Science.gov

Sample records for natural units

  1. Natural Units: Are They for Everybody?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the natural system of units as being more convenient, coherent, and conducive to communication between scientist and layman. Suggests a general discussion of whether the coming universal system should be the International System of Units. (CC)

  2. Natural aggregates of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.

    1988-01-01

    Crushed stone and sand and gravel are the two main sources of natural aggregates. These materials are commonly used construction materials and frequently can be interchanged with one another. They are widely used throughout the United States, with every State except two producing crushed stone. Together they amount to about half the mining volume in the United States. Approximately 96 percent of sand and gravel and 77 percent of the crushed stone produced in the United States are used in the construction industry. Natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States in a variety of geologic environments. Sand and gravel deposits commonly are the results of the weathering of bedrock and subsequent transportation and deposition of the material by water or ice (glaciers). As such, they commonly occur as river or stream deposits or in glaciated areas as glaciofluvial and other deposits. Crushed stone aggregates are derived from a wide variety of parent bedrock materials. Limestone and other carbonates account for approximately three quarters of the rocks used for crushed stone, with granite and other igneous rocks making up the bulk of the remainder. Limestone deposits are widespread throughout the Central and Eastern United States and are scattered in the West. Granites are widely distributed in the Eastern and Western United States, with few exposures in the Midwest. Igneous rocks (excluding granites) are largely concentrated in the Western United States and in a few isolated localities in the East. Even though natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States, they are not universally available for consumptive use. Some areas are devoid of sand and gravel, and potential sources of crushed stone may be covered with sufficient unconsolidated material to make surface mining impractical. In some areas many aggregates do not meet the physical property requirements for certain uses, or they may contain mineral constituents that react

  3. The physical basis of natural units and truly fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, L.; Hsu, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    The natural unit system, in which the value of fundamental constants such as c and ℏ are set equal to one and all quantities are expressed in terms of a single unit, is usually introduced as a calculational convenience. However, we demonstrate that this system of natural units has a physical justification as well. We discuss and review the natural units, including definitions for each of the seven base units in the International System of Units (SI) in terms of a single unit. We also review the fundamental constants, which can be classified as units-dependent or units-independent. Units-independent constants, whose values are not determined by human conventions of units, may be interpreted as inherent constants of nature.

  4. Natural Resources. Environmental Education Instructional Unit. Final Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Science Education.

    This unit on natural resources is one in a series of three prepared for use in the classroom. An interdisciplinary approach encompassing mathematics, science, and social studies is utilized in these environmental units. This material is designed for middle grades and above. Many of the activities are open-ended with each activity in this unit…

  5. ANTHROPOGENIC AND NATURAL FOREST FRAGMENTATION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set is a grid map of the conterminous United States, created from National Land Cover Data (NLCD). The NLCD data was reclassified into four categories: forest, other natural (e.g. grassland, wetland, etc.), human land use (e.g. agriculture, urban, etc.), and nodata (wa...

  6. Natural Hazard Assessment and Communication in the Central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Lynch, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    In the central United States, natural hazards, such as floods, tornados, ice storms, droughts, and earthquakes, result in significant damages and losses of life every year. For example, the February 5-6, 2008 tornado touched down in nine states (Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee), killing 57, injuring 350, and causing more than 1.0 billion in damages. The January 2009 ice storm struck Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Tennessee, and West Virginia, killing 36 and causing more than 1.0 billion in damages. It is a great challenge for the society to develop an effective policy for mitigating these natural hazards in the central United States. However, the development of an effective policy starts with a good assessment of the natural hazards. Scientists play a key role in assessing the natural hazards. Therefore, scientists play an important role in the development of an effective policy for the natural hazard mitigation. It is critical for scientists to clearly define, quantify, and communicate the hazard assessments, including the associated uncertainties which are a key factor in policy decision making, to end-users. Otherwise, end-users will have difficulty understanding and using the information provided. For example, ground motion hazard maps with 2, 5, and 10 percent probabilities of exceedance (PE) in 50 years in the central United States have been produced for seismic hazard mitigation purpose. End-users have difficulty understanding and using the maps, however, which has led to either indecision or ineffective policy for seismic hazard mitigation in many communities in the central United States.

  7. Planck’s constant as a natural unit of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quincey, Paul

    2013-09-01

    The proposed revision of SI units would embed Planck’s constant into the definition of the kilogram, as a fixed constant of nature. Traditionally, Planck’s constant is not readily interpreted as the size of something physical, and it is generally only encountered by students in the mathematics of quantum physics. Richard Feynman’s path integral formulation of quantum mechanics allows a neat visualization of the constant as the circumference of a surveyor’s wheel for measuring action along each path, making Planck’s constant a natural yardstick, almost literally. This approach is shown to have other benefits in the presentation of other basic quantum phenomena.

  8. Phenology research for natural resource management in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enquist, Carolyn A. F.; Kellermann, Jherime L.; Gerst, Katharine L.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.

    2014-05-01

    Natural resource professionals in the United States recognize that climate-induced changes in phenology can substantially affect resource management. This is reflected in national climate change response plans recently released by major resource agencies. However, managers on-the-ground are often unclear about how to use phenological information to inform their management practices. Until recently, this was at least partially due to the lack of broad-based, standardized phenology data collection across taxa and geographic regions. Such efforts are now underway, albeit in very early stages. Nonetheless, a major hurdle still exists: phenology-linked climate change research has focused more on describing broad ecological changes rather than making direct connections to local to regional management concerns. To help researchers better design relevant research for use in conservation and management decision-making processes, we describe phenology-related research topics that facilitate "actionable" science. Examples include research on evolution and phenotypic plasticity related to vulnerability, the demographic consequences of trophic mismatch, the role of invasive species, and building robust ecological forecast models. Such efforts will increase phenology literacy among on-the-ground resource managers and provide information relevant for short- and long-term decision-making, particularly as related to climate response planning and implementing climate-informed monitoring in the context of adaptive management. In sum, we argue that phenological information is a crucial component of the resource management toolbox that facilitates identification and evaluation of strategies that will reduce the vulnerability of natural systems to climate change. Management-savvy researchers can play an important role in reaching this goal.

  9. Natural Systems: MINNEMAST Coordinated Mathematics - Science Series, Unit 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakke, Jeannette; And Others

    This volume is the last in a series of 29 coordinated MINNEMAST units in mathematics and science for kindergarten and the primary grades. Intended for use by third-grade teachers, this unit guide provides a summary and overview of the unit, a list of materials needed, and descriptions of three groups of lessons. The purposes and procedures for…

  10. Unit 1001: The Nature of Meaning in Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Curriculum Development in English.

    This 10th-grade unit in Minnesota's "language-centered" curriculum introduces the complexity of linguistic meaning by demonstrating the relationships among linguistic symbols, their referents, their interpreters, and the social milieu. The unit begins with a discussion of Ray Bradbury's "The Kilimanjaro Machine," which illustrates how an otherwise…

  11. Unit-cell dimensions of natural and synthetic scapolites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eugster, H.P.; Prostka, H.J.; Appleman, D.E.

    1962-01-01

    In natural scapolites the cell dimension a shows a regular increase from marialite to meionite composition, while c remains constant. Both a and c of synthetic meionite are larger than the corresponding dimensions of synthetic marialite. The cell volume of both natural and synthetic scapolites is a nearly linear function of composition. Variations in cell dimensions of scapolites may be caused by differences in structural state similar to those in plagioclase feldspars.

  12. Changing prospects for natural gas in the United States.

    PubMed

    Burnet, W M; D Ban, T S

    1989-04-21

    Natural gas has emerged as one of the primary options for satisfying the need for environmentally clean energy: the resource base is large, it is the cleanest burning of the fossil fuels, and it can be used efficiently. New engine, combustion, and energy conversion technologies are emerging that will result in use of natural gas in electric generation, emissions reduction, transportation, and residential and commercial cooling. PMID:17738301

  13. The changing nature of flooding across the central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallakpour, Iman; Villarini, Gabriele

    2015-03-01

    In the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, flooding has taken a devastating societal and economic toll on the central United States, contributing to dozens of fatalities and causing billions of dollars in damage. As a warmer atmosphere can hold more moisture (the Clausius-Clapeyron relation), a pronounced increase in intense rainfall events is included in models of future climate. Therefore, it is crucial to examine whether the magnitude and/or frequency of flood events is remaining constant or has been changing over recent decades. If either or both of these attributes have changed over time, it is imperative that we understand the underlying mechanisms that are responsible. Here, we show that while observational records (774 stream gauge stations) from the central United States present limited evidence of significant changes in the magnitude of floodpeaks, strong evidence points to an increasing frequency of flooding. These changes in flood hydrology result from changes in both seasonal rainfall and temperature across this region.

  14. Industrial Research of Condensing Unit for Natural Gas Boiler House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemele, Jelena; Blumberga, Dagnija; Talcis, Normunds; Laicane, Ilze

    2012-12-01

    In the course of work industrial research was carried out at the boiler plant A/S "Imanta" where a 10MW passive condensing economizer working on natural gas was installed after the 116MW water boiler. The work describes the design of the condensing economizer and wiring diagram. During the industrial experiment, the following measurements were made: the temperature of water before and after the economizer; the ambient temperature; the quantity of water passing through the economizer; heat, produced by the economizer and water boilers. The work summarizes the data from 2010-2011.

  15. Myriad and its implications for patent protection of isolated natural products in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alice Yuen-Ting; Chan, Albert Wai-Kit

    2014-01-01

    Extracts and compounds of natural products have potential as alternatives to current Western medicines. However, these products may not be patentable under the statutory requirements because of their naturally-occurring nature. This article analyzes the current patenting practices for natural products in the United States, particularly in light of the recent Supreme Court ruling in Myriad, and suggests an advantageous strategy for patenting these products. Briefly, isolated natural products per se are not patentable in the United States. Therefore, patenting focus should be placed on the modification, formulation, manufacture, and application of natural products. A detailed description of each invention is highly recommended for stronger support and broader coverage of the claims. PMID:25006347

  16. Surface and Column Aerosol Impacts of the United States' Natural Gas Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burney, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper quantifies the air pollution and climate impacts of the natural gas transition over the past decade in the United States. We integrate satellite and ground measurements with chemical transport modeling to understand the impact of of the large-scale shift from coal to natural gas on the quantity and chemical composition of column aerosol and surface particulate matter. We leverage the natural experiment of individual units that changed technologies (a sharp discontinuity) as well as state-level changes from old plants being taken offline and new ones being brought online (a soft discontinuity) and connect technology changes to emissions changes to detected aerosol / particulate matter changes. We use this methodology to estimate the size of the 'sulfate' mask due to coal consumption in the United States and understand more fully the climate implications of energy technology changes.

  17. 40 CFR 60.5405 - What standards apply to sweetening units at onshore natural gas processing plants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... units at onshore natural gas processing plants? 60.5405 Section 60.5405 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5405 What standards apply to sweetening units at onshore natural gas processing plants? (a)...

  18. 40 CFR 60.5405 - What standards apply to sweetening units at onshore natural gas processing plants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... units at onshore natural gas processing plants? 60.5405 Section 60.5405 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5405 What standards apply to sweetening units at onshore natural gas processing plants? (a)...

  19. Planck's Constant as a Natural Unit of Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quincey, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The proposed revision of SI units would embed Planck's constant into the definition of the kilogram, as a fixed constant of nature. Traditionally, Planck's constant is not readily interpreted as the size of something physical, and it is generally only encountered by students in the mathematics of quantum physics. Richard Feynman's…

  20. Natural Environments, Obesity, and Physical Activity in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michimi, Akihiko; Wimberly, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the associations of the natural environment with obesity and physical activity in nonmetropolitan areas of the United States among representative samples by using 2 indices of outdoor activity potential (OAP) at the county level. Methods: We used the data from 457,820 and 473,296 noninstitutionalized adults aged over 18 years…

  1. Modeling the acoustical and airflow performance of natural ventilation inlet and outlet units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, David J.; Kang, Jian; Brocklesby, Martin

    2005-04-01

    One aspect of the trend towards designing green buildings has been the increasing use of natural ventilation for buildings which otherwise might have required mechanical ventilation or even full air conditioning. However, the pressure differentials available to drive the natural ventilation process are small and hence relatively large inlets and outlets with low resistance to flow are required. These apertures constitute significant acoustic weak points on building facades and hence need to be treated to reduce noise ingress. Although there are a number of natural ventilation units available they have frequently been designed from the application of simple principles without any attempt to optimise both their airflow and acoustical performance. In this paper the results of a series of computer modeling exercises are described using acoustic FEM and BEM plus Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) which seeks to establish recommendations for the optimum design of natural ventilation inlet and outlet devices for both acoustical and airflow performance.

  2. Development of a digital control unit to displace diesel fuel with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Talbott, A.D. |

    1997-03-01

    Full Circle Engineering (FCE), supported by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), proposed a Small Business CRADA with Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies/Kansas City (FM&T/KC) for the development of a fumigation digital control unit (DCU) that would allow the displacement of diesel fuel with natural gas. Nationwide, diesel trucks and buses consumed over 21 billion gallons of fuel in 1992. The development of systems that allow the use of alternative fuels, natural gas in particular, for transportation would significantly reduce emissions and pollutants. It would also help implement DOE`s mandate for energy security (use of domestic fuels) required by the Energy Policy Act (EPACT).

  3. National Petroleum Council Source and Supply Study - the potential for natural gas in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, D.L. ); Brown, R.L. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes the contribution of the Source and Supply Task Group to the recent (December 1992) National Petroleum Council (NPC) study entitled [open quotes]The Potential for Natural Gas in the United States.[close quotes] This task group evaluated potential sources of additions to US natural gas reserves with a team of more than 100 participants, representing various trade, academic, government, and industry organizations. The group evaluated reserve growth, unconventional resources, and undiscovered conventional resources of natural gas over a range of prices and to the year 2010. The study concluded that the US recoverable resource base consists of nearly 1,300 Tcf in the lower 48 States alone, of which more than 413 Tcf will be in new fields and 203 Tcf will be added from reserve appreciation. In addition, more than 519 Tcf will be available as recoverable unconventional resources of gas in coalbeds, gas shales, tight sands, and in other categories. Of the total resource, more than 600 Tcf will be recoverable at wellhead prices of $2.50 per million British thermal units. The NPC evaluation of the US resource base concluded that the domestic natural-gas resource is plentiful and that technological advances will ensure that the resources will be available to fill any foreseeable demand over the next few decades. 3 refs., 6 figs., 18 tabs.

  4. Patterns in Nature Forming Patterns in Minds: An Evaluation of an Introductory Physics Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheaffer, Christopher Ryan

    Educators are increasingly focused on the process over the content. In science especially, teachers want students to understand the nature of science and investigation. The emergence of scientific inquiry and engineering design teaching methods have led to the development of new teaching and evaluation methods that concentrate on steps in a process rather than facts in a topic. Research supports the notion that an explicit focus on the scientific process can lead to student science knowledge gains. In response to new research and standards many teachers have been developing teaching methods that seem to work well in their classrooms, but lack the time and resources to test them in other classroom environments. A high school Physics teacher (Bradford Hill) has developed a unit called Patterns in Nature (PIN) with objectives relating mathematical modeling to the scientific process. Designed for use in his large public school classroom, the unit was taken and used in a charter school with small classes. This study looks at specifically whether or not the PIN unit effectively teaches students how to graph the data they gather and fit an appropriate mathematical pattern, using that model to predict future measurements. Additionally, the study looks at the students' knowledge and views about the nature of science and the process of scientific investigation as it is affected by the PIN unit. Findings show that students are able to identify and apply patterns to data, but have difficulties explaining the meaning of the math. Students' show increases in their knowledge of the process of science, and the majority develop positive views about science in general. A major goal of this study is to place this unit in the cyclical process of Design-Based Research and allow for Pattern in Nature's continuous improvement, development and evaluation. Design-Based Research (DBR) is an approach that can be applied to the implementation and evaluation of classroom materials. This method

  5. Reported historic asbestos prospects and natural asbestos occurrences in the central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2006-01-01

    This map and its accompanying dataset provide information for 26 natural asbestos occurrences in the Central United States (U.S.), using descriptions found in the geologic literature. Data on location, mineralogy, geology, and relevant literature for each asbestos site are provided. Using the map and digital data in this report, the user can examine the distribution of previously reported asbestos occurrences and their geological characteristics in the Central U.S. This report is part of an ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey to identify and map reported natural asbestos occurrences in the U.S., which began with U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1189 (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1189/). These reports are intended to provide State and local government agencies and other stakeholders with geologic information on natural occurrences of asbestos in the U.S.

  6. Contribution of anthropogenic and natural sources to atmospheric sulfur in parts of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Harbert; Nochumson, D. H.; Hidy, G. M.

    This paper presents an estimate of the contributions to atmospheric sulfur of natural vs anthropogenic processes in areas of the United States. The areas were selected on the basis of population density, industrialization and potential for different kinds of geographically unique natural emissions. The sulfur emissions were estimated in part from land use practice and from geochemical arguments relating sulfur to biological carbon cycling. The natural or quasi-natural processes considered include sulfur gas production in freshwater sediments and intertidal mudflats, soil processes and vegetation. Agricultural activities and acid mine drainage were also taken into account as a perturbation to the available natural sulfur resources. The emissions appear to be heavily influenced by contributions from sulfate reduction in freshwater sediments and intertidal mudflats, and acid mine drainage. The anthropogenic emissions were calculated from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's inventories in the late 1960s. The natural vs man-derived sulfur were compared for 2° longitude by 2° latitude sectors in New England, the mid-Atlantic States, the Atlantic Coastal South, the Midwest, and the arid Southwest. In the sample regions where the anthropogenic emissions exceed 50-100 × 10 3 tonne S y -1 over a 2 × 2° sector, or ≳ 15-30 kg(S) ha -1 y -1, they tend to dominate the biogenic emissions. This appears to be the case for industrialized Ohio, Illinois, and New England. If 10% of the available biogenic sulfur is released to the atmosphere, natural or quasi-natural emissions may be a significant contributor in air over Minnesota and Wisconsin, Florida, and perhaps the rural areas of Virginia and remote parts of Arizona and Utah.

  7. Nature and Utilization of Civil Commitment for Substance Abuse in the United States.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Paul P; Pinals, Debra A; Stayton, Taylor; Sanders, Kellie; Blumberg, Lester

    2015-09-01

    Substance abuse is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Although civil commitment has been used to address substance abuse for more than a century, little is known today about the nature and use of substance-related commitment laws in the United States. We examined statutes between July 2010 and October 2012 from all 50 states and the District of Columbia for provisions authorizing civil commitment of adults for substance abuse and recorded the criteria and evidentiary standard for commitment and the location and the maximum duration of commitment orders. High-level state representatives evaluated these data and provided information on the use of commitment. Thirty-three states have statutory provisions for the civil commitment of persons because of substance abuse. The application of these statutes ranged from a few commitment cases to thousands annually. Although dangerousness was the most common basis for commitment, many states permitted it in other contexts. The maximum duration of treatment ranged from less than 1 month to more than 1 year for both initial and subsequent civil commitment orders. These findings show wide variability in the nature and application of civil commitment statutes for substance abuse in the United States. Such diversity reflects a lack of consensus on the role that civil commitment should play in managing substance abuse and the problems associated with it. PMID:26438809

  8. Regulation and guidelines for enhanced natural radiation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Guimond, R J

    1985-10-01

    This paper discusses radiation protection guidelines and standards in the United States for enhanced natural radiation levels. Although no national standards have been developed in the United States, there have been standards and guidelines developed for individual situations throughout the country. These apply to uranium mill sites and land in their vicinity, phosphate lands, land contaminated by radium processing, hazardous waste sites, and related situations. The rationale for these recommendations and standards is discussed along with the health implications and other important factors. The applicability of these recommendations and standards to other situations is also discussed. Finally, the recommendations and standards developed by EPA are compared generally to recommendations and standards of other U.S. organizations. PMID:4081769

  9. Application of commercial simulator to reproduce a real natural gas processing unit

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, L.G.; Maciel, M.R.W.

    1996-12-31

    In this work the intention is, using a commercial simulator, to reproduce the operating conditions of a Natural Gas Processing Unit. This is a complex task since in a real plant there are several kinds of equipments, accessories and designs that the most important available simulators cannot represent properly. This being the case, in this study, the simulation has been built in a unique computer file, simulating 48 equipments and 16 valves of the process unit. It was created five additional equipments and some adjust, recycle and set operations to adjust the simulator equipments to the real ones. The simulations has 84 operations and 116 streams of mass and energy. To bring near the column internal flows and temperatures to the real values, it were incorporated the column stage efficiencies, using a method, beginning with O`Connell global efficiency. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Research on Geographical Environment Unit Division Based on the Method of Natural Breaks (Jenks)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Yang, S. T.; Li, H. W.; Zhang, B.; Lv, J. R.

    2013-11-01

    Zoning which is to divide the study area into different zones according to their geographical differences at the global, national or regional level, includes natural division, economic division, geographical zoning of departments, comprehensive zoning and so on. Zoning is of important practical significance, for example, knowing regional differences and characteristics, regional research and regional development planning, understanding the favorable and unfavorable conditions of the regional development etc. Geographical environment is arising from the geographical position linkages. Geographical environment unit division is also a type of zoning. The geographical environment indicators are deeply studied and summed up in the article, including the background, the associated and the potential. The background indicators are divided into four categories, such as the socio-economic, the political and military, the strategic resources and the ecological environment, which can be divided into more sub-indexes. While the sub-indexes can be integrated to comprehensive index system by weighted stacking method. The Jenks natural breaks classification method, also called the Jenks optimization method, is a data classification method designed to determine the best arrangement of values into different classes. This is done by seeking to minimize each class's average deviation from the class mean, while maximizing each class's deviation from the means of the other groups. In this paper, the experiment of Chinese surrounding geographical environment unit division has been done based on the natural breaks (jenks) method, the geographical environment index system and the weighted stacking method, taking South Asia as an example. The result indicates that natural breaks (jenks) method is of good adaptability and high accuracy on the geographical environment unit division. The geographical environment research was originated in the geopolitics and flourished in the geo

  11. Can we manage for resilience? The integration of resilience thinking into natural resource management in the united states

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of resilience is now frequently invoked by natural resource agencies in the United States. This reflects growing trends within ecology, conservation biology, and other disciplines acknowledging that social-ecological systems require management approaches recognizing ...

  12. Age at natural menopause in Spain and the United States: results from the DAMES project.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Robert F; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf

    2005-01-01

    Our research was undertaken to determine the median age of natural menopause and correlates of the timing of menopause in Spain and the United States (U.S.). A population-based sample of 300 women from Madrid, Spain and a random sample of 293 women from Fallon Community Health plan (FCHP), a health maintenance organization (HMO) in central Massachusetts, were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Logit analysis and logistic regression were used to estimate the median age at menopause and identify factors associated with it. The median age of natural menopause in Spain is estimated at 51.7 years, and in the U.S., it is 52.6 years. In Spain, women with any children (OR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.25, 1.36) and a lower body mass index (BMI) (OR = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.27, 0.78) had later ages at menopause while current smokers (OR = 5.51, 95% CI: 1.82, 16.7) had earlier ages of menopause in a multivariate model. A multiplicative interaction between smoking status and parity was identified, and an interaction term included in the multivariate model (OR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.94). In the U.S., household income, marital status, and education level were statistically associated with age at natural menopause in bivariate models. These factors were no longer statistically significant after adjustments in a multivariate model. Oral contraceptive use, cycle length, and cycle regularity were not statistically associated with the age of menopause in either country. The ages of natural menopause in Spain and the U.S. are comparable to other industrialized nations. The factors associated with the timing of natural menopause, in particular smoking and BMI, are consistent with those identified in previous studies. PMID:15849704

  13. Evolvability Is an Evolved Ability: The Coding Concept as the Arch-Unit of Natural Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janković, Srdja; Ćirković, Milan M.

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes that characterize living matter are qualitatively distinct in that they involve encoding and transfer of specific types of information. Such information plays an active part in the control of events that are ultimately linked to the capacity of the system to persist and multiply. This algorithmicity of life is a key prerequisite for its Darwinian evolution, driven by natural selection acting upon stochastically arising variations of the encoded information. The concept of evolvability attempts to define the total capacity of a system to evolve new encoded traits under appropriate conditions, i.e., the accessible section of total morphological space. Since this is dependent on previously evolved regulatory networks that govern information flow in the system, evolvability itself may be regarded as an evolved ability. The way information is physically written, read and modified in living cells (the "coding concept") has not changed substantially during the whole history of the Earth's biosphere. This biosphere, be it alone or one of many, is, accordingly, itself a product of natural selection, since the overall evolvability conferred by its coding concept (nucleic acids as information carriers with the "rulebook of meanings" provided by codons, as well as all the subsystems that regulate various conditional information-reading modes) certainly played a key role in enabling this biosphere to survive up to the present, through alterations of planetary conditions, including at least five catastrophic events linked to major mass extinctions. We submit that, whatever the actual prebiotic physical and chemical processes may have been on our home planet, or may, in principle, occur at some time and place in the Universe, a particular coding concept, with its respective potential to give rise to a biosphere, or class of biospheres, of a certain evolvability, may itself be regarded as a unit (indeed the arch-unit) of natural selection.

  14. Automated extraction of natural drainage density patterns for the conterminous United States through high performance computing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanislawski, Larry V.; Falgout, Jeff T.; Buttenfield, Barbara P.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrographic networks form an important data foundation for cartographic base mapping and for hydrologic analysis. Drainage density patterns for these networks can be derived to characterize local landscape, bedrock and climate conditions, and further inform hydrologic and geomorphological analysis by indicating areas where too few headwater channels have been extracted. But natural drainage density patterns are not consistently available in existing hydrographic data for the United States because compilation and capture criteria historically varied, along with climate, during the period of data collection over the various terrain types throughout the country. This paper demonstrates an automated workflow that is being tested in a high-performance computing environment by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to map natural drainage density patterns at the 1:24,000-scale (24K) for the conterminous United States. Hydrographic network drainage patterns may be extracted from elevation data to guide corrections for existing hydrographic network data. The paper describes three stages in this workflow including data pre-processing, natural channel extraction, and generation of drainage density patterns from extracted channels. The workflow is concurrently implemented by executing procedures on multiple subbasin watersheds within the U.S. National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). Pre-processing defines parameters that are needed for the extraction process. Extraction proceeds in standard fashion: filling sinks, developing flow direction and weighted flow accumulation rasters. Drainage channels with assigned Strahler stream order are extracted within a subbasin and simplified. Drainage density patterns are then estimated with 100-meter resolution and subsequently smoothed with a low-pass filter. The extraction process is found to be of better quality in higher slope terrains. Concurrent processing through the high performance computing environment is shown to facilitate and refine

  15. Evolvability Is an Evolved Ability: The Coding Concept as the Arch-Unit of Natural Selection.

    PubMed

    Janković, Srdja; Ćirković, Milan M

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes that characterize living matter are qualitatively distinct in that they involve encoding and transfer of specific types of information. Such information plays an active part in the control of events that are ultimately linked to the capacity of the system to persist and multiply. This algorithmicity of life is a key prerequisite for its Darwinian evolution, driven by natural selection acting upon stochastically arising variations of the encoded information. The concept of evolvability attempts to define the total capacity of a system to evolve new encoded traits under appropriate conditions, i.e., the accessible section of total morphological space. Since this is dependent on previously evolved regulatory networks that govern information flow in the system, evolvability itself may be regarded as an evolved ability. The way information is physically written, read and modified in living cells (the "coding concept") has not changed substantially during the whole history of the Earth's biosphere. This biosphere, be it alone or one of many, is, accordingly, itself a product of natural selection, since the overall evolvability conferred by its coding concept (nucleic acids as information carriers with the "rulebook of meanings" provided by codons, as well as all the subsystems that regulate various conditional information-reading modes) certainly played a key role in enabling this biosphere to survive up to the present, through alterations of planetary conditions, including at least five catastrophic events linked to major mass extinctions. We submit that, whatever the actual prebiotic physical and chemical processes may have been on our home planet, or may, in principle, occur at some time and place in the Universe, a particular coding concept, with its respective potential to give rise to a biosphere, or class of biospheres, of a certain evolvability, may itself be regarded as a unit (indeed the arch-unit) of natural selection. PMID:26419865

  16. A Research-Informed Instructional Unit to Teach the Nature of Science to Pre-Service Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aduriz-Bravo, Agustin; Izquierdo-Aymerich, Merce

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the foundations and process of design of a research-informed instructional unit aimed for pre-service science teacher education. The unit covers some key ideas on the nature of science (around methodology, theory change, scientific inference and explanation, values, gender issues) anchoring them in a well-known episode…

  17. Understanding the Nature of Small Business. PACE Revised. Level 3. Unit 1. Research & Development Series No. 240CB1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This individualized, competency-based unit on understanding the nature of small business, the first of 18 modules, is on the third level of the revised Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). Intended for the advanced secondary and postsecondary levels and for adults wanting training or retraining, this unit, together with the…

  18. Changes Observed in Views of Nature of Science During a Historically Based Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudge, David Wÿss; Cassidy, David Paul; Fulford, Janice Marie; Howe, Eric Michael

    2014-09-01

    Numerous empirical studies have provided evidence of the effectiveness of an explicit and reflective approach to the learning of issues associated with the nature of science (NOS) (c.f. Abd-El-Khalick and Lederman in J Res Sci Teach 37(10):1057-1095, 2000). This essay reports the results of a mixed-methods association study involving 130 preservice teachers during the course of a three class unit based upon the history of science using such an approach. Within the unit the phenomenon of industrial melanism was presented as a puzzle for students to solve. Students were explicitly asked to reflect upon several NOS issues as they developed and tested their own explanations for the "mystery phenomenon". NOS views of all participants were characterized by means of surveys and follow-up interviews with a subsample of 17 participants, using a modified version of the VNOS protocol (c.f. Lederman et al. in J Res Sci Teach 39(6):497-521, 2002). An analysis of the survey results informed by the interview data suggests NOS views became more sophisticated for some issues, e.g., whether scientific knowledge requires experimentation; but not others, e.g., why scientists experiment. An examination of the interview data informed by our experiences with the unit provides insight into why the unit may have been more effective with regard to some issues than others. This includes evidence that greater sophistication of some NOS issues was fostered by the use of multiple, contextualized examples. The essay concludes with a discussion of limitations, pedagogical implications, and avenues for further research.

  19. Nature as capital: Advancing and incorporating ecosystem services in United States federal policies and programs

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Mark; Goldman, Erica; Bartuska, Ann M.; Sutton-Grier, Ariana; Lubchenco, Jane

    2015-01-01

    The concept of nature as capital is gaining visibility in policies and practices in both the public and private sectors. This change is due to an improved ability to assess and value ecosystem services, as well as to a growing recognition of the potential of an ecosystem services approach to make tradeoffs in decision making more transparent, inform efficient use of resources, enhance resilience and sustainability, and avoid unintended negative consequences of policy actions. Globally, governments, financial institutions, and corporations have begun to incorporate natural capital accounting in their policies and practices. In the United States, universities, nongovernmental organizations, and federal agencies are actively collaborating to develop and apply ecosystem services concepts to further national environmental and economic objectives. Numerous federal agencies have begun incorporating these concepts into land use planning, water resources management, and preparations for, and responses to, climate change. Going forward, well-defined policy direction will be necessary to institutionalize ecosystem services approaches in federal agencies, as well as to guide intersector and interdisciplinary collaborative research and development efforts. In addition, a new generation of decision support tools are needed to further the practical application of ecosystem services principles in policymaking and commercial activities. Improved performance metrics are needed, as are mechanisms to monitor the status of ecosystem services and assess the environmental and economic impacts of policies and programs. A greater national and international financial commitment to advancing ecosystem services and natural capital accounting would likely have broad, long-term economic and environmental benefits. PMID:26082544

  20. Natural Convection Cooling of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Hill, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    After fueling and prior to launch, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) will be stored for a period of time then moved to the launch pad for integration with the space probe and mounting on the launch vehicle. During this time, which could be as long as 3 years, the ASRG will operate continuously with heat rejected from the housing and fins. Typically, the generator will be cooled by forced convection using fans. During some of the ground operations, maintaining forced convection may add significant complexity, so allowing natural convection may simplify operations. A test was conducted on the ASRG Engineering Unit (EU) to quantify temperatures and operating parameters with natural convection only and determine if the EU could be safely operated in such an environment. The results show that with natural convection cooling the ASRG EU Stirling convertor pressure vessel temperatures and other parameters had significant margins while the EU was operated for several days in this configuration. Additionally, an update is provided on ASRG EU testing at NASA Glenn Research Center, where the ASRG EU has operated for over 16,000 hr and underwent extensive testing.

  1. Nature as capital: Advancing and incorporating ecosystem services in United States federal policies and programs.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Mark; Goldman, Erica; Bartuska, Ann M; Sutton-Grier, Ariana; Lubchenco, Jane

    2015-06-16

    The concept of nature as capital is gaining visibility in policies and practices in both the public and private sectors. This change is due to an improved ability to assess and value ecosystem services, as well as to a growing recognition of the potential of an ecosystem services approach to make tradeoffs in decision making more transparent, inform efficient use of resources, enhance resilience and sustainability, and avoid unintended negative consequences of policy actions. Globally, governments, financial institutions, and corporations have begun to incorporate natural capital accounting in their policies and practices. In the United States, universities, nongovernmental organizations, and federal agencies are actively collaborating to develop and apply ecosystem services concepts to further national environmental and economic objectives. Numerous federal agencies have begun incorporating these concepts into land use planning, water resources management, and preparations for, and responses to, climate change. Going forward, well-defined policy direction will be necessary to institutionalize ecosystem services approaches in federal agencies, as well as to guide intersector and interdisciplinary collaborative research and development efforts. In addition, a new generation of decision support tools are needed to further the practical application of ecosystem services principles in policymaking and commercial activities. Improved performance metrics are needed, as are mechanisms to monitor the status of ecosystem services and assess the environmental and economic impacts of policies and programs. A greater national and international financial commitment to advancing ecosystem services and natural capital accounting would likely have broad, long-term economic and environmental benefits. PMID:26082544

  2. Adipose tissue-derived microvascular fragments: natural vascularization units for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Laschke, Matthias W; Menger, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    The establishment of effective vascularization is a key challenge in regenerative medicine. To achieve this, the transplantation of native microvascular fragments has emerged as a promising novel concept. Microvascular fragments can be isolated in large amounts from fat tissue, exhibit a high angiogenic activity, and represent a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells. Originally, microvascular fragments have been used in angiogenesis research for the isolation of capillary endothelium and for functional sprouting assays. More recent studies have demonstrated that they rapidly develop into microvascular networks after transfer into tissue defects. Moreover, they are suitable for the generation of prevascularized tissue constructs. Hence, a wide range of future medical applications may benefit from the use of these natural vascularization units. PMID:26137863

  3. A comparison of hydrocarbon gases from natural sources in the northwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenson, T.D.; Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The northwestern United States hosts a remarkable quantity and variety of thermal springs, seeps, and other natural-gas sources. Although many studies have dealt with the liquids and nonhydrocarbon gases emanating from these sources, few have focused on hydrocarbon gases. Of these gases, methane in particular is now recognized as an important reactive trace gas in the Earth's atmosphere that plays a significant role in global warming because of its greenhouse properties. To understand better the magnitude and occurrence of emissions of hydrocarbons from natural sources to the atmosphere, we have begun a survey of these gases throughout the northwestern United States. This area encompasses a number of different tectonic provinces: The Yellowstone hot spot, the northern Basin and Range Province, the Cascade volcanic arc, and the Cascadia subduction complex. Each province hosts springs and seeps with some unique compositions owing to the geological processes operating there. Methane is present in each area at concentration levels ranging from about 2 parts per million by volume (ppm-v) to 95.6 percent (by volume). Hydrothermal activity in the Yellowstone area produces spring gases containing less than 4 percent methane, with carbon dioxide as the balance gas. The Grand Teton National Park area, immediately to the south, has a wide variety of gas compositions with either methane, carbon dioxide, or nitrogen as the primary gas component. Where methane is abundant, higher molecular weight hydrocarbon gases (ethane, ethene, propane, propene, isobutane, and n-butane) are also found in ppm-v concentrations. In the northern Great Basin, thermal springs and seeps typically occur along fault zones at the base of mountain ranges. Methane concentrations range from 0.2 to 47 percent, with higher molecular weight hydrocarbon concentrations from 0 to 3,100 ppm-v. 47 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Measurements of methane emissions at natural gas production sites in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Allen, David T.; Torres, Vincent M.; Thomas, James; Sullivan, David W.; Harrison, Matthew; Hendler, Al; Herndon, Scott C.; Kolb, Charles E.; Fraser, Matthew P.; Hill, A. Daniel; Lamb, Brian K.; Miskimins, Jennifer; Sawyer, Robert F.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Engineering estimates of methane emissions from natural gas production have led to varied projections of national emissions. This work reports direct measurements of methane emissions at 190 onshore natural gas sites in the United States (150 production sites, 27 well completion flowbacks, 9 well unloadings, and 4 workovers). For well completion flowbacks, which clear fractured wells of liquid to allow gas production, methane emissions ranged from 0.01 Mg to 17 Mg (mean = 1.7 Mg; 95% confidence bounds of 0.67–3.3 Mg), compared with an average of 81 Mg per event in the 2011 EPA national emission inventory from April 2013. Emission factors for pneumatic pumps and controllers as well as equipment leaks were both comparable to and higher than estimates in the national inventory. Overall, if emission factors from this work for completion flowbacks, equipment leaks, and pneumatic pumps and controllers are assumed to be representative of national populations and are used to estimate national emissions, total annual emissions from these source categories are calculated to be 957 Gg of methane (with sampling and measurement uncertainties estimated at ±200 Gg). The estimate for comparable source categories in the EPA national inventory is ∼1,200 Gg. Additional measurements of unloadings and workovers are needed to produce national emission estimates for these source categories. The 957 Gg in emissions for completion flowbacks, pneumatics, and equipment leaks, coupled with EPA national inventory estimates for other categories, leads to an estimated 2,300 Gg of methane emissions from natural gas production (0.42% of gross gas production). PMID:24043804

  5. Methane Emissions from the Natural Gas Transmission and Storage System in the United States.

    PubMed

    Zimmerle, Daniel J; Williams, Laurie L; Vaughn, Timothy L; Quinn, Casey; Subramanian, R; Duggan, Gerald P; Willson, Bryan; Opsomer, Jean D; Marchese, Anthony J; Martinez, David M; Robinson, Allen L

    2015-08-01

    The recent growth in production and utilization of natural gas offers potential climate benefits, but those benefits depend on lifecycle emissions of methane, the primary component of natural gas and a potent greenhouse gas. This study estimates methane emissions from the transmission and storage (T&S) sector of the United States natural gas industry using new data collected during 2012, including 2,292 onsite measurements, additional emissions data from 677 facilities and activity data from 922 facilities. The largest emission sources were fugitive emissions from certain compressor-related equipment and "super-emitter" facilities. We estimate total methane emissions from the T&S sector at 1,503 [1,220 to 1,950] Gg/yr (95% confidence interval) compared to the 2012 Environmental Protection Agency's Greenhouse Gas Inventory (GHGI) estimate of 2,071 [1,680 to 2,690] Gg/yr. While the overlap in confidence intervals indicates that the difference is not statistically significant, this is the result of several significant, but offsetting, factors. Factors which reduce the study estimate include a lower estimated facility count, a shift away from engines toward lower-emitting turbine and electric compressor drivers, and reductions in the usage of gas-driven pneumatic devices. Factors that increase the study estimate relative to the GHGI include updated emission rates in certain emission categories and explicit treatment of skewed emissions at both component and facility levels. For T&S stations that are required to report to the EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP), this study estimates total emissions to be 260% [215% to 330%] of the reportable emissions for these stations, primarily due to the inclusion of emission sources that are not reported under the GHGRP rules, updated emission factors, and super-emitter emissions. PMID:26195284

  6. Measurements of methane emissions at natural gas production sites in the United States.

    PubMed

    Allen, David T; Torres, Vincent M; Thomas, James; Sullivan, David W; Harrison, Matthew; Hendler, Al; Herndon, Scott C; Kolb, Charles E; Fraser, Matthew P; Hill, A Daniel; Lamb, Brian K; Miskimins, Jennifer; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-10-29

    Engineering estimates of methane emissions from natural gas production have led to varied projections of national emissions. This work reports direct measurements of methane emissions at 190 onshore natural gas sites in the United States (150 production sites, 27 well completion flowbacks, 9 well unloadings, and 4 workovers). For well completion flowbacks, which clear fractured wells of liquid to allow gas production, methane emissions ranged from 0.01 Mg to 17 Mg (mean = 1.7 Mg; 95% confidence bounds of 0.67-3.3 Mg), compared with an average of 81 Mg per event in the 2011 EPA national emission inventory from April 2013. Emission factors for pneumatic pumps and controllers as well as equipment leaks were both comparable to and higher than estimates in the national inventory. Overall, if emission factors from this work for completion flowbacks, equipment leaks, and pneumatic pumps and controllers are assumed to be representative of national populations and are used to estimate national emissions, total annual emissions from these source categories are calculated to be 957 Gg of methane (with sampling and measurement uncertainties estimated at ± 200 Gg). The estimate for comparable source categories in the EPA national inventory is ~1,200 Gg. Additional measurements of unloadings and workovers are needed to produce national emission estimates for these source categories. The 957 Gg in emissions for completion flowbacks, pneumatics, and equipment leaks, coupled with EPA national inventory estimates for other categories, leads to an estimated 2,300 Gg of methane emissions from natural gas production (0.42% of gross gas production). PMID:24043804

  7. Feasibility and Costs of Natural Gas as a Bridge to Deep Decarbonization in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. D.; McJeon, H. C.; Muratori, M.; Shi, W.

    2015-12-01

    Achieving emissions reductions consistent with a 2 degree Celsius global warming target requires nearly complete replacement of traditional fossil fuel combustion with near-zero carbon energy technologies in the United States by 2050. There are multiple technological change pathways consistent with this deep decarbonization, including strategies that rely on renewable energy, nuclear, and carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. The replacement of coal-fired power plants with natural gas-fired power plants has also been suggested as a bridge strategy to achieve near-term emissions reduction targets. These gas plants, however, would need to be replaced by near-zero energy technologies or retrofitted with CCS by 2050 in order to achieve longer-term targets. Here we examine the costs and feasibility of a natural gas bridge strategy. Using the Global Change Assessment (GCAM) model, we develop multiple scenarios that each meet the recent US Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) to reduce GHG emissions by 26%-28% below its 2005 levels in 2025, as well as a deep decarbonization target of 80% emissions reductions below 1990 levels by 2050. We find that the gas bridge strategy requires that gas plants be retired on average 20 years earlier than their designed lifetime of 45 years, a potentially challenging outcome to achieve from a policy perspective. Using a more idealized model, we examine the net energy system costs of this gas bridge strategy compared to one in which near-zero energy technologies are deployed in the near tem. We explore the sensitivity of these cost results to four factors: the discount rate applied to future costs, the length (or start year) of the gas bridge, the relative capital cost of natural gas vs. near-zero energy technology, and the fuel price of natural gas. The discount rate and cost factors are found to be more important than the length of the bridge. However, we find an important interaction as well. At low discount rates

  8. The Nature and Requirements of Work in University-Based Telehealth Units: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Telehealth units are one of many university administrative units created to foster innovation in universities over the last 40 years. Despite the proliferation of such units, few organizational studies have examined the work undertaken inside of these units. This qualitative study used a sequential two-part research design to understand the…

  9. Mapping Natural Terroir Units using a multivariate approach and legacy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priori, Simone; Barbetti, Roberto; L'Abate, Giovanni; Bucelli, Piero; Storchi, Paolo; Costantini, Edoardo A. C.

    2014-05-01

    Natural Terroir Unit (NTU) is a volume of earth's biosphere that is characterized by a stable set of variables related to the topography, climate, geology and soil. Methods to study the association soil-climate-vines are numerous, but the main question is always: which variables are actually important for the quality and the typicality of grapevines, and then wine, for a particular scale? This work aimed to setting up a multivariate methodology to define viticultural terroirs at the province scale (1:125,000), using viticultural and oenological legacy data. The study area was the Siena province in the Tuscany region (Central Italy). The reference grapevine cultivar was "Sangiovese", which is the most important cultivar of the region. The methodology was based upon the creation of a GIS storing several viticultural and oenological legacy data of 55 experimental vineyards (vintages between 1989-2009), the long term climate data, the digital elevation model, the soil-landscapes (land systems) and the soil profiles with the soil analysis. The selected viticultural and oenological parameters were: must sugar content, sugar accumulation rate from veraison to harvest, must titratable acidity, grape yield per vine, number of bunches for vine, mean bunch weight, and mean weight of berries. The environmental parameters related to viticulture, selected by an explorative PCA, were: elevation, mean annual temperature, mean soil temperature, annual precipitation, clay, sand and gravel content of soils, soil water availability, redoximorphic features and rooting depth. The geostatistical models of the variables interpolation were chosen on the best of mean standardize error, obtained by the cross-validation, between "Simple cokriging with varying local mean", "Multicollocated simple cokriging with varying local mean" and "Regression kriging". These variables were used for a k-means clustering aimed to map the Natural Terroirs Units (NTUs). The viticultural areas of Siena province

  10. Methane emissions from process equipment at natural gas production sites in the United States: liquid unloadings.

    PubMed

    Allen, David T; Sullivan, David W; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Pacsi, Adam P; Harrison, Matthew; Keen, Kindal; Fraser, Matthew P; Daniel Hill, A; Lamb, Brian K; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-01-01

    Methane emissions from liquid unloadings were measured at 107 wells in natural gas production regions throughout the United States. Liquid unloadings clear wells of accumulated liquids to increase production, employing a variety of liquid lifting mechanisms. In this work, wells with and without plunger lifts were sampled. Most wells without plunger lifts unload less than 10 times per year with emissions averaging 21,000-35,000 scf methane (0.4-0.7 Mg) per event (95% confidence limits of 10,000-50,000 scf/event). For wells with plunger lifts, emissions averaged 1000-10,000 scf methane (0.02-0.2 Mg) per event (95% confidence limits of 500-12,000 scf/event). Some wells with plunger lifts are automatically triggered and unload thousands of times per year and these wells account for the majority of the emissions from all wells with liquid unloadings. If the data collected in this work are assumed to be representative of national populations, the data suggest that the central estimate of emissions from unloadings (270 Gg/yr, 95% confidence range of 190-400 Gg) are within a few percent of the emissions estimated in the EPA 2012 Greenhouse Gas National Emission Inventory (released in 2014), with emissions dominated by wells with high frequencies of unloadings. PMID:25488307

  11. Age, growth, and natural mortality of yellowfin grouper (Mycteroperca venenosa) from the southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Jennifer C.; Carr, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Ages of yellowfin grouper (n = 306) from the southeastern United States coast from 1979–2014 were determined using sectioned sagittal otoliths. Opaque zones were annular, forming January–June (peaking in February–March). Yellowfin grouper ranged in age from 3 to 31 years; the largest fish measured 1,000 mm fork length (FL). Body size relationships for yellowfin grouper were: W = 1.22 × 10−5 FL3.03 (n = 229, r2 = 0.92); TL = 1.06 FL − 14.53 (n = 60, r2 = 0.99); and FL = 0.93 TL + 18.63 (n = 60, r2 = 0.99), where W = whole weight in grams, FL in mm, and TL = total length in mm. The von Bertalanffy growth equation was: Lt = 958 (1 − e−0.11(t+2.94)) (n = 306). The point estimate of natural mortality for yellowfin grouper was M = 0.14, while age-specific estimates of M ranged from 1.59 to 0.17 for ages 1–31. PMID:26244111

  12. Age, growth and natural mortality of coney (Cephalopholis fulva) from the southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Jennifer C.; Carr, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Coney (Cephalopholis fulva) sampled from recreational and commercial vessels along the southeastern coast of the United States in 1998–2013 (n = 353) were aged by counting opaque bands on sectioned sagittal otoliths. Analysis of otolith edge type (opaque or translucent) revealed that annuli formed in January–June with a peak in April. Coney were aged up to 19 years, and the largest fish measured 430 mm in total length (TL). The weight-length relationship was ln(W) = 3.03 × ln(TL) − 18.05 (n = 487; coefficient of determination [r2] = 0.91), where W = whole weight in kilograms and and TL = total length in millimeters. Mean observed sizes at ages 1, 3, 5, 10, and 19 years were 225, 273, 307, 338, and 400 mm TL, respectively. The von Bertalanffy growth equation for coney was Lt = 377 (1 − e(−0.20(t+3.53))). Natural mortality (M) estimated by Hewitt and Hoenig’s longevity-based method which integrates all ages was 0.22. Age-specific M values, estimated with the method of Charnov and others, were 0.40, 0.30, 0.26, 0.22, and 0.20 for ages 1, 3, 5, 10, and 19, respectively. PMID:25802801

  13. Unconventional natural gas development and human health: thoughts from the United States.

    PubMed

    Finkel, Madelon L; Hays, Jake; Law, Adam

    2015-10-01

    If unconventional gas development (UGD) continues to expand in Australia, the potential health and environmental impacts should be adequately addressed and preventive public health measures should be implemented. The United States has embraced UGD and has decades of experience that could be beneficial to Australia as stakeholders debate the potential benefits and harms of the technique. Additional research on the health impacts of UGD is necessary. Baseline and trend morbidity and mortality data need to be collected to assess changes in population health over time. To date, few health or epidemiological studies have been conducted, so it remains difficult to assess actual health outcomes. In the absence of scientific consensus, there are two possible risks: failing to develop unconventional natural gas when the harms are manageable; or developing it when the harms are substantial. Many government bodies around the world have chosen to minimise the risk of the latter until the impacts of UGD are better understood. Policies should be informed by empirical evidence based on actual experience rather than assurance of best practices. There is a strong rationale for precautionary measures based on the health and environmental risks identified in the scientific literature. PMID:26424064

  14. Methane emissions from process equipment at natural gas production sites in the United States: pneumatic controllers.

    PubMed

    Allen, David T; Pacsi, Adam P; Sullivan, David W; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Harrison, Matthew; Keen, Kindal; Fraser, Matthew P; Daniel Hill, A; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-01-01

    Emissions from 377 gas actuated (pneumatic) controllers were measured at natural gas production sites and a small number of oil production sites, throughout the United States. A small subset of the devices (19%), with whole gas emission rates in excess of 6 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h), accounted for 95% of emissions. More than half of the controllers recorded emissions of 0.001 scf/h or less during 15 min of measurement. Pneumatic controllers in level control applications on separators and in compressor applications had higher emission rates than controllers in other types of applications. Regional differences in emissions were observed, with the lowest emissions measured in the Rocky Mountains and the highest emissions in the Gulf Coast. Average methane emissions per controller reported in this work are 17% higher than the average emissions per controller in the 2012 EPA greenhouse gas national emission inventory (2012 GHG NEI, released in 2014); the average of 2.7 controllers per well observed in this work is higher than the 1.0 controllers per well reported in the 2012 GHG NEI. PMID:25488196

  15. Age, growth and natural mortality of coney (Cephalopholis fulva) from the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Burton, Michael L; Potts, Jennifer C; Carr, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    Coney (Cephalopholis fulva) sampled from recreational and commercial vessels along the southeastern coast of the United States in 1998-2013 (n = 353) were aged by counting opaque bands on sectioned sagittal otoliths. Analysis of otolith edge type (opaque or translucent) revealed that annuli formed in January-June with a peak in April. Coney were aged up to 19 years, and the largest fish measured 430 mm in total length (TL). The weight-length relationship was ln(W) = 3.03 × ln(TL) - 18.05 (n = 487; coefficient of determination [r (2)] = 0.91), where W = whole weight in kilograms and and TL = total length in millimeters. Mean observed sizes at ages 1, 3, 5, 10, and 19 years were 225, 273, 307, 338, and 400 mm TL, respectively. The von Bertalanffy growth equation for coney was Lt = 377 (1 - e ((-0.20(t+3.53)))). Natural mortality (M) estimated by Hewitt and Hoenig's longevity-based method which integrates all ages was 0.22. Age-specific M values, estimated with the method of Charnov and others, were 0.40, 0.30, 0.26, 0.22, and 0.20 for ages 1, 3, 5, 10, and 19, respectively. PMID:25802801

  16. Regional modeling of natural dust in the United State: Source emission, transport, and photochemical impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, D. Q.; Mathur, R.; Mobley, D.; Wong, D.; Yu, S.

    2008-12-01

    We developed a dust emission module to estimate the wind-blown dust emissions from dessert and agricultural land using local wind speed, threshold wind speed to initiate erosion, soil texture and moisture, land use type, and vegetation coverage. The estimated dust is then partitioned to create a fraction of the total sediment mobilized by the wind for vertical transport and subsequent regional circulation. This dust module also included detailed chemical speciation and size distribution, and a geographic filter to eliminate unrealistic emission sources (e.g., mountain peaks with dry soil and strong winds). We then couple the dust module with a regional air quality model CMAQ to: (1) study if the WRF-CMAQ national air quality forecasting system can accurately predict major dust storms occurring in the United States; 2) estimate the annual budget of natural dust emissions from agricultural and dessert lands and their relative importance for total PM2.5 over different U.S. regions; and 3) examine the effects of dust emissions on photolysis rates and consequently on levels of tropospheric O3 and atmospheric oxidants.

  17. Sociocultural dimensions of supply and demand for natural aggregate; examples from the Mid-Atlantic region, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Gilpin R., Jr.; Brown, William M.

    2002-01-01

    The United States uses large quantities of natural aggregate to build and maintain a continuously expanding infrastructure. In recent years, per capita demand for aggregate in the United States has grown to about 9.7 metric tons (10.7 tons) per person per year. Over the next 25 years, the aggregate industry expects to mine quantities equivalent to all aggregate mined in the United States over the past 100 years. The issues surrounding supply and demand for aggregate in the mid-Atlantic states of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia illustrate competing requirements for industrial minerals and many simultaneous social and environmental objectives.

  18. The Changing Nature of Teaching and Unit Evaluations in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Mahsood; Nair, Chenicheri Sid

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching and unit evaluations surveys are used to assess the quality of teaching and the quality of the unit of study. An analysis of teaching and unit evaluation survey practices in Australian universities suggests significant changes. One key change discussed in the paper is the shift from voluntary to mandatory use of surveys with the…

  19. Natural and transboundary pollution influences on sulfate-nitrate-ammonium aerosols in the United States: Implications for policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Rokjin J.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Field, Brendan D.; Yantosca, Robert M.; Chin, Mian

    2004-08-01

    We use a global three-dimensional coupled oxidant-aerosol model (GEOS-CHEM) to estimate natural and transboundary pollution influences on sulfate-nitrate-ammonium aerosol concentrations in the United States. This work is motivated in part by the Regional Haze Rule of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which requires immediate action to improve visibility in U.S. wilderness areas along a linear trajectory toward an endpoint of "natural visibility conditions" by 2064. We present full-year simulations for 1998 and 2001 and evaluate them with nationwide networks of observations in the United States and Europe (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE), Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET), National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP), European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP)) and with Asian outflow observations from the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) aircraft mission. Shutting off U.S. anthropogenic emissions in the model defines "background" aerosol concentrations representing contributions from both natural and transboundary pollution sources. We find that transboundary transport of pollution from Canada, Mexico, and Asia dominates over natural influences for both sulfate and nitrate. Trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution accounts for 30% of background sulfate in both the western and eastern United States. Our best estimates of natural concentrations for ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate in the United States are either consistent with or lower than the default values recommended by EPA for natural visibility calculations. However, the large transboundary pollution influence in our calculation suggests that a natural visibility objective cannot be approached without international emission controls.

  20. A review of water and greenhouse gas impacts of unconventional natural gas development in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Arent, Doug; Logan, Jeff; Macknick, Jordan; Boyd, William; Medlock , Kenneth; O'Sullivan, Francis; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Huntington, Hill; Heath, Garvin; Statwick, Patricia M.; Bazilian, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in the production and use of unconventional natural gas in the United States with a focus on water and greenhouse gas emission implications. If unconventional natural gas in the U.S. is produced responsibly, transported and distributed with little leakage, and incorporated into integrated energy systems that are designed for future resiliency, it could play a significant role in realizing a more sustainable energy future; however, the increased use of natural gas as a substitute for more carbon intensive fuels will alone not substantially alter world carbon dioxide concentration projections.

  1. Simulating past and future dynamics of natural ecosystems in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, Dominique; Neilson, Ronald P.; Hickler, Thomas; Drapek, Raymond J.; Lenihan, James M.; Sykes, Martin T.; Smith, Benjamin; Sitch, Stephen; Thonicke, Kirsten

    2003-06-01

    Simulations of potential vegetation distribution, natural fire frequency, carbon pools, and fluxes are presented for two DGVMs (Dynamic Global Vegetation Models) from the second phase of the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project. Results link vegetation dynamics to biogeochemical cycling for the conterminous United States. Two climate change scenarios were used: a moderately warm scenario from the Hadley Climate Centre and a warmer scenario from the Canadian Climate Center. Both include sulfate aerosols and assume a gradual CO2 increase. Both DGVMs simulate a reduction of southwestern desert areas, a westward expansion of eastern deciduous forests, and the expansion of forests in the western part of the Pacific Northwest and in north-central California. Both DGVMs predict an increase in total biomass burnt in the next century, with a more pronounced increase under the Canadian scenario. Under the Hadley scenario, both DGVMs simulate increases in total carbon stocks. Under the Canadian scenario, both DGVMs simulate a decrease in live vegetation carbon. We identify similarities in model behavior due to the climate forcing and explain differences by the different structure of the models and their different sensitivity to CO2. We compare model output with data to enhance our confidence in their ability to simulate potential vegetation distribution and ecosystem processes. We compare changes in the area of drought-induced decreases in vegetation density with a spatial index derived from the Palmer Drought Severity Index to illustrate the ability of the vegetation to cope with water limitations in the future and the role of the CO2 fertilization effect.

  2. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Coals and Coal Combustion Residuals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Nancy E; Hower, James C; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Taggart, Ross K; Vengosh, Avner

    2015-09-15

    The distribution and enrichment of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in coal combustion residuals (CCRs) from different coal source basins have not been fully characterized in the United States. Here we provide a systematic analysis of the occurrence of NORM ((232)Th, (228)Ra, (238)U, (226)Ra, and (210)Pb) in coals and associated CCRs from the Illinois, Appalachian, and Powder River Basins. Illinois CCRs had the highest total Ra ((228)Ra + (226)Ra = 297 ± 46 Bq/kg) and the lowest (228)Ra/(226)Ra activity ratio (0.31 ± 0.09), followed by Appalachian CCRs (283 ± 34 Bq/kg; 0.67 ± 0.09), and Powder River CCRs (213 ± 21 Bq/kg; 0.79 ± 0.10). Total Ra and (228)Ra/(226)Ra variations in CCRs correspond to the U and Th concentrations and ash contents of their feed coals, and we show that these relationships can be used to predict total NORM concentrations in CCRs. We observed differential NORM volatility during combustion that results in (210)Pb enrichment and (210)Pb/(226)Ra ratios greater than 1 in most fly-ash samples. Overall, total NORM activities in CCRs are 7-10- and 3-5-fold higher than NORM activities in parent coals and average U.S. soil, respectively. This study lays the groundwork for future research related to the environmental and human health implications of CCR disposal and accidental release to the environment in the context of this elevated radioactivity. PMID:26328894

  3. Fields of dreams: Agriculture, economy and nature in Midwest United States biofuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillon, Sean Thomas

    This work explores the social and ecological dimensions of recent biofuel production increases in the United States (US), focusing on the case of Iowa. Biofuels are proposed to mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change, improve US energy security, and support rural economies. Little research has examined how increased US Midwestern biofuels production will change social and ecological outcomes at farm and regional levels or interact with broader governance processes at the nexus of agriculture, energy and environment. These broad questions guide my research: (1) How does biofuel production reconfigure agricultural practice and landscapes in Iowa? (2) What are the costs, benefits and risks of increased biofuels production as seen by farmers and rural residents, and how do these factors influence farmer decisions about agriculture and conservation practice? (3) How and with what effects are biofuels initiatives constituted as a form of environmental governance through scientific knowledge and practice and political economic dynamics? To address these questions, this research integrates both qualitative and quantitative methods, drawing on a political ecological approach complemented by agroecological analysis and theoretical insights from geographical analyses of nature-society relations. Quantitative analysis focuses on changing land use patterns in agriculture and conservation practice in Iowa. Qualitative methods include extensive interviews, participant observation, and policy and document analyses. Fieldwork focused on Northeastern Iowa to understand regional changes in agricultural and conservation practice, the renegotiated position of farmers in agriculture and biofuel production, and biofuel industry development. I find that biofuel production presents significant social and ecological challenges for rural places of production. Longstanding, unequal political economic relations in industrialized agriculture limit rural economic benefits

  4. Civil Defense, U. S. A.: A Programmed Orientation to Civil Defense. Unit 3. Natural Disasters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Battle Creek, MI.

    The effects of natural disasters and the implications which those effects have for community emergency preparedness are discussed. Major topics include: (1) Similarities and differences in types of responses required by a nuclear and natural disasters, (2) The civil defense function in natural disasters, (3) Vulnerability analysis, (4) Warning…

  5. United States Producing and Nonproducing Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004

    EIA Publications

    2006-01-01

    This report discusses the regional and temporal trends in producing and nonproducing crude oil and natural gas reserves using the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) categorization of reserves. The report first focuses on EIA's collection and reporting of crude oil and natural gas reserves data, followed by a discussion of the natural gas reserve trends, and then the crude oil reserve trends.

  6. Attributes for NHDPlus Catchments (Version 1.1) for the Conterminous United States: Estimated Mean Annual Natural Groundwater Recharge, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael E.; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This data set represents the mean annual natural groundwater recharge, in millimeters, compiled for every catchment of NHDPlus for the conterminous United States. The source data set is Estimated Mean Annual Natural Ground-Water Recharge in the Conterminous United States (Wolock, 2003). The NHDPlus Version 1.1 is an integrated suite of application-ready geospatial datasets that incorporates many of the best features of the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and the National Elevation Dataset (NED). The NHDPlus includes a stream network (based on the 1:100,00-scale NHD), improved networking, naming, and value-added attributes (VAAs). NHDPlus also includes elevation-derived catchments (drainage areas) produced using a drainage enforcement technique first widely used in New England, and thus referred to as "the New England Method." This technique involves "burning in" the 1:100,000-scale NHD and when available building "walls" using the National Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD). The resulting modified digital elevation model (HydroDEM) is used to produce hydrologic derivatives that agree with the NHD and WBD. Over the past two years, an interdisciplinary team from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and contractors, found that this method produces the best quality NHD catchments using an automated process (USEPA, 2007). The NHDPlus dataset is organized by 18 Production Units that cover the conterminous United States. The NHDPlus version 1.1 data are grouped by the U.S. Geologic Survey's Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). MRB1, covering the New England and Mid-Atlantic River basins, containing NHDPlus Production Units 1 and 2. MRB2, covering the South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee River basins, contains NHDPlus Production Units 3 and 6. MRB3, covering the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy River basins, contains NHDPlus Production Units 4, 5, 7 and 9. MRB4, covering the

  7. Nature of Matter, Chemistry K-6, Elementary Science Unit No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethlehem Area Schools, PA.

    This unit emphasizes concept-learning through the discovery approach and child-centered activities. "Discovering Matter" is treated in the kindergarten, "Matter Around Us" in grade 1, "Changes in Matter" in grade 4 and "Atoms and Molecules" in grade 6. The unit for each grade contains (1) understandings to be discovered, (2) activities and (3)…

  8. Africa: Into Reality. An Integrated Unit Plan in Social and Natural Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedley, Charlee

    This unit is intended to dispel misconceptions students may have about Africa and its people, and to help students to develop a greater appreciation of that land and its people. The unit focuses upon the physical aspects of Africa and the customs, religion, and attitudes of its people. Ten lessons are included: (1) The continent of Africa; (2) The…

  9. Natural Vocalizations in the Mammalian Inferior Colliculus are Broadly Encoded by a Small Number of Independent Multi-Units.

    PubMed

    Lyzwa, Dominika; Herrmann, J Michael; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    How complex natural sounds are represented by the main converging center of the auditory midbrain, the central inferior colliculus, is an open question. We applied neural discrimination to determine the variation of detailed encoding of individual vocalizations across the best frequency gradient of the central inferior colliculus. The analysis was based on collective responses from several neurons. These multi-unit spike trains were recorded from guinea pigs exposed to a spectrotemporally rich set of eleven species-specific vocalizations. Spike trains of disparate units from the same recording were combined in order to investigate whether groups of multi-unit clusters represent the whole set of vocalizations more reliably than only one unit, and whether temporal response correlations between them facilitate an unambiguous neural representation of the vocalizations. We found a spatial distribution of the capability to accurately encode groups of vocalizations across the best frequency gradient. Different vocalizations are optimally discriminated at different locations of the best frequency gradient. Furthermore, groups of a few multi-unit clusters yield improved discrimination over only one multi-unit cluster between all tested vocalizations. However, temporal response correlations between units do not yield better discrimination. Our study is based on a large set of units of simultaneously recorded responses from several guinea pigs and electrode insertion positions. Our findings suggest a broadly distributed code for behaviorally relevant vocalizations in the mammalian inferior colliculus. Responses from a few non-interacting units are sufficient to faithfully represent the whole set of studied vocalizations with diverse spectrotemporal properties. PMID:26869890

  10. Natural Vocalizations in the Mammalian Inferior Colliculus are Broadly Encoded by a Small Number of Independent Multi-Units

    PubMed Central

    Lyzwa, Dominika; Herrmann, J. Michael; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2016-01-01

    How complex natural sounds are represented by the main converging center of the auditory midbrain, the central inferior colliculus, is an open question. We applied neural discrimination to determine the variation of detailed encoding of individual vocalizations across the best frequency gradient of the central inferior colliculus. The analysis was based on collective responses from several neurons. These multi-unit spike trains were recorded from guinea pigs exposed to a spectrotemporally rich set of eleven species-specific vocalizations. Spike trains of disparate units from the same recording were combined in order to investigate whether groups of multi-unit clusters represent the whole set of vocalizations more reliably than only one unit, and whether temporal response correlations between them facilitate an unambiguous neural representation of the vocalizations. We found a spatial distribution of the capability to accurately encode groups of vocalizations across the best frequency gradient. Different vocalizations are optimally discriminated at different locations of the best frequency gradient. Furthermore, groups of a few multi-unit clusters yield improved discrimination over only one multi-unit cluster between all tested vocalizations. However, temporal response correlations between units do not yield better discrimination. Our study is based on a large set of units of simultaneously recorded responses from several guinea pigs and electrode insertion positions. Our findings suggest a broadly distributed code for behaviorally relevant vocalizations in the mammalian inferior colliculus. Responses from a few non-interacting units are sufficient to faithfully represent the whole set of studied vocalizations with diverse spectrotemporal properties. PMID:26869890

  11. Photogeologic map of the Hellas basin floor, Mars: Nature, origin, and sequence of major infill units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, H.; Hiesinger, H.; Ivanov, M.; Erkeling, G.; Ruesch, O.; Reiss, D.

    2015-10-01

    Based on all state- of -the-art datasets and USGS -mapping guidelines [1,2], we produced a comprehensive photogeological map of the Hellas basin floor and its immediate surroundings (scale 1:2,000,000; Fig. 1). We compiled a self-consistent geologic history of the area, incorporating absolute and relative dating of identified units, as well as insights gained by previous investigations in and around the Hellas basin [e.g.,3-5]. Based on their ages, derived approximate volumes, as well as other characteristics, we suggest potential circum-Hellas source regions for specific basin floor units. Large deposits and erosional units in the basin show ages very similar to those of volcanic units in and around Hellas (~3.7 Ga), which is in agreement with certain volcanic outgassing models enabling liquid water runoff during that time.

  12. Are artificial reefs surrogates of natural habitats for corals and fish in Dubai, United Arab Emirates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, J.; Bartholomew, A.; Usseglio, P.; Bauman, A.; Sale, P. F.

    2009-09-01

    Artificial reefs are often promoted as mitigating human impacts in coastal ecosystems and enhancing fisheries; however, evidence supporting their benefits is equivocal. Such structures must be compared with natural reefs in order to assess their performance, but past comparisons typically examined artificial structures that were too small, or were immature, relative to the natural reefs. We compared coral and fish communities on two large (>400,000 m3) and mature (>25 year) artificial reefs with six natural coral patches. Coral cover was higher on artificial reefs (50%) than in natural habitats (31%), but natural coral patches contained higher species richness (29 vs. 20) and coral diversity ( H' = 2.3 vs. 1.8). Multivariate analyses indicated strong differences between coral communities in natural and artificial habitats. Fish communities were sampled seasonally for 1 year. Multivariate fish communities differed significantly among habitat types in the summer and fall, but converged in the winter and spring. Univariate analysis indicated that species richness and abundance were stable throughout the year on natural coral patches but increased significantly in the summer on artificial reefs compared with the winter and spring, explaining the multivariate changes in community structure. The increased summer abundance on artificial reefs was mainly due to adult immigration. Piscivores were much more abundant in the fall than in the winter or spring on artificial reefs, but had low and stable abundance throughout the year in natural habitats. It is likely that the decreased winter and spring abundance of fish on the artificial reefs resulted from both predation and emigration. These results indicate that large artificial reefs can support diverse and abundant coral and fish communities. However, these communities differ structurally and functionally from those in natural habitats, and they should not be considered as replacements for natural coral and fish communities.

  13. 8 CFR 324.5 - Former citizen of the United States whose naturalization by taking the oath is authorized by a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Former citizen of the United States whose... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS SPECIAL CLASSES OF PERSONS WHO MAY BE NATURALIZED... AUTHORIZED BY PRIVATE LAW § 324.5 Former citizen of the United States whose naturalization by taking the...

  14. Evaluation of the D-Area Expanded Operable Unit for Monitored Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Constituents of Concern: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, K.R.

    2003-01-08

    A comprehensive approach is being developed to evaluate SRS sites with inorganic constituents of concern (COCs) for potential implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation strategy. In order to invoke MNA, the operative, or controlling, attenuation mechanisms at a given site must be identified and demonstrated using a technically defensible approach and site-specific data. This report details ongoing research in the application of this approach at the D-Area expanded operable unit (DEXOU). Initial screening of the DEXOU described in this interim report indicates that natural attenuation of inorganic COCs (low pH, Cr, Ni, Se, and As) is occurring to a significant degree. This work is part of continuing efforts to characterize the natural attenuation processes, both abiotic and biotic, occurring at this location and likely occurring at other SRS sites with inorganic COCs.

  15. Emissions of CH4 from natural gas production in the United States using aircraft-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Petron, Gabrielle; Ryerson, Thomas; Peischl, Jeff; Trainer, Michael; Rella, Chris; Hardesty, Michael; Crosson, Eric; Montzka, Stephen; Tans, Pieter; Shepson, Paul; Kort, Eric

    2014-05-01

    New extraction technologies are making natural gas from shale and tight sand gas reservoirs in the United States (US) more accessible. As a result, the US has become the largest producer of natural gas in the world. This growth in natural gas production may result in increased leakage of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, offsetting the climate benefits of natural gas relative to other fossil fuels. Methane emissions from natural gas production are not well quantified because of the large variety of potential sources, the variability in production and operating practices, the uneven distribution of emitters, and a lack of verification of emission inventories with direct atmospheric measurements. Researchers at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) have used simple mass balance approaches in combination with isotopes and light alkanes to estimate emissions of CH4 from several natural gas and oil plays across the US. We will summarize the results of the available aircraft and ground-based atmospheric emissions estimates to better understand the spatial and temporal distribution of these emissions in the US.

  16. Estimation of natural dissolved-solids discharge in the Upper Colorado River basin, Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.K.; Osen, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    A statistical method was developed to estimate monthly natural dissolved-solids discharge at selected sites in the Upper Colorado River Basin. Natural dissolved-solids discharge was defined as the rate of inorganic-solute flow past a specific site that would have occurred if there had been no water-resources development in the basin upstream from the site. The method used weighted least-squares regression to fit a model of dissolved-solids discharge as a function of streamflow and several variables representing development. After the model had been calibrated for an individual site, the development variables were assigned a value of zero to yield the relation between dissolved-solids discharge and streamflow for conditions of no upstream development. Natural dissolved-solids discharge was calculated using this relation and estimates of natural streamflow provided by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Limitations of the method included lack of data to verify estimates of the natural dissolved-solids discharge and to represent all the effects of development adequately. However, model statistics indicated a good fit to historical data. Also, the estimates of natural dissolved-solids-discharge had the expected monthly distribution and were consistent between upstream and downstream sites. (USGS)

  17. Early Legal Education in the United States: Natural Law Theory and Law as a Moral Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Mark Warren

    1998-01-01

    An examination of the history of legal education covers the long period of law-office apprenticeship as the principal method of legal education in the United States and reviews trends in the period of formal education, the relationship between formal education and professional practice, the philosophical context for legal education, instruction in…

  18. Contributions of natural and anthropogenic forcing to changes in temperature extremes over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehl, Gerald A.; Arblaster, Julie M.; Tebaldi, Claudia

    2007-10-01

    Observations averaged over the U.S. for the second half of the 20th century have shown a decrease of frost days, an increase in growing season length, an increase in the number of warm nights, and an increase in heat wave intensity. For the first three, a nine member multi-model ensemble shows similar changes over the U.S. in 20th century experiments that combine anthropogenic and natural forcings, though the relative contributions of each are unclear. Here we show results from two global coupled climate models run with anthropogenic and natural forcings separately. Averaged over the continental U.S., they show that the observed changes in the four temperature extremes are accounted for with anthropogenic forcings, but not with natural forcings (even though there are some differences in the details of the forcings). This indicates that most of the changes in temperature extremes over the U.S. are likely due to human activity.

  19. The Natural Divisions of Arkansas: A Three Week Unit. Classroom Guide. Recommended for High School Level Social Studies, Earth Science and Biological Science Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foti, Thomas L.

    This unit is designed to (1) acquaint the student with Arkansas, (2) provide information on what an environment (natural system) is, and (3) provide information on how people relate to the environment as a whole. Natural systems and natural divisions (geographical areas) of Arkansas are described. Included in several sections are questions to…

  20. Changes Observed in Views of Nature of Science during a Historically Based Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudge, David Wÿss; Cassidy, David Paul; Fulford, Janice Marie; Howe, Eric Michael

    2014-01-01

    Numerous empirical studies have provided evidence of the effectiveness of an explicit and reflective approach to the learning of issues associated with the nature of science (NOS) (c.f. Abd-El-Khalick and Lederman in "J Res Sci Teach" 37(10):1057-1095, 2000). This essay reports the results of a mixed-methods association study involving…

  1. Genetic evidence for natural selection in humans in the contemporary United States.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Jonathan P

    2016-07-12

    Recent findings from molecular genetics now make it possible to test directly for natural selection by analyzing whether genetic variants associated with various phenotypes have been under selection. I leverage these findings to construct polygenic scores that use individuals' genotypes to predict their body mass index, educational attainment (EA), glucose concentration, height, schizophrenia, total cholesterol, and (in females) age at menarche. I then examine associations between these scores and fitness to test whether natural selection has been occurring. My study sample includes individuals of European ancestry born between 1931 and 1953 who participated in the Health and Retirement Study, a representative study of the US population. My results imply that natural selection has been slowly favoring lower EA in both females and males, and are suggestive that natural selection may have favored a higher age at menarche in females. For EA, my estimates imply a rate of selection of about -1.5 mo of education per generation (which pales in comparison with the increases in EA observed in contemporary times). Although they cannot be projected over more than one generation, my results provide additional evidence that humans are still evolving-albeit slowly, especially compared with the rapid changes that have occurred over the past few generations due to cultural and environmental factors. PMID:27402742

  2. Intake characteristics of grass species from semi-natural pastures in the United Kingdom

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four grass species (Lolium perenne L., Holcus lanatus L. cv Glen, Agrostis stolonifera L. cv Kromi, and Poa trivialis L.) commonly found in mesotropic lowland semi-natural grassland communities in the UK were sown in boxes (85 x 44 x 14 cm) to create micro-swards. Once established, the micro-sward...

  3. The `natural' body, God and contraceptive use in the southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    WOODSONG, CYNTHIA; SHEDLIN, MICHELE; KOO, HELEN

    2011-01-01

    Data collected among African-American and Caucasian women and men in the southeastern USA indicate that participants' perceptions of nature, God's will and the human body influence reproductive health and decision-making. Attitudes about the health care system, pharmaceutical companies and government programmes for fertility regulation reinforce these views and may negatively affect willingness to use contraceptive methods consistently and correctly. PMID:21972833

  4. Association between Natural Resources for Outdoor Activities and Physical Inactivity: Results from the Contiguous United States

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Yuan, Yongping; Neale, Anne; Jackson, Laura; Mehaffey, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Protected areas including national/state parks and recreational waters are excellent natural resources that promote physical activity and interaction with Nature, which can relieve stress and reduce disease risk. Despite their importance, however, their contribution to human health has not been properly quantified. This paper seeks to evaluate quantitatively how national/state parks and recreational waters are associated with human health and well-being, taking into account of the spatial dependence of environmental variables for the contiguous U.S., at the county level. First, we describe available natural resources for outdoor activities (ANROA), using national databases that include features from the Protected Areas Database, NAVSTREETS, and ATTAINSGEO 305(b) Waters. We then use spatial regression techniques to explore the association of ANROA and socioeconomic status factors on physical inactivity rates. Finally, we use variance analysis to analyze ANROA’s influence on income-related health inequality. We found a significantly negative association between ANROA and the rate of physical inactivity: ANROA and the spatial effect explained 69%, nationwide, of the variation in physical inactivity. Physical inactivity rate showed a strong spatial dependence—influenced not only by its own in-county ANROA, but also by that of its neighbors ANROA. Furthermore, community groups at the same income level and with the highest ANROA, always had the lowest physical inactivity rate. This finding may help to guide future land use planning and community development that will benefit human health and well-being. PMID:27548195

  5. Analysis of hazardous material releases due to natural hazards in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Hatice; Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Cruz, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    Natural hazards were the cause of approximately 16,600 hazardous material (hazmat) releases reported to the National Response Center (NRC) between 1990 and 2008-three per cent of all reported hazmat releases. Rain-induced releases were most numerous (26 per cent of the total), followed by those associated with hurricanes (20 per cent), many of which resulted from major episodes in 2005 and 2008. Winds, storms or other weather-related phenomena were responsible for another 25 per cent of hazmat releases. Large releases were most frequently due to major natural disasters. For instance, hurricane-induced releases of petroleum from storage tanks account for a large fraction of the total volume of petroleum released during 'natechs' (understood here as a natural hazard and the hazardous materials release that results). Among the most commonly released chemicals were nitrogen oxides, benzene, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Three deaths, 52 injuries, and the evacuation of at least 5,000 persons were recorded as a consequence of natech events. Overall, results suggest that the number of natechs increased over the study period (1990-2008) with potential for serious human and environmental impacts. PMID:22329456

  6. Association between Natural Resources for Outdoor Activities and Physical Inactivity: Results from the Contiguous United States.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Yuan, Yongping; Neale, Anne; Jackson, Laura; Mehaffey, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Protected areas including national/state parks and recreational waters are excellent natural resources that promote physical activity and interaction with Nature, which can relieve stress and reduce disease risk. Despite their importance, however, their contribution to human health has not been properly quantified. This paper seeks to evaluate quantitatively how national/state parks and recreational waters are associated with human health and well-being, taking into account of the spatial dependence of environmental variables for the contiguous U.S., at the county level. First, we describe available natural resources for outdoor activities (ANROA), using national databases that include features from the Protected Areas Database, NAVSTREETS, and ATTAINSGEO 305(b) Waters. We then use spatial regression techniques to explore the association of ANROA and socioeconomic status factors on physical inactivity rates. Finally, we use variance analysis to analyze ANROA's influence on income-related health inequality. We found a significantly negative association between ANROA and the rate of physical inactivity: ANROA and the spatial effect explained 69%, nationwide, of the variation in physical inactivity. Physical inactivity rate showed a strong spatial dependence-influenced not only by its own in-county ANROA, but also by that of its neighbors ANROA. Furthermore, community groups at the same income level and with the highest ANROA, always had the lowest physical inactivity rate. This finding may help to guide future land use planning and community development that will benefit human health and well-being. PMID:27548195

  7. Reported Historic Asbestos Mines, Historic Asbestos Prospects, and Natural Asbestos Occurrences in the Southwestern United States (Arizona, Nevada, and Utah)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    This map and its accompanying dataset provide information for 113 natural asbestos occurrences in the Southwestern United States (U.S.), using descriptions found in the geologic literature. Data on location, mineralogy, geology, and relevant literature for each asbestos site are provided. Using the map and digital data in this report, the user can examine the distribution of previously reported asbestos occurrences and their geological characteristics in the Southwestern U.S., which includes sites in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. This report is part of an ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey to identify and map reported natural asbestos occurrences in the U.S., which thus far includes similar maps and datasets of natural asbestos occurrences within the Eastern U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1189/), the Central U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1211/), and the Rocky Mountain States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1182/. These reports are intended to provide State and local government agencies and other stakeholders with geologic information on natural occurrences of asbestos in the U.S.

  8. Fingerprinting sedimentary and soil units by their natural metal contents: a new approach to assess metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Amorosi, Alessandro; Guermandi, Marina; Marchi, Nazaria; Sammartino, Irene

    2014-12-01

    One of the major issues when assessing soil contamination by inorganic substances is reliable determination of natural metal concentrations. Through integrated sedimentological, pedological and geochemical analyses of 1414 (topsoil/subsoil) samples from 707 sampling stations in the southern Po Plain (Italy), we document that the natural distribution of five potentially toxic metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb) can be spatially predicted as a function of three major factors: source-rock composition, grain size variability and degree of soil weathering. Thirteen genetic and functional soil units (GFUs), each reflecting a unique combination of these three variables, are fingerprinted by distinctive geochemical signatures. Where sediment is supplied by ultramafic (ophiolite-rich) sources, the natural contents of Cr and Ni in soils almost invariably exceed the Italian threshold limits designated for contaminated lands (150 mg/kg and 120 mg/kg, respectively), with median values around twice the maximum permissible levels (345 mg/kg for Cr and 207 mg/kg for Ni in GFU B5). The original provenance signal is commonly confounded by soil texture, with general tendency toward higher metal concentrations in the finest-grained fractions. Once reliable natural metal concentrations in soils are established, the anthropogenic contribution can be promptly assessed by calculating metal enrichments in topsoil samples. The use of combined sedimentological and pedological criteria to fingerprint GFU geochemical composition is presented here as a new approach to enhance predictability of natural metal contents, with obvious positive feedbacks for legislative purposes and environmental protection. Particularly, natural metal concentrations inferred directly from a new type of pedogeochemical map, built according to the international guideline ISO 19258, are proposed as an efficient alternative to the pre-determined threshold values for soil contamination commonly established by the national

  9. Regional visibility statistics in the United States: Natural and transboundary pollution influences, and implications for the Regional Haze Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Rokjin J.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Kumar, Naresh; Yantosca, Robert M.

    The Regional Haze Rule of the US Environmental Protection Agency mandates reduction in US anthropogenic emissions to achieve linear improvement of visibility in wilderness areas over the 2004-18 period toward an endpoint of natural visibility conditions by 2064. Linear improvement is to apply to the mean visibility degradation on the statistically 20% worst days, measured as a Haze Index in units of deciviews (log of aerosol extinction). We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) with 1°×1° horizontal resolution to simulate present-day visibility statistics in the USA, compare them to observations from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) surface network, and provide natural and background visibility statistics for application of the Regional Haze Rule. Background is defined by suppression of US anthropogenic emissions but allowance for present-day foreign emissions and associated import of pollution. Our model is highly successful at reproducing the observed variability of visibility statistics for present-day conditions, including the low tail of the frequency distribution that is most representative of natural or background conditions. We find considerable spatial and temporal variability in natural visibility over the USA, especially due to fires in the west. A major uncertainty in estimating natural visibility is the sensitivity of biogenic organic aerosol formation to the availability of preexisting anthropogenic aerosol. Background visibility is more variable than natural visibility and the 20% worst days show large contributions from Canadian and Mexican pollution. Asian pollution, while degrading mean background visibility, is relatively less important on the worst days. Recognizing the influence of uncontrollable transboundary pollution in the Regional Haze Rule would substantially decrease the schedule of emission reductions required in the 2004-18 implementation phase. Meaningful application of the Rule in

  10. Relating United States crop land use to natural resources and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Mendoza, F.J.; Hubbard, K.G.

    1995-02-01

    Crop production depends not only on the yield but also on the area harvested. The yield response to climate change has been widely examined, but the sensitivity of crop land use to hypothetical climate change has not been examined directly. Crop land-use regression models for estimating crop area indices (CAIs)-the percent of land used for corn, soybean, wheat, and sorghum production-are presented. Inputs to the models include available water-holding capacity of the soil, percent of land available for rain-fed agricultural production, annual precipitation, and annual temperature. The total variance of CAI explained by the models ranged from 78% from wheat to 87% for sorghum, and the root-mean-square errors ranged from 1.74% for sorghum to 4.24% for corn. The introduction of additional climatic variables to the models did not significantly improve their performance. The crop land-use models were used to predict the CAI for every crop reporting district in the United States for the current climatic condition and for possible future climate change scenarios (various combinations of temperature and precipitation changes over a range of -3{degrees} to +6{degrees}C and -20% to +20% respectively). The magnitude of climatic warming suggested by GCMs (GISS and GFDL) is from 3.5{degrees} to 5.9{degrees}C for regions of the United States. For this magnitude of warming, the model suggests corn and soybean production areas may decline while wheat and sorghum production areas may expand. If the warming is accompanied by a decrease in annual precipitation from 1% to 10%, then the areas used for corn and soybean production could decrease by as much as 20% and 40%, respectively. The area for sorghum and wheat under these conditions would increase by as much as 80% and 70%, respectively; the exact amount depending strongly on the change in precipitation. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  11. On the episodic nature of derecho-producing convective systems in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Walker S.; Mote, Thomas L.; Bentley, Mace L.

    2005-11-01

    Convectively generated windstorms occur over broad temporal and spatial scales; however, one of the larger-scale and most intense of these windstorms has been given the name derecho. This study illustrates the tendency for derecho-producing mesoscale convective systems to group together across the United States - forming a derecho series. The derecho series is recognized as any succession of derechos that develop within a similar synoptic environment with no more than 72 h separating individual events. A derecho dataset for the period 1994-2003 was assembled to investigate the groupings of these extremely damaging convective wind events. Results indicate that over 62% of the derechos in the dataset were members of a derecho series. On average, nearly six series affected the United States annually. Most derecho series consisted of two or three events; though, 14 series during the period of record contained four or more events. Two separate series involved nine derechos within a period of nine days. Analyses reveal that derecho series largely frequent regions of the Midwest, Ohio Valley, and the south-central Great Plains during May, June, and July. Results suggest that once a derecho occurred during May, June, or July, there was a 58% chance that this event was the first of a series of two or more, and about a 46% chance that this was the first of a derecho series consisting of three or more events. The derecho series climatology reveals that forecasters in regions frequented by derechos should be prepared for the probable regeneration of a derecho-producing convective system after an initial event occurs. Copyright

  12. Cultural factors of visitors' understanding of United States National Park Service natural resource messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Sunita Claire

    Current trends in the demographic structure of the US population indicate increasing cultural diversity. Culturally-diverse populations have varying beliefs, views and understandings of natural resource use and management. This study concentrates on understanding how messages pertaining to natural resources concepts and associated management decisions are communicated to and received by culturally-diverse audiences. This is particularly relevant to land managing agencies, such as the US National Park Service (NPS), that rely on a high degree of public contact and support. Failure to consider cultural-diversity has the potential to interfere with this agency's success at communicating its mission and management decisions. The study took place in three US National Parks; Grand Canyon National Park (North Rim), Guadalupe Mountains National Park, and Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Visitors were asked to complete an on-site anonymous questionnaire. Data were collected at various locations including trailheads, scenic overlooks, at visitor centers, and after interpretive programs. Total number of participants was 549, Grand Canyon National Park n = 156, Guadalupe Mountains National Park n = 153, and Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park n = 240. Results indicate that visitors were knowledgeable about the resources they were visiting. Visitors to NPS sites have achieved a high level of formal education. Certain aspects of culture, religion/spirituality seem to have a greater role in how visitors identify themselves, as opposed to ethnicity/cultural heritage. However when visitors are in a park they seem display similar cultural characteristics, which may come to the forefront while in the park setting as opposed to home setting. Methodological challenges of studying culture in a national park setting are also discussed.

  13. 8 CFR 324.5 - Former citizen of the United States whose naturalization by taking the oath is authorized by a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Former citizen of the United States whose... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS SPECIAL CLASSES OF PERSONS WHO MAY BE NATURALlZED... AUTHORIZED BY PRlVATE LAW § 324.5 Former citizen of the United States whose naturalization by taking the...

  14. Survival and catabolic activity of natural and genetically engineered bacteria in a laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, N.C.; Fry, J.C.; Weightman, A.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The survival of selected naturally occurring and genetically engineered bacteria in a fully functional laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit (ASU) was investigated. The effect of the presence of 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) on the survival of Pseudomonas putida UWC1, with or without a chimeric plasmid, pD10, which encodes 3CB catabolism, was determined. P. putida UWC1(pD10) did not enhance 3CB breakdown in the ASU, even following inoculation at a high concentration (3 x 10(8) CFU/ml). The emergence of a natural, 3CB-degrading population appeared to have a detrimental effect on the survival of strain UWC1 in the ASU. The fate of two 3CB-utilizing bacteria, derived from activated-sludge microflora, was studied in experiments in which these strains were inoculated into the ASU. Both strains, AS2, an unmanipulated natural isolate which flocculated readily in liquid media, and P. putida ASR2.8, a transconjugant containing the recombinant plasmid pD10, survived for long periods in the ASU and enhanced 3CB breakdown at 15 degrees C. The results reported in this paper illustrate the importance of choosing strains which are well adapted to environmental conditions if the use of microbial inoculants for the breakdown of target pollutants is to be successful.

  15. Direct measurements show decreasing methane emissions from natural gas local distribution systems in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Brian K; Edburg, Steven L; Ferrara, Thomas W; Howard, Touché; Harrison, Matthew R; Kolb, Charles E; Townsend-Small, Amy; Dyck, Wesley; Possolo, Antonio; Whetstone, James R

    2015-04-21

    Fugitive losses from natural gas distribution systems are a significant source of anthropogenic methane. Here, we report on a national sampling program to measure methane emissions from 13 urban distribution systems across the U.S. Emission factors were derived from direct measurements at 230 underground pipeline leaks and 229 metering and regulating facilities using stratified random sampling. When these new emission factors are combined with estimates for customer meters, maintenance, and upsets, and current pipeline miles and numbers of facilities, the total estimate is 393 Gg/yr with a 95% upper confidence limit of 854 Gg/yr (0.10% to 0.22% of the methane delivered nationwide). This fraction includes emissions from city gates to the customer meter, but does not include other urban sources or those downstream of customer meters. The upper confidence limit accounts for the skewed distribution of measurements, where a few large emitters accounted for most of the emissions. This emission estimate is 36% to 70% less than the 2011 EPA inventory, (based largely on 1990s emission data), and reflects significant upgrades at metering and regulating stations, improvements in leak detection and maintenance activities, as well as potential effects from differences in methodologies between the two studies. PMID:25826444

  16. Underground natural gas storage in the United States 1979 - 1980 heating year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    Total gas in storage in the nation's active underground natural gas storage reservoirs as of March 31, 1980, the end of the 1979-1980 heating year, was reported at 5,129 billion cubic feet. Of this total, approximately 69.1 percent was base, or cushion, gas and 30.9 percent was working gas. Working gas totaled 1,586 billion cubic feet, approximately 28.2 percent above that available at the beginning of the heating year. The nation's 383 active storage reservoirs were operated by 77 companies. Total reservoir capacity was reported at 7,287 billion cubic feet, approximately 51.4 percent, or 3,744 billion cubic feet of which was working gas capacity. Approximately 67.9 percent of this working gas capacity was in 228 reservoirs operated by 30 interstate pipeline companies, 29.1 percent was in 142 reservoirs operated by 42 intrastate companies, and 3.1 percent was in 13 reservoirs operated by 5 independent producers.

  17. Natural-gas-fired CC unit holds NO[sub x] emissions below 9. 0 ppm

    SciTech Connect

    Grunbeck, G.

    1994-09-01

    This article describes the East Syracuse generating plant, one of first commercial stations to include LM6000 gas turbines, designed to solve noise and emissions problems. This natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility provides 97 MW of power to Niagara Mohawk Power Corp and up to 80,000 lb/hr of process steam to a nearby Bristol-Myers Squibb Co plant. The plant's original design had contemplated a base-loaded facility. This stemmed from the original power sales agreement with Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. Flexibility of original design proved advantageous to the East Syracuse (NY) plant when, during the latter stages of construction, the original agreement was renegotiated into a schedulable'' contract. The new agreement now in force, providing for limited dispatch of one of the two gas turbines, is designed around other pre-existing project agreements. Design flexibility and the choice of two gas turbines made the plant capable of meeting dispatch requirements with only minor modifications of plant design and staffing.

  18. Populations, not clones, are the unit of vibrio pathogenesis in naturally infected oysters

    PubMed Central

    Lemire, Astrid; Goudenège, David; Versigny, Typhaine; Petton, Bruno; Calteau, Alexandra; Labreuche, Yannick; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    Disease in oysters has been steadily rising over the past decade, threatening the long-term survival of commercial and natural stocks. Our understanding and management of such diseases are of critical importance as aquaculture is an important aspect of dealing with the approaching worldwide food shortage. Although some bacteria of the Vibrio genus isolated from diseased oysters have been demonstrated to be pathogenic by experimental infection, direct causality has not been established. Little is known about the dynamics of how the bacterial population hosted by oysters changes during disease progression. Combining experimental ecology, a high-throughput infection assay and genome sequencing, we show that the onset of disease in oysters is associated with progressive replacement of diverse benign colonizers by members of a phylogenetically coherent virulent population. Although the virulent population is genetically diverse, all members of that population can cause disease. Comparative genomics across virulent and nonvirulent populations identified candidate virulence factors that were clustered in population-specific genomic regions. Genetic analyses revealed that one gene for a candidate virulent factor, a putative outer membrane protein, is necessary for infection of oysters. Finally, analyses of oyster mortality following experimental infection suggest that disease onset can be facilitated by the presence of nonvirulent strains. This is a new form of polymicrobial disease, in which nonpathogenic strains contribute to increase mortality. PMID:25489729

  19. The impact of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity on natural products research.

    PubMed

    Cragg, Gordon M; Katz, Flora; Newman, David J; Rosenthal, Joshua

    2012-12-01

    The discovery and development of novel, biologically active agents from natural sources, whether they be drugs, agrochemicals or other bioactive entities, involve a high level of interdisciplinary as well as international collaboration. Such collaboration, particularly at the international level, requires the careful negotiation of collaborative agreements protecting the rights of all parties, with special attention being paid to the rights of host (source) country governments, communities and scientific organizations. While many biodiversity-rich source countries currently might not have the necessary resources for in-country drug discovery and advanced development, they provide valuable opportunities for collaboration in this endeavor with research organizations from more high-income nations. This chapter discusses the experiences of the US National Cancer Institute and the US government-sponsored International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups program in the establishment of international agreements in the context of the Convention of Biological Diversity's objectives of promoting fair and equitable collaboration with multiple parties in many countries, and includes some specific lessons of value in developing such collaborations. PMID:23037777

  20. Populations, not clones, are the unit of vibrio pathogenesis in naturally infected oysters.

    PubMed

    Lemire, Astrid; Goudenège, David; Versigny, Typhaine; Petton, Bruno; Calteau, Alexandra; Labreuche, Yannick; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2015-07-01

    Disease in oysters has been steadily rising over the past decade, threatening the long-term survival of commercial and natural stocks. Our understanding and management of such diseases are of critical importance as aquaculture is an important aspect of dealing with the approaching worldwide food shortage. Although some bacteria of the Vibrio genus isolated from diseased oysters have been demonstrated to be pathogenic by experimental infection, direct causality has not been established. Little is known about the dynamics of how the bacterial population hosted by oysters changes during disease progression. Combining experimental ecology, a high-throughput infection assay and genome sequencing, we show that the onset of disease in oysters is associated with progressive replacement of diverse benign colonizers by members of a phylogenetically coherent virulent population. Although the virulent population is genetically diverse, all members of that population can cause disease. Comparative genomics across virulent and nonvirulent populations identified candidate virulence factors that were clustered in population-specific genomic regions. Genetic analyses revealed that one gene for a candidate virulent factor, a putative outer membrane protein, is necessary for infection of oysters. Finally, analyses of oyster mortality following experimental infection suggest that disease onset can be facilitated by the presence of nonvirulent strains. This is a new form of polymicrobial disease, in which nonpathogenic strains contribute to increase mortality. PMID:25489729

  1. The nature, scope and impact of genomic prediction in beef cattle in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Artificial selection has proven to be effective at altering the performance of animal production systems. Nevertheless, selection based on assessment of the genetic superiority of candidates is suboptimal as a result of errors in the prediction of genetic merit. Conventional breeding programs may extend phenotypic measurements on selection candidates to include correlated indicator traits, or delay selection decisions well beyond puberty so that phenotypic performance can be observed on progeny or other relatives. Extending the generation interval to increase the accuracy of selection reduces annual rates of gain compared to accurate selection and use of parents of the next generation at the immediate time they reach breeding age. Genomic prediction aims at reducing prediction errors at breeding age by exploiting information on the transmission of chromosome fragments from parents to selection candidates, in conjunction with knowledge on the value of every chromosome fragment. For genomic prediction to influence beef cattle breeding programs and the rate or cost of genetic gains, training analyses must be undertaken, and genomic prediction tools made available for breeders and other industry stakeholders. This paper reviews the nature or kind of studies currently underway, the scope or extent of some of those studies, and comments on the likely predictive value of genomic information for beef cattle improvement. PMID:21569623

  2. Conflicts and natural disaster management: a comparative study of flood control in the Republic of Korea and the United States.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jibum

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyse the conflicts that arise among major stakeholders during the process of disaster management and to suggest policy recommendations for improving disaster management systems. It describes several important conflict cases that have occurred among major stakeholders, such as governments, private-sector entities, and non-governmental organisations, during natural disaster management. In addition, it probes the similarities and the differences between such conflicts in the Republic of Korea and the United States. The differences between them may originate from a range of factors, such as the disaster itself, cultural features, management practices, and government organisation. However, the conflicts also are very similar in some ways, as the motivations and the behaviour of stakeholders during a disaster are alike in both countries. Based on this comparison, the study presents some common and important implications for successful disaster management practices in Korea and the US, as well as in many other nations around the world. PMID:26577979

  3. Isolation and screening of microalgae from natural habitats in the midwestern United States of America for biomass and biodiesel sources

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keesoo; Eisterhold, Megan L.; Rindi, Fabio; Palanisami, Swaminathan; Nam, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    Native species of microalgae were isolated from natural water bodies in the Midwestern United States of America and were screened for the ultimate goal of mass cultivation in Missouri and the surrounding states, and for their potential as biomass and biodiesel sources. A number of different nutrient media recipes were utilized to isolate the maximum number of colonies from each field samples. These nutrient recipes were modified in order to optimize the isolation and growth dynamics of specific colonies. All of the isolates were categorized based on the morphological appearance of the culture and the microscopic cellular appearance of the isolated colonies. Isolates included many common green microalgae and cyanobacteria. Lipid content was determined for selected strains that demonstrated relatively quick growth. Scenedesmus sp. that demonstrated the high growth rate, resistance to invasion, and contained sufficient amounts of lipid was investigated for its potential as a sustainable biomass and biodiesel feedstocks. PMID:25097410

  4. Emissions of coalbed and natural gas methane from abandoned oil and gas wells in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend-Small, Amy; Ferrara, Thomas W.; Lyon, David R.; Fries, Anastasia E.; Lamb, Brian K.

    2016-03-01

    Recent work indicates that oil and gas methane (CH4) inventories for the United States are underestimated. Here we present results from direct measurements of CH4 emissions from 138 abandoned oil and gas wells, a source currently missing from inventories. Most abandoned wells do not emit CH4, but 6.5% of wells had measurable CH4 emissions. Twenty-five percent of wells we visited that had not been plugged emitted > 5 g CH4 h-1. Stable isotopes indicate that wells emit natural gas and/or coalbed CH4. We estimate that abandoned wells make a small contribution (<1%) to regional CH4 emissions in our study areas. Additional data are needed to accurately determine the contribution of abandoned wells to national CH4 budgets, particularly measurements in other basins and better characterization of the abundance and regional distribution of high emitters.

  5. Conceptual change in pre-service science teachers' views on nature of science when learning a unit on the physics of waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattoula, Ehsan Habib

    Recent reform efforts in science education have culminated in National Science Education Standards (NSES), which include the nature of science and science inquiry themes across all grade levels. Consideration must be given to pre-service science teachers' nature of science conceptions and their perceived roles in implementing the nature of science in the science classroom. This qualitative study investigates how pre-service science teachers' views about the nature of science develop and change when learning a college physics unit on waves in an urban university. The study uses case study methodology with four pre-service science teachers as individual units of analysis. Data regarding the participants' views about the nature of science were collected before and after the instruction on the physics of waves unit. The research design used 'The Views of Nature of Science/Views of Scientific Inquiry-Physics Questionnaire' followed by structured interviews throughout the wave unit. In addition, the participants responded to daily questions that incorporated nature of science themes and constructed concept maps regarding the physics content and their nature of science understanding. After completing the VNOS/VOSI-PHYS questionnaire the pre-service science teachers' views of the nature of science were found to be mainly naive and transitional before the instruction. At the end of the wave unit instruction, the data indicated that conceptual change occurred in participants' nature of science views, shifting toward informed views. The findings of this study provide evidence that using explicit instruction with specific activities, such as experiments and concept mapping, shifted the pre-service science teachers' views away from naive and toward informed.

  6. The three-dimensional structure of trichocyte (hard alpha-) keratin intermediate filaments: the nature of the repeating unit.

    PubMed

    Fraser, R D B; Parry, David A D

    2006-08-01

    Recently, the spatial distribution of the crosslinks induced between lysine residues in trichocyte (alpha-) keratin intermediate filaments (IF) using disulfosuccinimidyl tartrate was analyzed in detail and the results used to provide information about the three-dimensional structure of the IF [Fraser, R.D.B., Parry, D.A.D., 2005. The three-dimensional structure of trichocyte (hard alpha-) keratin intermediate filaments: features of the molecular packing deduced from the sites of induced crosslinks. J. Struct. Biol. 151, 171-181.] The presence of small amounts of 0--> +/-4 crosslinkages between molecular strands four distant in the network implied that the three-dimensional network of interacting molecules must be deeply puckered, but no specific suggestions were made about the nature of the puckering. Whilst it was recognized that there may be more than one type of molecular environment in the structural repeat the initial analysis was confined to the simplest case in which all molecules had the same environment, that is to say the asymmetric unit comprised a single molecule. Further studies reported here suggest that it is likely that the asymmetric unit consists of at least two and possibly as many as four molecules and the implications of this for modeling the structure of trichocyte IF are discussed. PMID:16890455

  7. Characterizing the natural radiation levels throughout the main geological units of Sabkhat al Jabboul area, northern Syria.

    PubMed

    Al-Hilal, Mohamed; Aissa, Mosa

    2015-02-01

    The concentrations of equivalent eU, eTh, and K% were determined together with soil gas radon values and carborne gamma-ray survey in order to define the natural radioactivity levels throughout main geological units of Sabkhat al Jabboul region. Forty five soil and rock samples were collected from various lithofacies in each geological unit, and analyzed by γ-ray spectrometric technique for determining the concentration values of major radioelements. Such radiometric data could be used to differentiate between various lithologies of the investigated rocks. Although no distinct radioactive anomalies were found in the area, the radiometric profiles showed some minor variations with slightly higher values than the normal level. Despite the low radioactivity and the lack of rocks diversity in the surveyed area, it was possible to classify some certain rock types based on their radiometric response. The relationships between eU, eTh and their ratios were discussed for the Quaternary, Neogene and Paleogene formations, in order to evaluate the degree of uranium distribution and remobilization. The overall results of this radiometric survey were generally low, and lying within the range of the normal background levels in Syrian. PMID:25461509

  8. 2016 One-Year Seismic Hazard Forecast for the Central and Eastern United States from Induced and Natural Earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Mueller, Charles S.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Hoover, Susan M.; Llenos, Andrea L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Michael, Andrew J.; Rubinstein, Justin L.; McGarr, Arthur F.; Rukstales, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a 1-year seismic hazard forecast for 2016 for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) that includes contributions from both induced and natural earthquakes. The model assumes that earthquake rates calculated from several different time windows will remain relatively stationary and can be used to forecast earthquake hazard and damage intensity for the year 2016. This assessment is the first step in developing an operational earthquake forecast for the CEUS, and the analysis could be revised with updated seismicity and model parameters. Consensus input models consider alternative earthquake catalog durations, smoothing parameters, maximum magnitudes, and ground motion estimates, and represent uncertainties in earthquake occurrence and diversity of opinion in the science community. Ground shaking seismic hazard for 1-percent probability of exceedance in 1 year reaches 0.6 g (as a fraction of standard gravity [g]) in northern Oklahoma and southern Kansas, and about 0.2 g in the Raton Basin of Colorado and New Mexico, in central Arkansas, and in north-central Texas near Dallas. Near some areas of active induced earthquakes, hazard is higher than in the 2014 USGS National Seismic Hazard Model (NHSM) by more than a factor of 3; the 2014 NHSM did not consider induced earthquakes. In some areas, previously observed induced earthquakes have stopped, so the seismic hazard reverts back to the 2014 NSHM. Increased seismic activity, whether defined as induced or natural, produces high hazard. Conversion of ground shaking to seismic intensity indicates that some places in Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Arkansas may experience damage if the induced seismicity continues unabated. The chance of having Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) VI or greater (damaging earthquake shaking) is 5–12 percent per year in north-central Oklahoma and southern Kansas, similar to the chance of damage caused by natural earthquakes

  9. 2016 one-year seismic hazard forecast for the Central and Eastern United States from induced and natural earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Mueller, Charles S.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Hoover, Susan M.; Llenos, Andrea L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Michael, Andrew J.; Rubinstein, Justin L.; McGarr, Arthur F.; Rukstales, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced a 1-year seismic hazard forecast for 2016 for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) that includes contributions from both induced and natural earthquakes. The model assumes that earthquake rates calculated from several different time windows will remain relatively stationary and can be used to forecast earthquake hazard and damage intensity for the year 2016. This assessment is the first step in developing an operational earthquake forecast for the CEUS, and the analysis could be revised with updated seismicity and model parameters. Consensus input models consider alternative earthquake catalog durations, smoothing parameters, maximum magnitudes, and ground motion estimates, and represent uncertainties in earthquake occurrence and diversity of opinion in the science community. Ground shaking seismic hazard for 1-percent probability of exceedance in 1 year reaches 0.6 g (as a fraction of standard gravity [g]) in northern Oklahoma and southern Kansas, and about 0.2 g in the Raton Basin of Colorado and New Mexico, in central Arkansas, and in north-central Texas near Dallas. Near some areas of active induced earthquakes, hazard is higher than in the 2014 USGS National Seismic Hazard Model (NHSM) by more than a factor of 3; the 2014 NHSM did not consider induced earthquakes. In some areas, previously observed induced earthquakes have stopped, so the seismic hazard reverts back to the 2014 NSHM. Increased seismic activity, whether defined as induced or natural, produces high hazard. Conversion of ground shaking to seismic intensity indicates that some places in Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Arkansas may experience damage if the induced seismicity continues unabated. The chance of having Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) VI or greater (damaging earthquake shaking) is 5–12 percent per year in north-central Oklahoma and southern Kansas, similar to the chance of damage caused by natural earthquakes

  10. Naturally occurring Influenza A virus subtype H1N2 infection in a Midwest United States mink (Mustela vison) ranch.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Schwartz, Kent; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Jianqiang; Hildebrandt, Hugh

    2012-03-01

    Influenza A virus (FLUAV) causes acute respiratory disease in humans and a variety of animal species. The virus tends to remain within the species of origin; nonetheless, naturally occurring cross-species transmission of FLUAV has been periodically documented. Multiple cross-species transmissions of FLUAV have been reported from companion animals and captive wild animals, neither of which is historically considered as natural hosts of FLUAV. In the fall of 2010, mink (Mustela vison) inhabiting a 15,000-head mink farm in the Midwest United States experienced persistent severe respiratory distress and nose and/or mouth bleeding. Mink losses averaged approximately 10 animals per day. Six dead mink at 6 months of age were submitted to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for diagnostic investigation. Gross and microscopic examinations revealed that all 6 mink had hemorrhagic bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Hemolytic Escherichia coli was isolated from lungs, probably accounting for hemorrhagic pneumonia. All animals tested negative for Canine distemper virus and Aleutian mink disease virus. Interestingly, FLUAV of H1N2 subtype, which contained the matrix gene of swine lineage, was detected in the lungs. Serological follow-up on mink that remained in the ranch until pelting also confirmed that the ranch had been exposed to FLUAV of H1 subtype (δ clade). The case study suggests that FLUAV should be included in the differential diagnosis when mink experience epidemics of respiratory disease. Since the source of FLUAV appeared to be uncooked turkey meat, feeding animals fully cooked ration should be considered as a preventive measure. PMID:22362526

  11. Water usage for natural gas production through hydraulic fracturing in the United States from 2008 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Carter, Kimberly E

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has promoted the exploitation of shale oil and natural gas in the United States (U.S.). However, the large amounts of water used in hydraulic fracturing may constrain oil and natural gas production in the shale plays. This study surveyed the amounts of freshwater and recycled produced water used to fracture wells from 2008 to 2014 in Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, North Dakota, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Wyoming. Results showed that the annual average water volumes used per well in most of these states ranged between 1000 m(3) and 30,000 m(3). The highest total amount of water was consumed in Texas with 457.42 Mm(3) of water used to fracture 40,521 wells, followed by Pennsylvania with 108.67 Mm(3) of water used to treat 5127 wells. Water usages ranged from 96.85 Mm(3) to 166.10 Mm(3) annually in Texas from 2012 to 2014 with more than 10,000 wells fractured during that time. The percentage of water used for hydraulic fracturing in each state was relatively low compared to water usages for other industries. From 2009 to 2014, 6.55% (median) of the water volume used in hydraulic fracturing contained recycled produced water or recycled hydraulic fracturing wastewater. 10.84% (median) of wells produced by hydraulic fracturing were treated with recycled produced water. The percentage of wells where recycled wastewater was used was lower, except in Ohio and Arkansas, where more than half of the wells were fractured using recycled produced water. The median recycled wastewater volume in produced wells was 7127 m(3) per well, more than half the median value in annual water used per well 11,259 m(3). This indicates that, for wells recycling wastewater, more than half of their water use consisted of recycled wastewater. PMID:26826457

  12. Challenge theme 6: natural hazard risks in the Borderlands: Chapter 8 in United States--Mexican Borderlands--facing tomorrow’s challenges through USGS science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, William R.; Parcher, Jean W.; Stefanov, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Natural hazards such as earthquakes, landslides and debris flows, wildfires, hurricanes, and intense storm-induced flash floods threaten communities to varying degrees all along the United States–Mexican border. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collaborates with Federal, State, and local agencies to minimize the effects of natural hazards by providing timely, unbiased science information to emergency response officials, resource managers, and the public to help reduce property damage, injury, and loss of life. The USGS often mobilizes response efforts during and after a natural hazard event to provide technical and scientific counsel on recovery and response, and it has a long history of deploying emergency response teams to major disasters in both domestic and international locations. This chapter describes the challenges of natural hazards in the United States–Mexican border region and the capabilities of the USGS in the fields of hazard research, monitoring, and assessment, as well as preventative mitigation and post-disaster response.

  13. Effect of the nature of the heteroatoms at the spiro unit ofindoline spiropyrans on their structure and photochemical characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Aldoshin, S.M.

    1986-09-01

    In order to determine the effect of the nature of the heteroatom at the spiro unit on the structure and photochemical characteristics of indoline spiropyrans, the authors examined the results from x-ray crystallographic and photochemical investigation of 1'-phenyl-3',3'-dimethyl-6-nitrospiro STP (I), in which the oxygen atom in the benzopyran fragment is substituted by a sulfur atom. The structure was determined by the direct method and refined by full-matrix least-squares treatment in anisotropic approximation by means of the Rentgen-75 set of programs. The atomic coordinates and bond lengths and bond angles are given in tables, and the general appearance of the molecule is shown. It was shown that the C spiro-S bond which is cleaved in the spirothiopyrans during photoexcitation, like the C /SUB spiro/ -O bond in spiropyrans, is elongated and is the weakest in the molecule. In contrast to the C /SUB spiro/ -O bond of the spiropyrans, the elongation of the C /SUB spiro/ -S bond in the spirothiopyrans is due to not to specific orbital interactions but to steric strains in the molecule.

  14. Changing perceptions of United States natural-gas resources as shown by successive U. S. Department of the Interior assessments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, James W.; Dyman, Thaddeus S.

    2001-01-01

    Trends in four successive estimates of United States technically recoverable natural gas resources are examined in this report. The effective dates of these assessments were January 1 of 1975, 1980, 1987, and 1994. The 1994 estimate of the U.S. total gas endowment increased significantly over the previous three estimates, indicating that the technically recoverable endowment of gas is not an absolute volume, but rather is a quantity that can increase through time in response to advances in technology and in geologic understanding. Much of this increase was in the category of reserve growth. Reserve growth refers to additions to the estimated ultimate recovery of fields that typically occur as discovered fields are developed and produced. The potential for U.S. reserve growth, rather than being rapidly used up, appears to be sustainable for many years by intensive engineering efforts coupled with improving technology. Potential additions to reserves in continuous (unconventional) accumulations also represent a type of reserve growth, and were estimated (for the first time) in the 1994 assessment at 358 trillion cubic feet of gas. This resource category provides a significant new contribution to the estimated U.S. total gas endowment.

  15. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experimental and theoretical studies were made of the heat transfer characteristics of a latent heat storage unit used for a natural circulation cooling /latent heat storage system. Heating and cooling curves of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change of a PCM (lauric acid) was obtained by using anatural circulation loop of R22 which consisted of an electrically heated evaporater, a water cooled condenser and the latent heat storage unit. The latent heat storage unit showed a heat transfer performance which was high enough for practical use. An approximate theoretical analysis was conducted to investigate transient behavior of the latent heat storage unit. Predictions of the refrigerant and outer surface temperatures during the melting process were in fair agreement with the experimental data, whereas that of the refrigerant temperature during the solidification process was considerably lower than the measurement.

  16. Isotopic composition and origin of indigenous natural perchlorate and co-occurring nitrate in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Böhlke, John Karl; Gu, Baohua; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2010-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4−) has been detected widely in groundwater and soils of the southwestern United States. Much of this ClO4− appears to be natural, and it may have accumulated largely through wet and dry atmospheric deposition. This study evaluates the isotopic composition of natural ClO4− indigenous to the southwestern U.S. Stable isotope ratios were measured in ClO4− (δ18O, Δ17O, δ37Cl) and associated NO3− (δ18O, Δ17O, δ15N) in groundwater from the southern High Plains (SHP) of Texas and New Mexico and the Middle Rio Grande Basin (MRGB) in New Mexico, from unsaturated subsoil in the SHP, and from NO3−-rich surface caliche deposits near Death Valley, California. The data indicate natural ClO4− in the southwestern U.S. has a wide range of isotopic compositions that are distinct from those reported previously for natural ClO4− from the Atacama Desert of Chile as well as all known synthetic ClO4−. ClO4− in Death Valley caliche has a range of high Δ17O values (+8.6 to +18.4 ‰), overlapping and extending the Atacama range, indicating at least partial atmospheric formation via reaction with ozone (O3). However, the Death Valley δ37Cl values (−3.1 to −0.8 ‰) and δ18O values (+2.9 to +26.1‰) are higher than those of Atacama ClO4−. In contrast, ClO4− from western Texas and New Mexico has much lower Δ17O (+0.3 to +1.3‰), with relatively high δ37Cl (+3.4 to +5.1 ‰) and δ18O (+0.5 to +4.8 ‰), indicating either that this material was not primarily generated with O3 as a reactant or that the ClO4− was affected by postdepositional O isotope exchange. High Δ17O values in ClO4− (Atacama and Death Valley) are associated with high Δ17O values in NO3−, indicating that both compounds preserve characteristics of O3-related atmospheric production in hyper-arid settings, whereas both compounds have low Δ17O values in less arid settings. Although Δ17O variations in terrestrial NO3− can be attributed to mixing of atmospheric

  17. Why Is There Hunger in Africa? Nature Pleads "Not Guilty." A Curriculum Unit for Science and Social Studies Grades 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston, Jane; Commins, Stephen

    This unit uses six activities to examine questions of world hunger as seen in an African context and the related policy issues. Each activity allows students to explore a case study demonstrating a factor that affects hunger and grapple with some of the challenges facing policymakers today. Students should come to understand the nature of hunger,…

  18. The Nature of Small Business. Unit 2. Level 3. Instructor Guide. PACE: Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Third Edition. Research & Development Series No. 303-02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This instructor guide for a unit on the nature of small business in the PACE (Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship) curriculum includes the full text of the student module and lesson plans, instructional suggestions, and other teacher resources. The competencies that are incorporated into this module are at Level 3 of…

  19. Nature, origin, and production characteristics of the Lower Silurian regional oil and gas accumulation, central Appalachian basin, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, R.; Zagorski, W.A.

    2003-01-01

    uplift and erosion, causing gas leakage and a marked reduction in fluid pressure. Most future natural-gas production in the Clinton/Medina sandstones is anticipated to come from the basin-center accumulation. The Tuscarora Sandstone has additional gas resources but typically low reservoir porosity and permeability, and the likelihood of low-energy (in British thermal units) gas reduce the incentive to explore for it.

  20. Single-Unit Activity during Natural Vision: Diversity, Consistency, and Spatial Sensitivity among AF Face Patch Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Brian E.; Elnaiem, Heba D.; Kurnikova, Anastasia I.; Leopold, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Several visual areas within the STS of the macaque brain respond strongly to faces and other biological stimuli. Determining the principles that govern neural responses in this region has proven challenging, due in part to the inherently complex stimulus domain of dynamic biological stimuli that are not captured by an easily parameterized stimulus set. Here we investigated neural responses in one fMRI-defined face patch in the anterior fundus (AF) of the STS while macaques freely view complex videos rich with natural social content. Longitudinal single-unit recordings allowed for the accumulation of each neuron's responses to repeated video presentations across sessions. We found that individual neurons, while diverse in their response patterns, were consistently and deterministically driven by the video content. We used principal component analysis to compute a family of eigenneurons, which summarized 24% of the shared population activity in the first two components. We found that the most prominent component of AF activity reflected an interaction between visible body region and scene layout. Close-up shots of faces elicited the strongest neural responses, whereas far away shots of faces or close-up shots of hindquarters elicited weak or inhibitory responses. Sensitivity to the apparent proximity of faces was also observed in gamma band local field potential. This category-selective sensitivity to spatial scale, together with the known exchange of anatomical projections of this area with regions involved in visuospatial analysis, suggests that the AF face patch may be specialized in aspects of face perception that pertain to the layout of a social scene. PMID:25855170

  1. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experiments were performed to investigate feasibility of using organic materials as a PCM for a latent heat storage unit of a natural circulation cooling/latent heat storage system. This system was designed to cool a shelter accommodating telecommunication equipment located in subtropical deserts or similar regions without using a power source. Taking into account practical considerations and the results of various experiments regarding the thermodynamic properties, thermal degradation, and corrosiveness to metals, lauric acid and iron was selected for the PCM and the latent heat storage unit material, respectively. Cyclic heating and cooling of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change was repeated for more than 430 days. The results showed that the heating-cooling curve was almost unchanged between the early stage and the 1,870th cycle. It was concluded that the latent heat storage unit could be used safely for more than ten years as a component of the cooling system.

  2. AcuteToxicological Responses of Fischer Rats to Naturally Occurring Asbestos Samples from the United States and Canada

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential public health issues related to exposure to natural asbestos deposits (commonly termed naturally occurring asbestos, NO A) has gained the regulatory and media spotlight in recent years. Arguably the most well known example is Libby, Montana, the site of the largest ...

  3. Acute Toxicological Responses of Fischer Rats to Naturally Occurring Asbestos from theUnited States and Canada

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to provide understanding of the toxicity of naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) including Libby amphibole (LA), Sumas Mountain chrysotile (SM), EI Dorado Hills tremolite (ED) and Ontario actinolite/ferroactinolite cleavage fragments (ON). Ratrespirable fra...

  4. Two-phase natural-circulation experiments in a test facility modeled after Three Mile Island Unit-2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kiang, R.L.

    1981-10-01

    A series of natural circulation experiments was conducted in a test facility that was configured after the primary and the secondary cooling systems of TMI-2. Results support the feasibility of core residual heat removal by two-phase natural circulation. Tests with noncondensable gas in the primary system indicate that two-phase natural circulation is quite tolerant of the presence of noncondensable gas. The different modes of natural circulation were discovered. Mode 1, during which only saturated steam flows in the hot leg, accomplishes the heat removal via phase changes in the vessel and in the steam generator tubes. Mode 2, during which a percolating flow exists in the hot leg, removes the heat by means of a much faster circulation in the primary loop.

  5. Natural Gas Storage in the United States in 2001: A Current Assessment and Near-Term Outlook

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    This report examines the large decline of underground natural gas storage inventories during the 2000-2001 heating season and the concern that the nation might run out of working gas in storage prior to the close of the heating season on March 31, 2001. This analysis also looks at the current profile and capabilities of the U.S. natural gas underground storage sector.

  6. Natural Gas Methane Emissions in the United States Greenhouse Gas Inventory: Sources, Uncertainties and Opportunities for Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Garvin; Warner, Ethan; Steinberg, Daniel; Brandt, Adam

    2015-11-19

    Presentation summarizing key findings of a Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Report at an Environmental Protection Agency workshop: 'Stakeholder Workshop on EPA GHG Data on Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems' on November 19, 2015. For additional information see the JISEA report, 'Estimating U.S. Methane Emissions from the Natural Gas Supply Chain: Approaches, Uncertainties, Current Estimates, and Future Studies' NREL/TP-6A50-62820.

  7. Enhancing Interpretation of Natural Phenomena through a Mathematical Apparatus: A Proposal of an Interactive Unit in Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    This paper integrates technology, in the form of a physics simulation; science concepts, via image formation by lenses; and a mathematics apparatus, in the form of rational functions. All constituents merge into an instructional unit that can be embedded into a high school or undergraduate mathematics or physics course. The cognitive purpose of…

  8. Project CHOICE: #79. A Career Unit for Grades 5 and 6. Kern County Petroleum. (Agribusiness and Natural Resources Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Kern County Petroleum, is one in a series of curriculum guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking 5th and 6th grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. These ten lessons about petroleum…

  9. Initial efforts to develop a national strategy to protect crop wild relatives native or naturalized in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historically, the call to conserve crop wild relatives has been driven by habitat degradation fueled by exponential population growth. Today, we have a clarion call for action, as historic impetuses are compounded by the forecast of global climate change. In the United States efforts have been movin...

  10. MAPPING CRITICAL LEVELS OF OZONE, SULPHUR DIOXIDE AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE FOR CROPS, FORESTS AND NATURAL VEGETATION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollution abatement strategies for controlling nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone emissions in the United States focus on a "Standards-based" approach. his approach places limits on air pollution by maintaining a baseline value for air quality, no matter what the eco...

  11. Expatriate Academic Staff in the United Arab Emirates: The Nature of Their Work Experiences in Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ann E.; Chapman, David W.; Farah, Samar; Wilson, Elisabeth; Ridge, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    As many countries expand their higher education systems, they must attract, support, and retain qualified academic staff. This paper focuses on the United Arab Emirates (UAE) as a case study of a nation drawing on large numbers of mostly expatriate faculty working in short-term academic appointments. The paper begins by considering the national…

  12. UNIT, ALASKA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THE UNIT DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOKLET DEALS WITH THE GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. THE UNIT IS PRESENTED IN OUTLINE FORM. THE FIRST SECTION DEALS PRINCIPALLY WITH THE PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. DISCUSSED ARE (1) THE SIZE, (2) THE MAJOR LAND REGIONS, (3) THE MOUNTAINS, VOLCANOES, GLACIERS, AND RIVERS, (4) THE NATURAL RESOURCES, AND (5) THE CLIMATE. THE…

  13. A natural protecting group strategy to carry an amino acid starter unit in the biosynthesis of macrolactam polyketide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2011-11-16

    Macrolactam antibiotics are an important class of macrocyclic polyketides that contain a unique nitrogen-containing starter unit. In the present study, a set of starter biosynthetic enzymes in the macrolactam antibiotic vicenistatin was characterized. We found that the protection-deprotection strategy of the aminoacyl-ACP intermediate was critical in this system. On the basis of bioinformatics, the described pathway is also proposed as a common method for carrying amino acids in the biosynthesis of other macrolactam antibiotics. PMID:22010945

  14. Analysis of Five High School Biology Textbooks Used in the United States for Inclusion of the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiappetta, Eugene L.; Fillman, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Five high school biology textbooks were examined to determine the inclusion of four aspects of the nature of science: (a) science as a body of knowledge, (b) science as a way of investigating, (c) science as a way of thinking, and (d) science and its interactions with technology and society. The textbooks analyzed were "BSCS Biology--A Human…

  15. SUSTAINABILITY OF NATURAL RUBBER-PRODUCING CROPS IN THE UNITED STATES: APPLIED BIOTECHNOLOGY LESSONS 2000-2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber (NR) is a critical and strategic raw material for industrial manufacturing and national defense. Development of a US-based supply of NR is recognized in the Critical Agricultural Materials Act, Public Law 95–592. Domestic rubber-producing crops have been introduced in the US during ti...

  16. Stem cells are units of natural selection for tissue formation, for germline development, and in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Irving L

    2015-07-21

    It is obvious that natural selection operates at the level of individuals and collections of individuals. Nearly two decades ago we showed that in multi-individual colonies of protochordate colonial tunicates sharing a blood circulation, there exists an exchange of somatic stem cells and germline stem cells, resulting in somatic chimeras and stem cell competitions for gonadal niches. Stem cells are unlike other cells in the body in that they alone self-renew, so that they form clones that are perpetuated for the life of the organism. Stem cell competitions have allowed the emergence of competitive somatic and germline stem cell clones. Highly successful germline stem cells usually outcompete less successful competitors both in the gonads of the genotype partner from which they arise and in the gonads of the natural parabiotic partners. Therefore, natural selection also operates at the level of germline stem cell clones. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri the formation of natural parabionts is prevented by a single-locus highly polymorphic histocompatibility gene called Botryllus histocompatibility factor. This limits germline stem cell predation to kin, as the locus has hundreds of alleles. We show that in mice germline stem cells compete for gonad niches, and in mice and humans, blood-forming stem cells also compete for bone marrow niches. We show that the clonal progression from blood-forming stem cells to acute leukemias by successive genetic and epigenetic events in blood stem cells also involves competition and selection between clones and propose that this is a general theme in cancer. PMID:26195745

  17. Stem cells are units of natural selection for tissue formation, for germline development, and in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Irving L.

    2015-01-01

    It is obvious that natural selection operates at the level of individuals and collections of individuals. Nearly two decades ago we showed that in multi-individual colonies of protochordate colonial tunicates sharing a blood circulation, there exists an exchange of somatic stem cells and germline stem cells, resulting in somatic chimeras and stem cell competitions for gonadal niches. Stem cells are unlike other cells in the body in that they alone self-renew, so that they form clones that are perpetuated for the life of the organism. Stem cell competitions have allowed the emergence of competitive somatic and germline stem cell clones. Highly successful germline stem cells usually outcompete less successful competitors both in the gonads of the genotype partner from which they arise and in the gonads of the natural parabiotic partners. Therefore, natural selection also operates at the level of germline stem cell clones. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri the formation of natural parabionts is prevented by a single-locus highly polymorphic histocompatibility gene called Botryllus histocompatibility factor. This limits germline stem cell predation to kin, as the locus has hundreds of alleles. We show that in mice germline stem cells compete for gonad niches, and in mice and humans, blood-forming stem cells also compete for bone marrow niches. We show that the clonal progression from blood-forming stem cells to acute leukemias by successive genetic and epigenetic events in blood stem cells also involves competition and selection between clones and propose that this is a general theme in cancer. PMID:26195745

  18. Reported Historic Asbestos Mines, Historic Asbestos Prospects, and Natural Asbestos Occurrences in the Rocky Mountain States of the United States (Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, and Wyoming)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2007-01-01

    This map and its accompanying dataset provide information for 48 natural asbestos occurrences in the Rocky Mountain States of the United States (U.S.), using descriptions found in the geologic literature. Data on location, mineralogy, geology, and relevant literature for each asbestos site are provided. Using the map and digital data in this report, the user can examine the distribution of previously reported asbestos occurrences and their geological characteristics in the Rocky Mountain States. This report is part of an ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey to identify and map reported natural asbestos occurrences in the U.S., which thus far includes similar maps and datasets of natural asbestos occurrences within the Eastern U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1189/) and the Central U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1211/). These reports are intended to provide State and local government agencies and other stakeholders with geologic information on natural occurrences of asbestos in the U.S.

  19. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns: Helping the Western United States Manage Natural Resources One Project at a Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, Erin; Newcomer, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The western half of the United States is made up of a number of diverse ecosystems ranging from arid desert to coastal wetlands and rugged forests. Every summer for the past 7 years students ranging from high school to graduate level gather at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) as part of the DEVELOP Internship Program. Under the guidance of Jay Skiles [Ames Research Center (ARC) - Ames DEVELOP Manager] and Cindy Schmidt [ARC/San Jose State University Ames DEVELOP Coordinator] they work as a team on projects exploring topics including: invasive species, carbon flux, wetland restoration, air quality monitoring, storm visualizations, and forest fires. The study areas for these projects have been in Washington, Utah, Oregon, Nevada, Hawaii, Alaska and California. Interns combine data from NASA and partner satellites with models and in situ measurements to complete prototype projects demonstrating how NASA data and resources can help communities tackle their Earth Science related problems.

  20. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Estimated Mean Annual Natural Groundwater Recharge, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael E.; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the mean annual natural groundwater recharge, in millimeters, compiled for every MRB_E2RF1catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is Estimated Mean Annual Natural Ground-Water Recharge in the Conterminous United States (Wolock, 2003). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  1. Chemistry and mineralogy of natural bitumens and heavy oils and their reservoir rocks from the United States, Canada, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosterman, John W.; Meyer, R.F.; Palmer, C.A.; Doughten, M.W.; Anders, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-one samples from natural bitumen and heavy oil deposits in seven States of the United States and six samples from outside the United States form the basis of this initial study. This Circular gives the mineral content of the reservoir rock, the trace-element distribution in the reservoir rock and hydrocarbons, and the composition of the heavy oil and natural bitumen. The reservoir rock and sediment residues from California contain more trace-element maximum amounts than any of the other rock samples. These relatively high concentrations of trace elements may be due, in part, to the low quartz content of the rock and to the presence of heulandite, cristobalite, siderite, and pyrite. The reservoir rock and sediment residues from Oklahoma contain more minimum amounts of trace elements than any of the other rock samples. This pattern probably results from the large amount of quartz in four of the samples and a large amount of calcite in the other sample. The maximum and minimum amounts of trace elements in the bitumen and heavy oil do not correlate with those in the reservoir rocks. The bitumen from Utah contains the greatest number of trace-element maxima, whereas there is no trend in the trace-element minima in the bitumen and heavy oil.

  2. Fluctuations in Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing unit composition in two naturally infected triatomines: Mepraia gajardoi and M. spinolai after laboratory feeding.

    PubMed

    Egaña, Camila; Pinto, Raquel; Vergara, Fernanda; Ortiz, Sylvia; Campos, Ricardo; Solari, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    Mepraia species are hematophagous insects and the most important wild vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in southeastern South America. Because the domestic Triatoma infestans is already controlled, the transmission of different T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) by Mepraia species deserves attention. Our aim is to gather information on the diversity of T. cruzi DTUs circulating in natural insect populations. Two groups of naturally infected bugs 21 Mepraia gajardoi and 26 Mepraia spinolai were followed-up after two or more laboratory feedings by means of minicircle-PCR assays to evaluate the composition of four T. cruzi DTUs by hybridization tests. Fluctuations from positive T. cruzi detection to negative and the converse, as well as single to mixed infections with different T. cruzi DTUs and the opposite were frequent observations after laboratory feeding in both Mepraia species. Single and mixed infections with more than two T. cruzi DTUs were detected after the first feeding; however mainly mixed infections prevailed after the second feeding. Laboratory feeding on three or more occasions resulted in a decreasing trend of the parasite burden. In a comparison with 28 infected and fed M. gajardoi collected one year before from the same vector colony T. cruzi DTUs composition changed, indicating that temporal variations occur in T. cruzi. Natural populations of Mepraia species can transmit complex mixtures T. cruzi DTUs which fluctuate over time after feeding, with a tendency to eliminate the parasitism after prolonged feeding. PMID:27109041

  3. A methodology for risk analysis based on hybrid Bayesian networks: application to the regasification system of liquefied natural gas onboard a floating storage and regasification unit.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marcelo Ramos; Schleder, Adriana Miralles; Droguett, Enrique López

    2014-12-01

    This article presents an iterative six-step risk analysis methodology based on hybrid Bayesian networks (BNs). In typical risk analysis, systems are usually modeled as discrete and Boolean variables with constant failure rates via fault trees. Nevertheless, in many cases, it is not possible to perform an efficient analysis using only discrete and Boolean variables. The approach put forward by the proposed methodology makes use of BNs and incorporates recent developments that facilitate the use of continuous variables whose values may have any probability distributions. Thus, this approach makes the methodology particularly useful in cases where the available data for quantification of hazardous events probabilities are scarce or nonexistent, there is dependence among events, or when nonbinary events are involved. The methodology is applied to the risk analysis of a regasification system of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on board an FSRU (floating, storage, and regasification unit). LNG is becoming an important energy source option and the world's capacity to produce LNG is surging. Large reserves of natural gas exist worldwide, particularly in areas where the resources exceed the demand. Thus, this natural gas is liquefied for shipping and the storage and regasification process usually occurs at onshore plants. However, a new option for LNG storage and regasification has been proposed: the FSRU. As very few FSRUs have been put into operation, relevant failure data on FSRU systems are scarce. The results show the usefulness of the proposed methodology for cases where the risk analysis must be performed under considerable uncertainty. PMID:25041168

  4. Distribution and species-specific occurrence of cyathostomins (Nematoda, Strongylida) in naturally infected horses from Italy, United Kingdom and Germany.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Donato; Milillo, Piermarino; Barnes, Helen; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Schurmann, Sandra; Demeler, Janina; Otranto, Domenico; Lia, Riccardo P; Perrucci, Stefania; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Beraldo, Paola; Amodie, Deborah; Rohn, Karl; Cobb, Rami; Boeckh, Albert

    2010-02-26

    A broad scale study was carried out in 2008 to evaluate the distribution and species-specific occurrence of cyathostomin populations in horse yards from Europe. In total 102 properties and 3123 horses were included in Italy (60 yards and 1646 animals), United Kingdom (22 yards and 737 animals) and Germany (20 yards and 740 animals). Individual faecal samples were examined with a McMaster technique while pooled samples were subjected to the microscopic examination of in vitro cultured larvae and to a Reverse Line Blot (RLB) assay able to molecularly identify the most diffused 13 species of cyathostomins. All yards were positive for the presence of cyathostomins both at the McMaster technique and at the microscopic examination of cultured larvae. One thousand and nine hundred thirty-one horses (61.8%) showed a positive faecal egg count, i.e. 1110 (67.4%), 463 (62.8%) and 358 (48.3%) from Italy, UK and Germany respectively. Out of the 1931 positive animals 1133 (36.3%) showed a faecal egg count per gram >150, specifically 694 (42.2%) from Italy, 237 (32.2%) from UK and 202 (27.3%) from Germany. The molecular results showed that all 13 species that can be detected by the RLB were found in each of the three countries, with a range of 3-13 species present in individual yards. The five most prevalent were Cylicocyclus nassatus, Cylicostephanus longibursatus, Cyathostomum catinatum, Cylicocyclus goldi and Cyathostomum pateratum. The relevance of these results and related biological and epidemiological features are discussed, together with their significance for both future studies of cyathostomins and further intervention programs aiming to control the spread of anthelmintic-resistant populations. PMID:19906489

  5. Probing the nature of the pre-merging system Hickson Compact Group 31 through integral field unit data★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro-Cuello, M.; Torres-Flores, S.; Carrasco, E. R.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; de Mello, D. F.; Amram, P.

    2015-10-01

    We present a study of the kinematics and the physical properties of the central region of the Hickson Compact Group 31 (HCG 31), focusing on the HCG 31A+C system, using integral field spectroscopy data taken with the Gemini South Telescope. The main players in the merging event (galaxies A and C) are two dwarf galaxies, which have had one close encounter, given the observed tidal tails, and may now be in their second approach, and are possibly about to merge. We present new velocity fields and Hα emission, stellar continuum, velocity dispersion, electron density, Hα equivalent-width and age maps. Considering the high spatial resolution of the integral field unit data, we were able to measure various components and estimate their physical parameters, spatially resolving the different structures in this region. Our main findings are the following: (1) We report for the first time the presence of a super stellar cluster next to the burst associated with the HCG 31C central blob, related to the high values of velocity dispersion observed in this region as well as to the highest value of stellar continuum emission. This may suggest that this system is cleaning its environment through strong stellar winds that may then trigger a strong star formation event in its neighbourhood. (2) Among other physical parameters, we estimate L(Hα) ˜ 14 × 1041 erg s-1 and the star formation rate, SFR ˜11 M⊙ yr-1 for the central merging region of HCG 31A+C. These values indicate a high star formation density, suggesting that the system is part of a merging object, supporting previous scenarios proposed for this system.

  6. Socioeconomic impacts of natural gas curtailments: a study of the textile industry in the southeastern United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    A study was undertaken to identify the effects of fuel curtailments in the textile industry in North and South Carolina. Regional economic and social structures were affected with natural gas curtailments in 1976 and 1977. This document presents results of the effects of production shutdown resulting from the curtailments. Chapter II presents background information on the pipelines that service the region. Chapters III and IV describe the affected communities and the observed increase in government expenditures to counteract the impacts. Chapter V contains a complete list of textile plants in the study area that had to either work under abbreviated schedules or close entirely during the winter of 1976-1977. Attention was given to economic impacts at the industrial level that may have been attributable to the curtailment. Chapter VI covers these topics. In some instances, textile mills have relocated their plant facilities because they could not be guaranteed continuous fuel service at their original site. These data are the main concern of Chapter VII. Chapter VIII concentrates on social impacts; many facilities which provide services essential to human needs were subjected to gas curtailments so that the critical energy supplies could be diverted to industry. Chapter VIII also discusses an interesting geographic separation between social and economic impacts.

  7. Use of naturalized coagulants in removing laundry waste surfactant using various unit processes in lab-scale.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S Mariraj

    2014-04-01

    This lab-scale experiment is aimed at demonstrating a treatment system for purification and reuse of laundry rinsing water generated from households. The main objective of the study is to compare the efficiencies of various natural coagulants in removing laundry waste surfactants and other major pollutants from the laundry rinsing water. The treatment system consists of Coagulation-Flocculation, Sand filtration and Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) adsorption. Four experiments were conducted in batch process by varying the coagulants (Nirmali seed and Pectin extracted from pith of Orange peel). Coagulants have been selected due to their local availability at affordable cost and technical feasibility. From the study it is concluded that laundry rinsing water polluted with high turbidity and anionic surfactant treated with Nirmali seeds as coagulant at a retention time of 24 h gives the best results. The treatment system where Orange peel pectin is used as coagulant at a retention time of 24 h is found to be the most efficient one based on the weighted factor. Hence the treatment of laundry rinsing water by aforesaid combination results in better water quality. PMID:24583608

  8. Magnetic Fabric and Natural Remanent Magnetization in the MCU IVe' Unit of the Bjerkreim Sokndal Layered Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, A. R.; McEnroe, S. A.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Bjerkreim Sokndal intrusion consists of layers of plagioclase-pyroxene cumulates representing recharge and fractional crystallization of a jotunitic magma. The layers form a syncline with a SE plunging fold axis, and strong foliation at the limbs. One of these layers, MCU IVe', is associated with a strong negative magnetic anomaly on the east of the syncline, reducing the magnetic field intensity at the surface to about 1/3 to 1/2 of the expected value. The anomaly is less prominent where MCU IVe' outcrops in the hinge and west limb. Such a strong negative anomaly must be caused by remanent magnetization, most likely carried by lamellar hemo-ilmenite, which is known for its strong and stable remanence. A second magnetic phase present is magnetite. The aim of this study is to understand how the magnetic fabric affects the orientation and intensity of the remanence, which in turn controls the observed anomaly. Natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) have been measured on 500 cores from sites along MCU IVe'. The NRM direction changes along the layer, possibly related to mineral foliation. Both NRM intensity and mean susceptibility show a general decrease from east to north to west. In most sites, especially those with strong remanence, the NRM is sub-parallel to the maximum susceptibility, or lies within the magnetic foliation plane. Minimum susceptibility is normal to the expected mineral foliation plane in some sites, whereas it can lie within the foliation plane in others. This may be explained with the presence of two magnetic carriers, hemo-ilmenite and magnetite, which can give rise to different magnetic anisotropies. Understanding the relationship between mineral fabric, AMS, the intensity and direction of NRM, and the observed anomaly will help in interpreting other strong magnetic anomalies.

  9. Identification of Indole Alkaloid Structural Units Important for Stimulus-Selective TRPM8 Inhibition: SAR Study of Naturally Occurring Iboga Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuko; Kitajima, Mariko; Taguchi, Fuyumi; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Horie, Syunji; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2014-08-22

    The iboga alkaloid voacangine (1) has been reported previously to be the first stimulus-selective TRPM8 antagonist. In the present report, a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study is described on the effects of some naturally occurring indole alkaloid analogues on TRPM8 inhibition. Dihydrocatharanthine (10) and catharanthine (11) were found to be inhibitors of TRPM8 activity, and their IC50 values were equivalent to that of BCTC, a potent and representative TRPM8 antagonist. Furthermore, it was shown that the iboga moiety is the most crucial unit for TRPM8 blockade and that its stereostructure, as found in 1 but not in 10 and 11, is essential for chemical agonist-selective TRPM8 inhibition. These findings should provide useful information for synthesizing additional stimulus-selective and TRPM8-selective blockers. PMID:25052206

  10. Nature and origin of Proterozoic A-type granitic magmatism in the southwestern United States of America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. Lawford; Bender, E. Erik

    1989-06-01

    .75. Such extreme variations in primary levels of oxygen fugacity must be an indirect imprint of regional changes of the level of oxidation of the lower crust. The high-f O 2 Holy Moses and Hualapai plutons have intruded near the regional boundary between the metaluminous and peraluminous granites and appear to be imaging a major change in the level of oxidation of the lower crust. This boundary is also approximately equivalent to significant changes in the Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of these granites and the metamorphic and magmatic character of the older orogenic terrane. On a global scale, the crust-forming orogenies ended by 1.6 Ga ago and the continents entered a long-lived era dominated by localized extension and transcontinental intrusion of anorogenic potassic rapakivi granite, mafic dike swarms, charnockite and anorthosite. The absence of orogenic deformation implies that plate consumption became intraoceanic during this time. The profuse and widespread nature of the igneous activity has no Phanerozoic analogue and is considered to be unique to the Proterozoic. A crustal overturn model ties the magmatism to heating within a largely undepleted subcontinental mantle, the eventual rise of mantle plumes, and the transfer of heat into the youthful, undifferentiated Proterozoic crust. Subsequent melting and rise of potassic granitic magmas from the lower crust leads to considerable crustal reorganization, a process that would continue until both the mantle and crust reached a stable configuration.

  11. Effects of natural and human factors on groundwater quality of basin-fill aquifers in the southwestern United States-conceptual models for selected contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Thiros, Susan A.; Anning, David W.; Huntington, Jena M.; McKinney, Tim S.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, the Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study is building a better understanding of the factors that affect water quality in basin-fill aquifers in the Southwestern United States. The SWPA study area includes four principal aquifers of the United States: the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers in California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona; the Rio Grande aquifer system in New Mexico and Colorado; and the California Coastal Basin and Central Valley aquifer systems in California. Similarities in the hydrogeology, land- and water-use practices, and water-quality issues for alluvial basins within the study area allow for regional analysis through synthesis of the baseline knowledge of groundwater-quality conditions in basins previously studied by the NAWQA Program. Resulting improvements in the understanding of the sources, movement, and fate of contaminants are assisting in the development of tools used to assess aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability. This report synthesizes previously published information about the groundwater systems and water quality of 15 information-rich basin-fill aquifers (SWPA case-study basins) into conceptual models of the primary natural and human factors commonly affecting groundwater quality with respect to selected contaminants, thereby helping to build a regional understanding of the susceptibility and vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers to those contaminants. Four relatively common contaminants (dissolved solids, nitrate, arsenic, and uranium) and two contaminant classes (volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticide compounds) were investigated for sources and controls affecting their occurrence and distribution above specified levels of concern in groundwater of the case-study basins. Conceptual models of factors that are important to aquifer vulnerability with respect to those contaminants and contaminant classes were subsequently formed. The

  12. Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in ground water at Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinicola, Richard S.; Cox, S.E.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Bradley, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) evaluated the natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) in ground water beneath the former landfill at Operable Unit 1 (OU 1), Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington. The predominant contaminants in ground water are trichloroethene (TCE) and its degradation byproducts cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). The Navy planted two hybrid poplar plantations on the landfill in spring of 1999 to remove and control the migration of CVOCs in shallow ground water. Previous studies provided evidence that microbial degradation processes also reduce CVOC concentrations in ground water at OU 1, so monitored natural attenuation is a potential alternative remedy if phytoremediation is ineffective. This report describes the current (2000) understanding of natural attenuation of CVOCs in ground water at OU 1 and the impacts that phytoremediation activities to date have had on attenuation processes. The evaluation is based on ground-water and surface-water chemistry data and hydrogeologic data collected at the site by the USGS and Navy contractors between 1991 and 2000. Previously unpublished data collected by the USGS during 1996-2000 are presented. Natural attenuation of CVOCs in shallow ground water at OU 1 is substantial. For 1999-2000 conditions, approximately 70 percent of the mass of dissolved chlorinated ethenes that was available to migrate from the landfill was completely degraded in shallow ground water before it could migrate to the intermediate aquifer or discharge to surface water. Attenuation of CVOC concentrations appears also to be substantial in the intermediate aquifer, but biodegradation appears to be less significant; those conclusions are less certain because of the paucity of data downgradient of the landfill beneath the tide flats. Attenuation of CVOC concentrations is also substantial in surface water as it flows through the adjacent marsh and out to the tide

  13. S. 625: Natural Gas Regulatory Reform Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, March 16, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    S. 625 would eliminate artificial distortions in the natural gas marketplace to promote competition in the natural gas industry. It would do this by amending certain sections of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. Title I: Decontrol of Natural Gas describes provisions for elimination of wellhead price controls; coordination with the Natural Gas Act; application to first sales; technical and conforming amendments; effective date (January 1, 1993). Title II: Transitional Provisions describes the decontrol of natural gas subject to a newly executed contract, a renegotiated contract, a terminated contract, or to a contract which expires; coordination with the Natural Gas Act; and effective date (enactment of this bill).

  14. The Effectiveness of the Conceptual Change Approach, Explicit Reflective Approach, and Course Book by the Ministry of Education on the Views of the Nature of Science and Conceptual Change in Light Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cil, Emine; Cepni, Salih

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of the conceptual change approach, explicit reflective approach, and the course book by the Ministry of Education on the views toward the nature of science and conceptual change in the Light unit. Three study groups were selected from several seventh grade classes. Two of the three classes,…

  15. Project CHOICE: #26. A Career Education Unit for Junior High School. Careers in Conservation of the Environment and Natural Resources. (Agriculture and Ecological Studies Cluster; Science and Engineering Occupations Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This junior high teaching unit on careers in conservation of the environment and natural resources is one in a series of career guidebooks developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking classroom experiences with the world of work. The unit…

  16. The nature of porosity in organic-rich mudstones of the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation, North Sea, offshore United Kingdom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Neil S.; Hackley, Paul C.; Lowers, Heather; Hill, Ronald J.; Egenhoff, Sven O.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Blum, Alex E.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of organic-rich mudstones from wells that penetrated the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation, offshore United Kingdom, were performed to evaluate the nature of both organic and inorganic rock constituents and their relation to porosity in this world-class source rock. The formation is at varying levels of thermal maturity, ranging from immature in the shallowest core samples to mature in the deepest core samples. The intent of this study was to evaluate porosity as a function of both organic macerals and thermal maturity. At least four distinct types of organic macerals were observed in petrographic and SEM analyses and they all were present across the study area. The macerals include, in decreasing abundance: 1) bituminite admixed with clays; 2) elongate lamellar masses (alginite or bituminite) with small quartz, feldspar, and clay entrained within it; 3) terrestrial (vitrinite, fusinite, semifusinite) grains; and 4) Tasmanites microfossils. Although pores in all maceral types were observed on ion-milled surfaces of all samples, the pores (largely nanopores with some micropores) vary as a function of maceral type. Importantly, pores in the macerals do not vary systematically as a function of thermal maturity, insofar as organic pores are of similar size and shape in both the immature and mature Kimmeridge rocks. If any organic pores developed during the generation of hydrocarbons, they were apparently not preserved, possibly because of the highly ductile nature of much of the rock constituents of Kimmeridge mudstones (clays and organic material). Inorganic pores (largely micropores with some nanopores) have been observed in all Kimmeridge mudstones. These pores, particularly interparticle (i.e., between clay platelets), and intraparticle (i.e., in framboidal pyrite, in partially dissolved detrital K-feldspar, and in both detrital and authigenic dolomite) are noteworthy because they compose much of the observable porosity in the shales in both

  17. Survey of residual nitrite and nitrate in conventional and organic/natural/uncured/indirectly cured meats available at retail in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nuñez De González, Maryuri T; Osburn, Wesley N; Hardin, Margaret D; Longnecker, Michael; Garg, Harsha K; Bryan, Nathan S; Keeton, Jimmy T

    2012-04-18

    A survey of residual nitrite (NO(2)(-)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) in cured meats available at retail was conducted to verify concentrations in conventional (C) products and establish a baseline for organic/natural/uncured/indirectly cured (ONC) products. In this study, 470 cured meat products representing six major categories were taken from retail outlets in five major metropolitan cities across the United States. Random samples representing both C and ONC type products were analyzed for NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) content (ppm) using an ENO-20 high-performance liquid chromatography system equipped with a reverse phase column. Generally, there were no differences in NO(2)(-) concentrations between C and ONC meat categories, but a few ONC products surveyed in certain cities were lower in NO(3)(-) content. Pairwise comparisons between cities indicated that NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) contents of all C type products were not appreciably different, and the same was true for most ONC products. Numerical NO(2)(-) values were less variable than NO(3)(-) concentrations within each meat product category. NO(2)(-) concentrations were similar to those previously reported by Cassens ( Cassens , R. G. Residual nitrite in cured meat . Food Technol. 1997a , 51 , 53 - 55 ) in 1997. Residual NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) values in this study were numerically lower than those reported by NAS ( National Academy of Sciences . The Health Effects of Nitrate, Nitrite, and N-Nitroso Compounds ; National Academy Press : Washington, DC , 1981 ) in 1981. Data from this survey provide a benchmark of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) concentrations for ONC products available at retail. PMID:22414374

  18. Modular nature of abscisic acid (ABA) response complexes: composite promoter units that are necessary and sufficient for ABA induction of gene expression in barley.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Q; Zhang, P; Ho, T H

    1996-01-01

    The modular nature of the abscisic acid response complex (ABRC), the promoter unit necessary and sufficient for abscisic acid (ABA) induction of gene expression in barley, is defined in this study. We investigated ABA induction of a barley late embrogenesis abundant (Lea) gene, HVA1, and found that the ABRC of this gene consists of a 10-bp box with an ACGT core (ACGT-box) and the 11 bp directly upstream, named coupling element 3 (CE3). Only one copy of this ABRC is sufficient to confer ABA induction when linked to a minimal promoter. Because we previously reported another ABRC in the barley HVA22 gene, which consists of an ACGT-box with a distal coupling element (CE1), exchange experiments were conducted to study the interaction among modular elements in these ABRCs. We show that ACGT-boxes in these ABRCs are interchangeable, indicating that an ACGT-box can interact with either a distal or a proximal coupling element to confer ABA response. However, the two coupling elements are not fully exchangeable. Although CE3 can function either proximal or distal to the ACGT-box, CE1 is only functional at the distal position. The presence of both the distal and the proximal coupling elements has a synergistic effect on the absolute level of expression as well as on ABA induction. These ABRCs function in both seed and vegetative tissues. In seeds, ABA induction of the ABRC containing the proximal CE3, but not the ABRC with the distal CE1, is enhanced in the presence of the transcription regulator Viviparous1, indicating that these two ABRCs are mediated by different ABA signal transduction pathways. PMID:8768371

  19. Simulations and projections of major air pollutants over the United States and uncertainty analyses, effects of natural change and human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hang

    Changes in global climate and pollutant emissions are very likely to continue in the coming decades driven by the human-related activities and natural fluctuations in the Earth climate system. These potential changes would have very important consequences on regional air quality over the contiguous United States due to their effects on atmospheric chemical and physical processes. To understand these effects, the present studies use the global climate chemistry model, CAM-Chem version 3, to systematically assess potential changes in major air pollutants including surface ozone, particulate matter and mercury from the present (1998--2002) to the 2050 (2048--2052). The projections of future air quality consider changes in global climate, precursor emissions from anthropogenic and biogenic sources, and pollutant transport. Moreover, to evaluate the projection uncertainties resulting from different plausible trends of climate and emissions as a result of unknown human-related activities and climate variations, three IPCC SRES scenarios, A1FI, A1B and B1, are considered and compared to evaluate the resulting uncertainty in projecting future pollutant concentrations. To achieve a better understanding on the effect of mineral dust emissions on changes in future air quality especially the PM concentrations, a physical dust aerosol module is developed and incorporated into the CAM-Chem model. A mercury module is developed for the CAM-Chem model to simulate the atmospheric cycle of mercury and its consequences on the toxicity of U.S. air quality. For the study of ozone air quality, we focus on the risk of high ozone episodes and the relative contributions from changes in local anthropogenic emissions (LE) versus changes in intercontinental transport (ICT) on 2050 U.S. surface ozone air quality. It is found that the projected changes in air temperature, precipitation, lighting, planetary boundary layer height and cyclone activities tend to intensify the associated extreme

  20. Case Comment: Harvard Law School Forum v. Schultz: When Exclusion of Aliens Under the Immigration and Naturalization Act Conflicts with First Amendment Rights of United States Citizens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonini, Thomas J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Court litigation and decisions concerning the conflict between first amendment rights of free speech for United States citizens and the rights of controversial international figures, invited by college faculty to speak on campus, are discussed and compared. (MSE)

  1. The importance of natural habitats to Brazilian free-tailed bats in intensive agricultural landscapes in the Winter Garden Region of Texas, United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The conversion of natural lands to agriculture affects the distribution of biological diversity across the landscape. In particular, cropland monocultures alter insect abundance and diversity compared to adjacent natural habitats, but nevertheless can provide large numbers of insect pests as prey i...

  2. Demonstration of natural gas reburn for NO{sub x} emissions reduction at Ohio Edison Company`s cyclone-fired Niles Plant Unit Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Borio, R.W.; Lewis, R.D.; Koucky, R.W.; Lookman, A.A.; Manos, M.G.; Corfman, D.W.; Waddingham, A.L.; Johnson, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    Electric utility power plants account for about one-third of the NO{sub x} and two-thirds of the SO{sub 2} emissions in the US cyclone-fired boilers, while representing about 9% of the US coal-fired generating capacity, emit about 14% of the NO{sub x} produced by coal-fired utility boilers. Given this background, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Gas Research Institute, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, and the Ohio Coal Development Office sponsored a program led by ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB-CE) to demonstrate reburning on a cyclone-fired boiler. Ohio Edison provided Unit No. 1 at their Niles Station for the reburn demonstration along with financial assistance. The Niles Unit No. 1 reburn system was started up in September 1990. This reburn program was the first full-scale reburn system demonstration in the US. This report describes work performed during the program. The work included a review of reburn technology, aerodynamic flow model testing of reburn system design concepts, design and construction of the reburn system, parametric performance testing, long-term load dispatch testing, and boiler tube wall thickness monitoring. The report also contains a description of the Niles No. 1 host unit, a discussion of conclusions and recommendations derived from the program, tabulation of data from parametric and long-term tests, and appendices which contain additional tabulated test results.

  3. Professional Manpower and Bachelor's and Graduate Enrollment and Degrees in Agriculture and Natural Resources: Projections to 1980 for the United States and Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Roy M.; Geyer, Richard E.

    The comprehensive study, based on 1970 census data and other recent information from a variety of sources, provides assessment of trends and a projection of future States as well as the State of Ohio. Besides meeting the primary end objective of providing a basis for projecting enrollment needs in agriculture and natural resources in the College…

  4. The efficacy of monepantel against naturally acquired inhibited and developing fourth-stage larvae of Teladorsagia circumcincta in sheep in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Ramage, C; Bartley, D J; Jackson, F; Cody, R; Hosking, B C

    2012-05-25

    The inhibition of Teladorsagia and other nematode genera at the early fourth-stage is a biological process that allows the parasites to survive in their host in a dormant state when prevailing conditions may otherwise kill them or prevent their progeny from surviving in the external environment. A study was conducted in Scotland to evaluate the efficacy of monepantel, an amino-acetonitrile derivative, against natural infections of inhibited fourth-stage Teladorsagia spp. larvae. At necropsy it was determined that the untreated control sheep were additionally infected with developing fourth-stage Teladorsagia spp. larvae and this is the first published evidence on the efficacy of monepantel against natural infections of this parasite and stage. The study sheep, which had grazed on naturally contaminated pastures since birth, were transferred to indoor housing after a subset of animals was examined to confirm the presence of inhibited larvae within the study population prior to the experiment. After 14 days of housing, monepantel was orally administered at 2.5 mg/kg to half of the animals. The sheep were necropsied seven days later and their parasite burdens recovered for the determination of efficacy, which was 99.7% for the inhibited stages and 99.3% for the developing fourth-stages. In conclusion, monepantel dosed orally at 2.5 mg/kg is a highly effective treatment against naturally acquired infections of inhibited and developing fourth-stage larvae of Teladorsagia spp. PMID:22177334

  5. Camp Unit Design Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultsman, John T.; Cottrell, Richard L.

    This document provides a set of generalized guidelines for the design of units in large family campgrounds. Managers of recreational lands have two responsibilities and goals: to protect the natural resources, and to provide an enjoyable experience for users. With these goals in mind, unique variables to each unit such as shade, site aesthetics,…

  6. The United Nations University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salam, Abdus

    1973-01-01

    Reports the progress already made toward the establishment of a postgraduate international university under United Nations auspices. The resolution adopted by the U.N. General Assembly provides a concise statement of the nature and aims of the United Nations University, which is likely to start operating in 1974. (JR)

  7. Legislating gender inequalities: the nature and patterns of domestic violence experienced by South Asian women with insecure immigration status in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Anitha, Sundari

    2011-10-01

    Research on domestic violence documents the particular vulnerability of immigrant women due to reasons including social isolation, language barriers, lack of awareness about services, and racism on the part of services. Based on qualitative interviews with 30 South Asian women with insecure immigration status residing in Yorkshire and Northwest England, this article explores how inequalities created by culture, gender, class, and race intersect with state immigration and welfare policies in the United Kingdom, thereby exacerbating structures of patriarchy within minority communities. It is within these contexts that South Asian women with insecure immigration status experience intensified forms and specific patterns of abuse. PMID:22071095

  8. Implementation of Title I of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. Hearings before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, November 5 and 6, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Implementing title I of the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) as one of the five acts making up the National Energy Act was the subject of a two-day oversight hearing held in November 1981. The purpose was to review the effects of the act, and witnesses were asked to limit any discussion on the decontrol issue. The statements of 28 witnesses and two appendices with supplemental material make up the hearing record. Giving statements were members of Congress, State legislators, representatives of consumer and industrial groups, spokesmen for the natural gas industry, and others. Their testimony indicated that, while the technical aspects of implementation were relatively smooth, serious market effects can emerge after 1985 when large volumes of gas are decontrolled. (DCK)

  9. Design and evaluation of a low nitrogen oxides natural gas-fired conical wire-mesh duct burner for a micro-cogeneration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Omar Barka Ab

    A novel low NOx conical wire-mesh duct burner was designed, built and tested in the present research. This thesis documents the design process and the in-depth evaluation of this novel duct burner for the development of a more efficient micro-cogeneration unit. This duct burner provides the thermal energy necessary to raise the microturbine exhaust gases temperature to increase the heat recovery capability. The duct burner implements both lean-premixed and surface combustion techniques to achieve low NOx and CO emissions. The design of the duct burner was supported by a qualitative flow visualization study for the duct burner premixer to provide insight into the premixer flow field (mixing process). Different premixer geometries were used to control the homogeneity of the fuel-oxidant mixture at the exit of the duct burner premixer. Laser sheet illumination (LSI) technique was used to capture images of the mixing process, for each configuration studied. A quasi-quantitative analysis technique was developed to rank the different premixer geometries in terms of mixing effectiveness. The premixer geometries that provided better mixing were selected and used for the combustion tests. The full-scale gas-fired duct burner was installed in the exhaust duct of a micro-cogeneration unit for the evaluation. Three wire-mesh burners with different pressure drops were used. Each burner has a conical shape made from FeCrAL alloy mat and was designed based on a heat release per unit area of 2500 kW/m2 and a total heat release of 240kW at 100 percent excess air. The local momentum of the gaseous mixture introduced through the wire-mesh was adjusted so that the flame stabilized outside the burner mesh (surface combustion). Cold flow tests (i.e., the duct burner was off, but the microturbine was running) were conducted to measure the effect of different duct burner geometrical parameters on flow split between the combustion zone and the bypass channel, and on pressure drop across

  10. Natural resource damage assessments in the United States: rules and procedures for compensation from spills of hazardous substances and oil in waterways under US jurisdiction.

    PubMed

    Ofiara, Douglas D

    2002-02-01

    Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) procedures in the US involve the use of uniform federally approved rules and procedures to assess economic losses and/or address restoration of injured resources that result from spills of hazardous substances and/or oil and petroleum substances in waterways under US jurisdiction. This effort started in the 1980s and involves two federal agencies that have developed separate federally approved procedures and rules, the US Department of Interior (US DOI) and the US Department of Commerce, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (US DOC, NOAA). This paper provides a brief overview of the federal laws applicable to resource damage assessments in the US, review of NRDA rules and procedures, and progress to date regarding US cases. PMID:11981983

  11. Langmuir circulation driving sediment entrainment into newly formed ice: Tank experiment results with application to nature (Lake Hattie, United States; Kara Sea, Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethleff, Dirk; Kempema, E. W.

    2007-02-01

    Langmuir circulation (Lc) was generated under freezing conditions in saltwater tank experiments through surface wind stress and cross-waves interacting with subsurface return flow. Fine-grained sediments distributed in the tank prior to frazil crystal formation were aligned in parallel streaks in Lc bottom convergence zones. Downwelling at Lc surface convergence zones aligned floating frazil in wind-parallel rows, and individual crystals rotated on helical paths down to the tank bottom and up again to the surface. The crystals interacted with suspended particles in the water column, and with sediment on the tank bottom, preferentially collecting fine-grained particles and enhancing their entrainment into new ice. Evidence includes higher sediment concentrations in ice and ice-interstitial water (ice pore water) as compared to the tank water. Both tank ice and ice interstitial water contain more silt-sized particles than tank water suspension load and tank bottom sediment. Sand is reduced in the ice, and clay is about the same concentration in all samples. This points to preferential entrainment of fine particles in newly formed ice supported by Lc-driven circulation. Comparable results of Lc-supported ice particle entrainment were found in Lake Hattie. Comparison of ice sediment from tank experiments run with Kara Sea material to ice particles from the natural Kara setting showed both types of ice sediment have very similar grain size distributions and mineralogical compositions. Results from experiments and nature help to better understand the potentially Lc-driven entrainment of sediment into ice formed in shallow freezing waters.

  12. The Nature and Impacts of the July 1999 Heat Wave in the Midwestern United States: Learning from the Lessons of 1995.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palecki, Michael A.; Changnon, Stanley A.; Kunkel, Kenneth E.

    2001-07-01

    The July 1999 heat wave in the Midwest was an event of relatively long duration punctuated by extreme conditions during its last 2 days. The intensity of the heat wave on 29 and 30 July rivaled that of the 1995 heat wave that killed more than 1000 people in the central United States. In 1999, however, the death toll was about one-fourth of this amount in the same region. The 1999 heat wave 2-day maximum apparent temperature was slightly less than during the 1995 heat wave at most Midwestern first-order stations. In addition, the 2-day peak was preceded by several hot days that allowed some short-term acclimatization to occur prior to the intense final days. In Chicago, conditions during the peak of the 1999 heat wave were very similar to those during the 1995 heat wave peak, especially the extreme nocturnal conditions of temperatures and humidity. Therefore, it seems unlikely that the reduction in the heat wave death toll in Chicago from about 700 in 1995 to 114 in 1999 is due solely to meteorological differences between the two heat waves. In St. Louis, the 1999 heat wave was intense for a much longer duration than the 1995 heat wave, thus partially explaining the increase in heat-related deaths there from the 1995 event to the 1999 event. An examination of heat wave response efforts in both Chicago and St. Louis leads to the conclusion that both cities were quite effective at mitigating their respective heat wave mortality rates, which in the 1999 event were almost exactly the same in both metropolitan areas. This represents a great improvement for the city of Chicago compared to the 1995 heat wave. Suggestions are made for further improving municipal heat wave response efforts based on the 1999 experience.

  13. Drought and Water Resources Assessment in the Western United States Using Data and Analyses From the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasteris, P. A.; Garen, D. C.

    2001-12-01

    Recent extremes in western snowpacks, from record maximums to record minimums, have raised the awareness of climate variability and its effect on water resources. Water availability from melting snowpacks plays a key role in assessing water supplies and drought and their effects on agriculture, municipalities, hydropower, application of endangered species legislation, and forest management. The Natural Resources Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture has a 60 year history of measuring western snowpacks and producing water supply forecast products. With the installation of the SNOTEL (SNOwpack TELemetry) network in the early 1980s and wide availability of the Internet, many thousands of users have access to real-time climate information collected by the 660 SNOTEL sites throughout the West. These data are not only used directly by users but also are fundamental to a number of analyses and products, including water supply forecasts, a surface water supply index, and a drought map. This information is critical to managing water resources in the West, especially during drought years.

  14. Hydrologic Unit Map -- 1974, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1974-01-01

    This map and accompanying table show Hydrologic Units that are basically hydrographic in nature.  The Cataloging Units shown will supplant the Cataloging Units previously used by the U.S. Geological Survey in its Catalog of Information on Water Data (1966-72).   

  15. Optimal Siting and Sizing of Multiple DG Units for the Enhancement of Voltage Profile and Loss Minimization in Transmission Systems Using Nature Inspired Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Ambika; Ramachandran, Rajeswari

    2016-01-01

    Power grid becomes smarter nowadays along with technological development. The benefits of smart grid can be enhanced through the integration of renewable energy sources. In this paper, several studies have been made to reconfigure a conventional network into a smart grid. Amongst all the renewable sources, solar power takes the prominent position due to its availability in abundance. Proposed methodology presented in this paper is aimed at minimizing network power losses and at improving the voltage stability within the frame work of system operation and security constraints in a transmission system. Locations and capacities of DGs have a significant impact on the system losses in a transmission system. In this paper, combined nature inspired algorithms are presented for optimal location and sizing of DGs. This paper proposes a two-step optimization technique in order to integrate DG. In a first step, the best size of DG is determined through PSO metaheuristics and the results obtained through PSO is tested for reverse power flow by negative load approach to find possible bus locations. Then, optimal location is found by Loss Sensitivity Factor (LSF) and weak (WK) bus methods and the results are compared. In a second step, optimal sizing of DGs is determined by PSO, GSA, and hybrid PSOGSA algorithms. Apart from optimal sizing and siting of DGs, different scenarios with number of DGs (3, 4, and 5) and PQ capacities of DGs (P alone, Q alone, and  P and Q both) are also analyzed and the results are analyzed in this paper. A detailed performance analysis is carried out on IEEE 30-bus system to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. PMID:27057557

  16. Optimal Siting and Sizing of Multiple DG Units for the Enhancement of Voltage Profile and Loss Minimization in Transmission Systems Using Nature Inspired Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Ambika; Ramachandran, Rajeswari

    2016-01-01

    Power grid becomes smarter nowadays along with technological development. The benefits of smart grid can be enhanced through the integration of renewable energy sources. In this paper, several studies have been made to reconfigure a conventional network into a smart grid. Amongst all the renewable sources, solar power takes the prominent position due to its availability in abundance. Proposed methodology presented in this paper is aimed at minimizing network power losses and at improving the voltage stability within the frame work of system operation and security constraints in a transmission system. Locations and capacities of DGs have a significant impact on the system losses in a transmission system. In this paper, combined nature inspired algorithms are presented for optimal location and sizing of DGs. This paper proposes a two-step optimization technique in order to integrate DG. In a first step, the best size of DG is determined through PSO metaheuristics and the results obtained through PSO is tested for reverse power flow by negative load approach to find possible bus locations. Then, optimal location is found by Loss Sensitivity Factor (LSF) and weak (WK) bus methods and the results are compared. In a second step, optimal sizing of DGs is determined by PSO, GSA, and hybrid PSOGSA algorithms. Apart from optimal sizing and siting of DGs, different scenarios with number of DGs (3, 4, and 5) and PQ capacities of DGs (P alone, Q alone, and P and Q both) are also analyzed and the results are analyzed in this paper. A detailed performance analysis is carried out on IEEE 30-bus system to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. PMID:27057557

  17. A detailed taxonomy of Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary Crassatellidae in the Eastern United States; an example of the nature of extinction at the boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wingard, G. Lynn

    1993-01-01

    Current theories on the causes of extinction at the CretaceousTertiary boundary have been based on previously published data; however, few workers have stopped to ask the question, 'How good is the basic data set?' To test the accuracy of the published record, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the Crassatellidae (Mollusca, Bivalvia) of the Gulf and Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plains of the United States for the Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary was conducted. Thirty-eight species names and four generic names are used in publications for the Crassatellidae within the geographic and stratigraphic constraints of this analysis. Fourteen of the 38 species names are represented by statistically valid numbers of specimens and were tested by using canonical discriminant analysis. All 38 names, with the exception of 1 invalid name and 4 names for which no representative specimen could be located, were evaluated qualitatively. The results show that the published fossil record is highly inaccurate. Only 8 valid, recognizable species exist in the Crassatellidae within the limits of this study, 14 names are synonymized, and 11 names are represented by indeterminate molds or poorly preserved specimens. Three of the four genera are well founded; the fourth is based on the juvenile of another genus and therefore synonymized. This detailed taxonomic analysis of the Crassatellidae illustrates that the published fossil record is not reliable. Calculations of evolutionary and paleobiologic significance based on poorly defined, overly split fossil groups, such as the Crassatellidae, are biased in the following ways: Rates of evolution and extinction are higher, Faunal turnover at mass extinctions appears more catastrophic, Species diversity is high, Average species durations are shortened, and Geographic ranges are restricted. The data on the taxonomically standardized Crassatellidae show evolutionary rates one-quarter to one-half that of the published fossil record; faunal change

  18. Contaminants from Cretaceous Black Shale Part 1: Natural weathering processes controlling contaminant cycling in Mancos Shale, southwestern United States, with emphasis on salinity and selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Fahy, Juli W.; Elliott, John G.; Grauch, Richard I.; Stillings, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Soils derived from black shale can accumulate high concentrations of elements of environmental concern, especially in regions with semiarid to arid climates. One such region is the Colorado River basin in the southwestern United States where contaminants pose a threat to agriculture, municipal water supplies, endangered aquatic species, and water-quality commitments to Mexico. Exposures of Cretaceous Mancos Shale (MS) in the upper basin are a major contributor of salinity and selenium in the Colorado River. Here, we examine the roles of geology, climate, and alluviation on contaminant cycling (emphasis on salinity and Se) during weathering of MS in a Colorado River tributary watershed. Stage I (incipient weathering) began perhaps as long ago as 20 ka when lowering of groundwater resulted in oxidation of pyrite and organic matter. This process formed gypsum and soluble organic matter that persist in the unsaturated, weathered shale today. Enrichment of Se observed in laterally persistent ferric oxide layers likely is due to selenite adsorption onto the oxides that formed during fluctuating redox conditions at the water table. Stage II weathering (pedogenesis) is marked by a significant decrease in bulk density and increase in porosity as shale disaggregates to soil. Rainfall dissolves calcite and thenardite (Na2SO4) at the surface, infiltrates to about 1 m, and precipitates gypsum during evaporation. Gypsum formation (estimated 390 kg m−2) enriches soil moisture in Na and residual SO4. Transpiration of this moisture to the surface or exposure of subsurface soil (slumping) produces more thenardite. Most Se remains in the soil as selenite adsorbed to ferric oxides, however, some oxidizes to selenate and, during wetter conditions is transported with soil moisture to depths below 3 m. Coupled with little rainfall, relatively insoluble gypsum, and the translocation of soluble Se downward, MS landscapes will be a significant nonpoint source of salinity and Se to the

  19. Concerning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadlinger, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    SI units come in two distinct types: fundamental (kilogram, meter) and descriptive (atom, molecule). Proper/improper uses of atom/molecule from historical cases are presented followed by a re-introduction of a light "wave (cycle)" unit and the clearly defined photon model which is deduced. Also examines omission of the fundamental unit "radon."…

  20. Fluorite-related one-dimensional units in natural bismuth oxysulfates: the crystal structures of Bi14O16(SO4)5 and Bi30O33(SO4)9(AsO4)2.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Daniela; Garavelli, Anna; Bindi, Luca

    2015-10-01

    The crystal structures of two new natural Bi oxysulfates with the formula Bi14O16(SO4)5 [labelled new phase I; monoclinic, space group C2, a = 21.658 (4), b = 5.6648 (9), c = 15.092 (3) Å, β = 119.433 (11)° and Z = 2] and Bi30O33(SO4)9(AsO4)2 [labelled new phase II; triclinic, space group P1, a = 5.670 (3), b = 13.9408 (9), c = 22.7908 (18) Å, α = 80.903 (5), β = 82.854 (14), γ = 78.27 (2)° and Z = 1] from the high-temperature fumarole deposit of the La Fossa crater at Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) are reported. The structures are built up by a combination of fluorite-related Bi-O units and isolated (SO4)(2-) tetrahedra (new phase I) or both (SO4)(2-) and (AsO4)(3-) tetrahedra (new phase II). Owing to the effect of stereoactive lone pairs of Bi(3+), Bi-O units in both the structures can be suitably described in terms of oxo-centered OBi4 tetrahedra. The structure of Bi14O16(SO4)5 is based upon one-dimensional [O16Bi14](10+) ribbons formed by six chains of edge-sharing OBi4 tetrahedra extending along [010]. In the structure of Bi30O33(SO4)9(AsO4)2 the same ribbon type coexists with another one-dimensional ribbon formed by seven chains of edge-sharing OBi4 tetrahedra and with the composition [O17Bi16](14+). Ribbons of the same type are joined by (SO4)(2-) and (AsO4)(3-) tetrahedra along [010] – if a reduced triclinic unit-cell setting is considered – so forming two different (001) slabs which alternate to each other along [001] and are joined by additional (SO4)(2-) tetrahedra. New phase I represents the natural analogues of synthetic Bi14O16(SO4)5, but with an ordered structure model. PMID:26428401

  1. CEU [Continuing Education Unit].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Basic Education Region V Staff Development Bulletin, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is a means of recording and accounting non-credit programs and activities which are professional in nature. Seven criteria have been established to assure the professionalism and quality of instruction. The criteria concern the need, objectives, and rationale of the activity; the course planning and…

  2. Family Treatment Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawicki, Donna

    The document describes the Family Treatment Unit, a demonstration program to provide a variety of family treatment services to status offenders (11 to 17 years old) and their families. The goals of the program are: (1) to provide family services to families of status offenders; (2) to maintain status offenders in their natural homes by…

  3. Social Studies Resource Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemiss, Clair W.

    Based on the premise that fundamental solutions to environmental problems must include social solutions, these three resource units are designed to study the interrelation of man and nature as part of the social studies curriculum. A series of inquiry questions are posed with the intent of stimulating students to find solutions to our…

  4. Island Natural Science School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toronto Board of Education (Ontario).

    Prepared for students in grade six attending the Island Natural Science School, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, this booklet offers information and suggests activities in the areas of ecology, conservation, natural resources, and outdoor recreation. Introductory material describes island lore, its formation and significant features, followed by units of…

  5. Imperfect Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Katherine

    This unit provides visual activities to engage students in learning the imperfect tense in Spanish. Upon completion of the unit, students will be able to do the following: identify imperfect tense conjugation in children's books; conjugate verbs in the imperfect tense; list uses of the imperfect tense; discriminate between the imperfect tense and…

  6. UNIT, PETROLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR A UNIT ON PETROLOGY IS SUITABLE FOR ADAPTATION AT EITHER THE UPPER ELEMENTARY OR THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL LEVELS. THE UNIT BEGINS WITH A STORY THAT INTRODUCES VOLCANIC ACTION AND IGNEOUS ROCK FORMATION. SELECTED CONCEPTS ARE LISTED FOLLOWED BY SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES. A BIBLIOGRAPHY, FILM LIST, VOCABULARY LIST, AND QUESTION AND…

  7. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Instructional units deal with each aspect of conservation: forests, wildlife, rangelands, water, minerals, and soil. The area of the secondary school curriculum with which each is correlated is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the topic, questions to…

  8. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  9. A Step through the Looking Glass: Perpetuating Creativity through Speculative Fiction and Contemporary Art. (A Unit Using Speculative Art Forms as Vehicles in Understanding the Nature of Technological Change).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronberg, Bob; Petrzalek, Linda

    This publication outlines a unit of study which uses speculative fiction and artistic expression to help students in grades 7-12 view technology and understand how it changes. Speculative fiction is defined as that type of fiction that deals with different assumptions and projections about the future. Throughout the unit the art form highlighted…

  10. Natural Resources Education Notebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Eldon C.

    This notebook was developed cooperatively by the United States Soil Conservation Service and Iowa State University to be used by teachers in providing instruction regarding certain aspects of natural resources. It includes four sections which provide: (1) an instructional plan about the conservation provisions of the 1985 Food Security Act; (2) an…

  11. Natural Gas Annual

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    Provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by state for the current year. Summary data are presented for each state for the previous 5 years.

  12. S. 1251: a Bill entitled the Natural Gas Utilization Act of 1985. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, June 6, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The Natural Gas Utilization Act of 1985 (S.1251) repeals portions of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. The phrases ''or major fuel-burning installation'' and ''any existing electric powerplant'' are struck in several subsections. The Bill also repeals portions of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 to repeal incremental pricing requirements found in Title II.

  13. Natural Dyes. Third World Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Natalie; Hughes, Wyn

    This unit, developed by the Third World Science Project, is designed to add a multicultural element to existing science syllabi (for students aged 11-16) in the United Kingdom. The project seeks to develop an appreciation of the: boundless fascination of the natural world; knowledge, skills, and expertise possessed by men/women everywhere;…

  14. Nuclear safety assistance to Russia, Ukraine, and Eastern Europe. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, October 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The hearing addresses United States nuclear safety assistance to Russia, Ukraine and the nations of eastern europe operating Soviet-built nuclear powerplants. The primary issue is that Soviet-designed nuclear reactors bore almost no relation to the reactors designed and operated in Western countries. The Soviet reactors were devoid of safety features such as fire protection and containment. The absence of a safety culture and standardized operating procedures were also of great concern. The role and status of assistance by the United States in the future is discussed. Statements of government and industry officials are included, along with documents submitted for the record.

  15. NATURAL EMISSIONS OF OXIDANT PRECURSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides an overview of the sources, the estimation methodology, and the relative amounts of natural hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide emissions. he most recent estimate of natural nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions for the United States is 28 teragrams per year (Tg/...

  16. Mangroves and Seawalls. "Increased Pressure for Land Fill Will Cause More and More Stress to Natural Areas." Grades 7 and 8. A Three Lesson Unit. Student Learning Activity Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, James

    This module is an activity/discussion-centered unit focusing on the importance of shoreline surface area. The module is part of a series designed to be used by teachers, students, and community members to help them utilize community resources in developing and teaching environmental concepts and responsibility, and in seeking ways to solve…

  17. Habitat management for the establishment of Bemisia natural enemies. Chapter 15 in: Biological Control of Bemisia: a Review of the Interagency Research and Implementation Program in the United States, 1992-2001

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During outbreaks of sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B, in the 1990s in the southwestern United States, it was recognized that conservation biological control could play a key role in the establishment of newly introduced whitefly parasitoids. However, many Bemisia host plants in desert...

  18. Oil and gas development on the outer continental shelf. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, September 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The hearing addressed oil and gas development on the outer continental shelf. Testimony is given by Department of Energy officials on the United States oil and gas leasing program. Congressional questions and agency responses are provided. Statements and documents prepared for the record are included.

  19. The Changing United States Diet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Louise; Friend, Berta

    1978-01-01

    The nature of the United States diet has changed markedly in this century. We are using more meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products; sugars and other sweeteners; fats and oils; and processed fruits and vegetables. We are using fewer grain products, potatoes, fresh fruits and vegetables, and eggs. (BB)

  20. Country Profiles, United Arab Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croley, H. T.

    A profile of the United Arab Republic is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition,…

  1. Termination unit

    DOEpatents

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  2. Termination unit

    DOEpatents

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  3. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situtations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others or to reduce the number of heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures is predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few design guidelines are presented.

  4. Nature's Alphabet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Barb

    The purpose of this collection of environmental education units, written by teachers and environmental educators, is to develop in students a sense of wonder, curiosity, and interest about the environment. The 26 interdisciplinary activity units are designed to be used as pre-activities or follow-up activities to other outdoor studies in the…

  5. Natural gas pipeline technology overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2007-11-01

    The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies

  6. Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Forests and Public Land Management of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session, on S. 1608.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    When the national forests were withdrawn from the public domain a century ago, they were established with the assurances that proceeds from the sustainable management of their natural resources would be shared with local governments. These proceeds partially refund the tax revenues lost by local governments and go toward funding rural schools,…

  7. Temporal naturalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  8. Natural Hazards - A National Threat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geological Survey, U.S.

    2007-01-01

    The USGS Role in Reducing Disaster Losses -- In the United States each year, natural hazards cause hundreds of deaths and cost billions of dollars in disaster aid, disruption of commerce, and destruction of homes and critical infrastructure. Although the number of lives lost to natural hazards each year generally has declined, the economic cost of major disaster response and recovery continues to rise. Each decade, property damage from natural hazards events doubles or triples. The United States is second only to Japan in economic damages resulting from natural disasters. A major goal of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to reduce the vulnerability of the people and areas most at risk from natural hazards. Working with partners throughout all sectors of society, the USGS provides information, products, and knowledge to help build more resilient communities.

  9. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-05

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1989, and production volumes for the year 1989 for the total United States and for selected states and state sub-divisions. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), its two major components (nonassociated and associated-dissolved gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, two components of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, have their reserves and production reported separately. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. 28 refs., 9 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Imposing specific directives on the Bonneville Power Administration. Hearings before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, on S. 1701, August 3, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Hearings in Seattle and Washington, DC considered S. 1701 (identical to section 317 of H.R. 3363) relating to the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) No. 1, 2, and 3 units. The bill clarifies the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) authority to seek alternative financing for construction and states the limitations for seeking public funds through appropriations or municipal bonds. Seventy witnesses presented the views of state officials, utilities, consumers, industry, and labor. Of particular concern were the possibilities of bankruptcy and unemployment for Washington State. The hearing record includes the text of S. 1701, the testimony, and additional material submitted for the record.

  11. Social Studies: United States. Grade 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, E. G.

    This teachers guide attempts to facilitate the study of the United States through a conceptual approach and multimedia instruction in a spiral curriculum. There are five units: 1) Natural Setting --location, climate, terrain, water, soil, and economic and esthetic value, and conservation; 2) Historial Development --North American Indian cultures,…

  12. Hydrologic Unit Map -- 1974, State of Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1974-01-01

    This map and accompanying table show Hydrologic Units that are basically hydrographic in nature.  The Cataloging Units shown will supplant the Cataloging Units previously used by the U.S. Geological Survey in its Catalog of Information on Water Data (1966-72).  The previous U.S. Geological Survey Catalog-Indexing System was by map number and letter, such as 49M.  

  13. Hydrologic Unit Map -- 1974, State of Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1974-01-01

    This map and accompanying table show Hydrologic Units that are basically hydrographic in nature.  The Cataloging Units shown will supplant the Cataloging Units previously used by the U.S. Geological Survey in its Catalog of Information on Water Data (1966-72).  The previous U.S. Geological Survey Catalog-Indexing System was by map number and letter, such as 49M.  

  14. Natural Beauty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her art class students were able to create, in just four class periods, clay relief plaques depicting nature. A lesson on texture speeds up the completion of such a project. Seeing that clay is a natural material with its own unique texture, it seemed fitting that the final product should depict a variety…

  15. Nature Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harr, Natalie; Lee, Richard E.; Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Richard Louv's "Last Child in the Woods" (2008) added to a growing consensus to get children outside and experiencing nature. Using ideas from place-based education, the authors present a simple year-long project that brings science, nature, and other curriculum standards to life right in your school yard. With a focus on journaling, this project…

  16. Matematica Natural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Patricia; Medearis, Linda

    Matematica Natural (Natural Mathematics) is a mathematics curriculum for young children based on the assumption that they learn mathematics through concrete, real life, relevant experiences and that educational differences rather than cultural differences influence math achievement. The curriculum uses hands-on materials and activities to teach…

  17. A united physicochemical description of the protonation and metal ion complexation equilibria of natural organic acids (humic and fulvic acids). 2. Influence of polyelectrolyte properties and functional group heterogeneity on the protonation equilibria of fulvic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ephraim, J.; Alegret, S.; Mathuthu, A.; Bicking, M.; Malcolm, R.L.; Marinsky, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Potentiometric studies of the neutralization of several fulvic acid sources with standard base in aqueous and nonaqueous media have been conducted. Analysis of the results with a recently developed unified physicochemical model has shown that the protonation behavior of these fulvic acid sources is a reflection of (1) their polyelectrolyte nature and (2) their heterogeneity. It has been possible to ascribe the polyelectrolyte properties observed to a rather inflexible fulvic acid molecule whose variably charged surface is impermeable to simple electrolyte. ?? 1986 American Chemical Society.

  18. The Nature of Natural Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Joe E.

    A variety of types of evidence are examined to help determine the true nature of "deep structure" and what, if any, implications this has for linguistic theory as well as culture theory generally. The evidence accumulated over the past century on the nature of phonetic and phonemic systems is briefly discussed, and the following areas of analysis…

  19. Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, Robert N.; Moshfeghian, Mahmood; Ldol, James D.; Johannes, Arland H.

    Natural gas is a naturally occurring mixture of simple hydrocarbons and nonhydrocarbons that exists as a gas at ordinary pressures and temperatures. In the raw state, as produced from the earth, natural gas consists principally of methane (CH4) and ethane (C2H4), with fractional amounts of propane (C3H8), butane (C4H10), and other hydrocarbons, pentane (C5H12) and heavier. Occasionally, small traces of light aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and toluene may also be present.

  20. Inside Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroni, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Since its launch in 1869, Nature has seen its mission as two-fold: facilitating the prompt communication of the most important scientific developments to the relevant research communities, while at the same time fostering a greater appreciation of these great works of science amongst the wider public. Although the publishing landscape for scientific research is currently undergoing a period of rapid change, these core principles remain largely unchanged. In this talk, I will endeavour to explain how Nature editors - in particular those based at Nature Physics- apply these principles in practice, and so determine which few of the many excellent research submissions that we receive make it through to publication.

  1. Short Note on Units: Planetary Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-01-01

    While the emphasis on SI units in introductory physics textbooks has mercifully eliminated the use of English units, the exclusion of other systems of units is not necessary. For years physicists have simplified calculations by doing things like setting [h-bar] = c = 1. We could not imagine putting 4[pi][epsilon][subscript 0] into the formulas for…

  2. Short Note on Units: Planetary Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-03-01

    While the emphasis on SI units in introductory physics textbooks has mercifully eliminated the use of English units, the exclusion of other systems of units is not necessary. For years physicists have simplified calculations by doing things like setting ℏ = c = 1. We could not imagine putting 4πɛ0 into the formulas for Bohr orbits.1

  3. A retrospective audit of the extent and nature of domestic violence cases identified over a three year period in the two district command units of the police service of Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, T R; Goodall, E A; Moore, C B T

    2008-10-01

    The work load of forensic medical officers (FMOs) who provide medical cover for the Coleraine and Limavady district command units (DCU) of the police service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) in dealing with domestic violence was investigated over a three year period from 1st April 2003 to 31st March 2006. A total of 128 cases involving domestic violence were identified during this three year period. There was a significant increase from 4% (32/791) in the first year to 6.6% (56/851, p<0.01) in the number of cases of identified domestic violence in the second year which dropped to 4.2% (40/956) in the third year. Victims were identified in 38% of these domestic violence cases with 62% being identified as assailants. It was noted that there was a significant difference in the proportion of male assailants (96.2%) from female assailants (3.8%). Fifty-four percent of victims were noted to have injuries in accordance with the more serious injury categories of assault of actual bodily harm (AOABH) and grievous bodily harm (GBH). Domestic incidents occurred at the home in 91% of cases, with the FMO being the primary contact in 97% of cases. Alcohol was implicated in 56% of all domestic violence cases recorded. PMID:18761309

  4. The Changing Nature of Youth Violence. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Youth Violence of the Committee on the Judiciary. United States Senate, One Hundred Fourth Congress, Second Session on Examining the Current State of Youth Violence, Focusing on Its Changing Nature and Juvenile Intervention Programs Designed To Prevent Increased Violence (February 28, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

    This hearing examined the current state of youth violence, focusing on its changing nature and juvenile intervention programs designed to prevent increased violence. Opening statements by Senators Fred Thompson, Herbert Kohl, and Joseph R. Biden addressed the seriousness of the problem. Two panels contributed prepared statements. The first panel…

  5. Natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Cullen, J M

    1980-09-01

    This presentation covers the various types of natural disasters which are faced by investigators throughout the world. Each geophysical substance is discussed, including earth, air and water, and secondary effects including fire. Additionally, four myths associated with disasters are reviewed. PMID:7234811

  6. Nature Watch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Donna R.

    2010-01-01

    Children are naturally curious about the world in which they live. To focus this sense of wonder, have your students investigate their local habitat as it changes over the year. This multiseason study will build connections and add relevance to the habitats that children learn about. This series of activities for grades 4-6 explores the changing…

  7. Uranium, natural

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , natural ; CASRN 7440 - 61 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  8. Natural restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlet, K.S.

    1993-02-01

    After a company pays millions of dollars to clean up contaminated site, its liability may not be over. It may have to spend tens of millions more to restore damaged natural resources under an oft-overlooked Superfund program. Examples of liability are cited in this report from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a pcb leak which contaminated a harbor.

  9. Nature's Palette

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Brooke B.; Brewer, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Flower petals, acorn hats, exoskeletons of beetles, and lichens are just a few of the objects students may find in a surprising array of vivid colors. These tiny examples from nature's palette can be discovered in a school yard, a park, or even along the edges of a paved sidewalk...it simply takes careful observation! This article describes a…

  10. Natural or Organic Foods? [Project ECOLogy ELE Pak, Schmidt Pak].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Linda

    This is one of a series of units for environmental education developed by the Highline Public Schools. The unit is designed for secondary students in home economics classes. The content of the units focuses on natural and organic foods, characteristics of the foods, and uses of the foods. The seven lessons in this unit are designed to last over a…

  11. REACH. Electricity Units. Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gene; Sappe, Hoyt

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of electricity. The instructional units focus on electricity fundamentals and electric motors. Each unit follows a typical format that includes a unit sheet,…

  12. Regents Biology Resource Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Nancy A., Comp.

    This publication provides supplemental information which can be used by the teacher to accompany each unit in the Regents Biology Syllabus. Each unit of the supplement addresses topics and understandings in the corresponding unit of the syllabus. These units are: (1) unity and diversity among living things; (2) maintenance in living things; (3)…

  13. Responses to natural disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Since 1964, natural disasters caused by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, or extreme weather in the form of floods, droughts, or hurricanes, have been responsible for more than 2,756,000 deaths worldwide in nations other than the United States, the Soviet Union, and the Eastern European Bloc, according to figures tabulated by the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) of the Agency for International Development (AID). Over 95% of these fatalities occurred in developing or third world countries. Damage resulting from these calamities has been severe but extremely difficult to estimate in monetary terms. In 1986, U.S. government and voluntary agencies spent $303 million on natural disaster assistance around the world, 79% of total world assistance. In 1985 the U.S. total was nearly $900 million, 48% of the $1.84 billion world total.

  14. Noncariogenic intense natural sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Kinghorn, A D; Kaneda, N; Baek, N I; Kennelly, E J; Soejarto, D D

    1998-09-01

    There is a definite relationship between the dietary consumption of sucrose and the incidence of dental caries. Noncaloric sucrose substitutes for use in the sweetening of foods, beverages, and medicines may be either synthetic compounds or natural products. In the United States, four potently sweet artificial sweeteners are approved, namely, saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame potassium, and sucralose. Highly sweet plant constituents are used in Japan and some other countries, including the diterpene glycoside stevioside and the protein thaumatin. Recent progress in a research project oriented towards the discovery and evaluation of novel potentially noncariogenic sweeteners from plants has focused on substances in the sesquiterpenoid, diterpenoid, triterpenoid, steroidal saponin, and proanthocyanidin structural classes. The feasibility of using Mongolian gerbil electrophysiological and behavioral assays to monitor the sweetness of plant extracts, chromatographic fractions, and pure isolates has been investigated. An in vivo cariogenicity study on the commercially available natural sweeteners stevioside and rebaudioside A has been carried out. PMID:9735874

  15. Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption

    EIA Publications

    2010-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census division (1998 through 2009).

  16. Challenges in Renewable Natural Resources: A Guide to Alternative Futures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theobald, Robert

    First presented at a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) conference on renewable resources, this material includes information and discussion on critical issues, policies, and future alternatives for natural resources in the United States. (CO)

  17. Natural Rubber from Domestic Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States is wholly dependent upon imports of natural rubber from tropical countries and is the world’s largest consumer of this strategic raw material. Development of domestic rubber crops will create supply security for this strategic raw material, enhance rural development, and create bio...

  18. Integrating the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiland, Ingrid; Blieden, Katherine; Akerson, Valarie

    2014-01-01

    The nature of science (NOS) describes what science is and how knowledge in science is developed (NSTA 2013). To develop elementary students' understandings of how scientists explore the world, the authors--an education professor and a third-grade teacher--endeavored to integrate NOS into a third-grade life science unit. Throughout the lesson,…

  19. Calculus Students' Understanding of Area and Volume Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorko, Allison; Speer, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Units of measure are critical in many scientific fields. While instructors often note that students struggle with units, little research has been conducted about the nature and extent of these difficulties or why they exist. We investigated calculus students' unit use in area and volume computations. Seventy-three percent of students gave…

  20. Dynamic Action Units Slip in Speech Production Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Louis; Pouplier, Marianne; Chen, Larissa; Saltzman, Elliot; Byrd, Dani

    2007-01-01

    In the past, the nature of the compositional units proposed for spoken language has largely diverged from the types of control units pursued in the domains of other skilled motor tasks. A classic source of evidence as to the units structuring speech has been patterns observed in speech errors--"slips of the tongue". The present study reports, for…

  1. Natural thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annila, Arto

    2016-02-01

    The principle of increasing entropy is derived from statistical physics of open systems assuming that quanta of actions, as undividable basic build blocks, embody everything. According to this tenet, all systems evolve from one state to another either by acquiring quanta from their surroundings or by discarding quanta to the surroundings in order to attain energetic balance in least time. These natural processes result in ubiquitous scale-free patterns: skewed distributions that accumulate in a sigmoid manner and hence span log-log scales mostly as straight lines. Moreover, the equation for least-time motions reveals that evolution is by nature a non-deterministic process. Although the obtained insight in thermodynamics from the notion of quanta in motion yields nothing new, it accentuates that contemporary comprehension is impaired when modeling evolution as a computable process by imposing conservation of energy and thereby ignoring that quantum of actions are the carriers of energy from the system to its surroundings.

  2. Natural antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Berson, Diane S

    2008-07-01

    The constant exposure of the skin to oxidative stress results in damage to cellular DNA and cell membrane lipids and proteins. To combat this problem, the skin contains a number of antioxidants that protect against oxidative injury. However, these cutaneous antioxidants can be depleted by sun exposure and environmental insults, resulting in an overload of oxidation products. Thus, topical antioxidants that replenish the antioxidant capacity of the skin have the potential to prevent oxidative damage. A number of natural antioxidant ingredients also have anti-inflammatory properties, and can be used in the treatment of oxidative damage such as photoaging and perhaps even skin cancer. This article summarizes the active components, pharmacologic properties, and clinical effectiveness of a number of natural antioxidant ingredients including soy, feverfew, mushroom extracts, teas, Coffea arabica (CoffeeBerry), Pinus pinaster (Pycnogenol), and Polypodium leucotomos. Recent clinical trials suggest that these compounds have promising efficacy in the topical treatment of oxidative stress-induced dermatoses. PMID:18681153

  3. Natural Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Edward

    2005-02-01

    This updated new edition presents a comprehensive, inter-disciplinary analysis of the complete range of natural hazards. Edward Bryant describes and explains how hazards occur, examines prediction methods, considers recent and historical hazard events and explores the social impact of such disasters. Supported by over 180 maps, diagrams and photographs, this standard text is an invaluable guide for students and professionals in the field. First Edition Hb (1991): 0-521-37295-X First Edition Pb (1991): 0-521-37889-3

  4. Consumerism in Business Law--A Natural

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clow, John E.; Furjanic, Sheila

    1974-01-01

    Consumer protection should be a major objective in high school business law classes. Suggested units are the nature of law, sources of legal assistance, sales contracts, use of commercial paper, and rental or ownership of real property. (MS)

  5. Natural Disasters and Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Jon N.; Chan, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases acquired by survivors of large-scale natural disasters complicate the recovery process. During events such as tsunamis, hurricanes, earthquakes, and tornados and well into the recovery period, victims often are exposed to water-soil mixtures that have relocated with indigenous microbes. Because nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous in water and soil, there is potential for increased exposure to these organisms during natural disasters. In this hypothesis-driven commentary, we discuss the rise in NTM lung disease and natural disasters and examine the geographic overlap of NTM infections and disaster frequencies in the United States. Moreover, we show an increased number of positive NTM cultures from Louisiana residents in the years following three of the relatively recent epic hurricanes and posit that such natural disasters may help to drive the increased number of NTM infections. Finally, we advocate for increased environmental studies and surveillance of NTM infections before and after natural disasters. PMID:25644904

  6. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1997-01-01

    Logarithmic strain is the preferred measure of strain used by materials scientists, who typically refer to it as the "true strain." It was Nadai who gave it the name "natural strain," which seems more appropriate. This strain measure was proposed by Ludwik for the one-dimensional extension of a rod with length l. It was defined via the integral of dl/l to which Ludwik gave the name "effective specific strain." Today, it is after Hencky, who extended Ludwik's measure to three-dimensional analysis by defining logarithmic strains for the three principal directions.

  7. US Vulnerability to Natural Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Vink, G.; Apgar, S.; Batchelor, A.; Carter, C.; Gail, D.; Jarrett, A.; Levine, N.; Morgan, W.; Orlikowski, M.; Pray, T.; Raymar, M.; Siebert, A.; Shawa, T. W.; Wallace, C.

    2002-05-01

    Natural disasters result from the coincidence of natural events with the built environment. Our nation's infrastructure is growing at an exponential rate in many areas of high risk, and the Federal government's liability is increasing proportionally. By superimposing population density with predicted ground motion from earthquakes, historical hurricane tracks, historical tornado locations, and areas within the flood plain, we are able to identify locations of high vulnerability within the United States. We present a comprehensive map of disaster risk for the United States that is being produced for the Senate Natural Hazards Caucus. The map allows for the geographic comparison of natural disaster risk with past disaster declarations, the expenditure of Federal dollars for disaster relief, population increase, and variations of GDP. Every state is vulnerable to natural disasters. Although their frequency varies considerably, the annualized losses for disaster relief from hurricanes, earthquakes, and floods are approximately equivalent. While fast-growing states such as California and Florida remain highly vulnerable, changes in the occurrence of natural events combined with population increases are making areas such as Texas, North Carolina, and the East Coast increasingly vulnerable.

  8. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of UCP blog for the latest updates. United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  9. United Leukodystrophy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... matters. Please make your tax-deductible gift today! United Leukodystrophy Foundation 224 N. Second Street, Suite 2 ... validation purposes and should be left unchanged. Copyright © United Leukodystrophy Foundation, Inc. 224 North Second Street, Suite ...

  10. Connections: Water, Systems, and Resources. Unit Grade 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ney, Catherine R.

    Natural Resources for Grade 3 is a "hands-on" environmental activities unit designed for teachers to use with their students. Activities are chosen from natural resource programs such as Project Learning Tree, Project WILD, Aquatic Wild, and Project WET. The activities address natural resource themes and meet the Virginia Standards of Learning for…