of crystallization variables in a simple experimental matrix, using the minimum amount of sample. Analysis of the results quickly tells the investigator what conditions are the most important for the crystallization. These can then be used to maximize the crystallization results in terms of reducing crystal numbers and providing large crystals of suitable habit. We have used these techniques to grow large crystals of Glucose isomerase. Glucose isomerase is an industrial enzyme used extensively in the food industry for the conversion of glucose to fructose. The aim of this study is the elucidation of the enzymatic mechanism at the molecular level. The accurate determination of hydrogen positions, which is critical for this, is a requirement that neutron diffraction is uniquely suited for. Preliminary neutron diffraction experiments with these crystals conducted at the Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France) reveal diffraction to beyond 2.5 angstrom. Macromolecular crystal growth is a process involving many parameters, and statistical experimental design is naturally suited to this field. These techniques are sample independent and provide an experimental strategy to maximize crystal volume and habit for neutron diffraction studies.

  1. Crystal growth and characterization of L-valine cadmium acetate a semiorganic NLO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, J.; Ilayabarathi, P.; Maadeswaran, P.

    2012-08-01

    A new semiorganic nonlinear optical material, L-valine cadmium acetate, was grown successfully from aqueous solution by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals characterized by using Powder X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the structure of the grown title compound. The functional groups have been identified using FTIR spectral data. Transmittance compound was analyzed by using UV-vis spectrum. The thermal behavior of the grown crystal was determined with the aid of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The dielectric constant was studied as a function of frequency for various temperatures. The grown crystal has positive photoconductivity nature. The fluorescence spectrum of the crystal was recorded and its optical band gap is about 3.4479 eV. Second order nonlinear optical property of the grown crystal has been confirmed by modified Kurtz-Perry powder second harmonic generation (SHG) test.

  2. Synthesis, crystal growth and physiochemical characterization of organic NLO crystal: L-ornithinium dipicrate (LODP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaprabhakaran, S.; Chandrasekaran, J.; Babu, B.; Thirumurugan, R.; Anitha, K.

    2015-02-01

    L-ornithinium dipicrate (LODP) has been synthesized and good quality single crystals were grown by slow evaporation method at room temperature. Single crystal XRD confirms that the grown crystal belongs to the monoclinic system with the noncentrosymmetric space group P21. Powder X-ray diffraction study confirms the crystalline nature of the compound. FTIR spectral analysis confirms the functional group in the synthesized compound. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses reveal the thermal stability of the crystal. The optical absorption spectrum shows the absence of absorption between 475 nm and 800 nm. The dielectric measurements were carried out to estimate the dielectric parameters of the grown crystal in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 5 MHz at various temperatures. The second harmonic property has been investigated by Kurtz-Perry powder technique. The relative SHG efficiency of LODP is found to be 14.57 times greater than that of the reference material KDP.

  3. Controlled crystallization of emerald from the fluxed melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barilo, S. N.; Bychkov, G. L.; Kurnevich, L. A.; Leonuk, N. I.; Mikhailov, V. P.; Shiryaev, S. V.; Koyava, V. T.; Smirnova, T. V.

    1999-03-01

    The problem of controlled crystallization of emerald single crystals from a fluxed melt, its colour characteristics and optic parameters are discussed. Properties of the as-grown single crystals are very much like those of natural gems. Emeralds weighting as much as 150 ct grown on oriented seeds in dynamical regime feature small dichroism, uniform distribution of colour in the volume to offer good jewelry characteristics. The (1 0 1¯ 0) and (1 1 2¯ 0) cuts of previously grown crystals is established to be the optimal seed. The technique has the advantage of maintaining the optimal concentration ratio of the solute near the crystallization front through adequate stirring by a platinum crystal holder is rotated at a rate of 30 rounds per minute, and seed positioning. To examine emerald crystals quality we have performed a laser experiment and threshold measurements. Lasing was achieved at absorbed pump energy threshold of less than 0.6 mJ.

  4. Protein crystallization with paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  5. Crystallography of icosahedral crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, P.

    The crystallography of icosahedral crystals is constructed. The actual three-dimensional crystal is represented by a three-dimensional cut in a regular six-dimensional periodic crystal with symmetry described by a six-dimensional space group, and the positions of atoms correspond to an arrangement of hypersurface segments. The resulting crystal cannot in general be viewed as a space-filling arrangemment of a small number of different Penrose tiles. The intensities of Bragg spots are given directly as the intensities of Bragg spots of the six-dimensional crystal.

  6. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  7. Macromolecular complexes in crystals and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Krissinel, Evgeny

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of existing methods for the analysis of macromolecular interactions and complexes in crystal packing. Typical situations and conditions where wrong answers may be obtained in the course of ordinary procedures are presented and discussed. The more general question of what the relationship is between natural (in-solvent) and crystallized assemblies is discussed and researched. A computational analysis suggests that weak interactions with K d ≥ 100 µM have a considerable chance of being lost during the course of crystallization. In such instances, crystal packing misrepresents macromolecular complexes and interactions. For as many as 20% of protein dimers in the PDB the likelihood of misrepresentation is estimated to be higher than 50%. Given that weak macromolecular interactions play an important role in many biochemical processes, these results suggest that a complementary noncrystallographic study should be always conducted when inferring structural aspects of weakly bound complexes. PMID:21460456

  8. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Newby, Jason; Hamel, Sebastien; Carman, Leslie; Faust, Michelle; Lordi, Vincenzo; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Payne, Stephen A.

    2009-08-01

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10- diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  9. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  10. Qualification study of LiF flight crystals for the Objective Crystal Spectrometer on the SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, F. E.; Rasmussen, I.; Schnopper, H. W.; Wiebicke, H.; Halm, I.; Geppert, U.; Borozdin, K.

    1992-10-01

    The Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OXS) on the SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA satellite will carry three types of natural crystals LiF(220), Ge(111) and RAP(001). They will be used to study, among others, the H- and the He-like emission from the cosmically important elements Fe, S, Ar and O. More than 300 LiF-crystals of dimension about 23 x 63 sq mm are required to cover one side of a large (about 1000 x 600 sq mm) panel which is to be mounted in front of one of the high throughput X-ray telescopes. A qualification study examined a large sample of LiF(220) crystals at Cu-K-(alpha)2 (8.0278 keV). Data from 124 flight crystals yields an average FWHM of rocking curves of 2.3 arcmin with a standard deviation of 0.4 arcmin. For more than 80 percent of the crystals, angular deviation of the (220) planes from the actual crystal surface is less than 1.5 arcmin. These data will be used to select the best crystals for the flight panel and will determine precisely the orientation of the crystals mounted on the OXS. Eight crystals were glued onto a small test panel of the OXS and for only one crystal was there measured a significant deviation of the crystal properties, including alignment relative to the others.

  11. Welding Molecular Crystals.

    PubMed

    Adolf, Cyril R R; Ferlay, Sylvie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2015-12-16

    Both for fundamental and applied sciences, the design of complex molecular systems in the crystalline phase with strict control of order and periodicity at both microscopic and macroscopic levels is of prime importance for development of new solid-state materials and devices. The design and fabrication of complex crystalline systems as networks of crystals displaying task-specific properties is a step toward smart materials. Here we report on isostructural and almost isometric molecular crystals of different colors, their use for fabrication of core-shell crystals, and their welding by 3D epitaxial growth into networks of crystals as single-crystalline entities. Welding of crystals by self-assembly processes into macroscopic networks of crystals is a powerful strategy for the design of hierarchically organized periodic complex architectures composed of different subdomains displaying targeted characteristics. Crystal welding may be regarded as a first step toward the design of new hierarchically organized complex crystalline systems. PMID:26581391

  12. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  13. Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In order to rapidly and efficiently grow crystals, tools were needed to automatically identify and analyze the growing process of protein crystals. To meet this need, Diversified Scientific, Inc. (DSI), with the support of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center, developed CrystalScore(trademark), the first automated image acquisition, analysis, and archiving system designed specifically for the macromolecular crystal growing community. It offers automated hardware control, image and data archiving, image processing, a searchable database, and surface plotting of experimental data. CrystalScore is currently being used by numerous pharmaceutical companies and academic and nonprofit research centers. DSI, located in Birmingham, Alabama, was awarded the patent Method for acquiring, storing, and analyzing crystal images on March 4, 2003. Another DSI product made possible by Marshall SBIR funding is VaporPro(trademark), a unique, comprehensive system that allows for the automated control of vapor diffusion for crystallization experiments.

  14. Crystallization of PTP Domains.

    PubMed

    Levy, Colin; Adams, James; Tabernero, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Protein crystallography is the most powerful method to obtain atomic resolution information on the three-dimensional structure of proteins. An essential step towards determining the crystallographic structure of a protein is to produce good quality crystals from a concentrated sample of purified protein. These crystals are then used to obtain X-ray diffraction data necessary to determine the 3D structure by direct phasing or molecular replacement if the model of a homologous protein is available. Here, we describe the main approaches and techniques to obtain suitable crystals for X-ray diffraction. We include tools and guidance on how to evaluate and design the protein construct, how to prepare Se-methionine derivatized protein, how to assess the stability and quality of the sample, and how to crystallize and prepare crystals for diffraction experiments. While general strategies for protein crystallization are summarized, specific examples of the application of these strategies to the crystallization of PTP domains are discussed. PMID:27514806

  15. Effect of L-Valine on the growth and characterization of Sodium Acid Phthalate (SAP) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmala, L. Ruby; Prakash, J. Thomas Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Undoped and amino acid doped good quality single crystals of Sodium Acid Phthalate crystals (SAP) were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique which are semiorganic in nature. The effect of amino acid (L-Valine) dopant on the growth and the properties of SAP single crystal was investigated. The single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and FT-IR studies were carried out to identify the crystal structure and the presence of functional groups in undoped and L-Valine doped SAP crystals. The transparent nature of the grown crystal was observed using UV-Visible spectrum. The thermal decomposition of the doped SAP crystals was investigated by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The enhancement in the NLO property of the undoped and L-Valine doped SAP crystals using KDP crystal as a reference was studied using SHG measurements. Vickers micro hardness measurements are used for the study of mechanical strength of the grown crystals.

  16. Crystal growth, structural and thermal studies of amino acids admixtured L-arginine phosphate monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, P.; Saravanan, T.; Parthipan, G.; Kumar, R. Mohan; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Ravi, G.; Jayavel, R.

    2011-05-01

    To study the improved characteristics of L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) crystals, amino acids mixed LAP crystals have been grown by slow cooling method. Amino acids like glycine, L-alanine, and L-valine have been selected for doping. Optical quality bulk crystals have been harvested after a typical growth period of about twenty days. The effect of amino acids in the crystal lattice and molecular vibrational frequencies of various functional groups in the crystals have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) analyses respectively. Thermal behavior of the amino acids mixed LAP crystals have been studied from the TG and DTG analyses. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies have been carried out to find the crystalline nature. Optical transmission studies have been carried out by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The cut off wavelength is below 240 nm for the grown crystals.

  17. Synthesis and Physical Properties of Liquid Crystals: An Interdisciplinary Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hecke, Gerald R.; Karukstis, Kerry K.; Hanhan Li; Hendargo, Hansford C.; Cosand, Andrew J.; Fox, Marja M.

    2005-01-01

    A study involves multiple chemistry and physics concepts applied to a state of matter that has biological relevance. An experiment involving the synthesis and physical properties of liquid crystals illustrates the interdisciplinary nature of liquid crystal research and the practical devices derived from such research.

  18. Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; Helliwell, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The key concepts that attracted crystal growers, macromolecular or solid state, to microgravity research is that density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of the growing crystals are greatly reduced. Thus, defects and flaws in the crystals can be reduced, even eliminated, and crystal volume can be increased. Macromolecular crystallography differs from the field of crystalline semiconductors. For the latter, crystals are harnessed for their electrical behaviors. A crystal of a biological macromolecule is used instead for diffraction experiments (X-ray or neutron) to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal of a biological macromolecule then the more molecular structure detail that can be extracted. This structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry, and mathematics meet to enable insight to the basic fundamentals of life. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment, and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyze the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural

  19. Crystallization and crystal properties of squid rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Midori; Kitahara, Rei; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2007-06-01

    Truncated rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was extracted and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. Rhodopsin, a photoreceptor membrane protein in the retina, is a prototypical member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. In this study, rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was treated with V8 protease to remove the C-terminal extension. Truncated rhodopsin was selectively extracted from the microvillar membranes using alkyl glucoside in the presence of zinc ions and was then crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Of the various crystals obtained, hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. The diffraction data suggested that the crystal belongs to space group P6{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.1, c = 158.6 Å. Preliminary crystallographic analysis, together with linear dichroism results, suggested that the rhodopsin dimers are packed in such a manner that their transmembrane helices are aligned nearly parallel to the c axis.

  20. Inexpensive Electrooptic Experiments on Liquid Crystal Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciferno, Thomas M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an electrooptic apparatus that can be incorporated into the classroom to test liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and introduce students to experiments of an applied physics nature with very practical implications. Presents experiments that give students hands-on experience with technologies of current interest to…

  1. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  2. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy uses laser technology to reveal a defect, a double-screw dislocation, on the surface of this crystal of canavalin, a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. When a crystal grows, attachment kinetics and transport kinetics are competing for control of the molecules. As a molecule gets close to the crystal surface, it has to attach properly for the crystal to be usable. NASA has funded investigators to look at those attachment kinetics from a theoretical standpoint and an experimental standpoint. Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine, is one of those investigators. He uses X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy in his laboratory to answer some of the many questions about how protein crystals grow. Atomic force microscopy provides a means of looking at how individual molecules are added to the surface of growing protein crystals. This helps McPherson understand the kinetics of protein crystal growth. McPherson asks, How fast do crystals grow? What are the forces involved? Investigators funded by NASA have clearly shown that such factors as the level of supersaturation and the rate of growth all affect the habit [characteristic arrangement of facets] of the crystal and the defects that occur in the crystal.

  3. SSZ-13 Crystallization by Particle Attachment and Deterministic Pathways to Crystal Size Control.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manjesh; Luo, Helen; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2015-10-14

    Many synthetic and natural crystalline materials are either known or postulated to grow via nonclassical pathways involving the initial self-assembly of precursors that serve as putative growth units for crystallization. Elucidating the pathway(s) by which precursors attach to crystal surfaces and structurally rearrange (postattachment) to incorporate into the underlying crystalline lattice is an active and expanding area of research comprising many unanswered fundamental questions. Here, we examine the crystallization of SSZ-13, which is an aluminosilicate zeolite that possesses exceptional physicochemical properties for applications in separations and catalysis (e.g., methanol upgrading to chemicals and the environmental remediation of NO(x)). We show that SSZ-13 grows by two concerted mechanisms: nonclassical growth involving the attachment of amorphous aluminosilicate particles to crystal surfaces and classical layer-by-layer growth via the incorporation of molecules to advancing steps on the crystal surface. A facile, commercially viable method of tailoring SSZ-13 crystal size and morphology is introduced wherein growth modifiers are used to mediate precursor aggregation and attachment to crystal surfaces. We demonstrate that small quantities of polymers can be used to tune crystal size over 3 orders of magnitude (0.1-20 μm), alter crystal shape, and introduce mesoporosity. Given the ubiquitous presence of amorphous precursors in a wide variety of microporous crystals, insight of the SSZ-13 growth mechanism may prove to be broadly applicable to other materials. Moreover, the ability to selectively tailor the physical properties of SSZ-13 crystals through molecular design offers new routes to optimize their performance in a wide range of commercial applications. PMID:26376337

  4. Crystallization of pegmatites: Insights from chemistry of garnet, Jacumba pegmatites, San Diego County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.; Sirbescu, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Systematic mineral and textural variations from the border zone to the core of a zoned pegmatite sheet may reflect the kinetic or equilibrium fractionation processes that occurred during sequential crystallization of the pegmatite magma. Rhythmic layering, also named 'line rock', is a salient textural feature of world famous San Diego Co. pegmatites, that consists of alternating garnet × tourmaline layers and albite - quartz layers, mm's to cm's thick. Slowly diffusing, incompatible elements in the felsic magma including B, Fe, and Mn may become enriched in boundary layers formed ahead of rapidly crystallized quartzo-felspathic assemblages. This study explores whether the chemistry of garnet concentrated in the border and foot-wall zones and dispersed in the graphic feldspar, core, and pocket zones of Garnet Ledge pegmatite, Jacumba district, might fingerprint the diffusion-controlled oscillatory boundary layers. The lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) Jacumba pegmatite district, late product of the Eastern Peninsular Ranges Batholith, consists of numerous subparallel dikes, 3 to 7 m thick, intruding pre-batholitic metasedimentary rocks. The composite aplite-pegmatite dikes are texturally diverse. Comb-textured tourmaline, other unidirectional textures, garnet × tourmaline 'line rock', and coarse graphic K-feldspar crystals occur in the outer zones, followed by massive feldspar-quartz cores, vuggy cleavlandite- euhedral garnet, and miarolitic cavities. The Jacumba pegmatites have produced gem spodumene, beryl, and garnet from several open cuts such as the Beebe Hole and Pack Rat - Garnet Ledge workings. Systematic mineralogical and textural variations, and SEM-EDS garnet compositions were recorded from border to core at Garnet Ledge outcrop and thin section scale, focusing on continuous traverses across the line rock. Garnet from Garnet Ledge belongs to the spessartine-almandine series (Sp42 to Sp65) with minor contents of Mg, Ca, and Ti, consistent with garnet

  5. Growth and characterization of diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Siva Sankari, R.; Perumal, Rajesh Narayana

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate (DACS) is one of the most promising inorganic dielectric crystals with exceptional mechanical properties. Good quality crystals of DACS were grown by using solution method in a period of 30 days. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis in order to establish their crystalline nature. Thermo gravimetric, differential thermal analysis, FTIR, and UV–vis–NIR analysis were performed for the crystal. Several solid state physical parameters have been determined for the grown crystals. The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss and AC conductivity of the grown crystal were studied as a function of frequency and temperature has been calculated and plotted. - Highlights: • Diammonium copper disulphate is grown for the first time and CCDC number obtained. • Thermal analysis is done to see the stability range of the crystals. • Band gap and UV cut off wavelength of the crystal are determined to be 2.4 eV and 472.86 nm, respectively. • Dielectric constant, dielectric loss and AC conductivity are plotted as a function of applied field. - Abstract: Diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate is one of the most promising inorganic crystals with exceptional dielectric properties. A good quality crystal was harvested in a 30-day period using solution growth method. The grown crystal was subjected to various characterization techniques like single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo gravimetric, differential thermal analysis, FTIR, and UV–vis–NIR analysis. Unit cell dimensions of the grown crystal have been identified from XRD studies. Functional groups of the title compounds have been identified from FTIR studies. Thermal stability of the samples was checked by TG/DTA studies. Band gap of the crystal was calculated. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss were studied as a function of frequency of the applied field. AC conductivity was plotted as a function

  6. The Crystals Cave in a test tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, C.; Romero, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    It's quite easy to understand formation of crystals in Nature by evaporation of the solutions that contain minerals, but many times we have realised that our pupils hardly understand that precipitation is a process mostly caused by changing parameters in a solution, like pH, temperature, etc. and not necessarily depending on evaporation. We propose a hands-on activity using the context of the Cave of the Crystals in Naica's mine, Mexico. The Crystals Cave is a wonderful place where giant crystals of selenite (gypsum) have grown feeding from a supersaturated anhydrite solution1. Miners discovered the cave filled with hot water, and drained it to explore the gallery. The cave is now a giant laboratory where scientists are looking for the keys to understand geological processes. Teaching sequence (for students 15 years old) is as follows: DISCOVERING A MARVELLOUS PLACE: We showed our pupils several images and a short video of the Cave of the Crystals and ask them about the process that may have caused the phenomenon. Whole-class discussion. PRESENTING A CHALLENGE TO OUR STUDENTS: "COULD WE CREATE A CRYSTALS CAVE IN A TEST TUBE?" EXPERIMENTING TO IMITATE NATURE: Students tried to grow crystals simulating the same conditions as those in Naica's mine. We have chosen KNO3, a salt more soluble than gypsum. We added 85 g of salt to 200 ml of water (solubility of KNO3 at 25°C is 36 g per 100 gr of water) and heated it until it is dissolved. Afterwards, we poured the solution into some test tubes and other recipients and let them cool at room temperature. And they got a beautiful crystals cave!! THINKING A LITTLE MORE: we asked pupils some questions to make them think about the process and to predict what would happen in different situations. For example: a) What would happen with crystals if we heated the tubes again? or b) What would happen if we took the remaining solution from the tubes and keep it in the fridge? PROVING A NEW HYPOTHESIS: Pupils collected the remaining

  7. Crystallization of Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, David; Messick, Troy; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has evolved into a very powerful tool to determine the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. The major bottleneck in structure determination by X-ray crystallography is the preparation of suitable crystalline samples. This unit outlines steps for the crystallization of a macromolecule, starting with a purified, homogeneous sample. The first protocols describe preparation of the macromolecular sample (i.e., proteins, nucleic acids, and macromolecular complexes). The preparation and assessment of crystallization trials is then described, along with a protocol for confirming whether the crystals obtained are composed of macromolecule as opposed to a crystallization reagent . Next, the optimization of crystallization conditions is presented. Finally, protocols that facilitate the growth of larger crystals through seeding are described. PMID:22045560

  8. Automated macromolecular crystallization screening

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Rupp, Bernhard; Krupka, Heike I.

    2005-03-01

    An automated macromolecular crystallization screening system wherein a multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced. A multiplicity of analysis plates is produced utilizing the reagent mixes combined with a sample. The analysis plates are incubated to promote growth of crystals. Images of the crystals are made. The images are analyzed with regard to suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A design of reagent mixes is produced based upon the expected suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A second multiplicity of mixes of the reagent components is produced utilizing the design and a second multiplicity of reagent mixes is used for a second round of automated macromolecular crystallization screening. In one embodiment the multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced by a random selection of reagent components.

  9. Single Crystal Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stormont, R. W.; Morrison, A.

    1974-01-01

    Single crystal a- and c-axis tubes and ribbons of sodium beta-alumina and sodium magnesium beta-alumina were grown from sodium oxide rich melts. Additional experiments grew ribbon crystals containing sodium magnesium beta, beta double prime, beta triple prime, and beta quadruple prime. A high pressure crystal growth chamber, sodium oxide rich melts, and iridium for all surfaces in contact with the melt were combined with the edge-defined, film-fed growth technique to grow the single crystal beta-alumina tubes and ribbons. The crystals were characterized using metallographic and X-ray diffraction techniques, and wet chemical analysis was used to determine the sodium, magnesium, and aluminum content of the grown crystals.

  10. Function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bai-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Ba, Nuo; Wu, Yi-Heng; Wang, Qing-Cai

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new kind of function photonic crystals (PCs), whose refractive index is a function of space position. Conventional PCs structure grows from two materials, A and B, with different dielectric constants εA and εB. Based on Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional function photonic crystals. For one-dimensional function photonic crystals, we give the dispersion relation, band gap structure and transmissivity, and compare them with conventional photonic crystals, and we find the following: (1) For the vertical and non-vertical incidence light of function photonic crystals, there are band gap structures, and for only the vertical incidence light, the conventional PCs have band gap structures. (2) By choosing various refractive index distribution functions n( z), we can obtain more wider or more narrower band gap structure than conventional photonic crystals.