Science.gov

Sample records for natural co2 gradient

  1. Changes in microbial communities in coastal sediments along natural CO2 gradients at a volcanic vent in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Raulf, Felix F; Fabricius, Katharina; Uthicke, Sven; de Beer, Dirk; Abed, Raeid M M; Ramette, Alban

    2015-10-01

    Natural CO2 venting systems can mimic conditions that resemble intermediate to high pCO2 levels as predicted for our future oceans. They represent ideal sites to investigate potential long-term effects of ocean acidification on marine life. To test whether microbes are affected by prolonged exposure to pCO2 levels, we examined the composition and diversity of microbial communities in oxic sandy sediments along a natural CO2 gradient. Increasing pCO2 was accompanied by higher bacterial richness and by a strong increase in rare members in both bacterial and archaeal communities. Microbial communities from sites with CO2 concentrations close to today's conditions had different structures than those of sites with elevated CO2 levels. We also observed increasing sequence abundance of several organic matter degrading types of Flavobacteriaceae and Rhodobacteraceae, which paralleled concurrent shifts in benthic cover and enhanced primary productivity. With increasing pCO2 , sequences related to bacterial nitrifying organisms such as Nitrosococcus and Nitrospirales decreased, and sequences affiliated to the archaeal ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota Nitrosopumilus maritimus increased. Our study suggests that microbial community structure and diversity, and likely key ecosystem functions, may be altered in coastal sediments by long-term CO2 exposure to levels predicted for the end of the century. PMID:25471738

  2. Effects of ocean acidification on embryonic respiration and development of a temperate wrasse living along a natural CO2 gradient.

    PubMed

    Cattano, Carlo; Giomi, Folco; Milazzo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic CO2 seeps provide opportunities to investigate the effects of ocean acidification on organisms in the wild. To understand the influence of increasing CO2 concentrations on the metabolic rate (oxygen consumption) and the development of ocellated wrasse early life stages, we ran two field experiments, collecting embryos from nesting sites with different partial pressures of CO2 [pCO2; ambient (∼400 µatm) and high (800-1000 µatm)] and reciprocally transplanting embryos from ambient- to high-CO2 sites for 30 h. Ocellated wrasse offspring brooded in different CO2 conditions had similar responses, but after transplanting portions of nests to the high-CO2 site, embryos from parents that spawned in ambient conditions had higher metabolic rates. Although metabolic phenotypic plasticity may show a positive response to high CO2, it often comes at a cost, in this case as a smaller size at hatching. This can have adverse effects because smaller larvae often exhibit a lower survival in the wild. However, the adverse effects of increased CO2 on metabolism and development did not occur when embryos from the high-CO2 nesting site were exposed to ambient conditions, suggesting that offspring from the high-CO2 nesting site could be resilient to a wider range of pCO2 values than those belonging to the site with present-day pCO2 levels. Our study identifies a crucial need to increase the number of studies dealing with these processes under global change trajectories and to expand these to naturally high-CO2 environments, in order to assess further the adaptive plasticity mechanism that encompasses non-genetic inheritance (epigenetics) through parental exposure and other downstream consequences, such as survival of larvae. PMID:27293752

  3. Effects of ocean acidification on embryonic respiration and development of a temperate wrasse living along a natural CO2 gradient

    PubMed Central

    Cattano, Carlo; Giomi, Folco; Milazzo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic CO2 seeps provide opportunities to investigate the effects of ocean acidification on organisms in the wild. To understand the influence of increasing CO2 concentrations on the metabolic rate (oxygen consumption) and the development of ocellated wrasse early life stages, we ran two field experiments, collecting embryos from nesting sites with different partial pressures of CO2 [pCO2; ambient (∼400 µatm) and high (800–1000 µatm)] and reciprocally transplanting embryos from ambient- to high-CO2 sites for 30 h. Ocellated wrasse offspring brooded in different CO2 conditions had similar responses, but after transplanting portions of nests to the high-CO2 site, embryos from parents that spawned in ambient conditions had higher metabolic rates. Although metabolic phenotypic plasticity may show a positive response to high CO2, it often comes at a cost, in this case as a smaller size at hatching. This can have adverse effects because smaller larvae often exhibit a lower survival in the wild. However, the adverse effects of increased CO2 on metabolism and development did not occur when embryos from the high-CO2 nesting site were exposed to ambient conditions, suggesting that offspring from the high-CO2 nesting site could be resilient to a wider range of pCO2 values than those belonging to the site with present-day pCO2 levels. Our study identifies a crucial need to increase the number of studies dealing with these processes under global change trajectories and to expand these to naturally high-CO2 environments, in order to assess further the adaptive plasticity mechanism that encompasses non-genetic inheritance (epigenetics) through parental exposure and other downstream consequences, such as survival of larvae. PMID:27293752

  4. Sensitivity to ocean acidification parallels natural pCO2 gradients experienced by Arctic copepods under winter sea ice

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ceri N.; Brown, Kristina A.; Edwards, Laura A.; Cooper, Glenn; Findlay, Helen S.

    2013-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean already experiences areas of low pH and high CO2, and it is expected to be most rapidly affected by future ocean acidification (OA). Copepods comprise the dominant Arctic zooplankton; hence, their responses to OA have important implications for Arctic ecosystems, yet there is little data on their current under-ice winter ecology on which to base future monitoring or make predictions about climate-induced change. Here, we report results from Arctic under-ice investigations of copepod natural distributions associated with late-winter carbonate chemistry environmental data and their response to manipulated pCO2 conditions (OA exposures). Our data reveal that species and life stage sensitivities to manipulated OA conditions were correlated with their vertical migration behavior and with their natural exposures to different pCO2 ranges. Vertically migrating adult Calanus spp. crossed a pCO2 range of >140 μatm daily and showed only minor responses to manipulated high CO2. Oithona similis, which remained in the surface waters and experienced a pCO2 range of <75 μatm, showed significantly reduced adult and nauplii survival in high CO2 experiments. These results support the relatively untested hypothesis that the natural range of pCO2 experienced by an organism determines its sensitivity to future OA and highlight that the globally important copepod species, Oithona spp., may be more sensitive to future high pCO2 conditions compared with the more widely studied larger copepods. PMID:24297880

  5. How secure is subsurface CO2 storage? Controls on leakage in natural CO2 reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miocic, Johannes; Gilfillan, Stuart; McDermott, Christopher; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only industrial scale technology available to directly reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuelled power plants and large industrial point sources to the atmosphere. The technology includes the capture of CO2 at the source and transport to subsurface storage sites, such as depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or saline aquifers, where it is injected and stored for long periods of time. To have an impact on the greenhouse gas emissions it is crucial that there is no or only a very low amount of leakage of CO2 from the storage sites to shallow aquifers or the surface. CO2 occurs naturally in reservoirs in the subsurface and has often been stored for millions of years without any leakage incidents. However, in some cases CO2 migrates from the reservoir to the surface. Both leaking and non-leaking natural CO2 reservoirs offer insights into the long-term behaviour of CO2 in the subsurface and on the mechanisms that lead to either leakage or retention of CO2. Here we present the results of a study on leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs worldwide. We compiled a global dataset of 49 well described natural CO2 reservoirs of which six are leaking CO2 to the surface, 40 retain CO2 in the subsurface and for three reservoirs the evidence is inconclusive. Likelihood of leakage of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface is governed by the state of CO2 (supercritical vs. gaseous) and the pressure in the reservoir and the direct overburden. Reservoirs with gaseous CO2 is more prone to leak CO2 than reservoirs with dense supercritical CO2. If the reservoir pressure is close to or higher than the least principal stress leakage is likely to occur while reservoirs with pressures close to hydrostatic pressure and below 1200 m depth do not leak. Additionally, a positive pressure gradient from the reservoir into the caprock averts leakage of CO2 into the caprock. Leakage of CO2 occurs in all cases along a fault zone, indicating that

  6. A CO2 concentration gradient facility for testing CO2 enrichment and soil effects on grassland ecosystem function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuing increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations mandate techniques for examining impacts on terrestrial ecosystems. Most experiments examine only two or a few levels of CO2 concentration and a single soil type, but if CO2 can be varied as a gradient from subambient to superambient concentra...

  7. Natural Analog for Geologic Storage of CO2: CO2 accumulation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Xu, T.; Liu, N.; Zhou, B.

    2012-12-01

    Natural accumulations of CO2 are potential analogues of CO2 geological storage that can provide useful information on the behaviour of supercritical CO2 in reservoirs. Natural CO2 accumulations are common across Northeast China, and, although they occur in a wide variety of geological settings, their distribution is principally controlled by the Mesozoic-Cenozoic rift basins and associated Quaternary volcanism. High CO2 concentrations (>60 CO2%) in natural gas reservoirs are usually related to volcanism and magmatism, and possesses mantle-genetic origin. CO2 reservoirs consist of sandstone, volcanic rocks and carbonate rocks with the buried depth from 2000-3000 m. Dawsonite is recognized in almost all of the CO2-bearing basin, which has been proved to share the same carbon source with CO2 in the reservoirs in Songliao basin, Hailaer basin and Donghai basin. Petrographic data show that dawsonite is abundant in feldspar- rich sandstone, volcanic rock fragment-rich sandstones and tuff. In some cases, high percentage of dawsonite cement constitutes a diagenetic seal, which occurs in the reservoir-mudstone caprock and prevents upward leakage of CO2. Besides dawsonite, mantle-genetic CO2 flux leads to the formation of calcite, ankerite and siderite. The statistics of porosity and permeability measured from the dawsonite-bearing sandstone and dawsonite-absent sandstone with the almost same burial depth in Songliao basin show that the mantle-genetic CO2 flux result in lower reservoir quality, suggesting that mineral trapping for CO2 is significant. Chemical analyses of formation water in Songliao basin and Hailaer basin indicate that the concentrations of TDS, HCO3-,CO32-, Mg2+,Ca2+ and Na+ + K+ in dawsonite-bearing sandstone are higher than that in dawsonite-absent sandstone. Distribution of CO2 and dawsonite is constrainted by the regional caprocks in the Songliao basin. The charging time of the mantle-genetic CO2 in China dates from 50 to 25 Ma.

  8. Crystalline-gradient polycarbonates prepared from enantioselective terpolymerization of meso-epoxides with CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ye; Ren, Wei-Min; He, Ke-Ke; Lu, Xiao-Bing

    2014-12-01

    The development of efficient processes for CO2 transformation into useful products is a long-standing goal for chemists, since CO2 is an abundant, inexpensive and non-toxic renewable C1 resource. Here we describe the enantioselective copolymerization of 3,4-epoxytetrahydrofuran with CO2 mediated by biphenol-linked dinuclear cobalt complex, affording the corresponding polycarbonate with >99% carbonate linkages and excellent enantioselectivity (up to 99% enantiomeric excess). Notably, the resultant isotactic polycarbonate is a typical semicrystalline polymer, possessing a melting point of 271 °C. Furthermore, the enantioselective terpolymerization of 3,4-epoxytetrahydrofuran, cyclopentene oxide and CO2 mediated by this dinuclear cobalt complex gives novel gradient polycarbonates, in which the decrement of one component and the increment of the other component occur sequentially from one chain end to the other end. The resultant terpolymers show perfectly isotactic structure and have unique crystalline-gradient nature, in which the crystallinity continuously varies along the main chain.

  9. Crystalline-gradient polycarbonates prepared from enantioselective terpolymerization of meso-epoxides with CO2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Ren, Wei-Min; He, Ke-Ke; Lu, Xiao-Bing

    2014-01-01

    The development of efficient processes for CO2 transformation into useful products is a long-standing goal for chemists, since CO2 is an abundant, inexpensive and non-toxic renewable C1 resource. Here we describe the enantioselective copolymerization of 3,4-epoxytetrahydrofuran with CO2 mediated by biphenol-linked dinuclear cobalt complex, affording the corresponding polycarbonate with >99% carbonate linkages and excellent enantioselectivity (up to 99% enantiomeric excess). Notably, the resultant isotactic polycarbonate is a typical semicrystalline polymer, possessing a melting point of 271 °C. Furthermore, the enantioselective terpolymerization of 3,4-epoxytetrahydrofuran, cyclopentene oxide and CO2 mediated by this dinuclear cobalt complex gives novel gradient polycarbonates, in which the decrement of one component and the increment of the other component occur sequentially from one chain end to the other end. The resultant terpolymers show perfectly isotactic structure and have unique crystalline-gradient nature, in which the crystallinity continuously varies along the main chain. PMID:25477252

  10. Fingerprinting captured CO2 using natural tracers: Determining CO2 fate and proving ownership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, Stephanie; Gilfillan, Stuart; Johnston, Gareth; Stuart, Finlay; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    In the long term, captured CO2 will most likely be stored in large saline formations and it is highly likely that CO2 from multiple operators will be injected into a single saline formation. Understanding CO2 behavior within the reservoir is vital for making operational decisions and often uses geochemical techniques. Furthermore, in the event of a CO2 leak, being able to identify the owner of the CO2 is of vital importance in terms of liability and remediation. Addition of geochemical tracers to the CO2 stream is an effective way of tagging the CO2 from different power stations, but may become prohibitively expensive at large scale storage sites. Here we present results from a project assessing whether the natural isotopic composition (C, O and noble gas isotopes) of captured CO2 is sufficient to distinguish CO2 captured using different technologies and from different fuel sources, from likely baseline conditions. Results include analytical measurements of CO2 captured from a number of different CO2 capture plants and a comprehensive literature review of the known and hypothetical isotopic compositions of captured CO2 and baseline conditions. Key findings from the literature review suggest that the carbon isotope composition will be most strongly controlled by that of the feedstock, but significant fractionation is possible during the capture process; oxygen isotopes are likely to be controlled by the isotopic composition of any water used in either the industrial process or the capture technology; and noble gases concentrations will likely be controlled by the capture technique employed. Preliminary analytical results are in agreement with these predictions. Comparison with summaries of likely storage reservoir baseline and shallow or surface leakage reservoir baseline data suggests that C-isotopes are likely to be valuable tracers of CO2 in the storage reservoir, while noble gases may be particularly valuable as tracers of potential leakage.

  11. CO2 laser cutting of natural granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, A.; Mejías, A.; Soto, R.; Quintero, F.; del Val, J.; Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquiños, F.; Pardo, J.; Pou, J.

    2016-01-01

    Commercial black granite boards (trade name: "Zimbabwe black granite") 10 mm thick, were successfully cut by a 3.5 kW CO2 laser source. Cutting quality, in terms of kerf width and roughness of the cut wall, was assessed by means of statistically planned experiments. No chemical modification of the material in the cutting walls was detected by the laser beam action. Costs associated to the process were calculated, and the main factors affecting them were identified. Results reported here demonstrate that cutting granite boards could be a new application of CO2 laser cutting machines provided a supersonic nozzle is used.

  12. Soil type determines response of soil microbial activity to an atmospheric CO2 gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising atmospheric CO2 will have direct effects on ecosystems in addition to consequences for climate. We investigated belowground response of a prairie ecosystem to a preindustrial-to-future (250-500ppm) gradient of CO2. Three soil types are represented throughout the gradient, allowing us to ask...

  13. Effective Use of Natural CO2-RICH Systems for Stakeholder Communication: CO2FACTS.ORG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, H. C.; Romanak, K.; Osborne, V.; Hovorka, S. D.; Clift, S.; Castner, A.

    2011-12-01

    The impact of using natural analogues as an avenue for communicating about CO2 injection and storage technology with stakeholders has been addressed by previous researchers, e.g., Romanak et al (2011), Dixon et al (2011). Analogies between natural CO2-rich systems and engineered CO2 storage are not necessarily straightforward, and stakeholder opinion is often based on factors other than technical accuracy of information (e.g., lack of trust, confidence, and fear). In order to enhance this communication pathway, STORE (Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research and Education), the outreach arm of the Gulf Coast Carbon Center at The University of Texas at Austin, has created an online resource (www.co2facts.org) to help stakeholders better understand the injection and storage of CO2 underground. The online resource includes frequently asked questions (FAQs) for a variety of CO2-storage-related issues, including those related to natural analogues, and uses examples of natural systems of CO2 release for communication. The content targets various levels of technical education and understanding. A unique feature of the online resource is its approach to verification of information. Each FAQ and example is "fact-checked" by an actual expert in the field. Part of this verification process is to provide an online link to background, credentials, scientific research and images of actual experts in the field at natural release sites. This approach helps put a face to, and potentially builds a relationship of trust with, the scientist behind the technical information. Videos of experts discussing natural systems and their similarities and differences with CO2 injection and storage sites are also part of the resource. Stakeholders commonly draw incorrect parallels between natural disasters that gain attention in the media (e.g., Lake Nyos) and CO2 injection and storage technology. The video images available at www.co2facts.org are a useful tool for assuaging environmental fears

  14. Natural CO2 Releases Providing Messages For Stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, T.; Romanak, K.; Camps, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    Stakeholder viewpoints and beliefs about geologic carbon storage are not always accurate, yet they may affect the future of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Gaps in stakeholder understanding and perspectives must be addressed, and natural systems that release CO2 can be valuable tools for communicating difficult scientific concepts because they provide tangible examples of geologic principles at work. Stakeholder perceptions commonly involve a misunderstanding of geologic scale and mechanisms, and can be charged with emotions fueled by media coverage of natural disasters. One example of an event widely cited by stakeholders is the CO2 release at Lake Nyos in Cameroon in August 1986 that killed 1700 people. This event is commonly thought by stakeholders to be an analogue for a release from a CO2 storage site; however, this release occurred under a rare combination of circumstances (a 208-m-deep volcanic crater lake) not analogous to an engineered CO2 storage site. Stakeholders therefore gravitate towards natural systems to form concepts and opinions of how CO2 might behave in a geological environment, but they often choose systems that are not true analogues but that gain attention through the media because they are associated with a disaster. When chosen correctly, natural releases of CO2 may create a level of clarity for stakeholders by providing tangible concrete examples that explain difficult scientific principles and provide familiar reference points to adapt different viewpoints. We present suggestions and examples presented by scientists at an IEAGHG Workshop Natural Releases of CO2: Building Knowledge for CO2 Storage Environmental Impact Assessments', held at Maria Laach, Germany, November 2010 which brought together researchers from the EU, North America, Japan, and Australia. It also included field observations of natural CO2 releases around the Laacher See caldera lake, CO2 springs, and the Wallenborn CO2 geyser. New information from international

  15. Soil type interacts with soil respiration in prairie exposed to a gradient CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in soil respiration due to rising atmospheric CO2 have large implications for land-atmosphere carbon balance and consequently the greenhouse effect. Here we report results from prairie exposed to a gradient of CO2 spanning from preindustrial (250ppm) levels to levels expected mid-century ...

  16. The Werkendam natural CO2 accumulation: An analogue for CO2 storage in depleted oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Hangx, Suzanne; Kampman, Niko; Nover, Georg; Stanjek, Helge; Weniger, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    The Werkendam natural CO2 accumulation is hosted in the Röt (Early Triassic) sandstone of the West Netherlands Basin, at a depth of 2.8 km, about 20 km south-east of Rotterdam (NL). This reservoir, in a fault-bound structure, was oil-filled prior to charging with magmatic CO2 in the early Cretaceous. It therefore offers a unique opportunity to study long-term CO2-water-rock interactions in the presence of oil. This contribution will present the results of a detailed mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of core sections from the Werkendam CO2 reservoir and an adjacent, stratigraphically equivalent aquifer. X-ray diffraction combined with X-ray fluorescence spectrometry revealed that the reservoir samples contain substantially more feldspar and more barite and siderite than those from the aquifer, while the latter have higher hematite contents. These differences are attributed to the effects hydrocarbons and related fluids on diagenesis in the closed system of the CO2 reservoir versus the open-system of the aquifer. Petrophysical analyses yielded overall higher and more anisotropic permeability for the reservoir samples, while the porosity is overall not significantly different from that of their aquifer equivalents. The differences are most pronounced in coarse-grained sandstones. These have low anhydrite contents and contain traces of calcite, while all other analyzed samples contain abundant anhydrite, dolomite/ankerite and siderite, but no calcite. Detailed petrography revealed mm-sized zones of excessive primary porosity. These are attributed to CO2-induced dissolution of precompactional, grain-replacive anhydrite cement. Diagenetic dolomite/ankerite crystals are covered by anhedral, epitaxial ankerite, separated from the crystals by bitumen coats. Since these carbonates were oil-wet before CO2-charging, the overgrowths are interpreted to have grown after CO2-charging. Their anhedral habit suggests growth in a 2-phase water-CO2 system. Isotopic

  17. Natural CO2 Analogs for Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Scott H. Stevens; B. Scott Tye

    2005-07-31

    The report summarizes research conducted at three naturally occurring geologic CO{sub 2} fields in the US. The fields are natural analogs useful for the design of engineered long-term storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in geologic formations. Geologic, engineering, and operational databases were developed for McElmo Dome in Colorado; St. Johns Dome in Arizona and New Mexico; and Jackson Dome in Mississippi. The three study sites stored a total of 2.4 billion t (46 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} equivalent to 1.5 years of power plant emissions in the US and comparable in size with the largest proposed sequestration projects. The three CO{sub 2} fields offer a scientifically useful range of contrasting geologic settings (carbonate vs. sandstone reservoir; supercritical vs. free gas state; normally pressured vs. overpressured), as well as different stages of commercial development (mostly undeveloped to mature). The current study relied mainly on existing data provided by the CO{sub 2} field operator partners, augmented with new geochemical data. Additional study at these unique natural CO{sub 2} accumulations could further help guide the development of safe and cost-effective design and operation methods for engineered CO{sub 2} storage sites.

  18. Role of Rective Mineral Surface Area on the CO2 Mineralisation of CO2 Under Natural Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuddas, P.; Rillard, J.

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of complex reactions between CO2 rich fluids and rock is fundamental to secured, long-term CO2 storage in geological reservoirs. A natural hydrothermal field is considered to be a useful analogue of carbon dioxide mineralization because it integrates the long-term interaction signal. The hydrothermal field of Galicia (Spain) is characterized by co-genetic fluids resulting from a mostly homogeneous granite reservoir with pCO2 partial pressure ranging from 104 to105 Pa and pH from 10 to 6. Fluids are characterized by an increase of major elements (Ca, Mg, K and Na) and alkalinity, both correlated to pCO2. We evaluated the effects of deep CO2 perturbation on the fluid-rock interaction system. Mineral reactivity which produces changes in the fluid mineral composition is mainly dependent on the 'real' reactive surface area. The mineral surface area participating in reactions resulting from this pCO2 gradient was estimated by an inverse model approach. Input data was based on the chemical composition of the fluids we sampled. The rate of mineral dissolution was estimated by the observed pH and equilibrium conditions. Moreover, the major elemental concentrations allowed us to quantify the variation of the reactive surface area of minerals involved with the overall water-rock interaction. The irreversible mass transfer process, ruled by the continuum equilibrium condition, was defined by the overall degree of reaction advancement, using a set of polynomial equations solved independently of time scale. We found that reactive surface area of calcite, albite and K-feldspar increases by 2 orders of magnitude over the entire CO2 fluid-rock interaction process, while the reactive surface area of biotite increases by 4 orders of magnitude. This shows that fluid neutralisation and consequent CO2 mineralization under the form of carbonate species is greatly dependent on the behaviour of the reactive surface area of the mineral association in this geological

  19. Distribution and nature of CO2 on Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combe, J. P.; McCord, T. B.; Matson, D.; Johnson, T. V.; Scipioni, F.; Tosi, F.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first global mapping and analysis of CO2 on the surface of Enceladus, and we report the largest concentrations of free CO2 on the southern polar region using the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on Cassini. Free CO2 ice and complexed CO2 were already reported near the South Pole (Brown et al., Science, 2006; Hansen, LPSC, 2010). Our work focuses on determining the amount, location and molecular state of CO2 on Enceladus, which could help identify and model geophysical processes that currently occur in the interior. One hypothesis for bringing heat and chemicals to the surface is a warm subsurface ocean containing dissolved gases, mostly CO2 (Postberg F. et al., Nature, 2009). Therefore, our observations are consistent with erupted and condensed materials onto Enceladus' surface (Matson et al., Icarus, 2012; Matson et al. AGU Fall meeting 2015). Free CO2 ice absorbs at 4.268 µm (Sandford and Allamandola, 1990) and CO2 complexed with other molecules absorbs at 4.247 μm (Chaban et al., Icarus, 2007). The Enceladus case is complicated because both free and complexed CO2 are present, and the absorption band of interest is shallow and close to the instrument detection limit. Many of the few Enceladus VIMS data sets have significant and sometimes unusual noise, which we attempted to avoid or remove. We utilized all VIMS data sets available that were collected over ten years of the Cassini mission as a way to improve the detection statistics and signal to noise. We also used wavelengths near 2.7 μm where CO2 has a narrow absorption as a filter to help identify CO2-rich areas. Finally, we selected observations that have spatial resolution better than 100 km in order to create a map that can be compared with the largest fractures, known as Tiger Stripes, in the southern polar region.

  20. CO2 gradient affects on deep subsurface microbial ecology during carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliver, D.; Gregory, K.

    2011-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration is likely to be part of a comprehensive strategy to minimize the release of greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. Reservoir storage capacities and long-term security of these deposits will be dependent on the trapping mechanisms and mineral transformation in the deep subsurface. Therefore, a critical need exists to understand the evolution of microbial populations that may influence the biogeochemistry in the reservoirs. As the CO2 front moves through the storage aquifer, microbial communities may preside in residual brine left behind in cracks, dead flow zones, and upstream to the front; this brine will have a gradient of dissolved CO2 in which microbial interaction may behave differently, depending on the distance from the CO2 front. The evolution of microbial ecology along this CO2 gradient was investigated using fluid-slurry samples obtained from the prospective carbon sequestration site, the Arbuckle saline aquifer at the Wellington oil field, KS. The native species of these samples were investigated with a series of batch reactors under constant temperature of 40 °C, constant total pressure of 2,000 psi, and varying CO2 partial pressures of 0 psi, 20 psi, 200 psi, and 2,000 psi. After 1 day, 7 days, and 56 days of exposure in the batch reactors, fluid samples were centrifuged and the resulting pellet was biologically analyzed. Clone libraries and quantitative PCR determined that the bacterial diversity and population of the native microbial community was dependant on both the duration of exposure and the CO2 partial pressure. For example, the microbial community of 0 psi CO2 and 20 psi CO2 was predominantly related to the families halomonadaceae and marinilabiaceae while at 2,000 psi CO2 the community was predominantly in the family psychromonadaceae. The population size at 2,000 psi CO2 was also found to decrease by 3 orders of magnitude after only 7 days of CO2 exposure. Although these experiments were relatively short

  1. Properties of a natural CO2 analogue reservoir in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Csilla; Szamosfalvi, Ágnes; Sendula, Eszter; Falus, György; Szabó, Csaba; Kovács, István; Füri, Judit; Kónya, Péter; Káldos, Réka

    2014-05-01

    Reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions is one of the greatest goals of the present and future environmental scientists. Carbon capture and sequestration is considered to be an efficient technology in eliminating carbon-dioxide at large, stationary carbon-emitting industrial sources. To ensure the long term stability of the geologically trapped CO2, behavior of the CO2-reservoir-porewater system should be predictable on geological timescales. Natural CO2 reservoirs are very important in studying the safety of geological storage of industrial CO2. In these natural occurrences we can study long term rock-fluid reactions, which cannot be reproduced in laboratories or with computer models. Nevertheless, this information is essential to assure the long term safety of CCS-technology. The Mihályi-Répcelak area (Western Hungary) is the oldest known and produced CO2 occurrence in Hungary. In this area there are dozens of CO2 sites that are suitable for industrial production. As a consequence many of the data are publicly available. We have studied 28 wells from the area of Mihályi-Répcelak (10 wells from the area of Mihályi and 18 wells from Répcelak area). We have rock samples from the CO2 reservoirs and from their caprock and underlying rock layer, too. Furthermore, the fluid composition and the well log database are also known. In this study we discuss our first results of the core samples from the study area. The rocks were selected in order to represent CO2 reservoir lithologies, their caprocks and underlying sedimentary sequences. We have used conventional methods, i.e., petrographic microscope and also applied SEM, XRD, DTA to obtain control of the major mineralogical composition and textural feature of the reservoir rocks. Detailed analysis of samples on the caprock and underlying rock layers with XRD, SEM, FTIR and DTA are also done. The applied methods are expected to show the mineralogical and textural changes in the lithologies as a consequence of CO2. We

  2. Calibrating Laser Gas Measurements by Use of Natural CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Chris

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of calibration has been devised for instruments that utilize tunable lasers to measure the absorption spectra of atmospheric gases in order to determine the relative abundances of the gases. In this method, CO2 in the atmosphere is used as a natural calibration standard. Unlike in one prior calibration method, it is not necessary to perform calibration measurements in advance of use of the instrument and to risk deterioration of accuracy with time during use. Unlike in another prior calibration method, it is not necessary to include a calibration gas standard (and the attendant additional hardware) in the instrument and to interrupt the acquisition of atmospheric data to perform calibration measurements. In the operation of an instrument of this type, the beam from a tunable diode laser or a tunable quantum-cascade laser is directed along a path through the atmosphere, the laser is made to scan in wavelength over an infrared spectral region that contains one or two absorption spectral lines of a gas of interest, and the transmission (and, thereby, the absorption) of the beam is measured. The concentration of the gas of interest can then be calculated from the observed depth of the absorption line(s), given the temperature, pressure, and path length. CO2 is nearly ideal as a natural calibration gas for the following reasons: CO2 has numerous rotation/vibration infrared spectral lines, many of which are near absorption lines of other gases. The concentration of CO2 relative to the concentrations of the major constituents of the atmosphere is well known and varies slowly and by a small enough amount to be considered constant for calibration in the present context. Hence, absorption-spectral measurements of the concentrations of gases of interest can be normalized to the concentrations of CO2. Because at least one CO2 calibration line is present in every spectral scan of the laser during absorption measurements, the atmospheric CO2 serves

  3. Noble gas and carbon isotopic evidence for CO2-driven silicate dissolution in a recent natural CO2 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubacq, Benoît; Bickle, Mike J.; Wigley, Max; Kampman, Niko; Ballentine, Chris J.; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    Secure storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological reservoirs requires predicting gas-water-rock interactions over millennial timescales. Noble gases and carbon isotope measurements can be used to shed light on the nature of competing dissolution-precipitation processes over different timescales, from the fast dissolution of gaseous CO2 in groundwater to more sluggish reactions involving dissolution and precipitation of newly formed minerals in the reservoir. Here we study a compilation of gas analyses including noble gases and δ13C of CO2 from nine different natural CO2 reservoirs. Amongst these reservoirs, the Bravo Dome CO2 field (New Mexico, USA) shows distinct geochemical trends which are explained by degassing of noble gases from groundwater altering the composition of the gas phase. This groundwater degassing is synchronous with the dissolution of CO2 in groundwater. Progressive creation of alkalinity via CO2-promoted mineral dissolution is required to explain the observed positive correlation between CO2/3He and δ13C of the gas phase, a unique feature of Bravo Dome. The differences between Bravo Dome and other natural CO2 reservoirs are likely explained by the more recent filling of Bravo Dome, reflecting CO2-water-rock interactions over thousands of years rather than over millions of years in older reservoirs.

  4. The importance of internal CO2 gradients in tree roots for assessing belowground carbon allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, Jasper; De Bel, Bryan; Wittocx, Jonas; Anné, Thomas; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O.; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    In trees, it is known that allocation of recent assimilates belowground fuels metabolic processes like root respiration. Nonetheless, the fraction of carbon allocated belowground remains poorly quantified as the energetic costs of tree root metabolism remain largely unknown. Current estimates of root respiration are calculated from measurements of CO2 efflux from roots or soil. However, a substantial portion of CO2 released by root respiration might remain within the tree root system rather than diffusing into the soil environment, indicating that root respiration consumes substantially more carbohydrates than previously recognized. We measured internal CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and sap flow in three longitudinal sections of two large roots of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) and yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) trees (n=4 trees per species), while simultaneously measuring [CO2] in neighboring soil. We hypothesized that [CO2] would be lowest in soil and increase from the root tip to the base of the stem. We observed substantially higher [CO2] in tree roots (on average 8.5 ± 2.0 and 5.2 ± 1.9 Vol% for American beech and yellow poplar, respectively) compared with the soil environment (1.0 ± 0.4 and 1.3 ± 1.3 Vol% around American beech and yellow poplar, respectively), indicating that root tissues exert substantial barriers to outward diffusion of respired CO2. Moreover, we observed an internal [CO2] gradient from root tip to stem base which suggests that progressively more respired CO2 dissolved in flowing xylem sap as it moved from the soil through the root xylem. These results confirm that a fraction of root-respired CO2 concentrates in the xylem sap of the root system and fluxes upward within the tree. This CO2 that is removed from the site of respiration cannot be accounted for with measurements of CO2 efflux from roots or soil, indicating that efflux-based techniques underestimate the energetic costs of tree root metabolism and therefore the amount

  5. Primary productivity and water balance of grassland vegetation on three soils in a continuous CO2 gradient: initial results from the lysimeter CO2 gradient experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field studies of atmospheric CO2 effects on ecosystem processes usually include only a few levels of CO2 and a single soil type, making it difficult to ascertain the shape of ecosystem responses to increasing CO2 or to generalize CO2 effects across ecosystems on varying soil types. The Lysimeter CO2...

  6. Seagrass biofilm communities at a naturally CO2 -rich vent.

    PubMed

    Hassenrück, Christiane; Hofmann, Laurie C; Bischof, Kai; Ramette, Alban

    2015-06-01

    Seagrass meadows are a crucial component of tropical marine reef ecosystems. Seagrass plants are colonized by a multitude of epiphytic organisms that contribute to broadening the ecological role of seagrasses. To better understand how environmental changes like ocean acidification might affect epiphytic assemblages, the microbial community composition of the epiphytic biofilm of Enhalus acroides was investigated at a natural CO2 vent in Papua New Guinea using molecular fingerprinting and next-generation sequencing of 16S and 18S rRNA genes. Both bacterial and eukaryotic epiphytes formed distinct communities at the CO2 -impacted site compared with the control site. This site-related CO2 effect was also visible in the succession pattern of microbial epiphytes. We further found an increased relative sequence abundance of bacterial types associated with coral diseases at the CO2 -impacted site (Fusobacteria, Thalassomonas), whereas eukaryotes such as certain crustose coralline algae commonly related to healthy reefs were less diverse. These trends in the epiphytic community of E. acroides suggest a potential role of seagrasses as vectors of coral pathogens and may support previous predictions of a decrease in reef health and prevalence of diseases under future ocean acidification scenarios. PMID:25727314

  7. Seagrass biofilm communities at a naturally CO2-rich vent

    PubMed Central

    Hassenrück, Christiane; Hofmann, Laurie C; Bischof, Kai; Ramette, Alban

    2015-01-01

    Seagrass meadows are a crucial component of tropical marine reef ecosystems. Seagrass plants are colonized by a multitude of epiphytic organisms that contribute to broadening the ecological role of seagrasses. To better understand how environmental changes like ocean acidification might affect epiphytic assemblages, the microbial community composition of the epiphytic biofilm of Enhalus acroides was investigated at a natural CO2 vent in Papua New Guinea using molecular fingerprinting and next-generation sequencing of 16S and 18S rRNA genes. Both bacterial and eukaryotic epiphytes formed distinct communities at the CO2-impacted site compared with the control site. This site-related CO2 effect was also visible in the succession pattern of microbial epiphytes. We further found an increased relative sequence abundance of bacterial types associated with coral diseases at the CO2-impacted site (Fusobacteria, Thalassomonas), whereas eukaryotes such as certain crustose coralline algae commonly related to healthy reefs were less diverse. These trends in the epiphytic community of E. acroides suggest a potential role of seagrasses as vectors of coral pathogens and may support previous predictions of a decrease in reef health and prevalence of diseases under future ocean acidification scenarios. PMID:25727314

  8. CO2-gradient measurements using a parallel multi-analyzer setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, L.; Steinfeld, G.; Foken, T.

    2011-03-01

    Accurate CO2 concentration gradient measurements are needed for the computation of advective flux terms, which are part of the full Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) budget equation. A typical draw back of current gradient measurement designs in advection research is the inadequate sampling of complex flow phenomena using too few observation points in space and time. To overcome this draw back, a new measurement design is presented which allows the parallel measurement of several sampling points at a high frequency. Due to the multi-analyzer nature of the design, inter-instrument bias becomes more of a concern compared to conventional setups. Therefore a statistical approach is presented which allows for accurate observations of concentration gradients, which are typically small in relation to analyzer accuracy, to be obtained. This bias correction approach applies a conditional, time dependent signal correction. The correction depends on a mixing index based on cross correlation analysis, which characterizes the degree of mixing of the atmosphere between individual sample points. The approach assumes statistical properties of probability density functions (pdf) of concentration differences between a sample point and the field average which are common to the pdf's from several sample points. The applicability of the assumptions made was tested by Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using the model PALM and could be verified for a test case of well mixed conditions. The study presents concentration time series before and after correction, measured at a 2 m height in the sub-canopy at the FLUXNET spruce forest site Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen (DE-Bay), analyzes the dependence of statistical parameters of pdf's from atmospheric parameters such as stratification, quantifies the errors and evaluates the performance of the bias correction approach. The improvements that are achieved by applying the bias correction approach are one order of magnitude larger than possible errors associated

  9. CO2-gradient measurements using a parallel multi-analyzer setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, L.; Steinfeld, G.; Foken, T.

    2010-10-01

    Accurate CO2 concentration gradient measurements are needed for the computation of advective flux terms, which are part of the full Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) budget equation. A typical draw back of current gradient measurement designs in advection research is the inadequate sampling of complex flow phenomena using too few observation points in space and time. To overcome this draw back, a new measurement design is presented which allows the parallel measurement of several sampling points at a high frequency. Due to the multi-analyzer nature of the design, inter-instrument bias becomes more of a concern compared to conventional setups. Therefore a statistical approach is presented which allows for accurate observations of concentration gradients, which are typically small in relation to analyzer accuracy, to be obtained. This bias correction approach applies a conditional, time dependent signal correction. The correction depends on a mixing index based on cross correlation analysis, which characterizes the degree of mixing of the atmosphere between individual sample points. The approach assumes statistical properties of probability density functions (pdf) of concentration differences between a sample point and the field average which are common to the pdf's from several sample points. The validity of the assumptions made was successfully verified by Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using the model PALM. The study presents concentration time series before and after correction, measured at a 2 m height in the sub-canopy at the FLUXNET spruce forest site Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen (DE-Bay), analyzes the dependence of statistical parameters of pdf's from atmospheric parameters such as stratification, quantifies the errors and evaluates the performance of the bias correction approach. The improvements that are achieved by applying the bias correction approach are one order of magnitude larger than possible errors associated with it, which is a strong incentive to use the

  10. High-resolution simulations of the Δ14CO2 gradients from fossil fuels and nuclear power plants over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhinova, D.; van der Molen, M. K.; Palstra, S. W.; Meijer, H. A.; Krol, M. C.; Peters, W.

    2012-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14CO2) can be used to quantify fossil fuel CO2 addition to the atmosphere, since fossil CO2 is void of 14C. However, the current observational network is not dense enough to constrain regional emissions in most parts of the world. Furthermore, most sampling sites are not as informative for the regional anthropogenic emissions because they are located outside polluted regions. High resolution modeling of regional fossil fuel CO2 dispersion can help to define sampling locations at which Δ14CO2 gradients will be strong enough to estimate regional fossil fuel emissions. However, an important consideration should be the 14CO2 enrichment due to nuclear power plant 14CO2 production. These point sources contribute little to the global radiocarbon budget, but on a regional scale their importance for the atmospheric Δ14CO2 signature can be considerable. We therefore simulate the fossil fuel CO2 and nuclear 14CO2 transport for Western Europe using the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF-Chem) and evaluate the gradients and resulting Δ14CO2. We verify our modeling framework with integrated 14CO2, CO2, and meteorological observations. We find that the gradients in daytime fossil fuel CO2 addition can be as high as 10 ppm. Additionally, the effects of the nuclear 14CO2 emitted from the strongest source in the region can be traced to sites more than 500 km away, and their impact on the atmospheric Δ14CO2 signature can sometimes be of the same magnitude as the regional fossil fuel CO2 addition. We will present our findings and possible implications for sampling campaigns and observational sites.lt;img border=0 src="images/A33P-06_B.jpg">

  11. Application research of CO2 laser cutting natural stone plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lixiu; Song, Jijiang

    2009-08-01

    Now, the processing of natural stone plates is the high performance sawing machine primarily,many researchers deeply studied the processing characters in the sawing process and the strength characters during the processing. In order to realize the profiled-processing and pattern- carving of the natural stone, It lays a solid foundation for the laser cutting and the pattern-carving technology of natural stone plate. The working principle, type and characteristics of laser cutting are briefly described. The paper selects 6 kinds stone plates of natural taken as experimental sample,the experimental sample was China Shanxi Black, Old Spain Golden Yellow, New Spain Golden Yellow, Jazz White, Maple Leaf Red, Cream White respectively. Use high power CO2 laser cutting system,the stone plates cutting experiment of 6 kinds different hardness, the best working speed are obtained,The experimental results indicate that: The laser cutting speed has no correlation with the ingredient content of stone plate.

  12. Biases in the air-sea flux of CO2 resulting from ocean surface temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B.; Wanninkhof, R.; McGillis, W. R.; Jessup, A. T.; Degrandpre, M. D.; Hare, J. E.; Edson, J. B.

    2004-08-01

    The difference in the fugacities of CO2 across the diffusive sublayer at the ocean surface is the driving force behind the air-sea flux of CO2. Bulk seawater fugacity is normally measured several meters below the surface, while the fugacity at the water surface, assumed to be in equilibrium with the atmosphere, is measured several meters above the surface. Implied in these measurements is that the fugacity values are the same as those across the diffusive boundary layer. However, temperature gradients exist at the interface due to molecular transfer processes, resulting in a cool surface temperature, known as the skin effect. A warm layer from solar radiation can also result in a heterogeneous temperature profile within the upper few meters of the ocean. Here we describe measurements carried out during a 14-day study in the equatorial Pacific Ocean (GasEx-2001) aimed at estimating the gradients of CO2 near the surface and resulting flux anomalies. The fugacity measurements were corrected for temperature effects using data from the ship's thermosalinograph, a high-resolution profiler (SkinDeEP), an infrared radiometer (CIRIMS), and several point measurements at different depths on various platforms. Results from SkinDeEP show that the largest cool skin and warm layer biases occur at low winds, with maximum biases of -4% and +4%, respectively. Time series ship data show an average CO2 flux cool skin retardation of about 2%. Ship and drifter data show significant CO2 flux enhancement due to the warm layer, with maximums occurring in the afternoon. Temperature measurements were compared to predictions based on available cool skin parameterizations to predict the skin-bulk temperature difference, along with a warm layer model.

  13. Natural high pCO2 increases autotrophy in Anemonia viridis (Anthozoa) as revealed from stable isotope (C, N) analysis.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Rael; Borell, Esther M; Yam, Ruth; Shemesh, Aldo; Fine, Maoz

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary cnidarian-algae symbioses are challenged by increasing CO2 concentrations (ocean warming and acidification) affecting organisms' biological performance. We examined the natural variability of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis to investigate dietary shifts (autotrophy/heterotrophy) along a natural pCO2 gradient at the island of Vulcano, Italy. δ(13)C values for both algal symbionts (Symbiodinium) and host tissue of A. viridis became significantly lighter with increasing seawater pCO2. Together with a decrease in the difference between δ(13)C values of both fractions at the higher pCO2 sites, these results indicate there is a greater net autotrophic input to the A. viridis carbon budget under high pCO2 conditions. δ(15)N values and C/N ratios did not change in Symbiodinium and host tissue along the pCO2 gradient. Additional physiological parameters revealed anemone protein and Symbiodinium chlorophyll a remained unaltered among sites. Symbiodinium density was similar among sites yet their mitotic index increased in anemones under elevated pCO2. Overall, our findings show that A. viridis is characterized by a higher autotrophic/heterotrophic ratio as pCO2 increases. The unique trophic flexibility of this species may give it a competitive advantage and enable its potential acclimation and ecological success in the future under increased ocean acidification. PMID:25739995

  14. Sulfur Isotope Analysis of Minerals and Fluids in a Natural CO2 Reservoir, Green River, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Kampman, N.; Bickle, M. J.; Busch, A.; Turchyn, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting the security of geological CO2 storage sites requires an understanding of the geochemical behavior of the stored CO2, especially of fluid-rock reactions in reservoirs, caprocks and fault zones. Factors that may influence geochemical behavior include co-injection of sulfur gases along with the CO2, either in acid-gas disposal or as contaminants in CO2 storage sites, and microbial activity, such as bacterial sulfate reduction. The latter may play an important role in buffering the redox chemistry of subsurface fluids, which could affect toxic trace metal mobilization and transport in acidic CO2-rich fluids. These processes involving sulfur are poorly understood. Natural CO2-reservoirs provide natural laboratories, where the flow and reactions of the CO2-charged fluids and the activity of microbial communities are integrated over sufficient time-scales to aid prediction of long-term CO2 storage. This study reports on sulfur isotope analyses of sulfate and sulfide minerals in rock core and in CO2-charged fluids collected from a stacked sequence of natural CO2 reservoirs at Green River, Utah. Scientific drilling adjacent to a CO2-degassing normal fault to a depth of 325m retrieved core and fluid samples from two CO2 reservoirs in the Entrada and Navajo Sandstones and from the intervening Carmel Formation caprock. Fluid samples were collected from CO2-charged springs that discharge through the faults. Sulfur exists as sulfate in the fluids, as sedimentary gypsum beds in the Carmel Formation, as remobilized gypsum veins within a fault damage zone in the Carmel Fm. and in the Entrada Sandstone, and as disseminated pyrite and pyrite-mineralized open fractures throughout the cored interval. We use the stable sulfur (δ34S) and oxygen (δ18OSO4) isotopes of the sulfate, gypsum, and pyrite to understand the source of sulfur in the reservoir as well as the timing of gypsum vein and pyrite formation. The hydration water of the gypsum is also reported to explore the

  15. Atmospheric CO2 and soil extracellular enzyme activity: A meta-analysis and CO2 gradient experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations may alter carbon and nutrient cycling and microbial processes in terrestrial ecosystems. One of the primary ways that microbes interact with soil organic matter is through the production of extracellular enzymes, which break down large, complex organic molecules...

  16. Viability and adaptation potential of indigenous microorganisms from natural gas field fluids in high pressure incubations with supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, Janin; Rakoczy, Jana; Ostertag-Henning, Christian; Krüger, Martin

    2014-01-21

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is currently under debate as large-scale solution to globally reduce emissions of the greenhouse gas CO2. Depleted gas or oil reservoirs and saline aquifers are considered as suitable reservoirs providing sufficient storage capacity. We investigated the influence of high CO2 concentrations on the indigenous bacterial population in the saline formation fluids of a natural gas field. Bacterial community changes were closely examined at elevated CO2 concentrations under near in situ pressures and temperatures. Conditions in the high pressure reactor systems simulated reservoir fluids i) close to the CO2 injection point, i.e. saturated with CO2, and ii) at the outer boundaries of the CO2 dissolution gradient. During the incubations with CO2, total cell numbers remained relatively stable, but no microbial sulfate reduction activity was detected. After CO2 release and subsequent transfer of the fluids, an actively sulfate-respiring community was re-established. The predominance of spore-forming Clostridiales provided evidence for the resilience of this taxon against the bactericidal effects of supercritical (sc)CO2. To ensure the long-term safety and injectivity, the viability of fermentative and sulfate-reducing bacteria has to be considered in the selection, design, and operation of CCS sites. PMID:24320192

  17. Reactive fluid transport in CO2 reservoir caprocks: constraints from scientific drilling of a natural CO2 reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampman, N.; Bickle, M. J.; Bertier, P.; Busch, A.; Chapman, H.; Evans, J. P.; Graham, C.; Harrington, J.; Maskell, A.

    2013-12-01

    The long-term performance of reservoir caprocks in geological CO2 storage sites remains uncertain due to the poorly constrained nature of field-scale fluid-mineral reaction kinetics and CO2 transport processes in low permeability rocks. Predicting the nature, rates and impacts of CO2 penetration into the caprocks from numerical modelling studies maybe undermined by their reliance on laboratory derived reaction kinetics from short-term experiments, and the complexity of the coupled reactive transport processes at the nano- and micro-scale. We report here on the early results from scientific drilling and laboratory analysis of the caprocks of a stacked sequence of natural CO2 reservoir at Green River, Utah. In summer 2012, diamond drilling to a depth of 325m, adjacent to a CO2 degassing normal fault recovered core from two major CO2 reservoirs in the Entrada and Navajo Sandstones and from the intervening Carmel Formation regional caprock. In-situ pH, CO2 concentrations and fluid element and isotope geochemistry were determined from wireline downhole sampling of pressurized fluids from the reservoirs. The fluid geochemistry provides important constraints on reservoir filling by flow of CO2-charged brines through the fault damage zone, macro-scale fluid flow in the reservoirs and the state of fluid-mineral thermodynamic disequilibrium from which the nature of the fluid-mineral reactions can be interpreted. Mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical profiles through portions of the caprocks in contact with the CO2-charged reservoirs have been used to constrain the nature and penetration depths of the CO2-promoted fluid-mineral reaction fronts. The major reactions are the dissolution of diagenetic dolomite cements and hematite grain coatings which generate porosity in the caprocks. Analysis of the generated pore structure from a variety of analytical techniques will be discussed. Stable C- and O-isotopic shifts in the composition of the carbonate cements record their

  18. Spectral nature of CO2 adsorption onto meteorites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berlanga, Genesis; Hibbitts, Charles A; Takir, Driss; Dyar, Draby M; Elizabeth Sklute

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified carbon dioxide (CO2) on the surfaces of Jovian and Galilean satellites in regions of non-ice material that are too warm for CO2 ice to exist. CO2 ice would quickly sublimate if not retained by a less-volatile material. To ascertain what non-ice species may be responsible for stabilizing this CO2, we performed CO2 gas adsorption experiments on thirteen powdered CM, CI, and CV carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Reflectance spectra of the ν3 feature associated with adsorbed CO2 near 4.27 μm were recorded. Results show that many meteorites adsorbed some amount of CO2, as evidenced by an absorption feature that was stable over several hours at ultra-high vacuum (UHV) and high vacuum, (1.0×10−8 and 1.0×10−7 Torr, respectively). Ivuna, the only CI chondrite studied, adsorbed significantly more CO2 than the others. We found that CO2 abundance did not vary with ‘water’ abundance, organics, or carbonates as inferred from the area of the 3-μm band, the 3.2-3.4 μm C-H feature, and the ∼3.8-μm band respectively, but did correlate with hydrous/anhydrous phyllosilicate ratios. Furthermore, we did not observe CO2 ice because the position of the CO2 feature was generally shifted 3-10 nm from that of the 4.27 μm absorption characteristic of ice. The strongest compositional relationship observed was a possible affinity of CO2 for total FeO abundance and complex clay minerals, which make up the bulk of the CI chondrite matrix. This finding implies that the most primitive refractory materials in the Solar System may also act as reservoirs of CO2, and possibly other volatiles, delivering them to parts of the Solar System where their ices would not be stable.

  19. The doubled CO2 climate - Impact of the sea surface temperature gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David

    1987-01-01

    The Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM of Hansen et al. (1983) was run, with 4 deg x 5 deg resolution, with doubled CO2 and two sets of sea surface temperature gradient distributions. One set was derived from the equilibrium doubled CO2 run of the 8 deg x 10 deg GISS GCM, with minimal high latitude amplification. The other set resembled closely the GFDL model results, with greater amplification. Both experiments had the same global mean surface air temperature change. The two experiments were often found to produce substantially different climate characteristics. With reduced high latitude amplification (set one), and thus, more equatorial warming, there was a greater increase in specific humidity and the greenhouse capacity of the atmosphere, resulting in a warmer atmosphere in general. Features such as the low-latitude precipitation, Hadley cell intensity, jet stream magnitude, and atmospheric energy transports all increased in comparison with the control run. In contrast, these features all decreased in the experiment with greater high latitude amplification (set two).

  20. Response of soil respiration to a subambient to elevated CO2 gradient in grassland ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the importance of soil respiration responses to atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) for the global carbon cycle and climate change, the relationship between soil respiration and [CO2] has not been well developed, mainly because previous studies included few CO2 levels. We designed a unique...

  1. Natural CO2 accumulations in the western Williston Basin: A mineralogical analog for CO2 injection at the Weyburn site

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryerson, F. J.; Lake, John; Whittaker, Steven; Johnson, James W.

    2013-01-17

    The Devonian carbonates of the Duperow Formation on the western flank of the Williston Basin in southwest Saskatchewan contain natural accumulations of CO2, and may have done so for as long as 50 million years. These carbonate sediments are characterized by a succession of carbonate cycles capped by anhydrite-rich evaporites that are thought to act as seals to fluid migration. The Weyburn CO2 injection site lies 400 km to the east in a series of Mississippian carbonates that were deposited in a similar depositional environment. That long-term isolation of natural CO2 can be accomplished within carbonate strata has motivated themore » investigation of the Duperow rocks as a potential natural analog for storage of anthropogenic CO2 in carbonate lithologies. For the Duperow strata to represent a legitimate analog for Midale injection and storage, the similarity in lithofacies, whole rock compositions, mineral compositions and porosity with the Midale Beds must be established. Here we compare lithofacies, whole rock compositions, mineralogy and mineral compositions from both locales. The major mineral phases at both locales are calcite, dolomite and anhydrite. In addition, accessory pyrite, fluorite, quartz and celestine (strontium sulfate) are also observed. Dawsonite, a potential CO2-trapping mineral, is not observed within the CO2-bearing horizons of the Duperow Formation, however. The distribution of porosity in the Midale Vuggy units is similar to that of the Duperow Formation, but the Marly units of the Midale have significantly higher porosity. The Duperow Formation is topped by the Dinesmore evaporite that is rich in anhydrite, and often contains authigenic K-feldspar. The chemistry of dolomite and calcite from the two localities also overlaps. Silicate minerals are in low abundance (<3%) within the analyzed Duperow samples, with quartz and K-feldspar the only silicates observed petrographically or in X-ray diffraction patterns. The Midale Beds contain

  2. Altered brain ion gradients following compensation for elevated CO2 are linked to behavioural alterations in a coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Heuer, R M; Welch, M J; Rummer, J L; Munday, P L; Grosell, M

    2016-01-01

    Neurosensory and behavioural disruptions are some of the most consistently reported responses upon exposure to ocean acidification-relevant CO2 levels, especially in coral reef fishes. The underlying cause of these disruptions is thought to be altered current across the GABAA receptor in neuronal cells due to changes in ion gradients (HCO3(-) and/or Cl(-)) that occur in the body following compensation for elevated ambient CO2. Despite these widely-documented behavioural disruptions, the present study is the first to pair a behavioural assay with measurements of relevant intracellular and extracellular acid-base parameters in a coral reef fish exposed to elevated CO2. Spiny damselfish (Acanthochromis polyacanthus) exposed to 1900 μatm CO2 for 4 days exhibited significantly increased intracellular and extracellular HCO3(-) concentrations and elevated brain pHi compared to control fish, providing evidence of CO2 compensation. As expected, high CO2 exposed damselfish spent significantly more time in a chemical alarm cue (CAC) than control fish, supporting a potential link between behavioural disruption and CO2 compensation. Using HCO3(-) measurements from the damselfish, the reversal potential for GABAA (EGABA) was calculated, illustrating that biophysical properties of the brain during CO2 compensation could change GABAA receptor function and account for the behavioural disturbances noted during exposure to elevated CO2. PMID:27620837

  3. Seaweed fails to prevent ocean acidification impact on foraminifera along a shallow-water CO2 gradient

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Laura R; Smart, Christopher W; Hart, Malcolm B; Milazzo, Marco; Hall-Spencer, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification causes biodiversity loss, alters ecosystems, and may impact food security, as shells of small organisms dissolve easily in corrosive waters. There is a suggestion that photosynthetic organisms could mitigate ocean acidification on a local scale, through seagrass protection or seaweed cultivation, as net ecosystem organic production raises the saturation state of calcium carbonate making seawater less corrosive. Here, we used a natural gradient in calcium carbonate saturation, caused by shallow-water CO2 seeps in the Mediterranean Sea, to assess whether seaweed that is resistant to acidification (Padina pavonica) could prevent adverse effects of acidification on epiphytic foraminifera. We found a reduction in the number of species of foraminifera as calcium carbonate saturation state fell and that the assemblage shifted from one dominated by calcareous species at reference sites (pH ∼8.19) to one dominated by agglutinated foraminifera at elevated levels of CO2 (pH ∼7.71). It is expected that ocean acidification will result in changes in foraminiferal assemblage composition and agglutinated forms may become more prevalent. Although Padina did not prevent adverse effects of ocean acidification, high biomass stands of seagrass or seaweed farms might be more successful in protecting epiphytic foraminifera. PMID:26140195

  4. Seaweed fails to prevent ocean acidification impact on foraminifera along a shallow-water CO2 gradient.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Laura R; Smart, Christopher W; Hart, Malcolm B; Milazzo, Marco; Hall-Spencer, Jason M

    2015-05-01

    Ocean acidification causes biodiversity loss, alters ecosystems, and may impact food security, as shells of small organisms dissolve easily in corrosive waters. There is a suggestion that photosynthetic organisms could mitigate ocean acidification on a local scale, through seagrass protection or seaweed cultivation, as net ecosystem organic production raises the saturation state of calcium carbonate making seawater less corrosive. Here, we used a natural gradient in calcium carbonate saturation, caused by shallow-water CO2 seeps in the Mediterranean Sea, to assess whether seaweed that is resistant to acidification (Padina pavonica) could prevent adverse effects of acidification on epiphytic foraminifera. We found a reduction in the number of species of foraminifera as calcium carbonate saturation state fell and that the assemblage shifted from one dominated by calcareous species at reference sites (pH ∼8.19) to one dominated by agglutinated foraminifera at elevated levels of CO2 (pH ∼7.71). It is expected that ocean acidification will result in changes in foraminiferal assemblage composition and agglutinated forms may become more prevalent. Although Padina did not prevent adverse effects of ocean acidification, high biomass stands of seagrass or seaweed farms might be more successful in protecting epiphytic foraminifera. PMID:26140195

  5. The nature of the CO2 (-) radical anion in water.

    PubMed

    Janik, Ireneusz; Tripathi, G N R

    2016-04-21

    The reductive conversion of CO2 into industrial products (e.g., oxalic acid, formic acid, methanol) can occur via aqueous CO2 (-) as a transient intermediate. While the formation, structure, and reaction pathways of this radical anion have been modelled for decades using various spectroscopic and theoretical approaches, we present here, for the first time, a vibrational spectroscopic investigation in liquid water, using pulse radiolysis time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy for its preparation and observation. Excitation of the radical in resonance with its 235 nm absorption displays a transient Raman band at 1298 cm(-1), attributed to the symmetric CO stretch, which is at ∼45 cm(-1) higher frequency than in inert matrices. Isotopic substitution at C ((13)CO2 (-)) shifts the frequency downwards by 22 cm(-1), which confirms its origin and the assignment. A Raman band of moderate intensity compared to the stronger 1298 cm(-1) band also appears at 742 cm(-1) and is assignable to the OCO bending mode. A reasonable resonance enhancement of this mode is possible only in a bent CO2 (-)(C2v/Cs) geometry. These resonance Raman features suggest a strong solute-solvent interaction, the water molecules acting as constituents of the radical structure, rather than exerting a minor solvent perturbation. However, there is no evidence of the non-equivalence (Cs) of the two CO bonds. A surprising resonance Raman feature is the lack of overtones of the symmetric CO stretch, which we interpret due to the detachment of the electron from the CO2 (-) moiety towards the solvation shell. Electron detachment occurs at the energies of 0.28 ± 0.03 eV or higher with respect to the zero point energy of the ground electronic state. The issue of acid-base equilibrium of the radical, which has been in contention for decades, as reflected in a wide variation in the reported pKa (-0.2 to 3.9), has been resolved. A value of 3.4 ± 0.2 measured in this work is consistent with the vibrational

  6. The nature of the CO2- radical anion in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Ireneusz; Tripathi, G. N. R.

    2016-04-01

    The reductive conversion of CO2 into industrial products (e.g., oxalic acid, formic acid, methanol) can occur via aqueous CO2- as a transient intermediate. While the formation, structure, and reaction pathways of this radical anion have been modelled for decades using various spectroscopic and theoretical approaches, we present here, for the first time, a vibrational spectroscopic investigation in liquid water, using pulse radiolysis time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy for its preparation and observation. Excitation of the radical in resonance with its 235 nm absorption displays a transient Raman band at 1298 cm-1, attributed to the symmetric CO stretch, which is at ˜45 cm-1 higher frequency than in inert matrices. Isotopic substitution at C (13CO2-) shifts the frequency downwards by 22 cm-1, which confirms its origin and the assignment. A Raman band of moderate intensity compared to the stronger 1298 cm-1 band also appears at 742 cm-1 and is assignable to the OCO bending mode. A reasonable resonance enhancement of this mode is possible only in a bent CO2-(C2v/Cs) geometry. These resonance Raman features suggest a strong solute-solvent interaction, the water molecules acting as constituents of the radical structure, rather than exerting a minor solvent perturbation. However, there is no evidence of the non-equivalence (Cs) of the two CO bonds. A surprising resonance Raman feature is the lack of overtones of the symmetric CO stretch, which we interpret due to the detachment of the electron from the CO2- moiety towards the solvation shell. Electron detachment occurs at the energies of 0.28 ± 0.03 eV or higher with respect to the zero point energy of the ground electronic state. The issue of acid-base equilibrium of the radical, which has been in contention for decades, as reflected in a wide variation in the reported pKa (-0.2 to 3.9), has been resolved. A value of 3.4 ± 0.2 measured in this work is consistent with the vibrational properties, bond structure

  7. Deep microbial life in the Altmark natural gas reservoir: baseline characterization prior CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Daria; Shaheed, Mina; Vieth, Andrea; Krüger, Martin; Kock, Dagmar; Würdemann, Hilke

    2010-05-01

    Within the framework of the CLEAN project (CO2 Largescale Enhanced gas recovery in the Altmark Natural gas field) technical basics with special emphasis on process monitoring are explored by injecting CO2 into a gas reservoir. Our study focuses on the investigation of the in-situ microbial community of the Rotliegend natural gas reservoir in the Altmark, located south of the city Salzwedel, Germany. In order to characterize the microbial life in the extreme habitat we aim to localize and identify microbes including their metabolism influencing the creation and dissolution of minerals. The ability of microorganisms to speed up dissolution and formation of minerals might result in changes of the local permeability and the long-term safety of CO2 storage. However, geology, structure and chemistry of the reservoir rock and the cap rock as well as interaction with saline formation water and natural gases and the injected CO2 affect the microbial community composition and activity. The reservoir located at the depth of about 3500m, is characterised by high salinity fluid and temperatures up to 127° C. It represents an extreme environment for microbial life and therefore the main focus is on hyperthermophilic, halophilic anaerobic microorganisms. In consequence of the injection of large amounts of CO2 in the course of a commercial EGR (Enhanced Gas Recovery) the environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, pressure and solubility of minerals) for the autochthonous microorganisms will change. Genetic profiling of amplified 16S rRNA genes are applied for detecting structural changes in the community by using PCR- SSCP (PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism) and DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). First results of the baseline survey indicate the presence of microorganisms similar to representatives from other saline, hot, anoxic, deep environments. However, due to the hypersaline and hyperthermophilic reservoir conditions, cell numbers are low, so that

  8. Fraction of natural area as main predictor of net CO2 emissions from cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordbo, Annika; Järvi, Leena; Haapanala, Sami; Wood, Curtis R.; Vesala, Timo

    2012-10-01

    Cities account for most anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions, CO2 being most important. We evaluate the net urban contribution to CO2 emissions by performing a meta-analysis of all available 14 annual CO2 budget studies. The studies are based on direct flux measurements using the eddy-covariance technique which excludes all strong point sources. We show that the fraction of natural area is the strongest predictor of urban CO2 budgets, and this fraction can be used as a robust proxy for net urban CO2 emissions. Up-scaling, based on that proxy and satellite mapping of the fraction of natural area, identifies urban hotspots of CO2 emissions; and extraction of 56 individual cities corroborates their inventory-based estimates. Furthermore, cities are estimated as carbon-neutral when the natural fraction is about 80%. This fresh view on the importance of cities in climate change treats cities as urban ecosystems: incorporating natural areas like vegetation.

  9. Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO(2) sink in natural gas fields.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, Stuart M V; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Holland, Greg; Blagburn, Dave; Stevens, Scott; Schoell, Martin; Cassidy, Martin; Ding, Zhenju; Zhou, Zheng; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Ballentine, Chris J

    2009-04-01

    Injecting CO(2) into deep geological strata is proposed as a safe and economically favourable means of storing CO(2) captured from industrial point sources. It is difficult, however, to assess the long-term consequences of CO(2) flooding in the subsurface from decadal observations of existing disposal sites. Both the site design and long-term safety modelling critically depend on how and where CO(2) will be stored in the site over its lifetime. Within a geological storage site, the injected CO(2) can dissolve in solution or precipitate as carbonate minerals. Here we identify and quantify the principal mechanism of CO(2) fluid phase removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO(2) phase and provide a natural analogue for assessing the geological storage of anthropogenic CO(2) over millennial timescales. We find that in seven gas fields with siliciclastic or carbonate-dominated reservoir lithologies, dissolution in formation water at a pH of 5-5.8 is the sole major sink for CO(2). In two fields with siliciclastic reservoir lithologies, some CO(2) loss through precipitation as carbonate minerals cannot be ruled out, but can account for a maximum of 18 per cent of the loss of emplaced CO(2). In view of our findings that geological mineral fixation is a minor CO(2) trapping mechanism in natural gas fields, we suggest that long-term anthropogenic CO(2) storage models in similar geological systems should focus on the potential mobility of CO(2) dissolved in water. PMID:19340078

  10. Modeling plant-atmosphere carbon and water fluxes along a CO2 gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At short time scales (hourly to daily), plant photosynthesis and transpiration respond nonlinearly to atmospheric CO2 concentration and vapor pressure deficit, depending on plant water status and thus soil moisture. Modeling vegetation and soil responses to different values of CO2 at multiple time s...

  11. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.J.; Wood, R.A.; Haszeldine, R.S.

    2011-10-04

    Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO2 onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO2 leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO2 seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO2 stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO2 degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/ flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO2 poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO2 seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO2 flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO2 seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less than Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized.

  12. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jennifer J.; Wood, Rachel A.; Haszeldine, R. Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO2 onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO2 leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO2 seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO2 stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO2 degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO2 poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO2 seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO2 flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO2 seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less that Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized. PMID:21911398

  13. Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer J; Wood, Rachel A; Haszeldine, R Stuart

    2011-10-01

    Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO(2) onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO(2) leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO(2) seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO(2) stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO(2) degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO(2) poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO(2) seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO(2) flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO(2) seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less that Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized. PMID:21911398

  14. Future ocean hypercapnia driven by anthropogenic amplification of the natural CO2 cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Ben I.; Sasse, Tristan P.

    2016-01-01

    High carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in sea-water (ocean hypercapnia) can induce neurological, physiological and behavioural deficiencies in marine animals. Prediction of the onset and evolution of hypercapnia in the ocean requires a good understanding of annual variations in oceanic CO2 concentration, but there is a lack of relevant global observational data. Here we identify global ocean patterns of monthly variability in carbon concentration using observations that allow us to examine the evolution of surface-ocean CO2 levels over the entire annual cycle under increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We predict that the present-day amplitude of the natural oscillations in oceanic CO2 concentration will be amplified by up to tenfold in some regions by 2100, if atmospheric CO2 concentrations continue to rise throughout this century (according to the RCP8.5 scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). The findings from our data are broadly consistent with projections from Earth system climate models. Our predicted amplification of the annual CO2 cycle displays distinct global patterns that may expose major fisheries in the Southern, Pacific and North Atlantic oceans to hypercapnia many decades earlier than is expected from average atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We suggest that these ocean ‘CO2 hotspots’ evolve as a combination of the strong seasonal dynamics of CO2 concentration and the long-term effective storage of anthropogenic CO2 in the oceans that lowers the buffer capacity in these regions, causing a nonlinear amplification of CO2 concentration over the annual cycle. The onset of ocean hypercapnia (when the partial pressure of CO2 in sea-water exceeds 1,000 micro-atmospheres) is forecast for atmospheric CO2 concentrations that exceed 650 parts per million, with hypercapnia expected in up to half the surface ocean by 2100, assuming a high-emissions scenario (RCP8.5). Such extensive ocean hypercapnia has detrimental implications for

  15. Future ocean hypercapnia driven by anthropogenic amplification of the natural CO2 cycle.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Ben I; Sasse, Tristan P

    2016-01-21

    High carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in sea-water (ocean hypercapnia) can induce neurological, physiological and behavioural deficiencies in marine animals. Prediction of the onset and evolution of hypercapnia in the ocean requires a good understanding of annual variations in oceanic CO2 concentration, but there is a lack of relevant global observational data. Here we identify global ocean patterns of monthly variability in carbon concentration using observations that allow us to examine the evolution of surface-ocean CO2 levels over the entire annual cycle under increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We predict that the present-day amplitude of the natural oscillations in oceanic CO2 concentration will be amplified by up to tenfold in some regions by 2100, if atmospheric CO2 concentrations continue to rise throughout this century (according to the RCP8.5 scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). The findings from our data are broadly consistent with projections from Earth system climate models. Our predicted amplification of the annual CO2 cycle displays distinct global patterns that may expose major fisheries in the Southern, Pacific and North Atlantic oceans to hypercapnia many decades earlier than is expected from average atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We suggest that these ocean 'CO2 hotspots' evolve as a combination of the strong seasonal dynamics of CO2 concentration and the long-term effective storage of anthropogenic CO2 in the oceans that lowers the buffer capacity in these regions, causing a nonlinear amplification of CO2 concentration over the annual cycle. The onset of ocean hypercapnia (when the partial pressure of CO2 in sea-water exceeds 1,000 micro-atmospheres) is forecast for atmospheric CO2 concentrations that exceed 650 parts per million, with hypercapnia expected in up to half the surface ocean by 2100, assuming a high-emissions scenario (RCP8.5). Such extensive ocean hypercapnia has detrimental implications for

  16. Constraints on the magnitude and rate of CO2 dissolution at Bravo Dome natural gas field.

    PubMed

    Sathaye, Kiran J; Hesse, Marc A; Cassidy, Martin; Stockli, Daniel F

    2014-10-28

    The injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) captured at large point sources into deep saline aquifers can significantly reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. Dissolution of the injected CO2 into the formation brine is a trapping mechanism that helps to ensure the long-term security of geological CO2 storage. We use thermochronology to estimate the timing of CO2 emplacement at Bravo Dome, a large natural CO2 field at a depth of 700 m in New Mexico. Together with estimates of the total mass loss from the field we present, to our knowledge, the first constraints on the magnitude, mechanisms, and rates of CO2 dissolution on millennial timescales. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology records heating of the Bravo Dome reservoir due to the emplacement of hot volcanic gases 1.2-1.5 Ma. The CO2 accumulation is therefore significantly older than previous estimates of 10 ka, which demonstrates that safe long-term geological CO2 storage is possible. Integrating geophysical and geochemical data, we estimate that 1.3 Gt CO2 are currently stored at Bravo Dome, but that only 22% of the emplaced CO2 has dissolved into the brine over 1.2 My. Roughly 40% of the dissolution occurred during the emplacement. The CO2 dissolved after emplacement exceeds the amount expected from diffusion and provides field evidence for convective dissolution with a rate of 0.1 g/(m(2)y). The similarity between Bravo Dome and major US saline aquifers suggests that significant amounts of CO2 are likely to dissolve during injection at US storage sites, but that convective dissolution is unlikely to trap all injected CO2 on the 10-ky timescale typically considered for storage projects. PMID:25313084

  17. Constraints on the magnitude and rate of CO2 dissolution at Bravo Dome natural gas field

    PubMed Central

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Hesse, Marc A.; Cassidy, Martin; Stockli, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    The injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) captured at large point sources into deep saline aquifers can significantly reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. Dissolution of the injected CO2 into the formation brine is a trapping mechanism that helps to ensure the long-term security of geological CO2 storage. We use thermochronology to estimate the timing of CO2 emplacement at Bravo Dome, a large natural CO2 field at a depth of 700 m in New Mexico. Together with estimates of the total mass loss from the field we present, to our knowledge, the first constraints on the magnitude, mechanisms, and rates of CO2 dissolution on millennial timescales. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology records heating of the Bravo Dome reservoir due to the emplacement of hot volcanic gases 1.2–1.5 Ma. The CO2 accumulation is therefore significantly older than previous estimates of 10 ka, which demonstrates that safe long-term geological CO2 storage is possible. Integrating geophysical and geochemical data, we estimate that 1.3 Gt CO2 are currently stored at Bravo Dome, but that only 22% of the emplaced CO2 has dissolved into the brine over 1.2 My. Roughly 40% of the dissolution occurred during the emplacement. The CO2 dissolved after emplacement exceeds the amount expected from diffusion and provides field evidence for convective dissolution with a rate of 0.1 g/(m2y). The similarity between Bravo Dome and major US saline aquifers suggests that significant amounts of CO2 are likely to dissolve during injection at US storage sites, but that convective dissolution is unlikely to trap all injected CO2 on the 10-ky timescale typically considered for storage projects. PMID:25313084

  18. Polymer blend membranes for CO2 separation from natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtar, H.; Mannan, H. A.; Minh, D.; Nasir, R.; Moshshim, D. F.; Murugesan, T.

    2016-06-01

    Polymeric membranes are dominantly used in industrial gas separation membrane processes. Enhancement in membranes permeability and/or selectivity is a key challenge faced by membrane researchers. The current work represents the effect of poyetherimide blending on separation performance of polysulfone membranes. Polysulfone/poyetherimide (PSF/PEI) blend flat sheet dense membranes were synthesized and tested for permeation analysis of CO2 and CH4 gases at 6, 8 and 10 bar pressure and 25oC temperature. Morphology and thermal properties of membranes were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) respectively. Blend membranes were dense and homogeneous as deduced from FESEM analysis. Thermal stability of synthesized blend membranes was maintained by blending with PEI as characterized by TGA results. Decrease in permeability of both gases was observed by the addition of PEI due to rigidity of PEI chains. Additionally, selectivity of synthesized blend membranes was enhanced by blending PEI and blend membranes show improved selectivity over pure PSF membrane. This new material has the capability to be used as gas separation membrane material.

  19. Efficient electrochemical refrigeration power plant using natural gas with ∼100% CO2 capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-musleh, Easa I.; Mallapragada, Dharik S.; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    We propose an efficient Natural Gas (NG) based Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power plant equipped with ∼100% CO2 capture. The power plant uses a unique refrigeration based process to capture and liquefy CO2 from the SOFC exhaust. The capture of CO2 is carried out via condensation and purification using two rectifying columns operating at different pressures. The uncondensed gas mixture, comprising of relatively high purity unconverted fuel, is recycled to the SOFC and found to boost the power generation of the SOFC by 22%, when compared to a stand alone SOFC. If Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is available at the plant gate, then the refrigeration available from its evaporation is used for CO2 Capture and Liquefaction (CO2CL). If NG is utilized, then a Mixed Refrigerant (MR) vapor compression cycle is utilized for CO2CL. Alternatively, the necessary refrigeration can be supplied by evaporating the captured liquid CO2 at a lower pressure, which is then compressed to supercritical pressures for pipeline transportation. From rigorous simulations, the power generation efficiency of the proposed processes is found to be 70-76% based on lower heating value (LHV). The benefit of the proposed processes is evident when the efficiency of 73% for a conventional SOFC-Gas turbine power plant without CO2 capture is compared with an equivalent efficiency of 71.2% for the proposed process with CO2CL.

  20. Characterization of an urban-rural CO 2 /temperature gradient and associated changes in initial plant productivity during secondary succession

    SciTech Connect

    Ziska, L. H.; Bunce, J. A.; Goins, E. W.

    2004-05-01

    To examine the impact of climate change on vegetative productivity, we exposed fallow agricultural soil to an in situ temperature and CO2 gradient between urban, suburban and rural areas in 2002. Along the gradient, average daytime CO2 concentration increased by 21% and maximum (daytime) and minimum (nighttime) daily temperatures increased by 1.6 and 3.3°C, respectively in an urban relative to a rural location. Consistent location differences in soil temperature were also ascertained. No other consistent differences in meteorological variables (e.g. wind speed, humidity, PAR, tropospheric ozone) as a function of urbanization were documented. The urban-induced environmental changes that were observed were consistent with most short-term (~50 year) global change scenarios regarding CO2 concentration and air temperature. Productivity, determined as final above-ground biomass, and maximum plant height were positively affected by daytime and soil temperatures as well as enhanced [CO2], increasing 60 and 115% for the suburban and urban sites, respectively, relative to the rural site. While long-term data are needed, these initial results suggest that urban environments may act as a reasonable surrogate for investigating future climatic change in vegetative communities.

  1. Dominant plant taxa predict plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment across precipitation and soil gradients.

    PubMed

    Fay, Philip A; Newingham, Beth A; Polley, H Wayne; Morgan, Jack A; LeCain, Daniel R; Nowak, Robert S; Smith, Stanley D

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere will continue to be enriched with carbon dioxide (CO2) over the coming century. Carbon dioxide enrichment often reduces leaf transpiration, which in water-limited ecosystems may increase soil water content, change species abundances and increase the productivity of plant communities. The effect of increased soil water on community productivity and community change may be greater in ecosystems with lower precipitation, or on coarser-textured soils, but responses are likely absent in deserts. We tested correlations among yearly increases in soil water content, community change and community plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in experiments in a mesic grassland with fine- to coarse-textured soils, a semi-arid grassland and a xeric shrubland. We found no correlation between CO2-caused changes in soil water content and changes in biomass of dominant plant taxa or total community aboveground biomass in either grassland type or on any soil in the mesic grassland (P > 0.60). Instead, increases in dominant taxa biomass explained up to 85 % of the increases in total community biomass under CO2 enrichment. The effect of community change on community productivity was stronger in the semi-arid grassland than in the mesic grassland, where community biomass change on one soil was not correlated with the change in either the soil water content or the dominant taxa. No sustained increases in soil water content or community productivity and no change in dominant plant taxa occurred in the xeric shrubland. Thus, community change was a crucial driver of community productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in the grasslands, but effects of soil water change on productivity were not evident in yearly responses to CO2 enrichment. Future research is necessary to isolate and clarify the mechanisms controlling the temporal and spatial variations in the linkages among soil water, community change and plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment. PMID

  2. Critical evaluation of 13C natural abundance techniques to partition soil-surface CO2 efflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, H.; Midwood, A. J.; Robinson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Soil is the largest terrestrial store of carbon and the flux of CO2 from soils to the atmosphere is estimated at around 98 Pg (98 billion tonnes) of carbon per year. The CO2 efflux from the soil surface is derived from plant root and rhizosphere respiration (autotrophically fuelled) and microbial degradation of soil organic matter (heterotrophic respiration). Heterotrophic respiration is a key determinant of an ecosystem's long-term C balance, but one that is difficult to measure in the field. One approach involves partitioning the total soil-surface CO2 efflux between heterotrophic and autotrophic components; this can be done using differences in the natural abundance stable isotope ratios (δ13C) of autotrophic and heterotrophic CO2 as the end-members of a simple mixing model. In most natural, temperate ecosystems, current and historical vegetation cover (and therefore also plant-derived soil organic matter) is produced from C3 photosynthesis so the difference in δ13C between the autotrophic and heterotrophic CO2 sources is small. Successful partitioning therefore requires accurate and precise measurements of the δ13CO2 of the autotrophic and heterotrophic end-members (obtained by measuring the δ13CO2 of soil-free roots and root-free soil) and of total soil CO2 efflux. There is currently little consensus on the optimum measurement protocols. Here we systematically tested some of the most commonly used techniques to identify and minimise methodological errors. Using soil-surface chambers to sample total CO2 efflux and a cavity ring-down spectrometer to measure δ13CO2 in a partitioning study on a Scottish moorland, we found that: using soil-penetrating collars leads to a more depleted chamber measurement of total soil δ13CO2 as a result of severing roots and fungal hyphae or equilibrating with δ13CO2 at depth or both; root incubations provide an accurate estimate of in-situ root respired δ13CO2 provided they are sampled within one hour; the δ13CO2 from root

  3. Natural analogues for CO2 storage sites - analysis of a global dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miocic, Johannes; Gilfillan, Stuart; McDermott, Christopher; Haszeldine, R. Stuart

    2013-04-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage is the only industrial scale technology currently available to reduce CO2 emissions from fossil-fuelled power plants and large industrial source to the atmosphere and thus mitigate climate change. CO2 is captured at the source and transported to subsurface storage sites, such as depleted oil and gas fields or saline aquifers. In order to have an effect on emissions and to be considered safe it is crucial that the amount of CO2 leaking from storage sites to shallow aquifers or the surface remains very low (<1% over 1000 years). Some process that influence the safety of a reservoir, such as CO2-rock-brine interactions, can be studied using experiments on both laboratory and field-scale. However, long-term processes such as the development of leakage pathways can only be understood by either predictive modelling or by studying natural CO2 reservoirs as analogues for long term CO2 storage sites. Natural CO2 reservoirs have similar geological trapping mechanisms as anticipated for CO2 storage sites and often have held CO2 for a geological period of time (millions of years) without any indication for leakage. Yet, migration of CO2 from reservoirs to the surface is also common and evidenced by gas seeps such as springs and soil degassing. We have compiled and analysed a dataset comprising of more than 50 natural CO2 reservoirs from different settings all around the globe to provide an overview of the factors that are important for the retention of CO2 in the subsurface and what processes lead to leakage of CO2 from the reservoir. Initial results indicate that if the reservoir is found to be leaking, CO2 migration is along faults and not through caprock layers. This indicates that faults act as fluid pathways and play an important role when characterizing a storage site. Additionally, it appears that overpressure of the overburden and the state of CO2 in the reservoir influence the likelihood of migration and hence the safety of a reservoir.

  4. Soil microbial responses to a subambient to elevated gradient of atmospheric CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 has been shown to significantly affect terrestrial ecosystems through increased primary production. This response is thought to be mitigated by changes to the soil microbial community, which can alter nutrient availability in these systems. In this study we examine the e...

  5. Soil type modifies response of soil carbon pools to an atmospheric CO2 gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Literature suggests that as atmospheric CO2 rises, soil carbon will cycle more rapidly as plants input greater amounts of labile carbon into the soil. This labile carbon may stimulate the decomposition of more slowly-cycling soil organic matter through microbial priming. We test these hypotheses i...

  6. Comparative Reactivity Study of Natural Silicate Minerals in Wet Supercritical CO2 By In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C.; Schaef, T.; Miller, Q. R.; Loring, J. S.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, K. T.; McGrail, P.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term storage of CO2 in deep geologic reservoirs is one of the strategies being developed and implemented for reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere. Reservoirs containing basalt or peridotite have the potential to permanently entrap the CO2 as silicate minerals react with the CO2 and formation waters to form stable carbonate minerals. Although the relevant reactions have been well studied in the aqueous phase, comparatively little work has focused on silicate mineral reactivity in the CO2-rich fluid containing dissolved water at conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. In this study, we used in situ infrared spectroscopy to investigate the carbonation of naturally occurring samples of San Carlos olivine (Mg2SiO4), Bramble enstatite (MgSiO3), and a Hawaiian picritic basalt rich in olivine. To enhance reactivity, subsamples were micronized to obtain higher surface area materials, in the range of 14 to 23 m2g-1. Experiments were carried out at 50 °C and 91 bar by circulating a stream of dry or wet supercritical CO2 (scCO2) past a sample overlayer deposited on the window of a high-pressure infrared flow cell. Water concentrations ranged from 0% to 135% relative to saturation, and transmission-mode absorbance spectra were recorded as a function of time for 24 hours. In experiments with excess water, a controlled temperature gradient was used to intentionally condense a film of liquid water on the overlayers' surfaces. No discernible reaction was detected when the samples were exposed to dry scCO2. When water was added to the scCO2, a thin film of liquid-like water formed on the surfaces of each sample, followed by spectral evidence of carbonation. The extents of reaction were dependent on both the thickness of the water films and the materials being tested. The thinnest water film was associated with the Bramble enstatite, which also appeared minimally reactive. The Hawaiian picritic basalt was slightly more reactive but contained

  7. On the calculation of air-sea fluxes of CO2 in the presence of temperature and salinity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, D. K.; Land, P. E.; Shutler, J. D.; Goddijn-Murphy, L. M.; Donlon, C. J.

    2016-02-01

    The presence of vertical temperature and salinity gradients in the upper ocean and the occurrence of variations in temperature and salinity on time scales from hours to many years complicate the calculation of the flux of carbon dioxide (CO2) across the sea surface. Temperature and salinity affect the interfacial concentration of aqueous CO2 primarily through their effect on solubility with lesser effects related to saturated vapor pressure and the relationship between fugacity and partial pressure. The effects of temperature and salinity profiles in the water column and changes in the aqueous concentration act primarily through the partitioning of the carbonate system. Climatological calculations of flux require attention to variability in the upper ocean and to the limited validity of assuming "constant chemistry" in transforming measurements to climatological values. Contrary to some recent analysis, it is shown that the effect on CO2 fluxes of a cool skin on the sea surface is large and ubiquitous. An opposing effect on calculated fluxes is related to the occurrence of warm layers near the surface; this effect can be locally large but will usually coincide with periods of low exchange. A salty skin and salinity anomalies in the upper ocean also affect CO2 flux calculations, though these haline effects are generally weaker than the thermal effects.

  8. The impact of elevated CO2 concentrations on soil microbial community, soil organic matter storage and nutrient cycling at a natural CO2 vent in NW Bohemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Martin; Beulig, Felix; von Fischer, Joe; Muhr, Jan; Kuesel, Kirsten; Trumbore, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Natural CO2 vents or 'mofettes' are diffusive or advective exhalations of geogenic CO2 from soils. These structures occur at several places worldwide and in most cases they are linked to volcanic activity. Characteristic for mofette soils are high CO2 concentrations of up to more than 90% as well as a lack of oxygen, low pH values and reducing conditions. Mofette soils usually are considered to be sites of carbon accumulation, which is not only due to the absence of oxygen, but might also result from lower plant litter quality due to CO2 fertilization of CO2 influenced plants and reduced availability of N and P for the decomposer community. Furthermore, fermentation processes and the formation of reduced elements by anoxic decomposition might fuel chemo-lithoautotrophic or mixotrophic microbial CO2 uptake, a process which might have important ecological functions by closing internal element cycles, formation of trace gasses as well as by re-cycling and storing of carbon. Several studies of microbial community structure revealed a shift towards CO2 utilizing prokaryotes in moffete soils compared to a reference site. Here, we use combined stable and radiocarbon isotope data from mofette soils in NW Bohemia to quantify the contribution of geogenic CO2 to soil organic carbon formation within mofette soils, either resulting from plant litter or from microbial CO2 uptake. This is possible because the geogenic CO2 has a distinct isotopic signature (δ13C = -2 o Δ14C = -1000 ) that is very different from the isotopic signature of atmospheric CO2. First results show that mofette soils have a high Corg content (20 to 40 %) compared to a reference site (2 to 20 %) and soil organic matter is enriched in 13C as well as depleted in 14C. This indicates that geogenic CO2 is re-fixed and stored as SOM. In order to quantify microbial contribution to CO2 fixation and SOM storage, microbial CO2 uptake rates were determined by incubating mofette soils with 13CO2 labelled gas. The

  9. New York City's Urban Dome: Past and Present CO2 Concentration Patterns from an Urban to Rural Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, D.; Griffin, K.; McGillis, W. R.

    2010-12-01

    Urban centers may act as an important but often un-quantified point source for carbon dioxide (CO2) release and are a nexus between population growth, air quality and climate change. In addition, elucidating the effects of urbanization on plant physiology and function is critically important to understand how our natural ecosystems will respond to anthropogenic change. Tree ring 14C isotope composition can provide a localized historical record of an area’s fossil fuel-derived CO2 levels making it is possible to reconstruct an area’s anthropogenic CO2 history. Data from meteorological stations set up in and around New York City were utilized for the analysis of current CO2 levels. The focus here will be on the past 150 year record of CO2 concentrations in 10-year segments from an urban to rural transect in the greater New York City greater area. Furthermore, a 60 year record in 5-year increments were obtained from Commodore Barry Park, a highly industrialized, concrete-heavy area downwind from Manhattan, and the other in Forest Park, a densely vegetated park in Queens. Contemporary daily and seasonal variations of CO2 at a high temporal scale were measured as well. Variations in daily temperature ranges (DTR) will also be considered. Over the past century, the tree core data show that Central Park was approximately on average 15 ppm higher than the “clean” record of Mauna Loa and the Siple Ice Core. At a finer temporal scale, the current meteorological data show a similar overall trend, however, differences are much more variable and there are instances where urban CO2 can be as low as rural CO2, depending on the season and meteorological conditions of the region. Differences between an urban (Harlem) to rural (LDEO) site, for example, can vary 30.6 ppm in the winter and 13.7 in the summer, with similar seasonal trends at our other sites. The maximum average nighttime temperature difference between an urban (Harlem) and a rural (BRF) site reached 5.95

  10. Using the Bongwana natural CO2 release to understand leakage processes and develop monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David; Johnson, Gareth; Hicks, Nigel; Bond, Clare; Gilfillan, Stuart; Kremer, Yannick; Lister, Bob; Nkwane, Mzikayise; Maupa, Thulani; Munyangane, Portia; Robey, Kate; Saunders, Ian; Shipton, Zoe; Pearce, Jonathan; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Natural CO2 leakage along the Bongwana Fault in South Africa is being studied to help understand processes of CO2 leakage and develop monitoring protocols. The Bongwana Fault crops out over approximately 80 km in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. In outcrop the fault is expressed as a broad fracture corridor in Dwyka Tillite, with fractures oriented approximately N-S. Natural emissions of CO2 occur at various points along the fault, manifest as travertine cones and terraces, bubbling in the rivers and as gas fluxes through soil. Exposed rock outcrop shows evidence for Fe-staining around fractures and is locally extensively kaolinitised. The gas has also been released through a shallow water well, and was exploited commercially in the past. Preliminary studies have been carried out to better document the surface emissions using near surface gas monitoring, understand the origin of the gas through major gas composition and stable and noble gas isotopes and improve understanding of the structural controls on gas leakage through mapping. In addition the impact of the leaking CO2 on local water sources (surface and ground) is being investigated, along with the seismic activity of the fault. The investigation will help to build technical capacity in South Africa and to develop monitoring techniques and plans for a future CO2 storage pilot there. Early results suggest that CO2 leakage is confined to a relatively small number of spatially-restricted locations along the weakly seismically active fault. Fracture permeability appears to be the main method by which the CO2 migrates to the surface. The bulk of the CO2 is of deep origin with a minor contribution from near surface biogenic processes as determined by major gas composition. Water chemistry, including pH, DO and TDS is notably different between CO2-rich and CO2-poor sites. Soil gas content and flux effectively delineates the fault trace in active leakage sites. The fault provides an effective testing ground for

  11. Sapwood temperature gradients between lower stems and the crown do not influence estimates of stand-level stem CO(2) efflux.

    PubMed

    Bowman, William P; Turnbull, Matthew H; Tissue, David T; Whitehead, David; Griffin, Kevin L

    2008-10-01

    Temperature plays a critical role in the regulation of respiration rates and is often used to scale measurements of respiration to the stand-level and calculate annual respiratory fluxes. Previous studies have indicated that failure to consider temperature gradients between sun-exposed stems and branches in the crown and shaded lower stems may result in errors when deriving stand-level estimates of stem CO(2) efflux. We measured vertical gradients in sapwood temperature in a mature lowland podocarp rain forest in New Zealand to: (1) estimate the effects of within-stem temperature variation on the vertical distribution of stem CO(2) efflux; and (2) use these findings to estimate stand-level stem CO(2) efflux for this forest. Large within-stem gradients in sapwood temperature (1.6 +/- 0.1 to 6.0 +/- 0.5 degrees C) were observed. However, these gradients did not significantly influence the stand-level estimate of stem CO(2) efflux in this forest (536 +/- 42 mol CO(2) ha(-1) day(-1)) or the vertical distribution of stem CO(2) efflux, because of the opposing effects of daytime warming and nighttime cooling on CO(2) efflux in the canopy, and the small fraction of the woody biomass in the crowns of forest trees. Our findings suggest that detailed measurements of within-stand temperature gradients are unlikely to greatly improve the accuracy of tree- or stand-level estimates of stem CO(2) efflux. PMID:18708337

  12. Nature of protein-CO2 interactions as elucidated via molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Michael L; Wilson, Angela K; Cundari, Thomas R

    2012-09-27

    Rising global temperatures require innovative measures to reduce atmospheric concentrations of CO(2). The most successful carbon capture technology on Earth is the enzymatic capture of CO(2) and its sequestration in the form of glucose. Efforts to improve upon or mimic this naturally occurring process will require a rich understanding of protein-CO(2) interactions. Toward that end, extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on the CO(2)-utilizing enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). Preliminary simulations were performed using implicit and explicit solvent models, which yielded similar results: arginine, lysine, tyrosine, and asparagine enhance the ability of a protein to bind carbon dioxide. Extensive explicit solvent simulations were performed for both wild-type PEPCK and five single-point PEPCK mutants, revealing three prevalent channels by which CO(2) enters (or exits) the active site cleft, as well as a fourth channel (observed only once), the existence of which can be rationalized in terms of the position of a key Arg residue. The strongest CO(2) binding sites in these simulations consist of appropriately positioned hydrogen bond donors and acceptors. Interactions between CO(2) and both Mn(2+) and Mg(2+) present in PEPCK are minimal due to the stable protein- and solvent-based coordination environments of these cations. His 232, suggested by X-ray crystallography as being a potential important CO(2) binding site, is indeed found to be particularly "CO(2)-philic" in these simulations. Finally, a recent mechanism, proposed on the basis of X-ray crystallography, for PEPCK active site lid closure is discussed in light of the MD trajectories. Overall, the results of this work will prove useful not only to scientists investigating PEPCK, but also to groups seeking to develop an environmentally benign, protein-based carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization system. PMID:22882078

  13. Removal of CO2 and H2S from natural gases

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.; Volkamer, K.; Wagner, U.

    1985-08-27

    CO2 and, where relevant, H2S are removed from natural gases which contain CO2 and may or may not contain H2S by a process in which the said natural gases are treated, in an absorption stage at from 40 to 100 C., with an aqueous absorption liquid containing from 20 to 70% by weight of methyldiethanolamine, the treated natural gases are taken off at the top of the absorption stage, the aqueous absorption liquid laden with CO2 and, where relevant, H2S is taken off at the bottom of the absorption stage and then regenerated in one or more flash stages, and the regenerated absorption liquid is recycled to the absorption stage.

  14. A natural analogue for CO2 leakage: The release and fate of CO2 at the Jan Mayen vent fields (AMOR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, T.; Lilley, M. D.; Pedersen, R. B.; Thorseth, I. H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is seen as a new possible technique for reducing the emission of industrial CO2 to the atmosphere. To evaluate the risks of sub-seabed CO2 storage, the European Commission is supporting the international and multi-disciplinary ECO2 project. Among other objectives, this project is dealing with evaluating the likelihood of leakage and the resulting possible impacts on marine ecosystems. In the framework of the ECO2 project, the release and dispersal of CO2 have been studied at several natural seep sites. In this study, we present geochemical data collected at the natural CO2 leakage analogue, Jan Mayen vent fields (JMVF). The basalt-hosted JMVF are located at 71° N on the southern end of the ultra-slow spreading Mohns Ridge, which is part of the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) system. The JMVF are composed of several venting sites, spread over a large area. These venting areas include focused high-temperature venting and diffuse low-temperature fluid flow vents as well as areas where free gas bubbles are released. Over the past few years, we have repeatedly visited and extensively sampled these vent fields to study the release and fate of CO2 in this natural seep area. One of our main objectives was to constrain the CO2 content of the widely emitted gas and to study its dispersion and fate in the water column. We have also investigated hydrate formation, which is observed at various locations. The venting fluids are chemically characterized by CO2 concentrations of up to 110 mmol/kg, having an associated isotopic composition representing a mantle carbon source. Thus, the CO2 concentrations measured at the JMVF represent the high-end compared to the concentration range of most other basalt-hosted hydrothermal mid-ocean ridge systems. Even though the concentrations of the emitted CO2 vary over time and with the type of venting (focused flow, diffuse flow or bubbles), the overall release is continuously high. The dispersion of the

  15. Chemical-mechanical coupling observed for depleted oil reservoirs subjected to long-term CO2-exposure - A case study of the Werkendam natural CO2 analogue field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Bakker, Elisenda; Bertier, Pieter; Nover, Georg; Busch, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Geological storage of CO2 is one of the most promising technologies to rapidly reduce anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide. In order to ensure storage integrity, it is important to understand the effect of long-term CO2/brine/rock interactions on the mechanical behaviour of a storage complex. As most of these reactions are too slow to reproduce on laboratory timescales, we studied a natural CO2 analogue reservoir (the Röt Fringe Sandstone, Werkendam field, the Netherlands; 125-135 Ma of CO2-exposure) and its unreacted counterpart. We focused on CO2-induced mineralogical and porosity-permeability changes, and their effect on mechanical behaviour of both intact rock and simulated fault gouge. Overall, CO2-exposure did not lead to drastic mineralogical changes. The CO2-exposed material shows a stronger dependence of permeability on porosity, which is attributed to differences in diagenesis (closed-system diagenesis and hydrocarbon emplacement) taking place before CO2 charging. The limited extent of reaction was in part the result of bitumen coatings protecting specific mineral phases from reaction. In local, mm-sized zones displaying significant anhydrite cement dissolution, enhanced porosity was observed. For most of the reservoir the long-term mechanical behaviour after CO2-exposure could be described by the behaviour of the unreacted sandstone, while these more 'porous' zones had a lower rock strength. In addition, CO2-exposure did not affect the fault friction behaviour, and slip is expected to result in stable sliding. Simple stress path calculations predict that reservoir failure due to depletion and injection is unlikely, even for the 'porous' zones, nor will fault reactivation occur for realistic injection scenarios.

  16. Natural gradient learning algorithms for RBF networks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junsheng; Wei, Haikun; Zhang, Chi; Li, Weiling; Guo, Weili; Zhang, Kanjian

    2015-02-01

    Radial basis function (RBF) networks are one of the most widely used models for function approximation and classification. There are many strange behaviors in the learning process of RBF networks, such as slow learning speed and the existence of the plateaus. The natural gradient learning method can overcome these disadvantages effectively. It can accelerate the dynamics of learning and avoid plateaus. In this letter, we assume that the probability density function (pdf) of the input and the activation function are gaussian. First, we introduce natural gradient learning to the RBF networks and give the explicit forms of the Fisher information matrix and its inverse. Second, since it is difficult to calculate the Fisher information matrix and its inverse when the numbers of the hidden units and the dimensions of the input are large, we introduce the adaptive method to the natural gradient learning algorithms. Finally, we give an explicit form of the adaptive natural gradient learning algorithm and compare it to the conventional gradient descent method. Simulations show that the proposed adaptive natural gradient method, which can avoid the plateaus effectively, has a good performance when RBF networks are used for nonlinear functions approximation. PMID:25380332

  17. CO2, CH4 and N2O dynamics in Belgian rivers across a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Alberto V.; Darchambeau, François; Beulen, Aurore

    2014-05-01

    Two rivers and two streams close to the city of Liège in Belgium (Meuse, Ourthe, Geer and Blanc Gravier) were sampled to describe the dynamics of CO2, CH4 and N2O (for the first time in Belgium for freshwaters). The four systems were chosen to cover a gradient of size (stream to river) and of human influence (mainly forested to mainly agricultural watersheds). The study covers the period from February 2011 to March 2013 with weekly sampling in surface waters. The variables were very contrasted in the four systems, the Geer showing a strong enrichment in nitrogen NH4+ et NO2-) and phosphorous in relation to the other three systems. The O2 concentrations were much lower, and the concentration of CH4, N2O and pCO2 were much higher in the Geer than in other three systems. The concentrations in CH4, N2O and pCO2 were higher in the Ourthe than in the Meuse and than in the Blanc Gravier. Marked seasonal variations were observed in the 4 systems. In general the concentration of CH4, N2O and pCO2 were higher in summer than in winter. This is related on one hand to the increase of temperature in summer that stimulates bacterial activity. Also in summer, the availability of organic matter for bacterial activity is higher after the spring phytoplankton blooms and also from allochthnous inputs from the watersheds. The increase of temperature and bacterial consumption of O2 in the water column leads to a lesser O2 penetration in the sediments that could stimulate benthic anaerobic processes among which methanogenesis and denitrification, leading to an increase of CH4 and N2O in the water column. Also, the production of N2O by denitrification strongly increases at low O2. During low water, the increase of residence time of the water mass and the decrease of current (decrease of degasing) allow an accumulation of CO2, CH4 and N2O in the water column. On the contrary during high water, dilution and increase of current (increase of degasing) lead to a decrease of concentrations

  18. CO2-rich geothermal areas in Iceland as natural analogues for geologic carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D.; Maher, K.; Bird, D. K.; Brown, G. E.; Arnorsson, S.

    2013-12-01

    Geologic CO2 sequestration into mafic rocks via silicate mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation has been suggested as a way to mitigate industrial CO2 emissions by storing CO2 in a stable form. Experimental observations of irreversible reaction of basalt with supercritical or gaseous and aqueous CO2 have resulted in carbonate precipitation, but there are no universal trends linking the extent of mineralization and type of reaction products to the bulk rock composition, glass percentage or mineralogy of the starting material. Additionally, concern exists that CO2 leakage from injection sites and migration through the subsurface may induce mineral dissolution and desorption of trace elements, potentially contaminating groundwater. This study investigates low-temperature (≤180°C) basaltic geothermal areas in Iceland with an anomalously high input of magmatic CO2 as natural analogues of the geochemical processes associated with the injection of CO2 into mafic rocks and possible leakage. Fluids that contain >4 mmol/kg total CO2 are common along the divergent Snæfellsnes Volcanic Zone in western Iceland and within the South Iceland Seismic Zone in southwest Iceland. The meteorically derived waters contain up to 80 mmol/kg dissolved inorganic carbonate (DIC). The aqueous concentration of major cations and trace elements is greater than that in Icelandic surface and groundwater and increases with DIC and decreasing pH. Concentrations of As and Ni in some samples are several times the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for safe drinking water. Thermodynamic modeling indicates that waters approach saturation with respect to calcite and/or aragonite, kaolinite and amorphous silica, and are undersaturated with respect to plagioclase feldspar, clinozoisite and Ca-zeolites. Petrographic study of drill cuttings from wells that intersect the CO2-rich areas indicates that the sites have undergone at least two stages of hydrothermal alteration: initial high

  19. Carbonate reactions in a natural CO2 Reservoir, Green River, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, H.; Bickle, M. J.; Kampman, N.; Maskell, A.; Busch, A.; Evans, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the geochemical interaction of CO2 with minerals within a rock reservoir is vitally important to assess the long-term suitability of underground storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide. This study investigates the complexities of changes in mineralogy, porosity and flow within a series of porous aquifers and caprocks within Jurassic sedimentary sequences flooded by natural CO2 at Green River in Utah. This study of a natural analogue will inform the processes to quantify the risk of leakage and evolution of stored CO2 over a range of time scales in a sequence of stacked aquifers separated by less permeable rock layers. A 325m well (CO2W55 diamond drilled by DOSECC in 2012) gave excellent recovery of 282m of core from two major CO2 reservoirs in the Entrada and Navajo Sandstones and from the intervening Carmel Formation caprock. Fluid samples were also taken at pressure downhole. Element and isotope geochemistry were used to constrain fluid sources, mixing and fluid-rock reactions. Comparisons were made with the geochemistry of an adjacent cold water CO2-geyser to investigate the upward leakage and horizontal flow from the Little Grand Wash normal Fault that both the geyser and borehole intersect. Here we report the geochemical and isotopic compositions of the various carbonate and silicate components of the CO2 reacted rocks to constrain fluid-mineral reactions. A series of leaching experiments investigating reagents and reaction times allowed measurement of cation and strontium isotopic compositions of the major components within this sedimentary sequence. Strontium isotopes offer a powerful constraint in the study of subsurface fluid-rock reactions as they can be measured to high precision and are not affected by mass dependent fractionations during reaction and fluid transport. Analysis of major cations (especially Ca, Mg and Fe), Sr and 87Sr/86Sr of leachates from sequential leaching experiments allows estimation of the chemical and Sr

  20. Mofettes - Investigation of Natural CO2 Springs - Insights and Methods applied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübben, A.; Leven, C.

    2014-12-01

    The quantification of carbon dioxide concentrations and fluxes leaking from the subsurface into the atmosphere is highly relevant in several research fields such as climate change, CCS, volcanic activity, or earthquake monitoring. Many of the areas with elevated carbon dioxide degassing pose the problem that under the given situation a systematic investigation of the relevant processes is only possible to a limited extent (e.g. in terms of spatial extent, accessibility, hazardous conditions). The upper Neckar valley in Southwest Germany is a region of enhanced natural subsurface CO2 concentrations and mass fluxes of Tertiary volcanic origin. At the beginning of the twentieth century several companies started industrial mining of CO2. The decreasing productivity of the CO2 springs led to the complete shutdown of the industry in 1995 and the existing boreholes were sealed. However, there are evidences that the reservoir, located in the deposits of the Lower Triassic, started to refill during the last 20 years. The CO2 springs replenished and a variety of different phenomena (e.g. mofettes and perished flora and fauna) indicate the active process of large scale CO2 exhalation. This easy-to-access site serves as a perfect example for a natural analog to a leaky CCS site, including abandoned boreholes and a suitable porous rock reservoir in the subsurface. During extensive field campaigns we applied several monitoring techniques like measurements of soil gas concentrations, mass fluxes, electrical resistivity, as well as soil and atmospheric parameters. The aim was to investigate and quantify mass fluxes and the effect of variations in e.g. temperature, soil moisture on the mass flux intensity. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of the vicinity to a mofette on soil parameters like electrical conductivity and soil CO2 concentrations. In times of a changing climate due to greenhouse gases, regions featuring natural CO2 springs demand to be intensively investigated

  1. Potential CO2 Sequestration in Oil Field Reservoirs: Baseline Mineralogy and Natural Diagenesis, Kern County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, R. A.; Kaess, A. B.; Nguyen, D. T.; Caffee, S. E.; Olabise, O. E.

    2015-12-01

    Depleted oil fields have been suggested as potential sites for sequestration of CO2 generated from the burning of hydrocarbons. However, to be effective for removing CO2 from the atmosphere, the injected CO2 must remain within the reservoir. The role of atmospheric CO2 in rock weathering is well known and a growing body of experimental work indicates that under reservoir conditions supercritical CO2 also reacts with sedimentary rocks. In order to predict the behavior of injected CO2 in a given reservoir, detailed knowledge of the mineralogy is required. In addition, post-injection monitoring may include analyzing core samples to examine interactions between reservoir rocks and the CO2. Thus, documentation of the natural diagenetic processes within the reservoir is necessary so that changes caused by reactions with CO2 can be recognized. Kern County, California has been a major petroleum producing area for over a century and has three oil fields that have been identified as potential sites for CO2 sequestration. Two of these, Rio Bravo-Greeley and McKittrick, have no previously published mineralogic studies. Samples from these (and nearby Wasco) oil fields were studied using transmitted-light petrography and scanning electron microscopy. At Rio Bravo-Greeley-Wasco, Kreyenhagen (Eocene) and Vedder (Oligocene) sandstones are mainly arkosic arenites with only small amounts of volcanic rock fragments. Detrital feldspars exhibit wide compositional ranges (up to Or75Ab25 & Ab50An50). Diagenesis has greatly altered the rocks. There are significant amounts of relatively pure authigenic K-feldspar and albite. Small amounts of authigenic quartz, calcite, dolomite, ankerite, kaolinite, illite/smectite, chlorite, zeolite, and pyrite are present. Plagioclase has been preferentially dissolved, with andesine more susceptible than oligoclase. Al3+ has been exported from the sandstones. At McKittrick, Temblor sandstones (Oligocene-Miocene) contain up to 33% volcanic rock fragments

  2. A natural site for CO2 storage in the Little Hungarian Plain (western Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, C.; Berta, M.; Szamosfalvi, Á.; Falus, G.; Szabó, C.

    2012-04-01

    Reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions is one of the greatest goals of the present and future environmental scientists. A measureable decrease in the atmospheric CO2 level can be achieved only by applying different solutions at the same time. Carbon capture and sequestration is considered to be an efficient technology in eliminating carbon-dioxide at large, stationary carbon-emitting industrial sources. To ensure the long term stability of the geologically trapped CO2, behavior of the CO2-reservoir-porewater system should be predictable on geological timescales. One of the suitable methods to describe a potential future CCS system is to approach it from an accessible system similar in extensions, geophysical and geochemical properties, and characteristic interactions. These are called natural sites; one of them is located in the western part of Hungary: this is the Répcelak-Mihályi Field. However the carbon dioxide is produced since the early 20th century for industrial purposes, the studied system is composed by 38 fields (26 CO2, 10 hydrocarbon, and 2 mixed gas). The CO2 is situated in a depth of about 1400 m in the Pannonian sedimentary sequence. These formations are formed by mainly sandstone, siltstone and clay; and were deposited in the late Miocene. In this ongoing research we are summarizing all the available databases from this area, provided by hydrocarbon exploration well logs, and core samples from the studied layers. We are collecting information to have the input data for further modeling projects. These data are about basic petrophysical properties (porosity and permeability), surface and deep zone gas analysis, and pore fluid contents. Concerning this group of information, we will be able to identify which major processes were taking place in the past in this natural CO2-H2O-rock system. These are expected to be mainly fluid-rock interactions. As a result, we have a close view on what reactions and at what rates are expected at a future CCS storage

  3. The Himalayas of Nepal, a natural laboratory for the search and measurement of CO2 discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, Frédéric; Koirala, Bharat P.; Bhattarai, Mukunda; Rajaure, Sudhir; Richon, Patrick; Perrier, Frédéric

    2010-05-01

    : the presence of a hot spring with high δ13C, of H2S smell, of hot spots in thermal images, of a geological contact, of self-potential anomalies (Byrdina et al., Journal of Geophysical Research, 2009) or of large radon-222 flux. Preliminary results about the failures or successes of the various methods will be given in the Trisuli and Langtang valleys (Central Nepal), in the Kali Gandaki valley (Western Nepal) and in the Thuli Bheri valley (Lower Dolpo, Far Western Nepal). These various sites also offer an opportunity to test the optimal estimation of total CO2 flux, using the least amount of experimental measurements. Preliminary results complemented by simulations will also be given on the total CO2 flux. In parallel, monitoring methods are being studied in the Syabru-Bensi pilot site. First, CO2 flux has been studied as a function of time using repeated measurements. Furthermore, the high radon content of the geological CO2 allows cost-effective monitoring using BARASOL probes. More than two years of data are already available and give hints on the use of radon to follow CO2 discharge as a function of time. These first results show how experimental studies carried out in natural discharge zones provide a rich laboratory to test the methodological approaches useful for CO2 leakage and monitoring.

  4. Mineral Carbonation Potential of CO2 from Natural and Industrial-based Alkalinity Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, J.; Kirchofer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral carbonation is a Carbon Capture and Storage (CSS) technology where gaseous CO2 is reacted with alkaline materials (such as silicate minerals and alkaline industrial wastes) and converted into stable and environmentally benign carbonate minerals (Metz et al., 2005). Here, we present a holistic, transparent life cycle assessment model of aqueous mineral carbonation built using a hybrid process model and economic input-output life cycle assessment approach. We compared the energy efficiency and the net CO2 storage potential of various mineral carbonation processes based on different feedstock material and process schemes on a consistent basis by determining the energy and material balance of each implementation (Kirchofer et al., 2011). In particular, we evaluated the net CO2 storage potential of aqueous mineral carbonation for serpentine, olivine, cement kiln dust, fly ash, and steel slag across a range of reaction conditions and process parameters. A preliminary systematic investigation of the tradeoffs inherent in mineral carbonation processes was conducted and guidelines for the optimization of the life-cycle energy efficiency are provided. The life-cycle assessment of aqueous mineral carbonation suggests that a variety of alkalinity sources and process configurations are capable of net CO2 reductions. The maximum carbonation efficiency, defined as mass percent of CO2 mitigated per CO2 input, was 83% for CKD at ambient temperature and pressure conditions. In order of decreasing efficiency, the maximum carbonation efficiencies for the other alkalinity sources investigated were: olivine, 66%; SS, 64%; FA, 36%; and serpentine, 13%. For natural alkalinity sources, availability is estimated based on U.S. production rates of a) lime (18 Mt/yr) or b) sand and gravel (760 Mt/yr) (USGS, 2011). The low estimate assumes the maximum sequestration efficiency of the alkalinity source obtained in the current work and the high estimate assumes a sequestration efficiency

  5. Soil microbial respiration (CO2) of natural and anthropogenically-transformed ecosystems in Moscow region, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, Kristina; Ananyeva, Nadezhda; Rogovaya, Sofia; Vasenev, Viacheslav

    2016-04-01

    The CO2 concentration in modern atmosphere is increasing and one of the most reasons of it is land use changing. It is related not only with soil plowing, but also with growing urbanization and, thereby, forming the urban ecosystems. Such conversion of soil cover might be affected by efflux CO2 from soil into atmosphere. The soil CO2 efflux mainly supplies by soil microorganisms respiration (contribution around 70-90%) and plant roots respiration. Soil microbial respiration (MR) is determined in the field (in situ) and laboratory (in vitro) conditions. The measurement of soil MR in situ is labour-consuming, and for district, region and country areas it is difficult carried. We suggest to define the MR of the upper highest active 10 cm mineral soil layer (in vitro) followed by the accounting of area for different ecosystems in large region of Russia. Soils were sampled (autumn, 2011) in natural (forest, meadow) and anthropogenically-transformed (arable, urban) ecosystems of Sergiev-Posad, Taldom, Voskresenk, Shatura, Serpukhov and Serbryanye Prudy districts in Moscow region. In soil samples (total 156) the soil MR (24 h, 22°C, 60% WHC) were measured after preincubation procedure (7 d., 22°C, 55% WHC). The soil MR ranged from 0.13 (urban) to 5.41 μg CO2-C g-1 h-1 (meadow), the difference between these values was 42 times. Then, the soil MR values (per unit soil weight) were calculated per unit soil area (1 m2), the layer thickness of which was 0.1 m (soil volume weight was equaled 1 g cm-3). The high MR values were noted for forests soil (832-1410 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1) of studied districts, and the low MR values were for arable and urban soils (by 1.6-3.2 and 1.3-2.7 times less compared to forests, respectively). The MR rate of urban soil in Voskresenk district was comparable to that of corresponding meadows and it was even higher (in average by 2.3 times) in Serpukhov district. The soil MR rate of studied cities was higher by 20%, than in corresponding arable soils

  6. Long-term effects of CO2 on the mechanical behaviour of faults - a study of samples from a natural CO2 analogue (Entrada Sandstone, Utah, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, E.; Hangx, S.; Spiers, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 capture followed by storage in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is currently seen as one of the most promising CO2-mitigation strategies. An important issue in relation to long-term CO2 storage is the prediction of the effects of fluid-rock interaction on the mechanical integrity and sealing capacity of the reservoir-seal system, on timescales of the order of 103 or 104 years. However, the assumed chemical interactions in the rock/CO2/brine system are slow, so that their long-term effects on rock composition, microstructure, mechanical properties and transport properties cannot be reproduced in laboratory experiments. One way to address this is to study the effects of reactions in natural CO2 reservoirs, using a so-called natural analogue approach. We tackled the question of how reactions characterizing natural CO2 fields affect fault friction, fault reactivation potential and seismic vs. aseismic slip stability, as well as transmissivity evolution during and after fault reactivation. Simulated fault gouges were prepared by crushing material obtained from surface outcrops of the Entrada Sandstone, a locally CO2-bearing formation forming an analogue field under the Colorado Plateau, Utah, USA . We used three types of starting material: 1) CO2 unaffected (unbleached) samples consisting mainly of quartz and feldspar, 2) "bleached" samples, and 3) heavily cemented/altered fault rock containing a high percentage of carbonates (> 40 wt%). The latter two were altered as a result of interaction with CO2-rich fluids over geological time. We performed triaxial direct shear experiments on these materials at room temperature under nominally dry conditions, at normal stresses up to 90 MPa and shear velocities of 0.22 -10.9 μm/s. The results of the experiments yielded friction coefficients (μ= τ/σn) of 0.55-0.85 for unbleached sandstone gouge and 0.45-0.80 for bleached material, while the fault material showed systematically higher friction coefficients (0.60-0.95). All

  7. Performance analysis of a Cooling System with Natural-Circulation Loop using CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Takashi

    The experiments and calculations were carried out to evaluate the cycle performance of natural circulation loop with CO2. The cooling capacity of CO2 was compared with that of R410A and the cooling capacity of reverse circulation observed under the supercritical condition was analyzed from a point of view of refrigerant flow direction. The experimental results showed that the cooling capacity of CO2 was approximately4∼13% larger than that of R410A under the two-phase condition at indoor temperature of 30°C. On the other hand, the cooling capacity of CO2 was approximately11% smaller than that of R410A under the supercritical condition at indoor temperature of 50°C. In addition, the cooling capacity with the counter-cross flow heat exchanger was approximately 40% larger than that with the parallel-cross flow heat exchanger under the supercritical condition at indoor temperature of 50°C. These experimental results agreed well with the calculated results.

  8. Assessment of CO2 discharge in a spring using time-variant stable carbon isotope data as a natural analogue study of CO2 leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Soonyoung; Chae, Gitak; Jo, Minki; Kim, Jeong-Chan; Yun, Seong-Taek

    2015-04-01

    CO2-rich springs have been studied as a natural analogue of CO2 leakage through shallow subsurface environment, as they provide information on the behaviors of CO2 during the leakage from geologic CO2 storage sites. For this study, we monitored the δ13C values as well as temperature, pH, EC, DO, and alkalinity for a CO2-rich spring for 48 hours. The water samples (N=47) were collected every hour in stopper bottles without headspace to avoid the interaction with air and the CO2 degassing. The δ13C values of total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) in the water samples were analyzed using a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system (Picarro). The values of δ13CTDIC, temperature, pH, EC, DO, and alkalinity were in the range of -9.43 ~ -8.91 o 12.3 ~ 13.2oC, 4.86 ~ 5.02, 186 ~ 189 μS/cm, 1.8 ~ 3.4 mg/L, and 0.74 ~ 0.95 meq/L, respectively. The concentrations of TDIC calculated using pH and alkalinity values were between 22.5 and 34.8 mmol/L. The δ13CTDIC data imply that dissolved carbon in the spring was derived from a deep-seated source (i.e., magmatic) that was slightly intermixed with soil CO2. Careful examination of the time-series variation of measured parameters shows the following characteristics: 1) the δ13CTDIC values are negatively correlated with pH (r = -0.59) and positively correlated with TDIC (r = 0.58), and 2) delay times of the change of pH and alkalinity following the change of δ13CTDIC values are 0 and -3 hours, respectively; the pH change occurs simultaneously with the change of δ13CTDIC, while the alkalinity change happens before 3 hours. Our results indicate that the studied CO2-rich spring is influenced by the intermittent supply of deep-seated CO2. [Acknowledgment] This work was financially supported by the fundamental research project of KIGAM and partially by the "Geo-Advanced Innovative Action (GAIA) Project (2014000530003)" from Korea Ministry of Environment (MOE).

  9. Fault-controlled CO2 leakage from natural reservoirs in the Colorado Plateau, East-Central Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Na-Hyun; Han, Weon Shik; Watson, Z. T.; Graham, Jack P.; Kim, Kue-Young

    2014-10-01

    The study investigated a natural analogue for soil CO2 fluxes where CO2 has naturally leaked on the Colorado Plateau, East-Central Utah in order to identify various factors that control CO2 leakage and to understand regional-scale CO2 leakage processes in fault systems. The total 332 and 140 measurements of soil CO2 flux were made at 287 and 129 sites in the Little Grand Wash (LGW) and Salt Wash (SW) fault zones, respectively. Measurement sites for CO2 flux involved not only conspicuous CO2 degassing features (e.g., CO2-driven springs/geysers) but also linear features (e.g., joints/fractures and areas of diffusive leakage around a fault damage zone). CO2 flux anomalies were mostly observed along the fault traces. Specifically, CO2 flux anomalies were focused in the northern footwall of the both LGW and SW faults, supporting the existence of north-plunging anticlinal CO2 trap against south-dipping faults as well as higher probability of the north major fault traces as conduits. Anomalous CO2 fluxes also appeared in active travertines adjacent to CO2-driven cold springs and geysers (e.g., 36,259 g m-2 d-1 at Crystal Geyser), ancient travertines (e.g., 5,917 g m-2 d-1), joint zones in sandstone (e.g., 120 g m-2 d-1), and brine discharge zones (e.g., 5,515 g m-2 d-1). These observations indicate that CO2 has escaped through those pathways and that CO2 leakage from these fault zones does not correspond to point source leakage. The magnitude of CO2 flux is progressively reduced from north (i.e. the LGW fault zone, ∼36,259 g m-2 d-1) to south (i.e. the SW fault zone, ∼1,428 g m-2 d-1) despite new inputs of CO2 and CO2-saturated brine to the northerly SW fault from depth. This discrepancy in CO2 flux is most likely resulting from the differences in fault zone architecture and associated permeability structure. CO2-rich fluids from the LGW fault zone may become depleted with respect to CO2 during lateral transport, resulting in an additional decrease in CO2 fluxes

  10. Natural equivalents of thermal gradient experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Carmen; Geyer, Adelina; Castro, Antonio; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Crystallization experiments using the intrinsic thermal gradient in 10 mm length capsules loaded in piston-cylinder assemblies were used to investigate silicic magma crystallization. The application of experimental results to natural environments requires the scaling of physical parameters of petrological interest. Therefore, we propose here a comparative study between thermal gradients and numerical simulations of natural magma chambers. We use the Finite Element method to calculate thermal profiles across a cooling silicic magma chamber. These numerical profiles are compared with the intrinsic thermal structure of half-inch, piston-cylinder assemblies at 500 MPa. It is concluded that a set of varied magma chamber geometries and/or distinct stages of their cooling history can approach the intrinsic thermal structure of laboratory experiments. Once the thermal properties for magma and its host rock are fixed, the experimental-numerical approach is mostly dependent on the volume and aspect ratio of the magma chamber. Our results indicate, for instance, that a 10 mm length capsule with a thermal gradient of 40 °C/mm (from 1100 to 700 °C) may represent a 150-1100 m wide portion of a cooling magma chamber of 10-20 km diameter and 2-10 km height, emplaced at a depth of 18 km. Additional possible scenarios are represented by larger magma chambers, up to 30 km diameter, in which the experimental thermal gradient can represent a 150-3700 m-thin-section of the large igneous bodies.

  11. Long-term ecological dynamics: reciprocal insights from natural and anthropogenic gradients

    PubMed Central

    Fukami, Tadashi; Wardle, David A

    2005-01-01

    Many ecological dynamics occur over time-scales that are well beyond the duration of conventional experiments or observations. One useful approach to overcome this problem is extrapolation of temporal dynamics from spatial variation. We review two complementary variants of this approach that have been of late increasingly employed: the use of natural gradients to infer anthropogenic effects and the use of anthropogenic gradients to infer natural dynamics. Recent studies have considered a variety of naturally occurring gradients associated with climate, CO2, disturbance and biodiversity gradients, as well as anthropogenic gradients such as those created by biological invasions, habitat fragmentation and land abandonment. These studies show that natural gradients are useful in predicting long-term consequences of human-induced environmental changes, whereas anthropogenic gradients are helpful in inferring the mechanisms behind natural dynamics because covarying factors are often more clearly understood in anthropogenic gradients than in natural gradients. We classify these studies into several categories, each with different strengths and weaknesses, and outline how the limitations can be overcome by combining the gradient-based approach with other approaches. Overall, studies reviewed here demonstrate that the development of basic ecological concepts and the application of these concepts to environmental problems can be more effective when conducted complementarily than when pursued separately. PMID:16191623

  12. Long-term effects of CO2 on the mechanical behaviour of faults - a study of samples from a natural CO2 analogue (Entrada Sandstone, Utah, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, S. J. T.; Bakker, E.; Spiers, C. J.

    2012-04-01

    In an attempt to reduce CO2 emissions, CO2 capture and storage in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is seen as one of the most important mitigation strategies. However, in order to achieve safe storage on geological timescales, it is key to maintain integrity of the caprock and any faults penetrating the seal. One of the largest uncertainties lies in the prediction of the effects of fluid-rock interaction on the mechanical integrity and sealing capacity of the reservoir-seal system in the very long term, i.e. on timescales of the order of 103 or 104 years. As chemical interactions in the rock/CO2/brine system are slow, their long-term effects on rock composition, microstructure, mechanical properties and transport properties cannot be properly reproduced in laboratory experiments. One way of addressing this issue is to conduct experiments on reservoir, caprock and fault rock samples taken from natural CO2 reservoir-seal systems, which can serve as natural analogues for CO2 storage fields. The transport and mechanical properties of these rock samples, which have reacted with CO2 over geological timescales, can then be compared with data obtained for laterally equivalent materials that are unaffected by CO2. The observed changes in rock properties can subsequently be used as input for numerical models aimed at assessing the long-term effects of CO2 on reservoir compaction, caprock damage, fault reactivation and fault permeability. We assessed the mechanical behaviour and transport properties of fault rocks. To this end, we performed triaxial direct shear experiments at room temperature under nominally dry conditions, at normal stresses up to 90 MPa and shear velocities of 0.22 -10.9 μm/s. Simulated fault rocks were prepared by crushing material obtained from surface outcrops of the Entrada Sandstone, one of the CO2-bearing formations from an analogue field under the Colorado Plateau, Utah, USA. Three types of starting material were obtained: 1) red-coloured samples

  13. Natural and industrial analogues for leakage of CO2 from storagereservoirs: identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-28

    The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deepgeologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO2emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologiccarbon storage is to trap CO2 underground, CO2 could migrate away fromthe storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeablepathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitudereleases of CO2 have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs innumerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbondioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO2reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due toinfluences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. Thesesystems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potentialrelease of CO2 from geologic storage reservoirs and provide importantinformation about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that areassociated with releases, as well as the health, safety, andenvironmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can beapplied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO2 and industrialreleases of CO2 and natural gas in the context of these characteristics.Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessonscan be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO2 can bothaccumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondaryreservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Bothprimary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO2 should therefore bewell characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO2have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release,such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential forprocesses that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks andtrigger the release of CO2 from a storage reservoir should be evaluated.Third, unsealed fault and fracture zones may act as fast and directconduits

  14. A flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the CH4, CO2, and H2O fluxes at a lake-air interface.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Liu, Shoudong; Li, Hanchao; Xiao, Qitao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhenghua; Hu, Cheng; Gao, Yunqiu; Shen, Jing; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Mi; Lee, Xuhui

    2014-12-16

    Inland lakes play important roles in water and greenhouse gas cycling in the environment. This study aims to test the performance of a flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the fluxes of water vapor, CO2, and CH4 at a lake-air interface. The concentration gradients over the water surface were measured with an analyzer based on the wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy technology, and the eddy diffusivity was measured with a sonic anemometer. Results of a zero-gradient test indicate a flux measurement precision of 4.8 W m(-2) for water vapor, 0.010 mg m(-2) s(-1) for CO2, and 0.029 μg m(-2) s(-1) for CH4. During the 620 day measurement period, 97%, 69%, and 67% of H2O, CO2, and CH4 hourly fluxes were higher in magnitude than the measurement precision, which confirms that the flux-gradient system had adequate precision for the measurement of the lake-air exchanges. This study illustrates four strengths of the flux-gradient method: (1) the ability to simultaneously measure the flux of H2O, CO2, and CH4; (2) negligibly small density corrections; (3) the ability to resolve small CH4 gradient and flux; and (4) continuous and noninvasive operation. The annual mean CH4 flux (1.8 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)) at this hypereutrophic lake was close to the median value for inland lakes in the world (1.6 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)). The system has adequate precision for CH4 flux for broad applications but requires further improvement to resolve small CO2 flux in many lakes. PMID:25377990

  15. Large amplitude spatial and temporal gradients in atmospheric boundary layer CO2 mole fractions detected with a tower-based network in the U.S. upper Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Natasha L.; Richardson, Scott J.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Andrews, Arlyn E.; West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Crosson, Eric R.

    2012-03-01

    This study presents observations of atmospheric boundary layer CO2mole fraction from a nine-tower regional network deployed during the North American Carbon Program's Mid-Continent Intensive (MCI) during 2007-2009. The MCI region is largely agricultural, with well-documented carbon exchange available via agricultural inventories. By combining vegetation maps and tower footprints, we show the fractional influence of corn, soy, grass, and forest biomes varies widely across the MCI. Differences in the magnitude of CO2 flux from each of these biomes lead to large spatial gradients in the monthly averaged CO2mole fraction observed in the MCI. In other words, the monthly averaged gradients are tied to regional patterns in net ecosystem exchange (NEE). The daily scale gradients are more weakly connected to regional NEE, instead being governed by local weather and large-scale weather patterns. With this network of tower-based mole fraction measurements, we detect climate-driven interannual changes in crop growth that are confirmed by satellite and inventory methods. These observations show that regional-scale CO2 mole fraction networks yield large, coherent signals governed largely by regional sources and sinks of CO2.

  16. The nature of the solar wind interaction with CO2/CO-dominated comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpis, H. L. F.; Mendis, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The nature of the interaction of the solar wind with the ionospheres (field-free ion cavities) of comets with CO or CO2 as their dominant volatile species is considered and compared with the solar wind interaction with H2O-diominated comets. Calculations of the heliocentric variation of scale lengths defined as the nuclear distance at which the mean free path for ion-neutral collisions becomes equal to the nuclear distance, and the ion and neutral stand-off distances are presented for different modes of energy addition, nuclear radii and ionization time scales. Results indicate that whereas little activity can be expected from H2O-dominated comets at distances beyond 3 AU, COand CO2-dominated comets can be expected to be quite prolific at such distances. In contrast to H2O-dominated comets characterized by weak shocks, CO/CO2-dominated comet solar wind interactions are found to produce strong bow shocks within a specific heliocentric distance for the isothermal case of a CO-dominated comet, and a weak shock outside of this distance. In the general case, two types of cometary ionosphere transitions are found: a transition from strong to weak bow shock and from a compressible (soft) to an incompressible (hard) ionosphere, and a transition from a soft to a hard ionosphere with the bow shock remaining weak at a heliocentric distance dependant on atmospheric optical depth, bolometric albedo, nuclear radius, latent heat of sublimation of nuclear material, ionization time scale and type of heat addition. It is pointed out that the behavior of Comet Humason can be explained by solar wind interactions with a CO- or CO2-dominated comet.

  17. 300-Myr-old magmatic CO2 in natural gas reservoirs of the west Texas Permian basin.

    PubMed

    Ballentine, C J; Schoell, M; Coleman, D; Cain, B A

    2001-01-18

    Except in regions of recent crustal extension, the dominant origin of carbon dioxide in fluids in sedimentary basins has been assumed to be from crustal organic matter or mineral reactions. Here we show, by contrast, that Rayleigh fractionation caused by partial degassing of a magma body can explain the CO2/3He ratios and delta13C(CO2) values observed in CO2-rich natural gases in the west Texas Val Verde basin and also the mantle 3He/22Ne ratios observed in other basin systems. Regional changes in CO2/3He and CO2/CH4 ratios can be explained if the CO2 input pre-dates methane generation in the basin, which occurred about 280 Myr ago. Uplift to the north of the Val Verde basin between 310 and 280 Myr ago appears to be the only tectonic event with appropriate timing and location to be the source of the magmatic CO2. Our identification of magmatic CO2 in a foreland basin indicates that the origin of CO2 in other mid-continent basin systems should be re-evaluated. Also, the inferred closed-system preservation of natural gas in a trapping structure for approximately 300 Myr is far longer than the residence time predicted by diffusion models. PMID:11201738

  18. Soil microbial community changes as a result of long-term exposure to a natural CO 2 vent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, B. I.; Michaelis, W.; Blumenberg, M.; Frerichs, J.; Schulz, H. M.; Schippers, A.; Beaubien, S. E.; Krüger, M.

    2010-05-01

    The capture and geological storage of CO 2 can be used to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. To assess the environmental impact of potential CO 2 leakage from deep storage reservoirs on the abundance and functional diversity of microorganisms in near-surface terrestrial environments, a natural CO 2 vent (>90% CO 2 in the soil gas) was studied as an analogue. The microbial communities were investigated using lipid biomarkers combined with compound-specific stable carbon isotope analyses, the determination of microbial activities, and the use of quantitative polymerase chain reactions (Q-PCR). With this complementary set of methods, significant differences between the CO 2-rich vent and a reference site with a normal CO 2 concentration were detected. The δ 13C values of the plant and microbial lipids within the CO 2 vent demonstrate that substantial amounts of geothermal CO 2 were incorporated into the microbial, plant, and soil carbon pools. Moreover, the numbers of Archaea and Bacteria were highest at the reference site and substantially lower at the CO 2 vent. Lipid biomarker analyses, Q-PCR, and the determination of microbial activities showed the presence of CO 2-utilising methanogenic Archaea, Geobacteraceae, and sulphate-reducing Bacteria (SRB) mainly at the CO 2 vent, only minor quantities were found at the reference site. Stable carbon isotopic analyses revealed that the methanogenic Archaea and SRB utilised the vent-derived CO 2 for assimilatory biosynthesis. Our results show a shift in the microbial community towards anaerobic and acidophilic microorganisms as a consequence of the long-term exposure of the soil environment to high CO 2 concentrations.

  19. Seasonal Variations in CO2 Efflux, Vadose Zone Gas Concentrations, and Natural Attenuation Rates at a Crude Oil Spill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trost, J.; Sihota, N.; Delin, G. N.; Warren, E.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate estimates of hydrocarbon source zone natural attenuation (SZNA) rates are important for managing contaminated sites but are difficult to measure. Moreover, SZNA rates may vary seasonally in response to climatic conditions. Previous research at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota, USA showed that SZNA rates in the summer can be estimated by subtracting background soil CO2 efflux from the total soil CO2 efflux above the contaminated source. In this study, seasonal variations in surficial CO2 efflux were evaluated with measurements of gas concentrations (including 14CO2), temperature, and volumetric water content in the vadose zone at the site during a 2-year period. Soil CO2 effluxes in the source zone were consistently greater than background CO2 effluxes, and the magnitude and areal extent of the increased efflux varied seasonally. In the source zone, the 14CO2 and the CO2 efflux data showed a larger proportion of soil CO2 was derived from SZNA in fall and winter (October - February) compared to the summer (June - August). Surficial CO2 effluxes and vadose zone CO2 and CH4 concentrations in the source (2 - 7 meters below land surface) were positively correlated with soil temperature, indicating seasonal variability in SZNA rates. However, peak surficial CO2 effluxes did not correspond with periods of highest CO2 or CH4 concentrations at the 2 - 7 meter depth, demonstrating the effects of physical attributes (such as soil depth, frost, and volumetric water content) on gas transport. Overall, results showed that SZNA rates, background soil respiration rates, and gas transport varied seasonally, and that biological and physical factors are important to consider for accurately estimating SZNA rates.

  20. NATURAL CO2 FLOW FROM THE LOIHI VENT: IMPACT ON MICROBIAL PRODUCTION AND FATE OF THE CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Richard B. Coffin; Thomas J. Boyd; David L. Knies; Kenneth S. Grabowski; John W. Pohlman; Clark S. Mitchell

    2004-02-27

    The program for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration was initiated December 1997. Preliminary steps involved surveying a suite of biogeochemical parameters off the coast of Kona on the Big Island of Hawaii. The preliminary survey was conducted twice, in 1999 and 2000, to obtain a thorough data set including measurements of pH, current profiles, CO{sub 2} concentrations, microbial activities, and water and sediment chemistries. These data were collected in order to interpret a planned CO{sub 2} injection experiment. After these preliminary surveys were completed, local environment regulation forced moving the project to the coast north east of Bergen, Norway. The preliminary survey along the Norwegian Coast was conducted during 2002. However, Norwegian government revoked a permit, approved by the Norwegian State Pollution Control Authority, for policy reasons regarding the CO{sub 2} injection experiment. As a result the research team decided to monitor the natural CO{sub 2} flow off the southern coast of the Big Island. From December 3rd-13th 2002 scientists from four countries representing the Technical Committee of the International Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Experiment examined the hydrothermal venting at Loihi Seamount (Hawaiian Islands, USA). Work focused on tracing the venting gases, the impacts of the vent fluids on marine organisms, and CO{sub 2} influence on biogeochemical cycles. The cruise on the R/V Ka'imikai-O-Kanaloa (KOK) included 8 dives by the PISCES V submarine, 6 at Loihi and 2 at a nearby site in the lee of the Big Island. Data for this final report is from the last 2 dives on Loihi.

  1. Characterization of the Wymark CO2 Reservoir: A Natural Analog to Long-Term CO2 Storage at Weyburn

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F; Johnson, J

    2010-11-22

    Natural accumulations of CO{sub 2} occur in the Duperow and other Devonian strata on the western flank of the Williston Basin in lithologies very similar to those into which anthropogenic CO{sub 2} is being injected as part of an EOR program in the Weyburn-Midale pool. Previous workers have established the stratgraphic and petrographic similarities between the Duperow and Midale beds (Lake and Whittaker, 2004 and 2006). As the CO{sub 2} accumulations in the Devonian strata may be as old as 50 Ma, this similarity provides confidence in the efficacy of long-term geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2} in the Midale-Weyburn pool. Here we attempt to extend this comparison with whole rock and mineral chemistry using the same sample suite used by Lake and Whittaker. We provide XRD, XRF, and electron microprobe analysis of major constituent minerals along with extensive backscattered electron and x-ray imaging to identify trace phases and silicate minerals. LPNORM analysis is used to quantify modal concentrations of minerals species. Samples from depth intervals where CO{sub 2} has been observed are compared to those where CO{sub 2} was absent, with no systematic differences in mineral composition observed. Gas accumulation can be correlated with sample porosity. In particular gas-bearing samples from the Eastend region are more porous than the overlying gas-free samples. Silicate minerals are rare in the Duperow carbonates, never exceeding 3 wt%. As such, mineral trapping is precluded in these lithologies. The geochemical data presented here will be used for comparison with a similar geochemical-mineralogical study of the Midale (Durocher et al., 2003) in a subsequent report.

  2. End tidal-to-arterial CO2 and O2 gas gradients at low- and high-altitude during dynamic end-tidal forcing.

    PubMed

    Tymko, Michael M; Ainslie, Philip N; MacLeod, David B; Willie, Chris K; Foster, Glen E

    2015-06-01

    We sought to characterize and quantify the performance of a portable dynamic end-tidal forcing (DEF) system in controlling the partial pressure of arterial CO2 (Pa(CO2)) and O2 (Pa(O2)) at low (LA; 344 m) and high altitude (HA; 5,050 m) during an isooxic CO2 test and an isocapnic O2 test, which is commonly used to measure ventilatory and vascular reactivity in humans (n = 9). The isooxic CO2 tests involved step changes in the partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PET(CO2)) of -10, -5, 0, +5, and +10 mmHg from baseline. The isocapnic O2 test consisted of a 10-min hypoxic step (PET(O2) = 47 mmHg) from baseline at LA and a 5-min euoxic step (PET(O2) = 100 mmHg) from baseline at HA. At both altitudes, PET(O2) and PET(CO2) were controlled within narrow limits (<1 mmHg from target) during each protocol. During the isooxic CO2 test at LA, PET(CO2) consistently overestimated Pa(CO2) (P < 0.01) at both baseline (2.1 ± 0.5 mmHg) and hypercapnia (+5 mmHg: 2.1 ± 0.7 mmHg; +10 mmHg: 1.9 ± 0.5 mmHg). This P(a)-PET(CO2) gradient was approximately twofold greater at HA (P < 0.05). At baseline at both altitudes, PET(O2) overestimated Pa(O2) by a similar extent (LA: 6.9 ± 2.1 mmHg; HA: 4.5 ± 0.9 mmHg; both P < 0.001). This overestimation persisted during isocapnic hypoxia at LA (6.9 ± 0.6 mmHg) and during isocapnic euoxia at HA (3.8 ± 1.2 mmHg). Step-wise multiple regression analysis, on the basis of the collected data, revealed that it may be possible to predict an individual's arterial blood gases during DEF. Future research is needed to validate these prediction algorithms and determine the implications of end-tidal-to-arterial gradients in the assessment of ventilatory and/or vascular reactivity. PMID:25810386

  3. Calcifying invertebrates succeed in a naturally CO2-rich coastal habitat but are threatened by high levels of future acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, J.; Gutowska, M. A.; Saphörster, J.; Heinemann, A.; Trübenbach, K.; Fietzke, J.; Hiebenthal, C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Körtzinger, A.; Wahl, M.; Melzner, F.

    2010-11-01

    CO2 emissions are leading to an acidification of the oceans. Predicting marine community vulnerability towards acidification is difficult, as adaptation processes cannot be accounted for in most experimental studies. Naturally CO2 enriched sites thus can serve as valuable proxies for future changes in community structure. Here we describe a natural analogue site in the Western Baltic Sea. Seawater pCO2 in Kiel Fjord is elevated for large parts of the year due to upwelling of CO2 rich waters. Peak pCO2 values of >230 Pa (>2300 μatm) and pHNBS values of <7.5 are encountered during summer and autumn, average pCO2 values are ~70 Pa (~700 μatm). In contrast to previously described naturally CO2 enriched sites that have suggested a progressive displacement of calcifying auto- and heterotrophic species, the macrobenthic community in Kiel Fjord is dominated by calcifying invertebrates. We show that blue mussels from Kiel Fjord can maintain control rates of somatic and shell growth at a pCO2 of 142 Pa (1400 μatm, pHNBS = 7.7). Juvenile mussel recruitment peaks during the summer months, when high water pCO2 values of ~100 Pa (~1000 μatm) prevail. Our findings indicate that calcifying keystone species may be able to cope with surface ocean pHNBS values projected for the end of this century when food supply is sufficient. However, owing to non-linear synergistic effects of future acidification and upwelling of corrosive water, peak seawater pCO2 in Kiel Fjord and many other productive estuarine habitats could increase to values >400 Pa (>4000 μatm). These changes will most likely affect calcification and recruitment, and increase external shell dissolution.

  4. Calcifying invertebrates succeed in a naturally CO2 enriched coastal habitat but are threatened by high levels of future acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, J.; Gutowska, M. A.; Saphörster, J.; Heinemann, A.; Trübenbach, K.; Fietzke, J.; Hiebenthal, C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Körtzinger, A.; Wahl, M.; Melzner, F.

    2010-07-01

    CO2 emissions are leading to an acidification of the oceans. Predicting marine community vulnerability towards acidification is difficult, as adaptation processes cannot be accounted for in most experimental studies. Naturally CO2 enriched sites thus can serve as valuable proxies for future changes in community structure. Here we describe a natural analogue site in the Western Baltic Sea. Seawater pCO2 in Kiel Fjord is elevated for large parts of the year due to upwelling of CO2 rich waters. Peak pCO2 values of >230 Pa (>2300 μatm) and pH values of <7.5 are encountered during summer and autumn, average pCO2 values are ~70 Pa (~700 μatm). In contrast to previously described naturally CO2 enriched sites that have suggested a progressive displacement of calcifying auto- and heterotrophic species, the macrobenthic community in Kiel Fjord is dominated by calcifying invertebrates. We show that blue mussels from Kiel Fjord can maintain control rates of somatic and shell growth at a pCO2 of 142 Pa (1400 μatm, pH=7.7). Juvenile mussel recruitment peaks during the summer months, when high water pCO2 values of ~100 Pa (~1000 μatm) prevail. Our findings indicate that calcifying keystone species may be able to cope with surface ocean pH values projected for the end of this century. However, owing to non-linear synergistic effects of future acidification and upwelling of corrosive water, peak seawater pCO2 in Kiel Fjord and many other productive estuarine habitats could increase to values >400 Pa (>4000 μatm). These changes will most likely affect calcification and recruitment, and increase external shell dissolution.

  5. Leaching of Natural Gravel and Concrete by CO2 - Experimental Design, Leaching Behaviour and Dissolution Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Rita; Leis, Albrecht; Mittermayr, Florian; Harer, Gerhard; Wagner, Hanns; Reichl, Peter; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The durability of building material in aggressive aqueous environments is a key factor for evaluating the product quality and application as well as of high economic interest. Therefore, aspects of durability have been frequently investigated with different approaches such as monitoring, modelling and experimental work. In the present study an experimental approach based on leaching behaviour of natural calcite-containing siliceous gravel used as backfill material in tunnelling and sprayed concrete by CO2 was developed. CO2 was introduced to form carbonic acid, which is known as an important agent to induce chemical attack. The goals of this study were (i) to develop a proper experimental design to survey the leaching of building materials on-line, (ii) to decipher individual reaction mechanisms and kinetics and (iii) to estimate time-resolved chemical resistance of the used material throughout leaching. A combined flow through reactor unit was successfully installed, where both open and closed system conditions can be easily simulated by changing flow directions and rates. The chemical compositions of the experimental solutions were adjusted by CO2 addition at pHstat conditions and monitored in-situ by pH/SpC electrodes and by analysing the chemical composition of samples throughout an experimental run. From the obtained data e.g. dissolution rates with respect to calcite were obtained for the gravel material, which were dependent on the individual calcite content of the leached material. The rates were found to reflect the flow rate conditions, and the kinetic data lay within the range expected from dissolution experiments in the CaCO3-CO2-H2O system. In case of concrete the reactions throughout the leaching experiment were complex. Coupled dissolution and precipitation phenomena (e.g. portlandite dissolution, calcite formation) occurred. The coupled reactions can be followed by the evolution of the solution chemistry. The overall rates of elemental removal from

  6. A Mesocosm Experiment in an Inland Sea HNLC Region with Naturally High pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.; Canade, E.; Chong, M.; Peterson, A.; Reash, S.; Schaut, T.; Tonge, A.; Wang, A.; Bantam, C.; Foy, M. S.; Lessard, E. J.; Paul, B.; Fay, A.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Washington has constructed a new Ocean Acidification Experimental Lab (OAEL) facility at the Friday Harbor Laboratories (FHL). This facility consists of a small-scale indoor lab experimental facility, a large-scale in-water mesocosm facility and a fully equipped carbonate system analytical laboratory. A mesocosm experiment (nine 5m in water mesocosms with volumes of ~3500 l each) was conducted in April 2012 as part of a FHL Research Apprenticeship course. PCO2 levels in the mesocosms were adjusted initially to be ambient (3 at 650 μatm l-1) and two levels of enhancement (3 at 950 μatm l-1 and 3 at 1250 μatm l-1). The mesocosms were filled with seawater from the FHL dock and a time series over the previous nine months provided a historical context. Surface seawater at the FHL dock had concentrations of NO3 ranging from 15 to 30 μmol l-1 and values of PCO2 (calculated from DIC and Alkalinity) greater than 650 μatm l-1 over this period. The rich biological community of the San Juan Islands appear to sit in an ocean environment equivalent to an acidified ocean of the future 100 years and this is due to natural processes. The source for this high NO3 and CO2 water is upwelling along the Washington coast from the California Undercurrent that flows north from the oxygen minimum zone off Mexico along the west coast of the US. Meanwhile chlorophyll at the FHL dock is low (~1 mg l-1) so the waters around FHL qualify as a high nitrate low chlorophyll (HNLC) ocean region. Open ocean HNLC regions are thought to result from iron limitation, which influences food web structure. At FHL they are due to mixing with deeper water in the straits (mixed layer is deeper than the euphotic zone). Within two days of when the mesocosms a bloom developed. NO3 was reduced to 0 by day 6 and chlorophyll increased to 45 mg l-1. The experiment was continued for 6 days with NO3 = 0, then nutrients were added back to the initial values and a second bloom was followed with time

  7. Response of bacterioplankton community structure to an artificial gradient of pCO2 in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Xia, X.; Lau, S. C. K.; Motegi, C.; Weinbauer, M. G.; Jiao, N.

    2012-08-01

    The influences of ocean acidification on bacterial diversity were investigated using DNA fingerprinting and clone library analysis of bacterioplankton samples collected from the largest CO2 manipulation mesocosm study that had been performed thus far. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the PCR amplicons of the 16S rRNA genes revealed that bacterial diversity, species richness and community structure varied with the time of incubation but not the degree of ocean acidification. The phylogenetic composition of the major bacterial assemblage after a 30-day incubation under various pCO2 concentrations did not show clear effects of pCO2 levels. However, the maximum apparent diversity and species richness which occurred during incubation differed in the high and low pCO2 treatments, in which different bacterial community structure harbored. In addition, total alkalinity was one of the contributing factors for the temporal variations in bacterial community structure observed during incubation. A negative relationship between the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and pCO2 levels was observed for samples at the end of the experiment. Our study suggested that ocean acidification affected the development of bacterial assemblages and potentially impacts the ecological function of the bacterioplankton in the marine ecosystem.

  8. Soil carbon content and CO2 flux along a hydrologic gradient in a High-Arctic tundra lake basin, Northwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, J.; Klein, E. S.; Welker, J. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Franklin, M.

    2015-12-01

    High Arctic landscapes are composed of watershed basins that vary in size and ecohydrology, but typically have a plant community complex that ranges from dry tundra to moist tundra to wet sedge systems along water body shorelines. The spatial extent of these plant communities reflects mean annual soil moisture and temperature, and is vulnerable to changes in climate conditions. Soil moisture and temperature significantly influence organic matter microbial activity and decomposition, and can affect the fate of soil carbon in tundra soils. Consequently, due to the unique soil carbon differences between tundra plant communities, shifts in their spatial extent may drive future High Arctic biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Understanding this terrestrial-atmosphere trace gas feedback, however, requires quantification of the rates and patterns of CO2 exchange along soil moisture gradients and the associated soil properties. In summer of 2015, soil CO2 flux rate, soil moisture and temperature were measured along a soil moisture gradient spanning three vegetation zones (dry tundra, wet tundra, and wet grassland) in a snow melt-fed lake basin near Thule Greenland. Mean soil temperature during the 2015 growing season was greater in dry tundra than in wet tundra and wet grassland (13.0 ± 1.2, 7.8 ± 0.8, and 5.5 ± 0.9°C, respectively). Mean volumetric soil moisture differed among all three vegetation zones where the soil moisture gradient ranged from 9 % (dry tundra) to 34 % (wet tundra) to 51 % (wet grassland). Mean soil CO2 flux was significantly greater in the wet grassland (1.7 ± 0.1 μmol m-2 s-1) compared to wet tundra (0.9 ± 0.2 μmol m-2 s-1) and dry tundra (1.2 ± 0.2 μmol m-2 s-1). Soil CO2 flux increased and decreased with seasonal warming and cooling of soil temperature. Although soil temperature was an important seasonal driver of soil CO2 flux rates, differences in mean seasonal soil CO2 flux rates among vegetation zones appeared to be a function of the

  9. Gradient domestication of Haematococcus pluvialis mutant with 15% CO2 to promote biomass growth and astaxanthin yield.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Li, Ke; Yang, Zongbo; Lu, Hongxiang; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-09-01

    In order to increase biomass yield and reduce culture cost of Haematococcus pluvialis with flue gas from coal-fired power plants, a screened mutant by nuclear irradiation was gradually domesticated with 15% CO2 to promote biomass dry weight and astaxanthin yield. The biomass yield of mutant after 10 generations of 15% CO2 domestication increased to 1.3 times as that with air. With the optimization of nitrogen and phosphorus concentration, the biomass dry weight was further increased by 62%. The astaxanthin yield induced with 15% CO2 and high light of 135 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) increased to 87.4mg/L, which was 6 times higher than that induced with high light in air. PMID:27259189

  10. Predicting the ultimate potential of natural gas SOFC power cycles with CO2 capture - Part B: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanari, Stefano; Mastropasqua, Luca; Gazzani, Matteo; Chiesa, Paolo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-09-01

    An important advantage of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as future systems for large scale power generation is the possibility of being efficiently integrated with processes for CO2 capture. Focusing on natural gas power generation, Part A of this work assessed the performances of advanced pressurised and atmospheric plant configurations (SOFC + GT and SOFC + ST, with fuel cell integration within a gas turbine or a steam turbine cycle) without CO2 separation. This Part B paper investigates such kind of power cycles when applied to CO2 capture, proposing two ultra-high efficiency plant configurations based on advanced intermediate-temperature SOFCs with internal reforming and low temperature CO2 separation process. The power plants are simulated at the 100 MW scale with a set of realistic assumptions about FC performances, main components and auxiliaries, and show the capability of exceeding 70% LHV efficiency with high CO2 capture (above 80%) and a low specific primary energy consumption for the CO2 avoided (1.1-2.4 MJ kg-1). Detailed results are presented in terms of energy and material balances, and a sensitivity analysis of plant performance is developed vs. FC voltage and fuel utilisation to investigate possible long-term improvements. Options for further improvement of the CO2 capture efficiency are also addressed.

  11. Temperature and precipitation controls over leaf- and ecosystem-level CO2 flux along a woody plant encroachment gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of grasslands to woodlands may alter the sensitivity of CO2 exchange of both the dominant plants and the entire ecosystem to variation in air temperature and precipitation. We used a combination of leaf-level gas exchange experimentation and ecosystem-level eddy covariance monitoring tech...

  12. Root Responses Along a Subambient to Elevated CO2 Gradient in a C3-C4 Grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric CO2 (Ca) concentration has increased significantly during last 20,000 years, and is projected to double this century. Despite the importance of belowground processes in the global carbon cycle, community-level and single species root responses to rising Ca are poorly understood. We measu...

  13. Characterizing Microbial Diversity and Function in Natural Subsurface CO2 Reservoir Systems for Applied Use in Geologic Carbon Sequestration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, A. J.; Thompson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into geological formations at quantities necessary to significantly reduce CO2 emissions will represent an environmental perturbation on a continental scale. The extent to which biological processes may play a role in the fate and transport of CO2 injected into geological formations has remained an open question due to the fact that at temperatures and pressures associated with reservoirs targeted for sequestration CO2 exists as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), which has generally been regarded as a sterilizing agent. Natural subsurface accumulations of CO2 serve as an excellent analogue for studying the long-term effects, implications and benefits of CO2 capture and storage (CCS). While several geologic formations bearing significant volumes of nearly pure scCO2 phases have been identified in the western United States, no study has attempted to characterize the microbial community present in these systems. Because the CO2 in the region is thought to have first accumulated millions of years ago, it is reasonable to assume that native microbial populations have undergone extensive and unique physiological and behavioral adaptations to adjust to the exceedingly high scCO2 content. Our study focuses on the microbial communities associated with the dolomite limestone McElmo Dome scCO2 Field in the Colorado Plateau region, approximately 1,000 m below the surface. Fluid samples were collected from 10 wells at an industrial CO2 production facility outside Cortez, CO. Subsamples preserved on site in 3.7% formaldehyde were treated in the lab with Syto 9 green-fluorescent nucleic acid stain, revealing 3.2E6 to 1.4E8 microbial cells per liter of produced fluid and 8.0E9 cells per liter of local pond water used in well drilling fluids. Extracted DNAs from sterivex 0.22 um filters containing 20 L of sample biomass were used as templates for PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. 16S rRNA amplicons from these samples were cloned, sequenced and subjected to microbial

  14. Potential impacts on groundwater resources of deep CO2 storage: natural analogues for assessing potential chemical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lions, J.; Gale, I.; May, F.; Nygaard, E.; Ruetters, H.; Beaubien, S.; Sohrabi, M.; Hatzignatiou, D. G.; CO2GeoNet Members involved in the present study Team

    2011-12-01

    Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is considered as one of the promising options for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2 related to human activities. One of the main concerns associated with the geological storage of CO2 is that the CO2 may leak from the intended storage formation, migrate to the near-surface environment and, eventually, escape from the ground. This is a concern because such leakage may affect aquifers overlying the storage site and containing freshwater that may be used for drinking, industry and agriculture. The IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG) recently commissioned the CO2GeoNet Association to undertake a review of published and unpublished literature on this topic with the aim of summarizing 'state of the art' knowledge and identifying knowledge gaps and research priorities in this field. Work carried out by various CO2GeoNet members was also used in this study. This study identifies possible areas of conflict by combining available datasets to map the global and regional superposition of deep saline formations (DSF) suitable for CO2 storage and overlying fresh groundwater resources. A scenario classification is developed for the various geological settings where conflict could occur. The study proposes two approaches to address the potential impact mechanisms of CO2 storage projects on the hydrodynamics and chemistry of shallow groundwater. The first classifies and synthesizes changes of water quality observed in natural/industrial analogues and in laboratory experiments. The second reviews hydrodynamic and geochemical models, including coupled multiphase flow and reactive transport. Various models are discussed in terms of their advantages and limitations, with conclusions on possible impacts on groundwater resources. Possible mitigation options to stop or control CO2 leakage are assessed. The effect of CO2 pressure in the host DSF and the potential effects on shallow aquifers are also examined. The study provides a review of

  15. Natural Gas Hydrates as CH4 Source and CO2 Sink - What do SO2 Impurities do?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeskow-Strauch, B.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Erzinger, J.

    2009-04-01

    The large amounts of gas hydrates stored in natural reservoirs are thought to be a promising future energy source. The recently discussed idea of methane extraction from these formations, together with the subsequent storage of CO2 in form of gas hydrates is an elegant approach to bring forward. A number of experiments have been performed on lab scale showing the replacement of CH4 by CO2 and vice versa. For instance, Graue and Kvamme (2006) demonstrated with Magnetic Resonance Images of core plug experiments the possibility of CH4 extraction by using liquid CO2. Laser Raman investigations of Schicks et al. (2007) showed, on the other hand, the ineffectiveness and slowness of the CH4 exchange reaction with gaseous CO2. After 120 hours, only 20% CH4 were exchanged for CO2. Natural methane hydrates which include often higher hydrocarbons tend to be even more stable than pure methane hydrates (Schicks et al., 2006). Contrary to lab conditions, industrial emitted CO2 contains - despite much effort to clean it - traces of impurities. For instance, CO2 emitted from the state-of-the-art Vattenfall Oxyfuel pilot plant in Schwarze Pumpe should reach a quality of >99.7% CO2 but still contains small amounts of N2, Ar, O2, SOx and NOx (pers. comm. Dr. Rolland). Here we present a microscopic and laser Raman study in a p-T range of 1 to 4 MPa and 271 to 280K focussing on CO2 hydrate formation and CH4-exchange reaction in the presence of 1% SO2. The experiments have been performed in a small-scale cryocell. The Raman spectra show that CO2 and SO2 occupy both large and small cages of the hydrate lattice. SO2 occurs strongly enriched in the hydrate clathrate, compared to its concentration in the feed gas which causes a strong acidification of the liquid phase after hydrate dissociation. Our study reveals that the hydrate formation rate from impure CO2 is similar to that of pure CO2 hydrate but that the stability of the CO2-SO2-hydrate exceeds that of pure CO2 hydrate. The improved

  16. CO2-flux measurements above the Baltic Sea at two heights: flux gradients in the surface layer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, A.; Ament, F.

    2015-11-01

    The estimation of CO2 exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere is essential to understand the global carbon cycle. The eddy-covariance technique offers a very direct approach to observe these fluxes. The turbulent CO2 flux is measured, as well as the sensible and latent heat flux and the momentum flux, a few meters above the ocean in the atmosphere. Assuming a constant-flux layer in the near-surface part of the atmospheric boundary layer, this flux equals the exchange flux between ocean and atmosphere. The purpose of this paper is the comparison of long-term flux measurements at two different heights above the Baltic Sea to investigate this assumption. The results are based on a 1.5-year record of quality-controlled eddy-covariance measurements. Concerning the flux of momentum and of sensible and latent heat, the constant-flux layer theory can be confirmed because flux differences between the two heights are insignificantly small more than 95 % of the time. In contrast, significant differences, which are larger than the measurement error, occur in the CO2 flux about 35 % of the time. Data used for this paper are published at http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.808714.

  17. Response of bacterioplankton community structure to an artificial gradient of pCO2 in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Xia, X.; Lau, S. C. K.; Motegi, C.; Weinbauer, M. G.; Jiao, N.

    2013-06-01

    In order to test the influences of ocean acidification on the ocean pelagic ecosystem, so far the largest CO2 manipulation mesocosm study (European Project on Ocean Acidification, EPOCA) was performed in Kings Bay (Kongsfjorden), Spitsbergen. During a 30 day incubation, bacterial diversity was investigated using DNA fingerprinting and clone library analysis of bacterioplankton samples. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of the PCR amplicons of the 16S rRNA genes revealed that general bacterial diversity, taxonomic richness and community structure were influenced by the variation of productivity during the time of incubation, but not the degree of ocean acidification. A BIOENV analysis suggested a complex control of bacterial community structure by various biological and chemical environmental parameters. The maximum apparent diversity of bacterioplankton (i.e., the number of T-RFs) in high and low pCO2 treatments differed significantly. A negative relationship between the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and pCO2 levels was observed for samples at the end of the experiment by the combination of T-RFLP and clone library analysis. Our study suggests that ocean acidification affects the development of bacterial assemblages and potentially impacts the ecological function of the bacterioplankton in the marine ecosystem.

  18. Testing surface gas monitoring methods at sites of natural and man-made CO2 seepage in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Lister, R.; Barkwith, A.; Barlow, T.; Shaw, R.; Strutt, M.; Lombardi, S.; Beaubien, S.; Annunziatellis, A.; Graziani, S.

    2011-12-01

    Useful lessons for monitoring techniques and strategies can be learned at natural CO2 seepage sites. Existing methods and new developments can be tested at such sites to assess how useful they would be at geological CO2 storage sites. Such testing is not possible at actual storage sites where there is no leakage. Experience has been gained at the natural CO2 seepage sites near Latera in Italy, the Laacher See in Germany and Florina in Greece. Studies have also been carried out at experimental CO2 injection sites in the UK and Norway and at landfill sites in the UK. The sites have been used as a testing ground for existing and new techniques including open path lasers, eddy covariance, CO2 monitoring stations, flux chambers and in situ and laboratory soil gas analysis. Natural CO2 seepage at the sites tends to occur at gas vents of restricted surface extent. Typically such vents have a diameter of metres to tens of metres. Whilst the vents may align along faults or fractures they occur at small discrete points on such features where permeability is higher. These appear commonly to be associated with fracture intersections. Venting therefore occurs over only a small fraction of the total area of the sites. By analogy this suggests that a surface monitoring strategy for a CO2 storage site needs to include cost effective screening methods that can cover large areas quickly but which are capable of finding small leakage targets. Soil gas concentrations and fluxes vary with time in response to factors such as temperature, pressure, wind speed and soil moisture. This gives rise to diurnal, seasonal and weather system related cycles. Seepage of CO2 can therefore vary over time and this implies the need for continuous monitoring techniques to avoid missing transient releases. Developing legislation for CO2 storage sites (such as the European Union Storage Directive) also requires the quantification of any detected CO2 leakage and this will require an understanding of

  19. Seasonal time-course of gradients of photosynthetic capacity and mesophyll conductance to CO2 across a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) canopy.

    PubMed

    Montpied, Pierre; Granier, André; Dreyer, Erwin

    2009-01-01

    Leaf photosynthesis is known to acclimate to the actual irradiance received by the different layers of a canopy. This acclimation is usually described in terms of changes in leaf structure, and in photosynthetic capacity. Photosynthetic capacity is likely to be affected by mesophyll conductance to CO(2) which has seldom been assessed in tree species, and whose plasticity in response to local irradiance is still poorly known. Structural [N and chlorophyll content, leaf mass to area ratio (LMA)] and functional leaf traits [maximum carboxylation rate (V(cmax)), maximum light-driven electron flux (J(max)), and mesophyll conductance (g(i))] were assessed by measuring leaf response curves of net CO(2) assimilation versus intercellular CO(2) partial pressure, along a vertical profile across a beech canopy, and by fitting a version of the Farquhar model including g(i). The measurements were repeated five times during a growth season to catch potential seasonal variation. Irradiance gradients resulted in large decreasing gradients of LMA, g(i), V(cmax), and J(max). Relative allocation of leaf N to the different photosynthetic processes was only slightly affected by local irradiance. Seasonal changes after leaf expansion and before induction of leaf senescence were only minor. Structural equation modelling confirmed that LMA was the main driving force for changes in photosynthetic traits, with only a minor contribution of leaf Nitrogen content. In conclusion, mesophyll conductance to CO(2) displays a large plasticity that scales with photosynthetic capacity across a tree canopy, and that it is only moderately (if at all) affected by seasonal changes in the absence of significant soil water depletion. PMID:19457983

  20. Formation of submicron magnesite during reaction of natural forsterite in H2O-saturated supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qafoku, Odeta; Hu, Jianzhi; Hess, Nancy J.; Hu, Mary Y.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Feng, Ju; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2014-06-01

    Natural forsterite was reacted in bulk liquid water saturated with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and scCO2 saturated with water at 35-80 °C and 90 atm. The solid reaction products were analyzed with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. Two carbonate phases, nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3), were identified with the proportions of the two phases depending on experimental conditions. In liquid water saturated with scCO2, nesquehonite was the dominant carbonate phase at 35-80 °C with only a limited number of large, micron size magnesite particles forming at the highest temperature, 80 °C. In contrast, in scCO2 saturated with H2O magnesite formation was identified at all three temperatures: 35, 50, and 80 °C. Magnesite was the dominant carbonation reaction product at 50 and 80 °C, but nesquehonite was dominant at 35 °C. The magnesite particles formed under scCO2 saturated with H2O conditions exhibited an extremely uniform submicron grain-size and nearly identical rhombohedral morphologies at all temperatures. The distribution and form of the particles were not consistent with nucleation and growth on the forsterite surface.

  1. Formation of Submicron Magnesite during Reaction of Natural Forsterite in H2O-Saturated Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Odeta; Hu, Jian Z.; Hess, Nancy J.; Hu, Mary Y.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Feng, Ju; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2014-06-01

    Natural forsterite was reacted in a) liquid water saturated with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and in b) H2O-saturated scCO2 at 35-80 °C and 90 atm. The solid reaction products were analyzed with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. Two carbonate phases, nesquehonite (MgCO3.3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3), were identified with the proportions of the two phases depending on experimental conditions. In water saturated with scCO2, nesquehonite was the dominant carbonate phase at 35-80 °C with only a limited number of large, micron size magnesite particles forming at the highest temperature, 80 °C. In contrast, in H2O-saturated scCO2 magnesite formation was identified at all three temperatures: 35 °, 50 °, and 80 °C. Magnesite was the dominant carbonation reaction product at 50 ° and 80 °C; but nesquehonite was dominant at 35 °C. The magnesite particles formed under H2O-saturated scCO2 conditions exhibited an extremely uniform submicron grain-size and nearly identical rhombohedral morphologies at all temperatures. The distribution and form of the particles were not consistent with epitaxial nucleation and growth on the forsterite surface.

  2. Natural volcanic CO2 seeps reveal future trajectories for host-microbial associations in corals and sponges.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Kathleen M; Bourne, David G; Humphrey, Craig; Botté, Emmanuelle S; Laffy, Patrick; Zaneveld, Jesse; Uthicke, Sven; Fabricius, Katharina E; Webster, Nicole S

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are rapidly rising causing an increase in the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in the ocean and a reduction in pH known as ocean acidification (OA). Natural volcanic seeps in Papua New Guinea expel 99% pure CO2 and thereby offer a unique opportunity to explore the effects of OA in situ. The corals Acropora millepora and Porites cylindrica were less abundant and hosted significantly different microbial communities at the CO2 seep than at nearby control sites <500 m away. A primary driver of microbial differences in A. millepora was a 50% reduction of symbiotic Endozoicomonas. This loss of symbiotic taxa from corals at the CO2 seep highlights a potential hurdle for corals to overcome if they are to adapt to and survive OA. In contrast, the two sponges Coelocarteria singaporensis and Cinachyra sp. were ∼ 40-fold more abundant at the seep and hosted a significantly higher relative abundance of Synechococcus than sponges at control sites. The increase in photosynthetic microbes at the seep potentially provides these species with a nutritional benefit and enhanced scope for growth under future climate scenarios (thus, flexibility in symbiosis may lead to a larger niche breadth). The microbial community in the apparently pCO2-sensitive sponge species S. massa was not significantly different between sites. These data show that responses to elevated pCO2 are species-specific and that the stability and flexibility of microbial partnerships may have an important role in shaping and contributing to the fitness and success of some hosts. PMID:25325380

  3. Geochemistry and Age Dating of Ancient and Modern CO2 -rich Hydrothermal Systems as Natural Analogues for CO2 storage: Examples from Australia and Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, I.; Golding, S.; Esterle, J.; Feng, Y.; Zhao, J.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated physico-chemical conditions during mineral authigenesis in CO2-rich ancient and recent hydrothermal environments in Eastern Australia (Gunnedah and Bowen Basins) and Turkey, respectively. We performed Rb-Sr and U-series dating of clay-carbonate associations and travertine veins respectively to evaluate the degassing and storage history of CO2. Intense carbonate veining and coal seam cleat mineralisation in the Gunnedah Basin took place as a result of heat and CO2 release associated with magmatism during the breakup of Gondwana in the Late Cretaceous. Widespread carbonate veining and cementation in the Bowen Basin occurred as products of basin-wide CO2 rich meteoric hydrothermal fluids during the Late Triassic extension. CO2 has largely been used for carbonate precipitation (calcite, siderite, ankerite and dawsonite) in eastern Australian basins; however, some high proportion of CO2 has been stored in coal seams as adsorbed molecules on coal. Significant CO2 degassing is common in geothermal fields in Turkey, as manifested by recent deposition of travertine pools and terraces as well as travertine vein networks in damage zones of active major fault systems. Trace element geochemistry indicates that transient ascent of CO2-bearing fluids during seismic strain cycles without significant interaction with basement and host rocks resulted in rapid precipitation of the vein travertine near the surface. Such veins and associated breccias formed by hydraulic fracturing in response to overpressure of CO2-rich fluids. Correlation of high-precision U-series ages with global/regional climate events indicates that late Quaternary climate variability may have controlled the geothermal water circulation that regulates CO2 accumulation and the generation of CO2 over-pressurised reservoirs and their behaviour during seismic events.

  4. Small scale soil carbon and moisture gradients in a drained peat bog grassland and their influence on CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiber-Sauheitl, K.; Fuß, R.; Freibauer, A.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the UNFCCC report requirements of each country on the emissions of greenhouse gases from key sources the joint research project "Organic Soils" was established in Germany. The project's objective is to improve the data set on greenhousegas emissions from organic soils in Germany. Within 12 German Project Catchments emissions from different types of organic soils, e.g. under different land uses and hydrological conditions, are measured. At the location "Großes Moor" near Gifhorn (Lower Saxony) the effects of small-scale soil organic carbon and groundwater level gradients on the GHG fluxes (CO2, CH4 and N2O) are quantified. The study area is located within a former peat bog altered by drainage and peat cutting, which is currently grassland under extensive agricultural use. The focus of the study is on the acquisition of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes on six sites via manual closed chambers. In order to calculate the annual CO2 exchange rate, values are interpolated on a 0.5 hour scale between measurement campaigns. In combination with continually logged meteorological parameters, such as the photosynthetic active radiation as well as air and soil temperatures, we calculate the daily CO2 ecosystem exchange of the different sites. During the 2011 campaign, CO2 was determined as the most important greenhouse gas. The groundwater table was the dominant variable influencing gas emissions. Another important factor was the vegetation composition. In detail, highest CO2 emissions occurred with a water table of 40-50 cm below ground level, temperatures above 10°C and low plant biomass amounts. Due to the more complex formation of N2O by a number of processes, each being promoted by different soil conditions, the measurement of N2O fluxes in the field was complemented by a laboratory experiment. In this, the use of stable isotope tracer techniques enabled us to quantify the contribution of single biochemical pathways to the overall formation of N2O under controlled

  5. Efficiency enhancement for natural gas liquefaction with CO2 capture and sequestration through cycles innovation and process optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabdulkarem, Abdullah

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants are energy intensive. As a result, the power plants operating these LNG plants emit high amounts of CO2 . To mitigate global warming that is caused by the increase in atmospheric CO2, CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) using amine absorption is proposed. However, the major challenge of implementing this CCS system is the associated power requirement, increasing power consumption by about 15--25%. Therefore, the main scope of this work is to tackle this challenge by minimizing CCS power consumption as well as that of the entire LNG plant though system integration and rigorous optimization. The power consumption of the LNG plant was reduced through improving the process of liquefaction itself. In this work, a genetic algorithm (GA) was used to optimize a propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) LNG plant modeled using HYSYS software. An optimization platform coupling Matlab with HYSYS was developed. New refrigerant mixtures were found, with savings in power consumption as high as 13%. LNG plants optimization with variable natural gas feed compositions was addressed and the solution was proposed through applying robust optimization techniques, resulting in a robust refrigerant which can liquefy a range of natural gas feeds. The second approach for reducing the power consumption is through process integration and waste heat utilization in the integrated CCS system. Four waste heat sources and six potential uses were uncovered and evaluated using HYSYS software. The developed models were verified against experimental data from the literature with good agreement. Net available power enhancement in one of the proposed CCS configuration is 16% more than the conventional CCS configuration. To reduce the CO2 pressurization power into a well for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications, five CO2 pressurization methods were explored. New CO2 liquefaction cycles were developed and modeled using HYSYS software. One of the developed

  6. Aboveground net primary productivity and rainfall use efficiency of grassland on three soils after two years of exposure to a subambient to superambient CO2 gradient.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, P. A.; Polley, H. W.; Jin, V. L.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations (CA) have increased by about 100 μL L-1 over the last 250 years to ~ 380 μL L-1, the highest values in the last half-million years, and CA is expected to continue to increase to greater than 500 μL L-1 by 2100. CO2 enrichment has been shown to affect many ecosystem processes, but experiments typically examine only two or a few levels of CA, and are typically constrained to one soil type. However, soil hydrologic properties differ across the landscape. Therefore, variation in the impacts of increasing CA on ecosystem function on different soil types must be understood to model and forecast ecosystem function under future CA and climate scenarios. Here we evaluate the aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) of grassland plots receiving equal rainfall inputs (from irrigation) and exposed to a continuous gradient (250 to 500 μL L-1) of CA in the Lysimeter CO2 Gradient Experiment in central Texas, USA. Sixty intact soil monoliths (1 m2 x 1.5 m deep) taken from three soil types (Austin silty clay, Bastrop sandy loam, Houston clay) and planted to seven native tallgrass prairie grasses and forbs were exposed to the CA gradient beginning in 2006. Aboveground net primary productivity was assessed by end of season (November) harvest of each species in each monolith. Total ANPP of all species was 35 to 50% greater on Bastrop and Houston soils compared to Austin soils in both years (p < 0.0001), suggesting greater rainfall use efficiency on these soils despite lower water holding capacity of the Bastrop soils. On the Austin soil, grasses produced 2.7 fold more biomass than forbs, compared to only 30% more grass biomass on the Houston soil (p = 0.002), suggesting that grass dominance of community and ecosystem processes differed strongly among the soils. Total ANPP was strongly responsive to the CO2 gradient, with mean ANPP increasing from 260 g m- 2 at 250 μL L-1 CA to 455 g m-2 at 500 μL L-1 (p< 0.0001), suggesting greater overall

  7. On the nature of magnetic state in the spinel Co2SnO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thota, S.; Narang, V.; Nayak, S.; Sambasivam, S.; Choi, B. C.; Sarkar, T.; Andersson, M. S.; Mathieu, R.; Seehra, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    In the spinel Co2SnO4, coexistence of ferrimagnetic ordering below TN ≃ 41 K followed by a spin glass state below TSG ≃ 39 K was proposed recently based on the temperature dependence of magnetization M(T) data. Here new measurements of the temperature dependence of the specific heat CP(T), ac-susceptibilities χ‧(T) and χ″(T) measured at frequencies between 0.51 and 1.2 kHz, and the hysteresis loop parameters (coercivity HC(T) and remanence MR(T)) in two differently prepared samples of Co2SnO4 are reported. The presence of the Co2+ and Sn4+ states is confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) yielding the structure: Co2SnO4 = [Co2+][Co2+Sn4+]O4. The data of CP versus T shows only an inflection near 39 K characteristic of spin-glass ordering. The analysis of the frequency dependence of ac-magnetic susceptibility data near 39 K using the Vogel-Fulcher law and the power-law of the critical slowing-down suggests the presence of spin clusters in the system which is close to a spin-glass state. With a decrease in temperature below 39 K, the temperature dependence of the coercivity HC and remanence MR for the zero-field cooled samples show both HC and MR reaching their peak magnitudes near 25 K, then decreasing with decreasing T and becoming negligible below 15 K. The plot of CP/T versus T also yields a weak inflection near 15 K. This temperature dependence of HC and remanence MR is likely associated with the different magnitudes of the magnetic moments of Co2+ ions on the ‘A’ and ‘B’ sites and their different temperature dependence.

  8. Gas Hazard from Natural CO2 Emissions in Central and Southern Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Costa, A.; Avino, R.; Baldini, A.; Caliro, S.; Frondini, F.; Granieri, D.; Minopoli, C.; Morgantini, N.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies at regional scale showed that the central and southern Italy are affected by an active and intense process of CO2 Earth degassing. Considering the deeply derived carbon dissolved in the groundwater of large regional aquifers, Chiodini et al. (2004) elaborated a regional map of CO2 Earth degassing, pointing out the presence of two large CO2 degassing structures (62000 km2) a northern one, the tuscan roman degassing structure (TRDS) and a southern one, the campanian degassing structure (CDS). The deeply derived CO2 released by these two structures was estimated in ~ 9.2 Mt/y (Chiodini et al., 2004). This amount, which is globally relevant being ~ 10% of the present-day total CO2 discharge from subaerial volcanoes of the Earth, is of low magnitude with respect to the amount of CO2 that is estimated to be injected in the storage sites. TRDS and CDS are characterized by the presence of many vents of cold CO2 rich gases and areas of anomalous soil diffuse degassing of CO2. The gas manifestations are generally fed by buried carbonate reservoirs, covered by low permeability formations, where the gas produced at depth accumulates before the expulsion at the surface. More than 100 gas emissions are located in the Italian territory and represent a serious hazard for humans and animals. Gas flow rates are very high. For example, the biggest gas emissions daily release into atmosphere hundreds of tons of CO2, amounts similar to those released by diffuse degassing from active volcanoes (CO2 fluxes from 6 t/d to 2800 t/d, mean of 430 t/d, Morner and Etiope, 2002). Under stable atmospheric conditions and/or in presence of topographic depressions, CO2 air concentration can reach high values resulting in lethal effects to humans or animals. The last lethal accident occurred in 2003 in Tuscany, at Mt. Amiata. However, the most dangerous gas emission is Mefite d'Ansanto, located in the Southern Apennine, where three persons were killed during 1990's and historical

  9. Elevated CO2: Impact on diurnal patterns of photosynthesis in natural microbial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothschild, L. J.

    1994-11-01

    Algae, including blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), are the major source of fixed carbon in many aquatic ecosystems. Previous work has shown that photosynthetic carbon fixation is often enhanced in the presence of additional carbon dioxide (CO2). This study was undertaken to determine if this CO2 fertilization effect extended to microbial mats, and, if so, at what times during the day might the addition of CO2 affect carbon fixation. Four microbial mats from diverse environments were selected, including mats from a hypersaline pond (area 5, Exportadora de Sal, Mexico), the marine intertidal (Lyngbya, Laguna Ojo de Liebre, Mexico), an acidic hotspring (Cyanidium, Nymph Creek, Yellowstone National Park), and an acidic stream at ambient temperature (Zygogonium, Yellowstone National Park). Carbon fixation in the absence of additional CO2 essentially followed the rising and failing sunlight levels, except that during the middle of the day there was a short dip in carbon fixation rates. The addition of CO2 profoundly enhanced carbon fixation rates during the daylight hours, including during the midday dip. Therefore, it is unlikely that the midday dip was due to photoinhibition. Surprisingly, enhancement of carbon fixation was often greatest in the early morning or late afternoon, times when carbon fixation would be most likely to be light limited.

  10. Elevated CO2: impact on diurnal patterns of photosynthesis in natural microbial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, L J

    1994-01-01

    Algae, including blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), are the major source of fixed carbon in many aquatic ecosystems. Previous work has shown that photosynthetic carbon fixation is often enhanced in the presence of additional carbon dioxide (CO2). This study was undertaken to determine if this CO2 fertilization effect extended to microbial mats, and, if so, at what times during the day might the addition of CO2 affect carbon fixation. Four microbial mats from diverse environments were selected, including mats from a hypersaline pond (area 5, Exportadora de Sal, Mexico), the marine intertidal (Lyngbya, Laguna Ojo de Liebre, Mexico), an acidic hotspring (Cyanidium, Nymph Creek, Yellowstone National Park), and an acidic stream at ambient temperature (Zygogonium, Yellowstone National Park). Carbon fixation in the absence of additional CO2 essentially followed the rising and falling sunlight levels, except that during the middle of the day there was a short dip in carbon fixation rates. The addition of CO2 profoundly enhanced carbon fixation rates during the daylight hours, including during the midday dip. Therefore, it is unlikely that the midday dip was due to photoinhibition. Surprisingly, enhancement of carbon fixation was often greatest in the early morning or late afternoon, times when carbon fixation would be most likely to be light limited. PMID:11538022

  11. Elevated CO2: Impact on diurnal patterns of photosynthesis in natural microbial ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    Algae, including blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), are the major source of fixed carbon in many aquatic ecosystems. Previous work has shown that photosynthetic carbon fixation is often enhanced in the presence of additional carbon dioxide (CO2). This study was undertaken to determine if this CO2 fertilization effect extended to microbial mats, and, if so, at what times during the day might the addition of CO2 affect carbon fixation. Four microbial mats from diverse environments were selected, including mats from a hypersaline pond (area 5, Exportadora de Sal, Mexico), the marine intertidal (Lyngbya, Laguna Ojo de Liebre, Mexico), an acidic hotspring (Cyanidium, Nymph Creek, Yellowstone National Park), and an acidic stream at ambient temperature (Zygogonium, Yellowstone National Park). Carbon fixation in the absence of additional CO2 essentially followed the rising and falling sunlight levels, except that during the middle of the day there was a short dip in carbon fixation rates. The addition of CO2 profoundly enhanced carbon fixation rates during the daylight hours, including during the midday dip. Therefore, it is unlikely that the midday dip was due to photoinhibition. Surprisingly, enhancement of carbon fixation was often greatest in the early morning or late afternoon, times when carbon fixation would be most likely to be light limited.

  12. Characterizing Microbial Diversity and Function in Natural Subsurface CO2 Reservoir Systems for Applied Use in Geologic Carbon Sequestration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, A.; Thompson, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into geological formations at quantities necessary to significantly reduce CO2 emissions will represent an environmental perturbation on a continental scale. The extent to which biological processes may play a role in the fate and transport of CO2 injected into geological formations has remained an open question due to the fact that at temperatures and pressures associated with reservoirs targeted for sequestration CO2 exists as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), which has generally been regarded as a sterilizing agent. Natural subsurface accumulations of CO2 serve as an excellent analogue for studying the long-term effects, implications and benefits of CO2 capture and storage (CCS). While several geologic formations bearing significant volumes of nearly pure scCO2 phases have been identified in the western United States, no study has attempted to characterize the microbial community present in these systems. Because the CO2 in the region is thought to have first accumulated millions of years ago, it is reasonable to assume that native microbial populations have undergone extensive and unique physiological and behavioral adaptations to adjust to the exceedingly high scCO2 content. Our study focuses on the microbial communities associated with the dolomite limestone McElmo Dome scCO2 Field in the Colorado Plateau region, approximately 1,000 m below the surface. Fluid samples were collected from 10 wells at an industrial CO2 production facility outside Cortez, CO. Subsamples preserved on site in 3.7% formaldehyde were treated in the lab with Syto 9 green-fluorescent nucleic acid stain, revealing 3.2E6 to 1.4E8 microbial cells per liter of produced fluid and 8.0E9 cells per liter of local pond water used in well drilling fluids. Extracted DNAs from sterivex 0.22 um filters containing 20 L of sample biomass were used as templates for PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. 16S rRNA amplicons from these samples were cloned, sequenced and subjected to microbial

  13. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO2 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

    2002-07-26

    The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This provides results of the final year of the six-year project for each of the four areas.

  14. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO2 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Paul; Schechter, David S.

    1999-11-01

    The overall goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective was accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. Additionally, a ten (10) acre field demonstration pilot project is part of this project. This report discusses the activity, during the third calendar quarter (July through September) of 1998 (fourth quarter of the projects fiscal year).

  15. Higher fungal diversity is correlated with lower CO2 emissions from dead wood in a natural forest.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunyan; Schaefer, Douglas A; Liu, Weijie; Popescu, Viorel D; Yang, Chenxue; Wang, Xiaoyang; Wu, Chunying; Yu, Douglas W

    2016-01-01

    Wood decomposition releases almost as much CO2 to the atmosphere as does fossil-fuel combustion, so the factors regulating wood decomposition can affect global carbon cycling. We used metabarcoding to estimate the fungal species diversities of naturally colonized decomposing wood in subtropical China and, for the first time, compared them to concurrent measures of CO2 emissions. Wood hosting more diverse fungal communities emitted less CO2, with Shannon diversity explaining 26 to 44% of emissions variation. Community analysis supports a 'pure diversity' effect of fungi on decomposition rates and thus suggests that interference competition is an underlying mechanism. Our findings extend the results of published experiments using low-diversity, laboratory-inoculated wood to a high-diversity, natural system. We hypothesize that high levels of saprotrophic fungal biodiversity could be providing globally important ecosystem services by maintaining dead-wood habitats and by slowing the atmospheric contribution of CO2 from the world's stock of decomposing wood. However, large-scale surveys and controlled experimental tests in natural settings will be needed to test this hypothesis. PMID:27553882

  16. Higher fungal diversity is correlated with lower CO2 emissions from dead wood in a natural forest

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyan; Schaefer, Douglas A.; Liu, Weijie; Popescu, Viorel D.; Yang, Chenxue; Wang, Xiaoyang; Wu, Chunying; Yu, Douglas W.

    2016-01-01

    Wood decomposition releases almost as much CO2 to the atmosphere as does fossil-fuel combustion, so the factors regulating wood decomposition can affect global carbon cycling. We used metabarcoding to estimate the fungal species diversities of naturally colonized decomposing wood in subtropical China and, for the first time, compared them to concurrent measures of CO2 emissions. Wood hosting more diverse fungal communities emitted less CO2, with Shannon diversity explaining 26 to 44% of emissions variation. Community analysis supports a ‘pure diversity’ effect of fungi on decomposition rates and thus suggests that interference competition is an underlying mechanism. Our findings extend the results of published experiments using low-diversity, laboratory-inoculated wood to a high-diversity, natural system. We hypothesize that high levels of saprotrophic fungal biodiversity could be providing globally important ecosystem services by maintaining dead-wood habitats and by slowing the atmospheric contribution of CO2 from the world’s stock of decomposing wood. However, large-scale surveys and controlled experimental tests in natural settings will be needed to test this hypothesis. PMID:27553882

  17. Sequestration of CO2 in the Altmark natural gas field, Germany:Mobility control to extend enhanced gas recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Rebscher, D.; May, F.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2006-04-21

    We are investigating the technical feasibility of injecting CO2 for carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery (CSEGR) in the depleted Altmark natural gas reservoir, Germany. Our approach is numerical simulation using TOUGH2/EOS7C. Our earlier simulation studies have shown early CO2 breakthrough due to fast-flow through the high-permeability sand layers. In order to extend the period of enhanced CH4 recovery, we propose the preinjection of gelling fluids for the purpose of limiting the mobility of injected CO2 and thereby improving CO2 sweep and delaying CO2 breakthrough. We have implemented a simple gel model into EOS7C and simulated gel injection followed by CSEGR.Preliminary simulations to date show minimal improvements in CSEGR with breakthrough times delayed by only a few months to a year. While mobility control using pre-injected gelling fluids appears to be a promising strategy in controlling early breakthrough, more work is needed to design and simulate an effective procedure.

  18. Photosynthetic Water Use Efficiency in it Sorghastrum nutans (C4) and it Solidago canadensis (C3) in Three Soils Along a CO2 Concentration Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, P. A.; Hui, D.; Procter, A.; Johnson, H. B.; Polley, H. W.; Jackson, R. B.

    2006-12-01

    The water use efficiency (WUE) of leaf photosynthetic carbon uptake is a key regulator of ecosystem carbon cycles and is strongly sensitive to atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations [CO2]. However WUE responses to [CO2] typically differ between C3 and C4 species and may differ on varying soil types because of differences in soil moisture retention and plant uptake efficiency. We measured leaf-level photosynthesis (ACO2), stomatal conductance (gS), and transpiration (E) with an infrared gas analyzer to estimate WUE for the C4 grass Sorghastrum nutans and the C3 forb Solidago canadensis in constructed grassland species assemblages growing in three soils arrayed along a 200 560 ppm [CO2] gradient in the LYCOG Experiment, in central Texas, USA. LYCOG consists of eighty intact soil monoliths (1 m X 1 m X 1.5 m) representing 3 soil series, Austin (Udorthentic Haplustolls, a mollisol), Bastrop (Udic Paleustalfs, a sandy loam alfisol) and Houston Black (Udic Haplusterts, a vertisol). The monoliths were vegetated by transplanting 8 native perennial prairie species (5 grasses and 3 forbs), including S. nutans and S. canadensis. Both are abundant and widespread; S. nutans is a dominant species throughout much of North American tallgrass prairie, and S. canadensis is one of the most abundant and widespread forbs in North America. ACO2, gS, and E were measured three times during the growing season. Dark-adapted chlorophyll fluorescence (FvFm) was measured concurrently to assess photosynthetic capacity, and leaf water potential (Ψ leaf) and soil water content were measured to assess plant water status and soil moisture availability. WUE increased strongly (p< 0.0001) at higher [CO2], due to a combination of decreasing E due to decreased gS (p ≤ 0.0005) and increasing ACO2 (p = 0.0055). This pattern was the same in both species (species x [CO2] ns). There was a corresponding increase in Ψ leaf (p = 0.01) at higher [CO2], but no [CO2] effect on FvFm. E and gS were lower on

  19. Trace element profiles of the sea anemone Anemonia viridis living nearby a natural CO2 vent

    PubMed Central

    Borell, Esther M.; Fine, Maoz; Shaked, Yeala

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is not an isolated threat, but acts in concert with other impacts on ecosystems and species. Coastal marine invertebrates will have to face the synergistic interactions of OA with other global and local stressors. One local factor, common in coastal environments, is trace element contamination. CO2 vent sites are extensively studied in the context of OA and are often considered analogous to the oceans in the next few decades. The CO2 vent found at Levante Bay (Vulcano, NE Sicily, Italy) also releases high concentrations of trace elements to its surrounding seawater, and is therefore a unique site to examine the effects of long-term exposure of nearby organisms to high pCO2 and trace element enrichment in situ. The sea anemone Anemonia viridis is prevalent next to the Vulcano vent and does not show signs of trace element poisoning/stress. The aim of our study was to compare A. viridis trace element profiles and compartmentalization between high pCO2 and control environments. Rather than examining whole anemone tissue, we analyzed two different body compartments—the pedal disc and the tentacles, and also examined the distribution of trace elements in the tentacles between the animal and the symbiotic algae. We found dramatic changes in trace element tissue concentrations between the high pCO2/high trace element and control sites, with strong accumulation of iron, lead, copper and cobalt, but decreased concentrations of cadmium, zinc and arsenic proximate to the vent. The pedal disc contained substantially more trace elements than the anemone’s tentacles, suggesting the pedal disc may serve as a detoxification/storage site for excess trace elements. Within the tentacles, the various trace elements displayed different partitioning patterns between animal tissue and algal symbionts. At both sites iron was found primarily in the algae, whereas cadmium, zinc and arsenic were primarily found in the animal tissue. Our data suggests that A

  20. Investigation of Efficiency Improvements During CO2 Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, David S.; Vance, Harold

    2003-03-10

    The objective of this project was to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificial fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in HFR and NFR that eventually result in less efficient CO2 flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. This report provided results of the second semi-annual technical progress report that consists of three different topics.

  1. Rapid, Long-term Monitoring of CO2 Concentration and δ13CO2 at CCUS Sites Allows Discrimination of Leakage Patterns from Natural Background Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galfond, B.; Riemer, D. D.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    In order for Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) to gain wide acceptance as a method for mitigating atmospheric CO2 concentrations, schemes must be devised to ensure that potential leakage is detected. New regulations from the US Environmental Protection Agency require monitoring and accounting for Class VI injection wells, which will remain a barrier to wide scale CCUS deployment until effective and efficient monitoring techniques have been developed and proven. Monitoring near-surface CO2 at injection sites to ensure safety and operational success requires high temporal resolution CO2 concentration and carbon isotopic (δ13C) measurements. The only technologies currently capable of this rapid measurement of δ13C are optical techniques such as Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS). We have developed a comprehensive remote monitoring approach using CRDS and a custom manifold system to obtain accurate rapid measurements from a large sample area over an extended study period. Our modified Picarro G1101-i CRDS allows for automated rapid and continuous field measurement of δ13CO2 and concentrations of relevant gas species. At our field site, where preparations have been underway for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) operations, we have been able to measure biogenic effects on a diurnal scale, as well as variation due to precipitation and seasonality. Taking these background trends into account, our statistical treatment of real data has been used to improve signal-to-noise ratios by an order of magnitude over published models. Our system has proven field readiness for the monitoring of sites with even modest CO2 fluxes.

  2. Multi-isotope tracing of CO2 leakage and water-rock interaction in a natural CCS analogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Gemeni, Vasiliki; Lions, Julie; Koukouzas, Nikolaos; Humez, Pauline; Vasilatos, Charalampos; Millot, Romain; Pauwels, Hélène

    2015-04-01

    Natural analogues of CO2 accumulation and, potentially, leakage, provide a highly valuable opportunity to study (1) geochemical processes within a CO2-reservoir and the overlying aquifers or aquicludes, i.e. gas-water-rock interactions, (2) geology and tightness of reservoirs over geological timescales, (3) potential or real leakage pathways, (3) impact of leakage on shallow groundwater resources quality, and (4) direct and indirect geochemical indicators of gas leakage (Lions et al., 2014, Humez et al., 2014). The Florina Basin in NW Macedonia, Greece, contains a deep CO2-rich aquifer within a graben structure. The graben filling consists of highly heterogeneous Neogene clastic sediments constituted by components from the adjacent massifs including carbonates, schists, gneiss as well as some ultramafic volcanic rocks. Clay layers are observed that isolate hydraulically the deep, partly artesian aquifer. Organic matter, in form of lignite accumulations, is abundant in the Neogene series. The underlying bedrocks are metamorphic carbonates and silicate rocks. The origin of the CO2 accumulation is controversial (deep, partially mantle-derived D'Allessandro et al., 2008 or resulting from thermal decomposition of carbonates, Hatziyannis and Arvanitis, 2011). Groundwaters have been sampled from springs and borewells over 3 years at different depths. First results on major, minor and trace elements give evidence of water-rock interaction, mainly with carbonates but also with ultramafic components but do not indicate that CO2-seepage is the principal driver of those processes (Gemeni et al., submitted). Here we present isotope data on a selection of groundwaters (δ2H , δ18O, δ13CTDIC, 87Sr/86Sr, δ11B, δ7Li). Stable isotopes of water indicate paleo-recharge for some of the groundwaters, limited exchange with gaseous CO2 and, in one case, possibly thermal exchange processes with silicates. Sr isotope ratios vary between marine ratios and radiogenic values indicating

  3. The benthic foraminiferal community in a naturally CO2-rich coastal habitat of the southwestern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynert, K.; Schönfeld, J.; Polovodova-Asteman, I.; Thomsen, J.

    2012-11-01

    waters. Whereas benthic foraminifera indeed may cope with a high sediment pore water pCO2, the steady undersaturation of sediment pore waters would likely cause a significant higher mortality of the dominating Ammonia aomoriensis. This shift may eventually lead to changes in the benthic foraminiferal communities in Flensburg Fjord, as well as in other regions experiencing naturally undersaturated Ωcalc levels.

  4. The benthic foraminiferal community in a naturally CO2-rich coastal habitat in the southwestern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynert, K.; Schönfeld, J.; Polovodova-Asteman, I.; Thomsen, J.

    2012-06-01

    sediment pore waters. Whereas benthic foraminifera indeed may cope with a high sediment pore water pCO2, the steady undersaturation of sediment pore waters would likely cause a significant higher mortality of the dominating Ammonia aomoriensis. This shift may eventually lead to changes in the benthic foraminiferal communities in Flensburg Fjord, as well as in other regions experiencing naturally undersaturated Ωcalc levels.

  5. Predicting the ultimate potential of natural gas SOFC power cycles with CO2 capture - Part A: Methodology and reference cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanari, Stefano; Mastropasqua, Luca; Gazzani, Matteo; Chiesa, Paolo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-08-01

    Driven by the search for the highest theoretical efficiency, in the latest years several studies investigated the integration of high temperature fuel cells in natural gas fired power plants, where fuel cells are integrated with simple or modified Brayton cycles and/or with additional bottoming cycles, and CO2 can be separated via chemical or physical separation, oxy-combustion and cryogenic methods. Focusing on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) and following a comprehensive review and analysis of possible plant configurations, this work investigates their theoretical potential efficiency and proposes two ultra-high efficiency plant configurations based on advanced intermediate-temperature SOFCs integrated with a steam turbine or gas turbine cycle. The SOFC works at atmospheric or pressurized conditions and the resulting power plant exceeds 78% LHV efficiency without CO2 capture (as discussed in part A of the work) and 70% LHV efficiency with substantial CO2 capture (part B). The power plants are simulated at the 100 MW scale with a complete set of realistic assumptions about fuel cell (FC) performance, plant components and auxiliaries, presenting detailed energy and material balances together with a second law analysis.

  6. Predicting the ultimate potential of natural gas SOFC power cycles with CO2 capture - Part A: Methodology and reference cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanari, Stefano; Mastropasqua, Luca; Gazzani, Matteo; Chiesa, Paolo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-08-01

    Driven by the search for the highest theoretical efficiency, in the latest years several studies investigated the integration of high temperature fuel cells in natural gas fired power plants, where fuel cells are integrated with simple or modified Brayton cycles and/or with additional bottoming cycles, and CO2 can be separated via chemical or physical separation, oxy-combustion and cryogenic methods. Focusing on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) and following a comprehensive review and analysis of possible plant configurations, this work investigates their theoretical potential efficiency and proposes two ultra-high efficiency plant configurations based on advanced intermediate-temperature SOFCs integrated with a steam turbine or gas turbine cycle. The SOFC works at atmospheric or pressurized conditions and the resulting power plant exceeds 78% LHV efficiency without CO2 capture (as discussed in part A of the work) and 70% LHV efficiency with substantial CO2 capture (part B). The power plants are simulated at the 100 MW scale with a complete set of realistic assumptions about fuel cell (FC) performance, plant components and auxiliaries, presenting detailed energy and material balances together with a second law analysis.

  7. Natural gas and CO2 price variation: impact on the relative cost-efficiency of LNG and pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Ulvestad, Marte; Overland, Indra

    2012-01-01

    This article develops a formal model for comparing the cost structure of the two main transport options for natural gas: liquefied natural gas (LNG) and pipelines. In particular, it evaluates how variations in the prices of natural gas and greenhouse gas emissions affect the relative cost-efficiency of these two options. Natural gas is often promoted as the most environmentally friendly of all fossil fuels, and LNG as a modern and efficient way of transporting it. Some research has been carried out into the local environmental impact of LNG facilities, but almost none into aspects related to climate change. This paper concludes that at current price levels for natural gas and CO2 emissions the distance from field to consumer and the volume of natural gas transported are the main determinants of transport costs. The pricing of natural gas and greenhouse emissions influence the relative cost-efficiency of LNG and pipeline transport, but only to a limited degree at current price levels. Because more energy is required for the LNG process (especially for fuelling the liquefaction process) than for pipelines at distances below 9100 km, LNG is more exposed to variability in the price of natural gas and greenhouse gas emissions up to this distance. If the prices of natural gas and/or greenhouse gas emission rise dramatically in the future, this will affect the choice between pipelines and LNG. Such a price increase will be favourable for pipelines relative to LNG. PMID:24683269

  8. Discovery of natural gain amplification in the 10 muon m CO2 laser bands on Mars: The first definite natural laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M.; Buhl, D.; Chin, G.; Deming, D.; Espenak, F.; Kostiuk, T.; Zipoy, D.

    1980-01-01

    Fully resolved intensity profiles of various lines in the CO2 bands at 9.4 micrometers and 10.4 micrometers were measured on Mars using an infrared heterodyne spectrometer. Analysis of the line shapes shows that the Mars atmosphere exhibits positive gain on these lines, providing the first definite detection of natural optical gain amplification and enabling identification of these lines as the first definite natural laser ever discovered.

  9. The effect of heterogeneity on the character of density-driven natural convection of CO 2 overlying a brine layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajzadeh, R.; Ranganathan, P.; Zitha, P. L. J.; Bruining, J.

    2011-03-01

    The efficiency of mixing in density-driven natural-convection is largely governed by the aquifer permeability, which is heterogeneous in practice. The character (fingering, stable mixing or channeling) of flow-driven mixing processes depends primarily on the permeability heterogeneity character of the aquifer, i.e., on its degree of permeability variance (Dykstra-Parsons coefficient) and the correlation length. Here we follow the ideas of Waggoner et al. (1992) [13] to identify different flow regimes of a density-driven natural convection flow by numerical simulation. Heterogeneous fields are generated with the spectral method of Shinozuka and Jan (1972) [13], because the method allows the use of power-law variograms. In this paper, we extended the classification of Waggoner et al. (1992) [13] for the natural convection phenomenon, which can be used as a tool in selecting optimal fields with maximum transfer rates of CO 2 into water. We observe from our simulations that the rate of mass transfer of CO 2 into water is higher for heterogeneous media.

  10. Short-term dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of CO2 emission from the soils of natural and urban ecosystems in the Central Chernozemic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzhanov, D. A.; Vasenev, V. I.; Sotnikova, Yu. L.; Tembo, A.; Vasenev, I. I.; Valentini, R.

    2015-04-01

    A comparative analysis of the spatial-temporal trends in the emission of CO2 from soils of different functional zones of the city of Kursk, a dark gray soil of an oak forest, and a typical steppe chernozem has been performed. The averaged CO2 emission from the urban soils is 25% higher than that from the natural soils (32.1 ± 17.8 and 17.8 ± 10.2 g CO2/m2 daily, respectively). The spatial heterogeneity of the CO2 emission is also significantly higher for the urban soils, while variation in temporal dynamics of soil respiration among the studied ecosystems was insignificant.

  11. Adaptive method of realizing natural gradient learning for multilayer perceptrons.

    PubMed

    Amari, S; Park, H; Fukumizu, K

    2000-06-01

    The natural gradient learning method is known to have ideal performances for on-line training of multilayer perceptrons. It avoids plateaus, which give rise to slow convergence of the backpropagation method. It is Fisher efficient, whereas the conventional method is not. However, for implementing the method, it is necessary to calculate the Fisher information matrix and its inverse, which is practically very difficult. This article proposes an adaptive method of directly obtaining the inverse of the Fisher information matrix. It generalizes the adaptive Gauss-Newton algorithms and provides a solid theoretical justification of them. Simulations show that the proposed adaptive method works very well for realizing natural gradient learning. PMID:10935719

  12. Natural wax constituents of a supercritical fluid CO(2) extract from quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.) pomace.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Peter; Berger, Melanie; Bertrams, Julia; Wende, Kristian; Wenzel, Kristin; Lindequist, Ulrike; Meyer, Ulrich; Stintzing, Florian C

    2008-05-01

    The chemical constituents of a lipophilic extract from quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.), obtained by supercritical fluid CO(2) extraction of the dried fruit pomace were investigated. Solvent partition of quince wax with n-hexane or acetone yielded an insoluble (crystalline) and a soluble (oily) fraction. Both fractions were analyzed separately using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The insoluble fraction consisted of saturated n-aldehydes, n-alcohols and free n-alkanoic acids of carbon chain lengths between 22 and 32, with carbon chain lengths of 26 and 28 dominating. Also odd-numbered unbranched hydrocarbons, mainly C27, C29 and C31, were detected particularly in the acetone-insoluble fraction (total, 15.8%). By means of vacuum liquid chromatography, triterpenoic acids were separated from the hexane-insoluble matter and identified as a mixture of ursolic, oleanolic and betulinic acids. The major constituents of the hexane-soluble fraction were glycerides of linoleic [Δ(9,12), 18:2] and oleic [Δ(9), 18:1] acids, accompanied by free linoleic, oleic and palmitic acids (C16). Moreover β-sitosterol, Δ(5)-avenasterol as well as trace amounts of other sterols were assigned. Finally the carotenoids phytoene and phytofluene were identified and quantified by UV/vis and high-performance liquid chromatography/MS techniques, yielding 1.0 and 0.3% of the quince wax, respectively. It is anticipated that the complex of lipid constituents from quince wax may exert interesting biological activities, the elucidation of which awaits further studies. PMID:18418588

  13. Coastal Microbial Mat Diversity along a Natural Salinity Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, Henk; Fillinger, Lucas; Stal, Lucas J.

    2013-01-01

    The North Sea coast of the Dutch barrier island of Schiermonnikoog is covered by microbial mats that initiate a succession of plant communities that eventually results in the development of a densely vegetated salt marsh. The North Sea beach has a natural elevation running from the low water mark to the dunes resulting in gradients of environmental factors perpendicular to the beach. These gradients are due to the input of seawater at the low water mark and of freshwater from upwelling groundwater at the dunes and rainfall. The result is a natural and dynamic salinity gradient depending on the tide, rainfall and wind. We studied the microbial community composition in thirty three samples taken every ten meters along this natural salinity gradient by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of rRNA gene fragments. We looked at representatives from each Domain of life (Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya) and with a particular emphasis on Cyanobacteria. Analysis of the DGGE fingerprints together with pigment composition revealed three distinct microbial mat communities, a marine community dominated by diatoms as primary producers, an intermediate brackish community dominated by Cyanobacteria as primary producers and a freshwater community with Cyanobacteria and freshwater green algae. PMID:23704895

  14. Reactive Transport Modeling of Cap Rock Integrity During Natural and Engineered CO2 Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Morris, J P

    2004-05-26

    Long-term cap rock integrity represents the single most important constraint on the long-term isolation performance of natural and engineered CO{sub 2} storage sites. CO{sub 2} influx that forms natural accumulations and CO{sub 2} injection for EOR/sequestration or saline-aquifer disposal both lead to concomitant geochemical alteration and geomechanical deformation of the cap rock, enhancing or degrading its seal integrity depending on the relative effectiveness of these interdependent processes. Using our reactive transport simulator (NUFT), supporting geochemical databases and software (GEMBOCHS, SUPCRT92), and distinct-element geomechanical model (LDEC), we have shown that influx-triggered mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions within typical shale cap rocks continuously reduce microfracture apertures, while pressure and effective-stress evolution first rapidly increase then slowly constrict them. For a given shale composition, the extent of geochemical enhancement is nearly independent of key reservoir properties (permeability and lateral continuity) that distinguish EOR/sequestration and saline-aquifer settings and CO{sub 2} influx parameters (rate, focality, and duration) that distinguish engineered disposal sites and natural accumulations, because these characteristics and parameters have negligible (indirect) impact on mineral dissolution/precipitation rates. In contrast, the extent of geomechanical degradation is highly dependent on these reservoir properties and influx parameters because they effectively dictate magnitude of the pressure perturbation; specifically, initial geomechanical degradation has been shown inversely proportional to reservoir permeability and lateral continuity and proportional to influx rate. Hence, while the extent of geochemical alteration is nearly independent of filling mode, that of geomechanical deformation is significantly more pronounced during engineered injection. This distinction limits the extent to which naturally

  15. Modeling the Long-Term Isolation Performance of Natural and Engineered Geologic CO2 Storage Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Morris, J P

    2004-07-26

    Long-term cap rock integrity represents the single most important constraint on the long-term isolation performance of natural and engineered geologic CO{sub 2} storage sites. CO{sub 2} influx that forms natural accumulations and CO{sub 2} injection for EOR/sequestration or saline-aquifer disposal both lead to concomitant geochemical alteration and geomechanical deformation of the cap rock, enhancing or degrading its seal integrity depending on the relative effectiveness of these interdependent processes. This evolution of cap-rock permeability can be assessed through reactive transport modeling, an advanced computational method based on mathematical models of the coupled physical and chemical processes catalyzed by the influx event. Using our reactive transport simulator (NUFT), supporting geochemical databases and software (SUPCRT92), and distinct-element geomechanical model (LDEC), we have shown that influx-triggered mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions within typical shale cap rocks continuously reduce microfrac apertures, while pressure and effective-stress evolution first rapidly increase then slowly constrict them. For a given shale composition, the extent of geochemical enhancement is nearly independent of key reservoir properties (permeability and lateral continuity) that distinguish saline aquifer and EOR/sequestration settings and CO{sub 2} influx parameters (rate, focality, and duration) that distinguish engineered disposal sites and natural accumulations, because these characteristics and parameters have negligible impact on mineral reaction rates. In contrast, the extent of geomechanical degradation is highly dependent on these reservoir properties and influx parameters, because they effectively dictate magnitude of the pressure perturbation. Specifically, initial geomechanical degradation has been shown inversely proportional to reservoir permeability and lateral continuity and proportional to influx rate. As a result, while the extent of

  16. Fault-controlled advective, diffusive, and eruptive CO 2 leakage from natural reservoirs in the Colorado Plateau, East-Central Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Na-Hyun

    This study investigated a natural analogue for CO2 leakage near Green River, Utah, aiming to understand the influence of various factors on CO2 leakage and to reliably predict underground CO2 behavior after injection for geologic CO2 sequestration. Advective, diffusive, and eruptive characteristics of CO2 leakage were assessed via a soil CO2 flux survey and numerical modeling. The field results show anomalous CO2 fluxes (> 10 g m-2 d-1 ) along the faults, particularly adjacent to CO2-driven cold springs and geysers (e.g., 36,259 g m-2 d-1 at Crystal Geyser), ancient travertines (e.g., 5,917 g m-2 d-1), joint zones in sandstone (e.g., 120 g m-2 d-1), and brine discharge zones (e.g., 5,515 g m-2 d-1). Combined with similar isotopic ratios of gas and progressive evolution of brine chemistry at springs and geysers, a gradual decrease of soil CO2 flux from the Little Grand Wash (LGW; ~36,259 g m -2 d-1) to Salt Wash (SW; ~1,428 g m-2 d-1) fault zones reveals the same CO2 origin and potential southward transport of CO2 over 10-20 km. The numerical simulations exhibit lateral transport of free CO2 and CO2-rich brine from the LGW to SW fault zones through the regional aquifers (e.g., Entrada, Navajo, Kayenta, Wingate, White Rim). CO2 travels predominantly as an aqueous phase (XCO2=~0.045) as previously suggested, giving rise to the convective instability that further accelerates CO2 dissolution. While the buoyant free CO2 always tends to ascend, a fraction of dense CO2-rich brine flows laterally into the aquifer and mixes with the formation fluids during upward migration along the fault. The fault always enhances advective CO2 transport regardless of its permeability (k). However, only low-k fault prevents unconditional upright migration of CO2 and induces fault-parallel movement, feeding the northern aquifers with more CO2. Low-k fault also impedes lateral southward fluid flow from the northern aquifers, developing anticlinal CO2 traps at shallow depths (<300 m). The

  17. INVESTIGATION OF EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS DURING CO2 INJECTION IN HYDRAULICALLY AND NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Schechter

    2005-04-27

    This report describes the work performed during the fourth year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificially fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT scanner to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in hydraulically fractured reservoirs (HFR) and naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) that eventually result in more efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. In Chapter 1, we worked with DOE-RMOTC to investigate fracture properties in the Tensleep Formation at Teapot Dome Naval Reserve as part of their CO{sub 2} sequestration project. In Chapter 2, we continue our investigation to determine the primary oil recovery mechanism in a short vertically fractured core. Finally in Chapter 3, we report our numerical modeling efforts to develop compositional simulator with irregular grid blocks.

  18. Generating Aromatics From CO2 on Mars or Natural Gas on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Zubrin, Robert; Berggren, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Methane to aromatics on Mars ( METAMARS ) is the name of a process originally intended as a means of converting Martian atmospheric carbon dioxide to aromatic hydrocarbons and oxygen, which would be used as propellants for spacecraft to return to Earth. The process has been demonstrated on Earth on a laboratory scale. A truncated version of the process could be used on Earth to convert natural gas to aromatic hydrocarbon liquids. The greater (relative to natural gas) density of aromatic hydrocarbon liquids makes it more economically feasible to ship them to distant markets. Hence, this process makes it feasible to exploit some reserves of natural gas that, heretofore, have been considered as being "stranded" too far from markets to be of economic value. In the full version of METAMARS, carbon dioxide is frozen out of the atmosphere and fed to a Sabatier reactor along with hydrogen (which, on Mars, would have been brought from Earth). In the Sabatier reactor, these feedstocks are converted to methane and water. The water is condensed and electrolyzed to oxygen (which is liquefied) and hydrogen (which is recycled to the Sabatier reactor). The methane is sent to an aromatization reactor, wherein, over a molybdenum-on-zeolite catalyst at a temperature 700 C, it is partially converted into aromatic hydrocarbons (specifically, benzene, toluene, and naphthalene) along with hydrogen. The aromatics are collected by freezing, while unreacted methane and hydrogen are separated by a membrane. Most of the hydrogen is recycled to the Sabatier reactor, while the methane and a small portion of the hydrogen are recycled to the aromatization reactor. The partial recycle of hydrogen to the aromatization reactor greatly increases the catalyst lifetime and eases its regeneration by preventing the formation of graphitic carbon, which could damage the catalyst. (Moreover, if graphitic carbon were allowed to form, it would be necessary to use oxygen to remove it.) Because the aromatics

  19. INVESTIGATION OF EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS DURING CO2 INJECTION IN HYDRAULICALLY AND NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Schechter

    2004-10-10

    This report describes the work performed during the third year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificial fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in HFR and NFR that eventually result in more efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on modeling fluid flow through rough fractures and investigating the grid orientation effect in rectangular grid blocks particularly at high mobility ratio as our precursor to use a compositional simulator. We are developing a robust simulator using Voronoi grids to accurately represent natural and induced fractures. We are also verifying the accuracy of the simulation using scaled laboratory experiments to provide a benchmark for our simulation technique. No such simulator currently exists so this capability will represent a major breakthrough in simulation of gas injection in fractured systems. The following sections outline the results that appear in this report.

  20. The impact of CO2 on shallow groundwater chemistry: observations at a natural analog site and implications for carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Elizabeth; Fessenden, Julianna; Kanjorski, Nancy; Koning, Dan; Pawar, Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    In a natural analog study of risks associated with carbon sequestration, impacts of CO{sub 2} on shallow groundwater quality have been measured in a sandstone aquifer in New Mexico, USA. Despite relatively high levels of dissolved CO{sub 2}, originating from depth and producing geysering at one well, pH depression and consequent trace element mobility are relatively minor effects due to the buffering capacity of the aquifer. However, local contamination due to influx of saline waters in a subset of wells is significant. Geochemical modeling of major ion concentrations suggests that high alkalinity and carbonate mineral dissolution buffers pH changes due to CO{sub 2} influx. Analysis oftrends in dissolved trace elements, chloride, and CO2 reveal no evidence of in-situ trace element mobilization. There is clear evidence, however, that As, U, and Pb are locally co-transported into the aquifer with CO{sub 2}-rich saline water. This study illustrates the role that local geochemical conditions will play in determining the effectiveness of monitoring strategies for CO{sub 2} leakage. For example, if buffering is significant, pH monitoring may not effectively detect CO2 leakage. This study also highlights potential complications that CO{sub 2}carrier fluids, such as saline waters, pose in monitoring impacts ofgeologic sequestration.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS DURING CO2 INJECTION IN HYDRAULICALLY AND NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Schechter

    2003-10-01

    This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificial fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in HFR and NFR that eventually result in less efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on modeling the fluid flow in fracture surface, examining the fluid transfer mechanisms and describing the fracture aperture distribution under different overburden pressure using X-ray CT scanner.

  2. INVESTIGATION OF EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS DURING CO2 INJECTION IN HYDRAULICALLY AND NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Schechter

    2004-04-26

    This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificial fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in HFR and NFR that eventually result in less efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on investigating the effect of CO{sub 2} injection rates in homogeneous and fractured cores on oil recovery and a strategy to mitigate CO{sub 2} bypassing in a fractured core.

  3. Effect of H2O, and combined effects of H2O + F, H2O + CO2, and H2O + F + CO2 on the viscosity of a natural basalt from Fuego volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Whittington, A. G.; Knipping, J.; Scherbarth, S.; Stechern, A.; Behrens, H.

    2012-12-01

    We measured the viscosity of 5 series of remelted natural basalt from Fuego volcano, Guatemala. These series include single and multiple volatile species: H2O, F, H2O-F, H2O-CO2, and H2O-CO2-F. The hydrous glasses were synthesized at 3 kbar and 1250°C in Internally Heated Pressure Vessels. The multiple volatile series were synthesized at 5 kbar and 1250°C. CO2 was added as Ag2C2O4, F as AlF3, and H2O as distilled water. The anhydrous, F-bearing series was synthesized at 1 atm by simply remelting the Fuego basalt and adding F as CaF2.The natural, dry, remelted Fuego basalt has an NBO/T of 0.64. The following comparisons are based on parallel-plate viscosity measurements in the range ~108 to 1012 Pa s. The temperature at which the viscosity is 1012 Pa s (T12) is taken to be the viscosimetric glass transition temperature (Tg). The addition of 2 wt.% H2O results in a decrease of T12 of ~150°C for basalt. Fluorine on its own has a measurable, but much smaller effect, than the equivalent amount of water. Indeed, ~2 wt.% F results in a T12 depression of only ~30°C. When H2O and F are both present, their effects are approximately additive. For example, the viscosity of a basalt with 1.44 wt.% H2O is very similar to the viscosity of a basalt with ~1 wt.% H2O and ~1.25 wt.% F, and the viscosities of a basalt with 2.29 wt.% H2O and a basalt with ~1.65 wt.% H2O and ~1.3 wt.% F are also very similar. The effect of CO2 is somewhat ambiguous. The viscosity of a basalt with ~1.7 wt.% H2O, ~1.3 wt.% F and ~0.2 wt.% CO2 is essentially the same as the viscosity of a basalt with 2.29 wt.% H2O, so CO2 seems to have a negligible or even viscosity-increasing effect when F and H2O are also present. However, a basalt with ~0.84 wt.% H2O and ~0.09 wt.% CO2 has about the same viscosity as a basalt with 1.34 wt.% H2O, which could suggest a strong (viscosity-decreasing) effect of very small amounts of CO2. These results suggest that the effects on viscosity of F in basaltic systems are

  4. Antioxidant capacity of polychaetes occurring at a natural CO2 vent system: Results of an in situ reciprocal transplant experiment.

    PubMed

    Ricevuto, E; Benedetti, M; Regoli, F; Spicer, J I; Gambi, M C

    2015-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is occurring at a fast rate, resulting in changes of carbonate chemistry in the oceans and in lowering of the pH. Previous studies have documented significant changes in the antioxidant defenses of marine species in response to OA. Here, selected polychaete species, Platynereis dumerilii, Polyophthalmus pictus and Syllis prolifera, were sampled from a natural CO2 vent system (pH = 7.3) and from a non-venting 'control' site (pH = 8.1), and reciprocally transplanted in these areas for 30 days. Total antioxidant capacity toward different forms of oxyradicals was compared in native and transplanted polychaetes: the aim was to assess whether the environmental conditions at the vent site would act as a prooxidant stressor, and the capability of polychaetes to modulate their antioxidant capacity to counteract a varied oxyradicals formation. None of the investigated species enhanced the antioxidant potential during the experiment. A significant reduction of the capability to neutralize different forms of oxyradicals was observed in P. pictus and, partially, in S. prolifera when transplanted from control to naturally-acidified conditions. On the other hand, populations of P. dumerilii originating from the vent and of S. prolifera from both control and acidified sites, showed higher constitutive antioxidant efficiency toward peroxyl radicals and peroxynitrite, which may allow them to cope with short-term and chronic exposure to higher oxidative pressure without further enhancement of antioxidant defenses. Since low pH - high pCO2 is the greatest environmental difference between the control and the vent sites, we suggest that the pro-oxidant challenge due to such peculiarities may have different biological consequences in different polychaete species. Some appear more susceptible to oxidative effects, while others acquire a long term acclimatization to vent conditions through the enhancement of their basal antioxidant protection. PMID:26392350

  5. Hynol: An economic process for methanol production from biomass and natural gas with reduced CO2 emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, M.; Dong, Yuanji

    1993-10-01

    The Hynol process is proposed to meet the demand for an economical process for methanol production with reduced CO2 emission. This new process consists of three reaction steps: (1) hydrogasification of biomass, (2) steam reforming of the produced gas with additional natural gas feedstock, and (3) methanol synthesis of the hydrogen and carbon monoxide produced during the previous two steps. The H2-rich gas remaining after methanol synthesis is recycled to gasify the biomass in an energy neutral reactor so that there is no need for an expensive oxygen plant as required by commercial steam gasifiers. Recycling gas allows the methanol synthesis reactor to perform at a relatively lower pressure than conventional while the plant still maintains high methanol yield. Energy recovery designed into the process minimizes heat loss and increases the process thermal efficiency. If the Hynol methanol is used as an alternative and more efficient automotive fuel, an overall 41% reduction in CO2 emission can be achieved compared to the use of conventional gasoline fuel. A preliminary economic estimate shows that the total capital investment for a Hynol plant is 40% lower than that for a conventional biomass gasification plant. The methanol production cost is $0.43/gal for a 1085 million gal/yr Hynol plant which is competitive with current U.S. methanol and equivalent gasoline prices. Process flowsheet and simulation data using biomass and natural gas as cofeedstocks are presented. The Hynol process can convert any condensed carbonaceous material, especially municipal solid waste (MSW), to produce methanol.

  6. Anthropogenic and natural CO2 exchange through the Strait of Gibraltar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huertas, I. E.; Ríos, A. F.; García-Lafuente, J.; Makaoui, A.; Rodríguez-Gálvez, S.; Sánchez-Román, A.; Orbi, A.; Ruíz, J.; Pérez, F. F.

    2009-04-01

    The exchange of both anthropogenic and natural inorganic carbon between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea through Strait of Gibraltar was studied for a period of two years under the frame of the CARBOOCEAN project. A comprehensive sampling program was conducted, which was design to collect samples at eight fixed stations located in the Strait in successive cruises periodically distributed through the year in order to ensure a good spatial and temporal coverage. As a result of this monitoring, a time series namely GIFT (GIbraltar Fixed Time series) has been established, allowing the generation of an extensive data set of the carbon system parameters in the area. Data acquired during the development of nine campaigns were analyzed in this work. Total inorganic carbon concentration (CT) was calculated from alkalinity-pHT pairs and appropriate thermodynamic relationships, with the concentration of anthropogenic carbon (CANT) being also computed using two methods, the ΔC* and the TrOCA approach. Applying a two-layer model of water mass exchange through the Strait and using a value of -0.85 Sv for the average transport of the outflowing Mediterranean water recorded in situ during the considered period, a net export of inorganic carbon from the Mediterranean Sea to the Atlantic was obtained, which amounted to 25±0.6 Tg C yr-1. A net alkalinity output of 16±0.6 Tg C yr-1 was also observed to occur through the Strait. In contrast, the Atlantic water was found to contain a higher concentration of anthropogenic carbon than the Mediterranean water, resulting in a net flux of CANT towards the Mediterranean basin of 4.20±0.04 Tg C yr-1 by using the ΔC* method, which constituted the most adequate approach for this environment. A carbon balance in the Mediterranean was assessed and fluxes through the Strait are discussed in relation to the highly diverse estimates available in the literature for the area and the different approaches considered for CANT estimation

  7. Implications of Sub-Hydrostatic Pressures in the Bravo Dome Natural CO2 Reservoir for the Long-Term Security of Geological Carbon Dioxide Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhbari, D.; Hesse, M. A.; Larson, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Bravo Dome field in northeast New Mexico is one of the largest gas accumulations worldwide and the largest natural CO2 accumulation in North America. The field is only 580-900 m deep and located in the Permian Tubb sandstone that unconformably overlies the granitic basement. Sathaye et al. (2014) estimated that 1.3 Gt of CO2 is stored at the reservoir. A major increase in the pore pressure relative to the hydrostatic pressure is expected due to the large amount of CO2 injected into the reservoir. However, the pre-production gas pressures indicate that most parts of the reservoir are approximately 5 MPa below hydrostatic pressure. Three processes could explain the under pressure in the Bravo Dome reservoir; 1) erosional unloading, 2) CO2 dissolution into the ambient brine, 3) cooling of CO2after injection. Analytical solutions suggest that an erosion rate of 180 m/Ma is required to reduce the pore pressures to the values observed at Bravo Dome. Given that the current erosion rate is only 5 m/Ma (Nereson et al. 2013); the sub-hydrostatic pressures at Bravo Dome are likely due to CO2dissolution and cooling. To investigate the impact of CO2 dissolution on the pore pressure we have developed new analytical solutions and conducted laboratory experiments. We assume that gaseous CO2 was confined to sandstones during emplacement due to the high entry pressure of the siltstones. After emplacement the CO2 dissolves in to the brine contained in the siltstones and the pressure in the sandstones declines. Assuming the sandstone-siltstone system is closed, the pressure decline due to CO2 dissolution is controlled by a single dimensionless number, η = KHRTVw /Vg. Herein, KH is Henry's constant, R is ideal gas constant, T is temperature, Vw is water volume, and Vg is CO2 volume. The pressure drop is controlled by the ratio of water volume to CO2 volume and η varies between 0.1 to 8 at Bravo Dome. This corresponds to pressure drops between 0.8-7.5 MPa and can therefore account

  8. INVESTIGATION OF EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS DURING CO2 INJECTION IN HYDRAULICALLY AND NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Schechter

    2005-09-28

    even in a short matrix block. This results are contrary with the previous believes that gravity drainage has always been associated with tall matrix blocks. In order to reduce oil bypassed, we injected water that has been viscosified with a polymer into the fracture to divert CO{sub 2} flow into matrix and delay CO{sub 2} breakthrough. Although the breakthrough time reduced considerably, water ''leak off'' into the matrix was very high. A cross-linked gel was used in the fracture to avoid this problem. The gel was found to overcome ''leak off'' problems and effectively divert CO{sub 2} flow into the matrix. As part of our technology transfer activity, we investigated the natural fracture aperture distribution of Tensleep formation cores. We found that the measured apertures distributions follow log normal distribution as expected. The second chapter deals with analysis and modeling the laboratory experiments and fluid flow through fractured networks. We derived a new equation to determine the average fracture aperture and the amount of each flow through fracture and matrix system. The results of this study were used as the observed data and for validating the simulation model. The idea behind this study is to validate the use of a set of smooth parallel plates that is common in modeling fracture system. The results suggest that fracture apertures need to be distributed to accurately model the experimental results. In order to study the imbibition process in details, we developed imbibition simulator. We validated our model with X-ray CT experimental data from different imbibition experiments. We found that the proper simulation model requires matching both weight gain and CT water saturation simultaneously as oppose to common practices in matching imbibition process with weight gain only because of lack information from CT scan. The work was continued by developing dual porosity simulation using empirical transfer function (ETF) derived from imbibition experiments

  9. Photosynthetic water use efficiency in Sorghastrum nutans (C4) and Solidago canadensis (C3) in three soils along a CO2 concentration gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The water use efficiency (WUE) of leaf photosynthetic carbon uptake is a key regulator of ecosystem carbon cycles and is strongly sensitive to atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations [CO2]. However WUE responses to [CO2] typically differ between C3 and C4 species and may differ on varying soil ty...

  10. Geological and geophysical properties of cap rock in a natural CO2 occurrence, Mihályi-Répcelak area, Western Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Csilla; Szamosfalvi, Ágnes; Sendula, Eszter; Páles, Mariann; Kovács, István; Kónya, Péter; Falus, György; Szabó, Csaba

    2015-04-01

    The physical and geochemical consistency of the cap rock is primarily important for safe geological storage of CO2.. As a consequence of CO2 injection reactions took place between the minerals of the reservoir, the cap rock and CO2 saturated pore water. These reactions may change the mineral composition and petrophysical properties of the storage reservoir as well as the cap rock that provides the only physical barrier that retains carbon dioxide in the target reservoir formation. Study of the natural CO2 occurrences delivers information to understand which properties of a cap rock provide the sustainable closure and retainment. Knowledge of the long term effect of CO2 on the behavior of the cap rock is an important input in the selection procedure of a potential CO2 injection site. Yet, very few data exist on geochemical properties and reactivity of the cap rocks. During normal commercial operations the reservoir is typically cored, but not the cap rock. This study may enhance our knowledge about possible mineralogical reactions, which can occur in clayey-aleuritic cap rocks. The Mihályi-Répcelak natural CO2 occurrence is believed to be leakage safe. There is no known seepage on the surface. It is suggested that the aleuritic clay rich cap rock occurring at the natural reservoir can stop CO2 migration into other reservoirs or to the surface. The most important characteristics of cap rocks that they have low permeability (<0.1 mD) and porosity (eff.por. = 4%) and high clayeyness (approx. 80%). However, we demonstrate that in addition to these parameters the geochemical properties of cap rock is also important. In order to characterize the natural CO2 occurrence, we applied the following analysis, like XRD, FTIR, SEM. The petrophysical properties are determined from the interpretation of geophysical well-logs and grain size distribution. The most important result of this study that adequate petrophysical properties do not completely define the suitability of a cap

  11. Noble gases preserve history of retentive continental crust in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Smye, Andrew J.; Jordan, Jacob S.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-06-01

    Budgets of 4He and 40Ar provide constraints on the chemical evolution of the solid Earth and atmosphere. Although continental crust accounts for the majority of 4He and 40Ar degassed from the Earth, degassing mechanisms are subject to scholarly debate. Here we provide a constraint on crustal degassing by comparing the noble gases accumulated in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir, New Mexico USA, with the radiogenic production in the underlying crust. A detailed geological model of the reservoir is used to provide absolute abundances and geostatistical uncertainty of 4He, 40Ar, 21Ne, 20Ne, 36Ar, and 84Kr. The present-day production rate of crustal radiogenic 4He and 40Ar, henceforth referred to as 4He* and 40Ar*, is estimated using the basement composition, surface and mantle heat flow, and seismic estimates of crustal density. After subtracting mantle and atmospheric contributions, the reservoir contains less than 0.02% of the radiogenic production in the underlying crust. This shows unequivocally that radiogenic noble gases are effectively retained in cratonic continental crust over millennial timescales. This also requires that approximately 1.5 Gt of mantle derived CO2 migrated through the crust without mobilizing the crustally accumulated gases. This observation suggests transport along a localized fracture network. Therefore, the retention of noble gases in stable crystalline continental crust allows shallow accumulations of radiogenic gases to record tectonic history. At Bravo Dome, the crustal 4He*/40Ar* ratio is one fifth of the expected crustal production ratio, recording the preferential release of 4He during the Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny, 300 Ma.

  12. The effect of long-term fluid-rock interactions on the mechanical properties of reservoir rock - a case study of the Werkendam natural CO2 analogue field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Bertier, Pieter; Bakker, Elisenda; Nover, Georg; Busch, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Geological storage of CO2 is one of the most promising technologies to rapidly reduce anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide. During long-term geological storage of CO2, fluid-rock interactions, induced by the formation of carbonic acid, may affect the mineralogical composition of the reservoir rock. Commonly expected reactions include the dissolution of carbonate and/or sulphate cements, as well as the reaction of primary minerals (feldspars, clays, micas) to form new, secondary phases. In order to ensure storage integrity, it is important to understand the effect of such fluid-rock interactions on the mechanical behaviour of a CO2 storage complex. However, most of these reactions are very slow, which limits the ability to study coupled chemical-mechanical processes in the lab. A possible way to circumvent long reaction times is to investigate natural CO2 analogue fields, which experienced CO2-exposure for thousands of years. In this study, we looked at the Dutch Werkendam natural CO2 field and its unreacted counterpart (Röt Fringe Sandstone, Werkendam, the Netherlands). We focussed on CO2-induced mineralogical and porosity-permeability changes, and their effect on mechanical behaviour of intact rock. Overall, CO2-exposure did not lead to drastic mineralogical changes, though markedly different porosity-permeability relationships were found for the unreacted and exposed material. The limited extent of reaction was in part the result of bitumen coatings protecting specific mineral phases from reaction. In local, mm-sized zones displaying significant anhydrite dissolution, enhanced porosity was observed. For most of the reservoir the long-term mechanical behaviour after CO2-exposure could be described by the behaviour of the unreacted sandstone, while these more 'porous' zones were significantly weaker. Simple stress path calculations predict that reservoir failure due to depletion and injection is unlikely.

  13. Comparison of shallow aquifer and soil gas monitoring approaches for detecting CO2 leakage at a natural analogue site in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widory, D.; Gal, F.; Proust, E.; Mayer, B.

    2011-12-01

    Natural analogue sites where geologic CO2 is leaking to the surface provide excellent opportunities to test approaches suitable for monitoring for potential CO2 leakage at carbon capture and storage sites. We tested isotope monitoring approaches for CO2 detection in shallow aquifers and the overlying soil zone at a CO2 analogue site near Sainte-Marguerite in the Massif Central (France). The Sainte-Marguerite area is located in the southern part of the Limagne graben (French Massif Central). The basement, composed of highly fractured granite, outcrops toward the west of the study area, notably around the Saladis spring. An intercalated arkosic permeable interval between fractured granite and Oligocene marls and limestones acts as a stratiform drain for fluid migration while the overlying thick Oligocene interval is impermeable and acts as a seal. The Allier river bed is located near the contact between the basement and the sedimentary rocks. Deep CO2-ladden fluids migrate through the arkose interval toward the Sainte-Marguerite area and sustain a number of local springs. The Sainte-Marguerite area is known for the travertine deposits associated with the CO2-rich natural springs. We collected water samples and effervescent gases at the springs as well as soil gases for chemical and isotopic analyses. The analytical parameters included major anions and cations, δ13C & δ18O of CO2, δD & δ18O of H2O and δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Preliminary results revealed that δ13C values of CO2 in most groundwater and soil samples were similar. Oxygen isotope measurements revealed equilibrium between CO2 and H2O-oxygen in most samples, but except for a limited number of samples, δ18O values of water did not deviate significantly from the local meteoric water line. Our preliminary results suggest that both the groundwater and the soil sampling approaches should be capable of detecting leakage of CO2 provided that the leaking gas has a distinct isotopic

  14. Aboveground net primary productivity and rainfall use efficiency of grassland on three soils after two years of exposure to a subambient to superambient CO2 gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations (CA) have increased by about 100 µL L-1 over the last 250 years to ~ 380 µL L-1, the highest values in the last half-million years, and CA is expected to continue to increase to greater than 500 µL L-1 by 2100. CO2 enrichment has been shown to affect many ecosystem pr...

  15. Ancient and modern sites of natural CO2 leakage: Geochemistry and geochronology of Quaternary and modern travertine deposits on the Colorado Plateau, USA, and implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priewisch, A.; Crossey, L. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.; McPherson, B. J.; Mozley, P.

    2013-12-01

    Travertine-precipitating springs and travertine deposits of the Colorado Plateau serve as natural analogues for evaluating potential leakage associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Extensive Quaternary and modern travertine deposits occur along the Jemez lineament and Rio Grande rift in New Mexico and Arizona, and in the Paradox Basin in Utah, along the Little Grand Wash Fault and the Salt Wash Graben. These groundwater discharge deposits are interpreted to be sites of persistent and significant CO2 degassing along faults and above magmatic systems. Analysis of the geochemical and isotopic composition of U-series dated travertine deposits and modern travertine-precipitating waters allows evaluation of the flow paths of CO2-charged waters. Initial results from New Mexico and Arizona travertine deposits show characteristic rare earth element (REE) signatures for individual travertine deposits and yet generally overlap in concentrations of other trace elements such as Al, As, B, Ba, K, and Si. We report stable oxygen and carbon isotopes of the travertines in New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah. Different travertine deposits have different carbon-oxygen isotope variation patterns suggesting that these stable isotopes are tracers that have the ability to identify distinctive groundwater sources within and between spring groups based on the travertine record. Stable isotope analyses of travertine deposits in New Mexico and Arizona overlap substantially between deposits and cluster around -10‰ to -6‰ for δ18O and around 3.5‰ to 6.5‰ for δ13C. Travertine deposits in Utah show a distinctly different range of stable isotope values: δ18O values cluster around -14‰ to -10.5‰ and δ13C around 4.5‰ to 6.5‰. U-series dating of travertine deposits shows episodic travertine formation in New Mexico and Arizona over the last 700,000 years, and travertine accumulation over the last 400,000 years in Utah. We use U-series dating and volumetric

  16. Biodiversity response to natural gradients of multiple stressors on continental margins.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Erik A; Frieder, Christina A; Levin, Lisa A

    2016-04-27

    Sharp increases in atmospheric CO2 are resulting in ocean warming, acidification and deoxygenation that threaten marine organisms on continental margins and their ecological functions and resulting ecosystem services. The relative influence of these stressors on biodiversity remains unclear, as well as the threshold levels for change and when secondary stressors become important. One strategy to interpret adaptation potential and predict future faunal change is to examine ecological shifts along natural gradients in the modern ocean. Here, we assess the explanatory power of temperature, oxygen and the carbonate system for macrofaunal diversity and evenness along continental upwelling margins using variance partitioning techniques. Oxygen levels have the strongest explanatory capacity for variation in species diversity. Sharp drops in diversity are seen as O2 levels decline through the 0.5-0.15 ml l(-1) (approx. 22-6 µM; approx. 21-5 matm) range, and as temperature increases through the 7-10°C range. pCO2 is the best explanatory variable in the Arabian Sea, but explains little of the variance in diversity in the eastern Pacific Ocean. By contrast, very little variation in evenness is explained by these three global change variables. The identification of sharp thresholds in ecological response are used here to predict areas of the seafloor where diversity is most at risk to future marine global change, noting that the existence of clear regional differences cautions against applying global thresholds. PMID:27122565

  17. Macrofaunal Biodiversity Response to Natural Gradients of Multiple Stressors on Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, E. A.; Frieder, C.; Levin, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sharp increases in atmospheric CO2 are resulting in ocean warming, acidification and deoxygenation. Rates of change are unprecedented, raising questions about whether (and how) communities will adapt and if responses will reflect synergistic interactions among multiple stressors. Changes to benthic biodiversity on continental margins have important implications for carbon cycle processes and other ecosystem services. One strategy to interpret adaptation potential and predict future faunal change is to examine ecological shifts along natural gradients in the modern ocean. Here, we assess the explanatory power of major climate stressors for macrofaunal diversity and evenness along continental margins using variance partitioning techniques. Sharp drops in diversity are seen as O2 levels decline through the 0.5 - 0.15 ml/l (~22 - 6 μM; ~21 - 5 matm) range, and as temperature increases through the 7-10°C range. pCO2 shows a strong effect in the Arabian Sea but very little effect in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. In contrast, very little variation in evenness is explained by these three global change variables. The identification of sharp thresholds in ecological response are used here to predict seafloor areas most at risk to future marine global change, although the existence of clear regional differences cautions against applying global thresholds.

  18. Preliminary evidences of CCM operation and its down regulation in relation to increasing CO2 levels in natural phytoplankton assemblages from the coastal waters of Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Haimanti; Rahman Shaik, Aziz Ur; Bandyopadhyay, Debasmita

    2014-05-01

    Bay of Bengal (BoB), a low productive part of the North Indian Ocean, often possesses low CO2 levels in its surface water and diatoms dominate the phytoplankton communities. Virtually no studies are available from this area reporting how this diatom dominated phytoplankton community would respond any increase in dissolved CO2 levels either naturally or anthopogenically. In most of the marine phytoplankton, the inefficiency of the sole carbon fixing enzyme Rubisco necessitates the need of concentrating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (mostly as HCO3) inside the cell in excess of the ambient water concentrations in order to maintain high rate of photosynthesis under low CO2 levels through an energy consuming carbon concentration mechanisms (CCMs). The ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a vital role in CCMs by converting HCO3- to CO2 and usually utilizes the trace metal zinc (Zn) as a cofactor. However, it is evident in many marine phytoplankton species that with increasing external CO2 levels, CCMs can be down-regulated leading to energetic savings which can be reallocated to growth; although exceptions occur. Hence, in order to predict their responses to the projected changes, it is imperative to understand their carbon metabolism patterns. We have conducted a series of incubation experiments in microcosms with natural phytoplankton communities from the coastal waters of BoB under different CO2 levels. Our results revealed that the rate of net photosynthetic oxygen evolution and biomass build-up increased in response to increasing CO2 levels. The depletion in δ13CPOM values were more in the high CO2 treatments relative to the low CO2 treated cells (control), indicating that dissolved CO2 uptake was higher when CO2 levels were increased. When additional Zn was added to the low CO2 treated cells, net photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate was increased significantly than that of the untreated control. It is likely that upon the supply of Zn under low CO2

  19. In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of Supercritical CO2 Incorporation in Smectite-Natural Organic Matter Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Hoyt, David W.; Burton, Sarah D.; Ferguson, Brennan O.; Varga, Tamas; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.

    2014-01-29

    This paper presents an in situ NMR study of clay-natural organic polymer systems (a hectoritehumic acid [HA] composite) under CO2 storage reservoir conditions (90 bars CO2 pressure, 50°C). The 13C and 23Na NMR data show that supercritical CO2 interacts more strongly with the composite than with the base clay and does not react to form other C-containing species over several days at elevated CO2. With and without organic matter, the data suggest that CO2 enters the interlayer space of Na-hectorite equilibrated at 43% relative humidity. The presence of supercritical CO2 also leads to increased 23Na signal intensity, reduced line width at half height, increased basal width, more rapid 23Na T1 relaxation rates, and a shift to more positive resonance frequencies. Larger changes are observed for the hectorite-HA composite than for the base clay. In light of recently reported MD simulations of other polymer-Na-smectite composites, we interpret the observed changes as an increase in the rate of Na+ site hopping in the presence of supercritical CO2, the presence of potential new Na+ sorption sites when the humic acid is present, and perhaps an accompanying increase in the number of Na+ ions actively involved in site hopping. The results suggest that the presence of organic material either in clay interlayers or on external particle surfaces can significantly affect the behavior of supercritical CO2 and the mobility of metal ions in reservoir rocks.

  20. Comparison of natural aquifer geochemical variability with uncertainty from model-predicted CO2 induced geochemical changes: How detectable is leakage from carbon sequestration sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarre-Sitchler, A. K.; Moore, J.

    2012-12-01

    Leakage of CO2 from underground formations poses risk to the storage permanence goal of 99% of injected CO2 remaining sequestered from the atmosphere, which is needed to mitigate potential global climate change. Additionally, leaked CO2 that invades overlying shallow aquifers may cause deleterious changes to groundwater quality and pose risks to environmental and human health. For these reasons, technologies for monitoring, measurement and accounting of injected CO2 are necessary for regulation and permitting of CO2 sequestration operations. Changes in groundwater geochemistry induced by CO2 leakage offer a potential diagnostic tool for identifying leakage into shallow aquifers. In order to confidently use geochemical parameters as indicators of leakage, however, natural variability in geochemical concentrations and uncertainty in predicted geochemical changes induced by CO2 leakage must be quantitatively evaluated. For leakage monitoring, spatial variability of geochemical parameters such as alkalinity, pH, and specific conductivity is less relevant than temporal variability of these parameters within a given well. We used geochemical data from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Ambient Ground Water Monitoring Network to characterize geochemical variability within individual wells. We selected wells from limestone, sandstone, and unconsolidated aquifers with ≥15 samples (typically annual) and statistically analyzed variability in alkalinity, pH, and specific conductance using median and interquartile range (IQR) to avoid influence by outliers and non-gaussian distributions. Neither the medians nor the IQRs showed correlation with well depth, sampling month, or number of samples. Our results indicate that variability in alkalinity and pH (4 - 12%) within individual wells is lower than specific conductance (28 - 32%), and thus, alkalinity and pH potentially provide more robust indicators. Uncertainty in predicted alkalinity and pH changes due to uncertainty

  1. Natural variability and anthropogenic change in equatorial Pacific surface ocean pCO2 and pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Adrienne J.; Feely, Richard A.; Sabine, Christopher L.; McPhaden, Michael J.; Takahashi, Taro; Chavez, Francisco P.; Friederich, Gernot E.; Mathis, Jeremy T.

    2014-02-01

    The equatorial Pacific is a dynamic region that plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. This region is the largest oceanic source of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere, which varies interannually dependent on the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and other climatic and oceanic drivers. We present high-resolution observations of surface ocean CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) at four fixed locations in the Niño 3.4 area with data sets encompassing 10 ENSO warm and cold events from 1997 to 2011. The mooring observations confirm that ENSO controls much of the interannual variability in surface seawater pCO2 with values ranging from 315 to 578 µatm. The mooring time series also capture the temporal variability necessary to make the first estimates of long-term pH trends in the equatorial Pacific, which suggests that the combination of ocean acidification and decadal variability creates conditions for high rates of pH change since the beginning of the mooring record. Anthropogenic CO2 increases play a dominant role in significant observed seawater pCO2 trends of +2.3 to +3.3 µatm yr-1 and pH trends of -0.0018 to -0.0026 yr-1 across the full time series in this region. However, increased upwelling driven by increased trade winds, a shallower thermocline, and increased frequency of La Niña events also contribute an average of 40% of the observed trends since 1998. These trends are higher than previous estimates based on underway observations and suggest that the equatorial Pacific is contributing a greater amount of CO2 to the atmospheric CO2 inventory over the last decade.

  2. Assessing the impact of CO2 and brine leakage on shallow groundwater quality: Results from a natural analog study in New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, E. H.; Hakala, A.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Carey, J. W.; Fessenden, J. E.; Pawar, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    A vital aspect to public and regulatory acceptance of carbon sequestration is assurance that drinking water in overlying aquifers will be protected. Direct observations of CO2 flowing through shallow drinking water aquifers are invaluable for informing credible risk assessments. To this end, we have sampled shallow wells in a natural analog site in New Mexico, USA, where CO2 from natural sources is upwelling from depth, and have conducted laboratory experiments on aquifer sediments. Collectively, this work has generated insights into the processes controlling major ion and trace element geochemistry in a CO2-rich system. One finding has been that impacts related to upwelling saline water far exceed those related to in-situ CO2-induced trace metal mobilization. We have also developed 3-D reactive-transport simulations to represent the key aspects of this particular type of drinking water aquifer. In this paper we will summarize field and laboratory findings, and compare reactive-transport simulations with field data. We will then show how field-tested simulations can be used to predict the temporal evolution of shallow groundwater in hypothetical CO2 leakage scenarios. These simulations highlight the importance of transient, non-equilibrium effects. These effects should be carefully considered in risk assessments and monitoring network design. We conclude by presenting sensitivity analysis results showing the most important uncertain model parameters; these results can be used to guide future laboratory and field studies.

  3. STOMATAL SENSITIVITY TO VAPOR PRESSURE DIFFERENCE OVER A SUBAMBIENT TO ELEVATED CO2 GRADIENT IN A C3/C4 GRASSLAND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the response of stomatal conductance (gs) to increasing leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference (D) in early season C3 (Bromus japonicus) and late season C4 (Bothriochloa ischaemum) grasses grown in the field across a range of CO2 (200-550 umol mol-1). Stomatal sensitivity to D was calcul...

  4. CO2 leakage impacts on shallow groundwater. Field-scale reactive-transport simulations informed by observations at a natural analog site

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keating, Elizabeth H.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Viswanathan, Hari; Carey, J. William; Pawar, Rajesh; Guthrie, George D.; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna

    2013-03-01

    It is challenging to predict the degree to which shallow groundwater might be affected by leaks from a CO2 sequestration reservoir, particularly over long time scales and large spatial scales. In this study observations at a CO2 enriched shallow aquifer natural analog were used to develop a predictive model which is then used to simulate leakage scenarios. This natural analog provides the opportunity to make direct field observations of groundwater chemistry in the presence of elevated CO2, to collect aquifer samples and expose them to CO2 under controlled conditions in the laboratory, and to test the ability of multiphase reactivemore » transport models to reproduce measured geochemical trends at the field-scale. The field observations suggest that brackish water entrained with the upwelling CO2 are a more significant source of trace metals than in situ mobilization of metals due to exposure to CO2. The study focuses on a single trace metal of concern at this site: U. Experimental results indicate that cation exchange/adsorption and dissolution/precipitation of calcite containing trace amounts of U are important reactions controlling U in groundwater at this site, and that the amount of U associated with calcite is fairly well constrained. Simulations incorporating these results into a 3-D multi-phase reactive transport model are able to reproduce the measured ranges and trends between pH, pCO2, Ca, total C, U and Cl-at the field site. Although the true fluxes at the natural analog site are unknown, the cumulative CO2 flux inferred from these simulations are approximately equivalent to 37.8E-3 MT, approximately corresponding to a .001% leak rate for injection at a large (750 MW) power plant. The leakage scenario simulations suggest that if the leak only persists for a short time the volume of aquifer contaminated by CO2-induced mobilization of U will be relatively small, yet persistent over 100 a.« less

  5. Microsensor studies on Padina from a natural CO2 seep: implications of morphology on acclimation to low pH.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Laurie C; Fink, Artur; Bischof, Kai; de Beer, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Low seawater pH can be harmful to many calcifying marine organisms, but the calcifying macroalgae Padina spp. flourish at natural submarine carbon dioxide seeps where seawater pH is low. We show that the microenvironment created by the rolled thallus margin of Padina australis facilitates supersaturation of CaCO3 and calcifi-cation via photosynthesis-induced elevated pH. Using microsensors to investigate oxygen and pH dynamics in the microenvironment of P. australis at a shallow CO2 seep, we found that, under saturating light, the pH inside the microenvironment (pHME ) was higher than the external seawater (pHSW ) at all pHSW levels investigated, and the difference (i.e., pHME - pHSW ) increased with decreasing pHSW (0.9 units at pHSW 7.0). Gross photosynthesis (Pg ) inside the microenvironment increased with decreasing pHSW , but algae from the control site reached a threshold at pH 6.5. Seep algae showed no pH threshold with respect to Pg within the pHSW range investigated. The external carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, acetazolamide, strongly inhibited Pg of P. australis at pHSW 8.2, but the effect was diminished under low pHSW (6.4-7.5), suggesting a greater dependence on membrane-bound CA for the dehydration of HCO3 (-) ions during dissolved inorganic carbon uptake at the higher pHSW . In comparison, a calcifying green alga, Halimeda cuneata f. digitata, was not inhibited by AZ, suggesting efficient bicarbonate transport. The ability of P. australis to elevate pHME at the site of calcification and its strong dependence on CA may explain why it can thrive at low pHSW . PMID:26987005

  6. A Global Synthesis Inversion Analysis of Recent Variability in Natural CO2 Fluxes Using Gosat and in Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Collatz, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    About one-half of the CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and deforestation accumulates in the atmosphere, where it contributes to global warming. The rest is taken up by vegetation and the ocean. The precise contribution of the two, and the location and year-to-year variability of the CO2 sinks are, however, not well understood. We use a batch Bayesian inversion approach to deduce the global spatiotemporal distributions of CO2 fluxes during 2009-2010. For prior constraints, we utilize fluxes from the CASA-GFED model of the terrestrial biosphere and biomass burning driven by satellite observations and interannually varying meteorology. We also use measurement-based ocean flux estimates, and fixed fossil CO2 emissions. Here, we present results from our inversions that incorporate column CO2 measurements from the GOSAT satellite (ACOS retrieval, filtered and bias-corrected) and in situ observations (individual flask and afternoon-average continuous observations) to estimate fluxes in 108 regions over 8-day intervals. Relationships between fluxes and atmospheric concentrations are derived using the PCTM atmospheric transport model run at 2° x 2.5° (latitude/longitude) resolution driven by meteorology from the MERRA reanalysis. We evaluate the posterior CO2 concentrations using independent aircraft and other data sets. The optimized fluxes generally resemble those from other inversion systems using different techniques, for example indicating a net terrestrial biospheric CO2 sink, and a shift in the sink from tropics to northern high latitudes when going from an in-situ-only inversion to a GOSAT inversion. We show that in this inversion framework, GOSAT provides better flux estimates in most regions with its greater spatial coverage, but we also discuss impacts of possible remaining biases in the data.

  7. Combined effects of CO2 enrichment, changes in diurnal light level and water stress on foliar metabolites of potato plants grown in naturally sunlit controlled environment chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato plants (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Kennebec) were grown in outdoor, naturally sunlit, soil-plant-atmosphere research (SPAR) chambers. Drought treatments were imposed at post-tuber initiation stage to assess water stress effects on leaf metabolites, and interactions with enriched CO2 concentrati...

  8. Coupling of Multiphase Flow and Geomechanics in Fractured Porous Media: Application to CO2 Leakages from Natural and Stimulated Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Leakage to the atmosphere of a significant fraction of injected CO2 would constitute a failure of a geological CO2 storage project from a greenhouse gas mitigation perspective. We present a numerical model that simulates flow and transport of CO2 into heterogeneous subsurface systems. The model, StoTran, is a flexible numerical environment that uses state-of-the-art finite element and finite volume methods and unstructured adaptive mesh refinement scheme implemented using MPI and OpenMP protocols. Multiphase flow equations and the geomechanical equations are implicitly solved and either fully or sequentially coupled. StoTran can address inverse and forward problems under deterministic or stochastic conditions. For the current study, StoTran has been used to simulate several scenarios spanning from a homogeneous single layered reservoir to heterogeneous multi-layered systems, which including cap-rock with embedded fractures, have been simulated under different operations of CO2 injection and CO2 leakages conditions. Results show the impact of the injection and leakage rates on the time evolution of the spread of the CO2 plume, its interception of the fractured cap-rock and the risk associated with the contamination of the overlaying aquifer. Spatial and temporal moments have been calculated for different, deterministic of stochastic, subsurface physical and chemical properties. Spatial moments enable assessing the extent of the region of investigation under conditions of uncertainty. Furthermore, several leakage scenarios show the intermittence behavior and development of the CO2 plume in the subsurface; its first interception with the fractures located further far from the injection well then, at a second stage, its interception with the fracture within the immediate vicinity of the injection well. We will present a remedy to CO2 leakages from the reservoir in order to enhance a long term containment of the injected CO2. This work performed under the auspices of

  9. Contributions to accelerating atmospheric CO2 growth from economic activity, carbon intensity, and efficiency of natural sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Canadella, J.G.; Raupacha, M.R.; Le Quere, C.; Buitenhuis, E.T.; Gillett, N.P.; Field, C.B.; Ciais, P.; Conway, T.J.; Houghton, R.A.; Marland, G.

    2007-11-20

    The growth rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), the largest human contributor to human-induced climate change, is increasing rapidly. Three processes contribute to this rapid increase. Two of these processes concern emissions. Recent growth of the world economy combined with an increase in its carbon intensity have led to rapid growth in fossil fuel CO2 emissions since 2000: comparing the 1990s with 2000-2006, the emissions growth rate increased from 1.3% to 3.3%/y. The third process is indicated by increasing evidence (P 0.89) for a long-term (50-year) increase in the airborne fraction (AF) of CO2 emissions, implying a decline in the efficiency of CO2 sinks on land and oceans in absorbing anthropogenic emissions. Since 2000, the contributions of these three factors to the increase in the atmospheric CO2 growth rate have been {approx}65 {+-} 16% from increasing global economic activity, 17 {+-} 6% from the increasing carbon intensity of the global economy, and 18 {+-} 15% from the increase in AF. An increasing AF is consistent with results of climate-carbon cycle models, but the magnitude of the observed signal appears larger than that estimated by models. All of these changes characterize a carbon cycle that is generating stronger-than-expected and sooner-than-expected climate forcing. airborne fraction anthropogenic carbon emissions carbon-climate feedback terrestrial and ocean carbon emissions vulnerabilities of the carbon cycle.

  10. The Green River natural analogue as a field laboratory to study the long-term fate of CO2 in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Andreas; Kampman, Niko; Hangx, Suzanne; Bertier, Pieter; Bickle, Mike; Harrington, Jon

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the long-term response of CO2 injected into porous reservoirs is one of the most important aspects to demonstrate safe and permanent storage. At the same time this is one of the least understood aspects of CCS in general. The reasons are that 'long-term', in the sense of hundreds to thousands of years, is impractical from a laboratory and rather idealised from a reservoir modelling perspective. However understanding the coupled long-term hydro-chemical-mechanical response of a reservoir-seal pair following CO2 injection is highly desirable to improve confidence and trust from a regulator and societal perspective, as well as to improve risk assessment and risk reduction. In order to provide one building block to advance understanding of this subject, in July 2012 Shell recovered some 300m of core from a scientific drill hole through a natural CO2 field near Green River, Utah. This core transected two sandstone formations (Entrada and Navajo) and one intervening seal layer, composed of interbedded marine clay-/silt and sandstones (Carmel Fm.). Fluid samples and core material were taken adjacent to the Little Grand Wash Fault (LGW), along which CO2-charged fluids traverse from depth to the surface and which is believed to be the migration pathway for CO2 inflow into the reservoirs. In-situ pH, CO2 concentrations, and fluid element and isotope geochemistry were determined from wireline downhole sampling of pressurized fluids taken from the Navajo reservoirs. The fluid geochemistry provides important constraints on reservoir filling by flow of CO2 -charged brines through the LGW fault damage zone, macro-scale fluid flow in the reservoirs and the state of fluid-mineral thermodynamic disequilibrium, from which the nature of the fluid-mineral reactions can be interpreted. In addition to core samples, we obtained control samples from stratigraphically equivalent outcrop locations and drill holes that were not subject to alterations by CO2 -charged fluids and

  11. Natural Air-Sea Flux of CO2 in Simulations of the NASA-GISS Climate Model: Sensitivity to the Physical Ocean Model Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanou, A.; Gregg, Watson W.; Romanski, J.; Kelley, M.; Bleck, R.; Healy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Russell, G.; Schmidt, G. A.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.

    2013-01-01

    Results from twin control simulations of the preindustrial CO2 gas exchange (natural flux of CO2) between the ocean and the atmosphere are presented here using the NASA-GISS climate model, in which the same atmospheric component (modelE2) is coupled to two different ocean models, the Russell ocean model and HYCOM. Both incarnations of the GISS climate model are also coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (NOBM) which estimates prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2. Model intercomparison is carried out at equilibrium conditions and model differences are contrasted with biases from present day climatologies. Although the models agree on the spatial patterns of the air-sea flux of CO2, they disagree on the strength of the North Atlantic and Southern Ocean sinks mainly because of kinematic (winds) and chemistry (pCO2) differences rather than thermodynamic (SST) ones. Biology/chemistry dissimilarities in the models stem from the different parameterizations of advective and diffusive processes, such as overturning, mixing and horizontal tracer advection and to a lesser degree from parameterizations of biogeochemical processes such as gravitational settling and sinking. The global meridional overturning circulation illustrates much of the different behavior of the biological pump in the two models, together with differences in mixed layer depth which are responsible for different SST, DIC and nutrient distributions in the two models and consequently different atmospheric feedbacks (in the wind, net heat and freshwater fluxes into the ocean).

  12. The effects of CO2 on phytoplankton community structure in the Amazon River Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. L.; Goes, J. I.; Gomes, H. R.; McKee, K. T.

    2013-12-01

    The Amazon River Plume results from an enormous discharge of freshwater and organic matter into the Atlantic Ocean. It is a unique environment with a natural pCO2 gradient in the surface waters of the plume that range from 130-950 μatm. The response of coastal marine phytoplankton to increased anthropogenic CO2 emission is still unknown, hence the Amazon River Plume gradient can serve as a natural laboratory to examine the potential influence of atmospheric CO2 increases and ocean acidification on phytoplankton community composition. A two pronged study was undertaken: the first in which shipboard samples from a 2010 cruise to the Amazon River Plume were analyzed to examine the distribution of 3 major phytoplankton groups (diatoms, diatom-diazotroph associations [DDAs], and the diazotroph Trichodesmium spp.) with respect to the natural pCO2 gradient; the second in which the growth response of Thalassiosira weisflogii, a representative diatom species, was examined under experimentally manipulated CO2 conditions. Cruise data analysis showed that diatoms were found with higher cell counts around 150 μatm; DDAs seemed to dominate waters within the narrow range of 350-400 μatm CO2; and the diazotroph Trichodesmium spp. grew in a wide range of pCO2 conditions, but with higher cell counts at upwards of 500 μatm. Phytoplankton group distributions along the CO2 gradient may be due to differences in their carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCMs) efficiencies. The CO2 manipulation apparatus was assembled such that the cells were grown under three different CO2 environments. Differential growth of T. weisflogii was observed at 150, 400, and 800 ppm CO2 treatment. T. weisflogii grew at all three CO2 concentrations, reflecting diatoms' physiological flexibility and efficient CCMs. Absorption spectra analysis of pigments and Fast Repetition Rate Fluorometer analysis indicate potential changes in photosynthetic machinery with different CO2 treatments. Future CO2 manipulation

  13. Reduced emissions of CO2, NOx, and SO2 from U.S. power plants owing to switch from coal to natural gas with combined cycle technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouw, J. A.; Parrish, D. D.; Frost, G. J.; Trainer, M.

    2014-02-01

    Since 1997, an increasing fraction of electric power has been generated from natural gas in the United States. Here we use data from continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS), which measure emissions at the stack of most U.S. electric power generation units, to investigate how this switch affected the emissions of CO2, NOx, and SO2. Per unit of energy produced, natural gas power plants equipped with combined cycle technology emit on an average 44% of the CO2 compared with coal power plants. As a result of the increased use of natural gas, CO2 emissions from U.S. fossil-fuel power plants were 23% lower in 2012 than they would have been if coal had continued to provide the same fraction of electric power as in 1997. In addition, natural gas power plants with combined cycle technology emit less NOx and far less SO2 per unit of energy produced than coal power plants. Therefore, the increased use of natural gas has led to emission reductions of NOx (40%) and SO2 (44%), in addition to those obtained from the implementation of emission control systems on coal power plants. These benefits to air quality and climate should be weighed against the increase in emissions of methane, volatile organic compounds, and other trace gases that are associated with the production, processing, storage, and transport of natural gas.

  14. CO2 Solubility in Natural Rhyolitic Melts at High Pressures - Implications for Carbon Flux in Subduction Zones by Sediment Partial Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M. S.; Dasgupta, R.

    2011-12-01

    Partial melts of subducting sediments is thought to be a critical agent in carrying trace elements and water to arc basalt source regions. For subduction zones that contain significant amount of carbonates in ocean-floor sediments, sediment melts likely also act as a carrier of CO2. However, the CO2 carrying capacity of natural rhyolitic melts at sub-arc depths remains unconstrained. We conducted experiments on a synthetic composition, similar to average, low-degree experimental partial melt of pelitic sediments. The composition was constructed with reagent grade oxides and carbonates, the source of excess CO2. Experiments were conducted between 1 and 3 GPa at 1200 °C in Au80Pd20 capsules using a piston cylinder apparatus with a half-inch BaCO3 assembly at Rice University. Quench products showed glasses with bubbles, the latter suggesting saturation of the melt with a CO2-rich vapor phase. Oxygen fugacity during the experiments was not strictly controlled but the presence of CO2 bubbles and absence of graphite indicates fO2 above the CCO buffer. Major element concentrations of glasses were measured using EPMA. The CO2 and H2O contents of experimental doubly polished (50-110 μm), bubble-free portions of the glass chips were determined using a Thermo Nicolet Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer. Spectra were recorded with a resolution of 4 cm-1, 512 scans, from 650 to 4000 cm-1, under a nitrogen purge to eliminate atmospheric gases. Dissolved volatile concentrations were quantified using the Beer-Lambert law and linear molar absorption coefficients from previous studies [1, 2]. Total dissolved carbon dioxide of experimental glasses was determined from the intensity of the ν3 antisymmetric stretch bands of CO32- at 1430 cm-1 and CO2mol at 2348 cm-1. Dissolved water content of experimental glasses was determined from the intensity of O-H stretching at 3520 cm-1. Estimated total CO2 concentrations at 3 GPa are in the range of 1-2 wt%, for melts with H2O contents

  15. A Global Synthesis Inversion Analysis of Recent Variability in Natural CO2 Fluxes Using GOSAT and In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Collatz, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    Around one-half of the CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and deforestation accumulates in the atmosphere, where it contributes to global warming. The rest is taken up by vegetation and the ocean. The precise contribution of the two, and the location and year-to-year variability of the CO2 sinks are not well understood though. We use a batch Bayesian inversion approach to deduce the global spatiotemporal distributions of CO2 fluxes during 2009-2010. For prior constraints, we utilize fluxes from the CASA-GFED v.3 model of the terrestrial biosphere and biomass burning driven by satellite observations and interannually varying meteorology. We also use measurement-based ocean flux estimates from Takahashi et al. [2009], and fixed fossil CO2 emissions from the CDIAC dataset. Here, we present preliminary results from our inversions that incorporate column CO2 measurements from the GOSAT satellite, ground-based observations (individual flask and afternoon-average continuous observations), and aircraft observations to estimate fluxes in 108 regions over 8-day intervals. Relationships between fluxes and atmospheric concentrations are derived using the PCTM atmospheric transport model run at 2° x 2.5° (latitude/longitude) resolution driven by meteorology from the MERRA reanalysis. We obtain spatiotemporal distributions of fluxes resembling those from other inversions, including NOAA's CarbonTracker. We compare the a posteriori fluxes obtained with and without the addition of GOSAT observations to the in situ network, and discuss possible impacts of biases in the GOSAT data.

  16. Natural variability of pCO2 and pH in the Atlantic and Pacific coastal margins of the U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, A. J.; Sabine, C. L.; Feely, R. A.; Newton, J.; Salisbury, J.; Vandemark, D. C.; Musielewicz, S. B.; Maenner-Jones, S.; Bott, R.; Lawrence-Slavas, N.

    2011-12-01

    The discovery that seawater chemistry is changing as a result of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, referred to as "ocean acidification", has prompted a large effort to understand how this changing chemistry will impact marine life. Changes in carbon chemistry have been documented in the open ocean; however, in dynamic coastal systems where many marine species live, ocean acidification and the natural biogeochemical variability that organisms are currently exposed to are poorly quantified. In 2010 we began equipping coastal moorings currently measuring pCO2 with pH and other biogeochemical sensors to measure ocean acidification parameters at 3 hour intervals in the surface water. Here we present the magnitude and diurnal to seasonal variability of pCO2 and pH during the first year of observations at 2 sites in the Atlantic and Pacific coastal margins of the U.S.: the Gulf of Maine and outer coast of Washington state. Both the magnitude and range of pCO2 and pH values were much greater at the coastal moorings compared to the open ocean mooring at Ocean Station Papa in the North Pacific and also varied between the two coastal mooring sites. We observed maximum pCO2 values in coastal waters exceeding predicted values for the open ocean at 2x pre-industrial CO2 levels. The range of pCO2 and pH values during this time series was approximately 4 times the range observed at open ocean mooring Papa (2007-2011 time series). In many cases, large variance was observed at short time scales, with values fluctuating more than 200 μatm pCO2 and 0.2 pH between 3-hour cycles. These types of observations are critical for understanding how ocean acidification will manifest in naturally dynamic coastal systems and for informing the experimental design of species response studies that aim to mimic carbon chemistry experienced by coastal marine organisms.

  17. Measurement of 13CO2 in expired air as an index of compliance to a high carbohydrate diet naturally enriched in 13C.

    PubMed

    Gay, L J; Schutz, Y; DiVetta, V; Schneiter, P; Tappy, L; Jéquier, E

    1994-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether breath 13CO2 measurements could be used to assess the compliance to a diet containing carbohydrates naturally enriched in 13C. The study was divided into two periods: Period 1 (baseline of 4 days) with low 13C/12C ratio carbohydrates. Period 2 (5 days) isocaloric diet with a high 13C/12C ratio (corn, cane sugar, pineapple, millet) carbohydrates. Measurements were made of respiratory gas exchange by indirect calorimetry, urinary nitrogen excretion and breath 13CO2 every morning in post-absorptive conditions, both in resting state and during a 45-min low intensity exercise (walking on a treadmill). The subjects were 10 healthy lean women (BMI 20.4 +/- 1.7 kg/m2, % body fat 24.4 +/- 1.3%), the 13C enrichment of oxidized carbohydrate and breath 13CO2 were compared to the enrichment of exogenous dietary carbohydrates. At rest the enrichment of oxidized carbohydrate increased significantly after one day of 13C carbohydrate enriched diet and reached a steady value (103 +/- 16%) similar to the enrichment of exogenous carbohydrates. During exercise, the 13C enrichment of oxidized carbohydrate remained significantly lower (68 +/- 17%) than that of dietary carbohydrates. The compliance to a diet with a high content of carbohydrates naturally enriched in 13C may be assessed from the measurement of breath 13CO2 enrichment combined with respiratory gas exchange in resting, postabsorptive conditions. PMID:7812411

  18. Increased Use of Natural Gas for Power Generation in the U.S. and the Resulting Reductions in Emissions of CO2, NOx and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gouw, J. A.; Parrish, D. D.; Trainer, M.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past decades, natural gas has increasingly replaced coal as a fuel for electrical power generation in the U.S. As a result, there have been significant reductions in the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Power plant emissions are continuously measured at the stack using continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) required by the EPA. Previous studies using airborne measurements have shown these CEMS measurements to be accurate. Here, we use annual emissions since 1995 from all point sources included in the CEMS database to quantify the changes in CO2, NOx and SO2 emissions that have resulted from the changing use of fuels and technologies for power generation. In 1997, 83% of electrical power in the CEMS database was generated from coal-fired power plants. In 2012, the contribution from coal had decreased to 59%, and natural gas contributed 34% of the electrical power. Natural gas-fired power plants, in particular those equipped with combined cycle technology, emit less than 50% of CO2 per kWh produced compared to coal-fired plants. As a result of the increased use of natural gas, total CO2 emissions from U.S. power plants have decreased since 2008. In addition, natural gas-fired power plants emit less NOx and far less SO2 per kWh produced than coal-fired power plants. The increased use of natural gas has therefore led to significant emissions reductions of NOx and SO2 in addition to those obtained from the implementation of emissions control systems on coal-fired power plants. The increased use of natural gas for power generation has led to significant reductions in CO2 emissions as well as improvements in U.S. air quality. We will illustrate these points with examples from airborne measurements made using the NOAA WP-3D aircraft in the Southeastern U.S. in 2013 as part of the NOAA Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study. The emissions reductions from U.S. power plants due to the increased use of natural gas will

  19. Large Amplitude Spatial and Temporal Gradients in Atmospheric Boundary Layer CO2 Mole Fractions Detected With a Tower-Based Network in the U.S. Upper Midwest

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Andrews, A.; West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Crosson, Eric R.

    2012-02-21

    This study presents observations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} mole fraction from a nine-tower, regional network deployed during the North American Carbon Program's Mid-Continent Intensive during 2007-2009. Within this network in a largely agricultural area, mean atmospheric CO{sub 2} gradients were strongly correlated with both ground-based inventory data and estimates from satellite remote sensing. The average seasonal drawdown for corn-dominated sites (35 ppm) is significantly larger than has been observed at other continental boundary layer sites. Observed growing-season median CO{sub 2} gradients are strongly dependent on local flux. The gradients between cross-vegetation site-pairs, for example, average 2.0 ppm/100 km, four times larger than the similar-vegetation site-pair average. Daily-timescale gradients are as large as 5.5 ppm/100 km, but dominated by advection rather than local flux. Flooding in 2008 led to a region-wide 23 week delay in growing-season minima. The observations show that regional-scale CO{sub 2} mole fraction networks yield large, coherent signals governed largely by regional sources and sinks of CO{sub 2}.

  20. Natural heterogeneity and evolving geochemistry of Lower Tuscaloosa Formation brine in response to continuing CO2 injection at Cranfield EOR site, Mississippi, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordsen, J. J.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Thomas, B.; Abedini, A. A.; Conaway, C. H.; Manning, M. A.; Lu, J.

    2012-12-01

    Geochemical monitoring of Lower Tuscaloosa Formation (LTF) brine continues at the Cranfield CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration site to investigate the potential for the geologic storage of large volumes of CO2 in saline aquifers and depleted reservoirs. Cranfield oil field is a domal depleted oil and gas reservoir in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, with production in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones of the LTF (depth ~3000 m). CO2 flood began in July 2008. Brine samples were collected from selected production wells in March and December 2009, April 2010, and November 2011. Intensive sampling also was conducted for the first 18 days of a CO2 injection experiment below the oil-water contact (December 2009) at the Detailed Area of Study (DAS) 3-well array. The sampling objectives are to define the geochemical composition of the pre-injection brine, and to understand the geochemical changes resulting from interactions between the injected CO2, brine, and reservoir minerals. Results show that Tuscaloosa brine is Na-Ca-Cl type with total salinity ranging from ~140 to 160 g/L TDS (50 samples). Relatively large variations are observed in major divalent cations (Ca ~7,500-14,000 mg/L, Mg ~800-1,250 mg/L, Sr ~475-750 mg/L). Significant positive correlations are noted amongst Ca, Mg, Sr, Ba, and Br, whereas these solutes all trend negatively with Na and Cl. These results may be interpreted as possible binary mixing between two end-member waters: (1) high Na-Cl (51 and 97 g/L, respectively), low Ca, Mg, Sr, and Br (~7500, 800, 475, 280 mg/L, respectively); and (2) low Na-Cl (40 and 86 g/L), high Ca, Mg, Sr, and Br (~14,000, 1250, 750, 480 mg/L). This apparent binary mixing has no obvious correlation to CO2 injection, which suggests that observed variations are due to natural heterogeneities in LTF brine within the Cranfield dome. The variations may indicate vertical and/or lateral proximity to a halite source (i.e. salt dome), with the high Na-Cl, low Br

  1. An Inversion Analysis of Recent Variability in Natural CO2 Fluxes Using GOSAT and In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Baker, D. F.; Collatz, G. J.; Ott, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    About one-half of the global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and deforestation accumulates in the atmosphere, where it contributes to global warming. The rest is taken up by vegetation and the ocean. The precise contribution of the two sinks, and their location and year-to-year variability are, however, not well understood. We use two different approaches, batch Bayesian synthesis inversion and variational data assimilation, to deduce the global spatiotemporal distributions of CO2 fluxes during 2009-2010. One of our objectives is to assess different sources of uncertainties in inferred fluxes, including uncertainties in prior flux estimates and observations, and differences in inversion techniques. For prior constraints, we utilize fluxes and uncertainties from the CASA-GFED model of the terrestrial biosphere and biomass burning driven by satellite observations and interannually varying meteorology. We also use measurement-based ocean flux estimates and two sets of fixed fossil CO2 emissions. Here, our inversions incorporate column CO2 measurements from the GOSAT satellite (ACOS retrieval, filtered and bias-corrected) and in situ observations (individual flask and afternoon-average continuous observations) to estimate fluxes in 108 regions over 8-day intervals for the batch inversion and at 3° x 3.75° weekly for the variational system. Relationships between fluxes and atmospheric concentrations are derived consistently for the two inversion systems using the PCTM atmospheric transport model driven by meteorology from the MERRA reanalysis. We compare the posterior fluxes and uncertainties derived using different data sets and the two inversion approaches, and evaluate the posterior atmospheric concentrations against independent data including aircraft measurements. The optimized fluxes generally resemble those from other studies. For example, the results indicate that the terrestrial biosphere is a net CO2 sink, and a GOSAT-only inversion suggests a

  2. An Inversion Analysis of Recent Variability in Natural CO2 Fluxes Using GOSAT and In Situ Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, James S.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Collatz, G. James; Baker, David F.; Ott, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    About one-half of the global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and deforestation accumulates in the atmosphere, where it contributes to global warming. The rest is taken up by vegetation and the ocean. The precise contribution of the two sinks, and their location and year-to-year variability are, however, not well understood. We use two different approaches, batch Bayesian synthesis inversion and variational data assimilation, to deduce the global spatiotemporal distributions of CO2 fluxes during 2009-2010. One of our objectives is to assess different sources of uncertainties in inferred fluxes, including uncertainties in prior flux estimates and observations, and differences in inversion techniques. For prior constraints, we utilize fluxes and uncertainties from the CASA-GFED model of the terrestrial biosphere and biomass burning driven by satellite observations and interannually varying meteorology. We also use measurement-based ocean flux estimates and two sets of fixed fossil CO2 emissions. Here, our inversions incorporate column CO2 measurements from the GOSAT satellite (ACOS retrieval, filtered and bias-corrected) and in situ observations (individual flask and afternoon-average continuous observations) to estimate fluxes in 108 regions over 8-day intervals for the batch inversion and at 3 x 3.75 weekly for the variational system. Relationships between fluxes and atmospheric concentrations are derived consistently for the two inversion systems using the PCTM atmospheric transport model driven by meteorology from the MERRA reanalysis. We compare the posterior fluxes and uncertainties derived using different data sets and the two inversion approaches, and evaluate the posterior atmospheric concentrations against independent data including aircraft measurements. The optimized fluxes generally resemble those from other studies. For example, the results indicate that the terrestrial biosphere is a net CO2 sink, and a GOSAT-only inversion suggests a shift in

  3. Micro-CT imaging of reservoir condition CO2 during multi-phase flow in natural rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, M. G.; Bijeljic, B.; Menke, H. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Micron-resolution X-ray microtomography has allowed researchers to examine the processes controlling fluid flow behaviour at the pore scale, offering the promise of a transformation in our understanding of flow and transport in porous media. Until recently wettability has only been directly accessible in extremely simplified systems. A new method is presented for the measurement of the contact angle and capillary pressure of multiple immiscible fluids at the pore scale at reservoir conditions in the scCO2-brine-carbonate system. Contact angle is found by resampling the micro-CT data onto planes orthogonal to the contact lines, allowing for vectors to be traced along the grain surface and the scCO2 - brine interface. A distribution of contact angles ranging from 35o to 55o is observed. This distribution can be understood as the result of contact angle hysteresis and surface heterogeneity on a range of length scales. Ganglion capillary pressure for each ganglion was found by measuring the curvature of the CO2-brine interface, while the pore structure was parameterised using distance maps of the pore-space. The formation of the residual clusters by snap-off was examined by comparing the ganglion capillary pressure to local pore topography. The capillary pressure was found to be inversely proportional to the radius of the largest restriction (throat) surrounding the ganglion, which validates the imbibition mechanisms used in pore-network modelling. The potential mobilization of residual ganglia was assessed using a new formulation of both the capillary and Bond numbers, rigorously based on a balance of pore-scale forces, with the majority of ganglia remobilized at Ncmacro around 1. By the use of synchrotron tomography it is possible to create high quality 4D images of dynamic processes involving the flow of multiple fluid phases. We show how the drainage process take place as a series of discreet Haines jumps. Two different types of Haines jumps were seen, one where CO

  4. Temperature effects on fish production across a natural thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, Eoin J; Ólafsson, Ólafur P; Demars, Benoît O L; Friberg, Nikolai; Guðbergsson, Guðni; Hannesdóttir, Elísabet R; Jackson, Michelle C; Johansson, Liselotte S; McLaughlin, Órla B; Ólafsson, Jón S; Woodward, Guy; Gíslason, Gísli M

    2016-09-01

    Global warming is widely predicted to reduce the biomass production of top predators, or even result in species loss. Several exceptions to this expectation have been identified, however, and it is vital that we understand the underlying mechanisms if we are to improve our ability to predict future trends. Here, we used a natural warming experiment in Iceland and quantitative theoretical predictions to investigate the success of brown trout as top predators across a stream temperature gradient (4-25 °C). Brown trout are at the northern limit of their geographic distribution in this system, with ambient stream temperatures below their optimum for maximal growth, and above it in the warmest streams. A five-month mark-recapture study revealed that population abundance, biomass, growth rate, and production of trout all increased with stream temperature. We identified two mechanisms that contributed to these responses: (1) trout became more selective in their diet as stream temperature increased, feeding higher in the food web and increasing in trophic position; and (2) trophic transfer through the food web was more efficient in the warmer streams. We found little evidence to support a third potential mechanism: that external subsidies would play a more important role in the diet of trout with increasing stream temperature. Resource availability was also amplified through the trophic levels with warming, as predicted by metabolic theory in nutrient-replete systems. These results highlight circumstances in which top predators can thrive in warmer environments and contribute to our knowledge of warming impacts on natural communities and ecosystem functioning. PMID:26936833

  5. Evaluation of Brine Migration Risks Due to CO2 Injection - an Integrated Natural and Social Science Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, V.; Kissinger, A.; Class, H.; Knopf, S.; Konrad, W.; Scheer, D.

    2014-12-01

    Evaluation of possible risks for shallow groundwater systems caused by brine displacement due to CO2 injection requires an investigation of possible vertical pathways in regional-scale structural settings. The project CO2BRIM investigates this crucial issue in collaboration with external stakeholders to integrate expert feedback on migration scenarios. To evaluate possible brine displacement scenarios we construct a regional-scale 3D structural model based on data which represent a typical geological setting of the North German Basin. The model has a horizontal size of 39 km times 58 km and includes 11 geological layers from the Permian Zechstein salt up to the Quaternary. It comprises an anticlinal structure on top of a salt pillow and an elongated salt wall that dissect the overburden. For the risk scenarios we include discontinuities in the regionally important Rupelian aquitard (Tertiary) and a transition zone along the salt flank as such discontinuities are supposed to provide permeable pathways for brines which could reach shallow drinking water horizons. Based on this model we develop scenarios in which we vary for example hydro-geological parameters of the geological discontinuities, the injection rate and the initial state of the system in terms of the salinity distribution. Furthermore we compare different levels of model complexity with regard to the physical processes considered and their effects on our results. During the process of scenario development, external experts were invited to participate and share knowledge and concerns on both brine migration risks and possible migration paths and mechanisms. The results may help in site selection as they provide improved knowledge of pressure build-up in the reservoir and the overburden for such complex geological systems. Additionally, we want to identify the level of model complexity which is sufficient for this kind of setting with regard to the limited data availability at hand for the far field.

  6. A flow injection analyser conductometric coupled system for the field analysis of free dissolved CO2 and total dissolved inorganic carbon in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, Valter; Balordi, Marcella; Ciceri, Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    A flow injection analyser coupled with a gas diffusion membrane and a conductometric microdetector was adapted for the field analysis of natural concentrations of free dissolved CO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon in natural waters and used in a number of field campaigns for marine water monitoring. The dissolved gaseous CO2 presents naturally, or that generated by acidification of the sample, is separated by diffusion using a hydrophobic semipermeable gas porous membrane, and the permeating gas is incorporated into a stream of deionised water and measured by means of an electrical conductometric microdetector. In order to make the system suitable and easy to use for in-field measurements aboard oceanographic ships, the single components of the analyser were compacted into a robust and easy to use system. The calibration of the system is carried out by using standard solutions of potassium bicarbonate at two concentration ranges. Calibration and sample measurements are carried out inside a temperature-constant chamber at 25 °C and in an inert atmosphere (N2). The detection and quantification limits of the method, evaluated as 3 and 10 times the standard deviation of a series of measurements of the matrix solution were 2.9 and 9.6 μmol/kg of CO2, respectively. Data quality for dissolved inorganic carbon was checked with replicate measurements of a certified reference material (A. Dickson, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego), both accuracy and repeatability were -3.3% and 10%, respectively. Optimization, performance qualification of the system and its application in various natural water samples are reported and discussed. In the future, the calibration step will be operated automatically in order to improve the analytical performance and the applicability will be increased in the course of experimental surveys carried out both in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Considering the present stage of development of the method, it

  7. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  8. Gradient Shifts with Naturally Occurring Human Face Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derenne, Adam; Breitstein, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The present research examined stimulus generalization and gradient shifts on a dimension involving human faces. Twenty undergraduates were instructed to examine the proportion of the total face length that lay between the tip of the nose and the end of the chin. The face stimuli were images of actual people shown on a computer screen; no face was…

  9. Natural bog pine ecosystem in southern Germany is a steady and robust sink of CO2 but a minor source of CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommeltenberg, Janina; Schmid, Hans Peter; Droesler, Matthias; Werle, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Natural peatland ecosystems sequester carbon dioxide. They do this slowly but steadily, but also emit methane in small rates. Thus peatlands have both positive and negative greenhouse gas balance impacts on the climate system due to their influence on atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentration. We present data of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) of almost three years (July 2010 to March 2013) and of methane fluxes over a period of nine months (July 2012 to March 2013), measured by eddy covariance technique in the bog forest "Schechenfilz". The site (47°48' N; 11°19' E, 590 m a.s.l.) is an ICOS-ecosystems associate site, located in the pre-alpine region of southern Germany, where a natural Pinus mugo rotundata forest grows on an undisturbed, almost 6 m thick peat layer. The slow growing bog pines and their low rates of carbon sequestration, in combination with high water table and thus low availability of oxygen, lead to low carbon dioxide fluxes. Photosynthesis as well as soil respiration are considerably attenuated compared to upland sites. Additionally, the high soil water content is damping the impact of dry and hot periods on CO2 exchange. Thus the CO2 balance is very robust to changing environmental parameters. While the CO2 exchange is clearly related to soil temperature and photosynthetic active radiation, we have not yet identified a parameter that governs variations in methane exchange. Various environmental parameters appear to be related to methane emissions (including soil moisture, soil and air temperature and wind direction), but the scatter with respect to half hourly methane fluxes is too large to be useful for gap modeling. Analysis of daily averages reduces the scatter, but since methane exchange exhibits considerable daily variation, daily averages are not useful to fill data gaps of half hourly fluxes. In consequence, as the daily course is the summary result of all environmental parameters having influence on the methane exchange at the half

  10. Estimation of continuous anthropogenic CO2 using CO2, CO, δ13C(CO2) and Δ14C(CO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardag, S. N.; Gerbig, C.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Levin, I.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate different methods for estimating anthropogenic CO2 using modelled continuous atmospheric concentrations of CO2 alone, as well as CO2 in combination with the surrogate tracers CO, δ13C(CO2) and Δ14C(CO2). These methods are applied at three hypothetical stations representing rural, urban and polluted conditions. We find that independent of the tracer used, an observation-based estimate of continuous anthropogenic CO2 is not feasible at rural measurement sites due to the low signal to noise ratio of anthropogenic CO2 estimates at such settings. At urban and polluted sites, potential future continuous Δ14C(CO2) measurements with a precision of 5 ‰ or better are most promising for anthropogenic CO2 determination (precision ca. 10-20%), but the insensitivity against CO2 contributions from biofuel emissions may reduce its accuracy in the future. Other tracers, such as δ13C(CO2) and CO could provide an accurate and already available alternative if all CO2 sources in the catchment area are well characterized with respect to their isotopic signature and CO to anthropogenic CO2 ratio. We suggest a strategy for calibrating these source characteristics on an annual basis using precise Δ14C(CO2) measurements on grab samples. The precision of anthropogenic CO2 determination using δ13C(CO2) is largely determined by the measurement precision of δ13C(CO2) and CO2. The precision when using the CO-method is mainly limited by the variation of natural CO sources and CO sinks. At present, continuous anthropogenic CO2 could be determined using the tracers δ13C(CO2) and/or CO with a precision of about 30 %, a mean bias of about 10 % and without significant diurnal discrepancies. This allows significant improvement, validation and bias reduction of highly resolved emission inventories using atmospheric observation and regional modelling.

  11. The non-analogue nature of Pliocene temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    The strong warming of the North Atlantic and high latitudes in the Pliocene (5.3-2.6 million years ago) continually fails to be simulated in climate model simulations. Being the last period of Earth history with higher global temperatures and carbon dioxide levels similar to today, it is an important target period for palaeoclimate models. One of the key features of the Pliocene climate is the reduced meridional gradients, particularly in the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Here we show that previously unconsidered palaeogeographic changes (river routing, ocean bathymetry and additional landmass in the modern Barents Sea), in the North Atlantic region can produce significant temperature responses at high latitudes. Along with orbital forcing, this can significantly decrease equator to pole temperature gradients in the Atlantic Ocean. These additional forcings show that the large Arctic warming and significantly reduced temperature gradients in the Pliocene are not analogous to future warming and that careful consideration of all the possible climatic forcings is required to accurately simulate Pliocene climate.

  12. Separating natural and contaminant related gradients in estuarine macrobenthic community structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rakocinski, C.; Heard, R.; Walker, W.; Brown, S.; Gaston, G.; Summers, J.K.

    1995-12-31

    Using whole-community macrobenthic responses to assess pollution impacts in estuaries presents a difficult challenge due to dynamic natural conditions that may impose their own physical limitations on the biota. For example, the recognition of bioindicator taxa becomes confounded when correlations exist between gradients in natural environmental variables, such as salinity, and gradients in contaminants, such as trace metals. The authors used partial Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) to separate natural and contaminant related gradients in macrobenthic community structure across 319 EMAP sites dispersed throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico. Residual variation in macrobenthic community structure was examined with respect to gradients in contaminant levels to identify responses by positive and negative bioindicator taxa. Gradients in concentrations of trace metals do not coincide completely with those in other chemical contaminants, and responses by characteristic bioindicator taxa reveal information regarding effects of specific contaminants. Several indigenous taxa serve as good negative bioindicators, whereas other opportunistic taxa serve as positive bioindicators of estuarine contamination.

  13. Regional-scale advective, diffusive, and eruptive dynamics of CO2 and brine leakage through faults and wellbores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Na-Hyun; Han, Weon Shik; Han, Kyungdoe; Park, Eungyu

    2015-05-01

    Regional-scale advective, diffusive, and eruptive transport dynamics of CO2 and brine within a natural analogue in the northern Paradox Basin, Utah, were explored by integrating numerical simulations with soil CO2 flux measurements. Deeply sourced CO2 migrates through steeply dipping fault zones to the shallow aquifers predominantly as an aqueous phase. Dense CO2-rich brine mixes with regional groundwater, enhancing CO2 dissolution. Linear stability analysis reveals that CO2 could be dissolved completely within only ~500 years. Assigning lower permeability to the fault zones induces fault-parallel movement, feeds up-gradient aquifers with more CO2, and impedes down-gradient fluid flow, developing anticlinal CO2 traps at shallow depths (<300 m). The regional fault permeability that best reproduces field spatial CO2 flux variation is estimated 1 × 10-17 ≤ kh < 1 × 10-16 m2 and 5 × 10-16 ≤ kv < 1 × 10-15 m2. The anticlinal trap serves as an essential fluid source for eruption at Crystal Geyser. Geyser-like discharge sensitively responds to varying well permeability, radius, and CO2 recharge rate. The cyclic behavior of wellbore CO2 leakage decreases with time.

  14. Sequestration of CO2 by halotolerant algae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The potential of halotolerant algae isolated from natural resources was used to study CO2 fixation and algal lipid production. Biological fixation of CO2 in photobioreactor in presence of salinity is exploited. The CO2 concentration 1060 ppm gave the highest biomass yield (700 mg dry wt/l), the highest total lipid content (10.33%) with 80% of CO2 removal. PMID:24847439

  15. Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storagereservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-03-03

    The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in deep geologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologic carbon storage is to trap CO{sub 2} underground, CO{sub 2} could migrate away from the storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeable pathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitude releases of CO{sub 2} have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs in numerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbon dioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO{sub 2} reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due to influences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. These systems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potential release of CO{sub 2} from geologic storage reservoirs and provide important information about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that are associated with releases, as well as the health, safety, and environmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can be applied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO{sub 2} and industrial releases of CO{sub 2} and natural gas in the context of these characteristics. Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessons can be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO{sub 2} can both accumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondary reservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Both primary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO{sub 2} should therefore be well characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO{sub 2} have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release, such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential for processes that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks and trigger the release of CO{sub 2} from a storage

  16. Method for tracing simulated CO2 leak in terrestrial environment with a 13CO2 tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni, Christophe; Rasse, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Facilities for the geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes will be designed to prevent any leakage from the defined 'storage complex'. However, developing regulations and guidance throughout the world (e.g. the EC Directive and the USEPA Vulnerability Evaluation Framework) recognize the importance of assessing the potential for environmental impacts from CO2 storage. RISCS, a European (FP7) project, aims to improve understanding of those impacts that could plausibly occur in the hypothetical case that unexpected leakage occurs. As part of the RISCS project the potential impacts that an unexpected CO2 leaks might have on a cropland ecosystems was investigated. A CO2 exposure field experiment based on CO2 injection at 85 cm depth under an oats culture was designed. To facilitate the characterization of the simulated leaking zone the gas used for injection was produced from natural gas and had a δ13C of -46‰. The aim of the present communication is to depict how the injected gas was traced within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum using 13CO2 continuous cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS). Four subsurface experimental injection plots (6m x 3m) were set up. In order to test the effects of different intensity of leakage, the field experiment was designed as to create a longitudinal CO2 gradient for each plot. For this purpose gas supply pipes were inserted at one extremity of each plot at the base of a 45 cm thick layer of sand buried 40 cm below the surface under the clayey plough layer of Norwegian moraine soils. Soil CO2 concentration and isotopic signature were punctually recorded: 1) in the soil at 20 cm depth at 6 positions distributed on the central transect, 2) at the surface following a (50x50 cm) grid sampling pattern, and 3) in the canopy atmosphere at 10, 20, 30 cm along three longitudinal transects (seven sampling point per transect). Soil CO2 fluxes and isotopic signature were finally

  17. Nature-Inspired, Highly Durable CO2 Reduction System Consisting of a Binuclear Ruthenium(II) Complex and an Organic Semiconductor Using Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Kuriki, Ryo; Matsunaga, Hironori; Nakashima, Takuya; Wada, Keisuke; Yamakata, Akira; Ishitani, Osamu; Maeda, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-20

    A metal-free organic semiconductor of mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (C3N4) coupled with a Ru(II) binuclear complex (RuRu') containing photosensitizer and catalytic units selectively reduced CO2 into HCOOH under visible light (λ > 400 nm) in the presence of a suitable electron donor with high durability, even in aqueous solution. Modification of C3N4 with Ag nanoparticles resulted in a RuRu'/Ag/C3N4 photocatalyst that exhibited a very high turnover number (>33000 with respect to the amount of RuRu'), while maintaining high selectivity for HCOOH production (87-99%). This turnover number was 30 times greater than that reported previously using C3N4 modified with a mononuclear Ru(II) complex, and by far the highest among the metal-complex/semiconductor hybrid systems reported to date. The results of photocatalytic reactions, emission decay measurements, and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy indicated that Ag nanoparticles on C3N4 collected electrons having lifetimes of several milliseconds from the conduction band of C3N4, which were transferred to the excited state of RuRu', thereby promoting photocatalytic CO2 reduction driven by two-step photoexcitation of C3N4 and RuRu'. This study also revealed that the RuRu'/Ag/C3N4 hybrid photocatalyst worked efficiently in water containing a proper electron donor, despite the intrinsic hydrophobic nature of C3N4 and low solubility of CO2 in an aqueous environment. PMID:27027822

  18. Selecting CO2 Sources for CO2 Utilization by Environmental-Merit-Order Curves.

    PubMed

    von der Assen, Niklas; Müller, Leonard J; Steingrube, Annette; Voll, Philip; Bardow, André

    2016-02-01

    Capture and utilization of CO2 as alternative carbon feedstock for fuels, chemicals, and materials aims at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil resource use. For capture of CO2, a large variety of CO2 sources exists. Since they emit much more CO2 than the expected demand for CO2 utilization, the environmentally most favorable CO2 sources should be selected. For this purpose, we introduce the environmental-merit-order (EMO) curve to rank CO2 sources according to their environmental impacts over the available CO2 supply. To determine the environmental impacts of CO2 capture, compression and transport, we conducted a comprehensive literature study for the energy demands of CO2 supply, and constructed a database for CO2 sources in Europe. Mapping these CO2 sources reveals that CO2 transport distances are usually small. Thus, neglecting transport in a first step, we find that environmental impacts are minimized by capturing CO2 first from chemical plants and natural gas processing, then from paper mills, power plants, and iron and steel plants. In a second step, we computed regional EMO curves considering transport and country-specific impacts for energy supply. Building upon regional EMO curves, we identify favorable locations for CO2 utilization with lowest environmental impacts of CO2 supply, so-called CO2 oases. PMID:26752014

  19. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  20. CO2 laser modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  1. Petrogenesis of carbonated meta-ultramafic lenses from the Neoproterozoic Heiani ophiolite, South Eastern Desert, Egypt: A natural analogue to CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlan, Hisham A.; Arai, Shoji; Almadani, Sattam A.

    2015-02-01

    Among a set of peculiar meta-ultramafics, carbonate-orthopyroxenites are observed for the first time in the Heiani ophiolite belt, South Eastern Desert, Egypt. They form massive lensoidal masses up to 50 m long and 20 m wide. The lenses show a marked structural concordance with their neighboring country rocks. The typical country rocks are represented by the following high-grade metamorphic rocks: kyanite-muscovite schists, amphibolites, kyanite-bearing biotite gneisses, migmatites, granite gneisses and mobilizates. The studied carbonate-orthopyroxenites consist mainly of metamorphic orthopyroxene + magnesite, among other metamorphic, relict primary and retrograde secondary minerals. According to primary chromian spinel (Cr#, 0.7-0.84) chemistry and morphology, absence of clinopyroxene and presence of primary mantle olivine (Fo89-91) as relicts in the metamorphic orthopyroxene, the Heiani carbonate-orthopyroxenites seem to have formed from a highly depleted mantle peridotite precursor. At a late collisional stage during the Pan-Africa terrane accretion and the E-W crustal shortening (ca. 650-620 Ma), high-grade (upper amphibolite facies) low-P/high-T regional metamorphism (ca. 660 Ma) accompanied by CO2-metasomatism resulted in formation of the Heiani carbonate-orthopyroxenites. Mostly the carbonate-bearing shelf sediments beneath and/or in juxtaposition with the Heiani ophiolite are considered to be the proven source of the CO2-rich fluids. Although, a mixed sedimentary-mantle C source is not unlikely. A mineral paragenetic correlation with experimental data for the system MgO-SiO2-H2O-CO2 suggests metamorphic conditions consistent with those of the high-grade country rocks; i.e. 630-650 °C, 6-7 kbar (20-23 km depth) and high-XCO2 (0.6-0.7). The CO2-bearing fluids discharging along faults gave rise to regionally widespread carbonate-bearing assemblages. Accordingly, the Heiani carbonate-orthopyroxenites are considered the by-products of natural carbon

  2. Combined effects of CO2 enrichment, diurnal light levels and water stress on foliar metabolites of potato plants grown in naturally sunlit controlled environment chambers.

    PubMed

    Barnaby, Jinyoung Y; Fleisher, David; Reddy, Vangimalla; Sicher, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Experiments were conducted in outdoor, naturally sunlit, soil-plant-atmosphere research (SPAR) chambers using plants grown in pots. Drought treatments were imposed on potato plants (Solanum tuberosum cv. Kennebec) beginning 10 days after tuber initiation. A total of 23 out of 37 foliar metabolites were affected by drought when measured 11 days after initiating water stress treatments. Compounds that accumulated in response to drought were hexoses, polyols, branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) and aromatic amino acids, such as proline. Conversely, leaf starch, alanine, aspartate and several organic acids involved in respiratory metabolism decreased with drought. Depending upon harvest date, a maximum of 12 and 17 foliar metabolites also responded to either CO2 enrichment or diurnal treatments, respectively. In addition, about 20% of the measured metabolites in potato leaflets were simultaneously affected by drought, CO2 enrichment and diurnal factors combined. This group contained BCAAs, hexoses, leaf starch and malate. Polyols and proline accumulated in response to water stress but did not vary diurnally. Water stress also amplified diurnal variations of hexoses and starch in comparison to control samples. Consequently, specific drought responsive metabolites in potato leaflets were dramatically affected by daily changes of photosynthetic carbon metabolism. PMID:24888746

  3. Upgraded biogas from municipal solid waste for natural gas substitution and CO2 reduction--a case study of Austria, Italy, and Spain.

    PubMed

    Starr, Katherine; Villalba, Gara; Gabarrell, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Biogas is rich in methane and can be further purified through biogas upgrading technologies, presenting a viable alternative to natural gas. Landfills and anaerobic digestors treating municipal solid waste are a large source of such biogas. They therefore offer an attractive opportunity to tap into this potential source of natural gas while at the same time minimizing the global warming impact resulting from methane emissions in waste management schemes (WMS) and fossil fuel consumption reduction. This study looks at the current municipal solid waste flows of Spain, Italy, and Austria over one year (2009), in order to determine how much biogas is generated. Then it examines how much natural gas could be substituted by using four different biogas upgrading technologies. Based on current waste generation rates, exploratory but realistic WMS were created for each country in order to maximize biogas production and potential for natural gas substitution. It was found that the potential substitution of natural gas by biogas resulting from the current WMS seems rather insignificant: 0.2% for Austria, 0.6% for Italy and 0.3% for Spain. However, if the WMS is redesigned to maximize biogas production, these figures can increase to 0.7% for Austria, 1% for Italy and 2% for Spain. Furthermore, the potential CO2 reduction as a consequence of capturing the biogas and replacing fossil fuel can result in up to a 93% reduction of the annual national waste greenhouse gas emissions of Spain and Italy. PMID:25655352

  4. Large Releases from CO2 Storage Reservoirs: A Discussion ofNatural Analogs, FEPS, and Modeling Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.; Pruess, K.; Lewicki, J.L.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang,C-F.; Karimjee, A.

    2005-11-01

    While the purpose of geologic storage in deep saline formations is to trap greenhouse gases underground, the potential exists for CO{sub 2} to escape from the target reservoir, migrate upward along permeable pathways, and discharge at the land surface. In this paper, we evaluate the potential for such CO{sub 2} discharges based on the analysis of natural analogs, where large releases of gas have been observed. We are particularly interested in circumstances that could generate sudden, possibly self-enhancing release events. The probability for such events may be low, but the circumstances under which they occur and the potential consequences need to be evaluated in order to design appropriate site-selection and risk-management strategies. Numerical modeling of hypothetical test cases is suggested to determine critical conditions for large CO{sub 2} releases, to evaluate whether such conditions may be possible at designated storage sites, and, if applicable, to evaluate the potential impacts of such events as well as design appropriate mitigation strategies.

  5. Imprints of Natural Selection Along Environmental Gradients in Phenology-Related Genes of Quercus petraea

    PubMed Central

    Alberto, Florian J.; Derory, Jérémy; Boury, Christophe; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Kremer, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    We explored single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation in candidate genes for bud burst from Quercus petraea populations sampled along gradients of latitude and altitude in Western Europe. SNP diversity was monitored for 106 candidate genes, in 758 individuals from 32 natural populations. We investigated whether SNP variation reflected the clinal pattern of bud burst observed in common garden experiments. We used different methods to detect imprints of natural selection (FST outlier, clinal variation at allelic frequencies, association tests) and compared the results obtained for the two gradients. FST outlier SNPs were found in 15 genes, 5 of which were common to both gradients. The type of selection differed between the two gradients (directional or balancing) for 3 of these 5. Clinal variations were observed for six SNPs, and one cline was conserved across both gradients. Association tests between the phenotypic or breeding values of trees and SNP genotypes identified 14 significant associations, involving 12 genes. The results of outlier detection on the basis of population differentiation or clinal variation were not very consistent with the results of association tests. The discrepancies between these approaches may reflect the different hierarchical levels of selection considered (inter- and intrapopulation selection). Finally, we obtained evidence for convergent selection (similar for gradients) and clinal variation for a few genes, suggesting that comparisons between parallel gradients could be used to screen for major candidate genes responding to natural selection in trees. PMID:23934884

  6. CO2 transport over complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Burns, Sean P.; Delany, A.C.; Oncley, S.P.; Turnipseed, A.A.; Stephens, B.B.; Lenschow, D.H.; LeMone, M.A.; Monson, Russell K.; Anderson, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    CO2 transport processes relevant for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site in the front range of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, USA, were investigated during a pilot experiment. We found that cold, moist, and CO2-rich air was transported downslope at night and upslope in the early morning at this forest site situated on a ???5% east-facing slope. We found that CO2 advection dominated the total CO2 transport in the NEE estimate at night although there are large uncertainties because of partial cancellation of horizontal and vertical advection. The horizontal CO2 advection captured not only the CO2 loss at night, but also the CO2 uptake during daytime. We found that horizontal CO2 advection was significant even during daytime especially when turbulent mixing was not significant, such as in early morning and evening transition periods and within the canopy. Similar processes can occur anywhere regardless of whether flow is generated by orography, synoptic pressure gradients, or surface heterogeneity as long as CO2 concentration is not well mixed by turbulence. The long-term net effect of all the CO2 budget terms on estimates of NEE needs to be investigated. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Modelling global nitrogen export to ground and surface water from natural ecosystems: impact of N deposition, climate, and CO2 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakhekke, Maarten; Rebel, Karin; Dekker, Stefan; van Beek, Rens; Bierkens, Marc; Smith, Ben; Wassen, Martin

    2015-04-01

    For large regions in the world strong increases in atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition are predicted as a result of emissions from fossil fuel combustion and food production. This will cause many previously N limited ecosystems to become N saturated, leading to increased export to ground and surface water and negative impacts on the environment and human health. However, precise N export fluxes are difficult to predict. Due to its strong link to carbon, N in vegetation and soil is also determined by productivity, as affected by rising atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature, and denitrification. Furthermore, the N concentration of water delivered to streams depends strongly on local hydrological conditions. We aim to study how N delivery to ground and surface water is affected by changes in environmental factors. To this end we are developing a global dynamic modelling system that integrates representations of N cycling in vegetation and soil, and N delivery to ground and surface water. This will be achieved by coupling the dynamic global vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, which includes representations of N cycling, as well as croplands and pasture, to the global water balance model PCR-GLOBWB, which simulates surface runoff, interflow, groundwater recharge, and baseflow. This coupling will allow us to trace N across different systems and estimate the input of N into the riverine system which can be used as input for river biogeochemical models. We will present large scale estimates of N leaching and transport to ground and surface water for natural ecosystems in different biomes, based on a loose coupling of the two models. Furthermore, by means of a factorial model experiment we will explore how these fluxes are influenced by N deposition, temperature, and CO2 concentration.

  8. Usnea barbata CO2-supercritical extract in alkyl polyglucoside-based emulsion system: contribution of Confocal Raman imaging to the formulation development of a natural product.

    PubMed

    Zugic, Ana; Lunter, Dominique Jasmin; Daniels, Rolf; Pantelic, Ivana; Tasic Kostov, Marija; Tadic, Vanja; Misic, Dusan; Arsic, Ivana; Savic, Snezana

    2016-08-01

    Topical treatment of skin infections is often limited by drawbacks related to both antimicrobial agents and their vehicles. In addition, considering the growing promotion of natural therapeutic products, our objective was to develop and evaluate naturally-based emulsion system, as prospective topical formulation for skin infections-treatment. Therefore, alkyl polyglucoside surfactants were used for stabilization of a vehicle serving as potential carrier for supercritical CO2-extract of Usnea barbata, lichen with well-documented antimicrobial activity, incorporated using two protocols and three concentrations. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization suggested possible involvement of extract's particles in stabilization of the investigated system. Raman spectral imaging served as the key method in disclosing extract's particles potential to participate in the microstructure of the tested emulsion system via three mechanisms: (1) particle-particle aggregation, (2) adsorption at the oil-water interface and (3) hydrophobic particle-surfactant interactions. Stated extract-vehicle interaction proved to be correlated to the preparation procedure and extract concentration on one hand and to affect the physicochemical and biopharmaceutical features of investigated system, on the other hand. Thereafter, formulation with the best preliminary stability and liberation profile was selected for further efficiency and in vivo skin irritation potential evaluation, implying pertinent in vitro antimicrobial activity against G+ bacteria and overall satisfying preliminary safety profile. PMID:26135231

  9. CO2 Sequestration Crosswell Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Luo, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2, a green house gas, represents an effort to reduce the large amount of CO2 generated as a by-product of fossil fuels combustion and emitted into the atmosphere. This process of sequestration involves CO2 storage deep underground into highly permeable porous media sealed by caprock. "4D seismics" is a natural non-intrusive monitoring technique which involves 3D time-lapse seismic surveys. The success of monitoring CO2 movement relies upon a proper description of the physics of the problem. We realize time-lapse migrations comparing acoustic, elastic (with or without Gassmann's formulae), and poroelastic simulations of 4D seismic imaging. This approach highlights the influence of using different physical theories on interpreting seismic data, and, more importantly, on extracting the CO2 signature from the seismic wave field. We investigate various types of inversions using (1) P-wave traveltimes, (2) P- & S-wave traveltimes and (3) P- & S-wave traveltimes and amplitudes. Simulations are performed using a spectral-element method, and finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, used in the non-linear iterative inversions, are calculated based on an adjoint method. Biot's equations are implemented in the forward and adjoint simulations to account for poroelastic effects.

  10. CO2 blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  11. Fluid-rock interactions in CO2-saturated, granite-hosted geothermal systems: Implications for natural and engineered systems from geochemical experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Ré, Caroline; Kaszuba, John P.; Moore, Joseph N.; McPherson, Brian J.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrothermal experiments were conducted and geochemical models constructed to evaluate the geochemical and mineralogical response of fractured granite and granite + epidote in contact with thermal water, with and without supercritical CO2, at 250 °C and 25-45 MPa. Illite ± smectite ± zeolite(?) precipitate as secondary minerals at the expense of K-feldspar, oligoclase, and epidote. Illite precipitates in experiments reacting granite and granite + epidote with water; metastable smectite forms in the experiments injected with supercritical CO2. Waters are supersaturated with respect to quartz and saturated with respect to chalcedony in CO2-charged experiments, but neither mineral formed. Carbonate formation is predicted for experiments injected with supercritical CO2, but carbonate only formed during cooling and degassing of the granite + epidote + CO2 experiment. Experimental results provide insight into the buffering capacity of granites as well as the drivers of clay formation. Metastable smectite in the experiments is attributed to high water-rock ratios, high silica activities, and high CO2 and magnesium-iron concentrations. Smectite precipitation in supercritical CO2-bearing geothermal systems may affect reservoir permeability. Silicate formation may create or thicken caps within or on the edges of geothermal reservoirs. Carbonate formation, as desired for carbon sequestration projects coinciding with geothermal systems, may require extended periods of time; cooling and degassing of CO2-saturated waters leads to carbonate precipitation, potentially plugging near-surface production pathways.

  12. Venting of CO2 at Enceladus’ Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Davies, Ashley G.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Tom B.; Radebaugh, Jani

    2015-11-01

    Enceladus has CO2 surface deposits in its South Polar Region that have been recently mapped by J.-P. Combe et al. (2015 AGU Fall Meeting). Assuming that these are CO2 frost, we show how they can be formed. We use an ocean-water circulation model [1] that specifies pressure gradients that drive water to the surface from a relatively gas-rich, subsurface ocean. We now examine the movement of CO2 to the surface; formation of shallow CO2 gas pockets in the ice; and the venting of CO2, when at least some of the gas freezes to form frost. If the local heat flow is known (cf. [2]), then the depths of the corresponding gas pockets can be calculated. References: [1] Matson et al. (2012) Icarus, 221, 53-62. [2] Howett et al. (2011) J. Geophys. Res. 116, E03003. Acknowledgements: AGD thanks the NASA OPR Program for support.

  13. Electrochemical energy generation from natural and synthetic salinity gradients using reverse electrodialysis and capacitive mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    Salinity gradient energy (SGE) technologies are emerging systems designed to recover energy from engineered and natural mixing processes. Two electricity producing SGE systems are reverse electrodialysis (RED) and capacitive mixing (CapMix). RED captures mixing energy using a series of ion exchange membranes that drive electrochemical reactions at redox electrodes. CapMix utilizes polarizable electrodes to store charge in the surfaces electric double layer (EDL). Energy generation can then occur when the EDL is expanded and compressed in different concentration solutions. The use of themolytic salt solutions (e.g. ammonium bicarbonate--AmB) within a RED system is promising, as AmB can be regenerated using low-grade waste--heat (e.g. 40--60°C). One disadvantage to using AmB is the potential for gas bubbles (CO2, NH3) to form within the stack. Accumulation of bubbles can impede ion migration, and reduce system performance. The management and minimization of gaseous bubbles in RED flow fields is an important operational issue, and has not previously been addressed within RED literature. Flow field design with and without spacers in a RED stack was analyzed to determine how fluid flow and geometry effected the accumulation and removal of bubbles. In addition, the performance changes, in terms of power and resistance were measured in the presence of bubbles. Gaseous bubble accumulation was minimized using short vertically aligned channels, which resulted in a reduction in the amount of the membrane area which was restricted due to bubbles from ~20% to 7%. The stack power density improved by 12% when all gaseous bubbles were removed from the cell. AmB-RED systems can potentially produce hydrogen or electrical energy through altering the cathodic reaction. With a kinetically favorable cathodic reaction (oxygen reduction reaction), the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass AmB--RED system approached 78 Wh per m--3 (low concentrate). However, when RED was

  14. Incremental vacuum dehydration-decarbonation experiments on a natural gibbsite (α-Al(OH 3)): CO 2 abundance and δ 13C values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Neil J.; Yapp, Crayton J.

    2005-02-01

    Incremental vacuum dehydration-decarbonation experiments were performed at 190°C on chemically "cleaned" aliquots of a gibbsite-dominated, Eocene-age bauxite sample with evolution of CO 2 and H 2O. "Plateau" F (CO 2/H 2O ratios) and δ 13C values of the CO 2 derived from gibbsite were attained over the dehydration interval, X v(H 2) = 0.16 to 0.67 (i.e., 16 to 67% breakdown of gibbsite). The plateau value of F for gibbsite was 0.0043 ± 0.0003, while the corresponding δ 13C value of evolved CO 2 was -16.0‰±0.4‰. Additional experiments on chemically cleaned aliquots included (1) treatment with a solution of 0.3M Na-Citrate + 0.1M Na-Dithionite and (2) an exchange experiment with 0.1 bar of 13C-depleted CO 2 (-46‰) at 105°C for 64.5 h. Neither of these additional treatments resulted in a measurable perturbation of plateau values of F or δ 13C for CO 2 evolved from gibbsite during dehydroxylation. These results support published work on Holocene samples which suggested that CO 2 occluded in gibbsite may preserve information on δ 13C values of CO 2 in ancient terrestrial systems. The plateau values of F observed in the Eocene gibbsite indicate that it may be possible to experimentally calibrate a relationship between the concentration of CO 2 occluded in gibbsite and CO 2 in the environment at the time of crystallization. Such a calibration would significantly enhance the value of gibbsite as a source of information on ancient oxidized carbon systems.

  15. Large natural pH, CO2 and O2 fluctuations in a temperate tidal salt marsh on diel, seasonal, and interannual time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baumann, Hannes; Wallace, Ryan; Tagliaferri, Tristen N.; Gobler, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine organisms experience dynamic pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions in their natural habitats, which may impact their susceptibility to long-term anthropogenic changes. Robust characterizations of all temporal scales of natural pH and DO fluctuations in different marine habitats are needed; however, appropriate time series of pH and DO are still scarce. We used multiyear (2008–2012), high-frequency (6 min) monitoring data to quantify diel, seasonal, and interannual scales of pH and DO variability in a productive, temperate tidal salt marsh (Flax Pond, Long Island, US). pHNBS and DO showed strong and similar seasonal patterns, with average (minimum) conditions declining from 8.2 (8.1) and 12.5 (11.4) mg l−1 at the end of winter to 7.6 (7.2) and 6.3 (2.8) mg l−1 in late summer, respectively. Concomitantly, average diel fluctuations increased from 0.22 and 2.2 mg l−1 (February) to 0.74 and 6.5 mg l−1 (August), respectively. Diel patterns were modulated by tides and time of day, eliciting the most extreme minima when low tides aligned with the end of the night. Simultaneous in situ pCO2 measurements showed striking fluctuations between ∼330 and ∼1,200 (early May), ∼2,200 (mid June), and ∼4,000 μatm (end of July) within single tidal cycles. These patterns also indicate that the marsh’s strong net heterotrophy influences its adjacent estuary by ‘outwelling’ acidified and hypoxic water during ebb tides. Our analyses emphasize the coupled and fluctuating nature of pH and DO conditions in productive coastal and estuarine environments, which have yet to be adequately represented by experiments.

  16. Hydrochemical field investigations at a potential CO2 storage site - analysis of natural salinisation processes as an indicator for deep reaching flow processes in Eastern Brandenburg (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endler, Ricarda; Jahnke, Christoph; Ludwig, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    The storage of CO2 in deep saline aquifers may cause an upward brine migration as a result of the pressure increase and brine displacement in the reservoir. With regard to a possible endangerment for regional freshwater resources the understanding of natural and induced migration processes of brines is therefore of great importance for the evaluation of potential storage sites. Within the framework of the BMBF project 'brine - CO2 storage in Eastern Brandenburg' (Germany), hydrochemical investigations were carried out to get an idea of the sources of salinisation, the migration pathways and the current processes and interactions between salt- and freshwater aquifers above a potential CO2 storage reservoir. This reservoir is located at a salt anticline structure in a Lower Triassic sandstone formation at a depth of about 1000 m. Since the 19th century freshwater salinisation and salinised soils in part with populations of halophytes were observed in Brandenburg. Both, fault zones in the Mesozoic/Tertiary and Pleistocene erosion processes led locally to a leakage of the Oligocene Rupelian clay formation, the most important confining layer between Mesozoic saltwater and Cenozoic freshwater aquifers, and thus potential migration pathways for brines. Possible sources for the salinisation are the leaching of deep Permian salt structures as well as in situ brackish or marine waters from Tertiary and Mesozoic sediments. Still unclear is especially the timescale of the salinisation processes in the shallow aquifers. To answer these questions, extensive groundwater samples from Pleistocene, Tertiary and Mesozoic aquifers down to depths of 450 m were taken in an investigation area of 50 x 50 km2 surrounding the potential storage site. In addition, deep thermal waters in Brandenburg in depths down to 1700 m were sampled to have comparable data for the storage reservoir and the deep caprock formations. Field parameters and a wide range of hydrochemical indicators (anions

  17. Fundamental study of CO2-H2O-mineral interactions for carbon sequestration, with emphasis on the nature of the supercritical fluid-mineral interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Heath, Jason E.; Wang, Yifeng; Matteo, Edward N.; Meserole, Stephen P.; Tallant, David Robert

    2013-09-01

    In the supercritical CO2-water-mineral systems relevant to subsurface CO2 sequestration, interfacial processes at the supercritical fluid-mineral interface will strongly affect core- and reservoir-scale hydrologic properties. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that water films will form on mineral surfaces in supercritical CO2, but will be thinner than those that form in vadose zone environments at any given matric potential. The theoretical model presented here allows assessment of water saturation as a function of matric potential, a critical step for evaluating relative permeabilities the CO2 sequestration environment. The experimental water adsorption studies, using Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy methods, confirm the major conclusions of the adsorption/condensation model. Additional data provided by the FTIR study is that CO2 intercalation into clays, if it occurs, does not involve carbonate or bicarbonate formation, or significant restriction of CO2 mobility. We have shown that the water film that forms in supercritical CO2 is reactive with common rock-forming minerals, including albite, orthoclase, labradorite, and muscovite. The experimental data indicate that reactivity is a function of water film thickness; at an activity of water of 0.9, the greatest extent of reaction in scCO2 occurred in areas (step edges, surface pits) where capillary condensation thickened the water films. This suggests that dissolution/precipitation reactions may occur preferentially in small pores and pore throats, where it may have a disproportionately large effect on rock hydrologic properties. Finally, a theoretical model is presented here that describes the formation and movement of CO2 ganglia in porous media, allowing assessment of the effect of pore size and structural heterogeneity on capillary trapping efficiency. The model results also suggest possible engineering approaches for optimizing trapping capacity and for

  18. The Galapagos archipelago: A natural laboratory to examine sharp hydroclimatic, geologic and anthropogenic gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Percy, Madelyn; Schmitt, Sarah; Riveros-Iregui, Diego; Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2016-01-01

    Poor understanding of the water cycle in tropical ecosystems has the potential to exacerbate water shortages and water crises in the region. We suggest that the Galápagos Islands provide an excellent proxy to regions across the tropics as a result of sharp hydroclimatic, anthropogenic, and pedohydrologic gradients across the archipelago. Hydroclimatic and pedohydrologic gradients are found across different elevations on single islands, as well as across the archipelago, whereas anthropogenic gradients reflect land use and land cover change across islands as population and growth in tourism have affected individual islands differently. This article highlights specific opportunities to further examine our understanding of the interactions between water and critical zone processes in tropical ecosystems, making connections between the Galápagos archipelago and much of the understudied tropics. The Galápagos archipelago offers a natural laboratory through which we can examine current threats to freshwater security as well as the dynamics of coupled natural and human systems.

  19. The CO2nnect activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is one of the biggest challenges we face today. A first step is the understanding the problem, more exactly what is the challenge and the differences people can make. Pupils need a wide competencies to meet the challenges of sustainable development - including climate change. The CO2nnect activities are designed to support learning which can provide pupils the abilities, skills, attitudes and awareness as well as knowledge and understanding of the issues. The project "Together for a clean and healthy world" is part of "The Global Educational Campaign CO2nnect- CO2 on the way to school" and it was held in our school in the period between February and October 2009. It contained a variety of curricular and extra-curricular activities, adapted to students aged from 11 to 15. These activities aimed to develop in students the necessary skills to understanding man's active role in improving the quality of the environment, putting an end to its degrading process and to reducing the effects of climate changes caused by the human intervention in nature, including transport- a source of CO2 pollution. The activity which I propose can be easily adapted to a wide range of age groups and linked to the curricula of many subjects: - Investigate CO2 emissions from travel to school -Share the findings using an international database -Compare and discuss CO2 emissions -Submit questions to a climate- and transport expert -Partner with other schools -Meet with people in your community to discuss emissions from transport Intended learning outcomes for pupils who participate in the CO2nnect campaign are: Understanding of the interconnected mobility- and climate change issue climate change, its causes and consequences greenhouse-gas emissions from transport and mobility the interlinking of social, environmental, cultural and economic aspects of the local transport system how individual choices and participation can contribute to creating a more sustainable development

  20. An Earth system model of intermediate complexity: Simulation of the role of ocean mixing parameterizations and climate change in estimated uptake for natural and bomb radiocarbon and anthropogenic CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Long; Jain, Atul

    2005-09-01

    We examine the sensitivity of simultaneous simulation of climate, natural 14C, bomb 14C, and anthropogenic CO2 uptake to the choice of three different ocean mixing schemes: horizontal/vertical mixing (HV), isopycnal mixing (ISO), and Gent-McWilliams mixing (GM) using an Earth system model of intermediate complexity, Integrated Science Assessment Model-2.5D (ISAM-2.5D). Our modeling results suggest that the HV scheme greatly underestimates the observed values of natural 14C in the deep ocean, while the ISO and GM schemes yield more realistic results by simulating increased amounts of natural 14C values through enhanced vertical diffusion and deep water formation. The GM scheme further improves the ISO-based natural 14C distribution in the Southern Ocean and the deep Pacific and Indian oceans through a more realistic simulation of the Southern Ocean circulation. The model simulated global uptake of anthropogenic CO2 for the 1980s ranges between 1.8 and 2.3 PgC/yr, largely consistent with data-based estimates and OGCM results. The ISAM-2.5D simulated oceanic uptake of 14C and CO2 is highest for the ISO scheme and lowest for the HV scheme, with the largest discrepancies occurring among different mixing schemes found in the Southern Ocean. However, no single mixing scheme is more successful than the others in simulating GEOSECS-measured uptake of bomb 14C and anthropogenic CO2 for various ocean basins. Climate change is found to reduce CO2 uptake by 7-9% and 6-8% for the 1980s and over the period 1765-1990, mainly as a result of decreased CO2 solubility associated with increased sea surface temperatures. However, the effect of climate change on bomb 14C uptake is negligible.

  1. Different Influences on Tropical Pacific SST Gradient from Natural Forcing and Anthropogenic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, L.; Liu, J.; Wang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Several simulations under natural forcing, greenhouse gas forcing, and full forcing (both natural forcing and anthropogenic forcing) over the last 2000 years using the Community Earth System Model (CESM) were used to investigate the different changes of tropical Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) gradient and corresponding mechanisms. Under the full forcing, during the present warming period (PWP; 1901-1999), Pacific SST shows larger warming over the whole tropical Pacific region than the subtropical Pacific region. This pattern is composed by an El Niño-like SST gradient due to the greenhouse gas forcing and a La Niña-like SST gradient due to the natural forcing. Two sensitivity experiments, the PWP under greenhouse gas forcing and Medieval Warming Period (MWP; 751-1250) under natural forcing, were used to examine the mechanisms. The results showed that, under the greenhouse forcing, the larger warming over eastern tropical Pacific is induced by increased surface net heat flux mainly contributed by short-wave radiation and latent heat flux. Under the natural forcing, the larger warming over western tropical Pacific is induced by changes of vertical heat transportation caused by the surface wind anomalies.

  2. Quantification of Natural Gradient Flow Using Active Fiber Optic DTS in Sealed Boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, T. I.; Parker, B. L.; Munn, J. D.; Chalari, A.; Mondanos, M.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature has been used for many years to characterize flow in fractured rock systems. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) was adopted by the oil/gas industry over two decades ago for monitoring processes in deep fractured rock environments. Improvements in DTS system resolutions, methodology advancements, and improved data processing techniques have caused recent popularity for shallow fractured rock hydrogeologic applications. A powerful advance in DTS methodology is the use of response data collected during active cable heating. When applied to borehole applications active heating creates a thermal disequilibrium in the aquifer system that enhances the detection of groundwater flow. Active DTS has been applied to open borehole environments; however, characterization methods based on open borehole measurements are limited in that only the effects of unnatural flow (i.e. vertical cross-connection and redistribution of flow creating local, induced flows) can be observed. To characterize natural gradient flow processes borehole effects need to be minimized.The literature shows borehole sealing using flexible impervious fabric liners creates a static water column in the well that eliminates the negative effects of cross-connection. Measurements in this sealed environment have been shown by others to be representative of natural gradient flow conditions, rather than the conditions created by the borehole short circuiting units or fractures with varying hydraulic head. A new method for flow system characterization using active DTS in sealed boreholes has been developed with excellent prospects for quantitation of natural gradient groundwater fluxes and related hydraulic properties. This project demonstrates the utility of using an analytical solution for calculating apparent thermal conductivities and natural gradient groundwater fluxes at depth-discrete intervals observed continuously along a borehole using active DTS. Groundwater flux data can then be

  3. Quantifying the "chamber effect" in CO2 flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Childs, Amy; Long, Hazel; Waldron, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The significance of aquatic CO2 emissions has received attention in recent years. For example annual aquatic emissions in the Amazon basin have been estimated as 500 Mt of carbon1. Methods for determining the flux rates include eddy covariance flux tower measurements, flux estimates calculated from partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in water and the use floating flux chambers connected to an infra-red gas analyser. The flux chamber method is often used because it is portable, cheaper and allows smaller scale measurements. It is also a direct method and hence avoids problems related to the estimation of the gas transfer coefficient that is required when fluxes are calculated from pCO2. However, the use of a floating chamber may influence the flux measurements obtained. The chamber shields the water underneath from effects of wind which could lead to lower flux estimates. Wind increases the flux rate by i) causing waves which increase the surface area for efflux, and ii) removing CO2 build up above the water surface, hence maintaining a higher concentration gradient. Many floating chambers have an underwater extension of the chamber below the float to ensure better seal to water surface and to prevent any ingress of atmospheric air when waves rock the chamber. This extension may cause additional turbulence in flowing water and hence lead to overestimation of flux rates. Some groups have also used a small fan in the chamber headspace to ensure thorough mixing of air in the chamber. This may create turbulence inside the chamber which could increase the flux rate. Here we present results on the effects of different chamber designs on the detected flux rates. 1Richey et al. 2002. Outgassing from Amazonian rivers and wetlands as a large tropical source of atmospheric CO2. Nature 416: 617-620.

  4. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectra of CO{2}-ETHYLENE Sulfide, CO{2}-ETHYLENE Oxide and CO{2}-PROPYLENE Oxide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orita, Yukari; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Hirota, Eizi

    2010-06-01

    We have previously examined the difference in roles of O and S in structure and dynamics of the CO-ethylene oxide (EO) and CO-ethylene sulfide (ES) complexes. We have extended the investigation to CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES for comparison. We have also observed the CO{2}-propylene oxide (PO) complex, which is an important intermediate in the reaction of PO with CO{2} leading to polycarbonate. Both a-type and b-type transitions were observed for the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES, but no c-type transitions were observed at all. We also detected the {34}S and {13}C isotopic species in natural abundance and the species containing {18}OCO and C{18}O% {2}, which were synthesized by burning paper in an {18}O{2} and{% 16}O{2} mixture. By analyzing the observed spectra we concluded the CO{2} moiety of CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES located in a plane % prependicular to the three-membered ring and bisecting the COC or CSC angle of EO or ES, respectively, as in the case of CO-EO and CO-ES complexes. An % ab initio MO calculation at the level of MP2/6-311G(d, p) yielded an optimized structure in good agreement with the experimental result. We have derived from the observed spectra the distance, the stretching force constant, and the binding energy of the bonds between the constituents of the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES complexes and have found that the distances of the two complexes were shorter by 0.2Å than those in CO-EO and CO-ES, respectively, and that the intermolecular bonds were two times stronger in the CO{2} complexes than in the corresponding CO complexes. We have concluded from the observed spectra that the CO{2} moiety in CO{2}-PO is located on the PO three-membered ring plane opposite to the methyl group. The constituents in CO{2}-PO were more weakly bound than those in CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES. S. Sato, Y. Kawashima, Y. Tatamitani, and E. Hirota, 63rd International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, WF05 (2008).

  5. Carbon balance, partitioning and photosynthetic acclimation in fruit-bearing grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Tempranillo) grown under simulated climate change (elevated CO2, elevated temperature and moderate drought) scenarios in temperature gradient greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Parra, Carolina; Aranjuelo, Iker; Pascual, Inmaculada; Erice, Gorka; Sanz-Sáez, Álvaro; Aguirreolea, Jone; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel; Irigoyen, Juan José; Araus, José Luis; Morales, Fermín

    2015-02-01

    Although plant performance under elevated CO2 has been extensively studied in the past little is known about photosynthetic performance changing simultaneously CO2, water availability and temperature conditions. Moreover, despite of its relevancy in crop responsiveness to elevated CO2 conditions, plant level C balance is a topic that, comparatively, has received little attention. In order to test responsiveness of grapevine photosynthetic apparatus to predicted climate change conditions, grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Tempranillo) fruit-bearing cuttings were exposed to different CO2 (elevated, 700ppm vs. ambient, ca. 400ppm), temperature (ambient vs. elevated, ambient +4°C) and irrigation levels (partial vs. full irrigation). Carbon balance was followed monitoring net photosynthesis (AN, C gain), respiration (RD) and photorespiration (RL) (C losses). Modification of environment (13)C isotopic composition (δ(13)C) under elevated CO2 (from -10.30 to -24.93‰) enabled the further characterization of C partitioning into roots, cuttings, shoots, petioles, leaves, rachides and berries. Irrespective of irrigation level and temperature, exposure to elevated CO2 induced photosynthetic acclimation of plants. C/N imbalance reflected the inability of plants grown at 700ppm CO2 to develop strong C sinks. Partitioning of labeled C to storage organs (main stem and roots) did not avoid accumulation of labeled photoassimilates in leaves, affecting negatively Rubisco carboxylation activity. The study also revealed that, after 20 days of treatment, no oxidative damage to chlorophylls or carotenoids was observed, suggesting a protective role of CO2 either at current or elevated temperatures against the adverse effect of water stress. PMID:25462972

  6. Capnography: monitoring CO2.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-10-01

    MONITORING RESPIRATORY and metabolic function by using capnography to measure end tidal carbon dioxide is standard practice in anaesthesia. It is also becoming more common in intensive care units and during procedural sedation. End tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) monitoring may also be used to assess effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Capnography is now emerging in general medical and surgical wards to monitor respiratory depression in patients using opioid analgesics. Using EtCO2 to monitor respiratory function offers many benefits over pulse oximetry. It is important to understand the differences between these two monitoring methods, and why capnography is increasingly favoured in many situations. An understanding of the physiological processes involved in CO2 excretion allows nurses to use capnography in a safe and meaningful way, while monitoring at-risk patients in acute care. PMID:26638570

  7. Global Mapping of CO2 on Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, T. B.; Combe, J. P.; Matson, D.; Johnson, T. V.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first global map of CO2 on Enceladus. The purpose is to determine whether CO2 is associated to fractures and eruptions, and if it formed recently. Cassini observed tectonic features and plumes on Enceladus, which could be caused by a warm subsurface ocean containing dissolved gases. CO2 should be one of these gases (Postberg F. et al., Nature, 2009), and some of it should be erupted and condensed onto the surface (Matson et al., Icarus, 2012). Validation of this hypothesis could be done by determining the amount, location and molecular state of the CO2. Free CO2 ice and complexed CO2 were reported on Enceladus (Brown et al., Science, 2006; Hansen, LPSC, 2010) from analysis of Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data, and on other Saturn icy satellites (Cruikshank et al., Icarus, 2010 ; Filacchione et al., Icarus, 2010). Complexed CO2 has also been found from Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) spectra on the icy Galilean satellites (McCord et al., Science, 1997 and JGR, 1998), apparently due to both interior outgassing and radiation processing. CO2 has an asymmetric stretching mode that creates an absorption band, the wavelength position of which is sensitive to the nature of molecular associations between CO2 and their neighbors. Free CO2 ice absorbs at 4.268 μm for (Sandford and Allamandola, 1990) and CO2 complexed with other molecules absorbs at shorter wavelengths, around 4.25 μm or shorter (Chaban et al., Icarus, 2007). In VIMS spectra of Enceladus, this stretching mode absorption band is near the instrument detection limit. We utilized all VIMS data sets available that had significant spatial resolution to increase the statistics of the observations for any given location and improve the signal to noise. CO2 has also a smaller absorption at 2.7 μm, although it occurs in a range of wavelength that has higher signal-to-noise ratio by several magnitudes, because the surface of Enceladus (mostly H2O ice) has

  8. Dynamics of the adaptive natural gradient descent method for soft committee machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Masato; Park, Hyeyoung; Okada, Masato

    2004-05-01

    Adaptive natural gradient descent (ANGD) method realizes natural gradient descent (NGD) without needing to know the input distribution of learning data and reduces the calculation cost from a cubic order to a square order. However, no performance analysis of ANGD has been done. We have developed a statistical-mechanical theory of the simplified version of ANGD dynamics for soft committee machines in on-line learning; this method provides deterministic learning dynamics expressed through a few order parameters, even though ANGD intrinsically holds a large approximated Fisher information matrix. Numerical results obtained using this theory were consistent with those of a simulation, with respect not only to the learning curve but also to the learning failure. Utilizing this method, we numerically evaluated ANGD efficiency and found that ANGD generally performs as well as NGD. We also revealed the key condition affecting the learning plateau in ANGD.

  9. Experimental studies on the nature of property gradients in the human dentine.

    PubMed

    Kishen, A; Ramamurty, U; Asundi, A

    2000-09-15

    We conducted an investigation into the nature of dentine mineralization and mechanical property gradients with the aid of experimental techniques such as the fluoroscopic X-ray microanalysis and instrumented microindentation, respectively. It was found that the tooth adapts to a complex structure with significant gradients in properties. We observed a significant correlation between the degree of mineralization within the dentine and the mechanical properties. The natural gradation in mechanical properties is explained by the stress analysis within anatomical-sized tooth specimens done using digital photoelasticity. These results are explained within the context of the functional requirements that are imposed on the tooth. This study highlights tooth structure as a biologically adapted, functionally graded material. PMID:10880113

  10. The heat capacity of a natural monticellite and phase equilibria in the system CaO-MgO-SiO2-CO2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, Z.D.; Essene, E.J.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Metz, G.W.; Westrum, E.F., Jr.; Hemingway, B.S.; Valley, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The heat capacity of a natural monticellite (Ca1.00Mg.09Fe.91Mn.01Si0.99O3.99) measured between 9.6 and 343 K using intermittent-heating, adiabatic calorimetry yields Cp0(298) and S2980 of 123.64 ?? 0.18 and 109.44 ?? 0.16 J ?? mol-1 K-1 respectively. Extrapolation of this entropy value to end-member monticellite results in an S0298 = 108.1 ?? 0.2 J ?? mol-1 K-1. High-temperature heat-capacity data were measured between 340-1000 K with a differential scanning calorimeter. The high-temperature data were combined with the 290-350 K adiabatic values, extrapolated to 1700 K, and integrated to yield the following entropy equation for end-member monticellite (298-1700 K): ST0(J ?? mol-1 K-1) = S2980 + 164.79 In T + 15.337 ?? 10-3 T + 22.791 ?? 105 T-2 - 968.94. Phase equilibria in the CaO-MgO-SiO2 system were calculated from 973 to 1673 K and 0 to 12 kbar with these new data combined with existing data for akermanite (Ak), diopside (Di), forsterite (Fo), merwinite (Me) and wollastonite (Wo). The location of the calculated reactions involving the phases Mo and Fo is affected by their mutual solid solution. A best fit of the thermodynamically generated curves to all experiments is made when the S0298 of Me is 250.2 J ?? mol-1 K-1 less than the measured value of 253.2 J ?? mol-1 K-1. A best fit to the reversals for the solid-solid and decarbonation reactions in the CaO-MgO-SiO2-CO2 system was obtained with the ??G0298 (kJ ?? mole-1) for the phases Ak(-3667), Di(-3025), Fo(-2051), Me(-4317) and Mo(-2133). The two invariant points - Wo and -Fo for the solid-solid reactions are located at 1008 ?? 5 K and 6.3 ?? 0.1 kbar, and 1361 ?? 10 K and 10.2 ?? 0.2 kbar respectively. The location of the thermodynamically generated curves is in excellent agreement with most experimental data on decarbonation equilibria involving these phases. ?? 1986.