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Sample records for natural solution concept

  1. Naturally selecting solutions

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Timmy; Sleator, Roy D; Walsh, Paul

    2013-01-01

    For decades, computer scientists have looked to nature for biologically inspired solutions to computational problems; ranging from robotic control to scheduling optimization. Paradoxically, as we move deeper into the post-genomics era, the reverse is occurring, as biologists and bioinformaticians look to computational techniques, to solve a variety of biological problems. One of the most common biologically inspired techniques are genetic algorithms (GAs), which take the Darwinian concept of natural selection as the driving force behind systems for solving real world problems, including those in the bioinformatics domain. Herein, we provide an overview of genetic algorithms and survey some of the most recent applications of this approach to bioinformatics based problems. PMID:23222169

  2. Natural Concepts in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrnstein, R. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Pigeons learned discrimination rapidly and responded differentially to pictures seen for the first time. The essential feature of a natural discrimination--which is the ability to cope with natural ranges of variation--was approached and earlier experimental results were extended using other classes of stimuli. (Author/RK)

  3. Tail mean and related robust solution concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogryczak, Włodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Robust optimisation might be viewed as a multicriteria optimisation problem where objectives correspond to the scenarios although their probabilities are unknown or imprecise. The simplest robust solution concept represents a conservative approach focused on the worst-case scenario results optimisation. A softer concept allows one to optimise the tail mean thus combining performances under multiple worst scenarios. We show that while considering robust models allowing the probabilities to vary only within given intervals, the tail mean represents the robust solution for only upper bounded probabilities. For any arbitrary intervals of probabilities the corresponding robust solution may be expressed by the optimisation of appropriately combined mean and tail mean criteria thus remaining easily implementable with auxiliary linear inequalities. Moreover, we use the tail mean concept to develope linear programming implementable robust solution concepts related to risk averse optimisation criteria.

  4. A natural species concept for prokaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    Direct molecular analyses of natural microbial populations reveal patterns that should compel microbiologists to adopt a more natural species concept that has been known to biologists for decades. The species debate can be exploited to address a larger issue - microbiologists need, in general, to take a more natural view of the organisms they study.

  5. Teaching Russian Culture: Concepts of Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dianne

    Russian culture is very much influenced by its huge land area, peculiar topography, and harsh climate. To understand Russian culture one must know how Russians perceive nature. This paper discusses how this concept may be conveyed to U.S. middle school students through poetry. Poems about nature can provide students an opportunity to understand…

  6. Childrens' Conceptions of Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a study of sixth grade children's conceptions of nature and the environment. In so doing, it asks that environmental educators pay more attention to children's preconceived notions of environment and nature. Should this occur the theory-practice gap in environmental education may be diminished. Learners' concept…

  7. Missing concepts in natural selection theory reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Ginnobili, Santiago

    2016-09-01

    The concept of fitness has generated a lot of discussion in philosophy of biology. There is, however, relative agreement about the need to distinguish at least two uses of the term: ecological fitness on the one hand, and population genetics fitness on the other. The goal of this paper is to give an explication of the concept of ecological fitness by providing a reconstruction of the theory of natural selection in which this concept was framed, that is, based on the way the theory was put to use in Darwin's main texts. I will contend that this reconstruction enables us to account for the current use of the theory of natural selection. The framework presupposed in the analysis will be that of metatheoretical structuralism. This framework will provide both a better understanding of the nature of ecological fitness and a more complete reconstruction of the theory. In particular, it will provide what I think is a better way of understanding how the concept of fitness is applied through heterogeneous cases. One of the major advantages of my way of thinking about natural selection theory is that it would not have the peculiar metatheoretical status that it has in other available views. I will argue that in order to achieve these goals it is necessary to make several concepts explicit, concepts that are frequently omitted in usual reconstructions. PMID:27385113

  8. Natural gas as a natural' solution

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.T. Jr.

    1991-05-15

    This article promotes natural gas use as a means to cut US dependence on imported oil by some 28 percent over the next ten years, while improving energy efficiency and solving a portion of the global warming and acid rain problems. Topics of discussion include fuel substitution, the Clean Air Act, natural gas capacity and distribution, and natural gas exploration.

  9. Portable long trace profiler: Concept and solution

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shinan; Takacs, Peter; Sostero, Giovanni; Cocco, Daniele

    2001-08-01

    Since the early development of the penta-prism long trace profiler (LTP) and the in situ LTP, and following the completion of the first in situ distortion profile measurements at Sincrotrone Trieste (ELETTRA) in Italy in 1995, a concept was developed for a compact, portable LTP with the following characteristics: easily installed on synchrotron radiation beam lines, easily carried to different laboratories around the world for measurements and calibration, convenient for use in evaluating the LTP as an in-process tool in the optical workshop, and convenient for use in temporarily installation as required by other special applications. The initial design of a compact LTP optical head was made at ELETTRA in 1995. Since 1997 further efforts to reduce the optical head size and weight, and to improve measurement stability have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This article introduces the following solutions and accomplishments for the portable LTP: (1) a new design for a compact and very stable optical head, (2) the use of a small detector connected to a laptop computer directly via an enhanced parallel port, and there is no extra frame grabber interface and control box, (3) a customized small mechanical slide that uses a compact motor with a connector-sized motor controller, and (4) the use of a laptop computer system. These solutions make the portable LTP able to be packed into two laptop-size cases: one for the computer and one for the rest of the system.

  10. Nature, Human Nature, and Solutions to Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, B. C.

    This paper promotes an undergraduate course that would discuss the great ideas of Plato, St. Paul, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean Paul Sartre, B. F. Skinner, and Konrad Lorenz. This course would help students understand human values and behaviors while focusing on historical, world, and national problems. Tentative solutions would then be…

  11. A Review of Solution Chemistry Studies: Insights into Students' Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calyk, Muammer; Ayas, Alipa; Ebenezer, Jazlin V.

    2005-01-01

    This study has reviewed the last two decades of student conception research in solution chemistry pertaining to aims, methods of exploring students' conception, general knowledge claims, students' conceptions and difficulties, and conceptual change studies. The aims of solution chemistry studies have been to assess students' understanding level of…

  12. Marine geodesy - Problem areas and solution concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, N.

    1974-01-01

    This paper deals with a conceptional geodetic approach to solve various oceanic problems, such as submersible navigation under iced seas, demarcation/determination of boundaries in open ocean, resolving sea-level slope discrepancy, improving tsunami warning system, ecology, etc., etc. The required instrumentation is not described here. The achieved as well as desired positional accuracy estimates in open ocean for various tasks are also given.

  13. Exploring the folkbiological conception of human nature

    PubMed Central

    Linquist, Stefan; Machery, Edouard; Griffiths, Paul E.; Stotz, Karola

    2011-01-01

    Integrating the study of human diversity into the human evolutionary sciences requires substantial revision of traditional conceptions of a shared human nature. This process may be made more difficult by entrenched, ‘folkbiological’ modes of thought. Earlier work by the authors suggests that biologically naive subjects hold an implicit theory according to which some traits are expressions of an animal's inner nature while others are imposed by its environment. In this paper, we report further studies that extend and refine our account of this aspect of folkbiology. We examine biologically naive subjects' judgments about whether traits of an animal are ‘innate’, ‘in its DNA’ or ‘part of its nature’. Subjects do not understand these three descriptions to be equivalent. Both innate and in its DNA have the connotation that the trait is species-typical. This poses an obstacle to the assimilation of the biology of polymorphic and plastic traits by biologically naive audiences. Researchers themselves may not be immune to the continuing pull of folkbiological modes of thought. PMID:21199848

  14. The natural flow wing-design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1992-01-01

    A wing-design study was conducted on a 65 degree swept leading-edge delta wing in which the wing geometry was modified to take advantage of the naturally occurring flow that forms over a slender wing in a supersonic flow field. Three-dimensional nonlinear analysis methods were used in the study which was divided into three parts: preliminary design, initial design, and final design. In the preliminary design, the wing planform, the design conditions, and the near-conical wing-design concept were derived, and a baseline standard wing (conventional airfoil distribution) and a baseline near-conical wing were chosen. During the initial analysis, a full-potential flow solver was employed to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline standard delta wing and to investigate modifications to the airfoil thickness, leading-edge radius, airfoil maximum-thickness position, and wing upper to lower surface asymmetry on the baseline near-conical wing. The final design employed an Euler solver to analyze the best wing configurations found in the initial design and to extend the study of wing asymmetry to develop a more refined wing. Benefits resulting from each modification are discussed, and a final 'natural flow' wing geometry was designed that provides an improvement in aerodynamic performance compared with that of a baseline conventional uncambered wing, linear-theory cambered wing, and near-conical wing.

  15. Solar-Assisted Solution-Mining Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowler, W. L.; French, R. L.; Becker, J. C. J.; Bills, J.

    1983-01-01

    Brine heated in solar pond dissolves minerals from deposits. In proposed solution-mining process, hot brine is pumped down one well and recovered at one or more other wells. Emerging brine is rich in desired mineral. Brine is evaporated in solar ponds to recover mineral.

  16. Natural optical design concepts for highly miniaturized camera systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard

    1999-08-01

    Microcameras for computers, mobile phones, watches, security system and credit cards is a very promising future market. Semiconductor industry is now able to integrate light reception, signal amplification and processing in a low- power-consuming microchip of a few mm2 size. Active pixel sensors supply each pixel in an image sensor with an individually programmable functionality. Beside the electronic receptor chip, a highly miniaturized lens system is required. Compared to the progress in microelectronics, optics has not yet made a significant step. Today's microcamera lenses are usually a downscaled version of a classical lens system and rarely smaller than 3 mm X 3 mm X 3 mm. This lagging of optics is quite surprising. Biologists have systematically studied all types of natural eye sensors since the 18th Century. Mother Nature provides a variety of highly effective examples for miniaturized imaging system. Single-aperture systems are the appropriate solution if the size is a free design parameter. If the budget is tight and optics limited to size, nature prefers multiple-aperture systems, the so-called compound eyes. As compound eyes are limited in resolution and night view, a cluster of single-aperture eyes, as jumping spiders use, is probably a better solution. The recent development in micro- optics offers the chance to imitate such natural design concepts. We have investigated miniaturized imaging systems based on microlens array and natural optical design concepts. Practical limitations for system design, packaging and assembling are given. Examples for micro-optical components and imaging systems are presented.

  17. A Review of Solution Chemistry Studies: Insights into Students? Conceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çalýk, Muammer; Ayas, Alipaşa; Ebenezer, Jazlin V.

    2005-03-01

    This study has reviewed the last two decades of student conception research in solution chemistry pertaining to aims, methods of exploring students' conception, general knowledge claims, students' conceptions and difficulties, and conceptual change studies. The aims of solution chemistry studies have been to assess students' understanding level of solution chemistry and in some studies compare understanding based on age and year at school or college. The methods of exploring students' conceptions consisted of interviews, paper and pencil surveys (open-ended questions and multiple-choice questions), free writing and drawings and the validity of these methods have been highlighted. The general knowledge claims synthesized in this study are students' (a) attending to mechanical events, (b) preference for everyday language usage over chemical language, (c) confusing solution chemistry with non-related concepts, (d) lack of sub-microscopic explanation for macroscopic observation, (e) difficulty with visualizing and representing sub-microscopic ideas, (f) difficulty with symbolic representations, (g) inconsistent explanations, (h) development of student understanding with age, and (i) development of conservation reasoning with age. To incorporate students' conceptions, conceptual change studies have used strategies such as worksheet, analogy, collaboratively working with a teacher, hypermedia, and group exploration. The results of conceptual change studies generally have had a positive impact enabling students to consider their ideas and develop plausible models of solution chemistry. For improvement of student learning in chemistry, this review of solution chemistry studies sheds light on teacher thinking and capacity building with respect to explicitly incorporating students' conceptions into chemistry curriculum; practicing research-based strategies; forging links among types of chemical knowledge; collaborating for experimental teaching; and conducting further

  18. Kindergarten Teachers' Conceptions about Nature and the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flogaitis, Evgenia; Agelidou, Evagelia

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out within the framework of environmental education (EE) and its object was the recording, categorization and interpretation of kindergarten teachers' conceptions about two basic concepts: nature and the environment, which are key concepts of environmental education. The study involved the participation of 110 public…

  19. The Fuzzy Nature Of Concepts: Stochastic Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Megaklis Th.

    2010-09-01

    Concept is every assignment of a prototype to an icon, whatever may be the prototype or the icon. We call the prototype "object" and the icon "attributes". Concepts are couples of sets O and A, that is assignments, of the object O (a set of none, or one or more elements -there is no real difference), to the set A of (their common) attributes. The objects change according to the sequence of attributes. So, only couples of objects and attributes, enriched with the proper operations, are adequate for our Knowledge Space. Concepts are proved to have the structure (order) of a Boolean Algebra(Lattice), which is more complex than linear or hierarchical ones. The lattice is created by two algebraic operations ("intersection of concepts" as the multiplication and "symmetric-difference(!) of concepts" as the addition (!)). There are two other operations (the "union of two concepts" and the "complement of a concept"). Intersection and union(which cannot play the role of multiplication) express similarities, while the other two operations express dissimilarities. Union, intersection and the complement are used for the definition of the symmetric-difference. The complement cannot be expressed by the two predefined operations union and intersection, which have the meaning of "common". Besides, it is not a deterministic function: the complement Oc may have attributes inside the complement Ac of attributes (and if yes, we do not know, from the beginning, which of them). Now, the situation becomes stochastic: if Ω' is the set of n attributes we are interested in (e.g., in m sequential experiments), suppose that, in each experiment, some attributes appear(are detected) and the rest from Ω' do not appear. Everyone from the m experiments consists of n Bernulli trials (one for every attribute) and, consequently, we get m stochastically changing objects (concepts) and the (complete, if we are very lucky) lattice of the m concepts. Everyone from the n attributes corresponds to a B

  20. Threshold concepts: implications for the management of natural resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Gross, John

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts can have broad relevance in natural resource management. However, the concept of ecological thresholds has not been widely incorporated or adopted in management goals. This largely stems from the uncertainty revolving around threshold levels and the post hoc analyses that have generally been used to identify them. Natural resource managers have a need for new tools and approaches that will help them assess the existence and detection of conditions that demand management actions. Recognition of additional threshold concepts include: utility thresholds (which are based on human values about ecological systems) and decision thresholds (which reflect management objectives and values and include ecological knowledge about a system) as well as ecological thresholds. All of these concepts provide a framework for considering the use of threshold concepts in natural resource decision making.

  1. Exploring Prospective Teachers' Worldviews and Conceptions of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Shiang-Yao; Lederman, Norman G.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the relationship, if any, between an individual's culturally based worldviews and conceptions of nature of science. In addition, the implications of this relationship (or lack of relationship) for science teaching and learning are discussed. Participants were 54 Taiwanese prospective science teachers. Their conceptions of…

  2. The nature of dissection: Exploring student conceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Katharine

    The model of conceptual change in science describes the process of learning as a complete restructuring of knowledge, when learners discover or are shown more plausible, intelligent alternatives to existing conceptions. Emotions have been acknowledged as part of a learner's conceptual ecology, but the effects of emotions on learning have yet to be described. This research was conducted to examine the role that emotions have on learning for thirteen high school students, as they dissected cats in a Human Anatomy and Physiology class. The project also investigated whether a student's emotional reactions may be used to develop a sense of connectedness with the nonhuman world, which is defined as ecological literacy. This study utilized a grounded theory approach, in which student responses to interviews were the primary source of data. Interviews were transcribed, and responses were coded according to a constant comparative method of analysis. Responses were compared with the four conditions necessary for conceptual change to occur, and also to five principles of ecological literacy. Students who had negative reactions to dissection participated less in the activity, and demonstrated less conceptual change. Two female students showed the strongest emotional reactions to dissection, and also the lowest amount of conceptual change. One male student also had strong negative reactions to death, and showed no conceptual change. The dissection experiences of the students in this study did not generally reflect ecological principles. The two students whose emotional reactions to dissection were the most negative demonstrated the highest degree of ecological literacy. These results provide empirical evidence of the effects that emotions have on learning, and also supports the opinions of educators who do not favor dissection, because it does not teach students to respect all forms of life.

  3. Solution dynamics of synthetic and natural polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Wendy E.

    Polyelectrolytes are abundant in nature and essential to life, and used extensively in industry. This work discussed two polyelectrolytes: sodium poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonate) (NaPAMS), synthetic polyelectrolyte, and sodium hyaluronate (NaHA), a glycosaminoglycan. Rheological data of NaPAMS solutions of variable chain length and concentration were reported. A strong dependence of viscosity eta on chain length: eta ˜ M2.4 was found. The comparison of the rheological data with two proposed scaling theories (Dobrynin 1995, Witten 1987) forces the conclusion that neither theory is correct. A possible interpretation of the viscosity data falling between the predictions of the two scaling theories is that some chain rigidity may persist beyond the correlation length. A sample model for the conductivity of semidilute polyelectrolytes with no added salt was presented. The model correctly describes the logarithmic decrease of specific conductance observed for many polyelectrolytes at low concentration (below ca. 10-2M), and is in good agreement with data from NaPAMS solutions. NaHA in phosphate buffered saline behaves as a typical polyelectrolyte in the high-salt limit, as Newtonian viscosities are observed over a wide range of shear rates. There is no evidence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding causing gel formation in NaHA solutions without protein present. The viscosity of 3 mg/mL NaHA was measured in the presence of the selected anti-inflammatory agents. Of the seven additives investigated only (D)-penicillamine significantly altered the rheology of HA. (D)-Penicillamine dramatically reduced the viscosity of HA, probably by disrupting intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The plasma proteins albumin and gamma-globulins bind to HA in solution to form a weak reversible gel. The rheology and osmotic pressure of the simple model for synovial fluid, consisting of 3mg/mL NaHA, 11 mg/mL albumin, and 7 mg/mL gamma-globulins in phosphate buffered saline, were studied

  4. On natural solutal convection in magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. S.; Pshenichnikov, A. F.

    2015-09-01

    An experiment was carried out to investigate natural solutal convection in a magnetic fluid caused by non-homogeneous initial distribution of colloidal particles in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell. For experiment, we used a dilute magnetic fluid of the "magnetite-kerosene-oleic acid" type. The initial distribution of particles was formed by magnetophoresis of the drop-like aggregates and their sedimentation on the surface of the diamagnetic disk located in the center of the cell. Application of the magnetic field on the system led to the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and formation of descending convective jets. The velocity of the flow at the front of descending jets was measured for different values of cell thickness (up to 0.18 mm) and strength of the magnetic field generating the drop-like aggregates (up to 21 kA/m). The solutal Rayleigh numbers varied in the range Ra = 50-105. It was shown that the intensity of the convective flow characterized by the Reynolds number Re, increases with the Rayleigh number according to the power law: Re = 1.16 × 10-5Ra0.86.

  5. Solution Concepts for Distributed Decision-Making without Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beling, Peter A.; Patek, Stephen D.

    2005-01-01

    Consider a single-stage problem in which we have a group N agents who are attempting to minimize the expected cost of their joint actions, without the benefit of communication or a pre-established protocol but with complete knowledge of the expected cost of any joint set of actions for the group. We call this situation a static coordination problem. The central issue in defining an appropriate solution concept for static coordination problems is considering how to deal with the fact that if the agents axe faced with a set of multiple (mixed) strategies that are equally attractive in terms of cost, a failure of coordination may lead to an expected cost value that is worse than that of any of the strategies in the set. In this proposal, we describe the notion of a general coordination problem, describe initial efforts at developing a solution concept for static coordination problems, and then outline a research agenda that centers on activities that will be basis for obtaining a complete understanding of solutions to static coordination problems.

  6. Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Conceptions of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buaraphan, Khajornsak

    2011-01-01

    Understanding of NOS (nature of science) appears as a prerequisite of a scientifically literate person. Promoting adequate understanding of NOS in pre-service physics teachers is, therefore, an important task of science educators. Before doing that, science educators must have information concerning their pre-service teachers' conceptions of NOS.…

  7. Turkish Primary Students' Conceptions about the Particulate Nature of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmen, Haluk

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine 4th, 5th, and 6th grade primary students' conceptions about the particulate nature of matter in daily-life events. Five questions were asked of students and interviews were used to collect data. The interviews were conducted with 12 students, four students from each grade, after they finished the formal…

  8. Concepts and implementations of natural language query systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Liu, I-Hsiung

    1984-01-01

    The currently developed user language interfaces of information systems are generally intended for serious users. These interfaces commonly ignore potentially the largest user group, i.e., casual users. This project discusses the concepts and implementations of a natural query language system which satisfy the nature and information needs of casual users by allowing them to communicate with the system in the form of their native (natural) language. In addition, a framework for the development of such an interface is also introduced for the MADAM (Multics Approach to Data Access and Management) system at the University of Southwestern Louisiana.

  9. Green Extraction of Natural Products: Concept and Principles

    PubMed Central

    Chemat, Farid; Vian, Maryline Abert; Cravotto, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    The design of green and sustainable extraction methods of natural products is currently a hot research topic in the multidisciplinary area of applied chemistry, biology and technology. Herein we aimed to introduce the six principles of green-extraction, describing a multifaceted strategy to apply this concept at research and industrial level. The mainstay of this working protocol are new and innovative technologies, process intensification, agro-solvents and energy saving. The concept, principles and examples of green extraction here discussed, offer an updated glimpse of the huge technological effort that is being made and the diverse applications that are being developed. PMID:22942724

  10. Children's Concepts of Natural Phenomena: Use of a Cognitive Mapping Approach to Describe These Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, Richard M.

    Reported is a study based on the summary findings of a series of studies which indicated that many children who receive organized instruction designed around the few major concepts of science do, in fact, use scientific models to explain their observations of natural phenomena. The instruction that children in the study received was delivered by…

  11. "The City Snuffs out Nature": Young People's Conceptions of and Relationship with Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pointon, Pam

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a study of 384 13-14-year olds' written responses to open-ended questions about their understanding of and relationship with "nature." Using constant comparative method the responses were coded, categorised and themed. Most students held scientific conceptions of nature (excluding humans) and a utilitarian…

  12. The Nature and Variability of Children's Alternative Conceptions of Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Uyen Adelyn

    In recent years a large amount of research has focused on the alternative conceptions about evolution found among secondary and university students, but few studies have investigated younger students' ideas on this subject. The present study examines the alternative conceptions of evolution harbored by second and third-grade students who participated in a summer instructional course that scaffolded the mechanisms of natural selection through cases of microevolution. In order to identify the categories of alternative conceptions that students expressed, 60 sets of pre- and posttest structured interviews were analyzed, and these showed that participants in this study expressed alternative conceptions closely related to those identified in studies conducted using high school and college-age participants. The results demonstrated a variability of alternative conceptions across a range of interview items, and also revealed how contextual features in the assessment tasks may account for the patterns that emerged in students' responses. Students' evocations of alternative conceptions declined after their participation in the instructional course. The analyses of the four case study students, whose pre-and posttest patterns were representative of their cohorts, provided a detailed within-subject look at how these alternative conceptions occurred in the context of the interview items and how they changed from pre- to posttest. These findings have broad relevance to understanding conceptual development in young children and important implications both for considering at how early an age instruction about evolutionary biology should begin and for evaluating the potential long-term impact of a curriculum that targets sources of student difficulty at earlier grade levels.

  13. Monitoring the Impact of Solution Concepts within a Given Problematic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallucci, Denis; Rousselot, François; Zanni, Cecilia

    It is acknowledged that one of the most critical issues facing today’s organizations concerns the substantial leaps required to methodologically structure innovation. Among other published work, some suggest that a complete rethinking of current practices is required. In this article, we propose a methodology aiming at providing controlled R&D choices based on a monitoring of the impact Solution Concepts provoke on a problematic situation. Initially this problematic situation is modeled in a graph form, namely a Problem Graph. It has the objective to assists R&D managers when choosing which activities to support and bring them concrete arguments to defend their choices. We postulate that by improving the robustness of such approaches we help deciders to switch from intuitive decisions (mostly built upon their past experiences, fear regarding risks, and awareness of the company’s level of acceptance of novelties) to thoroughly constructed inventive problem solving strategies. Our approach will be discussed using a computer application that illustrates our hypothesis after being tested in several industrial applications.

  14. The concept of nature in Islamic science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarman, Wendi

    2016-02-01

    Science teaching is basically value laden activities. One of the values tells that science is not related to any religion. This secular value is reflected to science teaching in many places, including religious country like Indonesia. However, we argue that in Indonesia science teaching should not be secular as in the Western country since one of the basic aim of National Education according to the Indonesian constitution Undang-Undang Dasar 1945, is to inculcate faith and god-fearing to One God Almighty. As we know, Indonesia is a Moslem country and has many Islamic schools in it too. Thus, it is important to design a science teaching framework base on Islamic teaching to fulfill the basic aim of National Education This paper discusses concept of nature, the key term in science, based on Islamic view that may used as a framework to develop Islamic science teaching. In Islam, science has a strong relation to religion since nature reflects the existence of the Creator. This concept is derived from the analysis of several verses from Qur'an as the main source of Islamic teaching. There are several principle can be derived from this analysis. Firstly, visible world is not the only world, but there is also the unseen world. Secondly, the nature is not merely matter that doesn't have any sacred value, but it is the indication or symbol of God existence and His Nature. Thirdly, The Qur'an and the nature are both Books of Allah that contain messages of Him, so they are complementary to each other

  15. Undergraduate Students' Conceptions of Natural and Anthropogenic Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenbath, K. L.

    2011-12-01

    constructed definition removes human-causes from association with the word "climate change", which may influence their climate change understanding. Of the two higher achieving students, one emphasized anthropogenic climate change at the beginning of the semester, but later focused on natural climate change during his interviews. The other high achieving student included tangential environmental topics in her descriptions of climate change throughout the entire semester, thus conflating climate change's definition. These alternative definitions of climate change indicate that the learners constructed hybrid conceptions in order to incorporate class content with their prior ideas. These hybrid conceptions indicate that the students' understandings lie somewhere between misconceptions and conceptual change. Since the students demonstrated these hybrid conceptions at the end of class, perhaps more time is needed for the students to process the information. These case studies identify the gaps the professor should address for conceptual change to fully occur.

  16. Application of natural laminar flow to a supersonic transport concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhrmann, Henri D.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a preliminary investigation into an application of supersonic natural laminar flow (NLF) technology for a high speed civil transport (HSCT) configuration. This study focuses on natural laminar flow without regard to suction devices which are required for laminar flow control (LFC) or hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC). An HSCT design is presented with a 70 deg inboard leading-edge sweep and a 20 deg leading-edge outboard crank to obtain NLF over the outboard crank section. This configuration takes advantage of improved subsonic performance and NLF on the low-sweep portion of the wing while minimizing the wave drag and induced drag penalties associated with low-sweep supersonic cruise aircraft. In order to assess the benefits of increasing natural laminar flow wetted area, the outboard low-sweep wing area is parametrically increased. Using a range of supersonic natural laminar flow transition Reynolds numbers, these aircraft are then optimized and sized for minimum take-off gross weight (TOGW) subject to mission constraints. Results from this study indicate reductions in TOGW for the NLF concepts, due mainly to reductions in wing area and total wing weight. Furthermore, significant reductions in block fuel are calculated throughout the range of transition Reynolds numbers considered. Observations are made on the benefits of unsweeping the wingtips with all turbulent flow.

  17. What's Natural about Nature? Deceptive Concepts in Socio-Scientific Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Mats Gunnar; Linder, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The conflicts between nature and nurture are brought to the fore and challenges socio-scientific decision-making in science education. The multitude of meanings of these concepts and their roles in societal discourses can impede students' development of understanding for different perspectives, e.g. on gene technology. This study problematizes…

  18. Metabiotics: novel idea or natural development of probiotic conception

    PubMed Central

    Shenderov, Boris A.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, probiotics on the base of live microorganisms are considered to be both beneficial and safe. Unfortunately, their effects may have short-term success or are absent or uncertain. Some symbiotic (probiotic) microorganisms with known beneficial health affects may cause opportunistic infections, increase incidence of allergic sensitization and autoimmune disorders, produce microecological imbalance, modify gene expression, transfer antibiotic resistant and virulence genes, cause disorders in epigenome and genome integrity, induce chromosomal DNA damage, and activate signaling pathways associated with cancer and other chronic diseases. The commercially available probiotics should be considered as a first generation means of correcting microecological disorders. Further, their development will include the selection of natural metabiotics and/or working out the synthetic (or semi-synthetic) metabiotics that will be analogies or improved copies of natural bioactives, produced by symbiotic (probiotic) microorganisms. Metabiotics are the structural components of probiotic microorganisms and/or their metabolites and/or signaling molecules with a determined (known) chemical structure that can optimize host-specific physiological functions, regulator, metabolic and/or behavior reactions connected with the activity of host indigenous microbiota. Metabiotics have some advantages because of their exact chemical structure, well dosed, very safe and long shelf-life. Thus, now metabiotics should not consider myth; they are the result of the natural evolution of probiotic conception. PMID:23990841

  19. Constructing Concept Schemes From Astronomical Telegrams Via Natural Language Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew; Zhang, M.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Donalek, C.; Drake, A. J.; Mahabal, A.

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly emerging field of time domain astronomy is one of the most exciting and vibrant new research frontiers, ranging in scientific scope from studies of the Solar System to extreme relativistic astrophysics and cosmology. It is being enabled by a new generation of large synoptic digital sky surveys - LSST, PanStarrs, CRTS - that cover large areas of sky repeatedly, looking for transient objects and phenomena. One of the biggest challenges facing these is the automated classification of transient events, a process that needs machine-processible astronomical knowledge. Semantic technologies enable the formal representation of concepts and relations within a particular domain. ATELs (http://www.astronomerstelegram.org) are a commonly-used means for reporting and commenting upon new astronomical observations of transient sources (supernovae, stellar outbursts, blazar flares, etc). However, they are loose and unstructured and employ scientific natural language for description: this makes automated processing of them - a necessity within the next decade with petascale data rates - a challenge. Nevertheless they represent a potentially rich corpus of information that could lead to new and valuable insights into transient phenomena. This project lies in the cutting-edge field of astrosemantics, a branch of astroinformatics, which applies semantic technologies to astronomy. The ATELs have been used to develop an appropriate concept scheme - a representation of the information they contain - for transient astronomy using hierarchical clustering of processed natural language. This allows us to automatically organize ATELs based on the vocabulary used. We conclude that we can use simple algorithms to process and extract meaning from astronomical textual data.

  20. Usage of Stereo Orthoimage in Gis: Old Concept, Modern Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyka, K.; Słota, M.; Twardowski, M.

    2012-07-01

    The main goal of this paper is to find answer for two questions: why stereo orthoimage (orthophoto) was forgotten, and furthermore, what conditions have to be fulfilled for this particular technique to be reanimated? Stereo orthophoto concept was first introduced by Collins, during late seventies of last century (Colins, 1968). It has ignited huge interest, and many researchers were looking forward for its development (Blachut 1976, Kraus et al. 1976). However, after around twenty years, interest in stereo-orthophoto has shrunk, and during eighties of XX century it was almost extinct. Despite of fact that digital photogrammetry provides better conditions for it now than ever, it has never got chance for reactivation. There was but few papers about stereo orthoimage, and they are proposing continuous stereo ortho-mosaic generation while preserving its metric value (Li et al 2002, Wang 2004). Reasons of downfall of this interest were examined, and it has been concluded that the main cause was usage of this technique in conjunction with analog photogrammetry. The radiometric value of orthophotomaps and stereo components developed on photosensitive paper were very low during that time. Equipment for observation and measurement were simply very big and therefore impractical. Authors have concluded, that nowadays sum of gains outweighs its flaws and it is reason enough to go back to it. But in a time of digital vector 3D models there is a need for proper strategy for popularization stereo orthophoto. Main point of this strategy would be encapsulating stereo orthoimage method into GIS tools, optimally open source. GIS have large numbers of consumers whom regard for orthophotomap (or orthoimage) is very high. If they were to be proposed with possibility of using stereo orthoimage inside a GIS tool, as a complementary to the orthophotomap, probably they would recon how much stereoscopy helps with interpretation of an image. Authors have planned to develop software for

  1. Energy Literacy: A Natural and Essential Part of a Solutions-Based Approach to Climate Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inman, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    As with climate science topics, many Americans have misconceptions or gaps in understanding related to energy topics. Recent literacy efforts are geared to address these gaps in understanding. The U.S. Global Change Research Program's recently published "Energy Literacy: Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts for Energy Education" offers a welcome complement to the Climate Literacy Essential Principles released in 2008. Research and experience suggest that education, communication and outreach about global climate change and related topics is best done using a solutions-based approach. Energy is a natural and effective topic to frame these solutions around. Used as a framework for designing curricula, Energy Literacy naturally leads to solutions-based approaches to Climate Change education. An inherently interdisciplinary topic, energy education must happen in the context of both the natural and social sciences. The Energy Literacy Essential Principles reflect this and open the door to curriculum that integrates the two.

  2. Concept of CFD model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, T.

    2014-03-01

    The article deals with the development of CFD model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow. The physical phenomena taking place within a natural draft wet cooling tower are described by the system of conservation law equations along with additional equations. The heat and mass transfer in the counterflow wet-cooling tower fill are described by model [1] which is based on the system of ordinary differential equations. Utilization of model [1] of the fill allows us to apply commonly measured fill characteristics as shown by [2].The boundary value problem resulting from the fill model is solved separately. The system of conservation law equations is interlinked with the system of ordinary differential equations describing the phenomena occurring in the counterflow wet-cooling tower fill via heat and mass sources and via boundary conditions. The concept of numerical solution is presented for the quasi one dimensional model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow. The simulation results are shown.

  3. Nature is (a) mine: conceptions of nature in the Dutch ecogenomics community.

    PubMed

    Van der Hout, Sanne

    2014-12-01

    Every field of science, but especially biology, contains particular conceptions of nature. These conceptions are not merely epistemological or ontological, but also have normative dimensions; they provide an ethos, a framework for moral orientation. These normative dimensions, whilst often remaining 'hidden' and inarticulate, influence the way in which biologists practice their profession. In this paper, I explore what happens when different versions of these implicit normative frameworks collide. To do so, I will focus on a case study from the field of ecological genomics as it has evolved in one particular country, namely the Netherlands. During an important inaugural meeting, the director of one of the most sizeable Dutch ecogenomics centres gave a presentation in which he introduced the term 'nature mining'. Part of the audience immediately embraced the term, but others were very reluctant. This mixed response is generally explained as a culmination of growing tension about the future direction of the field: due to new funding demands, a shift had occurred from fundamental research to research more interested in 'valorisation'.In addition to this current interpretation, I will argue that the turmoil caused by the use of the term 'nature mining' also reveals a more fundamental difference between the various parties involved in the Dutch ecogenomics community. This term is part of a vocabulary that emphasises the beneficial 'goods' produced by nature. Whereas part of the audience saw no harm in this commodification of nature, others had difficulties with the reduction of nature to a reservoir to be exploited using the latest technologies. I will conclude by arguing that, although at present, the core of Dutch ecogenomics research reflects a more or less instrumental attitude towards nature, the field also harbours other interpretations of nature as a significant and meaningful order. For instance, ecogenomics might further develop the image of land as a

  4. Photodegradation of triazine herbicides in aqueous solutions and natural waters.

    PubMed

    Evgenidou, E; Fytianos, K

    2002-10-23

    The photodegradation of three triazines, atrazine, simazine, and prometryn, in aqueous solutions and natural waters using UV radiation (lambda > 290 nm) has been studied. Experimental results showed that the dark reactions were negligible. The rate of photodecomposition in aqueous solutions depends on the nature of the triazines and follows first-order kinetics. In the case of the use of hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation, a synergistic effect was observed. The number of photodegradation products detected, using FIA/MS and FIA/MS/MS techniques, suggests the existence of various degradation routes resulting in complex and interconnected pathways. PMID:12381128

  5. Advanced control concepts. [trim solution for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, M. F.; Friedland, B.

    1973-01-01

    The selection of a trim solution that provides the space shuttle with the highest level of performance and dynamic control in the presense of wind disturbances and bias torques due to misalignment of rocket engines is described. It was determined that engine gimballing is insufficient to provide control to trim the vehicle for headwind and sidewind disturbances, and that it is necessary to use aerodynamic surfaces in conjunction with engine gimballing to achieve trim. The algebraic equations for computing the trim solution were derived from the differential equations describing the motion of the vehicle by substituting the desired trim conditions. The general problem of showing how the trim equations are derived from the equations of motion and the mathematical forms of the performance criterion is discussed in detail, along with the general equations for studying the dynamic response of the trim solution.

  6. MODELLING OF AGRICHEMICALS IN ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARTMENTS - CONCEPTS, PROBLEMS, AND SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential of plant protection chemicals to migrate away from application sites and expose non-target biota is of continuing interest and concern to regulatory specialists, ecotoxicologists, agriculturalists, and natural resource managers. Regulatory decisions can wait upon ne...

  7. Teaching Concepts of Natural Sciences to Foreigners through Content-Based Instruction: The Adjunct Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satilmis, Yilmaz; Yakup, Doganay; Selim, Guvercin; Aybarsha, Islam

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates three models of content-based instruction in teaching concepts and terms of natural sciences in order to increase the efficiency of teaching these kinds of concepts in realization and to prove that the content-based instruction is a teaching strategy that helps students understand concepts of natural sciences. Content-based…

  8. The interstellar conundrum: a survey of concepts and proposed solutions.

    PubMed

    Gilster, Paul A

    2005-12-01

    Once considered intractable, the problem of interstellar flight is slowly yielding to analysis. Although manned missions to the stars are exceedingly improbable in this century, the possibility of interstellar robotic probes should not be ruled out. Recent laboratory work and theoretical analysis suggest several near-term technologies that could, given the development of an adequate space-based infrastructure, provide the needed propulsion. Laser-driven lightsails offer the key advantage of leaving the fuel behind, with the laser beam focused by a large Fresnel lens in the outer Solar System. Perhaps more efficient is the use of a particle beam to boost a spacecraft by interacting with its magnetic sail, the latter a system already under intense scrutiny. Variations on "pellet" propulsion using macroscopic objects continue to surface, their mass converted to energy as they arrive at the departing starship. Interstellar flight will be both difficult and expensive, although it can no longer be considered an impossibility. This paper examines the above concepts and relates them to older ideas, such as the Bussard ramjet, that are currently out of favor. The vibrancy of interstellar flight studies is its syncretism-it was through analysis of the drag problem in fusion ramjet designs that a practical means of decelerating an interstellar probe by deployment of a magnetic sail emerged. The intermingling of such ideas offers the hope of robust hybrid concepts that may make interstellar flight a reality. PMID:16510426

  9. Streamwise-Localized Solutions with natural 1-fold symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Willis, Ashley; Hof, Björn

    2014-11-01

    It has been proposed in recent years that turbulence is organized around unstable invariant solutions, which provide the building blocks of the chaotic dynamics. In direct numerical simulations of pipe flow we show that when imposing a minimal symmetry constraint (reflection in an axial plane only) the formation of turbulence can indeed be explained by dynamical systems concepts. The hypersurface separating laminar from turbulent motion, the edge of turbulence, is spanned by the stable manifolds of an exact invariant solution, a periodic orbit of a spatially localized structure. The turbulent states themselves (turbulent puffs in this case) are shown to arise in a bifurcation sequence from a related localized solution (the upper branch orbit). The rather complex bifurcation sequence involves secondary Hopf bifurcations, frequency locking and a period doubling cascade until eventually turbulent puffs arise. In addition we report preliminary results of the transition sequence for pipe flow without symmetry constraints.

  10. [Mouthwash solutions with microencapsuled natural extracts: Efficiency for dental plaque and gingivitis].

    PubMed

    Vervelle, A; Mouhyi, J; Del Corso, M; Hippolyte, M-P; Sammartino, G; Dohan Ehrenfest, D M

    2010-06-01

    Mouthwash solutions are mainly used for their antiseptic properties. They currently include synthetic agents (chlorhexidine, triclosan, etc.) or essential oils (especially Listerine). Many natural extracts may also be used. These associate both antiseptic effects and direct action on host response, due to their antioxidant, immunoregulatory, analgesic, buffering, or healing properties. The best known are avocado oil, manuka oil, propolis oil, grapefruit seed extract, pycnogenol, aloe vera, Q10 coenzyme, green tea, and megamin. The development of new technologies, such as microencapsulation (GingiNat concept), may allow an in situ slow release of active ingredients during several hours, and open new perspectives for mouthwash solutions. PMID:20605180

  11. Emerging Modeling Concepts and Solutions in Stem Cell Research.

    PubMed

    Papatsenko, Dmitri; Lemischka, Ihor R

    2016-01-01

    Modern stem cell research, as well as other fields of contemporary biology involves quantitative sciences in many ways. Identifying candidates for key differentiation or reprogramming factors, tracing global transcriptome changes, or finding drugs is now broadly involves bioinformatics and biostatistics. However, the next key step, understanding the underlying reasons and establishing causal links leading to differentiation or reprogramming requires qualitative and quantitative biological models describing complex biological systems. Currently, quantitative modeling is a challenging science, capable to deliver rather modest results or predictions. What model types are the most popular and what features of stem cell behavior they are capturing? What new insights do we expect from the computational modeling of stem cells in the foreseeable future? Current review attempts to approach these essential questions by considering published quantitative models and solutions emerging in the area of stem cell research. PMID:26970649

  12. School Students' Conceptions about Biodiversity Loss: Definitions, Reasons, Results and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilinc, Ahmet; Yeşiltaş, Namik Kemal; Kartal, Tezcan; Demiral, Ümit; Eroğlu, Baris

    2013-12-01

    Environmental degradation stemming from anthropocentric causes threatens the biodiversity more than ever before, leading scholars to warn governments about the impending consequences of biodiversity loss (BL). At this point, it is of great importance to study the public's conceptions of BL in order to identify significant educational implications. However, a review of the literature reveals a relatively small body of research about the public understanding of BL. In this qualitative study, we thus strived to elicit Turkish school students' conceptions about BL using a written questionnaire including open-ended questions with respect to the definition of biodiversity as well as reasons for, results of and solutions to BL. The sample consisted of 245 school students in a relatively small city. A two-staged content analysis was run on the responses. The results showed that school students most commonly preferred species-focused definitions of biodiversity and understood BL through such various conceptual patterns as, `balance of nature', `forest', `global warming', `hunting' and `indirect conservation'. At the end of the paper, the possible educational implications and future perspectives were discussed.

  13. The Nature of Scientific Conceptions: A Discursive Psychological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2008-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the literature in science education has accumulated a tremendous amount of research on students' conceptions--one bibliography currently lists 7000 entries concerning students' and teachers' conceptions and science education. Yet despite all of this research and all the advances in the associated conceptual change…

  14. The Concept of Need: Its Hedonistic and Logical Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattimore-Knudson, Russell

    1983-01-01

    Descriptions and clarifications of the concept of need have not included some of the problems inherent in the use of the term or implied by the term. This paper addresses the logical problem of the concept of need as a "referent" term and its hedonistic implications. (Author/SSH)

  15. Solution of naturally-occurring glasses in the geological environment

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, B.P.

    1982-12-01

    As part of a study to investigate the feasibility of putting nuclear wastes in glass containers and burying them on land or dumping them in the ocean, we have made a study of the amount of solution experienced by naturally occurring glasses from two land sites and thirty-four deep-sea sites. The glasses used in this study are microtektites from three strewn fields (Australasian, Ivory Coast, and North American) and from the Zhamanshin impact crater in southern Siberia. The microtektites range in age from 0.7 to 35 m.y. and they have a wide range in composition. Although several criteria for determining the amount of solution were considered, most of the conclusions are based on two criteria: (1) width of cracks, and (2) elevation of silica-rich inclusions above the adjacent microtektite surface. The amount of solution was determined for about 170 microtektites; and measured amounts of solution range from 0.2 to at least 28 {mu}m, but most are less than 5 {mu}m. There appears to be no systematic relationship between age and amount of solution. 21 refs., 7 tabs.

  16. ARPA-E: Creating Practical, Affordable Natural Gas Storage Solutions

    ScienceCinema

    Boysen, Dane; Loukus, Josh; Hansen, Rita

    2014-03-13

    Allowing people to refuel natural gas vehicles at home could revolutionize the way we power our cars and trucks. Currently, our nation faces two challenges in enabling natural gas for transportation. The first is improving the way gas tanks are built for natural gas vehicles; they need to be conformable, allowing them to fit tightly into the vehicle. The second challenge is improving the way those tanks are refueled while maintaining cost-effectiveness, safety, and reliability. This video highlights two ARPA-E project teams with innovative solutions to these challenges. REL is addressing the first challenge by developing a low-cost, conformable natural gas tank with an interconnected core structure. Oregon State University and OnBoard Dynamics are addressing the second challenge by developing a self-refueling natural gas vehicle that integrates a compressor into its engine-using one of the engine's cylinders to compress gas eliminates the need for an expensive at-home refueling system. These two distinct technologies from ARPA-E's MOVE program illustrate how the Agency takes a multi-pronged approach to problem solving and innovation.

  17. ARPA-E: Creating Practical, Affordable Natural Gas Storage Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane; Loukus, Josh; Hansen, Rita

    2014-02-24

    Allowing people to refuel natural gas vehicles at home could revolutionize the way we power our cars and trucks. Currently, our nation faces two challenges in enabling natural gas for transportation. The first is improving the way gas tanks are built for natural gas vehicles; they need to be conformable, allowing them to fit tightly into the vehicle. The second challenge is improving the way those tanks are refueled while maintaining cost-effectiveness, safety, and reliability. This video highlights two ARPA-E project teams with innovative solutions to these challenges. REL is addressing the first challenge by developing a low-cost, conformable natural gas tank with an interconnected core structure. Oregon State University and OnBoard Dynamics are addressing the second challenge by developing a self-refueling natural gas vehicle that integrates a compressor into its engine-using one of the engine's cylinders to compress gas eliminates the need for an expensive at-home refueling system. These two distinct technologies from ARPA-E's MOVE program illustrate how the Agency takes a multi-pronged approach to problem solving and innovation.

  18. Teaching the Nature of Science through the Concept of Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Byoung-Sug; McKinney, Mary

    2007-01-01

    By virtue of its connection with scientific literacy, the nature of science has been considered essential subject matter for the science curriculum. With this in mind, seventh-grade students were introduced to three aspects of the nature of science: (1) the distinction between observation and inference, (2) the subjective, and (3) the tentative…

  19. Solution of naturally-ocurring glasses in the geological environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. P.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a study to investigate the feasibility of putting nuclear wastes in glass containers and burying them on land or dumping them in the ocean, the amount of solution experience by naturally occurring glasses from two land sites and thirty-four deep sea sites was studied. The glasses are microtektites from three strewn fields and from the Zhamanshin impact crater. The microtektites range in age from 0.7 to 35 m.y. and have a wide range in composition. The weight percent SiO2, for example, ranges from 44.8 to 81.7. Although several criteria for determining the amount of solution were considered, most of the conclusions are based on two criteria: (1) width of cracks, and (2) elevation of silica rich inclusions above the adjacent microtektite surface. All the measurements were made on scanning electron microscope photomicrographs of the microtektites.

  20. Conceptions of Human Nature, Educational Practice, and Individual Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looft, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature-nurture controversy as a manifestation of the underlying assumptions of American education. Suggests these assumptions are neither desirable nor necessary for our society and educational system. (ST)

  1. Registered nurses' constructed meaning of concepts of solution and their use in clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

    1991-12-01

    Since the introduction of nursing into tertiary institutions in Australia in 1975, there has been increasing interest in the teaching of physical science to nurses. Various courses in physical science for nurse students have been developed. They vary in length and content but there is agreement that concepts taught should be closely related to nursing applications. The choice of relevant concepts tends to be made by individual curriculum developers. This paper reports an examination of the use of physical science concepts and their relevance from the perspective of registered nurses practising in general ward areas. Inherent in this study is the premise that for registered nurses to have ideas of the physical science underlying their practice they must have constructed meaning first for these concepts. Specific chemical concepts related to solutions are discussed in these terms.

  2. Developing an instrument for assessing students' concepts of the nature of technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Pey-Yan

    2015-05-01

    Background:The nature of technology has been rarely discussed despite the fact that technology plays an essential role in modern society. It is important to discuss students' concepts of the nature of technology, and further to advance their technological literacy and adaptation to modern society. There is a need to assess high school students' concepts of the nature of technology. Purpose:This study aims to engage in discourse on students' concepts of the nature of technology based on a proposed theoretical framework. Moreover, another goal is to develop an instrument for measuring students' concepts of the nature of technology. Sample:Four hundred and fifty-five high school students' perceptions of technology were qualitatively analyzed. Furthermore, 530 students' responses to a newly developed questionnaire were quantitatively analyzed in the final test. Design and method:First, content analysis was utilized to discuss and categorize students' statements regarding technology and its related issues. The Student Concepts of the Nature of Technology Questionnaire was developed based on the proposed theoretical framework and was supported by the students' qualitative data. Finally, exploratory factor analysis and reliability analysis were applied to determine the structure of the items and the internal consistency of each scale. Results:Through a process of instrument development, the Student Concepts of the Nature of Technology Questionnaire was shown to be a valid and reliable tool for measuring students' concepts of the nature of technology. This newly developed questionnaire is composed of 29 items in six scales, namely 'technology as artifacts,' 'technology as an innovation change,' 'the current role of technology in society,' 'technology as a double-edged sword,' 'technology as a science-based form,' and 'history of technology.' Conclusions:The Student Concepts of the Nature of Technology Questionnaire has been confirmed as a reasonably valid and reliable

  3. New toughening concepts for ceramic composites from rigid natural materials.

    PubMed

    Mayer, George

    2011-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying the toughening in rigid natural composites exhibited by the concentric cylindrical composites of spicules of hexactinellid sponges, and by the nacre (brick-and-mortar) structure of mollusks such as Haliotis rufescens (red abalone), as well as the crossed-lamellar structure of Strombus gigas (queen conch) show commonalities in the manner in which toughening takes place. It is proposed that crack diversion, a new kind of crack bridging, resulting in retardation of delamination, creation of new surface areas, and other energy-dissipating mechanisms occur in both natural systems. However, these are generally different from the toughening mechanisms that are utilized for other classes of structural materials. Complementary to those mechanisms found in rigid natural ceramic/organic composites, special architectures and thin viscoelastic organic layers have been found to play controlling roles in energy dissipation in these structures. PMID:21565715

  4. The Concept of Race on Campus: Exploring the Nature of College Students' Racial Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widely documented benefits associated with racial diversity in higher education, less is known about why and how race matters. A potential answer may be found in how students conceptualize race. This qualitative study explores students' underlying racial conceptions, which have been shown to influence various attitudes and…

  5. The Nature of Science in Science Curricula: Methods and Concepts of Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Sílvia; Morais, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    The article shows methods and concepts of analysis of the nature of science in science curricula through an exemplary study made in Portugal. The study analyses the extent to which the message transmitted by the Natural Science curriculum for Portuguese middle school considers the nature of science. It is epistemologically and sociologically…

  6. Fuels Containing Methane of Natural Gas in Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    While exploring ways of producing better fuels for propulsion of a spacecraft on the Mars sample return mission, a researcher at Johnson Space Center (JSC) devised a way of blending fuel by combining methane or natural gas with a second fuel to produce a fuel that can be maintained in liquid form at ambient temperature and under moderate pressure. The use of such a blended fuel would be a departure for both spacecraft engines and terrestrial internal combustion engines. For spacecraft, it would enable reduction of weights on long flights. For the automotive industry on Earth, such a fuel could be easily distributed and could be a less expensive, more efficient, and cleaner-burning alternative to conventional fossil fuels. The concept of blending fuels is not new: for example, the production of gasoline includes the addition of liquid octane enhancers. For the future, it has been commonly suggested to substitute methane or compressed natural gas for octane-enhanced gasoline as a fuel for internal-combustion engines. Unfortunately, methane or natural gas must be stored either as a compressed gas (if kept at ambient temperature) or as a cryogenic liquid. The ranges of automobiles would be reduced from their present values because of limitations on the capacities for storage of these fuels. Moreover, technical challenges are posed by the need to develop equipment to handle these fuels and, especially, to fill tanks acceptably rapidly. The JSC alternative to provide a blended fuel that can be maintained in liquid form at moderate pressure at ambient temperature has not been previously tried. A blended automotive fuel according to this approach would be made by dissolving natural gas in gasoline. The autogenous pressure of this fuel would eliminate the need for a vehicle fuel pump, but a pressure and/or flow regulator would be needed to moderate the effects of temperature and to respond to changing engine power demands. Because the fuel would flash as it entered engine

  7. Natural resource valuation: A primer on concepts and techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ulibarri, C.A.; Wellman, K.F.

    1997-07-01

    Natural resource valuation has always had a fundamental role in the practice of cost-benefit analysis of health, safety, and environmental issues. Today, this role is becoming all the more apparent in the conduct of natural resource damage assessments (NRDA) and cost-benefit analyses of environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) activities. As such, environmental professionals are more interested in how natural resource values are affected by ER and WM activities. This professional interest extends to the use of NRDA values as measures of liability and legal causes of action under such environmental status as the Clean Water Act (CWA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA, as amended); and the Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990. Also, environmental professionals are paying closer attention to NRDA values in cost-benefit analyses of risk and pollution-abatement standards, and in meeting environmental and safety standards - for achievable (ALARA). This handbook reviews natural resource valuation techniques that may be applied to resources at DOE sites within the foregoing contexts.

  8. Turkish Pupils' Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boz, Yezdan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research study is to explore year 6, 8 & 11 (13, 15 and 17 years old respectively) Turkish pupils' views about the particulate nature of matter within the context of phase changes. About 300 pupils participated in the study. Questionnaires distributed to year 6, 8 and 11 pupils included 6-item open-ended questions about (a)…

  9. Multiple Solutions Approach (MSA): Conceptions and Practices of Primary School Teachers in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabie, Michael Johnson; Raheem, Kolawole; Agbemaka, John Bijou; Sabtiwu, Rufai

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the curriculum guidelines and primary school teachers' conceptions and practices of the Multiple Solutions Approach (MSA) in teaching mathematics using basic qualitative research design. Informal conversation interviews (ICIs), observations, video and document analyses were used to collect data. Participants included a purposive…

  10. Technology Knowledge: High School Science Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waight, Noemi

    2014-01-01

    In-depth interviews guided by video elicitations examined 30 high school science teachers' conceptions of technology and by extension how these conceptions reflected dimensions of nature of technology. Altogether, 64% of the teachers characterized their schools and departments as aggressive-moderate adopters with generous access and support…

  11. Preservice Teachers' Classroom Practice and Their Conceptions of the Nature of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellado, Vicente

    1997-01-01

    Describes research conducted with student teachers of elementary and secondary science education. Analyzes and compares the preservice teachers' conceptions of science with their classroom practices when teaching a science lesson. Results indicate that there is no correspondence between student teacher conceptions of the nature of science and…

  12. Different Conceptions of the Nature of Science among Preservice Elementary Teachers of Two Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Do-Yong; Lee, Yong Bok

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the differences of the nature of science (NOS) conceptions portrayed by preservice teachers in Korea (N = 42) and the United States (N = 50). We conducted a survey of preservice elementary science teachers' NOS conceptions followed by interviews in both countries to further investigate their viewpoints. The NOS domains of this…

  13. Arguments about the nature of concepts: Symbols, embodiment, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Bradford Z; Hickok, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    How are the meanings of words, events, and objects represented and organized in the brain? This question, perhaps more than any other in the field, probes some of the deepest and most foundational puzzles regarding the structure of the mind and brain. Accordingly, it has spawned a field of inquiry that is diverse and multidisciplinary, has led to the discovery of numerous empirical phenomena, and has spurred the development of a wide range of theoretical positions. This special issue brings together the most recent theoretical developments from the leaders in the field, representing a range of viewpoints on issues of fundamental significance to a theory of meaning representation. Here we introduce the special issue by way of pulling out some key themes that cut across the contributions that form this issue and situating those themes in the broader literature. The core issues around which research on conceptual representation can be organized are representational format, representational content, the organization of concepts in the brain, and the processing dynamics that govern interactions between the conceptual system and sensorimotor representations. We highlight areas in which consensus has formed; for those areas in which opinion is divided, we seek to clarify the relation of theory and evidence and to set in relief the bridging assumptions that undergird current discussions. PMID:27282991

  14. Natural resource validation: A primer on concepts and techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ulibarri, C.A.; Wellman, K.F.

    1997-07-01

    Natural resource valuation has always had a fundamental role in the practice of cost-benefit analysis of health, safety, and environmental issues. The authors provide an objective overview of resource valuation techniques and describe their potential role in environmental restoration/waste management (ER/WM) activities at federal facilities. This handbook considers five general classes of valuation techniques: (1) market-based techniques, which rely on historical information on market prices and transactions to determine resource values; (2) nonmarket techniques that rely on indirect estimates of resource values; (3) nonmarket techniques that are based on direct estimates of resource values; (4) cross-cutting valuation techniques, which combine elements of one or more of these methods; and (5) ecological valuation techniques used in the emerging field of ecological economics. The various valuation techniques under consideration are described by highlighting their applicability in environmental management and regulation. The handbook also addresses key unresolved issues in the application of valuation techniques generally, including discounting future values, incorporating environmental equity concerns, and concerns over the uncertainties in the measurement of natural resource values and environmental risk.

  15. On the Concept of Information and Its Role in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Juan G.

    2003-03-01

    In this article we address some fundamental questions concerning information: Can the existing laws of physics adequately deal with the most striking property of information, namely to cause specific changes in the structure and energy flows of a complex system, without the information in itself representing fields, forces or energy in any of their characteristic forms? Or is information irreducible to the laws of physics and chemistry? Are information and complexity related concepts? Does the Universe, in its evolution, constantly generate new information? Or are information and information-processing exclusive attributes of living systems, related to the very definition of life? If that were the case, what happens with the physical meanings of entropy in statistical mechanics or wave function in quantum mechanics? How many distinct classes of information and information processing do exist in the biological world? How does information appear in Darwinian evolution? Does the human brain have unique properties or capabilities in terms of information processing? In what ways does information processing bring about human self-consciousness? We shall introduce the meaning of "information" in a way that is detached from human technological systems and related algorithms and semantics, and that is not based on any mathematical formula. To accomplish this we turn to the concept of interaction as the basic departing point, and identify two fundamentally different classes, with information and information-processing appearing as the key discriminator: force-field driven interactions between elementary particles and ensembles of particles in the macroscopic physical domain, and information-based interactions between certain kinds of complex systems that form the biological domain. We shall show that in an abiotic world, information plays no role; physical interactions just happen, they are driven by energy exchange between the interacting parts and do not require any

  16. Cross-sensory correspondences and naive conceptions of natural phenomena.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cross-sensory correspondences automatically intrude on performance in elaborate laboratory tasks (see Spence 2011 Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics 73 971-995, for a review). Outside such tasks, might they be responsible for some popular misconceptions about natural phenomena? Four simple demonstrations reveal how the correspondences between surface-lightness and weight, and between surface-lightness and auditory pitch, generate misconceptions about the weight and movement of objects and the vocalisations of animals. Specifically, people expect darker objects to be heavier than lighter-coloured objects, to free-fall more quickly, to roll across a table more slowly, and to make lower-pitched vocalisations when they come to life. PMID:23025164

  17. An Investigation of Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Text-Oriented Instruction on Students' Understanding of Solution Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Canpolat, Nurtac; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of conceptual change text-oriented instruction over traditional instruction on students' understanding of solution concepts (e.g., dissolving, solubility, factors affecting solubility, concentrations of solutions, types of solutions, physical properties of solutions) and their attitudes towards chemistry. The…

  18. Student conceptions of natural selection and its role in evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Beth A.; Anderson, Charles W.

    Pretests and posttests on the topic of evolution by natural selection were administered to students in a college nonmajors' biology course. Analysis of test responses revealed that most students understood evolution as a process in which species respond to environmental conditions by changing gradually over time. Student thinking differed from accepted biological theory in that (a) changes in traits were attributed to a need-driven adaptive process rather than random genetic mutation and sexual recombination, (b) no role was assigned to variation on traits within a population or differences in reproductive success, and (c) traits were seen as gradually changing in all members of a population. Although students had taken an average of 1.9 years of previous biology courses, performance on the pretest was uniformly low. There was no relationship between the amount of previous biology taken and either pretest or posttest performance. Belief in the truthfulness of evolutionary theory was also unrelated to either pretest or posttest performance. Course instruction using specially designed materials was moderately successful in improving students' understanding of the evolutionary process.

  19. Employment of Gibbs-Donnan-based concepts for interpretation of the properties of linear polyelectrolyte solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    Earlier research has shown that the acid dissociation and metal ion complexation equilibria of linear, weak-acid polyelectrolytes and their cross-linked gel analogues are similarly sensitive to the counterion concentration levels of their solutions. Gibbs-Donnan-based concepts, applicable to the gel, are equally applicable to the linear polyelectrolyte for the accommodation of this sensitivity to ionic strength. This result is presumed to indicate that the linear polyelectrolyte in solution develops counterion-concentrating regions that closely resemble the gel phase of their analogues. Advantage has been taken of this description of linear polyelectrolytes to estimate the solvent uptake by these regions. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  20. The Impact of Socio-Scientific Controversies in Portuguese Natural Science Teachers' Conceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Pedro; Galvao, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a qualitative study, based on case studies, aimed at: (a) assessing a group of Portuguese secondary school natural science teachers regarding their conceptions of the nature, teaching and learning of science; (b) studying possible impacts of recent controversies surrounding scientific and technological issues…

  1. Conceptions of the Nature of Science--Are They General or Context Specific?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urhahne, Detlef; Kremer, Kerstin; Mayer, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    The study investigates the relationship between general and context-specific conceptions of the nature of science (NOS). The categorization scheme by Osborne et al. (J Res Sci Teach 40:692-720, "2003") served as the theoretical framework of the study. In the category "nature of scientific knowledge", the certainty, development, simplicity,…

  2. A Study of Taiwanese Children's Conceptions of and Relation to Nature: Curricular and Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dai, Amy Hsin-I

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated children's conceptions of and relations to nature. Understanding the factors that influence them was the goal. The study used the Contextual Model of Learning as the theoretical framework to structure the research questions and data analysis to understand children's nature learning in the personal, sociocultural, and…

  3. What Is Technology? Investigating Student Conceptions about the Nature of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGironimo, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The science education literature clearly shows that knowledge of the nature of technology is an educational goal; however there is a lack of research on student conceptions about the nature of technology. To address this gap in the literature, this research began with a thorough review of the literature on scientific and technological literacy,…

  4. Science Teachers' Conceptions of Nature of Science: The Case of Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarkar, Md. Mahbub Alam; Gomes, Jui Judith

    2010-01-01

    This study explored Bangladeshi science teachers' conceptions of nature of science (NOS) with a particular focus on the nature of (a) scientific knowledge, (b) scientific inquiry and (c) scientific enterprise. The tentative, inferential, subjective and creative NOS, in addition to the myths of the scientific method and experimentation, the nature…

  5. Developing an Instrument for Assessing Students' Concepts of the Nature of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Pey-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The nature of technology has been rarely discussed despite the fact that technology plays an essential role in modern society. It is important to discuss students' concepts of the nature of technology, and further to advance their technological literacy and adaptation to modern society. There is a need to assess high school students'…

  6. Natural Conception May Be an Acceptable Option in HIV-Serodiscordant Couples in Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Ruolei; Zhu, Yunxia; Li, Jianwei; Shao, Ying; Ye, Jiangzhu; Chen, Danqing; Li, Zaicun

    2015-01-01

    Many HIV serodiscordant couples have a strong desire to have their own biological children. Natural conception may be the only choice in some resource limited settings but data about natural conception is limited. Here, we reported our findings of natural conception in HIV serodiscordant couples. Between January 2008 and June 2014, we retrospectively collected data on 91 HIV serodiscordant couples presenting to Beijing Youan Hospital with childbearing desires. HIV counseling, effective ART on HIV infected partners, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) in negative female partners and timed intercourse were used to maximally reduce the risk of HIV transmission. Of the 91 HIV serodiscordant couples, 43 were positive in male partners and 48 were positive in female partners. There were 196 unprotected vaginal intercourses, 100 natural conception and 97 newborns. There were no cases of HIV seroconversion in uninfected sexual partners. Natural conception may be an acceptable option in HIV-serodiscordant couples in resource limited settings if HIV-positive individuals have undetectable viremia on HAART, combined with HIV counseling, PrEP, PEP and timed intercourse. PMID:26540103

  7. EXACT SOLUTION TO FINITE TEMPERATURE SFDM: NATURAL CORES WITHOUT FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Robles, Victor H.; Matos, T. E-mail: tmatos@fis.cinvestav.mx

    2013-01-20

    Recent high-quality observations of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies have shown that their dark matter (DM) halos prefer flat central density profiles. However, the standard cold dark matter model simulations predict a more cuspy behavior. One mechanism used to reconcile the simulations with the observed data is the feedback from star formation. While this mechanism may be successful in isolated dwarf galaxies, its success in LSB galaxies remains unclear. Additionally, the inclusion of too much feedback in the simulations is a double-edged sword-in order to obtain a cored DM distribution from an initially cuspy one, the feedback recipes usually require one to remove a large quantity of baryons from the center of the galaxies; however, some feedback recipes produce twice the number of satellite galaxies of a given luminosity and with much smaller mass-to-light ratios from those that are observed. Therefore, one DM profile that produces cores naturally and that does not require large amounts of feedback would be preferable. We find both requirements to be satisfied in the scalar field dark matter model. Here, we consider that DM is an auto-interacting real scalar field in a thermal bath at temperature T with an initial Z {sub 2} symmetric potential. As the universe expands, the temperature drops so that the Z {sub 2} symmetry is spontaneously broken and the field rolls down to a new minimum. We give an exact analytic solution to the Newtonian limit of this system, showing that it can satisfy the two desired requirements and that the rotation curve profile is no longer universal.

  8. Exact Solution to Finite Temperature SFDM: Natural Cores without Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Victor H.; Matos, T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent high-quality observations of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies have shown that their dark matter (DM) halos prefer flat central density profiles. However, the standard cold dark matter model simulations predict a more cuspy behavior. One mechanism used to reconcile the simulations with the observed data is the feedback from star formation. While this mechanism may be successful in isolated dwarf galaxies, its success in LSB galaxies remains unclear. Additionally, the inclusion of too much feedback in the simulations is a double-edged sword—in order to obtain a cored DM distribution from an initially cuspy one, the feedback recipes usually require one to remove a large quantity of baryons from the center of the galaxies; however, some feedback recipes produce twice the number of satellite galaxies of a given luminosity and with much smaller mass-to-light ratios from those that are observed. Therefore, one DM profile that produces cores naturally and that does not require large amounts of feedback would be preferable. We find both requirements to be satisfied in the scalar field dark matter model. Here, we consider that DM is an auto-interacting real scalar field in a thermal bath at temperature T with an initial Z 2 symmetric potential. As the universe expands, the temperature drops so that the Z 2 symmetry is spontaneously broken and the field rolls down to a new minimum. We give an exact analytic solution to the Newtonian limit of this system, showing that it can satisfy the two desired requirements and that the rotation curve profile is no longer universal.

  9. College biology students' conceptions related to the nature of biological knowledge: Implications for conceptual change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameny, Gloria Millie Apio

    Adequate understanding of the nature of science is a major goal of science education. Understanding of the evolutionary nature of biological knowledge is a means of reinforcing biology students' understanding of the nature of science. It provides students with the philosophical basis, explanatory ideals, and subject matter-specific views of what counts as a scientifically-acceptable biological explanation. This study examined 121 college introductory biology and advanced zoology students for their conceptions related to the nature of biological knowledge. A 60-item Likert-scale questionnaire called the Nature of Biological Knowledge Scale and student interviews were used as complementary research instruments. Firstly, the study showed that 80--100% of college biology students have an adequate understanding of scientific methods, and that a similar percentage of students had learned the theory of evolution by natural selection in their biology courses. Secondly, the study showed that at least 60--80% of the students do not understand the importance of evolution in biological knowledge. Yet the study revealed that a statistically significant positive correlation exist among students' understanding of natural selection, divergent, and convergent evolutionary models. Thirdly, the study showed that about 20--58% of college students hold prescientific conceptions which, in part, are responsible for students' lack of understanding of the nature of biological knowledge. A statistically significant negative correlation was found among students' prescientific conceptions about basis of biological knowledge and nature of change in biological processes, and their understanding of natural selection and evolutionary models. However, the study showed that students' characteristics such as gender, age, major, or years in college have no statistically significant influence on students' conceptions related to the nature of biological knowledge. Only students' depth of biological

  10. How to Learn the Natural Numbers: Inductive Inference and the Acquisition of Number Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Eric; Laurence, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Theories of number concepts often suppose that the natural numbers are acquired as children learn to count and as they draw an induction based on their interpretation of the first few count words. In a bold critique of this general approach, Rips, Asmuth, Bloomfield [Rips, L., Asmuth, J. & Bloomfield, A. (2006). Giving the boot to the bootstrap:…

  11. Teachers' Knowledge Structures for Nature of Science and Scientific Inquiry: Conceptions and Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartos, Stephen A.; Lederman, Norman G.

    2014-01-01

    Research on nature of science (NOS) and scientific inquiry (SI) has indicated that a teacher's knowledge of each, however well developed, is not sufficient to ensure that these conceptions necessarily manifest themselves in classroom practice (Lederman & Druger, 1985; Lederman, 2007). In light of considerable research that has examined…

  12. The Problematic Nature of the Artist Teacher Concept and Implications for Pedagogical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoekstra, Marike

    2015-01-01

    The main argument of this article is that the problematic nature of the artist teacher concept might not be the duality between art and education, but might refer to a limited understanding of education, in such a way that art would appear to be contrasting to education. A different definition of education is required to understand the qualities…

  13. Representations of Fundamental Chemistry Concepts in Relation to the Particulate Nature of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirbulut, Zubeyde Demet; Beeth, Michael Edward

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated high school students' understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts - states of matter, melting, evaporation, condensation, boiling, and vapor pressure, in relation to their understanding of the particulate nature of matter. A sample of six students (four females and two males) enrolled in a second year chemistry course…

  14. Beyond Exemplars and Prototypes as Memory Representations of Natural Concepts: A Clustering Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbeemen, Timothy; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Pattyn, Sven; Storms, Gert; Verguts, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Categorization in well-known natural concepts is studied using a special version of the Varying Abstraction Framework (Vanpaemel, W., & Storms, G. (2006). A varying abstraction framework for categorization. Manuscript submitted for publication; Vanpaemel, W., Storms, G., & Ons, B. (2005). A varying abstraction model for categorization. In B. Bara,…

  15. Test-Enhanced Learning of Natural Concepts: Effects on Recognition Memory, Classification, and Metacognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Larry L.; Wahlheim, Christopher N.; Coane, Jennifer H.

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments examined testing effects on learning of natural concepts and metacognitive assessments of such learning. Results revealed that testing enhanced recognition memory and classification accuracy for studied and novel exemplars of bird families on immediate and delayed tests. These effects depended on the balance of study and test…

  16. Thai Pre-Service Science Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buaraphan, Khajornsak; Sung-ong, Sunun

    2009-01-01

    The conceptions of the nature of science (NOS), particularly scientific knowledge, scientific method, scientists' work, and scientific enterprise, of 113 Thai pre-service science teachers were was captured by the Myths of Science Questionnaire (MOSQ) in the first semester of the 2008 academic year. The data was quantitatively and qualitatively…

  17. Thai In-Service Science Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buaraphan, Khajornsak

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the Nature of Science (NOS) serves as one of the desirable characteristics of science teachers. The current study attempted to explore 101 Thai in-service science teachers' conceptions of the NOS, particularly scientific knowledge, the scientific method, scientists' work, and scientific enterprise, by using the Myths of Science…

  18. A Developmental Study of the Intension and Extension of Four Natural Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie-Jedermann, Janice

    To investigate the development of children's knowledge of the intension and extension of four natural concepts (cup, scissors, money, and musical instrument), three questions were explored in an experiment involving one-hundred-and-twenty 3-, 5-, and 7-year-old children (40 children for each age group). Extension was measured in a verbal labeling…

  19. A study of Taiwanese children's conceptions of and relation to nature: Curricular and policy implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Amy Hsin-I.

    The present study investigated children's conceptions of and relations to nature. Understanding the factors that influence them was the goal. The study used the Contextual Model of Learning as the theoretical framework to structure the research questions and data analysis to understand children's nature learning in the personal, sociocultural, and physical contexts that change over time. Twelve children aged 5 and 6 were prompted to draw a picture of themselves in nature. They were interviewed about the sources of those ideas and living experiences, and if they thought photographs of scenery were nature. These twelve children's parents also participated in a survey to study the family influence. I used interpretational analysis to seek for common patterns and themes. Scoring rubrics, coaxial comparison, constant comparison, and the theoretical framework were used to triangulate and investigate influential factors of children's ideas of nature. The study showed that children at this age already had developed a basic conception of what is nature, but also need to learn about the role of human beings in nature and the interrelations of nature in order to develop environmental education ideas. Most children also had a positive feeling toward nature. Children's definitions of nature were developed mainly from what parents and grandparents had told them and their firsthand exposure to nature. Only during the weekend did the children's families have time to visit nature. It was found that most parents in this study stated that they were inspired by nature and were very willing to take their children to nature settings. The most visited natural places that were reported visited were parks in the city and the mountains surrounding the city. However, very often parents missed teachable opportunities to make the experiences with nature meaningful to children. Implications of the study apply to curriculum designers, educators, urban planners, and parents. It is recommended

  20. Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Babcock, Walter C.; Edlund, David J.; Lyon, David K.; Miller, Warren K.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  1. Student concepts of Natural Selection from a resource-based perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Scott Shawn

    The past two decades have produced a substantial amount of research about the teaching and learning of evolution; however, recent research often lacks a theoretical foundation. Application of a new theoretical framework could help fill the void and improve research about student concepts of evolution. This study seeks to show that a resource-based framework (Hammer et al., 2005) can improve research into student concepts of natural selection. Concepts of natural selection from urban community college students were assessed via qualitative (interviews, written open-response questions, and write/think aloud procedures) and quantitative methods (coded open response analysis, Concept Inventory for Natural Selection (CINS)(Anderson, Fisher, & Norman, 2002). Results showed that students demonstrate four important aspects of resource-based framework: the multi-faceted construction of concepts, context sensitivity/ concept flexibility, at-the-moment activation of resources, and perceptual frames. In open response assessment, evolutionary-gain responses produced significantly different responses than evolutionary-loss questions with: 1) significantly more correct answers for the gain than loss question (Wilcoxon signed rank test, z = -3.68, p=0.0002); 2) more Lamarckian responses to loss than the gain question (Fisher exact, p=0.0039); and significantly different distributions in expanded need vs basic need answers (Fishers exact, p = 0.02). Results from CINS scores showed significant differences in post activity scores between students that held different naive concepts associated with origin of variation, origin of species, differential reproduction, and limited survival suggesting that some naive ideas facilitate learning. Outcomes also suggest that an everyday or self-experience typological perceptual frame is an underlying source of many incorrect ideas about evolution. Interview and write/think aloud assessments propose four process resources applied by students as

  2. Numerical Solution of Natural Convection in Eccentric Annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, D.W.

    2001-09-18

    The governing equations for transient natural convection in eccentric annular space are solved with two high-order accurate numerical algorithms. The equation set is transformed into bipolar coordinates and split into two one-dimensional equations: finite elements are used in the direction normal to the cylinder surfaces; the pseudospectral technique is used in the azimuthal direction. This report discusses those equations.

  3. High School Biology Students' Transfer of the Concept of Natural Selection: A Mixed-Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Kevin J.; Koskey, Kristin L. K.; Linnenbrink-Garcia, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The concept of natural selection serves as a foundation for understanding diverse biological concepts and has broad applicability to other domains. However, we know little about students' abilities to transfer (i.e. apply to a new context or use generatively) this concept and the relation between students' conceptual understanding and…

  4. The Electromagnetic Conception of Nature at the Root of the Special and General Relativity Theories and Its Revolutionary Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannetto, Enrico R. A.

    2009-01-01

    The revolution in XX century physics, induced by relativity theories, had its roots within the electromagnetic conception of Nature. It was developed through a tradition related to Brunian and Leibnizian physics, to the German "Naturphilosophie" and English XIXth physics. The electromagnetic conception of Nature was in some way realized by the…

  5. Solute properties of hydrocarbons in natural gas fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.; Teja, A.S.

    1995-12-01

    A knowledge of the solubility of various hydrocarbons in natural gases can lead to methods to ameliorate the problem of solid deposition in pipelines. We have measured the solubilities of the n-alkanes (heptane to hexatriacontane) and two diamondoids (adamantane and diamantane) in methane, ethane, and CO{sub 2} over a range of temperatures and pressures. The solubilities were measured with a new chromatographic apparatus using an evaporative light scattering detector, as well as with a traditional flow apparatus. The results also yield information on enhancement factors, as well as partial molal volumes and enthalpies at infinite dilution. The data were correlated both by carbon number and by equations of state.

  6. Sargassum as a Natural Solution to Enhance Dune Plant Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Amy; Feagin, Rusty

    2010-11-01

    Many beach management practices focus on creating an attractive environment for tourists, but can detrimentally affect long-term dune integrity. One such practice is mechanical beach raking in which the wrack line is removed from the beach front. In Texas, Sargassum fluitans and natans, types of brown alga, are the main components of wrack and may provide a subsidy to the ecosystem. In this study, we used greenhouse studies to test the hypothesis that the addition of sargassum can increase soil nutrients and produce increased growth in dune plants. We also conducted an analysis of the nutrients in the sargassum to determine the mechanisms responsible for any growth enhancement. Panicum amarum showed significant enhancement of growth with the addition of sargassum, and while Helianthus debilis, Ipomoea stolonifera, Sporobolus virginicus, and Uniola paniculata responded slightly differently to the specific treatments, none were impaired by the addition of sargassum. In general, plants seemed to respond well to unwashed sargassum and multiple additions of sargassum, indicating that plants may have adapted to capitalize on the subsidy in its natural state directly from the ocean. For coastal managers, the use of sargassum as a fertilizer could be a positive, natural, and efficient method of dealing with the accumulation of wrack on the beach.

  7. Evolvability Is an Evolved Ability: The Coding Concept as the Arch-Unit of Natural Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janković, Srdja; Ćirković, Milan M.

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes that characterize living matter are qualitatively distinct in that they involve encoding and transfer of specific types of information. Such information plays an active part in the control of events that are ultimately linked to the capacity of the system to persist and multiply. This algorithmicity of life is a key prerequisite for its Darwinian evolution, driven by natural selection acting upon stochastically arising variations of the encoded information. The concept of evolvability attempts to define the total capacity of a system to evolve new encoded traits under appropriate conditions, i.e., the accessible section of total morphological space. Since this is dependent on previously evolved regulatory networks that govern information flow in the system, evolvability itself may be regarded as an evolved ability. The way information is physically written, read and modified in living cells (the "coding concept") has not changed substantially during the whole history of the Earth's biosphere. This biosphere, be it alone or one of many, is, accordingly, itself a product of natural selection, since the overall evolvability conferred by its coding concept (nucleic acids as information carriers with the "rulebook of meanings" provided by codons, as well as all the subsystems that regulate various conditional information-reading modes) certainly played a key role in enabling this biosphere to survive up to the present, through alterations of planetary conditions, including at least five catastrophic events linked to major mass extinctions. We submit that, whatever the actual prebiotic physical and chemical processes may have been on our home planet, or may, in principle, occur at some time and place in the Universe, a particular coding concept, with its respective potential to give rise to a biosphere, or class of biospheres, of a certain evolvability, may itself be regarded as a unit (indeed the arch-unit) of natural selection.

  8. Evolvability Is an Evolved Ability: The Coding Concept as the Arch-Unit of Natural Selection.

    PubMed

    Janković, Srdja; Ćirković, Milan M

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes that characterize living matter are qualitatively distinct in that they involve encoding and transfer of specific types of information. Such information plays an active part in the control of events that are ultimately linked to the capacity of the system to persist and multiply. This algorithmicity of life is a key prerequisite for its Darwinian evolution, driven by natural selection acting upon stochastically arising variations of the encoded information. The concept of evolvability attempts to define the total capacity of a system to evolve new encoded traits under appropriate conditions, i.e., the accessible section of total morphological space. Since this is dependent on previously evolved regulatory networks that govern information flow in the system, evolvability itself may be regarded as an evolved ability. The way information is physically written, read and modified in living cells (the "coding concept") has not changed substantially during the whole history of the Earth's biosphere. This biosphere, be it alone or one of many, is, accordingly, itself a product of natural selection, since the overall evolvability conferred by its coding concept (nucleic acids as information carriers with the "rulebook of meanings" provided by codons, as well as all the subsystems that regulate various conditional information-reading modes) certainly played a key role in enabling this biosphere to survive up to the present, through alterations of planetary conditions, including at least five catastrophic events linked to major mass extinctions. We submit that, whatever the actual prebiotic physical and chemical processes may have been on our home planet, or may, in principle, occur at some time and place in the Universe, a particular coding concept, with its respective potential to give rise to a biosphere, or class of biospheres, of a certain evolvability, may itself be regarded as a unit (indeed the arch-unit) of natural selection. PMID:26419865

  9. Natural solution to antibiotic resistance: bacteriophages 'The Living Drugs'.

    PubMed

    Jassim, Sabah A A; Limoges, Richard G

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotics have been a panacea in animal husbandry as well as in human therapy for decades. The huge amount of antibiotics used to induce the growth and protect the health of farm animals has lead to the evolution of bacteria that are resistant to the drug's effects. Today, many researchers are working with bacteriophages (phages) as an alternative to antibiotics in the control of pathogens for human therapy as well as prevention, biocontrol, and therapy in animal agriculture. Phage therapy and biocontrol have yet to fulfill their promise or potential, largely due to several key obstacles to their performance. Several suggestions are shared in order to point a direction for overcoming common obstacles in applied phage technology. The key to successful use of phages in modern scientific, farm, food processing and clinical applications is to understand the common obstacles as well as best practices and to develop answers that work in harmony with nature. PMID:24781265

  10. Natural gas production problems : solutions, methodologies, and modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Herrin, James M.; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Basinski, Paul M.; Olsson, William Arthur; Arnold, Bill Walter; Broadhead, Ronald F.; Knight, Connie D.; Keefe, Russell G.; McKinney, Curt; Holm, Gus; Holland, John F.; Larson, Rich; Engler, Thomas W.; Lorenz, John Clay

    2004-10-01

    Natural gas is a clean fuel that will be the most important domestic energy resource for the first half the 21st centtuy. Ensuring a stable supply is essential for our national energy security. The research we have undertaken will maximize the extractable volume of gas while minimizing the environmental impact of surface disturbances associated with drilling and production. This report describes a methodology for comprehensive evaluation and modeling of the total gas system within a basin focusing on problematic horizontal fluid flow variability. This has been accomplished through extensive use of geophysical, core (rock sample) and outcrop data to interpret and predict directional flow and production trends. Side benefits include reduced environmental impact of drilling due to reduced number of required wells for resource extraction. These results have been accomplished through a cooperative and integrated systems approach involving industry, government, academia and a multi-organizational team within Sandia National Laboratories. Industry has provided essential in-kind support to this project in the forms of extensive core data, production data, maps, seismic data, production analyses, engineering studies, plus equipment and staff for obtaining geophysical data. This approach provides innovative ideas and technologies to bring new resources to market and to reduce the overall environmental impact of drilling. More importantly, the products of this research are not be location specific but can be extended to other areas of gas production throughout the Rocky Mountain area. Thus this project is designed to solve problems associated with natural gas production at developing sites, or at old sites under redevelopment.

  11. Analysis of Saudi Arabian middle and high school science teachers' conceptions of the nature of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almazroa, Hiya Mohammed

    This study was conducted to explore Saudi middle and high school science teachers' conceptions of the Nature of Science (NOS). It also detected the effects of gender, science content major, and years of teaching experience on teachers' conceptions of the NOS. The study included a sample of 786 science teachers (137 male and 649 female) who were teaching in middle and high schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in the 1995-1996 academic year. The study was conducted using a translated version of the Nature of Science Scale (NOSS) developed by Kimball (1967). The scale contains 29 items ranging from "agree" to "disagree", and the scoring of the items ranged from 29 to 87. The lowest score is 29 (1 x 29) and the highest score possible on the test is 87 (3 x 29 items). The data collected was statistically analyzed using descriptive statistics and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The study revealed that Saudi science teachers as a group hold numerous misconceptions about the NOS with a significant difference in understanding the NOS between the male and female teachers. The study also showed that teachers with a major in physics held more adequate views than did teachers with other majors. In addition, novice teachers were found to have more adequate conceptions of the NOS than did experienced teachers.

  12. The World Atlas of Desertification assessment concept for conscious land use solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherlet, Michael; Ivits, Eva; Kutnjak, Hrvoje; Smid, Marek; Sommer, Stefan; Zucca, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    Land degradation and desertification are complex phenomena that result in environmental damage, economic inefficiency and social inequity and are reflected by a reducing productive capacity of the land and soil. Research indicated that they are driven by a multiple but a limited number of causal aspects that unbalance the capacity of the environment system to sustainably produce ecosystem services and economic value. Competition for land, driven by societal needs or economic opportunities, adds further stress on the land resources. To address these complex global challenges, a monitoring and assessment system offering up-to-date information on the status and trends of land degradation and their causes and effects is needed to provide science-based routes for possible land use solutions. The assessment concept that has been outlined for the compilation of the new World Atlas of Desertification (WAD) confronts this complexity by converging evidence of stress on the land system caused by various issues. These issues relate to sets of dynamics of the human-environment system and include changing agricultural or pastoral land use and management practices, changing population and societal aspects, changing aridity and drought. The WAD describes the issues, spatially documents their change, whenever data is available, highlights the importance of the issues in relation to land degradation processes and illustrates the integrated assessment concepts. The first step is the preparation of solid global data layers that are related to, or express aspects that can be related to, land-system productivity dynamics and status. These can be used for identifying and evaluating the interaction of spatial variables with the land-system productivity dynamics. Initial analysis of the land productivity dynamics within stratified land cover/use areas, such as the global croplands, show substantial differences in the extension, geographic location and possible related causes of potentially

  13. Natural Sources as Innovative Solutions Against Fungal Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Girardot, Marion; Imbert, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Fungal cells are capable of adhering to biotic and abiotic surfaces and form biofilms containing one or more microbial species that are microbial reservoirs. These biofilms may cause chronic and acute infections. Fungal biofilms related to medical devices are particularly responsible for serious infections such as candidemia. Nowadays, only a few therapeutic agents have demonstrated activities against fungal biofilms in vitro and/or in vivo. So the discovery of new anti-biofilm molecules is definitely needed. In this context, biodiversity is a large source of original active compounds including some that have already proven effective in therapies such as antimicrobial compounds (antibacterial or antifungal agents). Bioactive metabolites from natural sources, useful for developing new anti-biofilm drugs, are of interest. In this chapter, the role of molecules isolated from plants, lichens, algae, microorganisms, or from animal or human origin in inhibition and/or dispersion of fungal biofilms (especially Candida and Aspergillus biofilms) is discussed. Some essential oils, phenolic compounds, saponins, peptides and proteins and alkaloids could be of particular interest in fighting fungal biofilms. PMID:27115410

  14. A natural compromise: a moderate solution to the GMO & "natural" labeling disputes.

    PubMed

    Amaru, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, genetically modified (GM) foods are labeled no differently from their natural counterparts, leaving consumers with no mechanism for deciphering genetically modified food content. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not formally defined the term "natural," which is frequently used on food labels despite consumer confusion as to what it means. The FDA should initiate a notice and comment rulemaking addressing the narrow issue of whether use of the word "natural" should be permitted oil GM food labels. Prohibition of the use of"natural" on genetically modified foods would mitigate consumer deception regarding genetically modified food content without significantly disadvantaging genetically modified food producers. PMID:25654943

  15. The Nature of Science in Science Curricula: Methods and concepts of analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Sílvia; Morais, Ana M.

    2013-11-01

    The article shows methods and concepts of analysis of the nature of science in science curricula through an exemplary study made in Portugal. The study analyses the extent to which the message transmitted by the Natural Science curriculum for Portuguese middle school considers the nature of science. It is epistemologically and sociologically grounded with particular emphasis on Bernstein's theory of pedagogic discourse and Ziman's conceptualization of science construction. The study used a mixed methodology and followed a dialectical process between the theoretical and the empirical. The results show that the nature of science has a low status in the curriculum with the exception of the external sociological dimension of science. Intra-disciplinary relations between scientific and metascientific knowledge are mostly absent. Recontextualization processes occurred between the two main parts of the curriculum. These results are discussed and their consequences in terms of scientific learning are explored. The mode of analysis used in the study has the potential of highlighting the level of a science curriculum, in terms of specific aspects of the nature of science.

  16. Achieving optimal gingival esthetics around restored natural teeth and implants. Rationale, concepts, and techniques.

    PubMed

    Bichacho, N

    1998-10-01

    The role of prosthetic restorations in the final appearance of the surrounding soft tissues has long been recognized. Innovative prosthodontic concepts as described should be used to enhance the biologic as well as the esthetic data of the supporting tissues, in natural teeth and implants alike. Combined dental treatment modalities of different kinds (i.e., orthodontics, periodontal treatment) are often required for optimal results. Meticulous care and attention to the delicate soft tissues should be given throughout all phases of the treatment, with a view to achieving a functional, healthy, and esthetic oral environment. PMID:9891656

  17. Eulerian-Lagrangian solution of the convection-dispersion equation in natural co-ordinates.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Casulli, V.; Milford, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The vast majority of numerical investigations of transport phenomena use an Eulerian formulation for the convenience that the computational grids are fixed in space. An Eulerian-Lagrangian method (ELM) of solution for the convection-dispersion equation is discussed and analyzed. The ELM uses the Lagrangian concept in an Eulerian computational grid system.-from Authors

  18. Solitary wave solutions of nonlinear financial markets: data-modeling-concept-practicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jin-Long; Ma, Fei-Te

    2007-07-01

    This paper seeks to solve the difficult nonlinear problem in financial markets on the complex system theory and the nonlinear dynamics principle, with the data-model-concept-practice issue-oriented reconstruction of the phase space by the high frequency trade data. In theory, we have achieved the differentiable manifold geometry configuration, discovered the Yang-Mills functional in financial markets, obtained a meaningful conserved quantity through corresponding space-time non-Abel localization gauge symmetry transformation, and derived the financial solitons, which shows that there is a strict symmetry between manifold fiber bundle and guage field in financial markets. In practical applications of financial markets, we have repeatedly carried out experimental tests in a fluctuant evolvement, directly simulating and validating the existence of solitons by researching the price fluctuations (society phenomena) using the same methods and criterion as in natural science and in actual trade to test the stock Guangzhou Proprietary and the futures Fuel Oil in China. The results demonstrate that the financial solitons discovered indicates that there is a kind of new substance and form of energy existing in financial trade markets, which likely indicates a new science paradigm in the economy and society domains beyond physics.

  19. Dynamics of a Definition: A Framework to Analyse Student Construction of the Concept of Solution to a Differential Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raychaudhuri, Debasree

    2008-01-01

    In this note we develop a framework that makes explicit the inherent dynamic structure of certain mathematical definitions by means of the four facets of context-entity-process-object. These facets and their interrelations are then used to capture and interpret specific aspects of student constructions of the concept of solution to first order…

  20. Sperm selection in natural conception: what can we learn from Mother Nature to improve assisted reproduction outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Sakkas, Denny; Ramalingam, Mythili; Garrido, Nicolas; Barratt, Christopher L.R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In natural conception only a few sperm cells reach the ampulla or the site of fertilization. This population is a selected group of cells since only motile cells can pass through cervical mucus and gain initial entry into the female reproductive tract. In animals, some studies indicate that the sperm selected by the reproductive tract and recovered from the uterus and the oviducts have higher fertilization rates but this is not a universal finding. Some species show less discrimination in sperm selection and abnormal sperm do arrive at the oviduct. In contrast, assisted reproductive technologies (ART) utilize a more random sperm population. In this review we contrast the journey of the spermatozoon in vivo and in vitro and discuss this in the context of developing new sperm preparation and selection techniques for ART. METHODS A review of the literature examining characteristics of the spermatozoa selected in vivo is compared with recent developments in in vitro selection and preparation methods. Contrasts and similarities are presented. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS New technologies are being developed to aid in the diagnosis, preparation and selection of spermatozoa in ART. To date progress has been frustrating and these methods have provided variable benefits in improving outcomes after ART. It is more likely that examining the mechanisms enforced by nature will provide valuable information in regard to sperm selection and preparation techniques in vitro. Identifying the properties of those spermatozoa which do reach the oviduct will also be important for the development of more effective tests of semen quality. In this review we examine the value of sperm selection to see how much guidance for ART can be gleaned from the natural selection processes in vivo. PMID:26386468

  1. Confronting, Representing, and Believing Counterintuitive Concepts: Navigating the Natural and the Supernatural

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jonathan D.; Harris, Paul. L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research shows that even preschoolers are skeptical; they frequently reject claims from other people when the claims conflict with their own perceptions and concepts. Yet, despite their skepticism, both children and adults come to believe in a variety of phenomena that defy their first-hand perceptions and intuitive conceptions of the world. In this review, we explore how children and adults acquire such concepts. We describe how a similar developmental process underlies mental representation of both the natural and the supernatural world, and we detail this process for two prominent supernatural counterintuitive ideas—God and the afterlife. In doing so, we highlight the fact that conceptual development does not always move in the direction of greater empirical truth, as described within naturalistic domains. We consider factors that likely help overcome skepticism, and in doing so promote belief in counterintuitive phenomena. These factors include qualities of the learners, aspects of the context, qualities of the informants, and qualities of the information. PMID:24683418

  2. Students' Conceptions of the Nature of Science: Perspectives from Canadian and Korean Middle School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeran; Nielsen, Wendy; Woodruff, Earl

    2014-05-01

    This study examined and compared students' understanding of nature of science (NOS) with 521 Grade 8 Canadian and Korean students using a mixed methods approach. The concepts of NOS were measured using a survey that had both quantitative and qualitative elements. Descriptive statistics and one-way multivariate analysis of variances examined the quantitative data while a conceptually clustered matrix classified the open-ended responses. The country effect could explain 3-12 % of the variances of subjectivity, empirical testability and diverse methods, but it was not significant for the concepts of tentativeness and socio-cultural embeddedness of science. The open-ended responses showed that students believed scientific theories change due to errors or discoveries. Students regarded empirical evidence as undeniable and objective although they acknowledged experiments depend on theories or scientists' knowledge. The open responses revealed that national situations and curriculum content affected their views. For our future democratic citizens to gain scientific literacy, science curricula should include currently acknowledged NOS concepts and should be situated within societal and cultural perspectives.

  3. Reflections on the nature of the concepts of field in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pombo, C.

    2012-12-01

    This paper is a short introduction on the analysis of the concepts of field in physics, showing their different natures. It comprises a study on the development of observers based on observational realism, a physical epistemology in development, on the basis of analytical psychology. This epistemology incorporates and justify the proposition of R. Carnap, of separating observational and theoretical domains of a theory, and gives a criterion for this separation. The basis of three theories are discussed, where concepts of field emerge. We discuss the different origins and meanings of these fields, from an epistemological point of view, in their respective theories. The aim of this paper is to form a basis of discussion to be applied in the analysis of other theories where concepts of field are present, to reach a better understanding of the contemporary programs of unification. We would like to clarify if these programs are intended for unification of fields as elements of the physical reality, fields as explanations for the observations, unification of their theories, or other possible cases.

  4. Confronting, Representing, and Believing Counterintuitive Concepts: Navigating the Natural and the Supernatural.

    PubMed

    Lane, Jonathan D; Harris, Paul L

    2014-03-01

    Recent research shows that even preschoolers are skeptical; they frequently reject claims from other people when the claims conflict with their own perceptions and concepts. Yet, despite their skepticism, both children and adults come to believe in a variety of phenomena that defy their first-hand perceptions and intuitive conceptions of the world. In this review, we explore how children and adults acquire such concepts. We describe how a similar developmental process underlies mental representation of both the natural and the supernatural world, and we detail this process for two prominent supernatural counterintuitive ideas-God and the afterlife. In doing so, we highlight the fact that conceptual development does not always move in the direction of greater empirical truth, as described within naturalistic domains. We consider factors that likely help overcome skepticism and, in doing so, promote belief in counterintuitive phenomena. These factors include qualities of the learners, aspects of the context, qualities of the informants, and qualities of the information. PMID:24683418

  5. Advanced onboard storage concepts for natural gas-fueled automotive vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.; Elkins, R. H.; Camara, E. H.; Bulicz, T.

    1984-01-01

    The evaluation of several advanced concepts for storing natural gas at reduced pressure is presented. The advanced concepts include adsorption on high surface area carbon, adsorption in high porosity zeolite, storage in clathration compounds, and storage by dissolution in liquid solvents. High surface area carbons with high packing density are the best low pressure storage mediums. A simple mathematical model is used to compare adsorption storage on a state of the art carbon with compression storage. The model indicates that a vehicle using adsorption storage of natural gas at 3.6 MPa will have 36 percent of the range, on the EPA city cycle, of a vehicle operating on a compression storage system having the same physical size and a peak storage pressure of 21 MPa. Preliminary experiments and current literature suggest that the storage capacity of state of the art carbons could be improved by as much as 50 percent, and that adsorption systems having a capacity equal to compression storage at 14 MPa are possible without exceeding a maximum pressure of 3.6 MPa.

  6. Epistemological and Hermeneutic Conceptions of the Nature of Understanding: The Cases of Paul H. Hirst and Martin Heidegger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okshevsky, Walter C.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses educational philosophy, presenting epistemological and hermeneutic conceptions of the nature of understanding according to Paul H. Hirst and Martin Heidegger. The article looks at Hirst's epistemology of understanding and Heidegger's understanding as a praxeological competence. (SM)

  7. Professional Development of Elementary and Science Teachers in a Summer Science Camp: Changing Nature of Science Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaman, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    Many countries all over the world have recently integrated nature of science (NOS) concepts into their science education standards. Providing professional support to teachers about NOS concepts is crucially important for successful implementation of the standards. For this purpose, a summer science camp was offered to elementary and science…

  8. Student Conceptions of Ionic Compounds in Solution and the Influences of Sociochemical Norms on Individual Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warfa, Abdi-Rizak M.

    Using the symbolic interactionist perspective that meaning is constituted as individuals interact with one another, this study examined how group thinking during cooperative inquiry-based activity on chemical bonding theories shaped and influenced college students' understanding of the properties of ionic compounds in solution. The analysis revealed the development of sociochemical norms and specific ways of reasoning about chemical ideas that led to shifts in student thinking and understanding of the nature of dissolved ionic solids. The analysis similarly revealed two kinds of teacher-initiated discourses, dialogical and monologic, that impacted student learning differently. I discuss the nature of this teacher-initiated discourse and number of moves, such as confirming, communicative, and re-orienting, that the course instructor made to communicate to students what counts as justifiable chemical reasoning and appropriate representations of chemical knowledge. I further describe the use of sociochemical dialogues as lens to study the ways in which chemistry instructors and students develop normative ways of reasoning and chemical justifications. Because the activity was designed as an intervention to target student misconceptions about ionic bonding, I also examined the extent to which the activity elicited and corrected commonly found student chemical misconceptions. To do so, student-generated particulate drawings were coded qualitatively into one of four broad themes: i) use of molecular framework with discrete atoms, ii) use of ionic framework with discrete ionic species, iii) use of quasi-ionic framework with partial ionic-molecular thinking, or iv) use of an all-encompassing "other" category. The findings suggested the intervention significantly improved students' conceptual knowledge of ionic compounds in solution - there was statistically significant increase in the number of drawings using ionic and quasi-ionic frameworks in the pre-activity vs. post

  9. Challenging the Concept of Natural Distributions: Global Change Turns Trees Into Weeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleadow, R.; O'Leary, B.; Burd, M.

    2015-12-01

    National parks and nature reserves are set aside to preserve certain ecosystems, reflecting species distributions at a moment in time. Changing climate and fire dynamics can mean that the species most suited to that area are different, leading new tree species to 'invade' the conservation areas. Pittosporum undulatum is an invasive tree native tree species with a natural range from southeast Queensland to Eastern Victoria, Australia. Soon after European settlement this species became a popular ornamental tree in gardens and was planted outside of its natural range across the continent and introduced to the USA (where it is known as Victorian Box), the Hawaiian Islands, Jamaica, southern Africa and the Azores. The reason this is important is because high density of P. undulatum lead to reduced biodiversity and often the complete suppression of regeneration of exiting forest trees. In Australia, changes in fire dynamics have played a major part in its in dominance. New strategies for forest management were proposed by Gleadow an Ashton in the 1980s, but lack of action has led us to predict that the entire Dandenong Ranges, near Melbourne, will be invaded within 25 years resulting in the loss of a major recreational and conservation area. This is a model of the type of problems that can be expected as the climate envelope for species changes in the coming century, challenging the very concept of a "native ".

  10. Investigating the Nature of Third Grade Students' Experiences with Concept Maps to Support Learning of Science Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Margaret L.

    2012-01-01

    To support and improve effective science teaching, educators need methods to reveal student understandings and misconceptions of science concepts and to offer all students an opportunity to reflect on their own knowledge construction and organization. Students can benefit by engaging in scientific activities in which they build personal…

  11. An Investigation into the Relationship between Students' Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter and Their Understanding of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Othman, Jazilah; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    A thorough understanding of chemical bonding requires familiarity with the particulate nature of matter. In this study, a two-tier multiple-choice diagnostic instrument consisting of ten items (five items involving each of the two concepts) was developed to assess students' understanding of the particulate nature of matter and chemical bonding so…

  12. The Electromagnetic Conception of Nature at the Root of the Special and General Relativity Theories and its Revolutionary Meaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetto, Enrico R. A.

    2009-06-01

    The revolution in XX century physics, induced by relativity theories, had its roots within the electromagnetic conception of Nature. It was developed through a tradition related to Brunian and Leibnizian physics, to the German Naturphilosophie and English XIXth physics. The electromagnetic conception of Nature was in some way realized by the relativistic dynamics of Poincaré of 1905. Einstein, on the contrary, after some years, linked relativistic dynamics to a semi-mechanist conception of Nature. He developed general relativity theory on the same ground, but Hilbert formulated it starting from the electromagnetic conception of Nature. Here, a comparison between these two conceptions is proposed in order to understand the conceptual foundations of special relativity within the context of the changing world views. The whole history of physics as well as history of science can be considered as a conflict among different worldviews. Every theory, as well as every different formulation of a theory implies a different worldview: a particular image of Nature implies a particular image of God (atheism too has a particular image of God) as well as of mankind and of their relationship. Thus, it is very relevant for scientific education to point out which image of Nature belongs to a particular formulation of a theory, which image comes to dominate and for which ideological reason.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Critical Phenomena in Natural Sciences: Chaos, Fractals, Selforganization and Disorder: Concepts and Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, S.

    2004-10-01

    Since the discovery of the renormalization group theory in statistical physics, the realm of applications of the concepts of scale invariance and criticality has pervaded several fields of natural and social sciences. This is the leitmotiv of Didier Sornette's book, who in Critical Phenomena in Natural Sciences reviews three decades of developments and applications of the concepts of criticality, scale invariance and power law behaviour from statistical physics, to earthquake prediction, ruptures, plate tectonics, modelling biological and economic systems and so on. This strongly interdisciplinary book addresses students and researchers in disciplines where concepts of criticality and scale invariance are appropriate: mainly geology from which most of the examples are taken, but also engineering, biology, medicine, economics, etc. A good preparation in quantitative science is assumed but the presentation of statistical physics principles, tools and models is self-contained, so that little background in this field is needed. The book is written in a simple informal style encouraging intuitive comprehension rather than stressing formal derivations. Together with the discussion of the main conceptual results of the discipline, great effort is devoted to providing applied scientists with the tools of data analysis and modelling necessary to analyse, understand, make predictions and simulate systems undergoing complex collective behaviour. The book starts from a purely descriptive approach, explaining basic probabilistic and geometrical tools to characterize power law behaviour and scale invariant sets. Probability theory is introduced by a detailed discussion of interpretative issues warning the reader on the use and misuse of probabilistic concepts when the emphasis is on prediction of low probability rare---and often catastrophic---events. Then, concepts that have proved useful in risk evaluation, extreme value statistics, large limit theorems for sums of independent

  14. Problems and solutions: two concepts of mankind in cognitive-behavior therapy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Rudolph Friedrich; Reinecker, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Scientific theories that are concerned with experience and behavior of human beings always include anthropological core assumptions. This applies in particular to psychotherapeutic theories. These anthropological core assumptions (i.e., concepts of mankind) affect techniques that are derived from these theories but they also have a great influence on acceptance and spreading of psychotherapeutic methods. This article examines the concept of mankind in cognitive-behavior therapy. In this connection two highly differing conceptions of the human being are identified: the early behavioristic black-box model and the conception of the human being as an actively performing subject ("man the scientist") in the framework of the self-management approach and in cognitive therapy. The image problem of today's behavior therapy, the lack of application of efficient methods of behavior therapy and problems in finding a professional identity as a behavior therapist can be seen as stemming from the differing concepts of mankind. To solve these problems we propose: an integrative concept of mankind, an increased emphasis of a cooperative therapist-patient relationship, and the taking into account of unconscious processes. PMID:12961823

  15. Natural conception in HIV-serodiscordant couples with the infected partner in suppressive antiretroviral therapy: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Del Romero, Jorge; Baza, María Begoña; Río, Isabel; Jerónimo, Adrián; Vera, Mar; Hernando, Victoria; Rodríguez, Carmen; Castilla, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    The potential of antiretroviral treatment (ART) to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV has increased the number of serodiscordant couples who are considering natural conception. We aim to describe the results of a protocol for reproductive counseling aimed at HIV serodiscordant couples who desire natural conception, in which the infected partner, the index case, is receiving suppressive antiretroviral treatment.A prospective cohort included all HIV serodiscordant couples attended a counseling program in the period 2002 to 2013 who opted for natural conception and met the following criteria: index case on ART with persistent plasma viral suppression for at least the previous 6 months, ART compliance over 95%, preserved immune status, undetectable HIV viral and proviral load in semen in male index cases, and absence of genitourinary infections and fertility problems in both members of the couple.Of the 161 HIV serodiscordant couples included, 133 with male index cases, 66% achieved at least 1 pregnancy, 18% a second one, and 5% a third pregnancy. A total of 144 natural pregnancies occurred and 107 babies were born. The pregnancy rate was 1.9 for each 100 acts of vaginal intercourse, and the mean time to conception was 6.1 months, both independently of the sex of the index case. No case of sexual or vertical HIV transmission occurred.In the absence of fertility problems and under controlled conditions, natural conception might be a safe and effective reproductive method for those HIV serodiscordant couples who choose this reproductive option. PMID:27472733

  16. An exploration of worldview and conceptions of nature of science among science teachers at a private Christian high school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kits, Kara M.

    Both worldview and conceptions of nature of science (NOS) are important components in teaching and learning science. However, few empirical studies have examined the interplay between both of these components for teachers or students. Therefore, this study examines the possible relationship between worldview and conceptions of nature of science for secondary science teachers who currently teach at a Christian school. Qualitative methodologies developed a rich description of the worldview beliefs and conceptions of NOS for teachers in this study. Eight secondary science teachers employed at a private Christian school participated in the study. A Views of Nature of Science (VNOS) questionnaire and follow-up interviews elicited participants' conceptions of NOS. A semi-structured interview and Test of Preferred Explanations (TOPE) questionnaire elicited participants' worldview beliefs regarding nature and the natural world and causality. Participants communicated understandings of NOS that ranged from uninformed to informed in various aspects. In addition, while their worldview beliefs and conceptions of NOS reflected their faith beliefs, participants did not have a less informed view of NOS than other science teachers in previous studies. In fact, for several aspects of NOS, these participants articulated more informed conceptions of NOS than participants in previous studies. For these participants, faith did not appear to interfere with their ability to think scientifically in regards to their worldview beliefs regarding nature and causality. Rather, faith was incorporated into a scientifically compatible worldview regarding nature and causality that is not much different from other teachers. Other than the fact that these science teachers integrated their faith beliefs into some of their responses regarding worldview and NOS, these teachers did not appear to be much different from other science teachers. That is, there was no predictable pattern between worldview

  17. Nature of fluid flows in differentially heated cylindrical container filled with a stratified solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jai-Ching

    1992-01-01

    Semiconductor crystals such as Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te grown by unidirectional solidification Bridgmann method have shown compositional segregations in both the axial and radial directions. Due to the wide separation between the liquidus and the solidus of its pseudobinary phase diagram, there is a diffusion layer of higher HgTe content built up in the melt near the melt-solid interface which gives a solute concentration gradient in the axial direction. Because of the higher thermal conductivity in the melt than that in the crystal there is a thermal leakage through the fused silica crucible wall near the melt-solid interface. This gives a thermal gradient in the radial direction. Hart (1971), Thorpe, Hutt and Soulsby (1969) have shown that under such condition a fluid will become convectively unstable as a result of different diffusivities of temperature and solute. It is quite important to understand the effects of this thermosolute convection on the compositional segregation in the unidirectionally solidified crystals. To reach this goal, we start with a simplified problem. We study the nature of fluid flows of a stratified solution in a cylindrical container with a radial temperature gradient. The cylindrical container wall is considered to be maintained at a higher temperature than that at the center of the solution and the solution in the lower gravitational direction has higher solute concentration which decrease linearly to a lower concentration and then remain constant to the top of the solution. The sample solution is taken to be salt water.

  18. Finite element, stream function-vorticity solution of steady laminar natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, W. N. R.

    1982-12-01

    Stream function-vorticity finite element solution of two-dimensional incompressible viscous flow and natural convection is considered. Steady state solutions of the natural convection problem have been obtained for a wide range of the two independent parameters. Use of boundary vorticity formulae or iterative satisfaction of the no-slip boundary condition is avoided by application of the finite element discretization and a displacement of the appropriate discrete equations. Solution is obtained by Newton-Raphson iteration of all equations simultaneously. The method then appears to give a steady solution whenever the flow is physically steady, but it does not give a steady solution when the flow is physically unsteady. In particular, no form of asymmetric differencing is required. The method offers a degree of economy over primitive variable formulations. Physical results are given for the square cavity convection problem. The paper also reports on earlier work in which the most commonly used boundary vorticity formula was found not to satisfy the no-slip condition, and in which segregated solution procedures were attempted with very minimal success.

  19. Urban e-Mobility - Challenges and potential solutions using the example of the "E3W" concept vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perterer, M.; Martin, P.; Lochner, H.

    2014-05-01

    Due to the increasing number of people in urban areas, there is a need for affordable individual transportation. Limited space in cities together with the need for a significant reduction of pollution will lead to new mobility concepts in the near future. The aim of these concepts is not replacing the car itself, but to supply an additional personal transportation solution with local zero emission. Therefore, electrical powered vehicle concepts may be used. Due to the limited energy density and high cost of current Li-ion batteries, a significant weight reduction of the vehicle could lead to acceptable range and cost. In order to develop an affordable urban concept, the requirements for this kind of vehicle also have to be adjusted in comparison to conventional cars. This concept, the so called "E3W", combines the advantages of a two-wheeler with those of a four-wheeler, resulting in a lightweight and compact vehicle. This concept accommodates space for two persons with luggage and guarantees a high level of safety including wind and weather protection. The overall measures of this vehicle are smaller than current compact cars and allow therefore better use in cities. In order to fulfill technical and commercial requirements, a load carrying, short fiber reinforced thermoplastic body structure is chosen, combining good weight specific mechanical properties and low production costs. This highly integrated body structure also provides the body cover all in one. Pultruded glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) beams are used as the backbone for the vehicle by carrying the main loads, the front crash structure and the rear swingarm. Finally, two prototypes are built to investigate the driving behavior, proof the concept and the suitability for daily use.

  20. Designing an Illustrated Food Web to Teach Ecological Concepts: Challenges and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, Celia M.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that food webs are an efficient method through which to communicate the core idea of ecology--that all living things are interconnected. Assesses the challenges and solutions to using illustrated food webs. (Author/CCM)

  1. Children's Conceptions of Air Pressure: Exploring the Nature of Conceptual Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tytler, Russell

    1998-01-01

    Constructs case studies of individuals to explore the way conceptions change over time, and the difficulties presented by the concept of atmospheric pressure. Evaluates different structural theories of conceptual change. Contains 62 references. (DDR)

  2. School Students' Conceptions about Biodiversity Loss: Definitions, Reasons, Results and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilinc, Ahmet; Yesiltas, Namik Kemal; Kartal, Tezcan; Demiral, Ümit; Eroglu, Baris

    2013-01-01

    Environmental degradation stemming from anthropocentric causes threatens the biodiversity more than ever before, leading scholars to warn governments about the impending consequences of biodiversity loss (BL). At this point, it is of great importance to study the public's conceptions of BL in order to identify significant educational…

  3. Removal of ammonium ion from aqueous solution by natural Turkish (Yildizeli) zeolite for environmental quality.

    PubMed

    Saltali, Kadir; Sari, Ahmet; Aydin, Mehmet

    2007-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the removal efficiency of ammonium (NH(4)(+)) ion from aqueous solution using the natural Turkish (Yildizeli) zeolite and to characterize equilibrium isotherms. Experiments were carried out using batch method as a function of the solution pH, shaking time, dosage of adsorbent, and temperature. All these factors affected NH(4)(+) ion removal from aqueous solution. Equilibrium modelling data were fitted to linear Langmuir and Freundlich models. Dubinin-Redushckevich (D-R) isotherm was applied to describe the nature of ion exchange of NH(4)(+) and found that it occurred physically. Thermodynamics parameters such as change in free energy (DeltaG degrees ), enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) were also calculated. These parameters confirmed that ion exchange of NH(4)(+) by the zeolite was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the natural Turkish (Yildizeli) zeolite is suitable for the removal of NH(4)(+) ions in wastewater treatments and agricultural purposes to in terms of sustainability of environmental quality. PMID:16930832

  4. 'Normal', 'natural', 'good' or 'good-enough' birth: examining the concepts.

    PubMed

    Darra, Susanne

    2009-12-01

    In the face of increasing intervention in childbirth, 'normal birth' is currently being promoted by the World Health Organization, national governments, professional bodies and other organisations throughout the world. This paper takes a postmodernist stance and explores the idea of the 'normal' before going on to analyse normal childbirth, referring to concepts of the normal and the natural. It refers to historical developments in childbearing and lay organisations along with research relating to women's views of childbirth, to question the appropriateness of using 'normal' to describe the very individual experiences of childbirth. It laments the way in which women have been treated and arguably continue to be 'cared for' in maternity/obstetric services. It adds to the current discussion by recalling psychoanalytical theory and philosophical analysis to conclude with a call for future consideration of the 'good-enough' birth instead of concentrating on promoting normal birth which is very difficult, if not impossible to define in retrospect, or to prospectively promote. PMID:19906280

  5. Detecting Underspecification in SNOMED CT Concept Definitions Through Natural Language Processing

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Edson; Stenzhorn, Holger; Nohama, Percy; Paetzold, Jan; Schulz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Quality assurance and audit issues play a major role in maintening large biomedical terminology, such as SNOMED CT. Several automatized techniques have been proposed to facilitate the identification of weak spots and suggest adequate improvements. In this study, we address a well-known issue within SNOMED CT: Albeit the wording of many free-text concept descriptions suggests a connection to other concepts, they are often not referred to in the logical concept definition. To detect such inconsistencies, we use a semantic indexing approach which maps free text onto a sequence of semantic identifiers. Applied to SNOMED CT concepts without attributes, our technique spots refinable concepts and suggests appropriate attributes, i.e., connections to other concepts. Based on a manual analysis of random samples, we estimate that approximately 18,000 refinable concepts can be found. PMID:20351905

  6. A leaky aquifer below Champlain Sea clay: closed-form solutions for natural seepage.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Robert P; Saucier, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Closed-form solutions are proposed for natural seepage in semiconfined (leaky) aquifers such as those existing below the massive Champlain Sea clay layers in the Saint-Lawrence River Valley. The solutions are for an ideal horizontal leaky aquifer below an ideal aquitard that may have either a constant thickness and a constant hydraulic head at its surface, or a variable thickness and a variable hydraulic head at its surface. A few simplifying assumptions were needed to obtain the closed-form solutions. These have been verified using a finite element method, which did not make any of the assumptions but gave an excellent agreement for hydraulic heads and groundwater velocities. For example, the difference between the two solutions was smaller than 1 mm for variations in the 5 to 8 m range for the hydraulic head in the semiconfined aquifer. Note that fitting the hydraulic head data of monitoring wells to the theoretical solutions gives only the ratio of the aquifer and aquitard hydraulic conductivities, a clear case of multiple solutions for an inverse problem. Consequently, field permeability tests in the aquitard and the aquifer, and pumping tests in the aquifer, are still needed to determine the hydraulic conductivity values. PMID:23441962

  7. The effectiveness of conceptual change texts and concept clipboards in learning the nature of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çil, Emine; Çepni, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most important goals of science education is to enable students to understand the nature of science (NOS). However, generally regular science teaching in classrooms does not help students improve informed NOS views. Purpose: This study investigated the influence of an explicit reflective conceptual change approach compared with an explicit reflective inquiry-oriented approach on seventh graders' understanding of NOS. Sample: The research was conducted with seventh grade students. A total of 44 students participated in the study. Design and method: The study was an interpretive study because this study focused on the meanings that students attach to target aspects of NOS. Participants were divided into two groups, each consisting of 22 students. One of the groups learned NOS with an explicit reflective conceptual change approach. The requirements of conceptual change were provided through the use of conceptual change texts and concept cartoons. The other group learned NOS with an explicit reflective inquiry-oriented approach. The data were collected through open-ended questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. These instruments were employed in a pre-test, a post-test and a delayed test. Students' views of the aspects of NOS were categorized as naive, transitional and informed. Results: The result of this study indicated that before receiving instruction, most of the participants had transitional views of the tentative, empirical and imaginative and creative aspects of the NOS, and they had naive understandings of the distinction between observation and inference. The instruction in the experimental group led to a 60% - a 25% increase in the number of students who possessed an informed understanding of the tentative, empirical, creative and observation and inference aspect of the NOS. The instruction in the control group led to a 30% - a 15% increase in the informed NOS views. Conclusion: The explicit reflective conceptual change approach

  8. Exploring Fundamental Concepts in Aqueous Solution Conductivity: A General Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; Stevanov, Kelly; Barlag, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Using a conductivity sensor, a temperature sensor, and a datalogger, fundamental factors that affect conductivity are explored. These factors are (i) concentration, (ii) temperature, (iii) ion charge, and (iv) size and or mass of anion. In addition, the conductivities of a number of other solutions are measured. This lab has been designed to…

  9. Student Conceptions of Ionic Compounds in Solution and the Influences of Sociochemical Norms on Individual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfa, Abdi-Rizak M.

    2013-01-01

    Using the symbolic interactionist perspective that meaning is constituted as individuals interact with one another, this study examined how group thinking during cooperative inquiry-based activity on chemical bonding theories shaped and influenced college students' understanding of the properties of ionic compounds in solution. The analysis…

  10. Student Learning of Thermochemical Concepts in the Context of Solution Calorimetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Meltzer, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes student performance on solution calorimetry problems in an introductory university chemistry class. Includes data from written classroom exams for 207 students and an extensive longitudinal interview with a student. Indicates learning difficulties, most of which appear to originate from failure to understand, that net increases and…

  11. Innovative Learning Solutions in New Communities: Opportunities and Challenges to Teachers' Conceptions of Workspace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costley, Debra

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the possibilities and opportunities created by large-scale property developers for new ways of learning and working in master-planned communities. The discussion is based on the findings from research of one developer's innovative solutions to learning in newly developed communities and specifically draws on data from one…

  12. Natural micro-scale heterogeneity induced solute and nanoparticle retardation in fractured crystalline rock.

    PubMed

    Huber, F; Enzmann, F; Wenka, A; Bouby, M; Dentz, M; Schäfer, T

    2012-05-15

    We studied tracer (Tritiated Water (HTO); Tritium replaces one of the stable hydrogen atoms in the H(2)O molecule) and nanoparticle (quantum dots (QD)) transport by means of column migration experiments and comparison to 3D CFD modeling. Concerning the modeling approach, a natural single fracture was scanned using micro computed tomography (μCT) serving as direct input for the model generation. The 3D simulation does not incorporate any chemical processes besides the molecular diffusion coefficient solely reflecting the impact of fracture heterogeneity on mass (solute and nanoparticles) transport. Complex fluid velocity distributions (flow channeling and flowpath heterogeneity) evolve as direct function of fracture geometry. Both experimental and simulated solute and colloidal breakthrough curves show heavy tailing (non-Fickian transport behavior), respectively. Regarding the type of quantum dots and geochemical conditions prevailing (Grimsel ground water chemistry, QD and diorite surface charge, respectively and porosity of the Äspö diorite drill core) experimental breakthrough of the quantum dots always arrives faster than the solute tracer in line with the modeling results. Besides retardation processes like sorption, filtration, straining or matrix diffusion, the results show that natural 3D fracture heterogeneity represents an important additional retardation mechanism for solutes and colloidal phases. This is clearly verified by the numerical simulations, where the 3D real natural fracture geometry and the resulting complex flow velocity distribution is the only possible process causing solute/nanoparticle retardation. Differences between the experimental results and the simulations are discussed with respect to uncertainties in the μCT measurements and experimental and simulation boundary conditions, respectively. PMID:22484609

  13. Removal Of Copper From Aqueous Solutions By Using Natural And Fe-Modified Clinoptilolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovský, Marek; Sirotiak, Maroš; Soldán, Maroš

    2015-06-01

    Removal of copper from aqueous solution on the natural and modified clinoptilolite was studied under static conditions. Batch adsorptions of copper were performed to investigate the effects of contact time and initial metal ion concentration. The Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms were used to analyse the experimental data. The kinetic analyses of the adsorption processes were performed using the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models.

  14. Thai and Bangladeshi In-Service Science Teachers' Conceptions of Nature of Science: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buaraphan, Khajornsak; Abedin Forhad, Ziaul

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of nature of science (NOS) serves as one of the desirable characteristics of science teachers. The current study explored 55 Thai and 110 Bangladeshi in-service secondary science teachers' conceptions of NOS regarding scientific knowledge, scientific method, scientists' work, and scientific enterprise, by using the Myths of…

  15. Using the History of Research on Sickle Cell Anemia to Affect Preservice Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric M.

    This paper examines how using a series of lessons developed from the history of research on sickle cell anemia affects preservice teacher conceptions of the nature of science (NOS). The importance of a pedagogy that has students do science through an integral use of the history of science is effective at enriching students' NOS views is presented.…

  16. Changing High School Students' Conceptions of the Nature of Science: The Partnership for Research and Education in Plants (PREP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Eric Dwayne

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether participation in the Partnership for Research and Education in Plants (PREP), a long-term authentic plant research project, in conjunction with explicit verses implicit instruction can change high school students' conceptions of the nature of science (NOS). The participants included a total of 134 students comprised…

  17. Students' Conceptions of the Nature of Science: Perspectives from Canadian and Korean Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hyeran; Nielsen, Wendy; Woodruff, Earl

    2014-01-01

    This study examined and compared students' understanding of nature of science (NOS) with 521 Grade 8 Canadian and Korean students using a mixed methods approach. The concepts of NOS were measured using a survey that had both quantitative and qualitative elements. Descriptive statistics and one-way multivariate analysis of variances examined…

  18. An Examination of the Documentary Film "Einstein and Eddington" in Terms of Nature of Science Themes, Philosophical Movements, and Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapucu, Munise Seçkin

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to examine nature of science themes, philosophical movements, and overall concepts covered in the documentary film, "Einstein and Eddington". A qualitative research method was used. In this study, the documentary film "Einstein and Eddington," the viewing time of which is 1 hour and 28 minutes, was used as the…

  19. Teaching Nature of Science to Preservice Science Teachers: A Phenomenographic Study of Chinese Teacher Educators' Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Zhi Hong; Wong, Siu Ling; Zhan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from the phenomenographic perspective, this study investigated Chinese science teacher educators' conceptions of teaching nature of science (NOS) to preservice science teachers through two semi-structured interviews. The subjects were twenty-four science teacher educators in the developed regions in China. Five key dimensions emerged…

  20. Outcomes of Nature of Science Instruction along a Context Continuum: Preservice Secondary Science Teachers' Conceptions and Instructional Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Randy L.; Mulvey, Bridget K.; Maeng, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation examined outcomes associated with nature of science (NOS) instruction along a science-content context continuum on the development of secondary preservice science teachers' conceptions of and plans to teach NOS, moving beyond the common dichotomy of contextualized versus noncontextualized instruction. Participants comprised six…

  1. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is typically "non-Fickian"; that is, it is characterized by early breakthrough and long tailing and by nonlinear growth of the Green function-centered second moment. This behavior is due to the effects of (1) multirate diffusion occurring between the highly permeable fracture network and the low-permeability rock matrix, (2) a wide range of advection rates in the fractures and, possibly, the matrix as well, and (3) a range of path lengths. As a consequence, prediction of solute transport processes at the macroscale represents a formidable challenge. Classical dual-porosity (or mobile-immobile) approaches in conjunction with an advection-dispersion equation and macroscopic dispersivity commonly fail to predict breakthrough of fractured porous media accurately. It was recently demonstrated that the continuous time random walk (CTRW) method can be used as a generalized upscaling approach. Here we extend this work and use results from high-resolution finite element-finite volume-based simulations of solute transport in an outcrop analogue of a naturally fractured reservoir to calibrate the CTRW method by extracting a distribution of retention times. This procedure allows us to predict breakthrough at other model locations accurately and to gain significant insight into the nature of the fracture-matrix interaction in naturally fractured porous reservoirs with geologically realistic fracture geometries.

  2. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2010-04-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is typically 'non-Fickian'; that is, it is characterized by early breakthrough and long tailing and by nonlinear growth of the Green function-centered second moment. This behavior is due to the effects of (1) multirate diffusion occurring between the highly permeable fracture network and the low-permeability rock matrix, (2) a wide range of advection rates in the fractures and, possibly, the matrix as well, and (3) a range of path lengths. As a consequence, prediction of solute transport processes at the macroscale represents a formidable challenge. Classical dual-porosity (or mobile-immobile) approaches in conjunction with an advection-dispersion equation and macroscopic dispersivity commonly fail to predict breakthrough of fractured porous media accurately. It was recently demonstrated that the continuous time random walk (CTRW) method can be used as a generalized upscaling approach. Here we extend this work and use results from high-resolution finite element-finite volume-based simulations of solute transport in an outcrop analogue of a naturally fractured reservoir to calibrate the CTRW method by extracting a distribution of retention times. This procedure allows us to predict breakthrough at other model locations accurately and to gain significant insight into the nature of the fracture-matrix interaction in naturally fractured porous reservoirs with geologically realistic fracture geometries.

  3. The NUCLEUS integrated electronic patient dossier breakthrough and concepts of an open solution.

    PubMed

    Kilsdonk, A C; Frandji, B; van der Werff, A

    1996-07-01

    This paper addresses the requirements of healthcare providers and hospital managers vis-à-vis electronic patient records that can be integrated. It starts from some critical failure factors, found with previous attempts to standardise the electronic health record. Standardisation appears to be the key issue: the subject of standardisation requires delicate positioning. Technology must provide us with the means to obtain the standardised foundation for an integrated health record concept, which can be completely configured and customised to meet the requirements of health professionals and institutions involved. NUCLEUS, project A2025 in the AIM programme, has taken on this endeavour, and with good success. This paper summarises the benefits of this approach for various categories of people interested in using electronic patient records. Moreover, it illustrates NUCLEUS' contribution to achieving seamless integration of care. Furthermore, this paper explains the conceptual innovations that have been achieved in the NUCLEUS project. It consolidates the main concept of Act Management, structuring the professional primary process as well as the interprofessional communication. These concepts are subsequently expanded to include the key elements of the NUCLEUS integrated electronic patient record. Next, the paper reflects on what has appeared to be one of the critical success factors of the electronic patient record: its configuration and customisation facilities. These facilities make it possible to access the patient record at various intuitive aggregation levels and to make the integrated patient record 'look like' the individually specialised record of the respective healthcare professionals. Finally, the paper addresses various topics required to facilitate the successful implementation and operation of the NUCLEUS integrated electronic patient record like security, integrity, message communication, distribution, heterogeneity and the context of the hospital

  4. Supply Chain Based Solution to Prevent Fuel Tax Evasion: Proof of Concept Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Capps, Gary J; Lascurain, Mary Beth; Franzese, Oscar; Earl, Dennis Duncan; West, David L; McIntyre, Timothy J; Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Connatser, Raynella M; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Moore, Sheila A

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this research was to provide a proof-of-concept (POC) system for preventing non-taxable (non-highway diesel use) or low-taxable (jet fuel) petrochemical products from being blended with taxable fuel products and preventing taxable fuel products from cross-jurisdiction evasion. The research worked to fill the need to validate the legitimacy of individual loads, offloads, and movements by integrating and validating, on a near-real-time basis, information from global positioning system (GPS), valve sensors, level sensors, and fuel-marker sensors.

  5. The contribution of nature to people: Applying concepts of values and properties to rate the management importance of natural elements.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael J; Wagner, Christian; Wallace, Ken J; Pourabdollah, Amir; Lewis, Loretta

    2016-06-15

    An important, and yet unresolved question in natural resource management is how best to manage natural elements and their associated values to ensure human wellbeing. Specifically, there is a lack of measurement tools to assess the contribution of nature to people. We present one approach to overcome this global issue and show that the preferred state of any system element, in terms of realising human values, is a function of element properties. Consequently, natural resource managers need to understand the nature of the relationships between element properties and values if they are to successfully manage for human wellbeing. In two case studies of applied planning, we demonstrate how to identify key element properties, quantify their relationships to priority human values, and combine this information to model the contribution of elements to human wellbeing. In one of the two case studies we also compared the modelling outputs with directly elicited stakeholder opinions regarding the importance of the elements for realising the given priority values. The two, largely congruent outputs provide additional support for the approach. The study shows that rating sets of elements on their relative overall value for human wellbeing, or utility, provides critical information for subsequent management decisions and a basis for productive new research. We consider that the described approach is broadly applicable within the domain of natural resource management. PMID:27056439

  6. Effects of radiation damping for biomolecular NMR experiments in solution: a hemisphere concept for water suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    Abundant solvent nuclear spins, such as water protons in aqueous solution, cause radiation damping in NMR experiments. It is important to know how the effect of radiation damping appears in high-resolution protein NMR because macromolecular studies always require very high magnetic field strengths with a highly sensitive NMR probe that can easily cause radiation damping. Here, we show the behavior of water magnetization after a pulsed-field gradient (PFG) using nutation experiments at 900 MHz with a cryogenic probe: when water magnetization is located in the upper hemisphere (having +Z component, parallel to the external magnetic field), dephasing of the magnetization by a PFG effectively suppresses residual water magnetization in the transverse plane. In contrast, when magnetization is located in the lower hemisphere (having −Z component), the small residual transverse component remaining after a PFG is still sufficient to induce radiation damping. Based on this observation, we designed 1H-15N HSQC experiments in which water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere, but not necessarily along Z, and compared them with the conventional experiments, in which water magnetization is inverted during the t1 period. The result demonstrates moderate gain of signal-to-noise ratio, 0–28%. Designing the experiments such that water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere allows shorter pulses to be used compared to the complete water flip-back and, thereby, is useful as a building block of protein NMR pulse programs in solution. PMID:27524944

  7. Natural Hazard Problem and Solution Definition in the News Media: the Case of Tropical Storm Allison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, Eric; Mosher-Howe, Katrina

    2010-05-01

    Focusing events such as natural or technological disasters can have significant impacts on public policy and planning in both the near and long term. These impacts can manifest at different temporal scales ranging from the period of immediate attention and disaster relief through the period of recovery and reconstruction and beyond. These impacts and associated decisions can be studied in retrospect and understood as not only short-term reactions, but as long-term components of subsequent natural hazard planning and public policy. By studying in detail how an event was defined, and the policy and planning alternatives that were raised or recommended in response to a disaster event, we can better understand the role that disaster-related focusing events play in the long-term evolution of a community's public policy, infrastructural planning efforts, and responses to natural disasters. This paper will use a focusing event framework to explore the local and regional policy impacts over time of a major urban flood in Houston, Texas, Tropical Storm Allison. Tropical Storm Allison (TSA), dropped 36 inches of rain on Houston over a period of four days in early June 2001, and was responsible for 22 deaths, 70,000 flood damaged homes, and 5 billion in damage to the region. The primary data source for this effort is a database of 500 articles from the major regional newspaper, the Houston Chronicle, over the period of 2001 through 2008. These articles were coded for multiple variables, including, cause, effect and impact (financial and social), blame, problem and solution definition and solution acceptance). This paper focuses primarily on the measures of problem definition (how was TSA, as an event, defined in the media, for example, as an act of God, or as a result of poor planning or decision making, etc), and on solution definition (what solutions were proposed to mitigate or adapt to future storms of this magnitude, how were they linked to the definition of the problem

  8. A Resource for Eliciting Student Alternative Conceptions: Examining the Adaptability of a Concept Inventory for Natural Selection at the Secondary School Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Margaret M.; Petrosino, Anthony J.

    2016-07-01

    The Conceptual Inventory of Natural Selection (CINS) is an example of a research-based instrument that assesses conceptual understanding in an area that contains well-documented alternative conceptions. Much of the CINS's use and original validation has been relegated to undergraduate settings, but the information learned from student responses on the CINS can also potentially be a useful resource for teachers at the secondary level. Because of its structure, the CINS can have a role in eliciting alternative conceptions and induce deeper conceptual understanding by having student ideas leveraged during instruction. In a first step toward this goal, the present study further investigated the CINS's internal properties by having it administered to a group (n = 339) of students among four different biology teachers at a predominantly Latino, economically disadvantaged high school. In addition, incidences of the concept inventory's use among the teachers' practices were collected for support of its adaptability at the secondary level. Despite the teachers' initial enthusiasm for the CINS's use as an assessment tool in the present study, results from a principal components analysis demonstrate inconsistencies between the original and present validations. Results also reveal how the teachers think CINS items may be revised for future use among secondary student populations.

  9. Three-dimensional perturbation solution of the natural vibrations of piezoelectric rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupiał, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    The paper discusses a perturbation solution of the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a piezoelectric rectangular plate modelled as a three-dimensional body. The coupled theory of piezoelectricity is used, with the governing equations consisting of one electrostatic and three mechanical equations coupled through the piezoelectric effect. Analytical perturbation formulas up to the first-order terms have been derived and used. An important difference of the present analysis as compared to the classical perturbation method consists in that the small parameter enters not only the governing equations but the boundary conditions as well. To address this complication an efficient new approach that makes use of generalized functions has been proposed. Results of the natural frequencies and mode shapes obtained by the perturbation method are discussed for a thin piezoelectric rectangular plate, a thick plate and a piezoelectric parallelepiped. All the results obtained using the perturbation method have been compared with the exact solutions of the coupled electromechanical problem. The proposed perturbation approach furnishes an efficient approximate method of studying the coupled piezoelectric vibration problem. The main advantage of the method derives from the fact that only the elastic solution is required, the effect of piezoelectric coupling being accounted for at a post-processing stage.

  10. The Online Dissemination of Nature-Health Concepts: Lessons from Sentiment Analysis of Social Media Relating to "Nature-Deficit Disorder".

    PubMed

    Palomino, Marco; Taylor, Tim; Göker, Ayse; Isaacs, John; Warber, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Evidence continues to grow supporting the idea that restorative environments, green exercise, and nature-based activities positively impact human health. Nature-deficit disorder, a journalistic term proposed to describe the ill effects of people's alienation from nature, is not yet formally recognized as a medical diagnosis. However, over the past decade, the phrase has been enthusiastically taken up by some segments of the lay public. Social media, such as Twitter, with its opportunities to gather "big data" related to public opinions, offers a medium for exploring the discourse and dissemination around nature-deficit disorder and other nature-health concepts. In this paper, we report our experience of collecting more than 175,000 tweets, applying sentiment analysis to measure positive, neutral or negative feelings, and preliminarily mapping the impact on dissemination. Sentiment analysis is currently used to investigate the repercussions of events in social networks, scrutinize opinions about products and services, and understand various aspects of the communication in Web-based communities. Based on a comparison of nature-deficit-disorder "hashtags" and more generic nature hashtags, we make recommendations for the better dissemination of public health messages through changes to the framing of messages. We show the potential of Twitter to aid in better understanding the impact of the natural environment on human health and wellbeing. PMID:26797628

  11. Major Design Drivers for LEO Space Surveillance in Europe and Solution Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krag, Holger; Flohrer, Tim; Klinkrad, Heiner

    Europe is preparing for the development of an autonomous system for space situational aware-ness. One important segment of this new system will be dedicated to surveillance and tracking of space objects in Earth orbits. First concept and capability analysis studies have led to a draft system proposal. This proposal foresees, in a first deployment step, a groundbased system consisting of radar sensors and a network of optical telescopes. These sensors will be designed to have the capability of building up and maintaining a catalogue of space objects. A number of related services will be provided, including collision avoidance and the prediction of uncontrolled reentry events. Currently, the user requirements are consolidated, defining the different services, and the related accuracy and timeliness of the derived products. In this consolidation process parameters like the lower diameter limit above which catalogue coverage is to be achieved, the degree of population coverage in various orbital regions and the accuracy of the orbit data maintained in the catalogue are important design drivers for the selection of number and location of the sensors, and the definition of the required sensor performance. Further, the required minimum time for the detection of a manoeuvre, a newly launched object or a fragmentation event, significantly determines the required surveillance performance. In the requirement consolidation process the performance to be specified has to be based on a careful analysis which takes into account accuracy constraints of the services to be provided, the technical feasibility, complexity and costs. User requirements can thus not be defined with-out understanding the consequences they would pose on the system design. This paper will outline the design definition process for the surveillance and tracking segment of the European space situational awareness system. The paper will focus on the low-Earth orbits (LEO). It will present the core user

  12. Problem Definition and Solution Concept for En Route Constrained Airspace Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven; Vivona, Robert

    2000-01-01

    NASA's AATT Program is investigating potential ground-based decision support tool (DST) development for en route controllers and managers. NASA's previous work in en route DST development has focused on Transition airspace, where aircraft are impacted by constraints associated with the transition of aircraft from en route to terminal airspace. This paper investigates the problems associated with aircraft in non-transitional en route airspace, termed Constrained Airspace. A literature search was performed to catalog previously identified constrained airspace problems. The results of this search were investigated with industry representatives to validate these problems were significant in constrained airspace. Three general problem areas were identified. The first problem area involves negative impacts caused by a loss of airspace (e.g., activation of Special Use Airspace (SUA), weather cell formation, and overloaded sectors). The second problem area is the lack of identifying and taking advantage of gained airspace (e.g., SUA deactivation, weather dissipation, and sector loading reductions). The third problem area is unforeseen negative impacts caused by the acceptance of user routing requests (e.g., a route change into an area of congestion that negated the users intended benefit). Based upon the problems identified, an operational concept was developed for a DST to help handle these problems efficiently. The goal is to strategically identify constrained airspace problems and to provide functionality to support ARTCC TMUs in resolving the identified impacts. The capability lends itself well to TMU and Airline Operations Center (AOC) collaboration.

  13. Darwin's "Imaginary Illustrations": Creatively Teaching Evolutionary Concepts & the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Alan C.

    2010-01-01

    An overlooked feature of Darwin's work is his use of "imaginary illustrations" to show that natural selection is competent to produce adaptive, evolutionary change. When set in the context of Darwin's methodology, these thought experiments provide a novel way to teach natural selection and the nature of science.

  14. Solving problems on base of concepts formalization of language image and figurative meaning of the natural-language constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisikalo, Oleg V.; Cieszczyk, Sławomir; Yussupova, Gulbahar

    2015-12-01

    Building of "clever" thesaurus by algebraic means on base of concepts formalization of language image and figurative meaning of the natural-language constructs in the article are proposed. A formal theory based on a binary operator of directional associative relation is constructed and an understanding of an associative normal form of image constructions is introduced. A model of a commutative semigroup, which provides a presentation of a sentence as three components of an interrogative language image construction, is considered.

  15. New fundamental evidence of non-classical structure in the combination of natural concepts.

    PubMed

    Aerts, D; Sozzo, S; Veloz, T

    2016-01-13

    We recently performed cognitive experiments on conjunctions and negations of two concepts with the aim of investigating the combination problem of concepts. Our experiments confirmed the deviations (conceptual vagueness, underextension, overextension etc.) from the rules of classical (fuzzy) logic and probability theory observed by several scholars in concept theory, while our data were successfully modelled in a quantum-theoretic framework developed by ourselves. In this paper, we isolate a new, very stable and systematic pattern of violation of classicality that occurs in concept combinations. In addition, the strength and regularity of this non-classical effect leads us to believe that it occurs at a more fundamental level than the deviations observed up to now. It is our opinion that we have identified a deep non-classical mechanism determining not only how concepts are combined but, rather, how they are formed. We show that this effect can be faithfully modelled in a two-sector Fock space structure, and that it can be exactly explained by assuming that human thought is the superposition of two processes, a 'logical reasoning', guided by 'logic', and a 'conceptual reasoning', guided by 'emergence', and that the latter generally prevails over the former. All these findings provide new fundamental support to our quantum-theoretic approach to human cognition. PMID:26621983

  16. A new approach to evaluate natural zeolite ability to sorb lead (Pb) from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosos, Evangelos I. P.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.

    2013-04-01

    Lead (Pb) is a hazardous pollutant commonly found in aquatic ecosystems. Among several methods available, the addition of sorbent amendments to soils or sediments is attractive, since its application is relatively simple, while it can also be cost effective when a low cost and re-usable sorbent is used; e.g. natural zeolites. Zeolites are crystalline aluminosilicates with a three-dimensional structure composed of a set of cavities occupied by large ions and water molecules. Zeolites can accommodate a wide variety of cations, such as Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, which are rather loosely held and can readily be exchanged for others in an aqueous solution. Natural zeolites are capable of removing cations, such as lead, from aqueous solutions by ion exchange. There is a wide variation in the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of natural zeolites because of the different nature of various zeolites cage structures, natural structural defects, adsorbed ions, and their associated gangue minerals. Naturally occurring zeolites are rarely pure and are contaminated to varying degrees by other minerals, such as clays and feldspars, metals, quartz, or other zeolites as well. These impurities affect the CEC even for samples originated from the same region but from a different source. CEC of the material increases with decreasing impurity content. Potentially exchangeable ions in such impurities do not necessarily participate in ion exchange mechanism, while, in some cases, impurities may additionally block the access to active sites. For zeoliferous rocks having the same percentage of a zeolitic phase, the CEC increases with decreasing Si/Al ratio, as the more Si ions are substituted by Al ions, the more negative the valence of the matrix becomes. Sodium seems to be the most effective exchangeable ion for lead. On the contrary, it is unlikely that the potassium content of the zeolite would be substituted. A pretreatment with high concentration solutions of Na, such as 2 M NaCl, can

  17. Outcomes of nature of science instruction along a context continuum: preservice secondary science teachers' conceptions and instructional intentions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Randy L.; Mulvey, Bridget K.; Maeng, Jennifer L.

    2016-02-01

    This investigation examined outcomes associated with nature of science (NOS) instruction along a science-content context continuum on the development of secondary preservice science teachers' conceptions of and plans to teach NOS, moving beyond the common dichotomy of contextualized versus noncontextualized instruction. Participants comprised six teacher cohorts (n = 70) enrolled in a two-year Master of Teaching program. Participants were explicitly taught current NOS conceptions using activities that incorporated varied degrees of contextualization and were informed by conceptual change principles during the first program year. Participants' pre- and post-instruction conceptions were assessed using VNOS-C questionnaire written responses and follow-up interviews. Participants' views were classified by degree of alignment (non, partially, or fully aligned) with current NOS conceptions. Interview transcripts were analyzed using analytic induction to verify/refine VNOS responses and to identify patterns in NOS instructional plans and rationales. Wilcoxon signed ranks tests were run to assess possible statistical significance of pre- to post-instruction changes. Participants' responses shifted markedly toward more aligned NOS conceptions post-instruction, with substantial and statistically significant gains for each assessed tenet (all p-values <.001). All participants planned future NOS instruction and most expressed a sophisticated rationale for this choice, including that NOS supported the teaching of key concepts such as evolution. These results indicate that teaching and scaffolding NOS lessons along a context continuum can be effective in eliciting desired changes in preservice teachers' NOS conceptions and instructional intentions within the confines of the science methods course. Future research will examine post-methods course and post-program NOS instruction.

  18. Developing an Evidence-Based Epilepsy Risk Assessment eHealth Solution: From Concept to Market

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Rohit; Hanna, Jane; McLean, Brendan; Osland, Alex; Milligan, Cathryn; Ball, Abbie; Jory, Caryn; Walker, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is possibly the most common cause of death as a result of complications from epilepsy. The need to educate and regularly review risk for all patients with epilepsy is paramount, but rarely delivered in actual clinical practice. Evidence suggests that education around SUDEP and modifiable risk variables translate into better self-management of epilepsy. Objective We aimed to develop and implement an eHealth solution to support education and self-management of risks, in epilepsy. Methods We undertook an innovation pathways approach, including problem identification, feasibility assessment, design, implementation, and marketing. People with epilepsy were provided a smartphone-based app (Epilepsy Self-Monitor, EpSMon), which translates the clinical risk assessment tool into an educational and self-monitoring platform, for the self-management of epilepsy. Results Results include the success of the marketing campaign, and in what areas, with an estimated reach of approximately 38 million people. EpSMon has proved a success in academic and clinical circles, attracting awards and nominations for awards. The number of users of EpSMon, after 3 months, turned out to be lower than expected (N=221). A 4-month trial of the app in use in the United Kingdom, and the success of the marketing strategy, point to necessary changes to the model of delivery and marketing, summarized in this paper. These include the marketing message, user cost model, and need for the availability of an Android version. Conclusions EpSMon has proven a success in respect to its reception by academics, clinicians, stakeholder groups, and the patients who use it. There is work needed to promote the model and increase its acceptability/attractiveness, including broadening the marketing message, increasing its availability, and reducing its cost. Future development and promotion of the tool will hopefully inform iterative design of its core features for

  19. Radiation effects on bifurcation and dual solutions in transient natural convection in a horizontal annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Kang; Yi, Hong-Liang Tan, He-Ping

    2014-05-15

    Transitions and bifurcations of transient natural convection in a horizontal annulus with radiatively participating medium are numerically investigated using the coupled lattice Boltzmann and direct collocation meshless (LB-DCM) method. As a hybrid approach based on a common multi-scale Boltzmann-type model, the LB-DCM scheme is easy to implement and has an excellent flexibility in dealing with the irregular geometries. Separate particle distribution functions in the LBM are used to calculate the density field, the velocity field and the thermal field. In the radiatively participating medium, the contribution of thermal radiation to natural convection must be taken into account, and it is considered as a radiative term in the energy equation that is solved by the meshless method with moving least-squares (MLS) approximation. The occurrence of various instabilities and bifurcative phenomena is analyzed for different Rayleigh number Ra and Prandtl number Pr with and without radiation. Then, bifurcation diagrams and dual solutions are presented for relevant radiative parameters, such as convection-radiation parameter Rc and optical thickness τ. Numerical results show that the presence of volumetric radiation changes the static temperature gradient of the fluid, and generally results in an increase in the flow critical value. Besides, the existence and development of dual solutions of transient convection in the presence of radiation are greatly affected by radiative parameters. Finally, the advantage of LB-DCM combination is discussed, and the potential benefits of applying the LB-DCM method to multi-field coupling problems are demonstrated.

  20. On the viscosity of natural hyper-saline solutions and its importance: The Dead Sea brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Shandalov, Semion; Lensky, Nadav

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the density, temperature and viscosity of hypersaline solutions, both natural and synthetic, is explored. An empirical equation of the density-viscosity relationship as a function of temperature was developed for the Dead Sea brine and its dilutions. The viscosity levels of the Dead Sea brine (density of 1.24 ṡ 103 kg/m3; viscosity of 3.6 mPa s at 20 °C) and of the more extremely saline natural brine (density of 1.37 ṡ 103 kg/m3) were found to be ∼3 and ∼10 times greater than that of fresh water, respectively. The combined effect of the above changes in viscosity and density on the hydraulic conductivity is reduction by a factor of 3-7. The chemical composition significantly affects the viscosity of brines with similar densities, whereby solutions with a higher Mg/Na ratio have higher viscosity. This explains the extremely high viscosity of the Dead Sea and related Mg-rich brines in comparison with the much lower values of NaCl and KCl brines with similar density. Possible impacts of the results include reduced settling velocity of grains in hypersaline viscous brines and changing hydraulic dynamics at the freshwater-saltwater and the vicinity of sinkholes.

  1. [Adsorption of Phosphate by Lanthanum Hydroxide/Natural Zeolite Composites from Low Concentration Phosphate Solution].

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-wei; Wang, Hong; Zhan, Yan-hui; Chen, Dong-mei

    2016-01-15

    A series of composites of lanthanum hydroxide/natural zeolite ( La( OH) 3/NZ composites) were prepared by co-precipitation method, and these composites were used as adsorbents to remove phosphate from aqueous solution. The phosphate adsorption capacities of different composites prepared with different precipitated pH values were compared in batch mode. The adsorption characteristics of phosphate from aqueous solution on the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11 was investigated using batch experiments. The results showed that the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH values of 5-7 and 13 had a low adsorption capacity for phosphate in aqueous solution, while the La( OH) 3/NZ composites prepared with the precipitated pH values of 9-12 exhibited much higher phosphate adsorption capacity. The phosphate adsorption capacity of the La (OH)3/NZ composite increased with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 9 to 11, but remained basically unchanged with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 11 to 12. The equilibrium adsorption data of phosphate from aqueous solution on the La ( OH ) 3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11 could be described by the Langmuir isotherm model with the predicted maximum phosphate adsorption of 44 mg x g(-1) (phosphate solution pH 7 and 30 degrees C). The kinetic data of phosphate adsorption from low concentration phosphate solution on the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11 well followed a pseudo-second-order model. The presence of Cl- and SO4(2-) in low concentration phosphate solution had no negative effect on phosphate adsorption onto the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11, while the presence of HCO3- slightly inhibited the adsorption of phosphate. Coexisting humic acid had a negative effect on the adsorption of phosphate at low concentration on the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the

  2. Removal of phosphate from aqueous solutions and sewage using natural and surface modified coir pith.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, K Anoop; Haridas, Ajit

    2008-04-01

    Iron impregnated coir pith (CP-Fe-I) can be effectively used for the removal of phosphate from aqueous streams and sewage. Iron impregnation on natural coir pith was carried out by drop by drop addition method. The effect of various factors such as pH, initial concentration of phosphate, contact time and adsorbent dose on phosphate adsorption was studied by batch technique. The pH at 3.0 favored the maximum adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solutions. The effect of pH on phosphate adsorption was explained by pH(zpc), phosphate speciation in solution and affinity of anions towards the adsorbent sites. A comparative study of the adsorption of phosphate using CP-Fe-I and CP (coir pith) was made and results show that the former one is five to six times more effective than the latter. Kinetic studies revealed that the adsorption process followed a pseudo-second order kinetic model. Adsorption followed Langmuir isotherm model. Column studies were conducted to examine the utility of the investigated adsorbent for the removal of phosphate from continuously flowing aqueous solutions. PMID:17706344

  3. Multi-period natural gas market modeling Applications, stochastic extensions and solution approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egging, Rudolf Gerardus

    This dissertation develops deterministic and stochastic multi-period mixed complementarity problems (MCP) for the global natural gas market, as well as solution approaches for large-scale stochastic MCP. The deterministic model is unique in the combination of the level of detail of the actors in the natural gas markets and the transport options, the detailed regional and global coverage, the multi-period approach with endogenous capacity expansions for transportation and storage infrastructure, the seasonal variation in demand and the representation of market power according to Nash-Cournot theory. The model is applied to several scenarios for the natural gas market that cover the formation of a cartel by the members of the Gas Exporting Countries Forum, a low availability of unconventional gas in the United States, and cost reductions in long-distance gas transportation. 1 The results provide insights in how different regions are affected by various developments, in terms of production, consumption, traded volumes, prices and profits of market participants. The stochastic MCP is developed and applied to a global natural gas market problem with four scenarios for a time horizon until 2050 with nineteen regions and containing 78,768 variables. The scenarios vary in the possibility of a gas market cartel formation and varying depletion rates of gas reserves in the major gas importing regions. Outcomes for hedging decisions of market participants show some significant shifts in the timing and location of infrastructure investments, thereby affecting local market situations. A first application of Benders decomposition (BD) is presented to solve a large-scale stochastic MCP for the global gas market with many hundreds of first-stage capacity expansion variables and market players exerting various levels of market power. The largest problem solved successfully using BD contained 47,373 variables of which 763 first-stage variables, however using BD did not result in

  4. Concept Representation in Natural and Artificial Languages: Axioms, Extensions and Applications for Fuzzy Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goguen, Joseph A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Paper reports research related to mathematics, philosophy, computer science and linguistics. It gives a system of axioms for a relatively simple form of fuzzy set theory, and uses these axioms to consider the accuracy of representing concepts in various ways by fuzzy sets. (Author)

  5. Using a Concept Cartoon© Method to Address Elementary School Students' Ideas about Natural Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minárechová, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the identification and subsequent development or modification of students´ ideas about scientific phenomena by teaching by concept cartoons© method. We found out ideas of students of the fourth grade of primary school by conceptual tasks which were parts of quasi-experiment (pretest and posttest design). For triangulation…

  6. Influence of Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science on Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarieddine, Diana; BouJaoude, Saouma

    2014-01-01

    Whether teachers' conceptions of NOS are reflected in their instructional planning and classroom practice remains an important research question. Consequently, this study investigated teachers' NOS views and their relationship to their classroom practice and delineated the factors that facilitate or impede this relationship. To achieve…

  7. Meaning Making: What Reflective Essays Reveal about Biology Students' Conceptions about Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balgopal, Meena M.; Montplaisir, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    The process of reflective writing can play a central role in making meaning as learners process new information and connect it to prior knowledge. An examination of the written discourse can therefore be revealing of learners' cognitive understanding and affective (beliefs, feelings, motivation to learn) responses to concepts. Despite reflective…

  8. Saccharification of natural lignocellulose biomass and polysaccharides by highly negatively charged heteropolyacids in concentrated aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yoshiyuki; Itagaki, Shintaro; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2011-04-18

    Highly negatively charged heteropolyacids (HPAs), in particular H(5) BW(12) O(40) , efficiently promoted saccharification of crystalline cellulose into water-soluble saccharides in concentrated aqueous solutions (e.g., 82 % total yield and 77 % glucose yield, based on cellulose with a 0.7 M H(5) BW(12) O(40) solution); the performance was much better than those of previously reported systems with commonly utilized mineral acids (e.g., H(2) SO(4) and HCl) and HPAs (e.g., H(3) PW(12) O(40) and H(4) SiW(12) O(40)). Besides crystalline cellulose, the present system was applicable to the selective transformation of cellobiose, starch, and xylan to the corresponding monosaccharides such as glucose and xylose. In addition, one-pot synthesis of levulinic acid and sorbitol directly from cellulose was realized by using concentrated HPA solutions. The present system, concentrated aqueous solutions of highly negatively charged HPAs, was further applicable to saccharification of natural (non-purified) lignocellulose biomass, such as "rice plant straw", "oil palm empty fruit bunch (palm EFB) fiber", and "Japanese cedar sawdust", giving a mixture of the corresponding water-soluble saccharides, such as glucose (main product), galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose, and cellobiose, in high yields (≥77 % total yields of saccharides based on holocellulose). Separation of the saccharides and H(5) BW(12) O(40) was easy, and the retrieved H(5) BW(12) O(40) could repeatedly be used without appreciable loss of the high performance. PMID:21404445

  9. NATURAL GRADIENT EXPERIMENT ON SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A SAND AQUIFER. 1. APPROACH AND OVERVIEW OF PLUME MOVEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large-scale field experiment on natural gradient transport of solutes in groundwater has been conducted at a site in Borden, Ontario. Well-defined initial conditions were achieved by the pulse injection of 12 cu m of a uniform solution containing known masses of two inorganic t...

  10. Student Knowledge of Scientific and Natural Resource Concepts Concerning Acidic Deposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed is the level of scientific and natural resource knowledge possessed by fourth-, eighth- and eleventh-grade students. Misconceptions are noted. Discussed are implications for teaching about acidic deposition. (CW)

  11. Natural convection in binary gases driven by combined horizontal thermal and vertical solutal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.A.; Viskanta, R. )

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of natural convection is presented to examine the influence of a horizontal temperature gradient and a concentration gradient occurring from the bottom to the cold wall in a cavity. As the solutal buoyancy force changes from augmenting to opposing the thermal buoyancy force, the fluid motion switches from unicellular to multicellular flow (fluid motion is up the cold wall and down the hot wall for the bottom counterrotating flow cell). Qualitatively, the agreement between predicted streamlines and smoke flow patterns is generally good. In contrast, agreement between measured and predicted temperature and concentration distributions ranges from fair to poor. Part of the discrepancy can be attributed to experimental error. However, there remains considerable discrepancy between data and predictions due to the idealizations of the mathematical model, which examines only first-order physical effects. An unsteady flow, variable thermophysical properties, conjugate effects, species interdiffusion, and radiation were not accounted for in the model. 31 refs.

  12. Microbially-Enhanced Redox Solution Reoxidation for Sour Natural Gas Sweetening

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Brezinsky

    2008-01-15

    The specific objective of this project are to advance the technology and improve the economics of the commercial iron-based chelate processes such as LO-CAT II and SulFerox process utilizing biologically enhanced reoxidation of the redox solutions used in these processes. The project is based on the use of chelated ferric iron as the catalyst for the production of elemental sulfur, and then oxidizing bacteria, such as Thiobacillus Ferrooxidans (ATCC 23270) as an oxidizer. The regeneration of Fe{sup 3+} - chelate is accomplished by the use of these same microbes under mild conditions at 25-30 C and at atmospheric pressure to minimize the chelate degradation process. The pH of the redox solution was observed to be a key process parameter. Other parameters such as temperature, total iron concentration, gas to liquid ratio and bacterial cell densities also influence the overall process. The second part of this project includes experimental data and a kinetic model of microbial H{sub 2}S removal from sour natural gas using thiobacillus species. In the experimental part, a series of experiments were conducted with a commercial chelated iron catalyst at pH ranges from 8.7 to 9.2 using a total iron concentration range from 925 ppm to 1050 ppm in the solution. Regeneration of the solution was carried out by passing air through the solution. Iron oxidizing bacteria were used at cell densities of 2.3 x 10{sup 7}cells/ml for optimum effective performance. In the modeling part, oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} ions by the iron oxidizing bacteria - Thiobacillus Ferrooxidans was studied for application to a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The factors that can directly affect the oxidation rate such as dilution rate, temperature, and pH were analyzed. The growth of the microorganism was assumed to follow Monod type of growth kinetics. Dilution rate had influence on the rate of oxidation of ferrous iron. Higher dilution rates caused washout of the biomass. The oxidation rate was

  13. Nature of science conceptions, attitudes towards evolution and global climate change, and course achievement in an introductory biology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Benjamin Elijah

    Many researchers have studied student attitudes toward and knowledge of evolutionary science, attitudes towards global climate change (GCC), conceptions about the nature of science (NOS), and course success. However, at the time of this writing, no studies explicitly link these topics. It is overwhelmingly acknowledged by the scientific community that evolution and global climate change (GCC) are undeniably supported by physical evidence. And yet, both topics remain very politically contentious in the United States. Efforts to mitigate the disconnects between the scientific community and the general public on these issues are imperative to science education. Such undertakings need to examine students' conceptions of the nature of science (NOS), how evidence is treated, how theories are constructed, and how scientific consensus is reached, as these may be key factors in acceptance of evolution and GCC. If students have a more thorough understanding of the weight behind scientific consensus and better tools to discern scientific versus non-scientific arguments, they may become more likely to accept strongly supported scientific ideas. Our study explored this hypothesis guided by the following questions: Do changes in NOS conceptions correlate with changes in attitudes towards evolution or GCC? If there are correlations, are they similar for evolution and GCC? What demographic factors affect these correlations? Further, we asked whether attitudes towards evolution before the course began was a significant predictor of achievement in the course. Previously-developed tools were used to measure students' conceptions of the nature of science and attitudes towards evolution, while national public opinion poll questions were used to measure attitudes towards GCC. Demographic questions were produced to target factors thought to influence attitudes towards evolution or global climate change. Overall sample size was N=620. Principle Components Analysis was used to determine

  14. Suppressing Synonymy with a Homonym: The Emergence of the Nomenclatural Type Concept in Nineteenth Century Natural History.

    PubMed

    Witteveen, Joeri

    2016-02-01

    'Type' in biology is a polysemous term. In a landmark article, Paul Farber (Journal of the History of Biology 9(1): 93-119, 1976) argued that this deceptively plain term had acquired three different meanings in early nineteenth century natural history alone. 'Type' was used in relation to three distinct type concepts, each of them associated with a different set of practices. Important as Farber's analysis has been for the historiography of natural history, his account conceals an important dimension of early nineteenth century 'type talk.' Farber's taxonomy of type concepts passes over the fact that certain uses of 'type' began to take on a new meaning in this period. At the closing of the eighteenth century, terms like 'type specimen,' 'type species,' and 'type genus' were universally recognized as referring to typical, model members of their encompassing taxa. But in the course of the nineteenth century, the same terms were co-opted for a different purpose. As part of an effort to drive out nomenclatural synonymy - the confusing state of a taxon being known to different people by different names - these terms started to signify the fixed and potentially atypical name-bearing elements of taxa. A new type concept was born: the nomenclatural type. In this article, I retrace this perplexing nineteenth century shift in meaning of 'type.' I uncover the nomenclatural disorder that the new nomenclatural type concept dissolved, and expose the conceptual confusion it left in its tracks. What emerges is an account of how synonymy was suppressed through the coinage of a homonym. PMID:26126490

  15. XANES Reveals the Flexible Nature of Hydrated Strontium in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paola; Migliorati, Valentina; Sessa, Francesco; Mancini, Giordano; Persson, Ingmar

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy has been used to determine the structure of the hydrated strontium in aqueous solution. The XANES analysis has been carried out using solid [Sr(H2O)8](OH)2 as reference model. Classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out and in the former case two different sets of Lennard-Jones parameters have been used for the Sr(2+) ion. The best performing theoretical approach has been chosen on the basis of the experimental results. XANES spectra have been calculated starting from MD trajectories, without carrying out any minimization of the structural parameters. This procedure allowed us to properly account for thermal and structural fluctuations occurring in the aqueous solution in the analysis of the experimental spectrum. A deconvolution procedure has been applied to the raw absorption data thus increasing the sensitivity of XANES spectroscopy. One of the classical MD simulations has been found to provide a XANES theoretical spectrum in better agreement with the experimental data. An 8-fold hydration complex with a Sr-O distance of 2.60 Å has been found to be compatible with the XANES data, in agreement with previous findings. However, the hydration shells of the strontium ions have been found to have a flexible nature with a fast ligand exchange rate between the first and second hydration shell occurring in the picosecond time scale. PMID:27065305

  16. Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, Jason T.; Soga, Kenichi; Banwart, Steven A.; Whalley, W. Richard; Ginn, Timothy R.; Nelson, Douglas C.; Mortensen, Brina M.; Martinez, Brian C.; Barkouki, Tammer

    2011-01-01

    Carbon sequestration, infrastructure rehabilitation, brownfields clean-up, hazardous waste disposal, water resources protection and global warming—these twenty-first century challenges can neither be solved by the high-energy consumptive practices that hallmark industry today, nor by minor tweaking or optimization of these processes. A more radical, holistic approach is required to develop the sustainable solutions society needs. Most of the above challenges occur within, are supported on, are enabled by or grown from soil. Soil, contrary to conventional civil engineering thought, is a living system host to multiple simultaneous processes. It is proposed herein that ‘soil engineering in vivo’, wherein the natural capacity of soil as a living ecosystem is used to provide multiple solutions simultaneously, may provide new, innovative, sustainable solutions to some of these great challenges of the twenty-first century. This requires a multi-disciplinary perspective that embraces the science of biology, chemistry and physics and applies this knowledge to provide multi-functional civil and environmental engineering designs for the soil environment. For example, can native soil bacterial species moderate the carbonate cycle in soils to simultaneously solidify liquefiable soil, immobilize reactive heavy metals and sequester carbon—effectively providing civil engineering functionality while clarifying the ground water and removing carbon from the atmosphere? Exploration of these ideas has begun in earnest in recent years. This paper explores the potential, challenges and opportunities of this new field, and highlights one biogeochemical function of soil that has shown promise and is developing rapidly as a new technology. The example is used to propose a generalized approach in which the potential of this new field can be fully realized. PMID:20829246

  17. Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions.

    PubMed

    DeJong, Jason T; Soga, Kenichi; Banwart, Steven A; Whalley, W Richard; Ginn, Timothy R; Nelson, Douglas C; Mortensen, Brina M; Martinez, Brian C; Barkouki, Tammer

    2011-01-01

    Carbon sequestration, infrastructure rehabilitation, brownfields clean-up, hazardous waste disposal, water resources protection and global warming-these twenty-first century challenges can neither be solved by the high-energy consumptive practices that hallmark industry today, nor by minor tweaking or optimization of these processes. A more radical, holistic approach is required to develop the sustainable solutions society needs. Most of the above challenges occur within, are supported on, are enabled by or grown from soil. Soil, contrary to conventional civil engineering thought, is a living system host to multiple simultaneous processes. It is proposed herein that 'soil engineering in vivo', wherein the natural capacity of soil as a living ecosystem is used to provide multiple solutions simultaneously, may provide new, innovative, sustainable solutions to some of these great challenges of the twenty-first century. This requires a multi-disciplinary perspective that embraces the science of biology, chemistry and physics and applies this knowledge to provide multi-functional civil and environmental engineering designs for the soil environment. For example, can native soil bacterial species moderate the carbonate cycle in soils to simultaneously solidify liquefiable soil, immobilize reactive heavy metals and sequester carbon-effectively providing civil engineering functionality while clarifying the ground water and removing carbon from the atmosphere? Exploration of these ideas has begun in earnest in recent years. This paper explores the potential, challenges and opportunities of this new field, and highlights one biogeochemical function of soil that has shown promise and is developing rapidly as a new technology. The example is used to propose a generalized approach in which the potential of this new field can be fully realized. PMID:20829246

  18. Investigating inquiry beliefs and nature of science (NOS) conceptions of science teachers as revealed through online learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atar, Hakan Yavuz

    teachers NOS conceptions. Developing desired understanding of nature of science conceptions and having an adequate experience with inquiry learning is especially important for science teachers because science education literature suggests that the development of teachers' nature of science conceptions is influenced by their experiences with inquiry science (Akerson et. al. 2000) and implementation of science lessons reflect teachers' NOS conceptions (Abd-EL-Khalick & Boujaoude, 1997; Matson & Parsons, 1998; Rosenthal, 1993; Trowbridge, Bybee & Powell, 2000; Turner & Sullenger, 1999). Furthermore, the impediments to successful integration of inquiry based science instruction from teachers' perspective are particularly important, as they are the implementers of inquiry based science education reform. The purpose of this study is to understand the relationship between the teachers' NOS conceptions and their inquiry beliefs and practices in their classrooms and how this relationship impedes or contributes to the implementation of inquiry based science education reform efforts. The participants of this study were in-service teachers who were accepted into the online Masters Program in science education program at a southern university. Three online courses offered in the summer semester of 2005 constituted the research setting of this study: (1) Special Problems in the Teaching of Secondary School Science: Nature of Science & Science Teaching, (2) Curriculum in Science Education, and (3) Colloquium. Multiple data sources were used for data triangulation (Miles & Huberman, 1984; Yin, 1994) in order to understand the relationship between participants' NOS views and their conceptions and beliefs about inquiry-based science teaching. The study revealed that the relationship between the teachers' NOS conceptions and their inquiry beliefs and practices is far from being simple and linear. Data suggests that the teachers' sophistication of NOS conceptions influence their perception of

  19. A study of elementary teachers' conceptions of nature of science and their beliefs about the developmental appropriateness and importance of nature of science throughout a professional development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibelli, Elif

    This qualitative study aimed to explore the changes in elementary science teachers' conceptions of nature of science (NOS) and their beliefs about the developmental appropriateness and importance of NOS after participating in an academic, year-long professional development program (PDP) as well as the factors facilitating these changes. The PDP consisted of two phases. In the first phase, the participants received NOS training designed with an explicit-reflective instructional approach. In the second phase, the participants implemented several NOS training activities in their classrooms. Four elementary science teachers who volunteered and completed all components of the PDP (i.e., the NOS training and the NOS teaching) comprised the participants of the present study. A multiple-embedded case study design was employed to explore the changes in the elementary science teachers' conceptions of NOS and their beliefs about the developmental appropriateness and importance of NOS. The study data were collected from multiple sources. The primary data sources included (a) Views of Nature of Science Elementary School Version 2 (VNOS-D2) questionnaire (Lederman & Khishfe, 2002), (b) Ideas about Science for Early Elementary (K-4) Students questionnaire (Sweeney, 2010), and (c) follow-up semi-structured interviews. The secondary data sources included videotaping of meetings with teachers, reflective field notes, and artifacts produced by teachers and their students. Data were analyzed using Yin's (1994, 2003) analytic tactics of pattern matching, explanation building, and cross-case synthesis. The findings of the study revealed that the elementary science teachers showed gradual, but substantial changes in their conceptions, and beliefs about the developmental appropriateness and importance of the NOS aspects over the course of participation in the PDP. Moreover, the participants identified nine components in the PDP that facilitated these changes in their conceptions, and

  20. n-butanol: challenges and solutions for shifting natural metabolic pathways into a viable microbial production.

    PubMed

    Branduardi, Paola; Porro, Danilo

    2016-04-01

    The economic upturn of the past 200 years would not have been conceivable without fossil resources such as coal and oil. However, the fossil-based economy increasingly reaches its limits and displays contradictions. Bioeconomy, strategically combining economy and ecology willing to make biobased and sustainable growth possible, is promising to make a significant contribution towards solving these issues. In this context, microbial bioconversions are promising to support partially the increasing need for materials and fuels starting from fresh, preferably waste, biomass. Butanol is a very attractive molecule finding applications both as a chemical platform and as a fuel. Today it principally derives from petroleum, but it also represents the final product of microbial catabolic pathways. Because of the need to maximize yield, titer and productivity to make the production competitive and viable, the challenge is to transform a robustly regulated metabolic network into the principal cellular activity. However, this goal can only be accomplished by a profound understanding of the cellular physiology, survival strategy and sensing/signalling cascades. Here, we shortly review on the natural cellular pathways and circumstances that lead to n-butanol accumulation, its physiological consequences that might not match industrial needs and on possible solutions for circumventing these natural constraints. PMID:27020412

  1. Elucidating nature's solutions to heart, lung, and blood diseases and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Carey, Hannah V; Martin, Sandra L; Horwitz, Barbara A; Yan, Lin; Bailey, Shannon M; Podrabsky, Jason; Storz, Jay F; Ortiz, Rudy M; Wong, Renee P; Lathrop, David A

    2012-03-30

    Evolution has provided a number of animal species with extraordinary phenotypes. Several of these phenotypes allow species to survive and thrive in environmental conditions that mimic disease states in humans. The study of evolved mechanisms responsible for these phenotypes may provide insights into the basis of human disease and guide the design of new therapeutic approaches. Examples include species that tolerate acute or chronic hypoxemia like deep-diving mammals and high-altitude inhabitants, as well as those that hibernate and interrupt their development when exposed to adverse environments. The evolved traits exhibited by these animal species involve modifications of common biological pathways that affect metabolic regulation, organ function, antioxidant defenses, and oxygen transport. In 2006, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute released a funding opportunity announcement to support studies that were designed to elucidate the natural molecular and cellular mechanisms of adaptation in species that tolerate extreme environmental conditions. The rationale for this funding opportunity is detailed in this article, and the specific evolved mechanisms examined in the supported research are described. Also highlighted are past medical advances achieved through the study of animal species that have evolved extraordinary phenotypes as well as the expectations for new understanding of nature's solutions to heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders through future research in this area. PMID:22461362

  2. Learning Nature of Science Concepts through a Research Apprenticeship Program: A Comparative Study of Three Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgin, Stephen R.; Sadler, Troy D.

    2016-01-01

    The merits of three approaches (explicit, reflective and implicit) to Nature of Science (NOS) teaching and learning in the context of a summer research experience on high school student participants' NOS ideas were explored in this study. The effectiveness of explicit over implicit approaches has been demonstrated in school contexts, but less…

  3. Student Conceptions of Natural Selection and Its Role in Evolution, Research Series No. l65.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Beth A.; Anderson, Charles W.

    Pretests and posttests on the topic of evolution through natural selection were administered to students in a college nonmajors' biology course. Analysis of test responses revealed that most students understood evolution as a process in which species respond to environmental conditions by changing gradually over time. Student thinking differed…

  4. Undergraduate Students' Conceptions of Natural and Anthropogenic Climate Change: A Case Study Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenbath, Thien-Kim Leckie

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation shows the evolution of five undergraduate students' ideas of natural and anthropogenic climate change throughout a lecture hall course on climate change. This research was informed by conceptual change theory and students' inaccurate ideas of climate change. Subjects represented different levels of climate change understanding at…

  5. Pre-Service and In-Service Science Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buaraphan, Khajornsak

    2010-01-01

    The author explores the history of nature of science beliefs among pre-service and in-service teachers primarily in the United States and Thailand and compares this history to findings in a current study being conducted in Thailand. Two research questions were used to guide this current study: What are pre-service and in-service science teachers'…

  6. Fostering Instrumentalist Conceptions of the Nature of Science: A Classroom Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jane O.

    This case study of learning explores the relationship between a chemistry teacher's instrumentalist perspective on the nature of science, the classroom culture that flourished through curriculum enactment during the course of a school year, and development of perspectives on science by his students. An ethnographic methodology was employed, with…

  7. The Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Texts and Concept Clipboards in Learning the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çil, Emine; Çepni, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most important goals of science education is to enable students to understand the nature of science (NOS). However, generally regular science teaching in classrooms does not help students improve informed NOS views. Purpose: This study investigated the influence of an explicit reflective conceptual change approach compared…

  8. Political Nature and Socio-Professional Determinants of the Concept of Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olaskoaga-Larrauri, Jon; González-Laskibar, Xabier; Barrenetxea-Ayesta, Miren

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on the hypothesis that the notions of teaching quality used in the higher education sector have a political nature; in other words, they may describe the approaches agents take as regards the duties they perform in institutions of higher education or the model of governance those institutions should adopt. This paper uses the…

  9. Time to Get a New Mountain? The Role of Function in Children's Conceptions of Natural Kinds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiYanni, Cara; Kelemen, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Prior research indicates that young children are promiscuously teleological, attributing purpose not only to artifacts, but also to living and non-living natural entities. This study further examines the role of function in children's reasoning about different object kinds by indirectly probing children's intuitions about what types of entities…

  10. Biological classification historical case studies: Fostering high school students' conceptions of the nature of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Ami J.

    The history of science has long been infused in science education. Research conducted in this area has primarily focused on physics and chemistry classes and few studies examine the effects of historical case studies on shaping female students' perspectives of the nature of science. This study aimed to examine female, high school students' conceptualizations of the nature of science while learning biological classification using historical case studies. To meet this end, this study used qualitative methods to identify and explore a female cohort's conceptualizations of the nature of science. Data collection over eight weeks included audio taped individual interviews, audio tapes of lab groups working together, field notes, artifacts, journal entries, a modified VNOS survey, and final exam essays. These data were subjected to qualitative analysis techniques. Initially, younger cohort students, compared with older cohort students, held more limited views of science, whereas the difference between younger and older cohort students dissipated by the end of the unit. Not only did the cohort express a more comprehensive view of science, but they also conceptualized various aspects of science in multiple ways indicating that grade level was not an issue when developing complex notions of the nature of science at the high school level. In addition, cohort students demonstrated a deep understanding of the nature of science by providing examples that reached beyond the biological classification unit. One lesson from the unit specifically addressed gender issues and science, allowing students to role play what was like to be a naturalist or a naturalist's wife during the Age of Discovery. This lesson provided insights into how girls conceptualize issues related to gender and science. In particular, girls viewed the perceptions, experiences, and opportunities of female scientists as being different from those of male scientists. Finally, the implications of this study were

  11. Undergraduate students' conceptions of natural and anthropogenic climate change: A case study approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenbath, Thien-Kim Leckie

    This dissertation shows the evolution of five undergraduate students' ideas of natural and anthropogenic climate change throughout a lecture hall course on climate change. This research was informed by conceptual change theory and students' inaccurate ideas of climate change. Subjects represented different levels of climate change understanding at the beginning of the course and were selected based on their scores on a climate change questionnaire. The study was designed to research how students' ideas changed throughout the course and compare trajectories of lower and higher achieving students. At the beginning, students had different levels of understanding, but as the semester continued, the lower-performing students progressed more than the higher-performing students. At the end of the course, all students described more ideas than they did at the beginning; however some of these ideas were inconsistent with the professors' instruction. Lower-performing students struggled more than the higher-performing students. Struggles included differentiating climate change and its causes, effects, and consequences from other environmental problems. Students also struggled with the idea that climate change is anthropogenic despite it being natural in the past. In order to understand that climate change is impacted by human forcings in addition to natural forcings, students developed the relationship that climate change is natural and humans are "speeding it up." They took time to integrate this relationship into their prior ideas. Three of the students constructed a definition of climate change that was different than the professor's. Two students defined "climate change" as only the natural aspects of climate change and reserved the anthropogenic changes for the term "global warming". For a third student, "climate change" included damming rivers, eutrophication, frog mutations, ozone depletion, and overfishing, which are environmental ailments but not climate change.

  12. Using the history of research on sickle-cell anemia to affect preservice teachers' conceptions of the nature of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Eric M.

    Preservice elementary teachers enrolled in an elective biology course participated in an eight-class unit of instruction based on the history of research in understanding the disease sickle-cell anemia. Students were introduced to the disease as a "mystery" for them to solve, and subsequently developed an understanding of the disease from several disciplines in biology (e.g., genetics, ecology, evolution, molecular biology). The unit involved open-ended problems in which students examined evidence and developed explanations in a manner analogous to the reasoning used by Anthony C. Allison and his colleagues during the early to middle part of the twentieth century. Throughout the unit, students were challenged to explicitly and reflectively connect their work with the historical material to more general conclusions about aspects of the nature of science. These aspects included (a) the nature of scientific theories, (b) the tentative nature of science, (c) the difference between scientific theories and laws, (d) the validity of observational methods in science, and (e) the subjective (theory-laden) nature of science. The research measured students' pre- and post-instruction views by using both an open-ended survey (VNOS) and follow-up, semi-structured interviews. The results indicated that an appreciable number of students underwent a change or enrichment in their views for some of the nature of science aspects. Moreover, change or enrichment in students' views was directly attributable to their work in the sickle-cell unit as evidenced from the specific examples students articulated in their post-instruction responses in support of their more informed views. In general, the findings of this research lend empirical support to the value of having students actively recapitulate the history of science to improve their nature of science conceptions. This is facilitated when the lessons challenge students to explicitly and reflectively develop views of the nature of

  13. Munazza's story: Understanding science teaching and conceptions of the nature of science in Pakistan through a life history study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halai, Nelofer

    In this study I have described and tried to comprehend how a female science teacher understands her practice. Additionally, I have developed some understanding of her understanding of the nature of science. While teaching science, a teacher projects messages about the nature of science that can be captured by observations and interviews. Furthermore, the manner is which a teacher conceptualizes science for teaching, at least in part, depends on personal life experiences. Hence, I have used the life history method to understand Munazza's practice. Munazza is a young female science teacher working in a private, co-educational school for children from middle income families in Karachi, Pakistan. Her stories are central to the study, and I have represented them using a number of narrative devices. I have woven in my own stories too, to illustrate my perspective as a researcher. The data includes 13 life history interviews and many informal conversations with Munazza, observations of science teaching in classes seven and eight, and interviews with other science teachers and administrative staff of the school. Munazza's personal biography and experiences of school and undergraduate courses has influenced the way she teaches. It has also influenced the way she does not teach. She was not inspired by her science teachers, so she has tried not to teach the way she was taught science. Contextual factors, her conception of preparation for teaching as preparation for subject content and the tension that she faces in balancing care and control in her classroom are some factors that influence her teaching. Munazza believes that science is a stable, superior and value-free way of knowing. In trying to understand the natural world, observations come first, which give reliable information about the world leading inductively to a "theory". Hence, she relies a great deal on demonstrations in the class where students "see" for themselves and abstract the scientific concept from the

  14. Interactions Between Mathematics and Physics: The History of the Concept of Function—Teaching with and About Nature of Mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Tinne Hoff; Lützen, Jesper

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the history of the concept of function and emphasize in particular how problems in physics have led to essential changes in its definition and application in mathematical practices. Euler defined a function as an analytic expression, whereas Dirichlet defined it as a variable that depends in an arbitrary manner on another variable. The change was required when mathematicians discovered that analytic expressions were not sufficient to represent physical phenomena such as the vibration of a string (Euler) and heat conduction (Fourier and Dirichlet). The introduction of generalized functions or distributions is shown to stem partly from the development of new theories of physics such as electrical engineering and quantum mechanics that led to the use of improper functions such as the delta function that demanded a proper foundation. We argue that the development of student understanding of mathematics and its nature is enhanced by embedding mathematical concepts and theories, within an explicit-reflective framework, into a rich historical context emphasizing its interaction with other disciplines such as physics. Students recognize and become engaged with meta-discursive rules governing mathematics. Mathematics teachers can thereby teach inquiry in mathematics as it occurs in the sciences, as mathematical practice aimed at obtaining new mathematical knowledge. We illustrate such a historical teaching and learning of mathematics within an explicit and reflective framework by two examples of student-directed, problem-oriented project work following the Roskilde Model, in which the connection to physics is explicit and provides a learning space where the nature of mathematics and mathematical practices are linked to natural science.

  15. Marginal cost of natural gas in developing countries: concepts and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mashayekhi, A.

    1983-01-01

    Many developing nations are facing complex questions regarding the best strategy for developing their domestic gas reserves. The World Bank has addressed these questions in studies on the cost and prices of gas and its optimal allocation among different markets. Based on the average incremental method, an estimate of the marginal cost of natural gas in 10 developing countries proved to be $0.61-1.79/1000 CF or $3.59-10.54/bbl of oil equivalent, far below the border prices of competing fuels in these nations. Moreover, the cost of gas is not expected to rise in these countries within the next 20 years while the reserves/production ratios remain high. The sample involves a variety of gas compositions and production conditions among the countries of Bangladesh, Cameroon, Egypt, India, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Tunisia.

  16. High Fluorescence Anisotropy of Thioflavin T in Aqueous Solution Resulting from Its Molecular Rotor Nature.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Irina M; Sulatskaya, Anna I; Maskevich, Alexander A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2016-01-01

    Thioflavin T (ThT) is widely used to study amyloid fibrils while its properties are still debated in the literature. By steady-state and femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence we showed that, unlike small sized rigid molecules, the fluorescence anisotropy value of the free ThT in aqueous solutions is very high, close to the limiting value. This is determined by the molecular rotor nature of ThT, where the direction of the ThT transition dipole moment S₀ → S₁* is not changed either by the internal rotation of the ThT benzothiazole and aminobenzene rings relative to each other in the excited state, because the axis of this rotation coincides with the direction of the transition dipole moment, or by the rotation of the ThT molecule as a whole, because the rate of this process is 3 orders of magnitude smaller than the rate of the internal rotation which leads to the fluorescence quenching. Consequently, ThT fluorescence anisotropy cannot be directly used to study amyloid fibrils formation, as it was proposed by some authors. PMID:26637393

  17. Electrochemical removal of microcystin-LR from aqueous solution in the presence of natural organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nam; Drogui, Patrick

    2013-01-15

    Removal of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) from water was evaluated using an electro-oxidation process. Different operating parameters were investigated, including current density, reaction time, anode material and type of supporting electrolyte. The current density and the type of anode material played an important role in the MC-LR degradation efficiency, whereas the type of sodium salts influenced the removal efficiency. The degradation of MC-LR was mainly attributed to direct anodic oxidation. The best operating conditions (98% of MC-LR removal) for MC-LR (initial concentration of 11-13 μg L(-1)) degradation in solution were obtained at a current density of 38 mA cm(-2) for 60 min with a recycling rate of 0.1 L min(-1) using a Ti/BDD anode in the presence of 0.2 g L(-1) of Na(2)SO(4). The colour caused by the presence of natural organic matter (humic acid) could be diminished by up to 81%. Likewise, MC-LR decomposition exhibited first-order reaction behaviours with a rate coefficient of 0.049 min(-1). PMID:23137914

  18. Experimental study of natural convection melting of ice in salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, L.J.; Cheung, F.B.; Linehan, J.H.; Pedersen, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The solid-liquid interface morphology and the micro-physical process near the moving phase boundary during natural convection melting of a horizontal layer of ice by an overlying pool of salt solution were studied experimentally. A cathetometer which amplifies the interface region was used to measure the ice melting rate. Also measured were the temperature transients of the liquid pool. Within the temperature and the density ratio ranges explored, the ice melting rate was found to be very sensitive to the ratio of pool-to-ice melt density but independent of pool-to-ice temperature difference. By varying the density ratio, three different flow regimes and morphologies of the solid-liquid interface were observed, with melt streamers emanating from the crests of the wavy interface into the pool in all three cases. The measured wavelengths (spacing) between the streamers for four different pairs of materials were correlated with the density ratio and found to agree favorably with the predictions of Taylor instability theory.

  19. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution using natural Jordanian zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taamneh, Yazan; Sharadqah, Suhail

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the adsorption process of cadmium and copper using natural Jordanian (NJ) zeolite as adsorbent has been experimentally estimated. The samples of NJ zeolite were obtained from Al Mafraq discrete, north east of Jordan. The influence of the bulk concentration (C o), contact time (t) and different adsorbent masses (m) of NJ zeolite on the removal of heavy metal were evaluated. These variables had a considerable function in promoting the sorption process of heavy metal using the NJ zeolite. The initial concentration of heavy metals in the stock solution was extended between 80 and 600 mg/L. The batch adsorption method was employed to investigate the adsorption process. The experimental data were correlated using Freundlich and Langmuir empirical formula. The ability of NJ zeolite to eliminate cadmium and copper was estimated according to Langmuir isotherm empirical formula and found 25.9 and 14.3 mg/g for cadmium and copper, respectively. The kinetics of adsorption of cadmium and copper have been analyzed and correlated by first-order and second-order reaction model. It was noticed that adsorption of cadmium and copper was better correlated with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results presented that NJ zeolite is practical adsorbent for removing cadmium and copper ion metal.

  20. Simultaneous transport of synthetic colloids and a nonsorbing solute through single saturated natural fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, P.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Nuttall, H.E.; Kale, R.

    1994-09-01

    Tracer transport experiments involving colloids that showed little tendency to attach to rock surfaces and a nonsorbing solute (iodide) -were conducted in three different well-characterized natural fractures in tuff. The colloids always arrived earlier in the effluent than the iodide, which we believe is evidence of (1) hydrodynamic chromatography and/or (2) the fact that the colloids experience a smaller effective volume in the fracture because they diffuse too slowly to enter low-velocity regions (dead zones) along the rough fracture walls. The iodide also approached the inlet concentration in the effluent more slowly than the colloids, with the concentration at a given elution volume being greater at higher flow rates. By contrast, the rate of approach of the colloid concentration to the inlet concentration did not vary with flow rate. We attribute this behavior to matrix diffusion of the iodide, with the colloids being too large/nondiffusive to experience this phenomenon. Dispersion of all tracers was greatest in the fracture of widest average aperture and least in the fracture of narrowest aperture, which is consistent with Taylor dispersion theory. The tracer experiments were modeled/interpreted using a three-step approach that involved (1) estimating the aperture distribution in each fracture using surface profiling techniques, (2) predicting the flow field in the fractures using a localized parallel-plate approximation, and (3) predicting tracer transport in the fractures using particle-tracking techniques. Although considered preliminary at this time, the model results were in qualitative agreement with the experiments.

  1. Evaluation of strategies for nature-based solutions to drought: a decision support model at the national scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Mike; Ives, Matthew; Hall, Jim

    2016-04-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence in support of the use of nature based solutions as a strategy to mitigate drought. Restored or constructed wetlands, grasslands and in some cases forests have been used with success in numerous case studies. Such solutions remain underused in the UK, where they are not considered as part of long-term plans for supply by water companies. An important step is the translation of knowledge on the benefits of nature based solutions at the upland/catchment scale into a model of the impact of these solutions on national water resource planning in terms of financial costs, carbon benefits and robustness to drought. Our project, 'A National Scale Model of Green Infrastructure for Water Resources', addresses this issue through development of a model that can show the costs and benefits associated with a broad roll-out of nature based solutions for water supply. We have developed generalised models of both the hydrological effects of various classes and implementations of nature-based approaches and their economic impacts in terms of construction costs, running costs, time to maturity, land use and carbon benefits. Our next step will be to compare this work with our recent evaluation of conventional water infrastructure, allowing a case to be made in financial terms and in terms of security of water supply. By demonstrating the benefits of nature based solutions under multiple possible climate and population scenarios we aim to demonstrate the potential value of using nature based solutions as a component of future long-term water resource plans. Strategies for decision making regarding the selection of nature based and conventional approaches, developed through discussion with government and industry, will be applied to the final model. Our focus is on keeping our work relevant to the requirements of decision-makers involved in conventional water planning. We propose to present the outcomes of our model for the evaluation of nature

  2. Isolation of nonvolatile, organic solutes from natural waters by zeotrophic distillation of water from N,N-dimethylformamide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, P.A.; Stiles, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    Nonvolatile, organic solutes that comprise the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in saline waters were isolated by removal of the water by distillation from a N,N-dimethylformamideformic acid-acetonitrile mixture. Salts isolated with the DOC were removed by crystallization of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate from the solvent mixture, removal of silicic acid by acidification and precipitation, removal of boric acid by methylation and volatilization, and removal of phosphate by zinc acetate precipitation. Chemical alteration of the organic solutes was minimized during evaporative concentration steps by careful control of acid concentrations in the solvent mixture and was minimized during drying by conversion of the samples to pyridinium and sodium salts. Recoveries of various hydrophilic organic standards from aqueous salt solutions and recoveries of natural organic solutes from various water samples varied from 60 to 100%. Losses of organic solutes during the isolation procedure were nonselective and related to the number of salt- and precipitate-washing cycles in the procedure.

  3. Nature of Non-Fickian Solute Transport in Complex Heterogeneous Porous Media - Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijeljic, B.; Mostaghimi, P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Despite the range of significant practical applications of solute transport, including the long-term fate of nuclear waste repositories, secure storage of CO2 and improved oil recovery, even the qualitative behavior of most rocks is uncertain: vast carbonate sedimentary basins contain more than half the world's current oil reserves yet experimental data on transport in carbonates is scant. The relationship between pore structure, velocity field and transport remains unknown, particularly for heterogeneous carbonates. We simulate solute transport through 3D μ-CT images of different rock samples, representing geological media of increasing pore-scale complexity: a sandpack, a Berea sandstone and a Portland limestone. A finite-difference Stokes solver is employed to compute the flow field and transport particles semi-analytically along streamlines to represent advection with a random motion to model diffusion. We predict the propagators measured on similar cores in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments. Dispersion coefficient dependence on Peclet number is shown to have different scaling for complex carbonates. The behavior is explained using continuous time random walks with a truncated power-law distribution of travel times: transport is qualitatively different for the complex limestone compared to the sandstone or sandpack, with long tailing, an almost immobile peak concentration and a very slow approach to asymptotic dispersion. We demonstrate the different nature of non-Fickian transport in carbonates by analyzing the transit time probabilities ψ(τ) of traveling between two neighboring voxels for Portland carbonate that show an approximately power-law dependence of travel times ψ(τ) ~ τ -1-β with a slope corresponding to β = 0.7, as shown in Fig.1. The comparison with ψ(τ) of the sandpack and Berea sandstone for Pe = ∝ indicates quantitatively different generic behavior, as the sandpack and sandstone have slope corresponding to β = 1.8 (two

  4. An analysis of 16-17-year-old students' understanding of solution chemistry concepts using a two-tier diagnostic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adadan, Emine; Savasci, Funda

    2012-03-01

    This study focused on the development of a two-tier multiple-choice diagnostic instrument, which was designed and then progressively modified, and implemented to assess students' understanding of solution chemistry concepts. The results of the study are derived from the responses of 756 Grade 11 students (age 16-17) from 14 different high schools who participated in the study. The final version of the instrument included a total of 13 items that addressed the six aspects of solution chemistry, and students' understandings in the test were challenged in multiple contexts with multiple modes and levels of representation. Cronbach alpha reliability coefficients for the content tier and both tiers of the test were found to be 0.697 and 0.748, respectively. Results indicated that a substantial number of students held an inadequate understanding of solution chemistry concepts. In addition, 21 alternative conceptions observed in more than 10% of the students were reported, along with discussion on possible sources of such conceptions.

  5. Considering Hans-Georg Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics as a referent for student understanding of nature-of-science concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashford, Jared M.

    The purpose of this study is to examine philosophical hermeneutics as a referent for student understanding of Nature-of-Science (NOS) concepts. Rather than focus on a prescriptive set of canons used in addressing NOS pedagogy in K-12 schools, this study seeks to explicate a descriptive set of principles based on Hans-Georg Gadamer's theory of interpretation that has the potential for developing dispositions necessary for understanding. Central among these are the concepts of fore-structure, prejudice, temporal distance, and history of effect, all of which constitute part of the whole of the hermeneutic circle as envisaged by Gadamer. As such, Gadamer's hermeneutics is contrasted with Cartesian epistemology and its primacy of method, the Enlightenment's prejudice against prejudice, the modernist/progressive tendency to consider all situations as problems to be solved by relegating all forms of knowledge to techne, and the subjective nature of interpretation inherent in a hermeneutics of suspicion. The implication of such a conceptual analysis for NOS pedagogy is that student understanding is considered not so much as a cognitive outcome dependent on a series of mental functions but rather as an ontological characteristic of Dasein (being-human) that situates learning in the interchange between interpreter and text. In addition, the philosophical foundations implicit in addressing student understanding of NOS found in many curricular reform efforts and pedagogical practices in science education are questioned. Gadamer's hermeneutics affords science education a viable philosophical framework within which to consider student understanding of the development of scientific knowledge and the scientific enterprise.

  6. Multiple Solutions in Natural Convection in an Air Filled Square Enclosure: Fractal Dimension of Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aklouche Benouaguef, S.; Zeghmati, B.; Bouhadef, K.; Daguenet, M.

    In this study, we investigated numerically the transient natural convection in a square cavity with two horizontal adiabatic sides and vertical walls composed of two regions of same size maintained at different temperatures. The flow has been assumed to be laminar and bi-dimensional. The governing equations written in dimensionless form and expressed in terms of stream function and vorticity, have been solved using the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) method and the GAUSS elimination method. Calculations were performed for air (Pr = 0.71), with a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 3.7x106. We analysed the effect of the Rayleigh number on the route to the chaos of the system. The first transition has been found from steady-state to oscillatory flow and the second is a subharmonic bifurcation as the Rayleigh number is increased further. For sufficiently small Rayleigh numbers, present results show that the flow is characterized by four cells with horizontal and vertical symmetric axes. The attractor bifurcates from a stable fixed point to a limit cycle for a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 2.51x105. A limit cycle settles from Ra = 3x105 and persists until Ra = 5x105. At a Rayleigh number of 2.5x105 the temporal evolution of the Nusselt number Nu(t) was stationary. As the Rayleigh number increases, the flow becomes unstable and bifurcates to a time periodic solution at a critical Rayleigh number between 2.5x105 and 2.51x105. After the first HOPF bifurcation at Ra = 2.51x105, the oscillatory flow undergoes several bifurcations and ultimately evolves into a chaotic flow.

  7. A Hypermedia Environment To Explore and Negotiate Students' Conceptions: Animation of the Solution Process of Table Salt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebenezer, Jazlin V.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the characteristics and values of hypermedia for learning chemistry. Reports on how a hypermedia environment was used to explore a group of 11th grade chemistry students' conceptions of table salt dissolving in water. Indicates that a hypermedia environment can be used to explore, negotiate, and assess students' conceptions of…

  8. Changing Preservice Science Teachers' Views of Nature of Science: Why Some Conceptions May be More Easily Altered than Others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesci, Gunkut; Schwartz, Renee'S.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess preservice teachers' views of Nature of Science (NOS), identify aspects that were challenging for conceptual change, and explore reasons why. This study particularly focused on why and how some concepts of NOS may be more easily altered than others. Fourteen preservice science teachers enrolled in a NOS and Science Inquiry course participated in this study. Data were collected by using a pre/post format with the Views of Nature of Science questionnaire (VNOS-270), the Views of Scientific Inquiry questionnaire (VOSI-270), follow-up interviews, and classroom artifacts. The results indicated that most students initially held naïve views about certain aspects of NOS like tentativeness and subjectivity. By the end of the semester, almost all students dramatically improved their understanding about almost all aspects of NOS. However, several students still struggled with certain aspects like the differences between scientific theory and law, tentativeness, and socio-cultural embeddedness. Results suggested that instructional, motivational, and socio-cultural factors may influence if and how students changed their views about targeted NOS aspects. Students thought that classroom activities, discussions, and readings were most helpful to improve their views about NOS. The findings from the research have the potential to translate as practical advice for teachers, science educators, and future researchers.

  9. Rotational diffusion of neutral and charged solutes in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids: influence of the nature of the anion on solute rotation.

    PubMed

    Karve, Lalita; Dutt, G B

    2012-02-16

    Temperature-dependent fluorescence anisotropies of two organic solutes, 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DMDPP) and rhodamine 110 (R110), have been measured in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim(+)])-based ionic liquids containing the anions hexafluorophosphate ([PF(6)(-)]), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Tf(2)N(-)]), tetrafluoroborate ([BF(4)(-)]), trifluoromethanesulfonate ([TfO(-)]), and nitrate ([NO(3)(-)]). This data has been used in conjunction with the recently published results (Dutt, G. B. J. Phys. Chem. B2010, 114, 8971) for the same solutes in [bmim(+)] tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([FAP(-)]) to understand the influence of various anions on solute rotation. The boundary condition parameter C(obs), which has been obtained from the analysis of the data using Stokes-Einstein-Debye hydrodynamic theory, for the neutral solute DMDPP is more or less the same in all the ionic liquids. Moreover, C(obs) values are close to the predictions of slip boundary condition, which indicates that solvent viscosity alone governs the rotation of DMDPP. In contrast, for R110, which experiences specific interactions with the anions of the ionic liquids, the C(obs) values are close to stick hydrodynamics. It has also been noticed that the C(obs) values vary with the nature of the anion and this variation correlates with the hydrogen bond basicities of the anions of the ionic liquids. PMID:22233259

  10. Aqueous photochemical degradation of BDE-153 in solutions with natural dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huili; Wang, Mei; Wang, Hui; Gao, Jiajia; Dahlgren, Randy A; Yu, Qing; Wang, Xuedong

    2016-07-01

    The compound 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-153) is an intermediate photolytic product in the degradation of highly brominated diphenyl ethers to lower brominated forms. Herein, we report the effects of two natural organic matter (NOM) sources, Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and Pony Lake fulvic acid (PLFA), on BDE-153 photolysis in water. The rate constant (k) and half-life of BDE-153 was 2.26 × 10(-2) min(-1) and 30.72 min under UV-Vis irradiation (direct photolysis at λ > 290 nm). The k value for BDE-153 decreased markedly in the presence of NOM with a larger decrease in the presence of PLFA than SRFA. Electron spin resonance (ESR) demonstrated generation of free radicals in the photolytic process that mainly involved (1)O2 and OH. The biomolecular k values for reaction of (1)O2 and OH with BDE-153 were 3.65 × 10(6) and 7.70 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The contribution of OH (28.7-31.0%) to the indirect photolysis of BDE-153 was higher than for (1)O2 (12.9-14.9%). The photolytic rate of BDE-153 in oxygen-rich (aerated) solution was much slower than in oxygen-poor (nitrogen-sparged) conditions, demonstrating that (3)NOM* is a more effective reagent for degradation of BDE-153 than (1)O2. Addition of sorbic acid (a (3)NOM* quencher) significantly reduced the photolytic rate of BDE-153 confirming the important role of (3)NOM* in indirect photolysis. In the presence of NOM, BDE-153 indirect photolysis was facilitated mainly by reaction with (3)NOM* and OH. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive investigation of indirect photolysis of BDE-153 in water containing NOM. PMID:27135698

  11. Dynamics of water solutions of natural polysaccharides by fast field cycling nmr relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prusova, Alena; Conte, Pellegrino; Kucerik, Jiri; de Pasquale, Claudio; Alonzo, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    second hydration shell contains water molecules, also recognized as partly-bound (PBW), which are not directly interacting with the hyaluronan chains but with BW. Finally, water molecules, which dynamics is resembling that of the pure and undisturbed water, are indicated either as a bulk water or free water (FW). As hyaluronan concentration is increased the third FW hydration shell is lost and all water molecules are affected by the presence of hyaluronan molecules. This work showed the great potential of FFC-NMR relaxometry in revealing water nature in polysaccharide solutions and the possibility for future applications on complex biological systems. Acknowledgements A.P. gratefully acknowledges a bilateral Erasmus project between Brno University of Technology and University of Palermo which provided grant sustainment for working in Italy. Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic, project MSM 0021630501 is also acknwledged. This work was partially funded by Ce.R.T.A. s.c.r.l. (Centri Regionali per le Tecnologie Alimentari; Italy). Authors kindly acknowledge Dr. Vladimír Velebný (CPN company, Dolní Dobrouč, Czech Republic) for providing of hyaluronan sample.

  12. Evolution of ion emission yield of alloys with the nature of the solute. 2: Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaise, G.; Slodzian, G.

    1977-01-01

    Solid solutions of transition elements in copper, nickel, cobalt, iron, and aluminum matrices were analyzed by observing secondary ion emissions under bombardment with 6.2-keV argon ions. Enchancement of the production of solute-element ions was observed. An ion emission model is proposed according to which the ion yield is governed by the probability of an atom leaving the metal in a preionized state. The energy distribution of the valence electrons of the solute atoms is the bases of the probability calculation.

  13. Drops of Water and of Soap Solution: Students' Constraining Mental Models of the Nature of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilam, Billie

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates how 25 junior high school students employed their bodies of knowledge and responded to problem cues while individually performing a science experiment and reasoning about a drops phenomenon. Line-by-line content analysis conducted on students' written ad hoc explanations aimed to reveal students' concepts and their…

  14. Improving the Integration of Recreation Management with Management of Other Natural Resources by Applying Concepts of Scale from Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Wayde C.; Hall, Troy E.; Kruger, Linda E.

    2009-03-01

    In this article, we examine how issues of scale affect the integration of recreation management with the management of other natural resources on public lands. We present two theories used to address scale issues in ecology and explore how they can improve the two most widely applied recreation-planning frameworks. The theory of patch dynamics and hierarchy theory are applied to the recreation opportunity spectrum (ROS) and the limits of acceptable change (LAC) recreation-planning frameworks. These frameworks have been widely adopted internationally, and improving their ability to integrate with other aspects of natural resource management has significant social and conservation implications. We propose that incorporating ecologic criteria and scale concepts into these recreation-planning frameworks will improve the foundation for integrated land management by resolving issues of incongruent boundaries, mismatched scales, and multiple-scale analysis. Specifically, we argue that whereas the spatially explicit process of the ROS facilitates integrated decision making, its lack of ecologic criteria, broad extent, and large patch size decrease its usefulness for integration at finer scales. The LAC provides explicit considerations for weighing competing values, but measurement of recreation disturbances within an LAC analysis is often done at too fine a grain and at too narrow an extent for integration with other recreation and resource concerns. We suggest that planners should perform analysis at multiple scales when making management decisions that involve trade-offs among competing values. The United States Forest Service is used as an example to discuss how resource-management agencies can improve this integration.

  15. Development of a model to predict the adsorption of lead from solution on a natural streambed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, David Wayne; Hem, John David

    1984-01-01

    Adsorption of solutes by solid mineral surfaces commonly influences the dissolved ionic composition of natural waters. A model based on electrical double-layer theory has been developed which appears to be capable of characterizing the surface chemical behavior of a natural fine-grained sediment containing mostly quartz and feldspar. This variable surface charge-variable surface potential (VSC-VSP) model differs from others in being capable of evaluating more closely the effect of total metal ion activity on the pH-dependent change in electrical potential at the solid surface. The model was tested using 10-4 molar solutions of lead and a silt-size fraction of sediment from the bed of Colma Creek, a small stream in urban northern San Mateo County, California. The average deviation of measured percent adsorption and values calculated from the model was 6.6 adsorption percent from pH 2.0 to pH 7.0.

  16. Darwinian agriculture: when can humans find solutions beyond the reach of natural selection?

    PubMed

    Denison, R Ford; Kiers, E Toby; West, Stuart A

    2003-06-01

    Progress in genetic improvement of crop yield potential has slowed since 1985. Simultaneously, more sustainable management of agricultural ecosystems is needed. A better understanding of natural selection can help solve both problems. We illustrate this point with two specific examples. First, the genetic legacy of crop plants has been refined by millions of years of natural selection, often driven by competition among plants. We therefore suggest that most simple, tradeoff-free options to increase competitiveness (e.g., increased gene expression, or minor modifications of existing plant genes) have already been tested by natural selection. Further genetic improvement of crop yield potential over the next decade will mainly involve tradeoffs, either between fitness in past versus present environments, or between individual competitiveness and the collective performance of plant communities. Eventually, we may develop the ability to predict the consequences of genetic alterations so radical that they have not yet been tested by natural selection. Second, natural selection acts mainly at the level of genes, individuals, and family groups, rather than ecosystems as a whole. Consequently, there is no reason to expect the structure of natural ecosystems (diversity, spatial, or temporal patterns) to be a reliable blueprint for agricultural ecosystems. Natural ecosystems are nonetheless an important source of information that could be used to improve agriculture. PMID:12825416

  17. Employing inquiry-based computer simulations and embedded scientist videos to teach challenging climate change and nature of science concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Edward Charles

    . The students in the video group had marked improvement compared to the non-video group on questions regarding modeling as a tool for representing objects and processes of science modeling aspects as evident by multiple data sources. The findings from the dissertation have potential impacts on improving Nature of Science (NOS) concepts around modeling by efficiently embedding short authentic scientific videos that can be easily used by many educators. Compared to published assessments by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), due to the curriculum interventions both groups scored higher than the average United States middle school student on many NOS and climate content constructs.

  18. Employing Inquiry-Based Computer Simulations and Embedded Scientist Videos To Teach Challenging Climate Change and Nature of Science Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, E.

    2013-12-01

    . The students in the video group had marked improvement compared to the non-video group on questions regarding modeling as a tool for representing objects and processes of science modeling aspects as evident by multiple data sources. The findings from the dissertation have potential impacts on improving Nature of Science (NOS) concepts around modeling by efficiently embedding short authentic scientific videos that can be easily used by many educators. Compared to published assessments by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), due to the curriculum interventions both groups scored higher than the average United States middle school student on many NOS and climate content constructs.

  19. First Year Chemical Engineering Students' Conceptions of Energy in Solution Processes: Phenomenographic Categories for Common Knowledge Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebenezer, Jazlin V.; Fraser, Duncan M.

    2001-01-01

    Examines first-year chemical engineering students' conceptions of the energy changes taking place in dissolution. Students were individually interviewed and transcripts (n=17) were analyzed using a phenomenographic methodology. The phenomenographic category explanations given by students were used as the basis for developing an approach to…

  20. Evaluating the potential of multi-purpose nature based solutions in peri-urban landscapes - a preliminary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geris, Josie; Wilkinson, Mark; Stutter, Marc; Guenther, Daniel; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Many communities across the world face the increasing challenge of balancing water quantity and quality protection and improvement with accommodating new growth and urban development. Urbanisation is typically associated with detrimental changes in water quality, sediment delivery, and effects on water storage and flow pathways (e.g. increases in flooding). Current mitigation solutions are typically based on isolated design strategies used at specific small scale sites and for storm water only. More holistic catchment scale approaches are urgently required to effectively manage the amount of water flows and protect the raw water quality in peri-urban landscapes. This project aims to provide a better understanding of the connectivity between natural and managed flow pathways, storage, and biogeochemical processes in the peri-urban landscape to eventually aid a more integrated water quantity and quality control design. For an actively urbanising catchment in NE Scotland we seek to understand the spatio-temporal character of the natural flow pathways and associated water quality, and how these may be used to support the design of nature based solutions during urbanisation. We present preliminary findings from a dense and multiscale monitoring network that includes hydrometric, tracer (stable water isotopes) and water quality (turbidity (sediment), nitrate, phosphate) data during a range of contrasting hydroclimatological conditions and at different stages of the development of urban infrastructure. These demonstrate a highly variable nature, both temporally and spatially, with water quality dynamics out of sync with storm responses and depending on management practices. This highlights potential difficulties for managing water quantity and quality simultaneously at the catchment scale, and suggests that a treatment train approach may be required. Well-designed nature based solutions that tackle both water quantity and quality issues will require adaptability and a

  1. A new concept of desulfurization: the electrochemically driven and green conversion of SO2 to NaHSO4 in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Liu, Hong; Li, Xiang-Zhong; Shi, Jianying; Ouyang, Gangfeng; Peng, Min; Jiang, Chengchun; Cui, Hua'nan

    2008-11-15

    A new concept of desulfurization was developed by designing a series of electrochemical reactions to drive an SO2 absorption-and-conversion process in aqueous solution, hence the SO2 in gas was eventually converted to a valuable chemical of NaHSO4. A model experiment of chemically substantiating this concept includes two steps: (I) absorption of SO2 gas by aqueous solution and oxidation of the absorbed SO2 to SO4(2-) by air and (II) transformation of the SO4(2-) to NaHSO4. The experiment demonstrated that in Step I, the cathodic reduction of 02 from ambient air scavenged the H+ released due to the SO2 absorption and its further oxidation, which thereby were accelerated. Meanwhile H2O2 as a cathodic product further enhanced the SO2 oxidation. In Step II, the anodic oxidation of H2O supplied H+ and allowed the NaHSO4 formation through balances of electrons and mass. Thereafter, a pH range of 5.0-6.0 for the SO2 oxidation was optimized, and an electrochemically driven process for the SO2 conversion to NaHSO4 was proposed. Sustainability evaluation indicated that this concept complies with the principles of green chemistry and potentially enables the SO2 conversion from flue gas to NaHSO4 as a value-added process. PMID:19068852

  2. ON THE DOUBLE NATURED SOLUTIONS OF THE TWO-TEMPERATURE EXTERNAL SOFT PHOTON COMPTONIZED ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Meirelles Filho, Cesar

    2009-08-01

    We have analyzed pair production in the innermost region of a two-temperature external soft photon Comptonized accretion disk. We have shown that, if the viscosity parameter is greater than a critical value {alpha}{sub c}, the solution to the disk equation is double valued: one, advection dominated, and the other, radiation dominated. When {alpha} {<=} {alpha}{sub c}, the accretion rate has to satisfy m-dot{sub 1}{<=}m-dot{<=}m-dot{sub c} in order to have two steady-state solutions. It is shown that these critical parameters m-dot{sub 1}, m-dot{sub c} are functions of r, {alpha}, and {theta}{sub e}, and {alpha}{sub c} is a function of r and {theta}{sub e}. Depending on the combination of the parameters, the advection-dominated solution may not be physically consistent. It is also shown that the electronic temperature is maximum at the onset of the thermal instability, from which results this inner region. These solutions are stable against perturbations in the electron temperature and in the density of pairs.

  3. Cancellation of the central singularity of the Schwarzschild solution with natural mass inversion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Jean-Pierre; D'Agostini, G.

    2015-02-01

    We reconsider the classical Schwarzschild solution in the context of a Janus cosmological model. We show that the central singularity can be eliminated through a simple coordinate change and that the subsequent transit from one fold to the other is accompanied by mass inversion. In such scenario matter swallowed by black holes could be ejected as invisible negative mass and dispersed in space.

  4. A Comparison of Numerical and Analytical Radiative-Transfer Solutions for Plane Albedo of Natural Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three numerical algorithms were compared to provide a solution of a radiative transfer equation (RTE) for plane albedo (hemispherical reflectance) in semi-infinite one-dimensional plane-parallel layer. Algorithms were based on the invariant imbedding method and two different var...

  5. A Comparison of Numerical and Analytical Radiative-Transfer Solutions for Plane Albedo in Natural Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several numerical and analytical solutions of the radiative transfer equation (RTE) for plane albedo were compared for solar light reflection by sea water. The study incorporated the simplest case, that being a semi-infinite one-dimensional plane-parallel absorbing and scattering...

  6. General nature of liquid-liquid transition in aqueous organic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Ken-Ichiro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2013-11-01

    The presence or absence of a liquid-liquid transition in water is one of the hot topics in liquid science, and while a liquid-liquid transition in water/glycerol mixtures is known, its generality in aqueous solutions has remained elusive. Here we reveal that 14 aqueous solutions of sugar and polyol molecules, which have an ability to form hydrogen bonding with water molecules, exhibit liquid-liquid transitions. We find evidence that both melting of ice and liquid-liquid transitions in all these aqueous solutions are controlled solely by water activity, which is related to the difference in the chemical potential between an aqueous solution and pure water at the same temperature and pressure. Our theory shows that water activity is determined by the degree of local tetrahedral ordering, indicating that both phenomena are driven by structural ordering towards ice-like local structures. This has a significant implication on our understanding of the low-temperature behaviour of water.

  7. Bridging the Gap between Preservice Early Childhood Teachers' Cultural Values, Perceptions of Values Held by Scientists, and the Relationships of These Values to Conceptions of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akerson, Valarie L.; Buzzelli, Cary A.; Eastwood, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored preservice teachers' views of their own cultural values, the cultural values they believed scientists hold, and the relationships of these views to their conceptions of nature of science (NOS). Parallel assignments in a foundations of early childhood education and a science methods course required preservice teachers to explore…

  8. Female and Male Teachers' Pro-Environmental Behaviour, Conceptions and Attitudes Towards Nature and the Environment Do Not Differ: Ecofeminism Put to the Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Ewen, B.; Clément, P.; Gericke, N. M.; Nyberg, E.; Hagman, M.; Landström, J.

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' pro-environmental behaviour, conceptions and attitudes towards nature and the environment were investigated using 47 questions from the BIOHEAD-Citizen questionnaire. The sample included 1,109 pre- and in-service teachers from Sweden and France. Analyses showed only few significant differences between female and male teachers. Forty-one…

  9. The Classroom Practice of a Prospective Secondary Biology Teacher and His Conceptions of the Nature of Science and of Teaching and Learning Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellado, Vicente; Bermejo, Maria Luisa; Blanco, Lorenzo J.; Ruiz, Constantino

    2008-01-01

    We describe research carried out with a prospective secondary biology teacher, whom we shall call Miguel. The teacher's conceptions of the nature of science and of learning and teaching science were analyzed and compared with his classroom practice when teaching science lessons. The data gathering procedures were interviews analyzed by means of…

  10. Focusing on the Classical or Contemporary? Chinese Science Teacher Educators' Conceptions of Nature of Science Content to Be Taught to Pre-Service Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Zhi Hong; Wong, Siu Ling; Wei, Bing; Zhan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from the phenomenographic perspective, an exploratory study investigated Chinese teacher educators' conceptions of teaching Nature of Science (NOS) to pre-service science teachers through semi-structured interviews. Five key dimensions emerged from the data. This paper focuses on the dimension, "NOS content to be taught to…

  11. Formulation and solution of the delayed gamma dose rate problem using the concept of effective delayed gamma production cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.

    1989-06-01

    With appropriate approximations, the delayed gamma dose rate problem can be formulated in terms of the effective delayed gamma production cross section. The coupled neutron-delayed-gamma transport equations then take the same form as the coupled neutron-prompt-gamma transport equations and they can, therefore, be solved directly in the same manner. This eliminates the need for the tedious and error prone flux coupling step in conventional calculations. Mathematical formulation and solution algorithms are derived. The advantages of this method are illustrated by an example of its application in the solution of a practical design problem. 62 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A unifying model for elongational flow of polymer melts and solutions based on the interchain tube pressure concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Manfred Hermann; Rolón-Garrido, Víctor Hugo

    2015-04-01

    An extended interchain tube pressure model for polymer melts and concentrated solutions is presented, based on the idea that the pressures exerted by a polymer chain on the walls of an anisotropic confinement are anisotropic (M. Doi and S. F. Edwards, The Theory of Polymer Dynamics, Oxford University Press, New York, 1986). In a tube model with variable tube diameter, chain stretch and tube diameter reduction are related, and at deformation rates larger than the inverse Rouse time τR, the chain is stretched and its confining tube becomes increasingly anisotropic. Tube diameter reduction leads to an interchain pressure in the lateral direction of the tube, which is proportional to the 3rd power of stretch (G. Marrucci and G. Ianniruberto. Macromolecules 37, 3934-3942, 2004). In the extended interchain tube pressure (EIP) model, it is assumed that chain stretch is balanced by interchain tube pressure in the lateral direction, and by a spring force in the longitudinal direction of the tube, which is linear in stretch. The scaling relations established for the relaxation modulus of concentrated solutions of polystyrene in oligomeric styrene (M. H. Wagner, Rheol. Acta 53, 765-777, 2014, M. H. Wagner, J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnnfm.2014.09.017, 2014) are applied to the solutions of polystyrene (PS) in diethyl phthalate (DEP) investigated by Bhattacharjee et al. (P. K. Bhattacharjee et al., Macromolecules 35, 10131-10148, 2002) and Acharya et al. (M. V. Acharya et al. AIP Conference Proceedings 1027, 391-393, 2008). The scaling relies on the difference ΔTg between the glass-transition temperatures of the melt and the glass-transition temperatures of the solutions. ΔTg can be inferred from the reported zero-shear viscosities, and the BSW spectra of the solutions are obtained from the BSW spectrum of the reference melt with good accuracy. Predictions of the EIP model are compared to the steady-state elongational viscosity data of PS

  13. Natural Cork Agglomerate Employed as an Environmentally Friendly Solution for Quiet Sandwich Composites

    PubMed Central

    Sargianis, James; Kim, Hyung-ick; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fiber-synthetic foam core sandwich composites are widely used for many structural applications due to their superior mechanical performance and low weight. Unfortunately these structures typically have very poor acoustic performance. There is increasingly growing demand in mitigating this noise issue in sandwich composite structures. This study shows that marrying carbon fiber composites with natural cork in a sandwich structure provides a synergistic effect yielding a noise-free sandwich composite structure without the sacrifice of mechanical performance or weight. Moreover the cork-core sandwich composites boast a 250% improvement in damping performance, providing increased durability and lifetime operation. Additionally as the world seeks environmentally friendly materials, the harvesting of cork is a natural, renewable process which reduces subsequent carbon footprints. Such a transition from synthetic foam cores to natural cork cores could provide unprecedented improvements in acoustic and vibrational performance in applications such as aircraft cabins or wind turbine blades. PMID:22574250

  14. Natural cork agglomerate employed as an environmentally friendly solution for quiet sandwich composites.

    PubMed

    Sargianis, James; Kim, Hyung-ick; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fiber-synthetic foam core sandwich composites are widely used for many structural applications due to their superior mechanical performance and low weight. Unfortunately these structures typically have very poor acoustic performance. There is increasingly growing demand in mitigating this noise issue in sandwich composite structures. This study shows that marrying carbon fiber composites with natural cork in a sandwich structure provides a synergistic effect yielding a noise-free sandwich composite structure without the sacrifice of mechanical performance or weight. Moreover the cork-core sandwich composites boast a 250% improvement in damping performance, providing increased durability and lifetime operation. Additionally as the world seeks environmentally friendly materials, the harvesting of cork is a natural, renewable process which reduces subsequent carbon footprints. Such a transition from synthetic foam cores to natural cork cores could provide unprecedented improvements in acoustic and vibrational performance in applications such as aircraft cabins or wind turbine blades. PMID:22574250

  15. Construct Validity: Choosing the Appropriate Factor Analytic Solution for Developing Subscales on a Self-Concept Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, Linda; Ahmadi, Behrokh

    The subscales of the How I See Myself Scale were originally established by using a principal components analysis on item scores for a sample of 4,217 elementary school children in grades three to six. A re-analysis of the same data using a common factor solution (using test communalities instead of units in the major diagonal of the correlation…

  16. An efficient initial guess formation of broken-symmetry solutions by using localized natural orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Mitsuo; Yoshioka, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2014-07-01

    A novel procedure to generate initial broken-symmetry solutions is proposed. Conventional methods for the initial broken-symmetry solutions are the MO alter, HOMO-LUMO mixing and fragment methods. These procedures, however, are quite complex. Our new approach is efficient, automatic and highly practical especially for large QM systems. This approach, called the LNO method, is applied to the following four typical open-shell systems: H2, dicarbene and two iron-sulfur clusters of Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S]. The performance and the efficiency as an electronic structural analysis are discussed. The LNO method will be applicable for general systems in the complicated broken symmetry states.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of the degradation of methyl parathion in aqueous hydrogen sulfide solution: investigation of natural organic matter effects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaofen; Jans, Urs

    2006-02-01

    The kinetics of the transformation of methyl parathion have been investigated in aqueous solution containing reduced sulfur species and small concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM) from different sources such as soil, river, and peat. It was shown that NOM mediates the degradation of methyl parathion in aqueous solutions containing hydrogen sulfide. After evaluating and quantifying the effect of the NOM concentration on the degradation kinetics of methyl parathion in the presence of hydrogen sulfide, it was found that the observed pseudo-first-order reaction rate constants (k(obs)) were proportional to NOM concentrations. The influence of pH on the degradation of methyl parathion in the aqueous solutions containing hydrogen sulfide and NOM has been studied. The rate of degradation of methyl parathion was strongly pH dependent. The results indicate k(obs) with a commercially available humic acid has a maximum value at approximately pH 8.3. Two main reaction mechanisms are identified to dominate the degradation of methyl parathion in aqueous solution containing hydrogen sulfide and NOM based on the products aminomethyl parathion and desmethyl methyl parathion. The two mechanisms are nitro-group reduction and nucleophilic attack at the methoxy-carbon. The reduction of the nitro-group is only observed in the presence of NOM. The results of this study form an important base for the evaluation and interpretation of transformation processes of methyl parathion in the environment. PMID:16509335

  18. Simultaneous removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution by natural limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdiri, Ali; Higashi, Teruo

    2013-03-01

    Two natural limestone samples, collected from the Campanian-Maastrichtian limestones, Tunisia, were used as adsorbents for the removal of toxic metals in aqueous systems. The results indicated that high removal efficiency could be achieved by the present natural limestones. Among the metal ions studied, Pb2+ was the most preferably removed cation because of its high affinity to calcite surface. In binary system, the presence of Cu2+ effectively depressed the sorption of Cd2+ and Zn2+. Similarly Cu2+ strongly competed with Pb2+ to limestone surface. In ternary system, the removal further decreased, but considerable amount of Pb2+ and Cu2+ still occurred regardless of the limestone sample. The same behavior was observed in quadruple system, where the selectivity sequence was Pb2+ > Cu2+ > Cd2+ > Zn2+. From these results, it was concluded that the studied limestones have the required technical specifications to be used for the removal of toxic metals from wastewaters.

  19. Anodic behavior of platinized titanium electrodes during the production of sodium hypochlorite solutions from natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailova, L.A.; Khodkevich, S.D.; Yakimenko, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Data obtained radiometrically are presented which relate to the influence of current density, temperature, and salinity of the electrolyte on the anodic dissolution rate of platinum sheet and of the platinum coating of platinized titanium electrodes in natural waters of different composition. The influence of current interruptions on the wear of the platinum coatings is estimated. The anodic dissolution rates of two forms of platinum coatings are compared, viz., freshly deposited and after prolonged prior polarization.

  20. Prevention of degradation of the natural high potency sweetener (2R,4R)-monatin in mock beverage solutions.

    PubMed

    Storkey, Corin; Pattison, David I; Koehler, Jamie A; Gaspard, Dan S; Evans, Jeff C; Hagestuen, Erik D; Davies, Michael J

    2015-04-15

    Exposure of the naturally-occurring sweetener monatin to light and metal ions results in loss of both parent monatin and total indole (monatin plus monatin lactone/lactam) in mock beverage solutions, with an accompanying decrease in sweetness. In this study potential protective strategies to prevent degradation were investigated. Metal ion chelating resin, or the chelators EDTA and desferrioxamine decreased monatin and indole loss for solutions kept either in darkness or exposed to light. Tannic acid and Chinese bayberry extract both afforded protection, but this did not arise from a light filtering effect. Plastics with defined absorbance characteristics provided protection with this being wavelength dependent; yellow transparent PET plastic was most effective. The contribution of these interventions (metal ion removal/binding; antioxidant; light absorption) was additive, with combinations providing the greatest protective effect against monatin and indole loss. These results indicate that it is possible to minimise monatin degradation by appropriate choices of treatments, additives and container. PMID:25466071

  1. Removal of lead from aqueous solutions by using the natural and Fe(III)-modified zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragović, Milan; Daković, Aleksandra; Sekulić, Živko; Trgo, Marina; Ugrina, Marin; Perić, Jelena; Gatta, G. Diego

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, the sorption of lead by the natural and Fe(III)-modified zeolite (clinoptilolite) is described. The characterization of the natural zeolite-rich rock and the Fe(III)-modified form was performed by chemical analysis, point of the zero charge (pHpzc), X-ray powder diffraction, applying the Rietveld/RIR method for the quantitative phase analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of sorbents dose and the initial lead concentrations on its sorption by two sorbents were investigated. For both sorbents, it was determined that at lower initial concentrations of lead, ion exchange of inorganic cations in zeolites with lead, together with uptake of hydrogen dominated, while at higher initial lead concentrations beside these processes, chemisorption of lead occurred. Significantly higher sorption of lead was achieved with Fe(III)-modified zeolite. From sorption isotherms, maximum sorbed amounts of lead, under the applied experimental conditions, were 66 mg/g for the natural and 133 mg/g for Fe(III)-modified zeolite. The best fit of experimental data was achieved with the Freundlich model (R2 ≥ 0.94).

  2. Dynamic residual complexity of natural products by qHNMR: solution stability of desmethylxanthohumol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Nong; Lankin, David C; Chadwick, Lucas R; Jaki, Birgit U; Pauli, Guido F

    2009-06-01

    The use of chromatographic assays to assess the residual complexity of materials that are purified from natural sources by chromatographic means is, in a sense, a case of the fox watching the henhouse. Beside their static residual complexity, which is intrinsic to their metabolic origin, biologically active natural materials can also be involved in chemical reactions that lead to dynamic residual complexity. The present study examines the dynamics of the hop prenylphenol, desmethylxanthohumol (DMX), by means of quantitative (1)H-NMR (qHNMR) in a setting that mimics IN VITRO and physiological conditions. The experiments provide a comprehensive, time-resolved, and mechanistic picture of the spontaneous isomerization of DMX into congeneric flavanones, including their (1)H/(2)D isotopomers. Formation of the potent phytoestrogen, 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN), suggests that measurable estrogenic activity even of high-purity DMX is an artifact. Together with previously established qHNMR assays including purity activity relationships (PARs), dynamic qHNMR assays complement important steps of the post-isolation evaluation of natural products. Thus, qHNMR allows assessment of several unexpected effects that potentially break the assumed linkage between a single chemical entity (SCE) and biological endpoints. PMID:19145555

  3. Study of colloidal properties of natural and Al-pillared smectite and removal of copper ions from an aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Sartor, Lucas Resmini; de Azevedo, Antonio Carlos; Andrade, Gabriel Ramatis Pugliese

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an Al-pillared smectite was synthesized and changes in its colloidal properties were investigated. The pillaring solution was prepared by mixing 0.4 mol L(-1) NaOH and 0.2 mol L(-1) AlCl3.6H2O solutions. Intercalated clays were heated to obtain the pillared clay, and X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and N2 sorption/desorption isotherms analysis were done to characterize the changes in clay properties. Moreover, adsorption experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the capacity of the pillared clays to remove Cu2+ from an aqueous solution and to characterize the interaction between adsorbent and adsorbate. The results indicate that the natural clay has a basal spacing of 1.26 nm, whereas the pillared clays reached 1.78 nm (500°C) and 1.80 nm (350°C) after calcination. XRF analysis revealed an increase in the Al3+ in the pillared clay as compared to the natural clay. The surface area and pore volume (micro and mesoporous) were higher for the pillared clays. Experimental data from the adsorption experiment were fit to Langmuir and Freundlich and Temkin adsorption models, and the former one was the best fit (highest r2 value) for all the clays and lower standard deviation (Δg%) for the natural clay. On the other hand, the Temkin model exhibited Δg% value lower for the pillared clays. Thermodynamics parameters demonstrate that the Cu2+ adsorption process is spontaneous for all the clays, but with higher values for the pillared materials. In addition, application of the Dubinin-Radushkevich model revealed that the bond between the metal and the clay are weak, characterizing a physisorption. PMID:25253565

  4. Uranium sorption onto natural sands as a function of sediment characteristics and solution pH

    SciTech Connect

    Rosentreter, J.J.; Quarder, S.H.; Smith, R.W.; McLing, T.

    1996-10-01

    Uranium sorption studies were conducted on twenty-five sandy sediments obtained from Virginia`s Easter Shore Peninsula using batch contact methods. Distribution coefficient (Kd) and sorption isotherms have been determined as function of solution pH. All sediment samples strongly sorbed dissolved uranium species at pH values above 5. Sediments characterized by high iron, aluminum, and surface area, possessed the highest sorption characteristics. Both, Freundlich and Dubinin Radushkevich equations were able to describe the sorption behavior. From the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation, the solution-component-solid surface bounding energy and the sorption capacities, were estimated. Least square regression utilizing sediment characteristics provided an effective statistical method for Kd prediction. Predictions with relative errors of about 30% were obtained using only two sediment variables, such as, iron or aluminum content and surface area. In conclusion, the results support that ion exchange and surface complexation reactions with the ferric and aluminum oxide/oxyhydroxides groups are the predominant sorption mechanisms.

  5. Nature of Glycine and Its α-Carbon Radical in Aqueous Solution: A Theoretical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Wood, Geoffrey P F; Gordon, Mark S; Radom, Leo; Smith, David M

    2008-10-14

    Quantum chemistry calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations have been used to examine the equilibria in solution between the neutral and zwitterionic forms of glycine and also of the glycyl radical. The established preference (by 30 kJ mol(-1)) for the zwitterion of glycine was confirmed by both the quantum chemical calculations and the classical molecular dynamics simulations. The best agreement with experiment was derived from thermodynamic integration calculations of explicitly solvated systems, which gives a free energy difference of 36.6 ± 0.6 kJ mol(-1). In contrast, for the glycyl radical in solution, the neutral form is preferred, with a calculated free energy difference of 54.8 ± 0.6 kJ mol(-1). A detailed analysis of the microsolvation environments of each species was carried out by evaluating radial distribution functions and hydrogen bonding patterns. This analysis provides evidence that the change in preference between glycine and glycyl radical is due to the inherent gas-phase stability of the neutral α-carbon radical rather than to any significant difference in the solvation behavior of the constituent species. PMID:26620181

  6. True molecular solutions of natural cellulose in the binary ionic liquid-containing solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rein, Dmitry M; Khalfin, Rafail; Szekely, Noemi; Cohen, Yachin

    2014-11-01

    Evidence is presented for the first time of true molecular dissolution of cellulose in binary mixtures of common polar organic solvents with ionic liquid. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, small-angle neutron-, X-ray- and static light scattering were used to investigate the structure of cellulose solutions in mixture of dimethyl formamide and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Structural information on the dissolved chains (average molecular weight ∼ 5 × 10(4)g/mol; gyration radius ∼ 36 nm, persistence length ∼ 4.5 nm), indicate the absence of significant aggregation of the dissolved chains and the calculated value of the second virial coefficient ∼ 2.45 × 10(-2)mol ml/g(2) indicates that this solvent system is a good solvent for cellulose. More facile dissolution of cellulose could be achieved in solvent mixtures that exhibit the highest electrical conductivity. Highly concentrated cellulose solution in pure ionic liquid (27 wt.%) prepared according to novel method, utilizing the rapid evaporation of a volatile co-solvent in binary solvent mixtures at superheated conditions, shows insignificant cellulose molecular aggregation. PMID:25129726

  7. Neuroontology, neurobiological naturalism, and consciousness: A challenge to scientific reduction and a solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Todd E.

    2012-03-01

    One of the great challenges to a science of consciousness is the inability to reduce critical features of consciousness to neural processes. In this paper I identify four neuroontologically irreducible features (NOIF) - referral of neural states, mental unity, qualia, and mental causation - defined as aspects of consciousness in which subjective experience is not wholly reducible to objectively observed or objectively understood neurons (ontological subjectivity). I next analyze the emergent and unique system properties of the neural hierarchy and argue that while the NOIF are indeed ontologically subjective, each of the NOIF individually can be explained by the unique architecture and functional properties of the neural hierarchy that lead to both emergent properties and their irreducibility in a manner that does not violate any known physical laws nor require any new physics or the application of physics to emergence or reduction beyond that normally applied to biology in general. I conclude that consciousness is a neurobiologically unique and local phenomenon that is specific to particular neural systems, a view that is consistent with both ontological subjectivity and biological naturalism. I call this position weakly emergent nonreductive physicalism or neurobiological naturalism.

  8. The characterization of the adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solution using natural fibers treated with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rediske, Nicole M.

    The objective of this research was to characterize natural carbon fibers from coconut husks, both bare and impregnated with metallic nanoparticles, in removing cadmium from aqueous media. The adsorbent load, kinetics, isotherm parameters, removal efficiencies, desorption capacity and possible contaminant removal mechanisms were evaluated. It was found that the fibers treated with metallic nanoparticles performed better than the bare fibers in removing cadmium from water. The ideal conditions were found to be neutral pH with low initial cadmium concentrations. Through the kinetic analyses, the adsorption process was first thought to be pseudo first order with two separate adsorption mechanisms apparent. Upon further analysis, it was seen that the first mechanism does not follow the pseudo first order kinetics model. An increase in calcium and magnesium concentrations was observed as the cadmium concentrations decreases. This increase corresponds with first mechanism. This suggests the cadmium removal in the first mechanism is due to ion exchange. The second mechanism's rate constant was consistently lower than the first mechanisms rate constant by an order of magnitude. This led to the hypothesis that the second mechanism is controlled by van de Waals forces, specifically ion-induced dipole interactions, and physical adsorption. It was also found that the cadmium does not effectively desorb from the wasted fibers in DI water. Keywords: Adsorption; kinetics; pseudo first order; cadmium; metallic nanoparticles; natural fibers; removal efficiencies; ion exchange.

  9. Neuroontology, neurobiological naturalism, and consciousness: a challenge to scientific reduction and a solution.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Todd E

    2012-03-01

    One of the great challenges to a science of consciousness is the inability to reduce critical features of consciousness to neural processes. In this paper I identify four neuroontologically irreducible features (NOIF) - referral of neural states, mental unity, qualia, and mental causation - defined as aspects of consciousness in which subjective experience is not wholly reducible to objectively observed or objectively understood neurons (ontological subjectivity). I next analyze the emergent and unique system properties of the neural hierarchy and argue that while the NOIF are indeed ontologically subjective, each of the NOIF individually can be explained by the unique architecture and functional properties of the neural hierarchy that lead to both emergent properties and their irreducibility in a manner that does not violate any known physical laws nor require any new physics or the application of physics to emergence or reduction beyond that normally applied to biology in general. I conclude that consciousness is a neurobiologically unique and local phenomenon that is specific to particular neural systems, a view that is consistent with both ontological subjectivity and biological naturalism. I call this position weakly emergent nonreductive physicalism or neurobiological naturalism. PMID:22056393

  10. Autobiographically significant concepts: more episodic than semantic in nature? An electrophysiological investigation of overlapping types of memory.

    PubMed

    Renoult, Louis; Davidson, Patrick S R; Schmitz, Erika; Park, Lillian; Campbell, Kenneth; Moscovitch, Morris; Levine, Brian

    2015-01-01

    A common assertion is that semantic memory emerges from episodic memory, shedding the distinctive contexts associated with episodes over time and/or repeated instances. Some semantic concepts, however, may retain their episodic origins or acquire episodic information during life experiences. The current study examined this hypothesis by investigating the ERP correlates of autobiographically significant (AS) concepts, that is, semantic concepts that are associated with vivid episodic memories. We inferred the contribution of semantic and episodic memory to AS concepts using the amplitudes of the N400 and late positive component, respectively. We compared famous names that easily brought to mind episodic memories (high AS names) against equally famous names that did not bring such recollections to mind (low AS names) on a semantic task (fame judgment) and an episodic task (recognition memory). Compared with low AS names, high AS names were associated with increased amplitude of the late positive component in both tasks. Moreover, in the recognition task, this effect of AS was highly correlated with recognition confidence. In contrast, the N400 component did not differentiate the high versus low AS names but, instead, was related to the amount of general knowledge participants had regarding each name. These results suggest that semantic concepts high in AS, such as famous names, have an episodic component and are associated with similar brain processes to those that are engaged by episodic memory. Studying AS concepts may provide unique insights into how episodic and semantic memory interact. PMID:25061931

  11. A numerical solution of variable porosity effects on natural convection in a packed-sphere cavity

    SciTech Connect

    David, E.; Lauriat, G. ); Cheng, P. )

    1991-05-01

    The problem of natural convection in differentially heated vertical cavities filled with spherical particles saturated with Newtonian fluids is investigated numerically. The Brinkman-Darcy-Ergun equation is used as the momentum equation, and the wall effect on porosity variation is approximated by an exponential function. The effect of variable stagnant thermal conductivities is taken into consideration in the energy equation. The formulation of the problem shows that the flow and heat transfer characteristics depend on six dimensionless parameters, namely, the Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers of the fluid phase, the dimensionless particle diameter, the conductivity ratio of the two phases, the bulk porosity, and the aspect ratio of the cavity. The influences of these parameters on the heat transfer rate are thoroughly investigated. The predicted Nusselt numbers are compared with existing experimental results. It is found that the computed Nusselt numbers based on the present model compare the best with experimental data.

  12. Removal of Alizarin Violet 3R (anthraquinonic dye) from aqueous solutions by natural coagulants.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Heredia, J; Sánchez-Martín, J; Delgado-Regalado, A; Jurado-Bustos, C

    2009-10-15

    In this paper the ability of two natural products in removing dyes has been tested. After a preliminary screening for dye removal capacity, a tannin-based coagulant called ACQUAPOL C-1 and a vegetal protein extract derived from Moringa oleifera seed have been fully studied. The influence of several parameters such as pH, temperature or initial dye concentration (IDC) have been tested and the behavior of both coagulants has been compared. pH results to be an interesting variable and dye removal decreases as pH increases. This effect is higher in ACQUAPOL C-1 than in M. oleifera seed extract. Temperature seems not to be so affecting parameter, while IDC appears to be a very important variable in q(c) capacity, which is higher as IDC increases. Langmuir isotherm model fits very well in both cases of ACQUAPOL C-1 and M. oleifera seed extract dye removal. PMID:19481341

  13. Cobalt (II) removal from aqueous solutions by natural hemp fibers: Batch and fixed-bed column studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofan, Lavinia; Teodosiu, Carmen; Paduraru, Carmen; Wenkert, Rodica

    2013-11-01

    Natural hemp fibers were explored as sorbent for the removal of Co(II) ions from aqueous solutions in batch and dynamic conditions. The batch Co(II) sorption capacity increased up to pH 5, reached the maximum (7.5-7.8 mg/g) over the initial pH of 4.5-5. As the initial concentration of metal ion increased (in the range of 25-200 mg/L), the cobalt uptake was enhanced, but the Co(II) removal efficiency decreased. The batch sorption of Co(II) on the tested hemp follows a pseudo-second order model, which relies on the assumption that the chemisorptions may be the rate-controlling step. The Langmuir model better described the Co(II) sorption process on the natural hemp fibers in comparison with the Freundlich model. This finding complies with the results of fixed-bed studies which emphasize that the optimal solution for describing the behavior of the investigated hemp bed column is provided by the Thomas model. The sorption capacity of the hemp fibers column (15.44 mg/g) performed better than that of the Co(II)-hemp batch system (13.58 mg/g). The possibility to use hemp fibers as an alternative in the Co(II) wastewater treatment should be studied under pilot scale applications, so as to complete the studies concerning the removal efficiencies with technical and economic factors that influence process scale-up.

  14. Structure and pH-induced alterations of recombinant and natural spider silk proteins in solution.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Jérémie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Pottier, Fabien; Morency, Louis-Philippe; Lapointe-Verreault, Camille; Gagné, Stéphane M; Auger, Michèle

    2012-06-01

    The spinning process of spiders can modulate the mechanical properties of their silk fibers. It is therefore of primary importance to understand what are the key elements of the spider spinning process to develop efficient industrial spinning processes. We have exhaustively investigated the native conformation of major ampullate silk (MaS) proteins by comparing the content of the major ampullate gland of Nephila clavipes, solubilized MaS (SolMaS) fibers and the recombinant proteins rMaSpI and rMaSpII using (1) H solution NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that the protein secondary structure is basically identical for the recombinant protein rMaSpI, SolMaS proteins, and the proteins in the dope, and corresponds to a disordered protein rich in 3(1) -helices. The data also show that glycine proton chemical shifts of rMaSpI and SolMaS are affected by pH, but that this change is not due to a modification of the secondary structure. Using a combination of NMR and dynamic light scattering, we have found that the spectral alteration of glycine is concomitant to a modification of the hydrodynamical diameter of recombinant and solubilized MaS. This led us to suggest new potential roles for the pH acidification in the spinning process of MaS proteins. PMID:21898365

  15. Rethinking Coal: Thin Films of Solution Processed Natural Carbon Nanoparticles for Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Keller, Brent D; Ferralis, Nicola; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-05-11

    Disordered carbon materials, both amorphous and with long-range order, have been used in a variety of applications, from conductive additives and contact materials to transistors and photovoltaics. Here we show a flexible solution-based method of preparing thin films with tunable electrical properties from suspensions of ball-milled coals following centrifugation. The as-prepared films retain the rich carbon chemistry of the starting coals with conductivities ranging over orders of magnitude, and thermal treatment of the resulting films further tunes the electrical conductivity in excess of 7 orders of magnitude. Optical absorption measurements demonstrate tunable optical gaps from 0 to 1.8 eV. Through low-temperature conductivity measurements and Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that variable range hopping controls the electrical properties in as-prepared and thermally treated films and that annealing increases the sp(2) content, localization length, and disorder. The measured hopping energies demonstrate electronic properties similar to amorphous carbon materials and reduced graphene oxide. Finally, Joule heating devices were fabricated from coal-based films, and temperatures as high as 285 °C with excellent stability were achieved. PMID:27031328

  16. Water content and nature of solutes in shallow-mantle fluids from fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, Maria Luce; Ferrando, Simona; Tecce, Francesca; Castelli, Daniele

    2012-10-01

    This study discusses new and published data on the composition of fluid inclusions contained in mantle minerals of spinel and garnet peridotite xenoliths, in samples from geodynamically distinct settings (Ethiopian plateau, Hawaii, Canary Islands, and western Mediterranean region). Based on spectroscopic Raman and FTIR analyses we show that, contrary to a commonly held view, fluid inclusions either contain relevant amounts of unsuspected H2O, or represent a "dehydrated" composition from multicomponent aqueo-carbonic fluids. We identify water loss from fluid inclusions through decrepitation, stretching and hydrogen diffusion. We also show that talc, magnesite, chlorides, and sulfates represent common phases in fluid inclusions. Talc and magnesite form through reactions of fluids with the surrounding minerals. Thermodynamic modeling in the MFSHC system of observed reactions between fluid inclusions and surrounding mantle minerals provides the basis for predicting water amounts in shallow-mantle fluids, and suggests X in the range of 10-50 mol%. Model hydrous fluids are relatively enriched solutions, dominated by Si, Cl, and alkalies, with significant amounts of Ca, and S, and low levels of Mg and Fe. This study argues that multicomponent hydrous fluids may be widespread in the shallow mantle, not only in subduction zones but also in intraplate and extensional settings.

  17. Natural biosorbents (garlic stem and horse chesnut shell) for removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Parlayıcı, Şerife; Pehlivan, Erol

    2015-12-01

    The biosorption of Cr(VI) by the garlic stem (GS)-Allium sativum L. and horse chesnut shell (HCS)-Aesculus hippocastanum plant residues in a batch type reactor was studied in detail for the purpose of wastewater treatment. The influence of initial Cr(VI) concentration, time, and pH was investigated to optimize Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solutions and equilibrium isotherms and kinetic data. This influence was evaluated. The adsorption capacity of the GS and the HCS for Cr(VI) was determined with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, and the data was fitted to the Langmuir. The adsorption capacity of the GS and the HCS was found to be 103.09 and 142.85 mg/g of adsorbent from a solution containing 3000 ppm of Cr(VI), respectively. The GS's capacity was considerably lower than that of the HCS in its natural form. Gibbs free energy was spontaneous for all interactions, and the adsorption process exhibited exothermic enthalpy values. The HCS was shown to be a promising biosorbent for Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:26581609

  18. Bridging the Gap Between Preservice Early Childhood Teachers' Cultural Values, Perceptions of Values Held by Scientists, and the Relationships of These Values to Conceptions of Nature of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerson, Valarie L.; Buzzelli, Cary A.; Eastwood, Jennifer L.

    2011-07-01

    This study explored preservice teachers' views of their own cultural values, the cultural values they believed scientists hold, and the relationships of these views to their conceptions of nature of science (NOS). Parallel assignments in a foundations of early childhood education and a science methods course required preservice teachers to explore their own cultural backgrounds and their perceptions of the cultural backgrounds of scientists. The Schwartz Values Inventory was used to measure preservice teachers' personal cultural values and those they perceived of scientists. The Views of Nature of Science version B questionnaire and interviews assessed teachers' conceptions of NOS. Copies of student work were collected and sought for themes indicating how preservice teachers perceived scientists' cultural values and how those perceptions changed over time. We found that from the beginning to the end of the semester, preservice teachers perceived fewer differences between their own cultural values and those they perceived scientists held, though they did not change their own cultural values. We found that preservice teachers' NOS conceptions improved, and that they were related to both their cultural values and those they perceived scientists held. Preservice teachers who indicated the fewest differences between their own cultural values and those they perceived scientists held the most informed conceptions of NOS.

  19. Technology Solutions Case Study: Improving the Field Performance of Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this project is to examine the impact that common installation practices and age-induced equipment degradation may have on the installed performance of natural gas furnaces, as measured by steady-state efficiency and AFUE. PARR identified twelve furnaces of various ages and efficiencies that were operating in residential homes in the Des Moines Iowa metropolitan area and worked with a local HVAC contractor to retrieve them and test them for steady-state efficiency and AFUE in the lab. Prior to removal, system airflow, static pressure, equipment temperature rise, and flue loss measurements were recorded for each furnace. After removal from the field the furnaces were transported to the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) laboratory, where PARR conducted steady-state efficiency and AFUE testing. The test results show that steady-state efficiency in the field was 6.4% lower than that measured for the same furnaces under standard conditions in the lab, which included tuning the furnace input and air flow rate. Comparing AFUE measured under ASHRAE standard conditions with the label value shows no reduction in efficiency for the furnaces in this study over their 15 to 24 years of operation when tuned to standard conditions. Further analysis of the data showed no significant correlation between efficiency change and the age or the rated efficiency of the furnace.

  20. Adsorption efficiency of natural materials for low-concentration cesium in solution.

    PubMed

    Miura, A; Kubota, T; Hamada, K; Hitomi, T

    2016-01-01

    In this study, several natural materials were investigated in order to clarify their potential use as cesium (Cs) adsorbents in situ. Four materials--carbonized rice hull, beech sawdust, oak sawdust, and charcoal (Japanese cedar)--which were previously shown to have Cs adsorption capabilities, were examined. Cs adsorption experiments were conducted using different initial Cs and adsorbent concentrations. The physical properties, adsorption isotherms, and adsorption processes were then examined, so as to exploit the Cs adsorption characteristics in the field. Based on these findings, carbonized rice hull and beech sawdust were selected as effective Cs adsorbents. It was found that these materials show continuous and stable Cs adsorption rates for different initial Cs concentrations. The adsorption efficiency of these two adsorption materials in combination was considered, and it was shown that the adsorption isotherms for carbonized rice hull and beech sawdust follow the Freundlich model. Furthermore, the beech sawdust adsorption process exhibited better agreement with the calculated values obtained via the adsorption rate model and the adsorption kinetics model than did the carbonized rice hull adsorption. PMID:27191567

  1. Concept-Development of a Structure Supported Membrane for Deployable Space Applications - From Nature to Manufacture and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, Martin; Belvin, W. K.

    2012-01-01

    Current space applications of membrane structures include large area solar power arrays, solar sails, antennas, and numerous other large aperture devices like the solar shades of the new James Webb Space Telescope. These expandable structural systems, deployed in-orbit to achieve the desired geometry, are used to collect, reflect and/or transmit electromagnetic radiation. This work, a feasibility study supporting a diploma thesis, describes the systematic process for developing a biologically inspired concept for a structure supported (integrated) membrane, that features a rip stop principle, makes self-deployment possible and is part of an ultra-light weight space application. Novel manufacturing of membrane prototypes and test results are presented for the rip-stop concepts. Test data showed that the new membrane concept has a higher tear resistance than neat film of equivalent mass.

  2. Removal of natural organic matter (NOM) from an aqueous solution by NaCl and surfactant-modified clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Niri, Mehdi Vosoughi; Mahvi, Amir Hosein; Alimohammadi, Mahmoud; Shirmardi, Mohammad; Golastanifar, Hafez; Mohammadi, Mohamma Javad; Naeimabadi, Abolfazl; Khishdost, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Zeolitic tuffs are found in different parts of the world. Iranian zeolite is a low-cost material that can be frequently found in nature. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) can be used for the adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption study was conducted to evaluate the adsorption capacity of SMZ; furthermore, the effects of contact time, initial pH, and the initial adsorbent dose on the adsorption process were investigated in a batch system. The kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of NOM on SMZ was a gradual process. The optimum initial pH values for the adsorption of NOM on SMZ were in the acidic ranges. The batch kinetic experiments showed that the adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model with good correlation coefficients. The equilibrium data were well described by the Langmuir isotherm model. The results show that the natural zeolite being modified with NaCl and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide as a cationic surfactant was an appropriate adsorbent for the removal of NOM. PMID:26042972

  3. DETECTING SELECTION IN NATURAL POPULATIONS: MAKING SENSE OF GENOME SCANS AND TOWARDS ALTERNATIVE SOLUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Haasl, Ryan J.; Payseur, Bret A.

    2016-01-01

    Genomewide scans for natural selection (GWSS) have become increasingly common over the last 15 years due to increased availability of genome-scale genetic data. Here, we report a representative survey of GWSS from 1999 to present and find that (i) between 1999 and 2009, 35 of 49 (71%) GWSS focused on human, while from 2010 to present, only 38 of 83 (46%) of GWSS focused on human, indicating increased focus on nonmodel organisms; (ii) the large majority of GWSS incorporate interpopulation or interspecific comparisons using, for example FST, cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity or the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions; (iii) most GWSS focus on detection of directional selection rather than other modes such as balancing selection; and (iv) in human GWSS, there is a clear shift after 2004 from microsatellite markers to dense SNP data. A survey of GWSS meant to identify loci positively selected in response to severe hypoxic conditions support an approach to GWSS in which a list of a priori candidate genes based on potential selective pressures are used to filter the list of significant hits a posteriori. We also discuss four frequently ignored determinants of genomic heterogeneity that complicate GWSS: mutation, recombination, selection and the genetic architecture of adaptive traits. We recommend that GWSS methodology should better incorporate aspects of genomewide heterogeneity using empirical estimates of relevant parameters and/or realistic, whole-chromosome simulations to improve interpretation of GWSS results. Finally, we argue that knowledge of potential selective agents improves interpretation of GWSS results and that new methods focused on correlations between environmental variables and genetic variation can help automate this approach. PMID:26224644

  4. Nature of amine-surfactant interactions at the air-solution interface.

    PubMed

    Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Zhang, X L; Taylor, D J F

    2009-04-01

    significant in the context of understanding the unusual nature of the PEI/surfactant interaction and of using small molecular weight additives rather than much larger molecular weight polymers to manipulate adsorption properties. PMID:19714886

  5. Removal of Cr(VI) and Cr(lll) from aqueous solutions and industrial wastewaters by natural clino-pyrrhotite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Anhuai; Zhong, Shaojun; Chen, Jie; Shi, Junxian; Tang, Junli; Lu, Xiaoying

    2006-05-01

    This paper introduced a simple method of treating Cr(Vl)-bearing toxic wastewaters using a natural mineral: clino-pyrrhotite. Laboratory bench-scale mixing experiments were carried out in both Cr(VI)-bearing artificial solutions and industrial wastewaters under controlled conditions. The effects of solution pH, Cr(VI) concentration, mineral grain size, mineral/solution ratio, and reaction time on the Cr(VI) removal were studied. Chromium was effectively removed from the solutions and wastewaters. After the treatment, the liquid was clean enough to be discharged directly into the natural environment. The Cr(VI) removal process involved sequentially the adsorption of Cr(VI), in the form of Cr2O7(2-) or CrO4(2-), onto the mineral surface, the reduction of the adsorbed Cr(VI) to Cr(lll), catalyzed at the vacant Fe sites of the mineral, and finally the precipitation of Cr(lll) as Cr2S3, Cr2O3, and Cr(OH)3 solid phases. Conditions such as a fine mineral grain size, an excessive quantity of clino-pyrrhotite and a weak acidic media, favored the removal process. For clino-pyrrhotite with a restricted grain size, the minimum required quantity of the mineral was proportional to the total quantity of Cr(VI) to be removed. Quantitatively, one cubic meter of industrial wastewater that contained approximately 1 mmol dm(-3) of Cr(VI) and had a pH value between 1 and 10 would be effectively treated after it was in contact with 220 kg of 145 +/- 28 microm clino-pyrrhotite for an hour. Furthermore, the quantity of the final solid waste byproduct was small, and the solid residue of clino-pyrrhotite could be reused after a simple rinse with water. Compared to the previous Cr(VI)-bearing wastewater treatment schemes, this method was simple, effective, economical, and environmentally sound. It has great potential for use in industrial-scale applications. PMID:16719112

  6. The Online Dissemination of Nature–Health Concepts: Lessons from Sentiment Analysis of Social Media Relating to “Nature-Deficit Disorder”

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Marco; Taylor, Tim; Göker, Ayse; Isaacs, John; Warber, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Evidence continues to grow supporting the idea that restorative environments, green exercise, and nature-based activities positively impact human health. Nature-deficit disorder, a journalistic term proposed to describe the ill effects of people’s alienation from nature, is not yet formally recognized as a medical diagnosis. However, over the past decade, the phrase has been enthusiastically taken up by some segments of the lay public. Social media, such as Twitter, with its opportunities to gather “big data” related to public opinions, offers a medium for exploring the discourse and dissemination around nature-deficit disorder and other nature–health concepts. In this paper, we report our experience of collecting more than 175,000 tweets, applying sentiment analysis to measure positive, neutral or negative feelings, and preliminarily mapping the impact on dissemination. Sentiment analysis is currently used to investigate the repercussions of events in social networks, scrutinize opinions about products and services, and understand various aspects of the communication in Web-based communities. Based on a comparison of nature-deficit-disorder “hashtags” and more generic nature hashtags, we make recommendations for the better dissemination of public health messages through changes to the framing of messages. We show the potential of Twitter to aid in better understanding the impact of the natural environment on human health and wellbeing. PMID:26797628

  7. Interactions between Mathematics and Physics: The History of the Concept of Function--Teaching with and about Nature of Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjeldsen, Tinne Hoff; Lützen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the history of the concept of function and emphasize in particular how problems in physics have led to essential changes in its definition and application in mathematical practices. Euler defined a function as an analytic expression, whereas Dirichlet defined it as a variable that depends in an arbitrary manner on another…

  8. The Transformation of Natural to Geometrical Concepts, Concerning Children 5-7 Years Old. The Case of Measuring Surfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharos, Konstantino; Ravanis, Konstantin

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the potentialities of teaching the concept of measuring surfaces to primary school children. Children tested in covering the surface of an object using socially significant materials (e.g., cardboard rectangles vs. car pictures and a drawing of a parking lot) were found to complete the task at ages younger than expected. (JPB)

  9. 'That's What Scientists Have To Do': Preservice Elementary Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science during a Moon Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abell, Sandra; Martini, Mariana; George, Melissa

    2001-01-01

    Describes a science methods course for elementary education majors in which students investigated the phases of the moon. Concludes that students did not make direct connections between their science learning activities and the nature of science. Provides a set of recommendations related to the nature of science and moon study. (Contains 27…

  10. Low-dose natural prostaglandin F2α (dinoprost) at timed insemination improves conception rate in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Divakar J; Gobikrushanth, Mohanathas; Zuidhof, Sjoert; Kastelic, John P

    2015-03-01

    The primary objective was to determine if low doses of PGF2α (dinoprost) given intramuscularly (im) concurrent with timed artificial insemination (TAI) would improve conception rates in dairy cattle. A secondary objective was to determine if body condition score (BCS) and parity would influence conception rates, either independently or in interaction with PGF2α treatment. In experiment I, 307 lactating Holstein cows were randomly assigned to receive either 5-mg PGF2α im (PGF2α treated, n = 154) or 0-mg PGF2α (control, n = 153) at TAI (Day 0). Blood samples were obtained on Days -10, -3, 0, and 7 to determine plasma progesterone (P4) concentrations. Pregnancy was confirmed 30 to 32 days after insemination by transrectal ultrasonography. In experiment II, 451 cows were randomly assigned to receive either 10-mg PGF2α im (PGF2α treated, n = 226) or 0-mg PGF2α (control, n = 225) at TAI, and pregnancy was confirmed 45 to 50 days after TAI by palpation per rectum. Pregnancy data were analyzed by CATMOD (SAS). In experiment I, PGF2α treatment, BCS, and parity did not affect conception rate (35.7% vs. 37.0% for PGF2α treated vs. control; P > 0.05). However, in experiment II, conception rates were higher in cows given 10-mg PGF2α than those in control cows (45.8% vs. 36.0%; P < 0.05), in cows with high BCS than in cows with low BCS (52.1% vs. 30.4%; P < 0.01), and in primiparous than in multiparous cows (47.6% vs. 34.4%; P < 0.01), but their interaction with PGF2α treatment did not affect conception rates. In summary, 5 mg of PGF2α given im concurrent with TAI failed to enhance conception rate in lactating dairy cows, whereas 10 mg of PGF2α significantly increased conception rate. PMID:25434776

  11. Heat stability of strawberry anthocyanins in model solutions containing natural copigments extracted from rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) petals.

    PubMed

    Shikov, Vasil; Kammerer, Dietmar R; Mihalev, Kiril; Mollov, Plamen; Carle, Reinhold

    2008-09-24

    Thermal degradation and color changes of purified strawberry anthocyanins in model solutions were studied upon heating at 85 degrees C by HPLC-DAD analyses and CIELCh measurements, respectively. The anthocyanin half-life values increased significantly due to the addition of rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) petal extracts enriched in natural copigments. Correspondingly, the color stability increased as the total color difference values were smaller for anthocyanins upon copigment addition, especially after extended heating. Furthermore, the stabilizing effect of rose petal polyphenols was compared with that of well-known copigments such as isolated kaempferol, quercetin, and sinapic acid. The purified rose petal extract was found to be a most effective anthocyanin-stabilizing agent at a molar pigment/copigment ratio of 1:2. The results obtained demonstrate that the addition of rose petal polyphenols slows the thermal degradation of strawberry anthocyanins, thus resulting in improved color retention without affecting the gustatory quality of the product. PMID:18729376

  12. Polarization dependent two-photon absorption spectroscopy on a naturally occurring biomarker (curcumin) in solution: A theoretical-experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiburcio-Moreno, Jose A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Diaz, Carlos; Echevarria, Lorenzo; Hernández, Florencio E.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the theoretical-experimental analysis of the two-photon absorption (TPA) and two-photon circular-linear dichroism (TPCLD) spectra of (1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione (curcumin) in Tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution. The measurement of the full TPA spectrum of this molecule reveals a maximum TPA cross-section at 740 nm, i.e. more than 10 times larger than the maximum reported in the literature at 800 nm for the application of curcumin in bioimaging. The TPCLD spectrum exposes the symmetry of the main excited-states involved in the two-photon excitation process. TD-DFT calculations support the experimental results. These outcomes are expected to expand the application of natural-occurring dyes in bioimaging.

  13. Natural laccase mediators separated from water-washed solution of steam exploded corn straw by nanofiltration and organic solvent fractionation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weihua; Zhang, Wenyan; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-03-01

    Artificially synthetic mediators of laccase had the limitation of high cost and possible toxicity. The separation of natural laccase mediators from water-washed solution (WWS) of steam exploded corn straw (SECS) was studied using nano-filtration and successive organic solvents extraction. Results indicated that the UV absorption intensity of nano-filtrated WWS was significantly enhanced. The UV absorption intensity of each extractive from WWS could be ranked as ether extractive (EE)>ethyl acetate extractive (EAE)>chloroform extractive (CE). Decoloration of crystal violet catalyzed by laccase/EE was higher than that by laccase/ABTS, which was 66.95% and 61.9% at 8h, respectively. All the decoloration rates of malachite green at 60min using EE, EAE and ABTS as mediator were both more than 80%. This research would benefit for broaden the source of laccase mediator and reduce the using cost of laccase/mediator system. PMID:24513027

  14. Conceptions of wellness among the Yup'ik of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta: the vitality of social and natural connection.

    PubMed

    Wolsko, Christopher; Lardon, Cecile; Hopkins, Scarlett; Ruppert, Elizabeth

    2006-11-01

    Focus group research was conducted to examine indigenous conceptions of wellness among the Yup'ik Eskimos of southwestern Alaska. The dialogue on wellness emphasized the importance of living a traditional lifestyle, seeking creative solutions to manage drastic cultural change, and fostering connection within the communities and the native landscape. These themes mesh well with existing characterizations of Alaska Native experiences and worldviews, and reflect substantial links between enculturation, acculturation and health. The data underscores the importance of comprehending local conceptions of wellness in order to effectively work toward promoting optimal health. This paper represents part of an ongoing dialogue in which researchers and native communities co-direct the investigation into healthy ways of being in the world. PMID:17060033

  15. Photocatalytic degradation of humic substances in aqueous solution using Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles under natural sunlight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Afshin; Safari, Mahdi; Shahmoradi, Behzad; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Daraei, Hiua; Gharibi, Fardin

    2015-11-01

    In this study, Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles were investigated as an efficient synthesized catalyst for photodegradation of humic substances in aqueous solution under natural sunlight irradiation. Cu-doped ZnO nanocatalyst was prepared through mild hydrothermal method and was characterized using FT-IR, powder XRD and SEM techniques. The effect of operating parameters such as doping ratio, initial pH, catalyst dosage, initial concentrations of humic substances and sunlight illuminance were studied on humic substances degradation efficiency. The results of characterization analyses of samples confirmed the proper synthesis of Cu-doped ZnO nanocatalyst. The experimental results indicated the highest degradation efficiency of HS (99.2%) observed using 1.5% Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles at reaction time of 120 min. Photocatalytic degradation efficiency of HS in a neutral and acidic pH was much higher than that at alkaline pH. Photocatalytic degradation of HS was enhanced with increasing the catalyst dosage and sunlight illuminance, while increasing the initial HS concentration led to decrease in the degradation efficiency of HS. Conclusively, Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles can be used as a promising and efficient catalyst for degradation of HS under natural sunlight irradiation. PMID:26104905

  16. What Are the Effects of Teaching Experience on In-Service Elementary Science Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates relationships between understanding of nature of science and four key factors elementary science teachers possess, which are: (1) Their specializations in different science areas (Physics, chemistry, and biology), (2) Gender issues, (3) How long they have been teaching in elementary school environments, (4) Their…

  17. The Effect of a "Science, Technology and Society" Course on Prospective Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Suat; Bayrakceken, Samih

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess prospective teachers' views of some aspects of the nature of science (NOS) and the effects of a "Science, Technology and Society" (STS) course embedded with scientific investigation (SI) on these views. A questionnaire consisting of 13 items was given to 212 prospective teachers enrolled in a STS course before…

  18. In the Eyes of the Beholder: Beginning Teachers' Conception of the Nature of Science and Science Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, K. C.; Toh, K. A.

    This paper seeks to explore how beginning elementary school teachers (N=161) in Singapore conceive the scope and nature of science and to understand the relationship between those views and their present approach to, as well as their past experience of, science teaching and learning. Results of an inquiry into the teachers' views indicate that…

  19. Using Multiple Watershed-scale Dye Tracing Tests to Study Water and Solute Transport in Naturally Obstructed Stream Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Meeks, J. L.; Hubbard, K. A.; Kurian, L. M.; Siegel, D. I.; Lautz, L. K.; Otz, M. H.

    2007-12-01

    Temporary storage of surface water at channel sides and pools significantly affects water and solute transport downstream in watersheds. Beavers, natural "stream channel engineers", build dams which obstruct stream flow and temporarily store water in small to large ponds within stream channels. These ponds substantially delay water movement and increase the water residence time in the system. To study how water and solutes move through these obstructed stream channels, we did multiple dye tracing tests at Cherry Creek, a main tributary to Red Canyon Creek (Wind River Range, Wyoming). First we surveyed beaver dam distributions in detail within the study reaches. We then introduced dyes four times from July 2nd to 6th, 2007 using a scale-up approach. The observation site was fixed at the mouth of Cherry Creek, and 1.5 grams of Rhodamine WT (RWT) dye was injected sequentially at upstream sites with increasing test reach length. The reach lengths scaled up from 500m to 2.5 km. A field fluorometer recorded RWT concentrations every 15 seconds. The results show non-linear decreases of the peak concentration of the dye tracing cloud as the reach scaled up. Also, the times to 1.) the arrivals of the leading edges (Tl), 2.) the peak concentrations (Tp) and 3.) the tailing edges (Tt) and 4) the durations of the tracer cloud (Td) behaved non-linearly as function of length scale. For example, plots of arrivals of leading edges and tailing edges with scale distance appear to define curves of the form; Tl=27.665e1.07× Distance (r2=0.99) and Tt=162.62e0.8551× Distance (r2=0.99), respectively. The greatest non-linearity occurred for the time of tailing and the least for the time of leading edge. These observations are consistent with what would be expected with greater density of dams and/or storage volumes as the reach length increased upgradient. To come to a first approximation, we are currently modeling the breakthrough curves with the solute transport code OTIS to address

  20. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Natural Conception: A Comparison of Live Birth Rates in Patients with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss Associated with Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi; Nagayoshi, Motoi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Takeda, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Background Established causes of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) include antiphospholipid syndrome, uterine anomalies, parental chromosomal abnormalities, particularly translocations, and abnormal embryonic karyotypes. The number of centers performing preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for patients with translocations has steadily increased worldwide. The live birth rate with PGD was reported to be 27-54%. The live birth rate with natural conception was reported to be 37-63% on the first trial and 65-83% cumulatively. To date, however, there has been no cohort study comparing age and the number of previous miscarriages in matched patients undergoing or not undergoing PGD. Thus, we compared the live birth rate of patients with RPL associated with a translocation undergoing PGD with that of patients who chose natural conception. Methods and Findings After genetic counseling, 52 patients who desired natural conception and 37 patients who chose PGD were matched for age and number of previous miscarriages and these comprised the subjects of our study. PGD was performed by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The live birth rates on the first PGD trial and the first natural pregnancy after ascertainment of the carrier status were 37.8% and 53.8%, respectively (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.22-1.23). Cumulative live birth rates were 67.6% and 65.4%, respectively, in the groups undergoing and not undergoing PGD. The time required to become pregnancy was similar in both groups. PGD was found to reduce the miscarriage rate significantly. The prevalence of twin pregnancies was significantly higher in the PGD group. The cost of PGD was $7,956 U.S. per patient. Conclusions While PGD significantly prevented further miscarriages, there was no difference in the live birth rate. Couples should be fully informed of the similarity in the live birth rate, the similarity in time to become pregnancy, the advantages of PGD, such as the reduction in the

  1. Maternal psychosocial consequences of twins and multiple births following assisted and natural conception: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Olga; Postavaru, Gianina-Ioana; Purewal, Satvinder

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis is to provide new evidence on the effects on maternal health of multiple births due to assisted reproductive technology (ART). A bibliographic search was undertaken using PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Science Direct. Data extraction was completed using Cochrane Review recommendations, and the review was performed following PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines. Meta-analytic data were analysed using random effects models. Eight papers (2993 mothers) were included. Mothers of ART multiple births were significantly more likely to experience depression (standardized mean difference [SMD] d = 0.198, 95% CI 0.050 - 0.345, z = 2.623, P = 0.009; heterogeneity I(2) = 36.47%), and stress (SMD d = 0.177, 95% CI 0.049 - 0.305, P = 0.007; heterogeneity I(2) = 0.01%) than mothers of ART singletons. No difference in psychosocial distress (combined stress and depression) (SMD d = 0.371, 95% CI -0.153 - 0.895; I(2) = 86.962%, P = 0.001) or depression (d = 0.152, 95% CI -0.179 - 0.483: z = 0.901; I(2) = 36.918%) were found between mothers of ART and naturally conceived multiple births. In conclusion, mothers of ART multiple births were significantly more likely to have depression and stress than mothers of ART singletons, but were no different from mothers of naturally conceived multiples. PMID:27156004

  2. Edaq530: A Transparent, Open-End and Open-Source Measurement Solution in Natural Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopasz, Katalin; Makra, Peter; Gingl, Zoltan

    2011-01-01

    We present Edaq530, a low-cost, compact and easy-to-use digital measurement solution consisting of a thumb-sized USB-to-sensor interface and measurement software. The solution is fully open-source, our aim being to provide a viable alternative to professional solutions. Our main focus in designing Edaq530 has been versatility and transparency. In…

  3. NATURAL GRADIENT EXPERIMENT ON SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A SAND AQUIFER. 2. SPATIAL MOMENTS AND THE ADVECTION AND DISPERSION OF NONREACTIVE TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The three-dimensional movement of a tracer plume containing bromide and chloride is investigated using the data base from a large-scale natural gradient field experiment on groundwater solute transport. The analysis focuses on the zeroth-, first-, and second-order spatial moments...

  4. Hybridization of natural systems with advanced treatment processes for organic micropollutant removals: new concepts in multi-barrier treatment.

    PubMed

    Sudhakaran, Sairam; Maeng, Sung Kyu; Amy, Gary

    2013-07-01

    Organic micropollutants (OMPs) represent a major constraint in drinking water supply. In the past, emphasis has been on individual treatment processes comprising conventional treatment (coagulation, sedimentation, and filtration) followed by advanced treatment processes (adsorption, ion-exchange, oxidation, and membrane separation). With the depletion of water resources and high demand for power and chemical usage, efforts need to be made to judiciously use advanced treatment processes. There is a new interest in multiple barriers with synergies in which two coupled processes can function as a hybrid process. Within the context of this paper, the hybrid processes include a natural treatment process coupled with an advanced process. Pilot/full-scale studies have shown efficient removal of OMPs by these hybrid processes. With this hybridization, the usage of resources such as power and chemicals can be reduced. In this study, coupling/hybridization of aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) with oxidation (O3), advanced oxidation process which involves OH radicals (AOP), nanofiltration (NF), reverse osmosis (RO) and granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption for OMP removal was studied. O3 or AOP as a pre-treatment and GAC, NF, RO, or UV/chlorination as a post-treatment to ARR was studied. NF can be replaced by RO for removal of OMPs since studies have shown similar performance of NF to RO for removal of many OMPs, thereby reducing costs and providing a more sustainable approach. PMID:23664475

  5. An examination of an aspect of the worldview of female college science teachers as revealed by their concepts of nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, Lisa A.

    American citizens are confronted every day with scientific issues such as global warming, alternative energy technologies, stem cell research, and the use of genetically modified foods. A scientifically literate adult should be able to understand these issues, see how they relate to their own lives, and make choices that reflect their knowledge of the problems at hand. Research has indicated that the majority of U.S. students are not prepared to take a proactive role in current scientific issues and so undergraduate educators are being charged with the task of improving the relevancy of science to the nonscience student. One method for exploring this problem has been the application of worldview theory, which seeks to analyze the thoughts and attitudes of teachers and students with regard to science in their lives. This qualitative case study sought to uncover the worldviews of female science college professors particularly as they related to nature and to examine how these educators felt their worldviews might influence their students. A series of established card sort activities used in previous worldview studies, in combination with an in-depth interview facilitated the data collection from female science professors teaching at universities in New England.

  6. When Do Short-Wave Cones Signal Blue or Red? A Solution Introducing the Concept of Primary and Secondary Cone Outputs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper by Oh and Sakata investigates the “incompletely solved mystery” of how the three cone responses map onto perceived hue, and particularly the S cone’s well-known problematic contribution to blueness and redness. Citing previous workers, they argue the twentieth century traditional multistage model does not satisfactorily account for color appearance. In their experiment, increasing S cone excitation with shortening wavelength from about 480–460 nm increased perceived blueness up to the unique Blue point at 470 nm, when (a) it began decreasing and (b) redness perception began increasing. The authors asked, What mechanism can be responsible for such functions? I demonstrate a solution. First, it is shown the problem does not lie in the traditional opponent color chromatic responses yellow-blue, red-green (y-b, r-g, which accurately predict the above functions), but in the traditional multistage model of mapping cone responses to chromatic response functions. Arguably, this is due to the S cone’s hypothetically signaling both blueness and redness by the same mechanism rather than by different, independent, mechanisms. Hence a new distinction or mechanism is proposed for a more accurate model, that introduces the new terms primary and secondary cone outputs. However, this distinction requires that the cones S, M, L each directly produce one of the three spectral chromatic responses b, g, y. Such a model was recently published, based on extremely high correlation of SML cone responsivities with the three spectral (bgy) chromatic responses. This model encodes the former directly onto the latter one-to-one as cone primary outputs, whilst S and L cones have a further or secondary function where each produces one of the two spectral lobes of r chromatic response. The proposed distinction between primary and secondary cone outputs is a new concept and useful tool in detailing cone outputs to chromatic channels, and provides a solution to the above

  7. The influence of the history of science course on pre-service science teachers' understanding of the nature of science concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Behiye

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of a history of science course on pre-service science teachers' understanding of the nature of science concepts. Subjects in the study were divided in two groups: (1) students who enrolled in only in the history of science course, (2) students who enrolled both the meaning of science and the history of science courses. An interpretative-descriptive approach and constant comparative analysis were used to identify similarities and differences among pre-service teachers' views about nature of scientific knowledge prior to and after the history of science course. The results of this study indicate that explicitly addressing certain aspects of the nature of science is effective in promoting adequate understanding of the nature of science for pre-service science teachers. Moreover, the results indicate that a student's prior experience with the history of science helps to improve their understanding of the history and nature of science. The history of science course helped pre-service teachers to develop the following views which are parallel with these advocated in both the Benchmarks (AAAS, 1993) and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996) concerning the nature of scientific knowledge: (1) Scientific knowledge is empirically based and an ongoing process of experimentation, investigation, and observation. (2) Science is a human endeavor. (3) People from different cultures, races, genders, and nationality contribute to science. (4) Scientific knowledge is not based on myths, personal beliefs, and religious values. (5) Science background and prior knowledge have important roles for scientific investigations. (6) Scientific theories and laws represent different kinds of knowledge. (7) Science is affected by political, social, and cultural values. (8) Creativity and imagination are used during all stages of scientific investigations. (9) Theories change because of new evidence and new views of existing

  8. Context, accuracy, and level of inclusion of nature of science concepts in current high school physics textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshamrani, Saeed Mohammed

    To improve K-12 students' images of the nature of science (NOS) through science textbooks, two issues must be addressed: (a) the level of NOS that ought to be included in science textbooks and (b) the treatment of this level in those textbooks. Science educators achieved a consensus level of agreement regarding what NOS aspects should be taught for K-12 science learners; however, there is a need for more clarification regarding the actual treatment of NOS in science textbooks. The purpose of this study is to investigate the NOS inclusion in high school physics textbooks. To be specific, this study examines the included NOS aspects, the frequency of NOS inclusion, the contexts exist for NOS inclusion, and the accuracy of NOS inclusion. This study utilized 12 science education studies to develop the Master Aspects of Nature of Science [MA-NOS] which includes 12 NOS aspects that ought to be included in K-12 science curriculum. The analyzed textbooks in this study are seven textbooks identified by The American Institute of Physics as the most widely used high school physics textbooks in the United States in 2005. These textbooks were used in teaching five academic levels: (a) Regular First-Year Physics, (b) Physics for Non-Science Students, (c) Honors Physics, (d) AP-B Physics, and (e) AP-C Physics. The researcher selected exclusively physics textbooks because physics is his main interest. To facilitate the content analysis of the selected textbooks, the study developed The Collection Data Coding Guide which includes six parts describing the MA-NOS aspects and the process of identifying and collecting data. For each NOS aspect, a description and one or more selected ideal indicators were provided to facilitate data collecting and judging the accuracy of NOS inclusion. This coding guide was reviewed for its content validity by two science educators who specialize in NOS. However, two types of reliability were conducted to identify the consistency of selecting NOS units

  9. Photoinduced chemical reactions on natural single crystals and synthesized crystallites of mercury(II) sulfide in aqueous solution containing naturally occurring amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pal, Bonamali; Ikeda, Shigeru; Ohtani, Bunsho

    2003-03-10

    Photoirradiation at >300 nm of aqueous suspensions of several natural crystal specimens and synthesized crystallites of mercury(II) sulfide (HgS) induced deaminocyclization of optically active or racemic lysine into pipecolinic acid (PCA) under deaerated conditions. This is the first example, to the best of our knowledge, of photoinduced chemical reactions of natural biological compounds over natural minerals. It was found that the natural HgS crystals had activity higher than those of synthesized ones but lower than those of other sulfides of transition metals, e.g., CdS and ZnS, belonging to the same II-IV chalcogenides. In almost all of the photoreactions, decompostion of HgS occurred to liberate hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and Hg(2+), and the latter seemed to have undergone in-situ reductive deposition on HgS as Hg(0) after a certain induction period (24-70 h) during the photoirradiation, as indicated by the darkened color of the suspensions. The formation of PCA, presumably through combination of oxidation of lysine and reduction of an intermediate, cyclic Schiff base, could also be seen after a certain induction time of the Hg(0) formation. This was supported by the fact that the addition of small amount of Hg(2+) (0.5 wt % of HgS) increased the PCA yield by almost 2-fold. We also tried to elucidate certain aspects of the plausible stereochemical reactions in relation to the chiral crystal structure of HgS. Although, in some experiments, slight enantiomeric excess of the product PCA was observed, the excess was below or equal to the experimental error and no other supporting analytical data could not be obtained; we cannot conclude the enantiomeric photoproduction of PCA by the natural chiral HgS specimen. PMID:12611518

  10. Solubilities of methane, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and a natural gas mixture in aqueous sodium bicarbonate solutions under high pressure and elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Zheng, D.Q.; Guo, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    The solubility of natural gas mixtures in formation water (brine) plays an important role in estimating the natural gas reserve, the formation/dissociation conditions of methane hydrates in situ, and the interfacial tension of the hydrocarbon-formation water system. However, solubility data at high pressure and elevated temperature conditions for aqueous electrolyte systems are rare. Recently, in the reservoirs found at the South China Sea areas, the main salt species in the formation water is sodium bicarbonate, and the solubility data of gases in aqueous sodium bicarbonate solutions under reservoir conditions have not previously been reported. An apparatus for measuring the solubility of gases in aqueous electrolyte solutions under high pressure and elevated temperature conditions is described. The solubility of methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and a natural gas mixture in aqueous sodium bicarbonate solutions were measured up to 58 MPa and 403 K. The modified Patel-Teja equation of state proposed by Zuo and Guo (1991) for aqueous electrolyte systems was applied to correlate the measured solubility data, and satisfactory results were obtained.

  11. How Not to Become a Buffoon in Front of a Shop Window: A Solution Allowing Natural Head Movement for Interaction with a Public Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubin, Omar; Lashina, Tatiana; van Loenen, Evert

    The user interaction solution described in this paper was developed in the context of an Intelligent Shop Window (ISW) with an aim to offer a user the interaction solution where system response would be triggered by naturally gazing at products. We have analyzed a possibility to realize such a user interaction solution using gaze tracking and concluded that remote calibration free eye tracking is still a subject of academic research, but that head tracking could be used instead. We argue that conventional use of head tracking requires conscious intentional head movements and thus does not fit into the context of applications such as the ISW. We further describe our experiment aimed to explore how head movements relate to eye movements when looking at objects in a shop window context. We show large variability in head movement and that per individual the gaze-head data could well be approximated with a straight line. Based on these results we propose a new solution that enables natural gaze interaction by means of head tracking.

  12. Comparative efficacy of oil solution and wettable powder of lambda-cyhalothrin to naturally occurring Ornithonyssus sylviarum infestation of chickens.

    PubMed

    Pan, Baoliang; Liang, Daming; Zhang, Yafeng; Wang, Hailiang; Wang, Ming

    2009-10-14

    The Northern Fowl Mite (NFM), Ornithonyssus sylviarum, is one of the most important and common pests of poultry. Most of available pesticides applied in the NFM control are formulated as wettable powder or emulsifiable concentrate and require to be diluted with water before use. As water has very low affinity to bird feathers, a part of the diluted pesticide will fall on the ground, on the cages, on feed bins or drift in the air upon application, which becomes a source of a potential harm to administrative workers and birds. In contrast to water, an oil solution of pesticide has a higher affinity for feathers and can stay on the feather for a longer time, and maybe provide a high efficacy and be effective for a longer, persistent period against the NFM. In the present study, the efficacy of oil solution and wettable powder of lambda-cyhalothrin to NFM in breeders was compared; the results showed that while spraying lambda-cyhalothrin wettable powder on birds could effectively control NFM, painting lambda-cyhalothrin oil solution on birds gave complete control of NFM for at least 6 weeks. In the application of lambda-cyhalothrin oil solution, no containment of pesticide to cages, feed bin and no pesticide drifting in the air was observed. These results indicated that lambda-cyhalothrin oil solution has a potential to become an effective and safe formulation to control NFM in breeders. PMID:19577369

  13. Edaq530: a transparent, open-end and open-source measurement solution in natural science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopasz, Katalin; Makra, Péter; Gingl, Zoltán

    2011-03-01

    We present Edaq530, a low-cost, compact and easy-to-use digital measurement solution consisting of a thumb-sized USB-to-sensor interface and measurement software. The solution is fully open-source, our aim being to provide a viable alternative to professional solutions. Our main focus in designing Edaq530 has been versatility and transparency. In this paper, we shall introduce the capabilities of Edaq530, complement it by showing a few sample experiments, and discuss the feedback we have received in the course of a teacher training workshop in which the participants received personal copies of Edaq530 and later made reports on how they could utilize Edaq530 in their teaching.

  14. Aggregation in five-coordinate high-spin natural hemins: Determination of solution structure by sup 1 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumdar, S.; Mitra, S. )

    1990-01-25

    {sup 1}H NMR measurements (at 500 MHz) of nuclear spin-spin relaxation time T{sub 2} (from NMR line width) at different temperatures are reported for aggregates of several five-coordinate high-spin iron(III) complexes of proto-, deutero-, and coproporphyrins in solution and are utilized to determine their solution structure. Extensive aggregation of these complexes in solution is observed, and the dominant form of the aggregates is shown to be dimers. The degree of aggregation for these iron(III) porphyrins follows the order proto- >> deutero- > copro-. The line width of the heme methyl resonances was analyzed by using a nonlinear least-squares fit program working in finite difference algorithm. The values of T{sub 2} were used to determine the structural details of the dimer.

  15. CTSPAC: MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR COUPLED TRANSPORT OF WATER, SOLUTES, AND HEAT IN THE SOIL-PLANT-ATMOSPHERE CONTINUUM. VOLUME 1. MATHEMATICAL THEORY AND TRANSPORT CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical structure of the model consists of the coupling of a model for the transport through soils to a model for transport through plants. The coupled model describes uptake of water and solutes by plants from the soil solution. The rate of uptake is a function of the e...

  16. Plants increase arsenic in solution but decrease the non-specifically bound fraction in the rhizosphere of an alkaline, naturally rich soil.

    PubMed

    Obeidy, Carole; Bravin, Matthieu N; Bouchardon, Jean-Luc; Conord, Cyrille; Moutte, Jacques; Guy, Bernard; Faure, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    We aimed at determining the major physical-chemical processes that drive arsenic (As) dynamic in the rhizosphere of four species (Holcus lanatus, Dittrichia viscosa, Lotus corniculatus, Plantago lanceolata) tested for phytostabilization. Experiments were performed with an alkaline soil naturally rich in As. Composition of the soil solution of planted and unplanted pots was monitored every 15 days for 90 days, with a focus on the evolution of As concentrations in solution and in the non-specifically bound (i.e. easily exchangeable) fraction. The four species similarly increased As concentration in solution, but decreased As concentration in the non-specifically bound fraction. The major part (60%) of As desorbed from the non-specifically bound fraction in planted pots was likely redistributed on the less available fractions of As on the solid phase. A second part (35%) of desorbed As was taken up by plants. The minor part (5%) of desorbed As supplied As increase in solution. To conclude, plants induced a substantial redistribution of As on the less available fractions in the rhizosphere, as expected in phytostabilization strategies. Plants however concomitantly increased As concentration in the rhizosphere solution which may contribute to As transfer through plant uptake and leaching. PMID:26707185

  17. The physical state of osmoregulatory solutes in unicellular algae. A natural-abundance carbon-13 nuclear-magnetic-resonance relaxation study.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, R S; MacKay, M A; Borowitzka, L J

    1982-01-01

    Natural-abundance 13C n.m.r. spin-lattice relaxation-time measurements have been carried out on intact cells of the unicellular blue--green alga Synechococcus sp. and the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina, with the aim of characterizing the environments of the organic osmoregulatory solutes in these salt-tolerant organisms. In Synechococcus sp., all of the major organic osmoregulatory solute, 2-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosylglycerol, is visible in spectra of intact cells. Its rotational motion in the cell is slower by a factor of approx. 2.4 than in aqueous solution, but the molecule is still freely mobile and therefore able to contribute to the osmotic balance. In D. salina, only about 60% of the osmoregulatory solute glycerol is visible in spectra of intact cells. The rotational mobility of this observable fraction is approximately half that found in aqueous solution, but the data also indicate that there is a significant concentration of some paramagnetic species in D. salina which contributes to the overall spin-lattice relaxation of the glycerol carbon atoms. The non-observable fraction, which must correspond to glycerol molecules that have very broad 13C resonances and that are in slow exchange with bulk glycerol, has not been properly characterized as yet, but may represent glycerol in the chloroplast. The implications of these findings in relation to the physical state of the cytoplasm and the mechanism of osmoregulation in these cells are discussed. PMID:6807296

  18. Computing Liquid-Liquid Phase Equilibria: An Exercise for Understanding the Nature of False Solutions and How to Avoid Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olaya, Maria del Mar; Ibarra, Isabel; Reyes-Labarta, Juan A.; Serrano, Maria Dolores; Marcilla, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    An exercise to compute LLE data is presented to illustrate the problems that can arise when the isoactivity equilibrium condition is used in the LLE calculations. A much more efficient condition is obtained when isoactivity is combined with the common tangent line criterion, avoiding false solutions that correspond with very low values of the…

  19. Adsorption states of amphipatic solutes at the surface of naturally hydrophobic minerals: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Du, Hao; Miller, J D

    2007-11-01

    An initial molecular dynamics simulation study regarding interfacial phenomena at selected naturally hydrophobic surfaces is reported. Simulation results show that, due to the natural hydrophobicity of graphite and talc basal planes, the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide preferentially adsorbs at these surfaces through hydrophobic interactions. When a model dextrin molecule is considered, the simulation results suggest that the hydrophobic interaction between the naturally hydrophobic surfaces of graphite, talc basal plane, and sulfur and the hydrophobic moieties (C-H and methylene groups) in the dextrin molecule plays a significant role in dextrin adsorption at these surfaces. The hydroxyl group in the dextrin molecule also contributes to its adsorption at the talc basal plane surface. In contrast, dextrin was not found to adsorb at talc edge surfaces. PMID:17929842

  20. A review of selected pumping systems in nature and engineering--potential biomimetic concepts for improving displacement pumps and pulsation damping.

    PubMed

    Bach, D; Schmich, F; Masselter, T; Speck, T

    2015-10-01

    The active transport of fluids by pumps plays an essential role in engineering and biology. Due to increasing energy costs and environmental issues, topics like noise reduction, increase of efficiency and enhanced robustness are of high importance in the development of pumps in engineering. The study compares pumps in biology and engineering and assesses biomimetic potentials for improving man-made pumping systems. To this aim, examples of common challenges, applications and current biomimetic research for state-of-the art pumps are presented. The biomimetic research is helped by the similar configuration of many positive displacement pumping systems in biology and engineering. In contrast, the configuration and underlying pumping principles for fluid dynamic pumps (FDPs) differ to a greater extent in biology and engineering. However, progress has been made for positive displacement as well as for FDPs by developing biomimetic devices with artificial muscles and cilia that improve energetic efficiency and fail-safe operation or reduce noise. The circulatory system of vertebrates holds a high biomimetic potential for the damping of pressure pulsations, a common challenge in engineering. Damping of blood pressure pulsation results from a nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of the artery walls which represent a complex composite material. The transfer of the underlying functional principle could lead to an improvement of existing technical solutions and be used to develop novel biomimetic damping solutions. To enhance efficiency or thrust of man-made fluid transportation systems, research on jet propulsion in biology has shown that a pulsed jet can be tuned to either maximize thrust or efficiency. The underlying principle has already been transferred into biomimetic applications in open channel water systems. Overall there is a high potential to learn from nature in order to improve pumping systems for challenges like the reduction of pressure pulsations, increase of jet

  1. Pareto-optimal solutions for environmental flow schemes incorporating the intra-annual and interannual variability of the natural flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Jenq-Tzong; Wu, Fu-Chun

    2007-06-01

    The temporal variations of natural flows are essential elements for preserving the ecological health of a river which are addressed in this paper by the environmental flow schemes that incorporate the intra-annual and interannual variability of the natural flow regime. We present an optimization framework to find the Pareto-optimal solutions for various flow schemes. The proposed framework integrates (1) the range of variability approach for evaluating the hydrologic alterations; (2) the standardized precipitation index approach for establishing the variation criteria for the wet, normal, and dry years; (3) a weir operation model for simulating the system of flows; and (4) a multiobjective optimization genetic algorithm for search of the Pareto-optimal solutions. The proposed framework is applied to the Kaoping diversion weir in Taiwan. The results reveal that the time-varying schemes incorporating the intra-annual variability in the environmental flow prescriptions promote the ecosystem and human needs fitness. Incorporation of the interannual flow variability using different criteria established for three types of water year further promotes both fitnesses. The merit of incorporating the interannual variability may be superimposed on that of incorporating only the intra-annual flow variability. The Pareto-optimal solutions searched with a limited range of flows replicate satisfactorily those obtained with a full search range. The limited-range Pareto front may be used as a surrogate of the full-range one if feasible prescriptions are to be found among the regular flows.

  2. Clastic dikes of the Hatrurim basin (western flank of the Dead Sea) as natural analogues of alkaline concretes: Mineralogy, solution chemistry, and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, E. V.; Gaskova, O. L.; Kozmenko, O. A.; Kokh, S. N.; Vapnik, E. A.; Novikova, S. A.; Nigmatulina, E. N.

    2014-11-01

    This study shows that the mineral assemblages from clastic dikes in areas adjacent to the Dead Sea graben may be considered as natural analogues of alkaline concretes. The main infilling material of the clastic dikes is composed of well-sorted and well-rounded quartz sand. The cement of these hard rocks contains hydroxylapophyllite, tacharanite, calcium silicate hydrates, opal, calcite, and zeolite-like phases, which is indicative of a similarity of the natural cementation processes and industrial alkaline concrete production from quartz sands and industrial alkaline cements. The quartz grains exhibit a variety of reaction textures reflecting the interaction with alkaline solutions (opal and calcium hydrosilicate overgrowths; full replacement with apophyllite or thomsonite + apophyllite). The physicochemical analysis and reconstruction of the chemical composition of peralkaline Ca, Na, and K solutions that formed these assemblages reveal that the solutions evolved toward a more stable composition of zeolite-like phases, which are more resistant to long-term chemical weathering and atmospheric corrosion. The 40Ar/39Ar age of 6.2 ± 0.7 Ma obtained for apophyllite provides conclusive evidence for the high corrosion resistance of the assemblages consisting of apophyllite and zeolite-like phases.

  3. Uncertainty of streamwater solute fluxes in five contrasting headwater catchments including model uncertainty and natural variability (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulenbach, B. T.; Burns, D. A.; Shanley, J. B.; Yanai, R. D.; Bae, K.; Wild, A.; Yang, Y.; Dong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    There are many sources of uncertainty in estimates of streamwater solute flux. Flux is the product of discharge and concentration (summed over time), each of which has measurement uncertainty of its own. Discharge can be measured almost continuously, but concentrations are usually determined from discrete samples, which increases uncertainty dependent on sampling frequency and how concentrations are assigned for the periods between samples. Gaps between samples can be estimated by linear interpolation or by models that that use the relations between concentration and continuously measured or known variables such as discharge, season, temperature, and time. For this project, developed in cooperation with QUEST (Quantifying Uncertainty in Ecosystem Studies), we evaluated uncertainty for three flux estimation methods and three different sampling frequencies (monthly, weekly, and weekly plus event). The constituents investigated were dissolved NO3, Si, SO4, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), solutes whose concentration dynamics exhibit strongly contrasting behavior. The evaluation was completed for a 10-year period at five small, forested watersheds in Georgia, New Hampshire, New York, Puerto Rico, and Vermont. Concentration regression models were developed for each solute at each of the three sampling frequencies for all five watersheds. Fluxes were then calculated using (1) a linear interpolation approach, (2) a regression-model method, and (3) the composite method - which combines the regression-model method for estimating concentrations and the linear interpolation method for correcting model residuals to the observed sample concentrations. We considered the best estimates of flux to be derived using the composite method at the highest sampling frequencies. We also evaluated the importance of sampling frequency and estimation method on flux estimate uncertainty; flux uncertainty was dependent on the variability characteristics of each solute and varied for

  4. As an Infused or a Separated Theme? Chinese Science Teacher Educators' Conceptions of Incorporating Nature of Science Instruction in the Courses of Training Pre-Service Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Zhi Hong; Wong, Siu Ling

    2013-01-01

    Teaching nature of science (NOS) is beginning to find its place in science education in China. This exploratory study interviewed twenty-four Chinese science teacher educators about their conceptions of teaching NOS to pre-service science teachers. Although five dimensions emerged, this paper mainly focuses on reporting the findings relevant to…

  5. Concept Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidya, Narendera

    This document, published in India by the Regional College of Education, deals with 13 subjects: the tough context (thinking), definitions of concept, functions of concept, the process of concept formation, discriminant learning, mediation process, second signalling system, factors affecting concept formation, studies in concept formation, the…

  6. Analytical solution of steady natural convection in an annular porous medium evaluated with a symbolic algebra code

    SciTech Connect

    Mojtabi, A. ); Charrier-Mojtabi, M.C. )

    1992-11-01

    Natural convection flows in a cylindrical annular porous medium have been studied extensively over the last twenty years. The main results concern the two-dimensional steady state. Several techniques have been developed, such as the finite difference method (Caltagirone, 1976), the finite element method (Mojtabi et al., 1987), and the spectral method (Charrier-Mojtabi and Caltagirone, 1980; Rao et al., 1987; Himasekhar and Bau, 1988; Charrier-Mojtabi et al., 1991). 6 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. On the nature of alloying in HgTeCdTe solid solutions at low temperatures from electrode potential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, R. D. S.; Warrier, A. V. R.

    1991-05-01

    Electrode potentials at HgTe, CdTe and Hg 0.8Cd 0.2Te in 0.1 M KOH solution are measured at 20°C with reference to a saturated calomel electrode. A model for the interfacial electron transfer reaction in equilibrium is proposed. An analysis is presented to show that the alloying of HgTe and CdTe at low temperatures is non-ideal. The enthalpy of formation of the x = 0.2 alloy from the pure component phases in solid state at 20°C is found to be +2.1 kcal mol -1.

  8. Solving for Efficiency or Decision Criteria: When the Non-unique Nature of Solutions Becomes a Benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, S. A.; Ciarleglio, M.; Dulay, M.; Lowry, T. S.; Sharp, J. M.; Barnes, J. W.; Eaton, D. J.; Tidwell, V. C.

    2006-12-01

    Work in the literature for groundwater allocation emphasizes finding a truly optimal solution, often with the drawback of limiting the reported results to either maximizing net benefit in regional scale models or minimizing pumping costs for localized cases. From a policy perspective, limited insight can be gained from these studies because the results are restricted to a single, efficient solution and they neglect non-market values that may influence a management decision. Conversely, economically derived objective functions tend to exhibit a plateau upon nearing the optimal value. This plateau effect, or non-uniqueness, is actually a positive feature in the behavior of groundwater systems because it demonstrates that multiple management strategies, serving numerous community preferences, may be considered while still achieving similar quantitative results. An optimization problem takes the same set of initial conditions and looks for the most efficient solution while a decision problem looks at a situation and asks for a solution that meets certain user-defined criteria. In other words, the election of an alternative course of action using a decision support system will not always result in selection of the most `optimized' alternative. To broaden the analytical toolset available for science and policy interaction, we have developed a groundwater decision support system (GWDSS) that generates a suite of management alternatives by pairing a combinatorial search algorithm with a numerical groundwater model for consideration by decision makers and stakeholders. Subject to constraints as defined by community concerns, the tabu optimization engine systematically creates hypothetical management scenarios running hundreds, and even thousands, of simulations, and then saving the best performing realizations. Results of the search are then evaluated against stakeholder preference sets using ranking methods to aid in identifying a subset of alternatives for final

  9. Dependence of the frequency dispersion of the bulk viscosity coefficient of solutions of electrolytes on the nature of the decay of relaxing fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinaev, S.; Akdodov, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    The region of the frequency dispersion of the bulk viscosity coefficient η V (ω) of solutions of electrolytes is studied as a function of the nature of the decay of the stress tensor in the momentum and configuration space, the analytical expressions of which are derived by means of kinetic equations. Numerical calculations of η V (ω) for a water solution of NaCl are performed over a wide range of frequencies, temperatures, and densities using a selection of the potentials of intermolecular interaction Φ{in{itab}}(|ěc r|) and radial distribution function {itg}{in{itab}}(|ěc r|). It is shown that the region of frequency dispersion η V (ω) based on the power law of the decay of the stress tensor is wide ( 105 Hz), while the region based on the exponential law is narrow ( 102 Hz).

  10. Investigation of Solute-Fiber Affinity and Orientational Ordering of Norbornadiene Interacting with Two-Polypeptide Chiral Liquid Crystalline Solvents by Natural Abundance Deuterium (NAD) NMR.

    PubMed

    Serhan, Zeinab; Aroulanda, Christie; Lesot, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    A prochiral bridged compound of C2v symmetry, the norbornadiene (NBD), oriented in a chiral liquid crystal composed of various mixtures of poly-γ-benzyl-l-glutamate (PBLG) and poly-ε-carboxy-l-lysine (PCBLL), two chiral homopolypeptides, is investigated using natural abundance deuterium 2D-NMR (NAD 2D-NMR) spectroscopy. In such chiral oriented solvents, enantiotopic directions are spectrally nonequivalent, and two distinct (2)H quadrupolar doublets associated with enantioisotopomeric pairs of NBD are detected. As the two homopolypeptides have the same absolute configuration but distinct chemical functions in their side chains, the variation of residual quadrupolar couplings (RQC's) allows the determination of the relative solute-fiber affinities toward the two polypeptides in these lyotropic bipolymeric systems. Besides the experimental measurement of RQC's and the determination of their signs at each inequivalent (2)H site, the elements of the second-rank order tensor, Sαβ, are calculated by assuming a modeled structure. The variations of RQC's and diagonalized order parameters, Sα'α', are followed versus the relative proportion of two polypeptides in the chiral oriented mixture. The influence of the solute mass fraction in the two-homopolypeptide oriented samples is also examined as well as the case of homogeneous and uniform achiral mesophases "PBG-PCBL" made of two pairs of mirror-image homopolypeptides (PBLG/PBDG and PCBLL/PCBDL). In the latter, the solute ordering is modulated by the proportion of each type of homopolypeptide (chemical nature and absolute configuration), leading to eliminate the enantiodiscrimination mechanisms on the average. In the frame of a model, new insights on the solute-homopolypeptide fiber interactions are discussed. PMID:27383731

  11. New insights into the nature of the asymmetrical flow of shear-thinning polymer solutions in transitional pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chaofan; Poole, Robert; Dennis, David

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies of shear-thinning fluids in pipe flow discovered that, although the time-averaged velocity profile was axisymmetric when the flow was laminar or fully turbulent, contrary to expectations it was asymmetric in the laminar-turbulent transition regime. The general consensus of these previous experiments was that the location of the peak velocity remained at a fixed point in space. We present new experimental data which demonstrates that this is in fact not the case. The experiment was performed using an aqueous solution of Xanthan Gum (0.15 wt%), a shear-thinning polymer solution. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) was used to measure the 3C velocity vectors over the entire circular cross-section of the pipe, 220 pipe diameters downstream of the inlet. The exhibition of significant departures from axisymmetry in transitional flows of shear-thinning fluids was observed and in addition it was discovered that the asymmetric flow pattern is not stationary, although the peak velocity does preferentially arise at certain azimuthal locations. The ensemble average of all the SPIV data results in the recovery of the velocity profile measured using laser Doppler velocimetry in previous studies: still asymmetric but to a lesser extent than the instantaneous flow.

  12. Use of Natural Tracers for Understanding Porewater Residence Time and Solute Transport: Challenges Encountered in Paleozoic Rocks of the Michigan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al, T. A.; Celejewski, M.; Clark, I. D.

    2014-12-01

    Geoscience programs that focus on long-term waste management in the geosphere commonly aim to develop a conceptual model that explains porewater residence time and the mechanisms and time scales for solute transport. Diffusion is the dominant transport process in low-permeability rocks so measurement of rock diffusion properties is important, but measurements at the laboratory scale can be highly variable due to changes in lithology, porosity, confining pressure and pore-fluid composition at scales of cm to 10's of m. The natural analogue approach, using tracers such as Cl, Br, 18O and 2H that commonly display conservative behaviour, provides a means to scale up the results of laboratory measurements to understand the larger-scale controls on porewater residence time and solute transport. The principal challenge in applying this approach is the difficulty of obtaining high-quality tracer concentration data from porewater in low-permeability rocks. Additional insight into solute transport and reaction processes could be gained by collecting data for the concentrations of major cations but these data are even more difficult to obtain. Using data from the geoscience site characterization for the Ontario Power Generation proposed Deep Geologic Repository at the Bruce site in southwest Ontario, this presentation will illustrate some of the problems with standard methods for obtaining porewater compositional data . Methods such as core squeezing and advective displacement simply do not work because the permeability and the water content are too low. The crush-leach method has been used but is susceptible to artifacts from dissolution of soluble minerals (halite, anhydrite, gypsum and celestite), ion exchange and difficulty in assigning a porosity value to specific solutes. In order to overcome these limitations and improve the outcome from the natural analogue approach, a new method has been developed that extracts porewater directly into hydrophyllic cellulosic paper by

  13. Relative influence of natural watershed properties and human disturbance on stream solute concentrations in the southwestern Brazilian Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Trent Wade; Dunne, Thomas; Domingues, Tomas Ferreira; Martinelli, Luiz Antonio

    2002-08-01

    We use a synoptic sampling of stream water to quantify the effect of soil type, rock type, deforestation extent determined by Landsat TM imagery, and urban population density on stream solute concentrations for 60 different watersheds in the dry season and 49 in the wet season in the southwestern Brazilian Amazon basin. Catchment areas range between 18 and 12,500 km2. Soil exchangeable cation content explains most of the variance in stream concentrations of cations, dissolved silicon (Si), and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in both forested and deforested basins based on regression analysis (R2 range 0.61-0.81), though the mechanism underlying the relationship is unknown. We use the relationship between soil exchangeable cation content and stream solute concentrations in forested catchments to estimate the predisturbance and postdisturbance signal concentrations of stream solutes for deforested watersheds. Signal concentrations of potassium (K), sodium (Na), and chloride (Cl) increase with deforestation extent for streams on gneiss, granite, and sedimentary rock in both the dry and wet seasons after the effect of soil type has been statistically removed. Sulfate (SO4) signal concentrations increase with deforestation extent in the dry season only. For catchments >40% deforested but with no urban populations, the ratios of disturbed to predisturbance stream concentrations range from 1.2 to 3.1 (K), 0.8 to 2.2 (Na), 0.7 to 2.7 (SO4), and 2.4 to 14.6 (Cl) in the dry season and 1.2 to 2.2 (K) and 0.6 to 3.4 (Cl) in the wet season. Urban population density strongly affects Cl and SO4 concentrations in both seasons and Na concentrations in the dry season; the urban signal comprises 40-58% of the dry season Cl signal and 83-89% of the wet season Cl signal for watersheds with >250 persons per km2. Streams on mica-schist, mafic rock and carbonate shale have higher concentrations of Ca, Mg, Si, and ANC than watersheds on gneiss, granite, tertiary sediments or sandstone for

  14. Sorption of cesium and strontium from mineralized aqueous solutions on natural aluminosilicates modified by ferrocyanides of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Panasyugin, A.S.; Trofimenko, N.E.; Masherova, N.P.; Rat`ko, A.I.; Golikova, N.I.

    1994-03-10

    The sorption behavior of natural aluminosilicates (bentonite and clinoptilolite) and aluminosilicates modified by ferrocyanides of heavy metals has been studied relative to radionuclides {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in the presence of various quantities of alkali and alkaline-earth ions (e.g. surface waters). It has been shown that the distribution coefficients of the modified samples may exceed 100 for Sr{sup 2+} and 10,000 for Cs{sup +}; however, with a concentration of mineral background over 1.0 g{center_dot}liter, the competing ions strongly depress the sorption properties of the aluminosilicates.

  15. Removal of ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine in aqueous solution onto natural clay: equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazri, Hassen; Ghorbel-Abid, Ibtissem; Kalfat, Rafik; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the adsorption of three pharmaceuticals compounds (ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine) onto natural clay on the basis of equilibrium parameters such as a function of time, effect of pH, varying of the concentration and the temperature. Adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the Lagergren's first-order and the pseudo-second-order kinetic equations. The kinetic results of adsorption are described better using the pseudo-second order model. The isotherm results were tested in the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. The thermodynamic parameters obtained indicate that the adsorption of pharmaceuticals on the clay is a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  16. The Nature of Politics and Government...Differing Concepts of "Authority" in the World...Differing Views of the "State." Resource Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Jeffrey B.

    This resource packet is designed to provide teachers and other civic educators with an introduction to differing concepts of authority views of the state in a complex world environment and to serve as a blueprint for developing materials, classes and programs for civic education. The material discusses: (1) the relationship between the concepts of…

  17. Assessing Assessment: How Use of the Concept Inventory of Natural Selection Influences the Instructional Practices of an Experienced Biology Professor and Supplemental Instruction Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanmali, Binaben H.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment has garnered increased interest in recent years. It is seen as critical to enhancing student learning and understanding. Formative assessment tools such as concept inventories could be valuable in moving toward such goals. Concept inventories, a recent addition to biology education, hold much promise for helping faculty to understand…

  18. Exploring the Relations among the Nature of the Abuse, Perceived Parental Support, and Child's Self-Concept and Trauma Symptoms among Sexually Abused Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Carla J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined two resiliency factors: self-concept and perceived parental support, in conjunction with abuse factors that impact psychological functioning. Data were collected on 61 sexually abused children prior to treatment. Findings indicate that a child's self-concept was associated with all the trauma symptoms except sexual concerns and…

  19. Education in the imbalance of Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlafman, L. M.; Kontar, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    There are two concepts understanding of the real Nature: balanced and imbalanced. The traditional balanced concept understanding of Nature was originated in prehistoric times to calm the frightened souls of prehistoric man and manage groups of people. The balanced concept presupposes that Nature is isotropic, balanced, etc. The balanced concept of understanding of Nature gradually has moved to science and technology. The balanced concept of understanding of Nature is dominating from the prehistoric time up to today. But always parallel and opposite was exists the concept imbalanced understanding of Nature, which presupposes that Nature is anisotropy, imbalanced, etc. The balanced concept is much simpler than Imbalanced. The balanced concept has given mankind a lot of rough description of Nature which helped to solve a lot of practical problems but with sufficient accuracy, i.e. approximately, but not with an absolute precision. While people were few, and a lot of resources, person could take from Nature only what Nature gave willingly. During this period, people feared and respected Nature and Nature was able easily compensate the activity of people. The high accuracy of the description of Nature was not needed when resources were plentiful and people were few. But now the situation is completely different. The population has become a very large and growing. Traditional resources are almost run out and the lack of resources escalates. People are not afraid of Nature and bravely try to take by force what Nature does not give voluntarily. People invaded into imbalance Nature, and Nature can no longer compensate activity of people. The era of global change is started, including those that man provokes. In the conditions of global changes is insufficiently of the approximate solutions of the traditional balanced concept. The balanced concept is exhausted, and increasingly misleads people. The balanced concept cannot solve the problems that arise in the global change

  20. The self-assemble of natural cyclodextrins in aqueous solutions: Application of miniature permeation studies for critical aggregation concentration (cac) determinations.

    PubMed

    Saokham, Phennapha; Sá Couto, André; Ryzhakov, Alexey; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2016-05-30

    Permeation techniques can be applied to determine the critical aggregation concentration (cac) of natural cyclodextrins (CDs) in aqueous solutions although the method is both laborious and time consuming. In the present study, the permeation technique was modified and the influence of osmotic pressure, sampling time, CD concentration and molecular weight-cut off (MWCO) of the membrane were investigated in two different permeation units, that is Franz diffusion cells and Slide-A-Lyzer™ MINI Dialysis. While both the osmotic pressure and CD concentration affect the steady state flux in both permeation units, effects of sampling time and the MWCO of the mounted membrane were only observed in the Franz diffusion cells. The osmotic effect was negligible in the Slide-A-Lyzer™ MINI Dialysis units. The modified permeation technique using Slide-A-Lyzer™ MINI Dialysis units was then used to determine the cac of natural CDs in water. The cac of αCD, βCD and γCD was 1.19±0.17, 0.69±0.05 and 0.93±0.04% (w/v), respectively. The results indicated that the cac values depended on their intrinsic solubility. Moreover, the cac value of γCD in aqueous hydrocortisone/γCD inclusion complex solution was identical to the γCD cac value determined in pure water. PMID:27021466

  1. Learning the Rules of the Game: The Nature of Game and Classroom Supports When Using a Concept-Integrated Digital Physics Game in the Middle School Science Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Phillip Michael, Jr.

    Games in science education is emerging as a popular topic of scholarly inquiry. The National Research Council recently published a report detailing a research agenda for games and science education entitled Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations (2011). The report recommends moving beyond typical proof-of-concept studies into more exploratory and theoretically-based work to determine how best to integrate games into K-12 classrooms for learning , as well as how scaffolds from within the game and from outside the game (from peers and teachers) support the learning of applicable science. This study uses a mixed-methods, quasi-experimental design with an 8th grade class at an independent school in southern Connecticut to answer the following questions: 1. What is the nature of the supports for science content learning provided by the game, the peer, and the teacher, when the game is used in a classroom setting? 2. How do the learning gains in the peer support condition compare to the solo play condition, both qualitatively and quantitatively? The concept-integrated physics game SURGE (Scaffolding Understanding through Redesigning Games for Education) was selected for this study, as it was developed with an ear towards specific learning theories and prior work on student understandings of impulse, force, and vectors. Stimulated recall interviews and video observations served as the primary sources and major patterns emerged through the triangulation of data sources and qualitative analysis in the software QSR NVivo 9. The first pattern which emerged indicated that scaffolding from within the game and outside the game requires a pause in game action to be effective, unless that scaffolding is directly useful to the player in the moment of action. The second major pattern indicated that both amount and type of prior gaming experience has somewhat complex effects on both the uses of supports and learning outcomes. In general, a high correlation was found

  2. Long-term passive restoration following fluvial deposition of sulphidic copper tailings: nature filters out the solutions.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Nina; Böcker, Reinhard; Nikolic, Miroslav

    2016-07-01

    Despite the growing popularity of ecological restoration approach, data on primary succession on toxic post-mining substrates, under site environmental conditions which considerably differ from the surrounding environment, are still scarce. Here, we studied the spontaneous vegetation development on an unusual locality created by long-term and large-scale fluvial deposition of sulphidic tailings from a copper mine in a pronouncedly xerothermic, calcareous surrounding. We performed multivariate analyses of soil samples (20 physical and chemical parameters) and vegetation samples (floristic and structural parameters in three types of occurring forests), collected along the pollution gradients throughout the affected floodplain. The nature can cope with two types of imposed constraints: (a) excessive Cu concentrations and (b) very low pH, combined with nutrient deficiency. The former will still allow convergence to the original vegetation, while the latter will result in novel, depauperate assemblages of species typical for cooler and moister climate. Our results for the first time demonstrate that with the increasing severity of environmental filtering, the relative importance of the surrounding vegetation for primary succession strongly decreases. PMID:26300359

  3. The Concept of "Teachability."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tubbs, Nigel

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that "teachability" is a speculative concept that has for its form and content the absolute, suggesting that its dialectical movement and speculative significance are mis-recognized when the illusionary nature of its constitutive moments is suppressed. The essay outlines the speculative nature of the master/slave relationship in Hegel's…

  4. Relational conceptual change in solution chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenezer, Jazlin V.; Gaskell, P. James

    This study explores changes to students' conceptions about solution chemistry in the context of instruction based on collaboration between a researcher and an experienced teacher attempting to implement strategies from the literature on conceptual change. Conceptual change for students and teachers is viewed not just as a process of replacement of old concepts but also as a process of learning to relate ideas to appropriate contexts. The process of instruction and collaboration was influenced by institutional limits on time, the press to cover the curriculum, and the teacher's prior beliefs and practices. The study uses phenomenography to conceptualize students' understandings of solubility. Six categories of description were constructed: (a) physical transformation from solid to liquid; (b) chemical transformation of solute; (c) density of solute; (d) amount of space available in solution; (e) properties of solute; and (f) size of solute. After instruction students showed evidence of two additional ways of talking about solubility: (a) chemical structure of components; and (b) solution equilibrium. The new language, however, did not necessarily replace initial ideas about what happens in particular instances of solution chemistry. A careful analysis of the students' conceptions of solubility revealed important factors influencing the nature of student learning in this area of chemistry. These factors include: (a) ambiguities of chemical theories about dissolving: (b) explanations of the observable; and (c) students' chemical language. It is argued, in conclusion, that the goals for instruction are to assist students to appreciate contexts where everyday conceptions of chemical phenomenon are appropriate and contexts where particular conceptions from the community of chemists are more appropriate.

  5. Cyclic growth and branching phenomena of calcite grown in Mg(2+) containing solutions and in natural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiethoff, Felix; Richter, Detlef K.; Neuser, Rolf D.; Immenhauser, Adrian; Gies, Hermann; Schreuer, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Undulosity in calcites (radiaxial fibrous calcite (RFC) and fascicular-optic fibrous calcite (FOFC)) is a common phenomenon in paleozoic and mesozoic limestones. Despite their importance as archives for climate reconstruction the underlying mechanisms and processes of their formation are still poorly understood [1]. To improve the application of such archives for climate reconstruction a better knowledge of their formation and possible alteration scenarios is necessary. In Mg2+ containing gel based growth experiments calcite crystals develop pathological morphologies. The morphology can be described as a product of a geometrical selective branching process at the rhombohedral crystal faces. Multiple sheet like building blocks evolve at the branching crystal face; each slightly tilted in respect to their substrate. The product is a crystal aggregate consisting out of several misoriented sub domains. In polarized light thin section microscopy the extinction behaviour of these sub units resemble the optical undulosity of radiaxial fibrous cements. In a multi method approach the local Mg2+ concentration was measured using EMPA and compared with maps of the local crystal orientation (via electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)) and thin section microscopy. We found that Mg2+ is enriched at the sub-domain boundaries and deduced that lattice misfit as a consequence of impurity incorporation causes the crystal branching. We propose that this process is cyclic and each new misoriented sheet represents a growth period after a phase of inhibited growth caused by crystal faces covered by Mg2+‑ions. In comparison to natural systems we found that radiaxial-fibrous cave cements show a pathological morphology based on the same formation principles. [1] Richter et al. (2011) Sediment. Geol. 239, 23-36 [2] Reeder & Paquette (1989) Sediment. Geol. 65, 239-247 [3] Davis et al. (2004) Am. Min. 89, 714-720

  6. Concept Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Laura K.; Brownson, Ross C.; Kelly, Cheryl; Ivey, Melissa K.; Leviton, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2003 to 2008, 25 cross-sector, multidisciplinary community partnerships funded through the Active Living by Design (ALbD) national program designed, planned, and implemented policy and environmental changes, with complementary programs and promotions. This paper describes the use of concept-mapping methods to gain insights into promising active living intervention strategies based on the collective experience of community representatives implementing ALbD initiatives. Methods Using Concept Systems software, community representatives (n=43) anonymously generated actions and changes in their communities to support active living (183 original statements, 79 condensed statements). Next, respondents (n=26, from 23 partnerships) sorted the 79 statements into self-created categories, or active living intervention approaches. Respondents then rated statements based on their perceptions of the most important strategies for creating community changes (n=25, from 22 partnerships) and increasing community rates of physical activity (n=23, from 20 partnerships). Cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling were used to describe data patterns. Results ALbD community partnerships identified three active living intervention approaches with the greatest perceived importance to create community change and increase population levels of physical activity: changes to the built and natural environment, partnership and collaboration efforts, and land-use and transportation policies. The relative importance of intervention approaches varied according to subgroups of partnerships working with different populations. Conclusions Decision makers, practitioners, and community residents can incorporate what has been learned from the 25 community partnerships to prioritize active living policy, physical project, promotional, and programmatic strategies for work in different populations and settings. PMID:23079266

  7. The Insidious Nature of 'Hard-Core' Alternative Conceptions: Implications for the constructivist research programme of patterns in high school students' and pre-service teachers' thinking about ionisation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taber, Keith S.; Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The present study contributes to the constructivist research programme (RP) into learning science by comparing patterns in responses from two groups of learners-senior high school students and pre-service teachers-in the same educational context (Singapore), to a diagnostic instrument relating to the topic of ionisation energies. This topic is currently included in the curriculum for 16- to 19-year-old students studying chemistry in Singapore (and elsewhere). The comparison shows that: (1) although graduate pre-service teachers offered some types of incorrect responses less frequently than high school students; (2) they retained high levels of alternative conceptions commonly found among high school students; and (3) of particular note, certain alternative conceptions were found to be more common among the graduates. This suggests the intuitive appeal of certain alternative conceptions is such that they can readily be reproduced down 'generations' of learners. The findings are explored in terms of a range of conceptual resources that have been developed within the constructivist RP. The analysis suggests that the curriculum sets out inappropriate target knowledge for senior high school students, given the nature of the subject matter and the prior learning of the students. It is also suggested that it may be fruitful to consider conceptual learning in terms analogous to the RP found in science, and that from this perspective certain insidious alternative conceptions can be understood as derived from commitments that are taken for granted and protected from explicit challenge by a protective belt of refutable auxiliary conceptions.

  8. On the effect of natural convection on solute segregation in the horizontal Bridgman configuration: Convergence of a theoretical model with numerical and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaddeche, S.; Garandet, J. P.; Henry, D.; Hadid, H. Ben; Mojtabi, A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of natural convection on solute segregation in the horizontal Bridgman configuration is studied. The objective is to check whether a single non-dimensional number, based on the fluid flow induced interface shear stress, is able to capture the physics of the mass transport phenomena. A number of heat and mass transfer numerical simulations are carried out in the laminar convection regime, and the segregation results are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of the scaling analysis. At the higher convective levels relevant for the comparison with existing experimental data, a direct computation of the segregation phenomena is not possible, but numerical simulations accounting for turbulence modeling can provide the interface shear stress. With this procedure, a good agreement between the experimentally measured segregation and the predictions of the scaling analysis is again observed, thus validating the choice of the interface shear stress as a key parameter for the segregation studies.

  9. The Lexicography of Scholarly Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Raymond G.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the function of concepts in scholarly discourse. Topics include the genesis of Greenwood Press's concept dictionaries; the origins of modern rhetoric; the prescriptive nature of meaning in scholarly discourse; conceptual change, including logical positivism, introspection, and historicism; and interdisciplinary application of concepts.…

  10. The Nature of Aqueous Solutions of a Cationic Calix[4]arene: A Comparative Study of Dye–Calixarene and Dye–Surfactant Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mchedlov-PetrossyanL. N. Vilkova, N. O.; Vodolazkaya, N. A.; Yakubovskaya, A. G.; Rodik, R. V.; Boyko, V. I.; Kalchenko, V. I.

    2006-01-01

    Among different types of calixarenes, the water–soluble ones are of especial interest because of their possible applications in biochemical research. In order to elucidate the nature of aqueous solutions of a cationic amphiphilic calixarene, substituted tetrapropoxy-calix[4]arene bearing hydrophilic choline groups at the upper rim, we studied vis–spectroscopically the influence of the above system on the acid–base behavior of three indicator dyes, namely, 2,4-dinitrophenol, bromophenol blue, and N,N/-dioctadecylrhodamine, at constant ionic strength of 0.05 M, maintained with NaCl addition. Simultaneously, ‘apparent’ ionization constants, Kaa, of the same dyes were determined in the presence of common cationic surfactant micelles. Within the concentration range from 1.0×10–5 to 0.01 M, the aforementioned water–soluble calixarene displays effects similar to those of micelles of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (or chloride). The shifts of the absorption and emission bands in the visible region, as well as the alterations of the Kaa values against the ‘aqueous’ ones appeared to be very similar in aqueous solutions of both calix[4]arene and cationic surfactant. A conclusion can be made about aggregation (or association), i.e., micelle formation of the cationic calix[4]arene under study.

  11. Oxidative photodegradation of herbicide fenuron in aqueous solution by natural iron oxide α-Fe2O3, influence of polycarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Kribéche, Mohamed El Amine; Mechakra, Hind; Sehili, Tahar; Brosillon, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The photodegradation of the herbicide fenuron (1,1-dimethyl-3-phenylurea) by using a natural iron oxide (NIO), α-Fe2O3, in aqueous solution at acidic pH has been undertaken. The NIO was characterized by the Raman spectroscopy method. The degradation pathways and the formation of degradation products were studied. A high-pressure mercury lamp and sunlight were employed as light source. Fenuron photodegradation using NIO with oxalic acid followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics, the optimal experimental conditions were [oxalic acid]0 = 10(-3) M and [NIO] = 0.1 g L(-1) at pH 3. A UVA/NIO/oxalic acid system led to a low fenuron half-life (60 min). The results were even better when solar light is used (30 min). The variables studied were the doses of iron oxide, of carboxylic acids, the solution pH and the effect of sunlight irradiation. The effects of four carboxylic acids, oxalic, citric, tartaric and malic acids, on the fenuron photodegradation with NIO have been investigated, oxalic acid was the most effective carboxylic acid used at pH 3. A similar trend was observed for the removal of total organic carbon (TOC), 75% of TOC was removed. The analytical study showed many aromatic intermediates, short-chain carboxylic acids and inorganic ion. PMID:26102217

  12. Removal of nickel(II) ions from aqueous solutions using the natural clinoptilolite and preparation of nano-NiO on the exhausted clinoptilolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajic, Nevenka; Stojakovic, Djordje; Jovanovic, Mina; Logar, Natasa Zabukovec; Mazaj, Matjaz; Kaucic, Venceslav

    2010-12-01

    The natural zeolite tuff (clinoptilolite) from a Serbian deposit has been studied as adsorbent for Ni(II) ions from aqueous solutions. Its sorption capacity at 298 K varies from 1.9 mg Ni g -1 (for the initial solution concentration of 100 mg Ni dm -3) to 3.8 mg Ni g -1 (for C0 = 600 mg Ni dm -3) and it increases 3 times at 338 K. The sorption is best described by the Sips isotherm model. The sorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order model, the activation energies being 7.44, 5.86, 6.62 and 6.63 kJ mol -1 for C0 = 100, 200, 300 and 400 mg Ni dm -3, respectively. The sorption involves a film diffusion, an intra-particle diffusion, and a chemical cation-exchange between the Na + ions of clinoptilolite and the Ni 2+ ions. The sorption is endothermic (Δ H° being 37.9, 33.4, 30.0, 27.7 and 24.3 kJ mol -1 for C0 = 100, 200, 300, 400 and 600 mg Ni dm -3, respectively) and spontaneous in the 298-338 K temperature range. Thermal treatment of the Ni(II)-loaded clinoptilolite results in the formation of spherical nano-NiO particles of approx. 5 nm in diameter which are randomly dispersed in the clinoptilolite lattice.

  13. Fe hydroxyphosphate precipitation and Fe(II) oxidation kinetics upon aeration of Fe(II) and phosphate-containing synthetic and natural solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, B.; Behrends, T.; Osté, L. A.; Schot, P. P.; Wassen, M. J.; Griffioen, J.

    2016-08-01

    Exfiltration of anoxic Fe-rich groundwater into surface water and the concomitant oxidative precipitation of Fe are important processes controlling the transport of phosphate (PO4) from agricultural areas to aquatic systems. Here, we explored the relationship between solution composition, reaction kinetics, and the characteristics of the produced Fe hydroxyphosphate precipitates in a series of aeration experiments with anoxic synthetic water and natural groundwater. A pH stat device was used to maintain constant pH and to record the H+ production during Fe(II) oxidation in the aeration experiments in which the initial aqueous P/Fe ratios ((P/Fe)ini), oxygen concentration and pH were varied. In general, Fe(II) oxidation proceeded slower in the presence of PO4 but the decrease of the PO4 concentration during Fe(II) oxidation due to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphates caused additional deceleration of the reaction rate. The progress of the reaction could be described using a pseudo-second-order rate law with first-order dependencies on PO4 and Fe(II) concentrations. After PO4 depletion, the Fe(II) oxidation rates increased again and the kinetics followed a pseudo-first-order rate law. The first-order rate constants after PO4 depletion, however, were lower compared to the Fe(II) oxidation in a PO4-free solution. Hence, the initially formed Fe hydroxyphosphates also affect the kinetics of continuing Fe(II) oxidation after PO4 depletion. Presence of aqueous PO4 during oxidation of Fe(II) led to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphates. The P/Fe ratios of the precipitates ((P/Fe)ppt) and the recorded ratio of H+ production over decrease in dissolved Fe(II) did not change detectably throughout the reaction despite a changing P/Fe ratio in the solution. When (P/Fe)ini was 0.9, precipitates with a (P/Fe)ppt ratio of about 0.6 were formed. In experiments with (P/Fe)ini ratios below 0.6, the (P/Fe)ppt decreased with decreasing (P/Fe)ini and pH value. Aeration experiments with

  14. A modular framework for biomedical concept recognition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Concept recognition is an essential task in biomedical information extraction, presenting several complex and unsolved challenges. The development of such solutions is typically performed in an ad-hoc manner or using general information extraction frameworks, which are not optimized for the biomedical domain and normally require the integration of complex external libraries and/or the development of custom tools. Results This article presents Neji, an open source framework optimized for biomedical concept recognition built around four key characteristics: modularity, scalability, speed, and usability. It integrates modules for biomedical natural language processing, such as sentence splitting, tokenization, lemmatization, part-of-speech tagging, chunking and dependency parsing. Concept recognition is provided through dictionary matching and machine learning with normalization methods. Neji also integrates an innovative concept tree implementation, supporting overlapped concept names and respective disambiguation techniques. The most popular input and output formats, namely Pubmed XML, IeXML, CoNLL and A1, are also supported. On top of the built-in functionalities, developers and researchers can implement new processing modules or pipelines, or use the provided command-line interface tool to build their own solutions, applying the most appropriate techniques to identify heterogeneous biomedical concepts. Neji was evaluated against three gold standard corpora with heterogeneous biomedical concepts (CRAFT, AnEM and NCBI disease corpus), achieving high performance results on named entity recognition (F1-measure for overlap matching: species 95%, cell 92%, cellular components 83%, gene and proteins 76%, chemicals 65%, biological processes and molecular functions 63%, disorders 85%, and anatomical entities 82%) and on entity normalization (F1-measure for overlap name matching and correct identifier included in the returned list of identifiers: species 88

  15. Geochemical processes and the effects of natural organic solutes on the solubility of selenium in coal-mine backfill samples from the Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    See, R.B.; Reddy, K.J.; Vance, G.F.; Fadlelmawla, A.A.; Blaylock, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    Geochemical processes and the effects of natural organic solutes on the solubility of selenium in coal-mine backfill aquifers were investigated. Backfill and ground-water samples were collected at coal mines in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Backfill was generally dominated by aluminum (14,400 to 49,000 mg/kg (milligrams per kilogram)), iron (3,330 to 23,200 mg/kg), and potassium (7,950 to 18,000 mg/kg). Backfill saturated-paste selenium concentrations ranged from 1 to 156 mg/kg (microsiemens per kilogram). Ground-water total selenium concentrations ranged from 3 to 125 mg/L. Dissolved organic carbon in all ground-water samples was dominated by hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids (38 to 84 percent). Selenite sorption/desorption experiments were conducted using background solutions of distilled-deionized water, 0.1 molar calcium chloride, and isolated hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids. Selenite sorption was larger when 0.1 molar calcium chloride was used. The addition of hydrophilic acid decreased selenite sorption more than the addition of hydrophobic acids. Geochemical modelling was used to predict the solid phases controlling dissolved selenium concentrations and to evaluate the effects of dissolved organic carbon on selenium solubility. Results suggested that 55 to 90 percent of selenium in backfill precipitation/dissolution extracts was dominated by magnesium selenate ion pairs. Dissolved organic carbon had little effect on selenium speciation. A redox chamber was constructed to control Eh and pH in water and backfill-core sample suspensions. The response of selenite and selenate in water samples to redox conditions did not follow thermodynamic predictions. Reduction of selenate in water samples did not occur at any of the redox levels tested.

  16. Polyacrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulfonic acid-grafted-natural rubber as bio-adsorbent for heavy metal removal from aqueous standard solution and industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Phetphaisit, Chor Wayakron; Yuanyang, Siriwan; Chaiyasith, Wipharat Chuachuad

    2016-01-15

    Bio-adsorbent modified natural rubber (modified NR) was prepared, by placing the sulfonic acid functional group on the isoprene chain. This modification was carried out with the aim to prepare material capable to remove heavy metals from aqueous solution. The structures of modified NR materials were characterized by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopies. Thermal gravimetric analysis of modified NR showed that the initial degradation temperature of rubber decreases with increasing amount of polyacrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulfonic acid (PAMPS) in the structure. In addition, water uptake of the rubber based materials was studied as a function of time and content of PAMPS. The influence of the amount of PAMPS grafted onto NR, time, pH, concentration of metal ions, temperature, and regeneration were studied in terms of their influence on the adsorption of heavy metals (Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Cu(2+)). The adsorption isotherms of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) were fitted to the Freundlich isotherm model, while Cu(2+) was fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. However, the results from these two isotherms resulted in a similar behavior. The adsorption capacity of the modified NR for the various heavy metals was in the following order: Pb(2+)∼Cd(2+)>Cu(2+). The maximum adsorption capacities of Pb(2+), Cd(2+), and Cu(2+) were 272.7, 267.2, and 89.7 mg/g of modified rubber, respectively. Moreover, the modified natural rubber was used for the removal of metal ions in real samples of industrial effluents where the efficiency and regeneration were also investigated. PMID:26348149

  17. Effects of Jigsaw Cooperative Learning and Animation Techniques on Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Their Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karacop, Ataman; Doymus, Kemal

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of jigsaw cooperative learning and computer animation techniques on academic achievements of first year university students attending classes in which the unit of chemical bonding is taught within the general chemistry course and these students' learning of the particulate nature of matter of this…

  18. The Influence of an Activity-Based Explicit Approach on the Turkish Prospective Science Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Suat; Bayrakceken, Samih

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an activity-based explicit nature of science (NOS) instruction undertaken in the context of a "Science, Technology and Society" course on the prospective science teachers' (PSTs') understandings of NOS. In this course, social science based inquiry activities were used to as a context to lead…

  19. Teachers' conceptions of the nature of science: Analyzing the impact of a teacher enhancement program in changing attitudes and perceptions of science and scientific research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govett, Aimee Lee

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a residential science research experience in changing participants' attitudes and understanding of the nature of science and their view of themselves as science researchers. Data from interviews, journal writings, classroom observations and two pre-post instruments were used in the evaluation plan. As participants of this study, 16 inservice teachers (K--16) attended a two-week residential institute at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virginia. The format of the institute featured a scientific research experience designed to arm its participants with the skills needed to model their classroom teaching after scientific research. The program included lessons on the fundamentals of radio astronomy, science talks and interactions with practicing scientists, in-depth tours of the NRAO facilities, and pedagogical instruction for implementing research in the classroom. The WVU College of Education staff and the NRAO staff stressed the importance of the nature of the research experience offered to these teachers. In the Education Sessions the WVU science education staff guided participants through the steps required to turn their experience around, in order to develop student research projects for their classrooms. The results from the Research Self Assessment instrument show significant gains for all participants in being more comfortable doing research. For the Nature of Science and Science Teaching instrument there were only three items that showed significant gains for all participants both in understanding the nature of science and in their views on implementing the Green Bank constructivist learning philosophy. The women, especially the elementary teacher group, showed the greatest change in their understanding of the nature of science as reflected in the interviews as well as in their personal journals. The seven men, who were all in the secondary field, made no significant

  20. Effects of Jigsaw Cooperative Learning and Animation Techniques on Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Their Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karacop, Ataman; Doymus, Kemal

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of jigsaw cooperative learning and computer animation techniques on academic achievements of first year university students attending classes in which the unit of chemical bonding is taught within the general chemistry course and these students' learning of the particulate nature of matter of this unit. The sample of this study consisted of 115 first-year science education students who attended the classes in which the unit of chemical bonding was taught in a university faculty of education during the 2009-2010 academic year. The data collection instruments used were the Test of Scientific Reasoning, the Purdue Spatial Visualization Test: Rotations, the Chemical Bonding Academic Achievement Test, and the Particulate Nature of Matter Test in Chemical Bonding (CbPNMT). The study was carried out in three different groups. One of the groups was randomly assigned to the jigsaw group, the second was assigned to the animation group (AG), and the third was assigned to the control group, in which the traditional teaching method was applied. The data obtained with the instruments were evaluated using descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and MANCOVA. The results indicate that the teaching of chemical bonding via the animation and jigsaw techniques was more effective than the traditional teaching method in increasing academic achievement. In addition, according to findings from the CbPNMT, the students from the AG were more successful in terms of correct understanding of the particulate nature of matter.

  1. Conception rate, uterine infection and embryo quality after artificial insemination and natural breeding with a stallion carrier of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause venereal disease and infertility in horses. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa - carrier stallion, often unresponsive to artificial vagina collection, was used to naturally breed mares. Semen collected from the same stallion was also used to perform artificial inseminations. Pregnancy rates, embryo quality and incidence of uterine infection were compared between inseminated or naturally-bred mares. Methods P. aeruginosa was isolated from swabbing of the penis, prepuce and distal urethra of the stallion. Before being bred or inseminated, clitoral/vestibular samples were collected from all mares, and cultured for isolation of P. aeruginosa. At the first observed estrus, endometrial swabs were also collected. All mares subjected to natural mating (NS) were re-evaluated for P.aeruginosa by culture of clitoral and endometrial swabs. Artificial inseminations (AI) were performed either with fresh-extended semen (11 AI/7 mares) or frozen semen (10 AI/7 mares). The stallion was also used to breed 3 mares (4 services). For embryo collection, 2 mares were inseminated with fresh-extended semen (1 AI/mare), and 2 additional mares were inseminated with frozen semen (2 AI/mare). Two mares were naturally-bred with a total of 9 services, for embryo collection. All mares were examined after AI or natural service (NS), for uterine pathologies. Embryo recoveries were attempted passing a catheter with inflatable cuff connected to a sterile flexible 2-way flushing catheter, through the cervix. Flushed media was recovered into an Em-Con filter, and embryos searched using a stereoscope. Embryos were graded from 1 (excellent) to 4 (degenerated/dead). Results Pregnancy rates obtained after NS was 50% per cycle. However, more than half of the NS resulted in uterine disease, while uterine pathology was seen only in 22% of the time following AI. Half of the mares bred by NS got positive to P. aeruginosa. Percentage of embryo recovery rates was identical after

  2. Non-exponential nature of calorimetric and other relaxations: Effects of 2 nm-size solutes, loss of translational diffusion, isomer specificity, and sample size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.; Khouri, J.

    2013-03-01

    Certain distributions of relaxation times can be described in terms of a non-exponential response parameter, β, of value between 0 and 1. Both β and the relaxation time, τ0, of a material depend upon the probe used for studying its dynamics and the value of β is qualitatively related to the non-Arrhenius variation of viscosity and τ0. A solute adds to the diversity of an intermolecular environment and is therefore expected to reduce β, i.e., to increase the distribution and to change τ0. We argue that the calorimetric value βcal determined from the specific heat [Cp = T(dS/dT)p] data is a more appropriate measure of the distribution of relaxation times arising from configurational fluctuations than β determined from other properties, and report a study of βcal of two sets of binary mixtures, each containing a different molecule of ˜2 nm size. We find that βcal changes monotonically with the composition, i.e., solute molecules modify the nano-scale composition and may increase or decrease τ0, but do not always decrease βcal. (Plots of βcal against the composition do not show a minimum.) We also analyze the data from the literature, and find that (i) βcal of an orientationally disordered crystal is less than that of its liquid, (ii) βcal varies with the isomer's nature, and chiral centers in a molecule decrease βcal, and (iii) βcal decreases when a sample's thickness is decreased to the nm-scale. After examining the difference between βcal and β determined from other properties we discuss the consequences of our findings for theories of non-exponential response, and suggest that studies of βcal may be more revealing of structure-freezing than studies of the non-Arrhenius behavior. On the basis of previous reports that β → 1 for dielectric relaxation of liquids of centiPoise viscosity observed at GHz frequencies, we argue that its molecular mechanism is the same as that of the Johari-Goldstein (JG) relaxation. Its spectrum becomes broader on

  3. Concepts for future solid state lighting solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Malm, N.; Wirth, R.; Illek, S.; Steegmüller, U.

    2010-08-01

    In this contribution the relevant technological aspects of LED-based lamps for solid state lighting are discussed. In addition to general energy efficiency considerations improvements in LED chip technology and white light generation are presented.

  4. Cruise summary for P-1-02-SC: acoustic imaging of natural oil and gas seeps and measurement of dissolved methane concentration in coastal waters near Pt. Conception, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; Dougherty, Jennifer A.; Ussler, William, III; Paull, Charles K.

    2003-01-01

    Water-column acoustic anomalies and methane concentrations were documented in coastal waters surrounding Pt. Conception, California, in March 2002. The purpose of this survey, supported by the Minerals Management Service, was to locate active oil and gas seeps in the area as a background for further studies to determine hydrocarbon flux, mainly oil, into the environment. Objectives in reaching this goal are to (1) document the locations and geochemically fingerprint natural seeps within the offshore southern Santa Maria Basin; (2) geochemically fingerprint coastal tar residues and potential sources, both onshore and offshore, in this region; (3) establish chemical correlations between offshore active seeps and coastal residues thus linking seep sources to oil residues; (4) measure the rate of natural seepage of individual seeps and attempt to assess regional natural oil and gas seepage rates; (5) attempt to predict transport pathways of oil from seep sources to the coastline and; (6) interpret the petroleum system history for the natural seeps. This survey, addressing objective 1, focused on the area from offshore Surf Beach to the north and Gaviota to the south in water depths ranging from 20 to 500m. In addition, nine stations were sampled outside this area to provide a regional context. Water-column methane concentrations were measured in water samples collected from the R/V Point Sur with Niskin bottles from various depths. A total of 724 water samples from 94 stations were collected.

  5. Temporal naturalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  6. Co-production of ethanol, biogas, protein fodder and natural fertilizer in organic farming--evaluation of a concept for a farm-scale biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Kádár, Zsófia; Heiske, Stefan; Klein-Marcuschamer, Daniel; Simmons, Blake A; Blanch, Harvey W; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2012-01-01

    The addition of a biorefinery to an organic farm was investigated, where ethanol was produced from germinated rye grains and whey, and the effluent was separated into two streams: the protein-rich solid fraction, to be used as animal feed, and the liquid fraction, which can be co-digested with clover grass silage to produce biogas. A method for ethanol production from rye was applied by utilizing inherent amylase activity from germination of the seed. Biogas potential of ethanol fermentation effluent was measured through anaerobic digestion trials. The effluent from the trials was assumed to serve as natural fertilizer. A technoeconomic analysis was also performed; total capital investment was estimated to be approximately 4 M USD. Setting a methane selling price according to available incentives for "green electricity" (0.72 USD/m(3)) led to a minimum ethanol selling price of 1.89 USD/L (project lifetime 25 yr, at a discount rate 10%). PMID:22154299

  7. The Concept of Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altrichter, Herbert; Kemmis, Stephen; McTaggart, Robin; Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun

    2002-01-01

    Explains why definition of action research is problematic and presents working definitions developed internationally that indicate its nature, philosophy, and methodology. Suggests that pragmatic approaches to definition serve communication purposes without narrowly confining the concept. (SK)

  8. The Power of Concept Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoyanova, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The ability to discover, explore, describe and mathematise relationships between different concepts is at the heart of scientific work of professional mathematicians and scientists. At school level, however, helping students to link, differentiate or investigate the nature of relationships between mathematics concepts remains in the shadow of…

  9. Concept Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Explains concept mapping as a heuristic device that is helpful in visualizing the relationships between and among ideas. Highlights include how to begin a map; brainstorming; map applications, including document or information summaries and writing composition; and mind mapping to strengthen note-taking. (LRW)

  10. An evaluation of contaminated complete feed as a vehicle for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection of naïve pigs following consumption via natural feeding behavior: proof of concept

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since its initial detection in May 2013, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has spread rapidly throughout the US swine industry. Initially, contaminated feed was proposed as a risk factor for PEDV; however, data were not available to support this theory. Here we provide proof of concept of this risk by describing a novel means for recovering PEDV-contaminated complete feed material from commercial swine sites and conducting an in vivo experiment to prove its infectivity. Results For on-farm detection of PEDV RNA in feed, paint rollers were used to collect material from at-risk feed bins from 3 clinically affected breeding herds. This material was tested by PCR and determined to be positive for PEDV-RNA (Ct = 19.50-22.20 range). To test infectivity, this material was pooled (Ct = 20.65) and a Treatment group of 3-week old PEDV-naïve piglets were allowed to consume it via natural feeding behavior. For the purpose of a Positive control, piglets were allowed to ingest feed spiked with stock PEDV (Ct = 18.23) while the negative control group received PEDV-free feed. Clinical signs of PEDV infection (vomiting and diarrhea) and viral shedding were observed in both the Positive control and Treatment group’ post-consumption with virus and microscopic lesions detected in intestinal samples No evidence of infection was observed in the Negative controls. Conclusions These data provide proof of concept that contaminated complete feed can serve as a vehicle for PEDV infection of naïve pigs using natural feeding behavior. PMID:25091641

  11. New probe of naturalness.

    PubMed

    Craig, Nathaniel; Englert, Christoph; McCullough, Matthew

    2013-09-20

    Any new scalar fields that perturbatively solve the hierarchy problem by stabilizing the Higgs boson mass also generate new contributions to the Higgs boson field-strength renormalization, irrespective of their gauge representation. These new contributions are physical, and in explicit models their magnitude can be inferred from the requirement of quadratic divergence cancellation; hence, they are directly related to the resolution of the hierarchy problem. Upon canonically normalizing the Higgs field, these new contributions lead to modifications of Higgs couplings that are typically great enough that the hierarchy problem and the concept of electroweak naturalness can be probed thoroughly within a precision Higgs boson program. Specifically, at a lepton collider this can be achieved through precision measurements of the Higgs boson associated production cross section. This would lead to indirect constraints on perturbative solutions to the hierarchy problem in the broadest sense, even if the relevant new fields are gauge singlets. PMID:24093250

  12. Current Concepts in Conception Control

    PubMed Central

    Ringrose, C. A. Douglas

    1963-01-01

    The progressive increase in world population has become a most urgent global problem in recent years. Man has, however, been interested in controlling his reproductivity at the family level for many centuries. Historical aspects of this saga are reviewed. The modern era of conception control was ushered in by Makepeace et al. in 1937 when ovulation inhibition by progesterone was demonstrated. Confirmation of this by Pincus and associates, and development of the potent oral progestational agents, the 19-norsteroids, have made efficient reliable contraception a reality. Experience with one of these agents (Ortho-Novum, 2 mg.) in 115 patients through 805 cycles is presented. Conception control was 100% effective at this dosage. Side effects were minimal. Only three of the women discontinued the tablets because of these effects. All but five in this group of 115 preferred the oral contraceptives to methods previously employed. PMID:13973987

  13. Difficult Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosbury, R.

    2005-12-01

    Beautiful colour images of the sky are both a blessing and a curse for the communication of astronomy to the public. While undoubtedly attractive, they can obscure the fact that discoveries are often made in astrophysics using techniques and measurements that are much more difficult to grasp and certainly less appealing to view. Should we try to explain such concepts as spectroscopy, polarimetry and interferometry, or is it a lost cause? The most effective approach to this problem may be to lead the audience to ask the question themselves: "But how do you know that?"

  14. The vibrational problem solution in natural coordinates with the application of ab initio methods and the functional density theory (DFT-methods)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselova, Anna V.; Chernavina, Mariya L.; Berezin, Kirill V.; Berezin, Valentin I.

    2015-03-01

    This article describes the algorithm and the creation of programs for the input process automate the scaling factors of quantum mechanical force fields calculated in the natural coordinates using ab initio methods and the density functional theory (DFT-methods).

  15. Learning to use scientific concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Gordon

    2008-07-01

    In responding to the research on conceptual change, this article attempts to make two points. First, scientific concepts are not possessed by individuals; rather, they are part of a culture's resources, which individuals learn to use for their own or for group purposes. Second, particular concepts are most effectively mastered when the learner is deeply engaged in solving a problem for which they function as effective semiotic tools in achieving a solution. On these grounds, it is argued that the mastering of scientific concepts is best achieved through learning to use them in motivated inquiry.

  16. Exact closed-form solutions for the natural frequencies and stability of elastically connected multiple beam system using Timoshenko and high-order shear deformation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanović, Vladimir; Kozić, Predrag; Janevski, Goran

    2013-02-01

    A general procedure for the determination of the natural frequencies and buckling load for a set of beam system under compressive axial loading is investigated using Timoshenko and high-order shear deformation theory. It is assumed that the set beams of the system are simply supported and continuously joined by a Winkler elastic layer. The model of beam includes the effects of axial loading, shear deformation and rotary inertia. In the special case of identical beams, explicit expressions for the natural frequencies and the critical buckling load are determined using a trigonometric method. The influences of the compressive axial loading and the number of beams in the system on the natural frequencies and the critical buckling load are discussed. These results are of considerable practical interest and have wide application in engineering practice of frameworks.

  17. Transient rheological behavior of natural polysaccharide xanthan gum solutions in start-up shear flow fields: An experimental study using a strain-controlled rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Seok; Kim, Yong-Seok; Song, Ki-Won

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to experimentally investigate the transient rheological behavior of concentrated xanthan gum solutions in start-up shear flow fields. Using a strain-controlled rheometer, a number of constant shear rates were suddenly imposed to aqueous xanthan gum solutions with different concentrations and the resultant shear stress responses were measured with time. The main findings obtained from this study can be summarized as follows: (1) For all shear rates imposed, however low it may be, the shear stress is rapidly increased with time (stress overshoot) upon inception of steady shear flow before passing through the maximum stress value and then gradually decreased with time (stress decay) until reaching a steady state flow. (2) As the imposed shear rate is increased, a more pronounced stress overshoot takes place and the maximum stress value becomes larger, whereas both times at which the maximum stress is observed and needed to reach a steady state flow are shortened. (3) The maximum shear stress is linearly increased with shear rate in a double logarithmic scale and becomes larger with increasing concentration at equal shear rates. In addition, the time at which the maximum stress occurs exhibits a linear relationship with the inverse of shear rate in a double logarithmic scale for all xanthan gum solutions, regardless of their concentrations. (4) The shear stress is sharply increased with an increase in strain until reaching the maximum stress at small range of deformations. The maximum stress is observed at similar strain values, irrespective of the imposed shear rates lower than 10 1/s. (5) The Bird-Leider model can be successfully used with regard to quantitatively predicting the transient behavior of concentrated xanthan gum solutions. However, this model has a fatal weakness in terms of describing a decrease in shear stress (stress decay).

  18. Solution-phase parallel synthesis of a pharmacophore library of HUN-7293 analogues: a general chemical mutagenesis approach to defining structure-function properties of naturally occurring cyclic (depsi)peptides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Bilban, Melitta; Foster, Carolyn A; Boger, Dale L

    2002-05-15

    HUN-7293 (1), a naturally occurring cyclic heptadepsipeptide, is a potent inhibitor of cell adhesion molecule expression (VCAM-1, ICAM-1, E-selectin), the overexpression of which is characteristic of chronic inflammatory diseases. Representative of a general approach to defining structure-function relationships of such cyclic (depsi)peptides, the parallel synthesis and evaluation of a complete library of key HUN-7293 analogues are detailed enlisting solution-phase techniques and simple acid-base liquid-liquid extractions for isolation and purification of intermediates and final products. Significant to the design of the studies and unique to solution-phase techniques, the library was assembled superimposing a divergent synthetic strategy onto a convergent total synthesis. An alanine scan and N-methyl deletion of each residue of the cyclic heptadepsipeptide identified key sites responsible for or contributing to the biological properties. The simultaneous preparation of a complete set of individual residue analogues further simplifying the structure allowed an assessment of each structural feature of 1, providing a detailed account of the structure-function relationships in a single study. Within this pharmacophore library prepared by systematic chemical mutagenesis of the natural product structure, simplified analogues possessing comparable potency and, in some instances, improved selectivity were identified. One potent member of this library proved to be an additional natural product in its own right, which we have come to refer to as HUN-7293B (8), being isolated from the microbial strain F/94-499709. PMID:11996584

  19. Personal Solutions; Family Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatto, John Taylor

    1995-01-01

    Relates the experience of an award-winning teacher who, with his wife, chose to leave their materialistic life in Manhattan 27 years ago to live in a barn on a 134-acre farm in southeastern New York state. Describes the pleasures in living with and learning from nature, as opposed to doing meaningless and unrewarding tasks. (LP)

  20. Advanced Gas Storage Concepts: Technologies for the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Freeway, Katy; Rogers, R.E.; DeVries, Kerry L.; Nieland, Joel D.; Ratigan, Joe L.; Mellegard, Kirby D.

    2000-02-01

    This full text product includes: 1) A final technical report titled Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts, Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage and presentations from two technology transfer workshops held in 1998 in Houston, Texas, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (both on the topic of Chilled Gas Storage in Mined Caverns); 2) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project, Final Report 1 October 1997 - 31 May 1999; 3) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project Phase II: Conceptual Design and Economic Study, Final Report 9 June - 10 October 1999; 4) A final technical report titled Commerical Potential of Natural Gas Storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC) and presentations from a DOE-sponsored workshop on Alternative Gas Storage Technologies, held Feb 17, 2000 in Pittsburgh, PA; and 5) Phase I and Phase II topical reports titled Feasibility Study for Lowering the Minimum Gas Pressure in Solution-Mined Caverns Based on Geomechanical Analyses of Creep-Induced Damage and Healing.

  1. Competition between reaction and intramolecular energy redistribution in solution: observation and nature of nonstatistical dynamics in the ozonolysis of vinyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Larisa Mae M; Singleton, Daniel A

    2011-09-01

    Experimental product ratios in ozonolyses of alkyl vinyl ethers in solution do not fit with expectations based on statistical rate theories. The selectivity among cleavage pathways increases with the size of the alkyl group but to an extent that is far less than RRKM theory would predict. Trajectory studies account for the observed selectivities and support a mechanism involving a competition between cleavage of the primary ozonide and intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution. A statistical model is presented that assumes that RRKM theory holds for a molecular subset of the primary ozonides, allowing the rates of energy loss from the ozonides to be estimated from the observed product ratios. PMID:21812422

  2. Competition between Reaction and Intramolecular Energy Redistribution in Solution. Observation and Nature of Nonstatistical Dynamics in the Ozonolysis of Vinyl Ethers

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, Larisa Mae M.; Singleton, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental product ratios in ozonolyses of alkyl vinyl ethers in solution do not fit with expectations from statistical rate theories. The selectivity among cleavage pathways increases with the size of the alkyl group but to an extent that is far less than RRKM theory would predict. Trajectory studies account for the observed selectivities and support a mechanism involving a competition between cleavage of the primary ozonide and intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution. An approximate statistical model is presented that assumes that RRKM theory holds for a molecular subset of the primary ozonides, allowing estimates of the rates of energy loss from the primary ozonides based on the observed product ratios. PMID:21812422

  3. Technium concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Marc; Davies, Stephen

    2002-05-01

    Traditionally the economy of Wales has been based on the coal and steel industries. Recently, Wales has elected its own National Assembly and together with the Welsh Development Agency (WDA) and through a Regional Technology Plan, has prioritized the creation and development of a knowledge based economy. The culture of Wales has always placed emphasis on education and for a small nation, has a University sector with an excellent reputation for advanced research. The WDA and the University of Wales Swansea came together to establish Technium, which is an unique concept designed to bridge the gap between advanced University research and commercial exploitation. Technium was co-funded by the WDA and the European Regional Development Fund. The project is seen as the first phase of creating a network of sector specific Techniums across the country, all linked via state of the art telecomm-infrastructure to University centers of research excellence. This paper will describe two case studies, both in the Optics/Photonics field, of research centers being established in Technium by blue chip international companies. Those companies having located in Technium specifically because of the links to high quality university research. One company is Agilent Technologies Inc., USA) a global leader in Optoelectronic components. The second company, ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc, design and develop optical devices to be used in conjunction with pharmaceuticals for the treatment of a range of diseases. Working closely with the WDA and the University of Wales Swansea, these and other companies will pursue product development, sponsor postgraduate research and generate intellectual capital that will benefit the company, students and the region alike.

  4. Calculation of amorphous silica solubilities at 25° to 300°C and apparent cation hydration numbers in aqueous salt solutions using the concept of effective density of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, Robert O.; Williams, Marshall L.

    1983-01-01

    The solubility of amorphous silica in aqueous salt solutions at 25° to 300°C can be calculated using information on its solubility in pure water and a model in which the activity of water in the salt solution is defined to equal the effective density. pe, of “free” water in that solution. At temperatures of 100°C and above, pe closely equals the product of the density of the solution times the weight fraction of water in the solution. At 25°C, a correction parameter must be applied to pe that incorporates a term called the apparent cation hydration number, h. Because of the many assumptions and other uncertainties involved in determining values of h, by the model used here, the reported numbers are not necessarily real hydration numbers even though they do agree with some published values determined by activity and diffusion methods. Whether or not h is a real hydration number, it would appear to be useful in its inclusion within a more extensive activity coefficient term that describes the departure of silica solubilities in concentrated salt solutions from expected behavior according to the model presented here. Values of h can be calculated from measured amorphous silica solubilities in salt solutions at 25°C provided there is no complexing of dissolved silica with the dissolved salt, or if the degree of complexing is known. The previously postulated aqueous silica-sulfate complexing in aqueous Na2SO4 solutions is supported by results of the present effective density of water model

  5. Modified natural neighbor interpolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversoni, Leonardo

    1992-11-01

    Based on the idea of Natural Neighbor Interpolant presented by Sibson in 1980, this paper shows how combining it with the concept of Covering Spheres, new and more practical algorithms can be made as well as a more complete theory.

  6. Preparation and characterization of chelating fibers based on natural wool for removal of Hg(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) metal ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; Nawar, N; Abdel-Latif, D A

    2010-12-15

    The graft copolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) onto natural wool fibers initiated by KMnO(4) and oxalic acid combined redox initiator system in limited aqueous medium was carried out in heterogeneous media. Moreover, modification of the grafted wool fibers was done by changing the nitrile group (-CN) into cyano-acetic acid α-amino-acrylic-hydrazide through the reaction with hydrazine hydrate followed by ethylcyanoacetate which eventually produce wool-grafted-poly(cyano-acetic acid α-amino-acrylic-hydrazide) (wool-g-PCAH) chelating fibers. The application of the modified fibers for metal ion uptake was studied using Hg(2+), Cu(2+) and Co(2+). The modified chelating fibers were characterized using FTIR spectroscopy, SEM and X-ray diffraction. PMID:20810212

  7. Natural faecal fluorophores and the potential of chlorophyll based markers to optimise fluorescence as a real-time solution for the detection of faecal contamination on carcasses.

    PubMed

    Lee, M R F; Theobald, V J; Ougham, H J; Dahl, A Veberg; Lundby, F; Scollan, N D; Wold, J-P

    2010-12-01

    More accurate and sensitive visualisation of faecal contamination in the abattoir would significantly reduce the risk posed by harbouring pathogenic micro-organisms. We carried out a preliminary investigation of the range of fluorophores found naturally in faeces from typical ruminant diets. Sixteen ewes were offered either: i) fresh forage (FF), ii) grass silage (GS), iii) grass hay (GH) or iv) concentrate and barley straw (CB). Animals offered FF diets had a greater concentration (P<0.001) of chlorophyll based compounds in their faeces and subsequent fluorescent emission spectra. In a second experiment we investigated a range of fluorescent markers against a basal concentrate and barley straw diet. Ten Cheviot sheep were split into five treatment groups during a duplicate 5 × 5 Latin square design. Four of the groups received a chlorophyll based marker at a rate of 2g/d: i) Mg-Chlorophyllin (MgC), ii) Fe-Chlorophyllin (FeC), iii) Zn-Chlorophyllin (ZnC) or iv) Spirulina (Chlorophyll a extract from blue green algae, Sp). The last group received no supplement as the control (Con). The appearance of chlorophyllin markers and their derivatives in faeces was similar with mean concentrations of 3.1 and 7.2 μg/g DM, respectively. The most intense fluorescent signal was shown with MgC followed by ZnC, FeC, Sp and Con at 685 nm. The use of markers in pre-slaughter diets would improve the accuracy of faecal detection as a result of greater fluorescence and specific emission wavelengths which do not overlap with natural meat components to help with visualisation. PMID:20813464

  8. Sorption of Hydrophobic Organic Compounds on Natural Sorbents and Organoclays from Aqueous and Non-Aqueous Solutions: A Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Moyo, Francis; Tandlich, Roman; Wilhelmi, Brendan S.; Balaz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Renewed focus on the sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) onto mineral surfaces and soil components is required due to the increased and wider range of organic pollutants being released into the environment. This mini-review examines the possibility of the contribution and mechanism of HOC sorption onto clay mineral sorbents such as kaolinite, and soil organic matter and the possible role of both in the prevention of environmental contamination by HOCs. Literature data indicates that certain siloxane surfaces can be hydrophobic. Therefore soils can retain HOCs even at low soil organic levels and the extent will depend on the structure of the pollutant and the type and concentration of clay minerals in the sorbent. Clay minerals are wettable by nonpolar solvents and so sorption of HOCs onto them from aqueous and non-aqueous solutions is possible. This is important for two reasons: firstly, the movement and remediation of soil environments will be a function of the concentration and type of clay minerals in the soil. Secondly, low-cost sorbents such as kaolinite and expandable clays can be added to soils or contaminated environments as temporary retention barriers for HOCs. Inorganic cations sorbed onto the kaolinite have a strong influence on the rate and extent of sorption of hydrophobic organic pollutants onto kaolinite. Structural sorbate classes that can be retained by the kaolinite matrix are limited by hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups of the octahedral alumosilicate sheet and the tetrahedral sheet with silicon. Soil organic carbon plays a key role in the sorption of HOCs onto soils, but the extent will be strongly affected by the structure of the organic soil matter and the presence of soot. Structural characterisation of soil organic matter in a particular soil should be conducted during a particular contamination event. Contamination by mining extractants and antibiotics will require renewed focus on the use of the QSAR approaches in the

  9. Citizenship Concepts in LINC Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derwing, Tracey M.; Thomson, Ronald I.

    2005-01-01

    In this study we surveyed teachers and program coordinators of Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) from Ontario, British Columbia, and Alberta to determine to what degree they believe they are incorporating citizenship concepts into the ESL classroom. Respondents provided us with information on the nature of their programs, the…

  10. Phenomena and mechanisms of mixed crystal formation in solutions I. General concept on the example of the system KHC 8H 4O 4-RbHC 8H 4O 4-H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikin, A. E.; Kovalev, S. I.; Rudneva, E. B.; Kryuchkova, L. Yu; Voloshin, A. E.

    2003-07-01

    A comprehensive study of crystal morphology and imperfections in the isomorphic series potassium acid phthalate-rubidium acid phthalate (KAP-RbAP) in aqueous solutions was conducted using a general model of the processes of mixed crystal formation in solutions discussed earlier by the authors on experimental and theoretical basis. The system was chosen as a model to interpret basic processes. The utilization of both substances as well as their solid solutions was taken into account. Interaction between RbAP or KAP crystals and aqueous solutions saturated with either KAP or RbAP or both, in ratios varying from 10 to 90 wt% (the step was about 10 wt%), has been studied. All the processes were observed in situ and ex situ by optical microscopy and X-ray topography (Lang method). Solubilities of KAP and RbAP mixtures in water were determined and compositions of corresponding solid solutions were estimated for the isotherms 29°C and 39°C. These indicated a considerable convex curvature in concentration Schreinemakers diagrams. The main peculiarity of crystals is their having heteroepitaxial porous or uniform textures, which occur due to the secondary volume deficit or excess at the exchange reaction between a crystal and solution. In turn, the primary/secondary volume ratio depends on the solubilities of the components in the system (unconnected with the molar volumes of the substances) determined directly from Schreinemakers diagrams. The convexity of the KAP-RbAP solubility isotherms displays specific crystal formation in this system compared with features of Co-Ni Tutton salts whose isotherms have small curvatures. Firstly, this appeared as a shift from volume-deficit replacement toward volume-excess replacement. This resulted in non-uniform heteroepitaxial textures and sharp slowing down of the process at an intermediate stage. Phenomena occurring in such peculiar systems and interactions between the crystals and solutions of intermediate compositions have not

  11. Time-dependent rheological behavior of natural polysaccharide xanthan gum solutions in interrupted shear and step-incremental/reductional shear flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Seok; Song, Ki-Won

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the present study is to systematically elucidate the time-dependent rheological behavior of concentrated xanthan gum systems in complicated step-shear flow fields. Using a strain-controlled rheometer (ARES), step-shear flow behaviors of a concentrated xanthan gum model solution have been experimentally investigated in interrupted shear flow fields with a various combination of different shear rates, shearing times and rest times, and step-incremental and step-reductional shear flow fields with various shearing times. The main findings obtained from this study are summarized as follows. (i) In interrupted shear flow fields, the shear stress is sharply increased until reaching the maximum stress at an initial stage of shearing times, and then a stress decay towards a steady state is observed as the shearing time is increased in both start-up shear flow fields. The shear stress is suddenly decreased immediately after the imposed shear rate is stopped, and then slowly decayed during the period of a rest time. (ii) As an increase in rest time, the difference in the maximum stress values between the two start-up shear flow fields is decreased whereas the shearing time exerts a slight influence on this behavior. (iii) In step-incremental shear flow fields, after passing through the maximum stress, structural destruction causes a stress decay behavior towards a steady state as an increase in shearing time in each step shear flow region. The time needed to reach the maximum stress value is shortened as an increase in step-increased shear rate. (iv) In step-reductional shear flow fields, after passing through the minimum stress, structural recovery induces a stress growth behavior towards an equilibrium state as an increase in shearing time in each step shear flow region. The time needed to reach the minimum stress value is lengthened as a decrease in step-decreased shear rate.

  12. Natural monocrystalline pyrite as a sensor in non-aqueous solution Part I: Potentiometric titration of weak acids in, N,N-dimethylformamide, methylpyrrolidone and pyridine.

    PubMed

    Mihajlović, Lj V; Mihajlović, R P; Antonijević, M M; Vukanović, B V

    2004-11-15

    The possibility of applying natural monocrystaline pyrite as a sensor for the potentiometric titration of weak acids in N,N-dimethylformamide, methylpyrrolidone and pyridine was investigated. The potential of this electrode in N,N-dimethylformamide, methylpyrrolidone and pyridine exhibits a sub-Nernst dependence. In N,N-dimethylformamide the slope (mV/pH) is 39.0 and in methylpyrrolidone it is 45.0. The potential jumps at the titration end-point obtained in the titration of weak acids are higher than those obtained by the application of a glass electrode as the indicator electrode The potential in the course of the titration and at the titration end-point (TEP) are rapidly established. Sodium methylate, potassium hydroxide and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) proved to be very suitable titrating agents for these titrations. The results obtained in the determination of the investigated weak acids deviate by 0.1-0.35% with respect to those obtained by using a glass electrode as the indicator electrode. PMID:18969684

  13. Transport and deposition of Suwannee River Humic Acid/Natural Organic Matter formed silver nanoparticles on silica matrices: the influence of solution pH and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Akaighe, Nelson; Depner, Sean W; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Sohn, Mary

    2013-07-01

    The transport and deposition of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) formed from Ag(+) reduction by Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) and Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter (SRNOM) utilizing a silica matrix is reported. The morphology and stability of the AgNPs was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. The percentage conversion of the initial [Ag(+)] to [AgNPs] was determined from a combination of atomic absorption (AAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy, and centrifugation techniques. The results indicate higher AgNP transport and consequently low deposition in the porous media at basic pH conditions and low ionic strength. However, at low acidic pH and high ionic strength, especially with the divalent metallic cations, the mobility of the AgNPs in the porous media was very low, most likely due to NP aggregation. Overall, the results suggest the potential for AgNP contamination of subsurface soils and groundwater aquifers is mostly dependent on their aggregation state, controlled by the soil water and sediment ionic strength and pH. PMID:23422173

  14. Studies of individual carbon sites of proteins in solution by natural abundance carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Strategies for assignments.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, E; Norton, R S; Allerhand, A

    1975-08-25

    Natural abundance 13C Fourier transform NMR spectra (at 15.18 MHz, in 20-mm sample tubes) of aqueous native proteins yield numerous narrow single carbon resonances of nonprotonated aromatic carbons. Techniques for the assignment of these resonances are presented. Each technique is applied to one or more of the following proteins: ferricytochrome c from horse heart and Candida krusei, ferrocytochrome c and cyanoferricytochrome c from horse heart, lysozyme from hen egg white, cyanoferrimyoglobins from horse and sperm whale skeletal muscle, and carbon monoxide myoglobin from horse. In all of the protein spectra we have examined, methine aromatic carbons give rise to broad bands. Studies of the narrow resonances of nonprotonated aromatic carbons of proteins are facilitated by removal of these broad bands by means of the convolution-difference method, preferably from spectra recorded under conditions of noise-modulated off-resonance proton decoupling. We present a summary of the chemical shift ranges for the various types of nonprotonated aromatic carbons of amino acid residues and hemes of diamagnetic proteins, based on our results for hen egg white lysozyme, horse heart ferrocytochrome c, horse carbon monoxide myoglobin, and carbon monoxide hemoglobins from various species... PMID:169240

  15. Effects of molecular weight-dependent physicochemical heterogeneity of natural organic matter on the aggregation of fullerene nanoparticles in mono- and di-valent electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mo-Hai; Yin, Yong-Guang; Booth, Andy; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2015-03-15

    Given the wide presence of heterogeneous natural organic matter (NOM) and metal ions (Na(+)/Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)), as well as their significant role in governing nanoparticle stability in aqueous environments, it is of great importance to understand how the molecular weight (MW)-dependent physicochemical properties of NOM impact fundamental transportation processes like the aggregation of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in the presence of Na(+)/Ca(2+)/Mg(2+). Here, we report on the aggregation behavior of a model ENP, fullerene nanoparticles (nC60) in the presence of five MW fractions of Suwannee River NOM (Mf-SRNOMs, separated by ultrafiltration techniques) and three electrolytes (NaCl, CaCl2 and MgCl2). We found that in all NaCl treatments and low concentration CaCl2/MgCl2 treatments, the enhancement of nC60 stability positively correlated with the MW of Mf-SRNOMs. Whereas, the stability efficiency of identical Mf-SRNOM in different electrolytes followed an order of NaCl > MgCl2 > CaCl2, and the enhanced attachment of nC60-SRNOM associations was observed in high MW Mf-SRNOM (SRNOM>100 kD and SRNOM 30-100 kD) at high concentration CaCl2/MgCl2. Our results indicate that although the high MW NOM with large humic-like material is the key component for stabilizing nC60 in monovalent electrolyte, it could play a reversed role in promoting the attachment of nC60, especially in long term aggregations and at high concentrations of divalent cations. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the effects of heterogeneous NOM on the aggregation of ENPs should be highly valued, and properly assessed against different cation species and concentrations. PMID:25577691

  16. Study of Chemical Surface Structure of Natural Sorbents Used for Removing of Pb2+ Ions from Model Aqueous Solutions (part Ii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bożęcka, Agnieszka; Bożęcki, Piotr; Sanak-Rydlewska, Stanisława

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the results of the chemical structure research of organic sorbent surface such as walnut shells, plums stones and sunflower hulls with using such methods as infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and elemental analysis. Based on the IR spectra identification of functional groups present on the surface of studied materials has been done as well as determination of their effect on the sorption mechanism of Pb2+ ions from aqueous model solutions W artykule przedstawiono wyniki badań chemicznej struktury powierzchni sorbentów organicznych takich jak: łupiny orzecha włoskiego, pestki śliwek oraz łuski słonecznika z wykorzystaniem metody spektrometrii w podczerwieni (FTIR) oraz analizy elementarnej. W oparciu o uzyskane widma IR dokonano identyfikacji grup funkcyjnych obecnych na powierzchni tych materiałów i określono ich wpływ na mechanizm sorpcji jonów Pb2+ z modelowych roztworów wodnych. Analiza elementarna wykazała, że spośród badanych sorbentów, największą zawartość węgla (49,91%) i wodoru (5,93%) mają pestki śliwek. Najwięcej azotu (1,59%) zawierają łuszczyny słonecznika (tabela 1). Zawartość siarki we wszystkich badanych materiałach jest znikoma, dlatego nie udało się jej oznaczyć tą metodą. Obecność pozostałych pierwiastków może świadczyć o istnieniu zarówno alifatycznych jak i aromatycznych połączeń organicznych. Potwierdzeniem tego są również zarejestrowane widma IR (rysunki 1-3). W oparciu o uzyskane wyniki można przypuszczać także, iż udział procesu wymiany jonowej w sorpcji ołowiu z roztworów wodnych jest znaczący. Świadczą o tym m.in. intensywności pasm na widmach IR dla próbek badanych materiałów po ich kontakcie z roztworami jonów Pb2+ (rysunki 4-6).

  17. Medicinal plants: conception / contraception.

    PubMed

    Chaing, H S; Merino-chavez, G; Yang, L L; Wang, F N; Hafez, E S

    1994-01-01

    Researchers have conducted considerable experiments on the effectiveness and therapeutic values of Chinese herbs and parts of plants. We should not ignore the significance of natural medicine. The Chinese have been perfecting medicinal therapy based on the raw ingredients of plants/herbs and their derivatives for thousands of years. Chinese practitioners of traditional medicine prescribe medicines based on yin and yang. Traditional medicine is communicated in a verb or written form. Natural resources used in traditional medicine to treat diseases are not limited to just medicinal plants but also include animals, shell fish, and minerals. Parts of plants used in traditional medicine are leaves, stems, flowers, bark, and root. Chinese medicine is the world's oldest continuous surviving tradition. The Chinese experimented with local plants, often resulting in mild to violent reactions. This process allowed them to become familiar with poisonous plants and those that could relieve pain or successfully treat illness. Current allopathic medicines are composed of synthetic compounds copied from natural chemical derivatives, which tend to be more potent than the original compound. Some medicinal plants used to effect conception/contraception include Striga astiatica (contraceptive); Eurycoma longifolia (male virility); and a mixture of lengkuas, mengkudu masak, black pepper seeds, ginger, salt, and 2 eggs (increase libido). Women in Malaysia take jamu to preserve their body shape and to provide nutrition during pregnancy. Praneem causes local cell-mediated immunity in the uterus. Clinical trials of Praneem with or without the hCG vaccine are planned. PMID:12287843

  18. Teaching and Learning Economic Creativity: How to Overcome Uncertainty in Realizing Creative New Concepts That Have a Value? How the CRAP System--Coordination & Registration of Action Points--and External Assessment Generates Possible Solutions to Create Value of New Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roelofs, Henk; Nieuwenhuis, Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    How do we identify tools that can overcome uncertainty in realizing value with students using their "idea creativity" in generating and developing ideas in new concepts? Tools that better fit in the mindset of the new generations. The major question of idea creativity, especially in an educational environment is: How to determine and…

  19. The role of integrating natural and social science concepts for risk governance and the design of people-centred early warning systems. Case study from the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System Project (GITEWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebert, Niklas; Post, Joachim

    2010-05-01

    . This requires the integration of natural / spatial and social science concepts, methods and data: E.g. a scenario based approach for tsunami inundation modeling was developed to provide decision makers with options to decide up to what level they aim to protect their people and territory, on the contrary household surveys were conducted for the spatial analysis of the evacuation preparedness of the population as a function of place specific hazard, risk, warning and evacuation perception; remote sensing was applied for the spatial analysis (land-use) of the socio-physical conditions of a city and region for evacuation; and existing social / population statistics were combined with land-use data for the precise spatial mapping of the population exposed to tsunami risks. Only by utilizing such a comprehensive assessment approach valuable information for risk governance can be generated. The results are mapped using GIS and designed according to the specific needs of different end-users, such as public authorities involved in the design of warning dissemination strategies, land-use planners (shelter planning, road network configuration) and NGOs mandated to provide education for the general public on tsunami risk and evacuation behavior. The case study of the city of Padang (one of the pilot areas of GITEWS), Indonesia clearly show, that only by intersecting social (vulnerability) and natural hazards research a comprehensive picture on tsunami risk can be provided with which risk governance in the early warning context can be conducted in a comprehensive, systemic and sustainable manner.

  20. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  1. Microeconomic Concepts Students Should Learn before Intermediate Macroeconomics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salemi, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    Identifies four microeconomic concepts students should learn before entering the study of intermediate macroeconomics. Included are relative prices, general versus partial equilibrium, constrained optimization, and the nature of production concepts. Recommends making intermediate microeconomics a prerequisite for intermediate macroeconomics. (MJP)

  2. The Concept of Relevance in IR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borlund, Pia

    2003-01-01

    Introduces the concept of relevance as viewed and applied in the context of IR (information retrieval) evaluation by presenting an overview of the multidimensionality and dynamic nature of the concept. Topics include classes and types of relevance; relevance criteria; degrees of relevance; levels of relevance; situational relevance; and…

  3. Number Concepts with "Number Worlds": Thickening Understandings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Peter; Sinclair, Nathalie; Zazkis, Rina

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the nature of preservice elementary school teachers' understandings of several concepts in elementary number theory that are evoked by a computer-based microworld called "Number Worlds". In particular, the focus is on the concepts of factor, multiple and prime number. The notion of "thickness" is examined with respect to…

  4. Education for Sustainable Living: A Useful Concept?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    le Grange, L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses some emerging discourses on environmental education and how "sustainability" has been used within different discourses. Asserts that the contested nature of the concept does not mean that it cannot be usefully adopted within environmental education processes. Focuses on how the concept has been adopted by students in a preservice science…

  5. AXTAR: Mission Design Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Philips, Bernard F.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Levine, Alan M.; Wood, Kent S.; Wolff, Michael T.; Gwon, Chul S.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Briggs, Michael S.; Capizzo, Peter; Fabisinski, Leo; Hopkins, Randall C.; Hornsby, Linda S.; Johnson, Les; Maples, C. Dauphne; Miernik, Janie H.; Thomas, Dan; DeGeronimo, Gianluigi

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR) is a mission concept for X-ray timing of compact objects that combines very large collecting area, broadband spectral coverage, high time resolution, highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. It is optimized for sub-millisecond timing of bright Galactic X-ray sources in order to study phenomena at the natural time scales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons, thus probing the physics of ultra-dense matter, strongly curved spacetimes, and intense magnetic fields. AXTAR s main instrument, the Large Area Timing Array (LATA) is a collimated instrument with 2 50 keV coverage and over 3 square meters effective area. The LATA is made up of an array of super-modules that house 2-mm thick silicon pixel detectors. AXTAR will provide a significant improvement in effective area (a factor of 7 at 4 keV and a factor of 36 at 30 keV) over the RXTE PCA. AXTAR will also carry a sensitive Sky Monitor (SM) that acts as a trigger for pointed observations of X-ray transients in addition to providing high duty cycle monitoring of the X-ray sky. We review the science goals and technical concept for AXTAR and present results from a preliminary mission design study

  6. Advocacy: exploring the concept.

    PubMed

    Mardell, A

    1996-10-01

    The concept of the nurse as the patient's advocate is one that has become popular in the last fifteen years or so in both North America and the United Kingdom, having its basis in nursing theory. The UKCC first embraced the concept, stating in the Code of Professional Conduct that nurses must; 'act always in such a manner so as to promote and safeguard the interests and well being of patients and clients'. This is a laudable principle and one that nurses cannot dispute as there are many members of our society who are weak and vulnerable and may be unable to speak up for themselves. But are nurses always in a position to be an advocate for their patients? As the nature of nursing is so diverse then the nature of advocacy will be different in the multifarious settings in which nurses practise. Can theatre nurses ever be in a position to act as an advocate for a patient who is often anaesthetised? What precisely is advocacy and is the Concise Oxford Dictionary definition of 'one who pleads for another' appropriate in the nursing context? Then there is the position of nurses in the healthcare organisation in which they practise. In advocating for their patients, nurses may find they are pleading a case for a patient, or a group of patients, that could bring the nurse into conflict with their medical colleagues or with the management of the organisation by whom they are employed. Additionally, they may not posses the skills and knowledge to advocate effectively under such circumstances. Nursing is littered with the casualties of such conflicts over the years, the most publicised of whom, in the UK, was probably Graham Pink who lost his job as a charge nurse after drawing public attention to what he considered to be an unacceptable standard of care in the hospital in which he worked. PMID:8974516

  7. Conceptions of Parents, Conceptions of Self, and Conceptions of God.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buri, John R.; Mueller, Rebecca A.

    Different theorists have suggested that an individual's view of God may be related to one's view of one's father, one's mother, or one's self. A study was conducted to examine the relationship of college students' conceptions of the wrathfulness-kindliness of God to their conceptions of their father's and mother's permissiveness, authoritarianism,…

  8. Multi-pack Disposal Concepts for Spent Fuel (Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    Hadgu, Teklu; Hardin, Ernest; Matteo, Edward N.

    2015-12-01

    At the initiation of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) R&D campaign, international geologic disposal programs and past work in the U.S. were surveyed to identify viable disposal concepts for crystalline, clay/shale, and salt host media (Hardin et al., 2012). Concepts for disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing are relatively advanced in countries such as Finland, France, and Sweden. The UFD work quickly showed that these international concepts are all “enclosed,” whereby waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials . Alternative “open” modes (emplacement tunnels are kept open after emplacement for extended ventilation) have been limited to the Yucca Mountain License Application Design (CRWMS M&O, 1999). Thermal analysis showed that, if “enclosed” concepts are constrained by peak package/buffer temperature, waste package capacity is limited to 4 PWR assemblies (or 9-BWR) in all media except salt. This information motivated separate studies: 1) extend the peak temperature tolerance of backfill materials, which is ongoing; and 2) develop small canisters (up to 4-PWR size) that can be grouped in larger multi-pack units for convenience of storage, transportation, and possibly disposal (should the disposal concept permit larger packages). A recent result from the second line of investigation is the Task Order 18 report: Generic Design for Small Standardized Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister Systems (EnergySolution, 2015). This report identifies disposal concepts for the small canisters (4-PWR size) drawing heavily on previous work, and for the multi-pack (16-PWR or 36-BWR).

  9. Serial concept maps: tools for concept analysis.

    PubMed

    All, Anita C; Huycke, LaRae I

    2007-05-01

    Nursing theory challenges students to think abstractly and is often a difficult introduction to graduate study. Traditionally, concept analysis is useful in facilitating this abstract thinking. Concept maps are a way to visualize an individual's knowledge about a specific topic. Serial concept maps express the sequential evolution of a student's perceptions of a selected concept. Maps reveal individual differences in learning and perceptions, as well as progress in understanding the concept. Relationships are assessed and suggestions are made during serial mapping, which actively engages the students and faculty in dialogue that leads to increased understanding of the link between nursing theory and practice. Serial concept mapping lends itself well to both online and traditional classroom environments. PMID:17547345

  10. SIRE Operations Concept For Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Daniel H.

    1981-07-01

    The objective of the Space Infrared (SIRE) Sensor program is to measure LWIR radiation of natural and man made sources in space. Measurements will be used to support development and operation of space based space surveillance systems. This paper describes the planned concept for operating SIRE as a non-deployed payload within the payload bay of the Orbiter. The operations concept is prefaced with an overview of the SIRE system addressing the sensor, space segment, ground segment and supporting elements of the Space Trans-portation System. This is followed by a description of operational concepts and data processing that will be used within the ground segment during flights to plan, command and evaluate SIRE operations. This responsive system provides for inflight evaluation of data and replanning of measurements as necessary to accommodate operational perturbations from the Orbiter and react to unexpected measurement results.

  11. Concepts in Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusanen, Anna-Mari; Poyhonen, Samuli

    2013-01-01

    In this article we focus on the concept of concept in conceptual change. We argue that (1) theories of higher learning must often employ two different notions of concept that should not be conflated: psychological and scientific concepts. The usages for these two notions are partly distinct and thus straightforward identification between them is…

  12. A systematic process for adaptive concept exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Janel Nicole

    Complex systems design is currently undergoing a paradigm shift toward Design for Capability. In this new paradigm, fewer vehicles are called on to perform a greater number of missions than ever before. As a result, solutions must be more robust to operational uncertainties while maintaining the ability to perform a greater number of tasks. Due to the nature of this goal, top-level needs are well known while specific vehicle requirements are poorly defined. This presents a combinatorial problem in which there are unlimited potential solutions from which to choose a subset of assets that can meet the stated needs. In order to downselect from the vast number of alternative solutions, designers often rely on qualitative methods because there are simply not enough resources available to thoroughly investigate all the potential solutions. However, qualitative information is often based on preconceived notions about what the design should look like, or partial derivatives. With this kind of static information, there is no reliable way to extrapolate how a particular solution might behave in a different environment or in uncertain operating conditions. For this reason, the ideal is to base concept selection on parametric, quantitative data so that informed, unbiased decisions can be made. However, this kind of information can be expensive and difficult to obtain, which is one reason quantitative analyses are traditionally reserved for optimization or more detailed design after a concept has been selected. This thesis presents a method for streamlining the process of obtaining and interpreting quantitative data for the purpose of creating a low-fidelity modeling and simulation environment. By providing a more efficient means for obtaining such information, quantitative analyses become much more practical for decision-making in the very early stages of design. However, in capability-based design, where the solution space is essentially unrestricted, we are faced with

  13. Reintroducing the Concept of Complementarity into Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Busemeyer, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Central to quantum theory is the concept of complementarity. In this essay, we argue that complementarity is also central to the emerging field of quantum cognition. We review the concept, its historical roots in psychology, and its development in quantum physics and offer examples of how it can be used to understand human cognition. The concept of complementarity provides a valuable and fresh perspective for organizing human cognitive phenomena and for understanding the nature of measurements in psychology. In turn, psychology can provide valuable new evidence and theoretical ideas to enrich this important scientific concept. PMID:26640454

  14. Web life: Ask Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-11-01

    Ask Nature is a site devoted to biomimicry, an interdisciplinary field in which practitioners study how animals and plants solve problems, and then use those solutions to develop better human technologies.

  15. Non-uniform solute segregation at semi-coherent metal/oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Samrat; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Fluss, Michael J.; Hsiung, Luke L.; Misra, Amit; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2015-08-26

    The properties and performance of metal/oxide nanocomposites are governed by the structure and chemistry of the metal/oxide interfaces. Here we report an integrated theoretical and experimental study examining the role of interfacial structure, particularly misfit dislocations, on solute segregation at a metal/oxide interface. We find that the local oxygen environment, which varies significantly between the misfit dislocations and the coherent terraces, dictates the segregation tendency of solutes to the interface. Depending on the nature of the solute and local oxygen content, segregation to misfit dislocations can change from attraction to repulsion, revealing the complex interplay between chemistry and structure at metal/oxide interfaces. These findings indicate that the solute chemistry at misfit dislocations is controlled by the dislocation density and oxygen content. As a result, fundamental thermodynamic concepts – the Hume-Rothery rules and the Ellingham diagram – qualitatively predict the segregation behavior of solutes to such interfaces, providing design rules for novel interfacial chemistries.

  16. Non-uniform Solute Segregation at Semi-Coherent Metal/Oxide Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Samrat; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Fluss, Michael J; Hsiung, Luke L; Misra, Amit; Uberuaga, Blas P

    2015-01-01

    The properties and performance of metal/oxide nanocomposites are governed by the structure and chemistry of the metal/oxide interfaces. Here we report an integrated theoretical and experimental study examining the role of interfacial structure, particularly misfit dislocations, on solute segregation at a metal/oxide interface. We find that the local oxygen environment, which varies significantly between the misfit dislocations and the coherent terraces, dictates the segregation tendency of solutes to the interface. Depending on the nature of the solute and local oxygen content, segregation to misfit dislocations can change from attraction to repulsion, revealing the complex interplay between chemistry and structure at metal/oxide interfaces. These findings indicate that the solute chemistry at misfit dislocations is controlled by the dislocation density and oxygen content. Fundamental thermodynamic concepts – the Hume-Rothery rules and the Ellingham diagram – qualitatively predict the segregation behavior of solutes to such interfaces, providing design rules for novel interfacial chemistries. PMID:26306812

  17. Electromarking solution

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jonathan S.; Harper, William L.; Peck, Charles G.

    1976-06-22

    This invention is directed to an aqueous halogen-free electromarking solution which possesses the capacity for marking a broad spectrum of metals and alloys selected from different classes. The aqueous solution comprises basically the nitrate salt of an amphoteric metal, a chelating agent, and a corrosion-inhibiting agent.

  18. Pictorial Analogies XI: Concentrations and Acidity of Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortman, John J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents pictorial analogies of several concepts relating to solutions for chemistry students. These include concentration of solution, strength of solution, supersaturated solution, and conjugate acid-base pairs. Among the examples are comparison of acid strength to percentage of strong soldiers or making supersaturated solution analogous to a…

  19. Concept Innateness, Concept Continuity, and Bootstrapping

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The commentators raised issues relevant to all three important theses of The Origin of Concepts (TOOC). Some questioned the very existence of innate representational primitives, and others questioned my claims about their richness and whether they should be thought of as concepts. Some questioned the existence of conceptual discontinuity in the course of knowledge acquisition and others argued that discontinuity is much more common than portrayed in TOOC. Some raised issues with my characterization of Quinian bootstrapping, and others questioned the dual factor theory of concepts motivated by my picture of conceptual development. PMID:23264705

  20. The nature of undergraduates' conceptual understanding of oxygen transport and utilization in humans: Can cardiopulmonary simulation software enhance learning of propositional knowledge and/or diagnose alternative conceptions in novices and intermediates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissing, Dennis Robert

    The purpose of the this research was to explore undergraduates' conceptual development for oxygen transport and utilization, as a component of a cardiopulmonary physiology and advanced respiratory care course in the allied health program. This exploration focused on the student's development of knowledge and the presence of alternative conceptions, prior to, during, and after completing cardiopulmonary physiology and advanced respiratory care courses. Using the simulation program, SimBioSysTM (Samsel, 1994), student-participants completed a series of laboratory exercises focusing on cardiopulmonary disease states. This study examined data gathered from: (1) a novice group receiving the simulation program prior to instruction, (2) a novice group that experienced the simulation program following course completion in cardiopulmonary physiology, and (3) an intermediate group who experienced the simulation program following completion of formal education in Respiratory Care. This research was based on the theory of Human Constructivism as described by Mintzes, Wandersee, and Novak (1997). Data-gathering techniques were based on theories supported by Novak (1984), Wandersee (1997), and Chi (1997). Data were generated by exams, interviews, verbal analysis (Chi, 1997), and concept mapping. Results suggest that simulation may be an effective instructional method for assessing conceptual development and diagnosing alternative conceptions in undergraduates enrolled in a cardiopulmonary science program. Use of simulation in conjunction with clinical interview and concept mapping may assist in verifying gaps in learning and conceptual knowledge. This study found only limited evidence to support the use of computer simulation prior to lecture to augment learning. However, it was demonstrated that students' prelecture experience with the computer simulation helped the instructor assess what the learner knew so he or she could be taught accordingly. In addition, use of computer

  1. Teaching Health in a Natural History Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Ian M.

    The opportunities offered by a natural history museum to enhance and expand classroom instruction in health are discussed. A basic constellation of typical natural history museum exhibit concepts and an array of health-related opportunities that are easily developed around these displays is outlined. The natural history concept provides an…

  2. Systems evaluation of thermal bus concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalmach, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal bus concepts, to provide a centralized thermal utility for large, multihundred kilowatt space platforms, were studied and the results are summarized. Concepts were generated, defined, and screened for inclusion in system level thermal bus trades. Parametric trade studies were conducted in order to define the operational envelope, performance, and physical characteristics of each. Two concepts were selected as offering the most promise for thermal bus development. All of four concepts involved two phase flow in order to meet the required isothermal nature of the thermal bus. Two of the concepts employ a mechanical means to circulate the working fluid, a liquid pump in one case and a vapor compressor in another. Another concept utilizes direct osmosis as the driving force of the thermal bus. The fourth concept was a high capacity monogroove heat pipe. After preliminary sizing and screening, three of these concepts were selected to carry into the trade studies. The monogroove heat pipe concept was deemed unsuitable for further consideration because of its heat transport limitations. One additional concept utilizing capillary forces to drive the working fluid was added. Parametric system level trade studies were performed. Sizing and weight calculations were performed for thermal bus sizes ranging from 5 to 350 kW and operating temperatures in the range of 4 to 120 C. System level considerations such as heat rejection and electrical power penalties and interface temperature losses were included in the weight calculations.

  3. Current Mined Geologic Disposal System concept of operations

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, R.B.; Teraoka, G.M.

    1998-07-01

    The concept of operations for the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) provides an integrated, conceptual description of the physical architecture and operating concept of the potential repository. The document facilitates a common understanding of the operations among system planners, developers and implementors by summarizing design solutions and operating concepts. During this past year, the MGDS Concept of Operations document was updated to reflect the Viability Assessment (VA) design and operating concept. Previously, this document reflected the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD). This paper presents a description of the significant operational changes from ACD to VA design that are now captured in the concept of operations document.

  4. Space Mission Operations Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squibb, Gael F.

    1996-01-01

    This paper will discuss the concept of developing a space mission operations concept; the benefits of starting this system engineering task early; the neccessary inputs to the process; and the products that are generated.

  5. Creative Concept Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David S.

    2002-01-01

    Recommends the use of concept mapping in science teaching and proposes that it be presented as a creative activity. Includes a sample lesson plan of a potato stamp concept mapping activity for astronomy. (DDR)

  6. Race concepts in medicine.

    PubMed

    Hardimon, Michael O

    2013-02-01

    Confusions about the place of race in medicine result in part from a failure to recognize the plurality of race concepts. Recognition that the ordinary concept of race is not identical to the racialist concept of race makes it possible to ask whether there might be a legitimate place for the deployment of concepts of race in medical contexts. Two technical race concepts are considered. The concept of social race is the concept of a social group that is taken to be a racialist race. It is apt for use in examining and addressing the medical effects of discrimination. The populationist concept of race represents race as a kind of biological population. It makes it possible to frame the question whether biological race is a factor in disease susceptibility and drug responsiveness. It is apt for use in determining whether biological race is a medically significant category. PMID:23300217

  7. Nature and Nationhood: Danish Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnack, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I shall discuss Danish perspectives on nature, showing the interdependence of conceptions of "nature" and "nationhood" in the formations of a particular cultural community. Nature, thus construed, is never innocent of culture and cannot therefore simply be "restored" to some pristine, pre-lapsarian state. On the other hand,…

  8. Anhedonia: A Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Nancy; Sommers, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Anhedonia presents itself in a myriad of disease processes. To further develop our understanding of anhedonia and effective ways to manage it, the concept requires clear boundaries. This paper critically examined the current scientific literature and conducted a concept analysis of anhedonia to provide a more accurate and lucid understanding the concept. As part of the concept analysis, this paper also provides model, borderline, related, and contrary examples of anhedonia. PMID:23706888

  9. Advanced propulsion concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    A variety of Advanced Propulsion Concepts (APC) is discussed. The focus is on those concepts that are sufficiently near-term that they could be developed for the Space Exploration Initiative. High-power (multi-megawatt) electric propulsion, solar sails, tethers, and extraterrestrial resource utilization concepts are discussed. A summary of these concepts and some general conclusions on their technology development needs are presented.

  10. MCCB warm adjustment testing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdei, Z.; Horgos, M.; Grib, A.; Preradović, D. M.; Rodic, V.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation in to operating of thermal protection device behavior from an MCCB (Molded Case Circuit Breaker). One of the main functions of the circuit breaker is to assure protection for the circuits where mounted in for possible overloads of the circuit. The tripping mechanism for the overload protection is based on a bimetal movement during a specific time frame. This movement needs to be controlled and as a solution to control this movement we choose the warm adjustment concept. This concept is meant to improve process capability control and final output. The warm adjustment device design will create a unique adjustment of the bimetal position for each individual breaker, determined when the testing current will flow thru a phase which needs to trip in a certain amount of time. This time is predetermined due to scientific calculation for all standard types of amperages and complies with the IEC 60497 standard requirements.

  11. Conceptions of Mathematics and Student Identity: Implications for Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Tracy S.

    2013-01-01

    Lecturers of first-year mathematics often have reason to believe that students enter university studies with naïve conceptions of mathematics and that more mature conceptions need to be developed in the classroom. Students' conceptions of the nature and role of mathematics in current and future studies as well as future career are…

  12. E-Concept Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    Not all demonstrations involve using exciting visual displays of one or a series of scientific principles. Demonstrations can be as simple as showing the interrelationship between scientific concepts or principles using concept maps. Concepts maps are tools that help people conceptualize and remember a conglomeration of facts making up complex…

  13. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  14. Applications of Concept Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Simone, Christina

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews three major uses of the concept-mapping strategies for postsecondary learning: the external representation of concept maps as an external scratch pad to represent major ideas and their organization, the mental construction of concept maps when students are seeking a time-efficient tool, and the electronic construction and…

  15. Concepts: a potboiler.

    PubMed

    Fodor, J

    1994-01-01

    An informal, but revisionist, discussion of the role that the concept of a concept plays in recent theories of the cognitive mind. It is argued that the practically universal assumption that concepts are (at least partially) individuated by their roles in inferences is probably mistaken. A revival of conceptual atomism appears to be the indicated alternative. PMID:8039378

  16. Bracken Basic Concept Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naglieri, Jack A.; Bardos, Achilles N.

    1990-01-01

    The Bracken Basic Concept Scale, for use with preschool and primary-aged children, determines a child's school readiness and knowledge of English-language verbal concepts. The instrument measures 258 basic concepts in such categories as comparisons, time, quantity, and letter identification. This paper describes test administration, scoring and…

  17. The Meritocratic Conception of Educational Equality: Ideal Theory Run Amuck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    The dominant conception of educational equality in the United States is meritocratic: an individual's chances of educational achievements should track only (natural) talent and effort, not social class or other morally irrelevant factors. The meritocratic conception must presuppose that natural talent and effort can be isolated from social…

  18. Investigating the Ocean-Climate System, Concept by Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decharon, A.; Karp-Boss, L.; Boss, E.; Graham, S.; Manahan, A.; Weller, H.

    2006-12-01

    In fall 2005, a new initiative was added to the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Network. COSEE-Ocean Systems (OS) is a collaborative effort among the University of Maine (UMaine), University of New Hampshire, and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences. Being thematic in nature, COSEE-OS has the flexibility to tackle topics that are important on the national scale, such as those highlighted in the recent "Ocean Literacy" campaign. COSEE-OS has the long-term goal of helping COSEE reach rural and inland audiences. We are creating and evaluating a series of interconnected tools and techniques to broaden understanding of oceans in the context of the earth and solar systems. This includes: - Building and training scientist-educator teams who work together to distinguish meaningful "key messages" and the K-12 audiences who would benefit most from exposure to these concepts; - Translating the concepts into innovative products, workshops, and courses that showcase oceans in the Earth-Sun system; - Working with NASA multimedia experts, developing immersive web-based interfaces that will be utilized by and / or customized for other COSEEs; and - Training in-service and pre-service teachers in using ocean phenomena as a vehicle to teach physical concepts using hands-on activities and inquiry based learning. Part of the COSEE-OS strategy is engaging teams with an educational tool called "concept mapping." Dr. Joseph Novak developed concept mapping in the 1960s as a technique for representing knowledge in graphical formats. Used as a group activity this allows COSEE-OS to gather vital information from scientists to construct multimedia products. Another benefit of this activity is helping scientists and educators test the utility of concept mapping for their instructional purposes. To complement the development of concept maps and associated multimedia, a UMaine COSEE-OS pilot workshop was held in July 2006. The workshop targeted middle- and high

  19. ASSOCIATIVE CONCEPT LEARNING IN ANIMALS

    PubMed Central

    Zentall, Thomas R.; Wasserman, Edward A.; Urcuioli, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Nonhuman animals show evidence for three types of concept learning: perceptual or similarity-based in which objects/stimuli are categorized based on physical similarity; relational in which one object/stimulus is categorized relative to another (e.g., same/different); and associative in which arbitrary stimuli become interchangeable with one another by virtue of a common association with another stimulus, outcome, or response. In this article, we focus on various methods for establishing associative concepts in nonhuman animals and evaluate data documenting the development of associative classes of stimuli. We also examine the nature of the common within-class representation of samples that have been associated with the same reinforced comparison response (i.e., many-to-one matching) by describing manipulations for distinguishing possible representations. Associative concepts provide one foundation for human language such that spoken and written words and the objects they represent become members of a class of interchangeable stimuli. The mechanisms of associative concept learning and the behavioral flexibility it allows, however, are also evident in the adaptive behaviors of animals lacking language. PMID:24170540

  20. Culturing conceptions: From first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Lee, Yew Jin; Hwang, Sungwon

    2008-07-01

    Over the past three decades, science educators have accumulated a vast amount of information on conceptions--variously defined as beliefs, ontologies, cognitive structures, mental models, or frameworks--that generally (at least initially) have been derived from interviews about certain topics. During the same time period, cultural studies has emerged as a field in which everyday social practices are interrogated with the objective to understand culture in all its complexity. Science educators have however yet to ask themselves what it would mean to consider the possession of conceptions as well as conceptual change from the perspective of cultural studies. The purpose of this article is thus to articulate in and through the analysis of an interview about natural phenomenon the first principles of such a cultural approach to scientific conceptions. Our bottom-up approach in fact leads us to develop the kind of analyses and theories that have become widespread in cultural studies. This promises to generate less presupposing and more parsimonious explanations of this core issue within science education than if conceptions are supposed to be structures inhabiting the human mind.

  1. Concept analysis of mentoring.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of a concept analysis is to examine the structure and function of a concept by defining its attributes and internal structure. Concept analysis can clarify an overused or vague concept and promote mutual understanding by providing a precise operational definition. Mentoring is a concept more fully used by other fields, such as business, than in nursing and may not always translate well for use in nursing. Therefore, clarifying the meaning of the existing concept of mentoring and developing an operational definition for use in nursing are aims of this concept analysis. Mentoring is broadly based and concentrates on developing areas such as career progression, scholarly achievements, and personal development. Mentoring relationships are based around developing reciprocity and accountability between each partner. Mentoring is seen related to transition in practice, role acquisition, and socialization, as a way to support new colleagues. Mentorship is related to nurses' success in nursing practice linked to professionalism, nursing quality improvement, and self-confidence. PMID:24042140

  2. Relational Conceptual Change in Solution Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebenezer, Jazlin V.; Gaskell, P. James

    1995-01-01

    Explores changes in students' conceptions about solution chemistry in the context of instruction based on collaboration between a researcher and an experienced teacher attempting to implement strategies from the literature on conceptual change. (ZWH)

  3. Hydrophobic Solvation: Aqueous Methane Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrod, Oliver; Lankau, Timm

    2007-01-01

    A basic introduction to concept of a solvation shell around an apolar solute as well as its detection is presented. The hydrophobic solvation of toluene is found to be a good teaching example which connects macroscopic, phenomenological thermodynamic results with an atomistic point of view.

  4. Construction concepts for precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Withnell, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    Three construction concepts for deployable precision segmented reflectors are presented. The designs produce reflectors with very high surface accuracies and diameters three to five times the width of the launch vehicle shroud. Of primary importance is the reliability of both the deployment process and the reflector operation. This paper is conceptual in nature, and uses these criteria to present beneficial design concepts for deployable precision segmented reflectors.

  5. Perspectives on culture and concepts.

    PubMed

    ojalehto, Bethany l; Medin, Douglas L

    2015-01-01

    The well-respected tradition of research on concepts uses cross-cultural comparisons to explore which aspects of conceptual behavior are universal versus culturally variable. This work continues, but it is being supplemented by intensified efforts to study how conceptual systems and cultural systems interact to modify and support each other. For example, cultural studies within the framework of domain specificity (e.g., folkphysics, folkpsychology, folkbiology) are beginning to query the domains themselves and offer alternative organizing principles (e.g., folksociology, folkecology). Findings highlight the multifaceted nature of both concepts and culture: Individuals adopt distinct conceptual construals in accordance with culturally infused systems such as language and discourse, knowledge and beliefs, and epistemological orientations. This picture complicates questions about cognitive universality or variability, suggesting that researchers may productively adopt a systems-level approach to conceptual organization and cultural epistemologies. Related implications for diversity in cognitive science are discussed. PMID:25251487

  6. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  7. Dual character concepts and the normative dimension of conceptual representation.

    PubMed

    Knobe, Joshua; Prasada, Sandeep; Newman, George E

    2013-05-01

    Five experiments provide evidence for a class of 'dual character concepts.' Dual character concepts characterize their members in terms of both (a) a set of concrete features and (b) the abstract values that these features serve to realize. As such, these concepts provide two bases for evaluating category members and two different criteria for category membership. Experiment 1 provides support for the notion that dual character concepts have two bases for evaluation. Experiments 2-4 explore the claim that dual character concepts have two different criteria for category membership. The results show that when an object possesses the appropriate concrete features, but does not fulfill the appropriate abstract value, it is judged to be a category member in one sense but not in another. Finally, Experiment 5 uses the theory developed here to construct artificial dual character concepts and examines whether participants react to these artificial concepts in the same way as naturally occurring dual character concepts. The present studies serve to define the nature of dual character concepts and distinguish them from other types of concepts (e.g., natural kind concepts), which share some, but not all of the properties of dual character concepts. More broadly, these phenomena suggest a normative dimension in everyday conceptual representation. PMID:23454798

  8. Promoting Conceptual Understanding via Adaptive Concept Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of a scalable concept map based navigation system for a digital textbook. A literature review has been conducted to identify possible methods to promote conceptual understanding in the context of a digital textbook, and these hypothesized solutions will be evaluated through…

  9. Specialization: A Detriment to Problem Conception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siller, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gearold R.

    2010-01-01

    Specialization is an agent of separation, both between competing specialists and between technology and society. Specialization is not an agent of integration. In the problem conception phase of the engineering design process, the emphasis must be on formulating and developing the questions that will frame the ultimate design solution. Using…

  10. Reinventing Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geraedts, Caspar L.; Boersma, Kerst Th.

    2006-01-01

    Although many research studies report students' Lamarckian misconceptions, only a few studies present learning and teaching strategies that focus on the successful development of the concept of natural selection. The learning and teaching strategy for upper secondary students (aged 15-16) presented in this study conducted in The Netherlands is…

  11. Feasibility for application of soil bioengineering techniques to natural wastewater treatment systems. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report examines the general feasibility for application of Soil Bioengineering techniques in construction, operation, and management of natural wastewater treatment systems. Soil Bioengineering is an applied science that combines structural, biological, and ecological concepts to construct living structures for erosion, sediment, and flood control (Sotir and Gray, 1989). Using live plant parts as major structural components to reinforce the soil mantle, Soil Bioengineering offers natural and effective solutions to land instability problems along streams and rivers, transportation and utilities transmission corridors, and in forest and wetlands sites. Natural treatment systems are wastewater treatment processes which use the soil-water-plant matrix as a 'natural reactor' for physically, chemically, and biologically stabilizing applied wastes. Recognized natural treatment systems currently include constructed and natural wetlands, aquatic plant systems(aquaculture), wastewater stabilization ponds, and land application of wastes, termed 'land treatment'.

  12. Polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Gerhard Erich; Miller, Kevin Michael

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method of making a polymer solution comprising polymerizing one or more monomer in a solvent, wherein said monomer comprises one or more ethylenically unsaturated monomer that is a multi-functional Michael donor, and wherein said solvent comprises 40% or more by weight, based on the weight of said solvent, one or more multi-functional Michael donor.

  13. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  14. Developmental psychopathology: concepts and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rutter, M; Sroufe, L A

    2000-01-01

    The defining features of developmental psychopathology concepts include attention to the understanding of causal processes, appreciation of the role of developmental mechanisms, and consideration of continuities and discontinuities between normality and psychopathology. Accomplishments with respect to these issues are reviewed in relation to attachment disorders, antisocial behavior, autism, depressive disorder, schizophrenia, and intellectual development. Major research challenges remain in relation to measurement issues, comorbidity, gender differences, cognitive processing, nature-nurture interplay, heterotypic continuity, continuities between normal variations and disorders, developmental programming, and therapeutic mechanisms in effective treatments. PMID:11014739

  15. A system model to integrate the “Green Manufacturing” concept in Romanian manufacturing organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilină, D. I.; Zapciu, M.; Mohora, C.

    2015-11-01

    In Romania, the large majorities of the manufacturing companies consume natural resources and energy in an unsustainable manner. Over the years, the emissions of greenhouse gases have led not only to many environmental problems but also to important social and economic problems. A real solution to help the Romanian manufacturing companies to adapt to the new legislative requirements is the green manufacturing implementation. Considering the current situation, the purpose of this paper is to present a model that will integrate the green manufacturing concept at the organizational level based on the practices identified in the Romanian manufacturing companies at the operational level in the context of sustainable development.

  16. Evolving Ethical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Van Rensselaer

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the role of the scientist in changing ethical concepts from simple interpersonal and theological imperatives towards "survival imperatives that must form the core of environmental bioethics." (CS)

  17. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness: a fitter fitness concept

    PubMed Central

    Costa, James T.

    2013-01-01

    In 1963–1964 W. D. Hamilton introduced the concept of inclusive fitness, the only significant elaboration of Darwinian fitness since the nineteenth century. I discuss the origin of the modern fitness concept, providing context for Hamilton's discovery of inclusive fitness in relation to the puzzle of altruism. While fitness conceptually originates with Darwin, the term itself stems from Spencer and crystallized quantitatively in the early twentieth century. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness, with Price's reformulation, provided the solution to Darwin's ‘special difficulty’—the evolution of caste polymorphism and sterility in social insects. Hamilton further explored the roles of inclusive fitness and reciprocation to tackle Darwin's other difficulty, the evolution of human altruism. The heuristically powerful inclusive fitness concept ramified over the past 50 years: the number and diversity of ‘offspring ideas’ that it has engendered render it a fitter fitness concept, one that Darwin would have appreciated. PMID:24132089

  18. Integrated Global Nuclear Materials Management Preliminary Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E; Dreicer, M

    2006-06-19

    The world is at a turning point, moving away from the Cold War nuclear legacy towards a future global nuclear enterprise; and this presents a transformational challenge for nuclear materials management. Achieving safety and security during this transition is complicated by the diversified spectrum of threat 'players' that has greatly impacted nonproliferation, counterterrorism, and homeland security requirements. Rogue states and non-state actors no longer need self-contained national nuclear expertise, materials, and equipment due to availability from various sources in the nuclear market, thereby reducing the time, effort and cost for acquiring a nuclear weapon (i.e., manifestations of latency). The terrorist threat has changed the nature of military and national security requirements to protect these materials. An Integrated Global Nuclear Materials Management (IGNMM) approach would address the existing legacy nuclear materials and the evolution towards a nuclear energy future, while strengthening a regime to prevent nuclear weapon proliferation. In this paper, some preliminary concepts and studies of IGNMM will be presented. A systematic analysis of nuclear materials, activities, and controls can lead to a tractable, integrated global nuclear materials management architecture that can help remediate the past and manage the future. A systems approach is best suited to achieve multi-dimensional and interdependent solutions, including comprehensive, end-to-end capabilities; coordinated diverse elements for enhanced functionality with economy; and translation of goals/objectives or standards into locally optimized solutions. A risk-informed basis is excellent for evaluating system alternatives and performances, and it is especially appropriate for the security arena. Risk management strategies--such as defense-in-depth, diversity, and control quality--help to weave together various technologies and practices into a strong and robust security fabric. Effective

  19. Compatible solutes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Recently we reported a role for compatible solute uptake in mediating bile tolerance and increased gastrointestinal persistence in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.1 Herein, we review the evolution in our understanding of how these low molecular weight molecules contribute to growth and survival of the pathogen both inside and outside the body, and how this stress survival mechanism may ultimately be used to target and kill the pathogen. PMID:21326913

  20. Illustrating Chemical Concepts through Food Systems: Introductory Chemistry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, E., IV; Setser, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Demonstrations involving foods that illustrate chemical concepts are described, including vaporization of liquids and Graham's law of diffusion, chemical reaction rates, adsorption, properties of solutions, colloidal dispersions, suspensions, and hydrogen ion concentration. (CS)

  1. Advanced Airspace Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    A general overview of the Advanced Airspace Concept (AAC) is presented. The topics include: 1) Limitations of the existing system; 2) The Advanced Airspace Concept; 3) Candidate architecture for the AAC; 4) Separation assurance and conflict avoidance system (TSAFE); and 5) Ground-Air Interactions. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  2. Learning Our Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laverty, Megan J.

    2009-01-01

    Richard Stanley Peters appreciates the centrality of concepts for everyday life, however, he fails to recognize their pedagogical dimension. He distinguishes concepts employed at the first-order (our ordinary language-use) from second-order conceptual clarification (conducted exclusively by academically trained philosophers). This distinction…

  3. Children's Conceptions of Jesus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aylward, Karen; Freathy, Rob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a recent study investigating young children's (aged 10-11) conceptions of Jesus in England. The overall picture revealed by the study is that whilst there was a general assent amongst pupils in our sample towards an ethical and humanistic conception of the historical Jesus, there was less of a consensus about…

  4. Badminton--Teaching Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Marilyn J.

    1988-01-01

    Teaching four basic badminton concepts along with the usual basic skill shots allows players to develop game strategy awareness as well as mechanical skills. These four basic concepts are: (1) ready position, (2) flight trajectory, (3) early shuttle contact, and (4) camouflage. (IAH)

  5. Data Transmission Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christenson, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Introduces some basic concepts related to the transmission of data from a computer to its peripherals to help distance educators make decisions regarding computer equipment purchases for their institutions. The following data transmission concepts are described: cables, serial and parallel, synchronous and asynchronous, bandwidth, and analog and…

  6. VOCABULARY AND CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANGER, JOHN H.

    THE PROCESSES OF THOUGHT, OF CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT, AND OF VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT ARE SIGNIFICANTLY INTERRELATED. COMMUNICATION OF IDEAS DEPENDS UPON THE ABILITY TO ASSOCIATE WRITTEN AND VERBAL SYMBOLS WITH THE REFERENTS THROUGH A SYSTEMATIC PROCESS OF REORGANIZING AND INTEGRATING OLD AND NEW CONCEPTS. THE ABILITY TO ASSOCIATE, IN TURN, DEPENDS UPON…

  7. The Concept of Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borsboom, Denny; Mellenbergh, Gideon J.; van Heerden, Jaap

    2004-01-01

    This article advances a simple conception of test validity: A test is valid for measuring an attribute if (a) the attribute exists and (b) variations in the attribute causally produce variation in the measurement outcomes. This conception is shown to diverge from current validity theory in several respects. In particular, the emphasis in the…

  8. Threshold Concepts in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine threshold concepts in the context of teaching and learning first-year university economics. It outlines some of the arguments for using threshold concepts and provides examples using opportunity cost as an exemplar in economics. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper provides an overview of the…

  9. Values Concepts and Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    This book contains 29 articles for elementary and secondary teachers dealing with fundamental concepts and teaching techniques in values education. Part one of the book deals with concepts. Louis E. Raths examines valuing and its relationship to freedom and intelligence. The cognitive developmental approach to moral education is discussed by…

  10. Transition: Terms and Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Ed

    This paper provides explanations and case examples of some terms and concepts related to transition of students with disabilities under 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Explanations and examples focus on the concepts of "statement of transition service needs" and "statement of needed transition services". The…

  11. Integral Fast Reactor concept

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative LMR concept, being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, that fully exploits the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel to achieve breakthroughs in economics and inherent safety. This paper describes key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, technology development status, fuel cycle economics potential, and future development path.

  12. Tools and Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artis, Margaret, Ed.; And Others

    This guide provides enrichment for students to develop tools and concepts used in various areas of mathematics. The first part presents arithmetic progressions, geometric progressions, and harmonic progression. In the second section, the concept of mathematic induction is developed from intuitive induction, using concrete activities, to the…

  13. The Self Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgibbon, Ann

    The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of the self concept as a variable, to indicate what is known about the self concept from existing research, to discuss its importance to the school and its effect on learning, and to offer a method of assessment which is tied to a definition arbitrarily made as a starting point for researchers. A…

  14. Changing Concepts in Forensics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarefsky, David

    This paper discusses five theoretical concepts in general and two theoretical models in particular that are involved in forensics. The five concepts are: (1) causation, an inquiry into the reasons for ongoing processes or problems; (2) inherency, the division of a universe into its necessary features and its accidental features; (3) presumption, a…

  15. Solving Solutions: Exploring Unknowns through Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, John; Yoshina, Granville; Goodding, Debbie; Streitberger, Eric

    2000-01-01

    Presents a chemistry activity that introduces students to one type of chemical bond by developing the integer operation concept of zero pairs. Leads to an activity of combining drops of 0.3 molar solutions to form six different colored precipitates from five solutions. (ASK)

  16. Developing Corrosion Prevention Coating Solutions for the Canadian SCWR Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao

    2016-02-01

    The development of coating materials and processes was carried out with the objective to reduce material degradation in supercritical water. Based on the test results of bulk coating alloys (FeCrAlY and NiCrAl), two coating processes, plasma spray of dense NiCrAlY and pack aluminizing, have been developed to apply coatings to candidate stainless steels and Ni-based alloys. The SCW test results and microstructure characterization of both coating alloys and coated candidate alloys are presented in this short paper.

  17. Employing Geodatabases for Planetary Mapping Conduct - Requirements, Concepts and Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanGasselt, Stephan; Nass, A.

    2010-01-01

    Planetary geologic mapping has become complex in terms of merging and co-registering a variety of different datasets for analysis and mapping. But it has also become more convenient when it comes to conducting actual (geoscientific) mapping with the help of desktop Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The complexity and variety of data, however, are major issues that need to be taken care of in order to provide mappers with a consistent and easy-to-use mapping basis. Furthermore, a high degree of functionality and interoperability of various commercial and open-source GIS and remote sensing applications allow mappers to organize map data, map components and attribute data in a more sophisticated and intuitional way when compared to workflows 15 years ago. Integration of mapping results of different groups becomes an awkward task as each mapper follows his/her own style, especially if mapping conduct is not coordinated and organized programmatically. Problems of data homogenization start with various interpretations and implementations of planetary map projections and reference systems which form the core component of any mapping and analysis work. If the data basis is inconsistent, mapping results in terms of objects georeference become hard to integrate. Apart from data organization and referencing issues, which are important on the mapping as well as the data-processing side of every project, the organization of planetary geologic map units and attributes, as well as their representation within a common GIS environment, are key components that need to be taken care of in a consistent and persistent way.

  18. Advanced Turbulence Modeling Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    2005-01-01

    The ZCET program developed at NASA Glenn Research Center is to study hydrogen/air injection concepts for aircraft gas turbine engines that meet conventional gas turbine performance levels and provide low levels of harmful NOx emissions. A CFD study for ZCET program has been successfully carried out. It uses the most recently enhanced National combustion code (NCC) to perform CFD simulations for two configurations of hydrogen fuel injectors (GRC- and Sandia-injector). The results can be used to assist experimental studies to provide quick mixing, low emission and high performance fuel injector designs. The work started with the configuration of the single-hole injector. The computational models were taken from the experimental designs. For example, the GRC single-hole injector consists of one air tube (0.78 inches long and 0.265 inches in diameter) and two hydrogen tubes (0.3 inches long and 0.0226 inches in diameter opposed at 180 degree). The hydrogen tubes are located 0.3 inches upstream from the exit of the air element (the inlet location for the combustor). To do the simulation, the single-hole injector is connected to a combustor model (8.16 inches long and 0.5 inches in diameter). The inlet conditions for air and hydrogen elements are defined according to actual experimental designs. Two crossing jets of hydrogen/air are simulated in detail in the injector. The cold flow, reacting flow, flame temperature, combustor pressure and possible flashback phenomena are studied. Two grid resolutions of the numerical model have been adopted. The first computational grid contains 0.52 million elements, the second one contains over 1.3 million elements. The CFD results have shown only about 5% difference between the two grid resolutions. Therefore, the CFD result obtained from the model of 1.3-million grid resolution can be considered as a grid independent numerical solution. Turbulence models built in NCC are consolidated and well tested. They can handle both coarse and

  19. Concentration Dependence of Solution Shear Viscosity and Solute Mass Diffusivity in Crystal Growth from Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izmailov, Alexander F.; Myerson, Allan S.

    1995-01-01

    The physical properties of a supersaturated binary solution such as its density rho, shear viscosity eta, and solute mass diffusivity D are dependent on the solute concentration c: rho = rho(c), eta = eta(c), and D = D(c). The diffusion boundary layer equations related to crystal growth from solution are derived for the case of natural convection with a solution density, a shear viscosity, and a solute diffusivity that are all depen- dent on solute concentration. The solution of these equations has demonstrated the following. (1) At the vicinity of the saturation concentration c(sub s) the solution shear viscosity eta depends on rho as eta(sub s) = eta(rho(sub s))varies as square root of rho(c(sub s)). This theoretically derived result has been verified in experiments with several aqueous solutions of inorganic and organic salts. (2) The maximum solute mass transfer towards the growing crystal surface can be achieved for values of c where the ratio of d ln(D(c)/dc) to d ln(eta(c)/dc) is a maximum.

  20. Natural Capital: Hard Economics, Soft Metaphor?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winnett, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    This paper views the concept of natural capital from an economist's perspective. It begins by drawing on historical debates in economics on the nature of capital. These serve to identify central issues to do with the relationship between theory, empirics and method in the way in which the concept of capital is deployed in economic discourse. It is…

  1. Conception of Learning Outcomes in the Bloom's Taxonomy Affective Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savickiene, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    The article raises a problematic issue regarding an insufficient base of the conception of learning outcomes in the Bloom's taxonomy affective domain. The search for solutions introduces the conception of teaching and learning in the affective domain as well as presents validity criteria of learning outcomes in the affective domain. The…

  2. A Label as a Hidden Persuader: Chemists' Neutralization Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    1991-01-01

    Identifies and describes the problems students have with the concept of neutralization. Analysis of over 7,500 students' answers to test questions over neutralization showed that many students understand the concept in its original meaning. Students assumed that in any neutralization reaction a neutral solution is formed, even if a weak acid or…

  3. Developments and Tendencies in Fission Reactor Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamov, E. O.; Fuji-Ie, Y.

    This chapter describes, in two parts, new-generation nuclear energy systems that are required to be in harmony with nature and to make full use of nuclear resources. The issues of transmutation and containment of radioactive waste will also be addressed. After a short introduction to the first part, Sect. 58.1.2 will detail the requirements these systems must satisfy on the basic premise of peaceful use of nuclear energy. The expected designs themselves are described in Sect. 58.1.3. The subsequent sections discuss various types of advanced reactor systems. Section 58.1.4 deals with the light water reactor (LWR) whose performance is still expected to improve, which would extend its application in the future. The supercritical-water-cooled reactor (SCWR) will also be shortly discussed. Section 58.1.5 is mainly on the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which offers efficient and multipurpose use of nuclear energy. The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) is also included. Section 58.1.6 focuses on the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) as a promising concept for advanced nuclear reactors, which may help both to achieve expansion of energy sources and environmental protection thus contributing to the sustainable development of mankind. The molten-salt reactor (MSR) is shortly described in Sect. 58.1.7. The second part of the chapter deals with reactor systems of a new generation, which are now found at the research and development (R&D) stage and in the medium term of 20-30 years can shape up as reliable, economically efficient, and environmentally friendly energy sources. They are viewed as technologies of cardinal importance, capable of resolving the problems of fuel resources, minimizing the quantities of generated radioactive waste and the environmental impacts, and strengthening the regime of nonproliferation of the materials suitable for nuclear weapons production. Particular attention has been given to naturally safe fast reactors with a closed fuel cycle (CFC

  4. Pioneering Concepts of Planetary Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin Cerceau, Florence

    Famous astronomers such as Richard A. Proctor (1837-1888), Jules Janssen (1824-1907), and Camille Flammarion (1842-1925) studied the concept of planetary habitability a century before this concept was updated in the context of the recent discoveries of exoplanets and the development of planetary exploration in the solar system. They independently studied the conditions required for other planets to be inhabited, and these considerations led them to specify the term "habitability." Naturally, the planet Mars was at the heart of the discussion. Our neighboring planet, regarded as a sister planet of Earth, looked like a remarkable abode for life. During the second part of the nineteenth century, the possibility of Martian intelligent life was intensively debated, and hopes were still ardent to identify a kind of vegetation specific to the red planet. In such a context, the question of Mars' habitability seemed to be very valuable, especially when studying hypothetical Martian vegetation. At the dawn of the Space Age, German-born physician and pioneer of space medicine Hubertus Strughold (1898-1987) proposed in the book The Green and Red Planet: A Physiological Study of the Possibility of Life on Mars (1954) to examine the planets of the solar system through a "planetary ecology." This innovative notion, which led to a fresh view of the concept of habitability, was supposed to designate a new field involving biology: "the science of planets as an environment for life" (Strughold 1954). This notion was very close to the concept of habitability earlier designated by our nineteenth-century pioneers. Strughold also coined the term "ecosphere" to name the region surrounding a star where conditions allowed life-bearing planets to exist. We highlight in this chapter the historical aspects of the emergence of the (modern) concept of habitability. We will consider the different formulations proposed by the pioneers, and we will see in what way it can be similar to our

  5. How Do Korsakoff Patients Learn New Concepts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitel, Anne Lise; Beaunieux, Helene; Guillery-Girard, Berengere; Witkowski, Thomas; de la Sayette, Vincent; Viader, Fausto; Desgranges, Beatrice; Eustache, Francis

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present investigation was to assess semantic learning in Korsakoff patients (KS), compared with uncomplicated alcoholics (AL) and control subjects (CS), taking the nature of the information to-be-learned and the episodic memory profiles of the three groups into account. Ten new complex concepts, each illustrated by a photo and…

  6. Aristotle's Conception of Childhood and the Poliscraft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Examines Aristotle's conception of childhood in relation to the creation of the ideal community. According to Aristotle, children are incompletely developed, so the goal of education should be to help children outgrow their original, animal-like natures so that they will find happiness as adults in rational behavior. (AM)

  7. Forces and Particles: Concepts Again in Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, George

    1973-01-01

    Traces the historical developments in physics leading to the present conflict of fundamental beliefs about the nature of the physical world. It has been recently proposed that the concept of fundamental particles (corpuscularianism) be replaced with a full-blown field dynamical theory. (JR)

  8. THE CHILD'S CONCEPTION OF PHYSICAL CAUSALITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PIAGET, JEAN

    THE CHILD'S CONCEPTION OF PHYSICAL CAUSALITY WAS INVESTIGATED. THREE METHODS OF INVESTIGATION WERE USED. THE FIRST METHOD WAS PURELY VERBAL, AND CONSISTED OF A SERIES OF QUESTIONS DIRECTED TO CHILDREN, REGARDING SOME NATURAL PHENOMENON. THE SECOND METHOD INVOLVED A HALF-VERBAL, HALF-PRACTICAL APPROACH, WHEREIN A SPECIFIC REFERENCE TO NATURAL…

  9. Reconceptualizing the "Nature" of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Affrica

    2011-01-01

    This interdisciplinary article draws upon human geography to bring fresh new perspectives to the relationship between two commonly conflated concepts: "childhood" and "nature". Childhood studies scholars have gone a long way towards retheorizing childhood beyond the "natural" and the "universal" by pointing to its historical and cultural…

  10. Feminism: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Allan, H T

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the concept of feminism in order to clarify a sociological concept for its use in nursing theory and practice. This analysis is carried out using the Walker & Avant (1988) model. It includes: a literature review, an overview of the uses of the concept drawn from the literature, the defining attributes and the justification of their choice, the cases to demonstrate the concept, and the concept criteria. The concept was chosen out of an interest in developing a feminist nursing theory and desire to enhance nursing practice. The literature search proved most fruitful in the sociological literature. The nursing sources were fewer and concerned with practice rather than articulating any feminist nursing theory. Many of these sources were sociologists and nurses. The concept of feminism was defined as the concern with gender equality and the promotion of equal rights for men and woman, the expression of these concerns through theory or action, and the valuing of individuals for their contributions to society rather than their biological or sexual characteristics or roles. Although the concept of feminism was defined and analysed within the model suggested by Walker & Avant, the author found that the concept became oversimplified, losing much of the richness of the literature. The author felt that, for any development of theory or practice, this analysis would have to be expanded. It is argued that their model is too restrictive as it is based on positivist philosophy which seeks to establish divisions where, in fact, there is a blurring of meaning.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8263244

  11. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  12. Learning, Creating, and Using Knowledge: Concept Maps as Facilitative Tools in Schools and Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Joseph Donald

    As illustrated by a concept map in chapter 1, this book discusses three concepts: (1) the nature of knowledge, its capture, creation, and use; (2) the nature of human learning; and (3) a theory of education tying together the first two concepts. Chapter 2 discusses the need for a theory of education to resolve numerous questions, issues, and…

  13. Reality in quantum mechanics, Extended Everett Concept, and consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensky, M. B.

    2007-09-01

    Conceptual problems in quantum mechanics result from the specific quantum concept of reality and require, for their solution, including the observer’s consciousness into the quantum theory of measurements. Most naturally, this is achieved in the framework of Everett’s “many-world interpretation” of quantum mechanics. According to this interpretation, various classical alternatives are perceived by consciousness separately from each other. In the Extended Everett Concept (EEC) proposed by the present author, the separation of the alternatives is identified with the phenomenon of consciousness. This explains the classical character of the alternatives and unusual manifestations of consciousness arising “at the edge of consciousness” (i.e., in sleep or trance) when its access to “other alternative classical realities” (other Everett’s worlds) becomes feasible. Because of reversibility of quantum evolution in EEC, all time moments in the quantum world are equivalent, while the impression of flow of time appears only in consciousness. If it is assumed that consciousness may influence the probabilities of alternatives (which is consistent in case of infinitely many Everett’s worlds), EEC explains free will, “probabilistic miracles” (observing low-probability events), and decreasing entropy in the sphere of life.

  14. What a Concept! Using Concept Mapping on Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royer, Regina; Royer, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    When designed properly, concept mapping activities can engage students in meaningful learning. In the process of creating concept maps, students relate new information to more general concepts already held, develop fuller understandings of those general concepts, and recognize new relationships between concepts. Students engage in these activities…

  15. Common tester platform concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, Michael James

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a case study on the doctrine of a common tester platform, a concept of a standardized platform that can be applicable across the broad spectrum of testing requirements throughout the various stages of a weapons program, as well as across the various weapons programs. The common tester concept strives to define an affordable, next-generation design that will meet testing requirements with the flexibility to grow and expand; supporting the initial development stages of a weapons program through to the final production and surveillance stages. This report discusses a concept investing key leveraging technologies and operational concepts combined with prototype tester-development experiences and practical lessons learned gleaned from past weapons programs.

  16. The concept of poverty.

    PubMed

    Carney, P

    1992-06-01

    Although poverty is one of the most familiar and enduring conditions known to humanity, it is an extremely complicated concept to understand. Some researchers view it as a reaction to the stress of being poor, whereas others perceive it as a process of adapting to the condition of poverty. Historical definitions are numerous, but can be classified as relating to either lack of financial income or lower social status. Numerous factors contribute to the concept of poverty, including political, economic, social, and cultural forces. The one that has consistently had the greatest effect on the evolving concept is the passage of time, which encompasses all these forces in a very intricate manner. This author explored the evolution of the concept of poverty to identify relevant themes for consideration in the public health nursing domain. PMID:1508832

  17. Blazars: Artist Conception

    NASA Video Gallery

    What astronomers once thought were two blazar families may in fact be one, as shown in this artist's concept. Energy stored in the black hole during its salad days of intense accretion may later be...

  18. Space Station - early concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Display model of space station concept--Manned Orbiting Research Laboratory in Saturn S-IVB Orbit configuration. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995).

  19. Space Station - early concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Wind tunnel model of Manned Orbiting Research Laboratory concept on sting. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995).

  20. Decoding Astronomical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durisen, Richard H.; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2004-01-01

    Two astronomy professors, using the Decoding the Disciplines process, help their students use abstract theories to analyze light and to visualize the enormous scale of astronomical concepts. (Contains 5 figures.)